WorldWideScience

Sample records for remote detection mri

  1. Remote detected Low-Field MRI using an optically pumped atomic magnetometer combined with a liquid cooled pre-polarization coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilschenz, Ingo; Ito, Yosuke; Natsukawa, Hiroaki; Oida, Takenori; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    Superconducting quantum interference devices are widely used in basic and clinical biomagnetic measurements such as low-field magnetic resonance imaging and magnetoencephalography primarily because they exhibit high sensitivity at low frequencies and have a wide bandwidth. The main disadvantage of these devices is that they require cryogenic coolants, which are rather expensive and not easily available. Meanwhile, with the advances in laser technology in the past few years, optically pumped atomic magnetometers (OPAMs) have been shown to be a good alternative as they can have adequate noise levels and are several millimeters in size, which makes them significantly easier to use. In this study, we used an OPAM module operating at a Larmor frequency of 5kHz to acquire NMR and MRI signals. This study presents these initial results as well as our initial attempts at imaging using this OPAM module. In addition, we have designed a liquid-cooled pre-polarizing coil that reduces the measurement time significantly.

  2. Remote detected Low-Field MRI using an optically pumped atomic magnetometer combined with a liquid cooled pre-polarization coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilschenz, Ingo; Ito, Yosuke; Natsukawa, Hiroaki; Oida, Takenori; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    Superconducting quantum interference devices are widely used in basic and clinical biomagnetic measurements such as low-field magnetic resonance imaging and magnetoencephalography primarily because they exhibit high sensitivity at low frequencies and have a wide bandwidth. The main disadvantage of these devices is that they require cryogenic coolants, which are rather expensive and not easily available. Meanwhile, with the advances in laser technology in the past few years, optically pumped atomic magnetometers (OPAMs) have been shown to be a good alternative as they can have adequate noise levels and are several millimeters in size, which makes them significantly easier to use. In this study, we used an OPAM module operating at a Larmor frequency of 5 kHz to acquire NMR and MRI signals. This study presents these initial results as well as our initial attempts at imaging using this OPAM module. In addition, we have designed a liquid-cooled pre-polarizing coil that reduces the measurement time significantly.

  3. Remote optical detection using microcantilevers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachter, E.A.; Thundat, T.; Oden, P.I.; Warmack, R.J. [Health Sciences Research Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Datskos, P.G.; Sharp, S.L. [Consultec Scientific, Inc., Knoxville, Tennessee 37932 (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The feasibility of microcantilever-based optical detection is demonstrated. Microcantilevers may provide a simple means for developing single-element and multielement infrared sensors that are smaller, more sensitive, and lower in cost than quantum well, thermoelectric, or bolometric sensors. Here we specifically report here on an evaluation of laboratory prototypes that are based on commercially available microcantilevers, such as those used in atomic force microscopy. In this work, optical transduction techniques were used to measure microcantilever response to remote sources of thermal energy. The noise equivalent power at 20 Hz for room temperature microcantilevers was found to be approximately 3.5 nW/{radical}Hz, with a specific detectivity of 3.6{times}10{sup 7} cm Hz{sup 1/2}/W, when an uncoated microcantilever was irradiated by a low-power diode laser operating at 786 nm. Operation is shown to be possible from dc to kHz frequencies, and the effect of cantilever shape and the role of absorptive coatings are discussed. Finally, spectral response in the midinfrared is evaluated using both coated and uncoated microcantilevers. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Remote detection of forest damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, B. N.; Vogelmann, J. E.; Vogelmann, A. F.; Hoshizaki, T.; Williams, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    The use of remote sensing to discriminate, measure, and map forest damage is evaluated. TM spectal coverage, a helicopter-mounted radiometer, and ground-based surveys were utilized to examine the responses of the spruces and firs of Camels Hump Mountain, Vermont to stresses, such as pollution and trace metals. The basic spectral properties of vegetation are described. Forest damage at the site was estimated as 11.8-76.0 percent for the spruces and 19-43.8 percent for the balsam firs. Shifts in the spectra of the conifers in particular in the near IR region are analyzed, and variations in the mesophyll cell anatomy and pigment content of the spruces and firs are investigated. The relations between canopy moisture and damage is studied. The TM data are compared to aircraft data and found to be well correlated.

  5. Multiparametric MRI in detection and staging of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    the aggressiveness and stage of the cancer. Scientific work supports the rapidly growing use of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) as the most sensitive and specific imaging tool for detection, lesion characterisation and staging of PCa. However, the experience with mp-MRI in PCa management...... in Denmark has been very limited. Therefore, we carried out this PhD project based on three original studies to evaluate the use of mp-MRI in detection, assessment of biological aggression and staging of PCa in a Danish setup with limited experience in mp-MRI prostate diagnostics. The aim was to assess...... whether mp-MRI could 1) improve the overall detection rate of clinically significant PCa previously missed by TRUS-bx, 2) identify patients with extracapsular tumour extension and 3) categorize the histopathological aggressiveness based on diffusion-weighted imaging. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Study I included...

  6. Restriction spectrum imaging improves MRI-based prostate cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCammack, Kevin C.; Schenker-Ahmed, Natalie M.; White, Nathan S.; Best, Shaun R.; Marks, Robert M.; Heimbigner, Jared; Kane, Christopher J.; Parsons, J. Kellogg; Kuperman, Joshua M.; Bartsch, Hauke; Desikan, Rahul S.; Rakow-Penner, Rebecca A.; Liss, Michael A.; Margolis, Daniel J. A.; Raman, Steven S.; Shabaik, Ahmed; Dale, Anders M.; Karow, David S.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic performance of restriction spectrum imaging (RSI), with that of conventional multi-parametric (MP) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for prostate cancer (PCa) detection in a blinded reader-based format. Methods Three readers independently evaluated 100 patients (67 with proven PCa) who underwent MP-MRI and RSI within 6 months of systematic biopsy (N = 67; 23 with targeting performed) or prostatectomy (N = 33). Imaging was performed at 3 Tesla using a phased-array coil. Readers used a five-point scale estimating the likelihood of PCa present in each prostate sextant. Evaluation was performed in two separate sessions, first using conventional MP-MRI alone then immediately with MP-MRI and RSI in the same session. Four weeks later, another scoring session used RSI and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) without conventional diffusion-weighted or dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging. Reader interpretations were then compared to prostatectomy data or biopsy results. Receiver operating characteristic curves were performed, with area under the curve (AUC) used to compare across groups. Results MP-MRI with RSI achieved higher AUCs compared to MP-MRI alone for identifying high-grade (Gleason score greater than or equal to 4 + 3=7) PCa (0.78 vs. 0.70 at the sextant level; P MRI for high-grade PCa (0.71 vs. 0.70 at the sextant level). With hemigland analysis, high-grade disease results were similar when comparing RSI + T2WI with MP-MRI, although with greater AUCs compared to the sextant analysis (0.80 vs. 0.79). Conclusion Including RSI with MP-MRI improves PCa detection compared to MP-MRI alone, and RSI with T2WI achieves similar PCa detection as MP-MRI. PMID:26910114

  7. MRI diagnosis of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy from a remote childhood malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sainani, Nisha I.; Lawande, Malini A.; Pungavkar, Sona A.; Patkar, Deepak P.; Sase, Kirti S. [Dr. Balabhai Nanavati Hospital and Research Centre, Department of MRI, Mammography and BMD, Mumbai (India); Parikh, Vipul P. [Dr. Balabhai Nanavati Hospital and Research Centre, Department of CT and USG, Mumbai (India)

    2007-06-15

    Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) is a clinico-radiological syndrome characterized by digital clubbing, periosteal proliferation, bone pain, synovitis and arthralgia, all of these being commonly symmetrical. It is occasionally associated with nasopharyngeal lymphoepitheliomas and may develop before or after development of lung metastases in these patients. We report a case of a healthy 22-year-old female who presented to our institution with pain and swelling in the thighs and legs. She had a history of childhood nasopharyngeal lymphoepithelioma. Radiographs of the knees were negative. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed features suggestive of bilateral periostitis. Because of the propensity of the rare childhood nasopharyngeal lymphoepithelioma to present with HOA, this entity was included in the differential diagnosis. A subsequent chest radiograph and CT demonstrated a lung and mediastinal mass that were histologically confirmed to be metastatic. To the best of our knowledge, HOA and metastases from nasopharyngeal lymphoepithelioma occurring after such a long time interval have not been previously reported. Early demonstration and consideration of HOA on the basis of MRI, lead to expeditious and appropriate subsequent investigation. (orig.)

  8. [A review on polarization information in the remote sensing detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jie-Qiong; Zhan, Hai-Gang; Liu, Da-Zhao

    2010-04-01

    Polarization is one of the inherent characteristics. Because the surface of the target structure, internal structure, and the angle of incident light are different, the earth's surface and any target in atmosphere under optical interaction process will have their own characteristic nature of polarization. Polarimetric characteristics of radiation energy from the targets are used in polarization remote sensing detection as detective information. Polarization remote sensing detection can get the seven-dimensional information of targets in complicated backgrounds, detect well-resolved outline of targets and low-reflectance region of objectives, and resolve the problems of atmospheric detection and identification camouflage detection which the traditional remote sensing detection can not solve, having good foreground in applications. This paper introduces the development of polarization information in the remote sensing detection from the following four aspects. The rationale of polarization remote sensing detection is the base of polarization remote sensing detection, so it is firstly introduced. Secondly, the present researches on equipments that are used in polarization remote sensing detection are particularly and completely expatiated. Thirdly, the present exploration of theoretical simulation of polarization remote sensing detection is well detailed. Finally, the authors present the applications research home and abroad of the polarization remote sensing detection technique in the fields of remote sensing, atmospheric sounding, sea surface and underwater detection, biology and medical diagnosis, astronomical observation and military, summing up the current problems in polarization remote sensing detection. The development trend of polarization remote sensing detection technology in the future is pointed out in order to provide a reference for similar studies.

  9. Automated detection of multiple sclerosis lesions in serial brain MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llado, Xavier; Ganiler, Onur; Oliver, Arnau; Marti, Robert; Freixenet, Jordi [University of Girona, Computer Vision and Robotics Group, Girona (Spain); Valls, Laia [Dr. Josep Trueta University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Girona (Spain); Vilanova, Joan C. [Girona Magnetic Resonance Center, Girona (Spain); Ramio-Torrenta, Lluis [Dr. Josep Trueta University Hospital, Institut d' Investigacio Biomedica de Girona, Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroimmunology Unit, Girona (Spain); Rovira, Alex [Vall d' Hebron University Hospital, Magnetic Resonance Unit, Department of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a serious disease typically occurring in the brain whose diagnosis and efficacy of treatment monitoring are vital. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently used in serial brain imaging due to the rich and detailed information provided. Time-series analysis of images is widely used for MS diagnosis and patient follow-up. However, conventional manual methods are time-consuming, subjective, and error-prone. Thus, the development of automated techniques for the detection and quantification of MS lesions is a major challenge. This paper presents an up-to-date review of the approaches which deal with the time-series analysis of brain MRI for detecting active MS lesions and quantifying lesion load change. We provide a comprehensive reference source for researchers in which several approaches to change detection and quantification of MS lesions are investigated and classified. We also analyze the results provided by the approaches, discuss open problems, and point out possible future trends. Lesion detection approaches are required for the detection of static lesions and for diagnostic purposes, while either quantification of detected lesions or change detection algorithms are needed to follow up MS patients. However, there is not yet a single approach that can emerge as a standard for the clinical practice, automatically providing an accurate MS lesion evolution quantification. Future trends will focus on combining the lesion detection in single studies with the analysis of the change detection in serial MRI. (orig.)

  10. Remote detection and diagnosis of thunderstorm turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John K.; Sharman, Robert; Craig, Jason; Blackburn, Gary

    2008-08-01

    This paper describes how operational radar, satellite and lightning data may be used in conjunction with numerical weather model data to provide remote detection and diagnosis of atmospheric turbulence in and around thunderstorms. In-cloud turbulence is measured with the NEXRAD Turbulence Detection Algorithm (NTDA) using extensively qualitycontrolled, ground-based Doppler radar data. A real-time demonstration of the NTDA includes generation of a 3-D turbulence mosaic covering the CONUS east of the Rocky Mountains, a web-based display, and experimental uplinks of turbulence maps to en-route commercial aircraft. Near-cloud turbulence is inferred from thunderstorm morphology, intensity, growth rate and environment data provided by (1) satellite radiance measurements, rates of change, winds, and other derived features, (2) lightning strike measurements, (3) radar reflectivity measurements and (4) weather model data. These are combined via a machine learning technique trained using a database of in situ turbulence measurements from commercial aircraft to create a predictive model. This new capability is being developed under FAA and NASA funding to enhance current U.S. and international turbulence decision support systems, allowing rapid-update, highresolution, comprehensive assessments of atmospheric turbulence hazards for use by pilots, dispatchers, and air traffic controllers. It will also contribute to the comprehensive 4-D weather information database for NextGen.

  11. Remotely Detectable Biosignatures of Anoxygenic Phototrophs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenteau, M. N.; Kiang, N. Y.; Blankenship, R. E.; Sanromá, E.; Palle Bago, E.; Hoehler, T. M.; Pierson, B. K.

    2014-12-01

    Many astrobiological/exobiological studies have been directed at searching for evidence of life on planetary bodies within our solar system, but the search for life does not have to be restricted to our stellar neighborhood. The field of exoplanet research has grown rapidly over the last several years. Studies have moved beyond detection to assessing the habitability and biosignatures of these worlds. The biosignatures considered thus far focus on biogenic gases and planetary surface features, such as the light reflected from the surface of plants to generate the "red edge" of vegetation. Much work has focused on detecting biosignatures of higher life forms (vegetation) on exoplanets. However, land plants only appeared on the Earth 450 million years ago, and required a long path of photosynthetic evolution. There is a dearth of studies examining how light might interact with much simpler, more evolutionarily ancient pigmented communities, such as photosynthetic microbes. These anoxygenic phototrophs, which have inhabited Earth for nearly 80% of its history, may dominate exoplanets at a similar stage of evolution as the Archean or Paleoproterozoic Earth. Similar to the remotely detectable "red edge" of chlorophyll a - containing vegetation, we measured the reflectance spectra of pure cultures and environmental samples of purple sulfur, purple non-sulfur, heliobacteria, green sulfur, and green non-sulfur anoxygenic phototrophs. We observed an increase in reflectivity just past the absorption maximum for the bacteriochlorophyll pigments. Since this reflectance feature is shifted into the NIR compared to that of the red edge of vegetation, we're calling this the "NIR edge" of anoxygenic phototrophs. The bacteriochlorophyll pigments are particularly well suited to absorb the far-red and near-infrared radiation emitted by M dwarf stars, the most common type of star in our galaxy. Therefore these phototrophs serve as model organisms for photosynthesis adapted to

  12. White matter injury detection in neonatal MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Irene; Hajari, Nasim; Firouzmanesh, Amirhossein; Shen, Rui; Miller, Steven; Poskitt, Ken; Basu, Anup

    2013-02-01

    Early detection of white matter injury in premature newborns can facilitate timely clinical treatments reducing the potential risk of later developmental deficits. It was reported that there were more than 5% premature newborns in British Columbia, Canada, among which 5-10% exhibited major motor deficits and 25-50% exhibited significant developmental and visual deficits. With the advancement of computer assisted detection systems, it is possible to automatically identify white matter injuries, which are found inside the grey matter region of the brain. Atlas registration has been suggested in the literature to distinguish grey matter from the soft tissues inside the skull. However, our subjects are premature newborns delivered at 24 to 32 weeks of gestation. During this period, the grey matter undergoes rapid changes and differs significantly from one to another. Besides, not all detected white spots represent injuries. Additional neighborhood information and expert input are required for verification. In this paper, we propose a white matter feature identification system for premature newborns, which is composed of several steps: (1) Candidate white matter segmentation; (2) Feature extraction from candidates; (3) Validation with data obtained at a later stage on the children; and (4) Feature confirmation for automated detection. The main challenge of this work lies in segmenting white matter injuries from noisy and low resolution data. Our approach integrates image fusion and contrast enhancement together with a fuzzy segmentation technique to achieve promising results. Other applications, such as brain tumor and intra-ventricular haemorrhage detection can also benefit from our approach.

  13. Multi-flux-transformer MRI detection with an atomic magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savukov, Igor; Karaulanov, Todor

    2014-10-18

    Recently, anatomical ultra-low field (ULF) MRI has been demonstrated with an atomic magnetometer (AM). A flux-transformer (FT) has been used for decoupling MRI fields and gradients to avoid their negative effects on AM performance. The field of view (FOV) was limited because of the need to compromise between the size of the FT input coil and MRI sensitivity per voxel. Multi-channel acquisition is a well-known solution to increase FOV without significantly reducing sensitivity. In this paper, we demonstrate twofold FOV increase with the use of three FT input coils. We also show that it is possible to use a single atomic magnetometer and single acquisition channel to acquire three independent MRI signals by applying a frequency-encoding gradient along the direction of the detection array span. The approach can be generalized to more channels and can be critical for imaging applications of non-cryogenic ULF MRI where FOV needs to be large, including head, hand, spine, and whole-body imaging.

  14. Detection of colorectal liver metastases: a prospective multicenter trial comparing unenhanced MRI, MnDPDP-enhanced MRI, and spiral CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolozzi, Carlo; Donati, Francescamaria; Cioni, Dania; Lencioni, Riccardo [Department of Radiology, University of Pisa, Via Roma 67, 56100, Pisa (Italy); Procacci, Carlo; Morana, Giovanni [Department of Radiology, University of Verona, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 1, 37134, Verona (Italy); Chiesa, Antonio; Grazioli, Luigi [Department of Radiology, University of Brescia, Piazzale Spedali Civili 1, 25023, Brescia (Italy); Cittadini, Giorgio; Cittadini, Giuseppe [Department of Radiology, University of Genova, Largo R. Benzi 10, 16132, Genova (Italy); Giovagnoni, Andrea [Department of Radiology, University of Ancona, Concam, Torrette, 60020, Ancona (Italy); Gandini, Giovanni; Maass, Jochen [Department of Radiology, University of Torino, Genova 3, 10110, Torino (Italy)

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare unenhanced MRI, MnDPDP-enhanced MRI, and spiral CT in the detection of hepatic colorectal metastases. Forty-four patients with hepatic colorectal metastases were examined with unenhanced and MnDPDP-enhanced MRI and with unenhanced and contrast-enhanced spiral CT. The MR examination protocol included baseline T1-weighted spin-echo (SE), T1-weighted gradient-recalled-echo (GRE), and T2-weighted fast-SE sequences; and T1-weighted SE and T1-weighted GRE sequences obtained 30-60 min after administration of 0.5 {mu}mol/kg (0.5 ml/kg) mangafodipir trisodium (MnDPDP). Images were interpreted by three blinded readers. Findings at CT and MRI were compared with those at intraoperative US, which were used as term of reference. Intraoperative US detected 128 metastases. In a lesion-by-lesion analysis, the overall detection rate was 71% (91 of 128) for spiral CT, 72% (92 of 128) for unenhanced MRI, and 90% (115 of 128) for MnDPDP-enhanced MRI. MnDPDP-enhanced MRI was more sensitive than either unenhanced MRI (p<0.0001) or spiral CT (p=0.0007). In a patient-by-patient analysis, agreement with gold standard was higher for MnDPDP-enhanced MRI (33 of 44 cases) than for spiral CT (22 of 44 cases, p=0.0023) and unenhanced MRI (21 of 44 cases, p=0.0013). MnDPDP-enhanced MRI is superior to unenhanced MRI and spiral CT in the detection of hepatic colorectal metastases. (orig.)

  15. Remote sensing and vegetation stress detection - Problems and progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggin, M. J.; Whitehead, V.

    1983-01-01

    Although considerable progress has been made in applying remote sensing technology to vegetation monitoring, considerable problems still exist in the improvement of techniques for crop type discrimination, stress detection on a large scale, and stress quantification. In this paper, some of the problems remaining in the operational use of remote sensing technology for vegetation stress detection are discussed, and directions in which some of these problems might be solved are proposed.

  16. Research on Remote Network Bidirectional Detect and Control Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyao Ju

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Remote network bidirectional detect and control technologies are the key factors to solve local network allopatry expansibility and management. With studying gateway integration technology, bidirectional VPN technology, identity authentication technology and dynamic host management technology can be integrated into gateway. Thus, bidirectional connect and control among allopatry local networks based on Internet can be solved. Whole area expansibility of local network is realized. With experiment, the model is proved to finish remote bidirectional interconnection of local network automatically and to obtain allopatry local users authority. The equipment detecting and controlling in remote local networks are realized.  

  17. Automatic probe artifact detection in MRI-guided cryoablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinyang; Tuncali, Kemal; Wells, William M.; Zientara, Gary P.

    2013-03-01

    Probe or needle artifact detection in 3D scans gives an approximate location for the tools inserted, and is thus crucial in assisting many image-guided procedures. Conventional needle localization algorithms often start with cropped images, where unwanted parts of raw scans are cropped either manually or by applying pre-defined masks. In cryoablation, however, the number of probes used, the placement and direction of probe insertion, and the portions of abdomen scanned differs significantly from case to case, and probes are often constantly being adjusted during the Probe Placement Phase. These features greatly reduce the practicality of approaches based on image cropping. In this work, we present a fully Automatic Probe Artifact Detection method, APAD, that works directly on uncropped raw MRI images, taken during the Probe Placement Phase in 3Tesla MRI-guided cryoablation. The key idea of our method is to first locate an initial 2D line strip within a slice of the MR image which approximates the position and direction of the 3D probes bundle, noting that cryoprobes or biopsy needles create a signal void (black) artifact in MRI with a bright cylindrical border. With the initial 2D line, standard approaches to detect line structures such as the 3D Hough Transform can be applied to quickly detect each probe's axis. By comparing with manually labeled probes, the analysis of 5 patient treatment cases of kidney cryoablation with varying probe placements demonstrates that our algorithm combined with standard 3D line detection is an accurate and robust method to detect probe artifacts.

  18. Unexpected Coexisting Myocardial Infarction Detected by Delayed Enhancement MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edouard Gerbaud

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of an unexpected coexisting anterior myocardial infarction detected by delayed enhancement MRI in a 41-year-old man following a presentation with a first episode of chest pain during inferior acute myocardial infarction. This second necrotic area was not initially suspected because there were no ECG changes in the anterior leads and the left descending coronary artery did not present any significant stenoses on emergency coronary angiography. Unrecognised myocardial infarction may carry important prognostic implications. CMR is currently the best imaging technique to detect unexpected infarcts.

  19. Automated detection of periventricular veins on 7 T brain MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijf, Hugo J.; Bouvy, Willem H.; Zwanenburg, Jaco J. M.; Viergever, Max A.; Biessels, Geert Jan; Vincken, Koen L.

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is common in elderly persons and a leading cause of cognitive decline, dementia, and acute stroke. With the introduction of ultra-high field strength 7.0T MRI, it is possible to visualize small vessels in the brain. In this work, a proof-of-principle study is conducted to assess the feasibility of automatically detecting periventricular veins. Periventricular veins are organized in a fan-pattern and drain venous blood from the brain towards the caudate vein of Schlesinger, which is situated along the lateral ventricles. Just outside this vein, a region-of- interest (ROI) through which all periventricular veins must cross is defined. Within this ROI, a combination of the vesselness filter, tubular tracking, and hysteresis thresholding is applied to locate periventricular veins. All detected locations were evaluated by an expert human observer. The results showed a positive predictive value of 88% and a sensitivity of 95% for detecting periventricular veins. The proposed method shows good results in detecting periventricular veins in the brain on 7.0T MR images. Compared to previous works, that only use a 1D or 2D ROI and limited image processing, our work presents a more comprehensive definition of the ROI, advanced image processing techniques to detect periventricular veins, and a quantitative analysis of the performance. The results of this proof-of-principle study are promising and will be used to assess periventricular veins on 7.0T brain MRI.

  20. Target Detection: Remote Sensing Techniques for Defence Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Chaudhuri

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available The tremendous development in remote sensing technology in the recent past has opened up new challenges in defence applications. On important area of such applications is in target detection. This paper describes both classical and newly developed approaches to detect the targets by using remotely-sensed digital images. The classical approach includes statistical classification methods and image processing techniques. The new approach deals with a relatively new sensor technology, namely, synthetic aperture radar (SAR systems and fast developing tools, like neural networks and multisource data integration for analysis and interpretation. With SAR images, it is possible to detect targets or features of a target that is otherwise not possible. Neural networks and multisource data integration tools also have a great potential in analysing and interpreting remote sensing data for target detection.

  1. [A mobile sensor for remote detection of natural gas leakage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Wen-qing; Zhang, Yu-jun; Kan, Rui-feng; Ruan, Jun; Wang, Li-ming; Yu, Dian-qiang; Dong, Jin-ting; Han, Xiao-lei; Cui, Yi-ben; Liu, Jian-guo

    2012-02-01

    The detection of natural gas pipeline leak becomes a significant issue for body security, environmental protection and security of state property. However, the leak detection is difficult, because of the pipeline's covering many areas, operating conditions and complicated environment. A mobile sensor for remote detection of natural gas leakage based on scanning wavelength differential absorption spectroscopy (SWDAS) is introduced. The improved soft threshold wavelet denoising was proposed by analyzing the characteristics of reflection spectrum. And the results showed that the signal to noise ratio (SNR) was increased three times. When light intensity is 530 nA, the minimum remote sensitivity will be 80 ppm x m. A widely used SWDAS can make quantitative remote sensing of natural gas leak and locate the leak source precisely in a faster, safer and more intelligent way.

  2. Clinical outcome following a low-suspicion multiparametric prostate MRI or benign MRI-guided biopsy to detect prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Lars; Nørgaard, Nis; Løgager, Vibeke;

    2017-01-01

    predictive values of MRI in ruling out any prostate cancer and significant prostate cancer defined as: a) any core with Gleason score (GS) > 6 or b) > 2 positive cores/cancerous core ≥ 50%. RESULTS: Prostate cancer was detected in 38/194 (20%) patients during the median study period of 47 months...... (interquartile range 43-52). The overall negative predictive value of MRI in ruling out any and significant prostate cancer was 80% (156/194) and 95% (184/194), respectively. No patient with a low-suspicion MRI had intermediate/high grade cancer (Gleason score > 6). The majority of patients with no cancer during...

  3. Discovery Radiomics for Multi-Parametric MRI Prostate Cancer Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Audrey G; Kumar, Devinder; Khalvati, Farzad; Haider, Masoom A; Wong, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed form of cancer in Canadian men, and is the third leading cause of cancer death. Despite these statistics, prognosis is relatively good with a sufficiently early diagnosis, making fast and reliable prostate cancer detection crucial. As imaging-based prostate cancer screening, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), requires an experienced medical professional to extensively review the data and perform a diagnosis, radiomics-driven methods help streamline the process and has the potential to significantly improve diagnostic accuracy and efficiency, and thus improving patient survival rates. These radiomics-driven methods currently rely on hand-crafted sets of quantitative imaging-based features, which are selected manually and can limit their ability to fully characterize unique prostate cancer tumour phenotype. In this study, we propose a novel \\textit{discovery radiomics} framework for generating custom radiomic sequences tailored for prostate cancer detection. Discover...

  4. Increasing cancer detection yield of breast MRI using a new CAD scheme of mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Maxine; Aghaei, Faranak; Hollingsworth, Alan B.; Stough, Rebecca G.; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Although breast MRI is the most sensitive imaging modality to detect early breast cancer, its cancer detection yield in breast cancer screening is quite low (women) to date. The purpose of this preliminary study is to test the potential of developing and applying a new computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme of digital mammograms to identify women at high risk of harboring mammography-occult breast cancers, which can be detected by breast MRI. For this purpose, we retrospectively assembled a dataset involving 30 women who had both mammography and breast MRI screening examinations. All mammograms were interpreted as negative, while 5 cancers were detected using breast MRI. We developed a CAD scheme of mammograms, which include a new quantitative mammographic image feature analysis based risk model, to stratify women into two groups with high and low risk of harboring mammography-occult cancer. Among 30 women, 9 were classified into the high risk group by CAD scheme, which included all 5 women who had cancer detected by breast MRI. All 21 low risk women remained negative on the breast MRI examinations. The cancer detection yield of breast MRI applying to this dataset substantially increased from 16.7% (5/30) to 55.6% (5/9), while eliminating 84% (21/25) unnecessary breast MRI screenings. The study demonstrated the potential of applying a new CAD scheme to significantly increase cancer detection yield of breast MRI, while simultaneously reducing the number of negative MRIs in breast cancer screening.

  5. Remote detection of rotating machinery with a portable atomic magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmugi, Luca; Gori, Lorenzo; Hussain, Sarah; Deans, Cameron; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2017-01-20

    We demonstrate remote detection of rotating machinery, using an atomic magnetometer at room temperature and in an unshielded environment. The system relies on the coupling of the AC magnetic signature of the target with the spin-polarized, precessing atomic vapor of a radio-frequency optical atomic magnetometer. The AC magnetic signatures of rotating equipment or electric motors appear as sidebands in the power spectrum of the atomic sensor, which can be tuned to avoid noisy bands that would otherwise hamper detection. A portable apparatus is implemented and experimentally tested. Proof-of-concept investigations are performed with test targets mimicking possible applications, and the operational conditions for optimum detection are determined. Our instrument provides comparable or better performance than a commercial fluxgate and allows detection of rotating machinery behind a wall. These results demonstrate the potential for ultrasensitive devices for remote industrial and usage monitoring, security, and surveillance.

  6. Change detection in the Florida Bay using remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Joseph P.; Busch, Terrence V.

    1997-09-01

    The Florida Bay region is experiencing an economically and environmentally debilitating algal bloom. Remotely sensed data collected by the SPOT satellites provides fine spatial resolution data, necessary for this environment, currently available covering the spectral signature of chlorophyll. The study used SPOT multispectral data to test the utility of the green band (.5 - .6 microns) in algae detection while providing a change detection analysis of the Florida Bay for the years 1987, 1991, 1994 and 1996.

  7. Two-Dimensional Change Detection Methods Remote Sensing Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ilsever, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Change detection using remotely sensed images has many applications, such as urban monitoring, land-cover change analysis, and disaster management. This work investigates two-dimensional change detection methods. The existing methods in the literature are grouped into four categories: pixel-based, transformation-based, texture analysis-based, and structure-based. In addition to testing existing methods, four new change detection methods are introduced: fuzzy logic-based, shadow detection-based, local feature-based, and bipartite graph matching-based. The latter two methods form the basis for a

  8. Detection of Lesions Underlying Intractable Epilepsy on T1-Weighted MRI as an Outlier Detection Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Azami, Meriem; Hammers, Alexander; Jung, Julien; Costes, Nicolas; Bouet, Romain; Lartizien, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Pattern recognition methods, such as computer aided diagnosis (CAD) systems, can help clinicians in their diagnosis by marking abnormal regions in an image. We propose a machine learning system based on a one-class support vector machine (OC-SVM) classifier for the detection of abnormalities in magnetic resonance images (MRI) applied to patients with intractable epilepsy. The system learns the features associated with healthy control subjects, allowing a voxelwise assessment of the deviation of a test subject pattern from the learned patterns. While any number of various features can be chosen and learned, here we focus on two texture parameters capturing image patterns associated with epileptogenic lesions on T1-weighted brain MRI e.g. heterotopia and blurred junction between the grey and white matter. The CAD output consists of patient specific 3D maps locating clusters of suspicious voxels ranked by size and degree of deviation from control patterns. System performance was evaluated using realistic simulations of challenging detection tasks as well as clinical data of 77 healthy control subjects and of eleven patients (13 lesions). It was compared to that of a mass univariate statistical parametric mapping (SPM) single subject analysis based on the same set of features. For all simulations, OC-SVM yielded significantly higher values of the area under the ROC curve (AUC) and higher sensitivity at low false positive rate. For the clinical data, both OC-SVM and SPM successfully detected 100% of the lesions in the MRI positive cases (3/13). For the MRI negative cases (10/13), OC-SVM detected 7/10 lesions and SPM analysis detected 5/10 lesions. In all experiments, OC-SVM produced fewer false positive detections than SPM. OC-SVM may be a versatile system for unbiased lesion detection. PMID:27603778

  9. MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRI does not use ionizing radiation. No side effects from the magnetic fields and radio waves have been reported. The most common type of contrast (dye) used is gadolinium. It is very safe. Allergic reactions rarely ...

  10. Detecting regional changes in myocardial contraction patterns using MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Ortiz, Gerardo I.; Chandrashekara, Raghavendra; Rhode, Kawal S.; Razavi, Reza; Hill, Derek L. G.; Rueckert, Daniel

    2004-04-01

    Measuring changes in cardiac motion patterns can assist in diagnosing the onset of arrhythmia and ischaemia and in the follow-up of treatment. This work presents a methodology for measuring such motion changes from MR images. Non-rigid registration is used to track cardiac motion in a sequence of 3D tagged MR images. We use a cylindrical coordinate system to subdivide the myocardium into smaller anatomically meaningful regions and to express motion derived measurements such as displacement and strain for each myocardial region during the cardiac cycle. In the first experiment we have evaluated the proposed methods using synthetic image sequences where the ground truth was available. These images were generated using a cardiac motion simulator for tagged MRI. Normal and abnormal motion fields were produced by modifying parameters in a small region of the myocardium. In the second experiment we have acquired two separate tagged MR image sequences from five healthy volunteers. Both acquisitions have been carried out without moving the volunteer inside the scanner, thus avoiding potential misregistration errors due to subject motion between scans. In addition, one of volunteers was subjected to stress during one of the scans. In the final experiment we acquired tagged MR images from a patient with super-ventricular tachyarrhythmia, before and after radio frequency ablation. The image acquisition and catheter intervention were performed with a combined X-ray and MRI system. Detection results were correct on synthetic data and no region was incorrectly classified as having significant changes in the repetition studies. Significant changes in motion pattern were measured in the stress and ablation studies. Furthermore, results seem to corroborate that the ablation regularised cardiac contraction.

  11. PERFORMANCE OF IMPULSE NOISE DETECTION METHODS IN REMOTE SENSING IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrs.V.RADHIKA,

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing (RS images are affected by different types of noises like Gaussian noise, speckle noise and impulse noise. These noises are introduced into the RS images during acquisition or transmission process. The main challenge in impulse noise removal is to suppress the noise as well as to preserve the details (edges. Removal ofthe impulse noise is done by two stages: detection of noisy pixel and replacement of that pixel. Detecting and Removing or reducing impulse noise is a very active research area in image processing. In this paper three different existing detection methods are discussed with the intension of developing a new one.

  12. Proliferation detection using a remote resonance Raman chemical sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Chen, C.L.; Dougherty, D.R.

    1993-08-01

    The authors discussed the potential of the resonance Raman chemical sensor as a remote sensor that can be used for gases, liquids or solids. This spectroscopy has the fundamental advantage that it is based on optical fingerprints that are insensitive to environmental perturbations or excitation frequency. By taking advantage of resonance enhancement, the inelastic scattering cross-section can increase anywhere from 4 to 6 orders of magnitude which translates into increased sensing range or lower detection limits. It was also shown that differential cross-sections as small as 10{sup {minus}27} cm{sup 2}/sr do not preclude the use of this technique as being an important component in one`s remote-sensing arsenal. The results obtained in the early 1970s on various pollutants and the more recent work on atmospheric water cast a favorable light on the prospects for the successful development of a resonance Raman remote sensor. Currently, of the 20 CW agent-related {open_quotes}signature{close_quotes} chemicals that the authors have investigated, 18 show enhancements ranging from 3 to 6 orders of magnitude. The absolute magnitudes of the measured resonance enhanced Raman cross-sections for these 18 chemicals suggest that detection and identification of trace quantities of the {open_quotes}signature{close_quotes} chemicals, through a remote resonance Raman chemical sensor, could be achieved.

  13. Can Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Detect Species Specific Biochemicals ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.; Daughtry, C. S.

    2011-12-01

    Discrimination of a few plants scattered among many plants is a goal common to detection of agricultural weeds, invasive plant species and illegal Cannabis clandestinely grown outdoors, the subject of this research. Remote sensing technology provides an automated, computer based, land cover classification capability that holds promise for improving upon the existing approaches to Cannabis detection. In this research, we investigated whether hyperspectral reflectance of recently harvested, fully turgid Cannabis leaves and buds depends upon the concentration of the psychoactive ingredient Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) that, if present at sufficient concentration, presumably would allow species-specific identification of Cannabis.

  14. Prenatal detection of microtia by MRI in a fetus with trisomy 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milic, Andrea; Blaser, Susan; Robinson, Ashley [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Viero, Sandra; Halliday, William [University of Toronto, Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Winsor, Elizabeth [University of Toronto, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Toi, Ants [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Thomas, Micki [University of Toronto, The Prenatal Diagnosis and Medical Genetics Program, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mount Sinai Hospital, Rm. 3292 Toronto, ON (Canada); Chitayat, David [University of Toronto, The Prenatal Diagnosis and Medical Genetics Program, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mount Sinai Hospital, Rm. 3292 Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Clinical and Metabolic Genetics, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)

    2006-07-15

    Trisomy 22 is a rare chromosomal abnormality infrequently detected prenatally. External ear abnormalities, in particular microtia, are often associated with trisomy 22, but prenatal detection of microtia has not been reported in association with trisomy 22. We report a fetus with trisomy 22, with fetal MRI findings of microtia, craniofacial dysmorphism, and polygyria. Fetal MRI is a useful tool for auricular assessment and might have utility in the prenatal detection of chromosomal abnormalities, especially among fetuses with structural anomalies. (orig.)

  15. US correlation for MRI-detected breast lesions in women with familial risk of breast cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sim, L.S.; Hendriks, J.H.C.L.; Bult, P.; Fook-Chong, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To examine the value of US correlation for MRI-detected breast lesions in women with familial risk of breast cancer. METHODS: From an initial dataset of 245 women with positive family history who had breast cancer surveillance involving mammography or MRI between November 1994 and February 2001

  16. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis bone erosions by two different dedicated extremity MRI units and conventional radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer-Jensen, A.; Vestergaard, A.; Dohn, U.M.;

    2008-01-01

    was particularly more sensitive than CR for metacarpal heads and carpal bones. MagneVu MRI and CR detected 100% and 89%, respectively, of large erosions (Outcome Measures in Rheumatoid Arthritis Clinical Trials-Rheumatoid Arthritis MRI Scoring System (OMERACT-RAMRIS) score >1 on Artoscan) in MCP joints and 69......% and 15.8% of large erosions in wrists. Conclusions: Both E-MRI units detected more erosions than CR, in particular due to a higher sensitivity in metacarpal heads and carpal bones. The MagneVu unit detected fewer erosions than the Artoscan unit due to a lower average image quality and a smaller...

  17. MRI脑测谎实验方法学%Brain-Based MRI lie detection experiment methodology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李文石; 张好; 胡清泉; 苏香; 郭亮

    2006-01-01

    The brain-based MRI lie detection experiment methodology is reviewed for the first time, including the magnetic resonance imaging paradigm,the double-block deign,the equidistance hit-ball and the test mechanice,This paper illustrates the research results of 3D MRI lie detection and the contrastive experiment of otopoint mapping brain signature lie detection,ingeminates the lie-Truth Law(PT/PL ≤0.618)which we get from the statistic of the world MRI reports. The conclusion points out the essence of this technology,its advantages and disadvantages,and the evolution of this methodology.

  18. Label-free CEST MRI Detection of Citicoline-Liposome Drug Delivery in Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huanling; Jablonska, Anna; Li, Yuguo; Cao, Suyi; Liu, Dexiang; Chen, Hanwei; Van Zijl, Peter CM; Bulte, Jeff W.M.; Janowski, Miroslaw; Walczak, Piotr; Liu, Guanshu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Citicoline (CDPC) is a natural supplement with well-documented neuroprotective effects in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, we sought to exploit citicoline as a theranostic agent with its inherent chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI signal, which can be directly used as an MRI guidance in the citicoline drug delivery. Our in vitro CEST MRI results showed citicoline has two inherent CEST signals at +1 and +2 ppm, attributed to exchangeable hydroxyl and amine protons, respectively. To facilitate the targeted drug delivery of citicoline to ischemic regions, we prepared liposomes encapsulating citicoline (CDPC-lipo) and characterized the particle properties and CEST MRI properties. The in vivo CEST MRI detection of liposomal citicoline was then examined in a rat brain model of unilateral transient ischemia induced by a two-hour middle cerebral artery occlusion. The results showed that the delivery of CPDC-lipo to the brain ischemic areas could be monitored and quantified by CEST MRI. When administered intra-arterially, CDPC-lipo clearly demonstrated a detectable CEST MRI contrast at 2 ppm. CEST MRI revealed that liposomes preferentially accumulated in the areas of ischemia with a disrupted blood-brain-barrier. We furthermore used CEST MRI to detect the improvement in drug delivery using CDPC-lipo targeted against vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 in the same animal model. The MRI findings were validated using fluorescence microscopy. Hence, liposomal citicoline represents a prototype theranostic system, where the therapeutic agent can be detected directly by CEST MRI in a label-free fashion. PMID:27446492

  19. Remote measurement of microwave distribution based on optical detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Zhong; Ding, Wenzheng; Yang, Sihua; Chen, Qun, E-mail: redrocks-chenqun@hotmail.com, E-mail: xingda@scnu.edu.cn; Xing, Da, E-mail: redrocks-chenqun@hotmail.com, E-mail: xingda@scnu.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and Institute of Laser Life Science, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China)

    2016-01-04

    In this letter, we present the development of a remote microwave measurement system. This method employs an arc discharge lamp that serves as an energy converter from microwave to visible light, which can propagate without transmission medium. Observed with a charge coupled device, quantitative microwave power distribution can be achieved when the operators and electronic instruments are in a distance from the high power region in order to reduce the potential risk. We perform the experiments using pulsed microwaves, and the results show that the system response is dependent on the microwave intensity over a certain range. Most importantly, the microwave distribution can be monitored in real time by optical observation of the response of a one-dimensional lamp array. The characteristics of low cost, a wide detection bandwidth, remote measurement, and room temperature operation make the system a preferred detector for microwave applications.

  20. Comparison of Ultrasound and MRI in Detecting Fetal Anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Abdi

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Background: Ultrasound (US and MRI are considered complementary technologies, and MRI is utilized as an adjunct to US in the evaluation of fetal anomalies. Overall ultrasound remains the prime mo-dality for evaluating disorders of the fetus and pregnancy. Ultrasound continues to have several obvious advan-tages over MRI. It is safe and relatively inexpensive and is widely available It also allows for real-time imaging. However, US does have important limitations. First, it is uniquely operator-and interpreter-dependent. In ad-dition, compared to MRI, US provides a smaller field-of-view, and the resolution of US images is restricted by penetration through soft tissues and bone. Thus, the sensitivity of US in evaluating the fetus is reduced in obese patients and in women whose pregnancies are complicated by low amniotic fluid volume. There is a growing body of literature on the use of MRI and has documented its usefulness in confirming or expanding upon US findings. On the contrary, MRI visualization of the fetus is not significantly limited by maternal obe-sity, fetal position, or oligohydramnios, and visualization of the brain is not restricted by the ossified skull. It provides superior soft-tissue contrast resolution and the ability to distinguish individual structures such as lung, liver, kidney, bowel, and gray and white matter. Patients & Methods: In this study, patients in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy were recruited on the basis of abnormal fetal US results within 2 days of MR imaging by another radiologist. Results: In some cases such as anencephaly which is associated with polyhydraminous or in multicystic dys-plastic kidney disease, MRI added no more information to ultrasonography; but in the following cases MRI had more data. In a fetus with bilateral hydronephrosis, MRI could differentiate PUV from UPJ stenosis by visualizing distention of the ureters. MRI allowed better depiction of complex anomalies

  1. Whole-body muscle MRI to detect myopathies in non-extrapyramidal bent spine syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohana, Mickael [Nouvel Hopital Civil - Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Radiologie B, Strasbourg (France); Durand, Marie-Christine [AP-HP - Hopital Raymond Poincare, Service de Neurologie, Garches (France); Marty, Catherine; Lazareth, Jean-Philippe [AP-HP - Hopital Raymond Poincare, Service de Rhumatologie, Garches (France); Maisonobe, Thierry [APH-HP - Hopital de la Pitie-Salpetriere, Service de Neuropathologie, Paris (France); Mompoint, Dominique; Carlier, Robert-Yves [AP-HP - Hopital Raymond Poincare, Service de Radiologie, Garches (France)

    2014-08-15

    Bent spine syndrome (BSS), defined as an abnormal forward flexion of the trunk resolving in supine position, is usually related to parkinsonism, but can also be encountered in myopathies. This study evaluates whole-body muscle MRI (WB-mMRI) as a tool for detecting underlying myopathy in non-extrapyramidal BSS. Forty-three patients (90 % women; 53-86 years old) with a non-extrapyramidal BSS were prospectively included. All underwent a 1.5-T WB-mMRI and a nerve conduction study. Muscle biopsy was performed if a myopathy could not be eliminated based on clinical examination and all tests. Systematic MRI interpretation focused on peripheral and axial muscle injury; spinal posture and incidental findings were also reported. WB-mMRI was completed for all patients, with 13 muscle biopsies ultimately needed and myopathy revealed as the final etiological diagnosis in five cases (12 %). All biopsy-proven myopathies were detected by the WB-mMRI. Relevant incidental MRI findings were made in seven patients. This study supports WB-mMRI as a sensitive and feasible tool for detecting myopathy in BSS patients. Associated with electroneuromyography, it can better indicate when a muscle biopsy is needed and guide it when required. Rigorous radiological interpretation is mandatory, so as not to miss incidental findings of clinical consequence. (orig.)

  2. Mineralogy and Astrobiology Detection Using Laser Remote Sensing Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedin, M. Nurul; Bradley, Arthur T.; Sharma, Shiv K.; Misra, Anupam K.; Lucey, Paul G.; Mckay, Chistopher P.; Ismail, Syed; Sandford, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    A multispectral instrument based on Raman, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), and a lidar system provides high-fidelity scientific investigations, scientific input, and science operation constraints in the context of planetary field campaigns with the Jupiter Europa Robotic Lander and Mars Sample Return mission opportunities. This instrument conducts scientific investigations analogous to investigations anticipated for missions to Mars and Jupiter's icy moons. This combined multispectral instrument is capable of performing Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy out to a >100 m target distance from the rover system and provides single-wavelength atmospheric profiling over long ranges (>20 km). In this article, we will reveal integrated remote Raman, LIF, and lidar technologies for use in robotic and lander-based planetary remote sensing applications. Discussions are focused on recently developed Raman, LIF, and lidar systems in addition to emphasizing surface water ice, surface and subsurface minerals, organics, biogenic, biomarker identification, atmospheric aerosols and clouds distributions, i.e., near-field atmospheric thin layers detection for next robotic-lander based instruments to measure all the above-mentioned parameters. OCIS codes: (120.0280) Remote sensing and sensors; (130.0250) Optoelectronics; (280.3640) Lidar; (300.2530) Fluorescence, laser-induced; (300.6450) Spectroscopy, Raman; (300.6365) Spectroscopy, laser induced breakdown

  3. USING COVARIANCE INTERSECTION FOR CHANGE DETECTION IN REMOTE SENSING IMAGES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Meng; Zhang Gong

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,an unsupervised change detection technique for remote sensing images acquired on the same geographical area but at different time instances is proposed by conducting Covariance Intersection (CI) to perform unsupervised fusion of the final fuzzy partition matrices from the Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) clustering for the feature space by applying compressed sampling to the given remote sensing images.The proposed approach exploits a CI-based data fusion of the membership function matrices,which are obtained by taking the Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) clustering of the frequency-domain feature vectors and spatial-domain feature vectors,aimed at enhancing the unsupervised change detection performance.Compressed sampling is performed to realize the image local feature sampling,which is a signal acquisition framework based on the revelation that a small collection of linear projections of a sparse signal contains enough information for stable recovery.The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm has a good change detection results and also performs quite well on denoising purpose.

  4. A survey on object detection in optical remote sensing images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gong; Han, Junwei

    2016-07-01

    Object detection in optical remote sensing images, being a fundamental but challenging problem in the field of aerial and satellite image analysis, plays an important role for a wide range of applications and is receiving significant attention in recent years. While enormous methods exist, a deep review of the literature concerning generic object detection is still lacking. This paper aims to provide a review of the recent progress in this field. Different from several previously published surveys that focus on a specific object class such as building and road, we concentrate on more generic object categories including, but are not limited to, road, building, tree, vehicle, ship, airport, urban-area. Covering about 270 publications we survey (1) template matching-based object detection methods, (2) knowledge-based object detection methods, (3) object-based image analysis (OBIA)-based object detection methods, (4) machine learning-based object detection methods, and (5) five publicly available datasets and three standard evaluation metrics. We also discuss the challenges of current studies and propose two promising research directions, namely deep learning-based feature representation and weakly supervised learning-based geospatial object detection. It is our hope that this survey will be beneficial for the researchers to have better understanding of this research field.

  5. Gadoxetic Acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-Enhanced MRI versus Gadobenate Dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA)-Enhanced MRI for Preoperatively Detecting Hepatocellular Carcinoma: an Initial Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yu Lri; Kim, Seong Hyun; Kim, Seung Hoon; Choi, Dong Il; Lee, Won Jae; Kim, Hee Jung; Koo, Ji Hyun; Lim, Hyo Keun [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Yong Hwan [Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Mee; Kim, Min Ju [Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    This study was designed to compare the diagnostic performance of gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadobenate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI for preoperatively detecting hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Eighteen consecutive patients (17 men and one woman, age range: 31-73 years) with 22 HCCs underwent examinations with gadoxetic acid enhanced MRI and gadobenate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI on a 3.0-Tesla unit. The diagnosis of HCC was established after surgical resection and pathological conformation. Three observers independently reviewed each MR image in a random order on a tumor-by-tumor basis. The diagnostic accuracy of these techniques for the detection of HCC was assessed by performing an alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The sensitivity and positive predictive values were evaluated. The average value of the area under the ROC curve (Az) for gadoxetic acid enhanced MRI (0.887) was not significantly different from the Az (0.899) for gadobenate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI (p > 0.05). The overall sensitivities of gadoxetic acid enhanced MRI and gadobenate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI were 80% and 83%, respectively, with no significant difference (p > 0.05). The differences of the positive predictive values for the two contrast agents for each observer were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The diagnostic performance of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and gadobenate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI for preoperatively detecting HCC is quite similar

  6. MRI in the evaluation of spina bifida patients in the remote period after meningomyelocele repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, M.R.; Glasier, C.M.; Chadduck, W.M.; Angtuaco, E.J.C.; Binet, E.F.

    1989-07-01

    MRI was performed on 22 patients ranging in age from 3 months to 16 years who had closure of their meningomyelocele shortly after birth. These patients had developed new clinical findings suggestive of spinal cord dysfunction. MRI showed low placement of the spinal cord in all 22. Six patients had lipomas, five had diastematomyelia and six had hydromyelia. Four patients had an obviously dysplastic terminal cord. (orig.).

  7. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis in acute isolated thalamic infarction detected by dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Förster

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD is a state of neural depression caused by loss of connections to injured neural structures remote from the cerebellum usually evaluated by positron emission tomography. Recently it has been shown that dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion weighted MRI (PWI may also be feasible to detect the phenomenon. In this study we aimed to assess the frequency of CCD on PWI in patients with acute thalamic infarction. METHODS: From a MRI report database we identified patients with acute isolated thalamic infarction. Contralateral cerebellar hypoperfusion was identified by inspection of time to peak (TTP maps and evaluated quantitatively on TTP, mean transit time (MTT, cerebral blood flow and volume (CBF, CBV maps. A competing cerebellar pathology or an underlying vascular pathology were excluded. RESULTS: A total of 39 patients was included. Common symptoms were hemiparesis (53.8%, hemihypaesthesia (38.5%, dysarthria (30.8%, aphasia (17.9%, and ataxia (15.4%. In 9 patients (23.1% PWI showed hypoperfusion in the contralateral cerebellar hemisphere. All of these had lesions in the territory of the tuberothalamic, paramedian, or inferolateral arteries. Dysarthria was observed more frequently in patients with CCD (6/9 vs. 6/30; OR 8.00; 95%CI 1.54-41.64, p = 0.01. In patients with CCD, the median ischemic lesion volume on DWI (0.91 cm³, IQR 0.49-1.54 cm³ was larger compared to patients with unremarkable PWI (0.51 cm³, IQR 0.32-0.74, p = 0.05. The most pronounced changes were found in CBF (0.94±0.11 and MTT (1.06±0.13 signal ratios, followed by TTP (1.05±0.02. CONCLUSIONS: Multimodal MRI demonstrates CCD in about 20% of acute isolated thalamic infarction patients. Lesion size seems to be a relevant factor in its pathophysiology.

  8. Detecting neighborhood vacancy level in Detroit city using remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Wang, R.; Yang, A.; Vojnovic, I.

    2015-12-01

    With the decline of manufacturing industries, many Rust Belt cities, which enjoyed prosperity in the past, are now suffering from financial stress, population decrease and urban poverty. As a consequence, urban neighborhoods deteriorate. Houses are abandoned and left to decay. Neighborhood vacancy brings on many problems. Governments and agencies try to survey the vacancy level by going through neighborhoods and record the condition of each structure, or by buying information of active mailing addresses to get approximate neighborhood vacancy rate. But these methods are expensive and time consuming. Remote sensing provides a quick and comparatively cost-efficient way to access spatial information on social and demographical attributes of urban area. In our study, we use remote sensing to detect a major aspect of neighborhood deterioration, the vacancy levels of neighborhoods in Detroit city. We compared different neighborhoods using Landsat 8 images in 2013. We calculated NDVI that indicates the greenness of neighborhoods with the image in July 2013. Then we used thermal infrared information from image in February to detect human activities. In winter, abandoned houses will not consume so much energy and therefore neighborhoods with more abandoned houses will have smaller urban heat island effect. Controlling for the differences in terms of the greenness obtained from summer time image, we used thermal infrared from winter image to determine the temperatures of urban surface. We find that hotter areas are better maintained and have lower house vacancy rates. We also compared the changes over time for neighborhoods using Landsat 7 images from 2003 to 2013. The results show that deteriorated neighborhoods have increased NDVI in summer and get colder in winter due to abandonment of houses. Our results show the potential application of remote sensing as an easily accessed and efficient way to obtain data about social conditions in cities. We used the neighborhood

  9. An approach to the detection of underwater remote target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xixin; JIANG Guojian; XU Xinsheng; XU Xinsheng

    2004-01-01

    An approach to the detection of underwater remote target by estimating its backscattering coefficient is presented. The key to this approach is that the echo signal is represented in state-variable model and the back-scattering coefficients of target are contained in dynamic noise of this model, thus underwater target can be detected by estimating this dynamic noise,i.e., deconvolving this model. When all noise statistics are a priori known, an optimum deconvolution algorithm based on the optimum state filter is derived, or else, an adaptive deconvolution algorithm based on the adaptive state filter of alternatively estimating the vector state and the noise statistics is developed. In the final simulation test, an echo signal with SNR equal to -6.1 dB is proceeded using the aforementioned two deconvolution algorithms, respectively, and the results demonstrate good performance of the approach.

  10. Dictionary-Driven Ischemia Detection From Cardiac Phase-Resolved Myocardial BOLD MRI at Rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, Marco; Dharmakumar, Rohan; Tsaftaris, Sotirios A

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac Phase-resolved Blood-Oxygen-Level Dependent (CP-BOLD) MRI provides a unique opportunity to image an ongoing ischemia at rest. However, it requires post-processing to evaluate the extent of ischemia. To address this, here we propose an unsupervised ischemia detection (UID) method which relies on the inherent spatio-temporal correlation between oxygenation and wall motion to formalize a joint learning and detection problem based on dictionary decomposition. Considering input data of a single subject, it treats ischemia as an anomaly and iteratively learns dictionaries to represent only normal observations (corresponding to myocardial territories remote to ischemia). Anomaly detection is based on a modified version of One-class Support Vector Machines (OCSVM) to regulate directly the margins by incorporating the dictionary-based representation errors. A measure of ischemic extent (IE) is estimated, reflecting the relative portion of the myocardium affected by ischemia. For visualization purposes an ischemia likelihood map is created by estimating posterior probabilities from the OCSVM outputs, thus obtaining how likely the classification is correct. UID is evaluated on synthetic data and in a 2D CP-BOLD data set from a canine experimental model emulating acute coronary syndromes. Comparing early ischemic territories identified with UID against infarct territories (after several hours of ischemia), we find that IE, as measured by UID, is highly correlated (Pearson's r=0.84) with respect to infarct size. When advances in automated registration and segmentation of CP-BOLD images and full coverage 3D acquisitions become available, we hope that this method can enable pixel-level assessment of ischemia with this truly non-invasive imaging technique.

  11. A potential MRI contract agent for tumor detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Since the first successful attempt in the early 1970s, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a non-invasive diagnostic tool has seen rapid and wide applications in clinical practice. However,new types of contrast agents remain to be developed for further improving the sensitivity and specificity of the technology.

  12. Accuracy of [18F]FDG PET/MRI for the Detection of Liver Metastases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Beiderwellen

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of [18F]FDG-PET/MRI with PET/CT for the detection of liver metastases.32 patients with solid malignancies underwent [18F]FDG-PET/CT and subsequent PET/MRI of the liver. Two readers assessed both datasets regarding lesion characterization (benign, indeterminate, malignant, conspicuity and diagnostic confidence. An imaging follow-up (mean interval: 185±92 days and/-or histopathological specimen served as standards of reference. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV were calculated for both modalities. Accuracy was determined by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve. Values of conspicuity and diagnostic confidence were compared using Wilcoxon-signed-rank test.The standard of reference revealed 113 liver lesions in 26 patients (malignant: n = 45; benign: n = 68. For PET/MRI a higher accuracy (PET/CT: 82.4%; PET/MRI: 96.1%; p<0.001 as well as sensitivity (67.8% vs. 92.2%, p<0.01 and NPV (82.0% vs. 95.1%, p<0.05 were observed. PET/MRI offered higher lesion conspicuity (PET/CT: 2.0±1.1 [median: 2; range 0-3]; PET/MRI: 2.8±0.5 [median: 3; range 0-3]; p<0.001 and diagnostic confidence (PET/CT: 2.0±0.8 [median: 2; range: 1-3]; PET/MRI 2.6±0.6 [median: 3; range: 1-3]; p<0.001. Furthermore, PET/MRI enabled the detection of additional PET-negative metastases (reader 1: 10; reader 2: 12.PET/MRI offers higher diagnostic accuracy compared to PET/CT for the detection of liver metastases.

  13. Building multiclass classifiers for remote homology detection and fold recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karypis George

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein remote homology detection and fold recognition are central problems in computational biology. Supervised learning algorithms based on support vector machines are currently one of the most effective methods for solving these problems. These methods are primarily used to solve binary classification problems and they have not been extensively used to solve the more general multiclass remote homology prediction and fold recognition problems. Results We present a comprehensive evaluation of a number of methods for building SVM-based multiclass classification schemes in the context of the SCOP protein classification. These methods include schemes that directly build an SVM-based multiclass model, schemes that employ a second-level learning approach to combine the predictions generated by a set of binary SVM-based classifiers, and schemes that build and combine binary classifiers for various levels of the SCOP hierarchy beyond those defining the target classes. Conclusion Analyzing the performance achieved by the different approaches on four different datasets we show that most of the proposed multiclass SVM-based classification approaches are quite effective in solving the remote homology prediction and fold recognition problems and that the schemes that use predictions from binary models constructed for ancestral categories within the SCOP hierarchy tend to not only lead to lower error rates but also reduce the number of errors in which a superfamily is assigned to an entirely different fold and a fold is predicted as being from a different SCOP class. Our results also show that the limited size of the training data makes it hard to learn complex second-level models, and that models of moderate complexity lead to consistently better results.

  14. Real-time QRS detection using integrated variance for ECG gated cardiac MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Marcus

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available During magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, a patient’s vital signs are required for different purposes. In cardiac MRI (CMR, an electrocardiogram (ECG of the patient is required for triggering the image acquisition process. However, a reliable QRS detection of an ECG signal acquired inside an MRI scanner is a challenging task due to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD effect which interferes with the ECG. The aim of this work was to develop a reliable QRS detector usable inside the MRI which also fulfills the standards for medical devices (IEC 60601-2-27. Therefore, a novel real-time QRS detector based on integrated variance measurements is presented. The algorithm was trained on ANSI/AAMI EC13 test waveforms and was then applied to two databases with 12-lead ECG signals recorded inside and outside an MRI scanner. Reliable results for both databases were achieved for the ECG signals recorded inside (DBMRI: sensitivity Se = 99.94%, positive predictive value +P = 99.84% and outside (DBInCarT: Se = 99.29%, +P = 99.72% the MRI. Due to the accurate R-peak detection in real-time this can be used for monitoring and triggering in MRI exams.

  15. Mineralogy and astrobiology detection using laser remote sensing instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedin, M Nurul; Bradley, Arthur T; Sharma, Shiv K; Misra, Anupam K; Lucey, Paul G; McKay, Christopher P; Ismail, Syed; Sandford, Stephen P

    2015-09-01

    A multispectral instrument based on Raman, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), and a lidar system provides high-fidelity scientific investigations, scientific input, and science operation constraints in the context of planetary field campaigns with the Jupiter Europa Robotic Lander and Mars Sample Return mission opportunities. This instrument conducts scientific investigations analogous to investigations anticipated for missions to Mars and Jupiter's icy moons. This combined multispectral instrument is capable of performing Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy out to a >100  m target distance from the rover system and provides single-wavelength atmospheric profiling over long ranges (>20  km). In this article, we will reveal integrated remote Raman, LIF, and lidar technologies for use in robotic and lander-based planetary remote sensing applications. Discussions are focused on recently developed Raman, LIF, and lidar systems in addition to emphasizing surface water ice, surface and subsurface minerals, organics, biogenic, biomarker identification, atmospheric aerosols and clouds distributions, i.e., near-field atmospheric thin layers detection for next robotic-lander based instruments to measure all the above-mentioned parameters.

  16. MRI detected prevalence of abnormalities in patients of knee pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Mehta

    2015-10-01

    Results: In this present study 72% patients were males and 28% patients females and their ages ranging from (11-80 years. Knee pain was found common in age group 31-40 years. Menisci lesions (44% were more common as compared to ligament lesions (14% in patients of knee pain. Osteoarthritis was found in 40 % of patients of knee pain. Joint effusion and marrow edema was found with incidence of 74% and 62% respectively. 4% patients were suffering from intraarticular tumors. Conclusions: Knee pain can occur at any stage of life due to various causative factors. MRI can demonstrate the exact nature and extent of bony as well as soft tissue abnormality. This has increase the use of MRI in evaluation of patients of knee pain. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(10.000: 2572-2575

  17. Comparative study of whole-body MRI and bone scintigraphy for the detection of bone metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balliu, E., E-mail: eballiu@gmail.co [Department of Magnetic Resonance, IDI Girona, Hospital Universitari de Girona Dr Josep Trueta, Girona (Spain); Boada, M.; Pelaez, I. [Department of Magnetic Resonance, IDI Girona, Hospital Universitari de Girona Dr Josep Trueta, Girona (Spain); Vilanova, J.C. [Department of Magnetic Resonance, Clinica Girona - Hospital Sta Caterina, Girona (Spain); Barcelo-Vidal, C. [Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics, University of Girona (Spain); Rubio, A.; Galofre, P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, IDI Girona, Hospital Universitari de Girona Dr Josep Trueta, Girona (Spain); Castro, A. [Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Universitari de Girona Dr Josep Trueta, Girona (Spain); Pedraza, S. [Department of Magnetic Resonance, IDI Girona, Hospital Universitari de Girona Dr Josep Trueta, Girona (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    Aim: To assess and compare the diagnostic accuracy of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and bone scintigraphy in the detection of metastases to bone. Material and methods: Forty randomly selected patients with known malignant tumours were prospectively studied using bone scintigraphy and whole-body MRI. Two patients were excluded. Symptoms of bone metastasis were present in 29 (76%) patients and absent in nine (24%). Findings were classified into four categories according to the probability of bone metastasis: (1) negative, (2) probably negative, (3) probably positive, and (4) positive. Diagnostic accuracy was determined according to the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The definitive diagnosis was reached using other imaging techniques, biopsy, or 12 months clinical follow-up. Results: Metastases were present in 18 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy were 94, 90, and 92%, respectively, for whole-body MRI and 72, 75, and 74%, respectively, for bone scintigraphy. Diagnostic accuracy measured by the area under the ROC curve was significantly higher for whole-body MRI (96%) than for bone scintigraphy (77%; p<0.05). Interobserver agreement measured by the kappa index was significantly higher for whole-body MRI (0.895) than for bone scintigraphy (0.524; p<0.05). Whole-body MRI detected lesions in tissues other than bone in 17 (45%) patients. Conclusions: Whole-body MRI is more accurate and more objective than bone scintigraphy for the detection of bone metastases. Whole-body MRI can also detect lesions in tissues other than bone.

  18. Detecting Fleeting MRI Signals with Frequency-Modulated Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Naoharu; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Corum, Curtis; Moeller, Steen; Chamberlain, Ryan; O'Connell, Robert; Nixdorf, Donald R.; Garwood, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We describe a fundamentally different approach to MRI referred to as SWIFT (sweep imaging with Fourier transformation). SWIFT exploits time-shared RF excitation and signal acquisition, allowing capture of signal from spins with extremely short transverse relaxation time, T2*. The MR signal is acquired in gaps inserted into a broadband frequency-swept excitation pulse, which results in acquisition delays of only 1 – 2 microseconds. In SWIFT, 3D k-space is sampled in a radial manner, whereby one projection of the object is acquired in the gaps of each frequency-swept pulse, allowing a repetition time (TR) on the order of the pulse length (typically 1 – 3 milliseconds). Since the orientation of consecutive projections varies in a smooth manner (i.e., only small increments in the values of the x, y, z gradients occur from view to view), SWIFT scanning is close to inaudible and is insensitive to gradient timing errors and eddy currents. SWIFT images can be acquired in scan times similar to and sometimes faster than conventional 3D gradient echo techniques. With its ability to capture signals from ultrashort T2* spins, SWIFT promises to expand the role of MRI in areas of research where MRI previously played no or negligible role. In this article, we show wood and tooth images obtained with SWIFT as examples of materials with ultrashort T2*. Early experience suggests SWIFT can play a role in materials science and porous media research. PMID:22661791

  19. Prospective detection of cortical dysplasia on clinical MRI in pediatric intractable epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhakrishnan, Rupa; Leach, James L.; Gelfand, Michael J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Mangano, Francesco T. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Rozhkov, Leonid; Greiner, Hansel M. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Comprehensive Epilepsy Treatment Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Miles, Lili [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Cortical dysplasia is the most common cause of pediatric refractory epilepsy. MRI detection of epileptogenic lesion is associated with good postsurgical outcome. Additional electrophysiological information is suggested to be helpful in localization of cortical dysplasia. Educational measures were taken to increase the awareness of cortical dysplasia at our institution in the context of a recent International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE 2011) classification of cortical dysplasia. To determine changes in the rate of prospective identification of cortical dysplasia on an initial radiology report and also evaluate the benefit of MRI review as part of a multidisciplinary epilepsy conference in identifying previously overlooked MRI findings. We retrospectively evaluated surgically treated children with refractory epilepsy from 2007 to 2014 with cortical dysplasia on histopathology. We analyzed the initial radiology report, preoperative MRI interpretation at multidisciplinary epilepsy conference and subsequent retrospective MRI review with knowledge of the resection site. We recorded additional electrophysiological data and the presence of lobar concordance with the MRI findings. Of 78 children (44 MRI lesional) evaluated, 18 had initially overlooked MRI findings. Comparing 2007-2010 to 2011-2014, there was improvement in the rate of overlooked findings on the initial radiology report (54% vs. 13% of lesional cases, respectively; P = 0.008). The majority (72%) were identified at a multidisciplinary conference with lobar concordance of findings with at least one additional electrophysiological investigation in 89%. Awareness of current classification schemes of cortical dysplasia and image review in the context of a multidisciplinary conference can lead to improved MRI detection of cortical dysplasia in children. (orig.)

  20. Preoperative detection of colorectal liver metastases in fatty liver: MDCT or MRI?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulemann, Vanessa, E-mail: vanessa.kulemann@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Schima, Wolfgang [KH Goettlicher Heiland, Vienna (Austria); Tamandl, Dietmar; Kaczirek, Klaus; Gruenberger, Thomas [Department of Surgery, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Wrba, Friedrich [Department of Pathology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Weber, Michael; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)

    2011-08-15

    Objective: To compare the diagnostic value of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the preoperative detection of colorectal liver metastases in diffuse fatty infiltration of the liver, associated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Materials and methods: Twenty preoperative tri-phasic MDCT (4-64-row, Siemens) and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (1.5 T or 3.0 T, Siemens) examinations of patients with colorectal cancer and liver metastases in diffuse steatosis were retrospectively evaluated. All patients underwent surgical resection for liver metastases (time interval 1-60 days). The amount of fatty infiltration of the liver was determined histopathologically by semi-quantitative percent-wise estimation and ranged from 25 to 75%. Results: Overall, 51 metastases were found by histopathology of the resected liver segments/lobes. The size of the metastases ranged from 0.4 to 13 cm, with 18 (35%) being up to 1 cm in diameter. In the overall rating, MDCT detected 33/51 lesions (65%), and MRI 45/51 (88%). For lesions up to 1 cm, MDCT detected only 2/18 (11%) and MRI 12/18 (66%). One false positive lesion was detected by MDCT. Statistical analysis showed that MRI is markedly superior to MDCT, with a statistically significant difference (p < .001), particularly for the detection of small lesions ({<=}1 cm; p < .004). There was no significant difference between the two modalities in the detection of lesions > 1 cm. Conclusion: For the detection of colorectal liver metastases after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and consecutive diffuse fatty infiltration of the liver, MRI is superior to MDCT, especially for the detection of small lesions.

  1. Bladder cancer: utility of MRI in detection of occult muscle-invasive disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B. [Dept. of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States)], E-mail: Andrew.rosenkrantz@nyumc.org; Mussi, Thais C. [Dept. of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States); Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Melamed, Jonathan [Dept. of Pathology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States); Taneja, Samir S.; Huang, William C. [Dept. of Urology, Div. of Urologic Oncology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Background. The presence of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer is a key factor in prognosis and treatment decisions, although may be missed by biopsy due to sampling error. MRI has shown potential for detection of muscle invasion but has not specifically been evaluated for this purpose in the setting of bladder cancer patients without evidence of muscle invasion on initial biopsy. Purpose. To evaluate the role of MRI in detection of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer following a pathologic diagnosis of non-invasive tumor. Material and Methods. This retrospective study included 23 patients who underwent pelvic MRI following a pathologic diagnosis of bladder cancer without muscularis propria invasion and in whom additional histologic evaluation was performed following MRI. Two radiologists in consensus reviewed T2-weighted images to identify those cases suspicious for muscle invasion on MRI. The radiologists identified whether cases suspicious for invasion demonstrated disruption of the T2-hypointense muscularis layer of the bladder wall, peri-vesical fat stranding, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity. Findings were compared with pathologic results obtained after MRI. Results. Suspicion was raised for muscle invasion in eight of 23 cases, four of which exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. No case without suspicion on MRI exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. Therefore, sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 79%, respectively. Among individual findings, muscularis disruption on T2WI exhibited sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 79%, peri-vesical fat stranding exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 50% and 84%, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 25% and 100%. Conclusion. MRI demonstrated high sensitivity for detection of muscle invasion in cases of bladder cancer without invasion on initial histologic assessment. Muscularis disruption on T2WI appeared to exhibit a better

  2. Early detection of Alzheimer's disease using MRI hippocampal texture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lauge; Igel, Christian; Hansen, Naja Liv

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with reduction in hippocampal volume in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, it is unknown whether hippocampal texture changes in persons with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) that does not have a change...... applied to score independent data sets from the Australian Imaging, Biomarker & Lifestyle Flagship Study of Ageing (AIBL) and the Metropolit 1953 Danish Male Birth Cohort (Metropolit). Hippocampal texture was superior to volume reduction as predictor of MCI-to-AD conversion in ADNI (area under...

  3. Computer-aided Detection of Prostate Cancer with MRI: Technology and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lizhi; Tian, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Fei, Baowei

    2016-08-01

    One in six men will develop prostate cancer in his lifetime. Early detection and accurate diagnosis of the disease can improve cancer survival and reduce treatment costs. Recently, imaging of prostate cancer has greatly advanced since the introduction of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI). Mp-MRI consists of T2-weighted sequences combined with functional sequences including dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging. Because of the big data and variations in imaging sequences, detection can be affected by multiple factors such as observer variability and visibility and complexity of the lesions. To improve quantitative assessment of the disease, various computer-aided detection systems have been designed to help radiologists in their clinical practice. This review paper presents an overview of literatures on computer-aided detection of prostate cancer with mp-MRI, which include the technology and its applications. The aim of the survey is threefold: an introduction for those new to the field, an overview for those working in the field, and a reference for those searching for literature on a specific application.

  4. Remote-excitation and remote-detection of single quantum dot using propagating surface plasmons on silver nanowire

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Qiang; Xu, Hong-Xing

    2014-01-01

    Using propagating surface plasmons (SPs) on silver nanowire (NW), we demonstrate that focused laser light at the end of silver nanowire can excite single quantum dot (QD) microns away from the excitation spot. The QD-NW interaction allows the excited QD convert part of its energy into propagating SPs which then can be detected at the remote sites. Simultaneous multi-QDs remote-excitation and detection are also realized. Furthermore, the tight confinement of propagating SPs around the NW surface enables selective excitation of QDs very close in space, which cannot be realized under conventional excitation condition. This remote excitation and detection approach may find applications in optical imaging and sensing of chemical and biological systems.

  5. REMOTE DETECTION OF RADIOACTIVE PLUMES USING MILLIMETER WAVE TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnowski, R.; Chien; H.; Gopalsami, N.

    2009-01-01

    The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, a common method for manufacturing weapons-grade special nuclear materials, is accompanied by the release of fi ssion products trapped within the fuel. One of these fi ssion products is a radioactive isotope of Krypton (Kr-85); a pure β- emitter with a half-life of 10.72 years. Due to its chemical neutrality and relatively long half life, nearly all of the Kr-85 is released into the surrounding air during reprocessing, resulting in a concentration of Kr-85 near the source that is several orders of magnitude higher than the typical background (atmospheric) concentrations. This high concentration of Kr-85 is accompanied by a proportionately high increase in air ionization due to the release of beta radiation from Kr-85 decay. Millimeter wave (MMW) sensing technology can be used to detect the presence of Kr-85 induced plumes since a high concentration of ions in the air increases the radar cross section due to a combination of atmospheric phenomena. Possible applications for this technology include the remote sensing of reprocessing activities across national borders bolstering global anti-proliferation initiatives. The feasibility of using MMW radar technology to uniquely detect the presence of Kr-85 can be tested using commercial ion generators or sealed radioactive sources in the laboratory. In this paper we describe our work to derive an ion dispersion model that will describe the spatial distribution of ions from Kr-85 and other common lab sources. The types and energies of radiation emitted by isotopes Co-60 and Cs-137 were researched, and these parameters were incorporated into these dispersion models. Our results can be compared with the results of MMW detection experiments in order to quantify the relationship between radar cross section and air ionization as well as to further calibrate the MMW detection equipment.

  6. Imaging of Her2-targeted magnetic nanoparticles for breast cancer detection: comparison of SQUID-detected magnetic relaxometry and MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolphi, Natalie L; Butler, Kimberly S; Lovato, Debbie M; Tessier, T E; Trujillo, Jason E; Hathaway, Helen J; Fegan, Danielle L; Monson, Todd C; Stevens, Tyler E; Huber, Dale L; Ramu, Jaivijay; Milne, Michelle L; Altobelli, Stephen A; Bryant, Howard C; Larson, Richard S; Flynn, Edward R

    2012-01-01

    Both magnetic relaxometry and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to detect and locate targeted magnetic nanoparticles, noninvasively and without ionizing radiation. Magnetic relaxometry offers advantages in terms of its specificity (only nanoparticles are detected) and the linear dependence of the relaxometry signal on the number of nanoparticles present. In this study, detection of single-core iron oxide nanoparticles by superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID)-detected magnetic relaxometry and standard 4.7 T MRI are compared. The nanoparticles were conjugated to a Her2 monoclonal antibody and targeted to Her2-expressing MCF7/Her2-18 (breast cancer cells); binding of the nanoparticles to the cells was assessed by magnetic relaxometry and iron assay. The same nanoparticle-labeled cells, serially diluted, were used to assess the detection limits and MR relaxivities. The detection limit of magnetic relaxometry was 125 000 nanoparticle-labeled cells at 3 cm from the SQUID sensors. T(2)-weighted MRI yielded a detection limit of 15 600 cells in a 150 µl volume, with r(1) = 1.1 mm(-1) s(-1) and r(2) = 166 mm(-1) s(-1). Her2-targeted nanoparticles were directly injected into xenograft MCF7/Her2-18 tumors in nude mice, and magnetic relaxometry imaging and 4.7 T MRI were performed, enabling direct comparison of the two techniques. Co-registration of relaxometry images and MRI of mice resulted in good agreement. A method for obtaining accurate quantification of microgram quantities of iron in the tumors and liver by relaxometry was also demonstrated. These results demonstrate the potential of SQUID-detected magnetic relaxometry imaging for the specific detection of breast cancer and the monitoring of magnetic nanoparticle-based therapies.

  7. A new diagnostic score to detect osteoporosis in patients undergoing lumbar spine MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandirali, Michele; Messina, Carmelo [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Milano (Italy); Di Leo, Giovanni; Papini, Giacomo Davide Edoardo [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Sardanelli, Francesco [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Ulivieri, Fabio Massimo [IRCCS Fondazione Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Mineralometria Ossea Computerizzata e Ambulatorio Malattie Metabolismo Minerale e Osseo, Servizio di Medicina Nucleare, Milano (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Signal intensity of lumbar-spine at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) correlates to bone mineral density (BMD). Our aim was to define a quantitative MRI-based score to detect osteoporosis on lumbar-spine MRI. After Ethics Committee approval, we selected female patients who underwent both lumbar-spine MRI and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and a reference group of 131 healthy females (20-29 years) who underwent lumbar-spine MRI. We measured the intra-vertebral signal-to-noise ratio in L1-L4. We introduced an MRI-based score (M-score), on the model of T-score. M-score diagnostic performance in diagnosing osteoporosis was estimated against DXA using receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis. We included 226 patients (median age 65 years), 70 (31 %) being osteoporotic at DXA. MRI signal-to-noise ratio correlated to BMD (r = -0.677, P < 0.001). M-score negatively correlated to T-score (r = -0.682, P < 0.001). Setting a 90 %-specificity, an M-score threshold of 5.5 was found, distinguishing osteoporosis from non-osteoporosis (sensitivity 54 %; ROC AUC 0.844). Thirty-one (14 %) patients had a fragility fracture, with osteoporosis detected in 15 (48 %) according to M-score and eight (26 %) according to T-score (P = 0.016). M-score obtained on lumbar spine MRI is a quantitative method correlating with osteoporosis. Its diagnostic value remains to be demonstrated on a large prospective cohort of patients. (orig.)

  8. Comparison of detection pattern of HCC by ferumoxide-enhanced MRI and intratumoral blood flow pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itou, Naoki; Kotake, Fumio [Tokyo Medical Coll., Ami, Ibaraki (Japan). Kasumigaura Hospital; Saitou, Kazuhiro; Abe, Kimihiko

    2000-08-01

    We compared the detection rate and pattern of ferumoxide-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (Fe-MRI) with the intratumoral blood flow pattern determined by CT angiography (CTA) and CT portography (CTAP) in 124 nodes (34 cases) diagnosed as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or borderline HCC, based on the clinical course. Sequences to obtain a T1-weighted images (T1W), proton density-weighted images (PDW), T2-weighted images (T2W), T2*-weighted images (T2*W) were used in Fe-MRI. In nodes shown to be hypervascular on CTA, the detection rate by Fe-MRI was 69.7%. In nodes shown to be avascular by CTAP, the detection rate by Fe-MRI was 67.3%. These rates were higher than with other flow patterns. In nodes showing high signal intensity (HSI) on any sequences, arterial blood flow was increased and portal blood flow decreased in comparison with nodes without high signal intensity. All nodes showing HSI, both on Fe-MRI T2W and T2*W, were hypervascular on CTA, and portal blood flow was absent on CTAP. Nodes showing HSI on both T2*W and T2W were considered to have greater arterial blood flow and decreased portal blood flow compared with nodes appearing as HSI on T2*W, but only as iso- or low signal intensity on T2W (Mann-Whitney U-test; p<0.05). (author)

  9. A SVM-based quantitative fMRI method for resting-state functional network detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaomu; Chen, Nan-kuei

    2014-09-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) aims to measure baseline neuronal connectivity independent of specific functional tasks and to capture changes in the connectivity due to neurological diseases. Most existing network detection methods rely on a fixed threshold to identify functionally connected voxels under the resting state. Due to fMRI non-stationarity, the threshold cannot adapt to variation of data characteristics across sessions and subjects, and generates unreliable mapping results. In this study, a new method is presented for resting-state fMRI data analysis. Specifically, the resting-state network mapping is formulated as an outlier detection process that is implemented using one-class support vector machine (SVM). The results are refined by using a spatial-feature domain prototype selection method and two-class SVM reclassification. The final decision on each voxel is made by comparing its probabilities of functionally connected and unconnected instead of a threshold. Multiple features for resting-state analysis were extracted and examined using an SVM-based feature selection method, and the most representative features were identified. The proposed method was evaluated using synthetic and experimental fMRI data. A comparison study was also performed with independent component analysis (ICA) and correlation analysis. The experimental results show that the proposed method can provide comparable or better network detection performance than ICA and correlation analysis. The method is potentially applicable to various resting-state quantitative fMRI studies.

  10. MRI for troubleshooting detection of prostate cancer; MRT zur Problemloesung beim Nachweis des Prostatakarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyersdorff, D.; Hamm, B. [Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Charite Mitte (Germany)

    2005-06-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in males. Men aged 50 and older are recommended to undergo an annual digital rectal examination (DRE) and determination of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in serum for early detection. However, prostate biopsies guided by transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) come up negative for cancer in many patients despite having PSA levels above 4 ng/ml. T2-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is able to represent the prostate including the surrounding anatomy and depict suspicious areas of low intensity within a high-intensity peripheral zone. MRI has a higher sensitivity for detecting prostate carcinomas than DRE and TRUS in patients having an elevated PSA value and a negative core biopsy. However, its specificity is poor since other abnormalities such as prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), prostatitis, scars, or haemmorrhage have a similar MRI appearance. The use of additional techniques such as MR spectroscopy and contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI improves sensitivity, but in particular it improves the specificity of tumor detection. Newly developed biopsy devices enable the performance of targeted biopsies in areas that appear suspicious in the MRI. (orig.)

  11. SQUID-Detected Microtesla MRI in the presence of Metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moessle, Michael; Han, Song-I.; Myers, Whittier; Lee, Seung-Kyun; Kelso, Nathan; Hatridge, Michael; Pines, Alexander; Clarke, John

    2006-09-06

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed at fields of 1 T and above, the presence of a metal insert can distort the image because of susceptibility differences within the sample and modification of the radiofrequency fields by screening currents. Furthermore, it is not feasible to perform nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy or acquire a magnetic resonance image if the sample is enclosed in a metal container. Both problems can be overcome by substantially lowering the NMR frequency. Using a microtesla imaging system operating at 2.8 kHz, with a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) as the signal detector, we have obtained distortion-free images of a phantom containing a titanium bar and three-dimensional images of an object enclosed in an aluminum can; in both cases high-field images are inaccessible.

  12. The usefulness of MRI for detection of the thymus gland in myasthenia gravis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hokezu, Youichi; Kaseda, Syun; Arimura, Kimiyoshi; Osame, Mitsuhiro; Baba, Kuniaki (Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Ohkubo, Koichi; Hagiwara, Hiroshi

    1989-08-01

    Seven patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) were examined to find thymus or thymoma employing chest radiographs, computed tomography (CT), pneumomediastinography (PMG), computed tomography after pneumomediastinography (PMG-CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). X-ray CT examination could reveal thymus only in half out of 6 cases scanned. On the other hand, MRI confirmed thymus or thymoma in 6 out of 7 patients. PMG and PMG-CT confirmed thymus or thymoma clearly in all of the 4 cases studied. PMG and PMG-CT examinations revealed thymus or thymoma more clearly than MRI. MRI is, however, an examination causing no pain to the patients and also more superior to X-ray CT in distinguishing between a thymus and mediastinal fat or vascular structure. In addition, MRI could reveal even capsules in thymoma which were never revealed by X-ray CT. We concluded that MRI could be an alternative method to CT and PMG in detection of thymus or thymoma in MG. (author).

  13. Detection and Demarcation of Tumor using Vector Quantization in MRI images

    CERN Document Server

    Kekre, H B; Gharge, Saylee M

    2010-01-01

    Segmenting a MRI images into homogeneous texture regions representing disparate tissue types is often a useful preprocessing step in the computer-assisted detection of breast cancer. That is why we proposed new algorithm to detect cancer in mammogram breast cancer images. In this paper we proposed segmentation using vector quantization technique. Here we used Linde Buzo-Gray algorithm (LBG) for segmentation of MRI images. Initially a codebook of size 128 was generated for MRI images. These code vectors were further clustered in 8 clusters using same LBG algorithm. These 8 images were displayed as a result. This approach does not leads to over segmentation or under segmentation. For the comparison purpose we displayed results of watershed segmentation and Entropy using Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix along with this method.

  14. Exploring hyperpolarized 83Kr by remotely detected NMR relaxometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Zackary I.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Stupic, Karl F.; LeNoir, Catherine F.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    For the first time, a hyperpolarized (hp) noble gas with a nuclear electric quadrupole moment is available for high-field nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic-resonance imaging. Hp Kr83 (I=9/2) is generated by spin-exchange optical pumping and separated from the rubidium vapor used in the pumping process. Optical pumping occurs under the previously unstudied condition of high krypton gas densities. Signal enhancements of more than three orders of magnitude compared to the thermal equilibrium Kr83 signal at 9.4T magnetic-field strength are obtained. The spin-lattice relaxation of Kr83 is caused primarly by quadrupolar couplings during the brief adsorption periods of the krypton atoms on the surrounding container walls and significantly limits the currently obtained spin polarization. Measurements in macroscopic glass containers and in desiccated canine lung tissue at field strengths between 0.05 and 3T using remotely detected hp Kr83 NMR spectroscopy reveal that the longitudinal relaxation dramatically accelerates as the magnetic-field strength decreases.

  15. Detection of asphalt pavement cracks using remote sensing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettas, Christodoulos; Agapiou, Athos; Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Neocleous, Kyriacos; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.

    2016-10-01

    Deterioration of asphalt road pavements is inevitable throughout its life cycle. There are several types of deterioration that take place on these surfaces, like surface defects and deformations. One of the most common asphalt defects is cracking. Fatigue, transverse, longitudinal, reflective, edge, block and slippage are types of cracking that can be observed anywhere in the world. Monitoring and preventative/periodic maintenance of these types of wears are two very important actions that have to take place to avoid "costly" solutions. This paper aims to introduce the spectral characteristics of uncracked (healthy) and cracked asphalt surfaces which can give a new asphalt crack index. This is performed through remote sensing applications in the area of asphalt pavements. Multispectral images can be elaborated using the index to enhance crack marks on asphalt surfaces. Ground spectral signatures were acquired from both uncracked and cracked asphalted areas of Cyprus (Limassol). Evaluation separability indices can be used to identify the optimum wavelength regions that can distinguish better the uncracked and cracked asphalt surfaces. The results revealed that the spectral sensitivity for the enhancement of cracked asphalt was detected using the Euclidean, Mahalanobis and Cosine Distance Indices in the Vis range (approximately at 450 nm) and in the SWIR 1 range (approximately at 1750 nm).

  16. Rapid and Robust Damage Detection using Radar Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, S.; Fielding, E. J.; Simons, M.; Webb, F.; Rosen, P. A.; Owen, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    Under ARIA (Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis) project at JPL and Caltech, we developed a prototype algorithm and data system to rapidly detect surface change caused by natural or man-made damage using a radar remote sensing technique of InSAR coherence. We tested the algorithm with a building demolition site in the City of Pasadena, California. The results show clear signal at the demolition site, with about 150% SNR improvement compared to conventional approach. Out of fourteen strongest detected signals, we confirmed that at least eleven of them were associated with real demolition and construction projects. We applied the algorithm to the February 2011 M6.3 Christchurch earthquake in New Zealand, which killed 185 people and caused financial damage of US $16-24 billion. We produced a damage proxy map (DPM) using radar data from ALOS satellite (Figure A), where red pixels identify regions where there may have been earthquake induced building damage, landslides, and liquefaction. The distribution of the red regions agrees well with the post-earthquake assessment performed on the ground by inspectors from the New Zealand government and summarized in their damage assessment zone map (Figure B). The DPM was derived from radar data acquired 3 days after the earthquake, whereas the ground truth zone map was first published 4 months after the earthquake. In addition to all-weather and day-and-night capability of radar, the sensitivity of radar signal to surface property change is high enough for reliable damage assessment. Current and future satellite and airborne missions should keep the expected composite data acquisition latency within a day. Rapidly produced accurate damage assessment maps will help saving people, assisting effective prioritization of rescue operations at early stage of response, and significantly improve timely situational awareness for emergency management and national / international assessment for response and recovery.

  17. MRI Brain Tumor Segmentation and Necrosis Detection Using Adaptive Sobolev Snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhmani, Arie; Kikinis, Ron; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2014-01-01

    Brain tumor segmentation in brain MRI volumes is used in neurosurgical planning and illness staging. It is important to explore the tumor shape and necrosis regions at different points of time to evaluate the disease progression. We propose an algorithm for semi-automatic tumor segmentation and necrosis detection. Our algorithm consists of three parts: conversion of MRI volume to a probability space based on the on-line learned model, tumor probability density estimation, and adaptive segmentation in the probability space. We use manually selected acceptance and rejection classes on a single MRI slice to learn the background and foreground statistical models. Then, we propagate this model to all MRI slices to compute the most probable regions of the tumor. Anisotropic 3D diffusion is used to estimate the probability density. Finally, the estimated density is segmented by the Sobolev active contour (snake) algorithm to select smoothed regions of the maximum tumor probability. The segmentation approach is robust to noise and not very sensitive to the manual initialization in the volumes tested. Also, it is appropriate for low contrast imagery. The irregular necrosis regions are detected by using the outliers of the probability distribution inside the segmented region. The necrosis regions of small width are removed due to a high probability of noisy measurements. The MRI volume segmentation results obtained by our algorithm are very similar to expert manual segmentation. PMID:25302005

  18. Involvement patterns in myotilinopathy and desminopathy detected by a novel neuromuscular whole-body MRI protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, Nicolai; Born, Christine; Weckbach, Sabine; Reiser, Maximilian F. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Reilich, Peter; Walter, Maggie C. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Friedrich-Baur-Institute, Department of Neurology, Munich (Germany)

    2008-12-15

    Whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) has been successfully applied for oncologic and cardiovascular diagnostics, whereas imaging in myopathies usually employs dedicated protocols restricted to areas of specific interest. In this study, we propose a comprehensive neuromuscular WB-MRI protocol. Eighteen patients with degenerative and inflammatory muscle diseases were included. Whole-body imaging was performed on a 1.5-T MR system using parallel imaging. Examination time was 41:26 min. Coronal and axial T1-weighted and coronal short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences of the whole body were acquired. Images were analysed by two radiologists. With this protocol we could detect characteristic involvement patterns in different myofibrillar myopathies (MFMs): Patients with myotilinopathy showed frequent involvement of the rhomboid muscles (4/5), the erector spinae (5/5), the biceps femoris and the semimembranosus (5/5), while the semitendinosus was relatively spared (2/5). In contrast, in desminopathy patients the ilipsoas (3/4), the sartorius, (3/4), the gracilis (3/4) and the semitendinosus (3/4) were frequently involved, while the semimembranosus was spared (1/4). As shown for MFMs, WB-MRI is an appropriate modality to detect fatty infiltration and oedema in skeletal muscles. WB-MRI could be more useful than dedicated examinations for differential diagnosis, muscle biopsy planning and noninvasive follow-up examinations. (orig.)

  19. Utility of vaginal and rectal contrast medium in MRI for the detection of deep pelvic endometriosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassang, M.; Novellas, S.; Bloch-Marcotte, C.; Chevallier, P. [Hopital Archet 2, Service d' Imagerie Diagnostique et Interventionnelle, Centre Hospitalier Regional et Universitaire de Nice, 151 route de Saint Antoine de Ginestiere, B.P. 3079, Nice Cedex 3 (France); Delotte, J.; Bongain, A. [Hopital Archet 2, Service de Gynecologie-Obstetrique, Centre Hospitalier Regional et Universitaire de Nice, 151 route de Saint Antoine de Ginestiere, B.P. 3079, Nice Cedex 3 (France); Toullalan, O. [Hopital de Cannes, Service de Gynecologie, 15 avenue des Broussailles, B.P. 264, Cannes Cedex (France)

    2010-04-15

    To study the sensitivity of MRI performed utilising vaginal and rectal opacification with ultrasound gel in the detection of deep pelvic endometriosis. This was a prospective monocentric study. All patients evaluated by the gynaecologist for pelvic pain, endometriosis or infertility were included. Axial and sagittal T2-weighted images were performed both with and without vaginal and rectal opacification with ultrasound gel. Three radiologists, all blinded, interpreted the images with a minimum of 15 days between the two readings. MRI performance with and without vaginal and rectal opacification was evaluated by calculating sensitivity, specificity and both positive and negative predictive values. Seventy-eight patients were included. Among these, 31 patients had deep pelvic endometriosis of which 24 were confirmed by laparoscopy. Seventy-six locations of deep pelvic endometriosis were discovered on MRI. For the three reviewers there was a significant improvement in sensitivity between pre- and post-contrast MRI (p < 0.0002). Opacification of the vagina and rectum significantly improved the sensitivity of MRI for the detection of deep pelvic endometriosis by expanding the vagina and rectum, thus allowing better delineation of the pelvic organs. This was especially apparent for lesions localised to the vagina and rectovaginal septum. (orig.)

  20. Serial cranial ultrasonography or early MRI for detecting preterm brain injury?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plaisier, Annemarie; Raets, Marlou M A; Ecury-Goossen, Ginette M; Govaert, Paul; Feijen-Roon, Monique; Reiss, Irwin K M; Smit, Liesbeth S; Lequin, Maarten H; Dudink, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate detection ability and feasibility of serial cranial ultrasonography (CUS) and early MRI in preterm brain injury. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Level III neonatal intensive care unit. PATIENTS: 307 infants, born below 29 weeks of gestation. METHODS: Serial CUS a

  1. Detection and localization of deep endometriosis by means of MRI and correlation with the ENZIAN score

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Paola, V., E-mail: dipaola.valerio@libero.it; Manfredi, R.; Castelli, F.; Negrelli, R.; Mehrabi, S.; Pozzi Mucelli, R.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •The accuracy of MRI for deep endometriosis was 95%. •The agreement between histopathological and MRI ENZIAN score was excellent (k = 0.824). •The highest agreement was for adenomyosis (1.000) and lesions of utero-sacral ligaments (0.890). •MRI ENZIAN score allows to obtain a correct preoperative staging of deep endometriosis. -- Abstract: Purpose: To determine the accuracy of ENZIAN score, as detected on MR imaging, compared to surgical-pathologic findings. Materials and methods: This retrospective study was approved by the investigational review board and the requirement for informed patient consent was waived. 115 patients were included according to following criteria: tubo-ovarian and/or deep endometriosis suspected at physical examination and transvaginal ultrasound; availability of MR examination; histopathological results from laparoscopic or surgical treatment. Exclusion criteria: lack of available MR examination, and/or (b) lack of a definitive histopathological results. Histopathological findings from bioptic specimens obtained during laparoscopic or laparotomic treatment were considered as reference standard. For all detected lesions a score according to ENZIAN score (revised 2010) was assigned both for MRI and histopathological findings. By comparing MRI-ENZIAN score and histopathological-ENZIAN score the overall sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values in relation to presence/absence of deep endometriosis in each patient were calculated. k-Cohen to evaluate the degree of concordance between MRI-ENZIAN score and histopathological-ENZIAN score was also measured. Moreover the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values for each specific localization provided by ENZIAN score were also calculated. Results: At histopathology, the diagnosis of deep endometriosis was confirmed in 82/115 (71.3%) patients. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV of MRI were 94%, 97

  2. Hyperspectral remote sensing techniques for early detection of plant diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krezhova, Dora; Maneva, Svetla; Zdravev, Tomas

    Hyperspectral remote sensing is an emerging, multidisciplinary field with diverse applications in Earth observation. Nowadays spectral remote sensing techniques allow presymptomatic monitoring of changes in the physiological state of plants with high spectral resolution. Hyperspectral leaf reflectance and chlorophyll fluorescence proved to be highly suitable for identification of growth anomalies of cultural plants that result from the environmental changes and different stress factors. Hyperspectral technologies can find place in many scientific areas, as well as for monitoring of plants status and functioning to help in making timely management decisions. This research aimed to detect a presence of viral infection in young pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L.) caused by Cucumber Mosaic Virus (CMV) by using hyperspectral reflectance and fluorescence data and to assess the effect of some growth regulators on the development of the disease. In Bulgaria CMV is one of the widest spread pathogens, causing the biggest economical losses in crop vegetable production. Leaf spectral reflectance and fluorescence data were collected by a portable fibre-optics spectrometer in the spectral ranges 450÷850 nm and 600-900 nm. Greenhouse experiment with pepper plants of two cultivars, Sivria (sensitive to CMV) and Ostrion (resistant to CMV) were used. The plants were divided into six groups. The first group consisted of healthy (control) plants. At growth stage 4-6 expanded leaf, the second group was inoculated with CMV. The other four groups were treated with growth regulators: Spermine, MEIA (beta-monomethyl ester of itaconic acid), ВТН (benzo(1,2,3)thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid-S-methyl ester) and Phytoxin. On the next day, the pepper plants of these four groups were inoculated with CMV. The viral concentrations in the plants were determined by the serological method DAS-ELISA. Statistical, first derivative and cluster analysis were applied and several vegetation indices were

  3. Efficacy of ultrasound elastography in detecting active myositis in children: can it replace MRI?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berko, Netanel S.; Levin, Terry L. [Montefiore Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Bronx, NY (United States); Hay, Arielle [Montefiore Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Rheumatology, Bronx, NY (United States); Miami Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Miami, FL (United States); Sterba, Yonit; Wahezi, Dawn [Montefiore Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Rheumatology, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy is a rare yet potentially debilitating condition. MRI is used both for diagnosis and to assess response to treatment. No study has evaluated the performance of US elastography in the diagnosis of this condition in children. To assess the performance of compression-strain US elastography in detecting active myositis in children with clinically confirmed juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy and to compare its efficacy to MRI. Children with juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy underwent non-contrast MR imaging as well as compression-strain US elastography of the quadriceps muscles. Imaging findings from both modalities were compared to each other as well as to the clinical determination of active disease based on physical examination and laboratory data. Active myositis on MR was defined as increased muscle signal on T2-weighted images. Elastography images were defined as normal or abnormal based on a previously published numerical scale of muscle elastography in normal children. Muscle echogenicity was graded as normal or abnormal based on gray-scale sonographic images. Twenty-one studies were conducted in 18 pediatric patients (15 female, 3 male; age range 3-19 years). Active myositis was present on MRI in ten cases. There was a significant association between abnormal MRI and clinically active disease (P = 0.012). US elastography was abnormal in 4 of 10 cases with abnormal MRI and in 4 of 11 cases with normal MRI. There was no association between abnormal elastography and either MRI (P > 0.999) or clinically active disease (P > 0.999). Muscle echogenicity was normal in 11 patients; all 11 had normal elastography. Of the ten patients with increased muscle echogenicity, eight had abnormal elastography. There was a significant association between muscle echogenicity and US elastography (P < 0.001). The positive and negative predictive values for elastography in the determination of active myositis were 75% and 31

  4. Detection of Sulfatase Enzyme Activity with a CatalyCEST MRI Contrast Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Fernández-Cuervo, Gabriela; Acfalle, Jasmine P; Pagel, Mark D

    2016-05-01

    A chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI contrast agent has been developed that detects sulfatase enzyme activity. The agent produces a CEST signal at δ=5.0 ppm before enzyme activity, and a second CEST signal appears at δ=9.0 ppm after the enzyme cleaves a sulfate group from the agent. The comparison of the two signals improved detection of sulfatase activity.

  5. Enhancing the Detection of BOLD Signal in fMRI by Reducing the Partial Volume Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiping P. Du

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the advantages of reducing the partial volume effect (PVE to enhance the detection of the BOLD signal in fMRI. Methods. A linear phase term was added in k-space to obtain half-voxel shifting of 64 × 64 T2*-weighted echo-planar images. Three sets of image data shifted in the x, y, and diagonal direction, respectively, are combined with the original 64 × 64 data to form the 128 × 128 voxel-shifted interpolated data. Results. A simulation of a synthetic fMRI dataset shows that the voxel-shifted interpolation (VSI can increase the t-score up to 50% in single-voxel activations. An fMRI study (n=7 demonstrates that 20.4% of the interpolated voxels have higher t-scores than their nearest neighboring voxels in the original maps. The average increase of the t-score in these interpolated voxels is 13.3%. Conclusion. VSI yields increased sensitivity in detecting voxel-size BOLD activations, improved spatial accuracy of activated regions, and improved detection of the peak BOLD signal of an activated region. VSI can potentially be used as an alternative to the high-resolution fMRI studies in which reduction in SNR and increase in imaging time become prohibitive.

  6. 7 tesla T2*-weighted MRI as a tool to improve detection of focal cortical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veersema, Tim J; van Eijsden, Pieter; Gosselaar, Peter H; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Zwanenburg, Jaco J M; Spliet, Wim G M; Aronica, Eleonora; Braun, Kees P J; Ferrier, Cyrille H

    2016-09-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia is one of the most common underlying pathologies in patients who undergo surgery for refractory epilepsy. Absence of a MRI-visible lesion necessitates additional diagnostic tests and is a predictor of poor surgical outcome. We describe a series of six patients with refractory epilepsy due to histopathologically-confirmed focal cortical dysplasia, for whom pre-surgical 7 tesla T2*-weighted MRI was acquired. In four of six patients, T2* sequences showed areas of marked superficial hypointensity, co-localizing with the epileptogenic lesion. 7 tesla T2* hypointensities overlying focal cortical dysplasia may represent leptomeningeal venous vascular abnormalities associated with the underlying dysplastic cortex. Adding T2* sequences to the MRI protocol may aid in the detection of focal cortical dysplasias.

  7. Detection of cranial meningiomas: comparison of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT and contrast-enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Giesel, Frederik L.; Haberkorn, Uwe; Haufe, Sabine; Kratochwil, Clemens [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Linhart, Heinz G. [DKFZ, National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany); Combs, Stephanie E. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology and Therapy, Heidelberg (Germany); Podlesek, Dino [University Hospital of Dresden, Department of Neurosurgery, Dresden (Germany); Eisenhut, Michael [DKFZ, Department of Radiopharmacy, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    PET imaging with somatostatin receptor ligands, such as {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC, is a well-established method for detection and target volume definition of meningiomas prior to radiotherapy. Since DOTATOC PET delivers a higher contrast between meningiomas and surrounding tissues than MRI, we conducted a retrospective analysis to compare the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) with {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in patients with cranial meningiomas prior to radiotherapy. Over a period of 6 years, 134 patients (20-82 years of age, 107 women and 27 men) underwent cranial CE-MRI and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT. To compare the two methods, the lesions considered typical of meningiomas visually were counted and analysed with respect to their location and SUVmax. In the 134 patients investigated by both modalities, 190 meningiomas were detected by {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT and 171 by CE-MRI. With knowledge of the PET/CT data, the MRI scans were reinvestigated, which led to the detection of 4 of the 19 incidental meningiomas, resulting in an overall detection rate of 92 % of the meningioma lesions that were found by PET/CT. Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT demonstrated an improved sensitivity in meningioma detection when compared to CE-MRI. Tumours adjacent to the falx cerebri, located at the skull base or obscured by imaging artefacts or calcification are particularly difficult to detect by MRI. Therefore {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT may provide additional information in patients with uncertain or equivocal results on MRI or could help to confirm a diagnosis of meningioma based on MRI or could help to confirm MRI-based diagnosis of meningiomas in cases of biopsy limitations. It is possible that not only radiotherapy and surgical planning, but also follow-up strategies would benefit from this imaging modality. (orig.)

  8. Diffusion-weighted MRI for uveal melanoma liver metastasis detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Mathilde; Petras, Slavomir; Servois, Vincent [Institut Curie, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Mariani, Pascale; Cassoux, Nathalie [Institut Curie, Department of Surgery, Paris (France); Bidard, Francois Clement; Rodrigues, Manuel Jorge; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie [Institut Curie, Department of Medical Oncology, Paris (France); Farkhondeh, Fereshteh [Institut Curie, Department of Pathology, Paris (France)

    2015-08-15

    We aimed to assess the sensitivity of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for the detection of pathologically confirmed uveal melanoma liver metastases (UMLM). Twenty patients who underwent complete surgical resection of their UMLM (N = 83) were included. Pre-surgery liver MR imaging included T2-weighted, T1-weighted, DW and dynamic-gadolinium-enhanced MR sequences. Two radiologists independently reviewed three sets of images (DW / morphologic-dynamic / combined) for each patient using intraoperative and pathological findings as a standard of reference. The sensitivities of the morphologic-dynamic and DW images for UMLM detection were 63 % and 59 %, respectively, for reader 1 (R1) and 64 % and 53 %, for reader 2 (R2). Sensitivity of the combined set was higher than sensitivity in the two other sets (R1:69 %, R2:67 %), but was only significantly different than the sensitivity of the DW images (McNemar test). For the three sets and the two readers, the sensitivity for UMLM smaller than 5 mm (37-46 %) was significantly lower than that for UMLM larger than 5 mm (67-90 %). The sensitivity for UMLM located in the subcapsular area (41-54 %) was significantly lower than that for intraparenchymal UMLM (68-86 %) (Chi-square test). Our study shows that the addition of DW imaging to morphologic-dynamic images does not significantly increase MR sensitivities for UMLM detection. (orig.)

  9. Detection of Spontaneous Schwannomas by MRI in a Transgenic Murine Model of Neurofibromatosis Type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Messerli

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous schwannomas were detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in a transgenic murine model of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 expressing a dominant mutant form of merlin under the Schwann cell-specific PO promoter. Approximately 85% of the investigated mice showed putative tumors by 24 months of age. Specifically, 21% of the mice showed tumors in the intercostal muscles, 14% in the limb muscles, 7% in the spinal cord and spinal ganglia, 7% in the external ear, 14% in the muscle of the abdominal region, and 7% in the intestine; 66% of the female mice had uterine tumors. Multiple tumors were detected by MRI in 21% of mice. The tumors were isointense with muscle by T1-weighted MRI, showed strong enhancement following administration of gadolinium-DTPA, and were markedly hyperintense by T2-weighted MRI, all hallmarks of the clinical manifestation. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry indicated that the tumors consisted of schwannomas and Schwann cell hyperplasias. The lesions stained positively for S-100 protein and a marker antigen for the mutated transgenic NF2 protein, confirming that the imaged tumors and areas of hyperplasia were of Schwann cell origin and expressed the mutated NF2 protein. Tumors were highly infectable with a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 vector, hrR3, which contains the reporter gene, lacZ. The ability to develop schwannoma growth with a noninvasive imaging technique will allow assessment of therapeutic interventions.

  10. A Method of Target Detection in Remote Sensing Image Captured based for Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Jin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A refined energy constrained minimization method is developed for target detection in hyperspectral remote sensing images captured by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs during their surveillance missions, which has been tested in the experiment under this paper. The experiment result proves, in the detection process, this method can effectively restrain noises so far as the spectral characteristics of any potential target are known, and find sub-pixel targets out effectively from the hyperspectral remote sensing image in unknown background spectrum

  11. Robust detection of multiple sclerosis lesions from intensity-normalized multi-channel MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpate, Yogesh; Commowick, Olivier; Barillot, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease with heterogeneous evolution among the patients. Quantitative analysis of longitudinal Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) provides a spatial analysis of the brain tissues which may lead to the discovery of biomarkers of disease evolution. Better understanding of the disease will lead to a better discovery of pathogenic mechanisms, allowing for patient-adapted therapeutic strategies. To characterize MS lesions, we propose a novel paradigm to detect white matter lesions based on a statistical framework. It aims at studying the benefits of using multi-channel MRI to detect statistically significant differences between each individual MS patient and a database of control subjects. This framework consists in two components. First, intensity standardization is conducted to minimize the inter-subject intensity difference arising from variability of the acquisition process and different scanners. The intensity normalization maps parameters obtained using a robust Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) estimation not affected by the presence of MS lesions. The second part studies the comparison of multi-channel MRI of MS patients with respect to an atlas built from the control subjects, thereby allowing us to look for differences in normal appearing white matter, in and around the lesions of each patient. Experimental results demonstrate that our technique accurately detects significant differences in lesions consequently improving the results of MS lesion detection.

  12. Morphometric MRI analysis improves detection of focal cortical dysplasia type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jan; Weber, Bernd; Urbach, Horst; Elger, Christian E; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen

    2011-10-01

    Focal cortical dysplasias type II (FCD II) are highly epileptogenic lesions frequently causing pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Detection of these lesions on MRI is still challenging as FCDs may be very subtle in appearance and might escape conventional visual analysis. Morphometric MRI analysis is a voxel-based post-processing method based on algorithms of the statistical parametric mapping software (SPM5). It creates three dimensional feature maps highlighting brain areas with blurred grey-white matter junction and abnormal gyration, and thereby may help to detect FCD. In this study, we evaluated the potential diagnostic value of morphometric analysis as implemented in a morphometric analysis programme, compared with conventional visual analysis by an experienced neuroradiologist in 91 patients with histologically proven FCD II operated on at the University Hospital of Bonn between 2000 and 2010 (FCD IIa, n = 17; IIb, n = 74). All preoperative MRI scans were evaluated independently (i) based on conventional visual analysis by an experienced neuroradiologist and (ii) using morphometric analysis. Both evaluators had the same clinical information (electroencephalography and semiology), but were blinded to each other's results. The detection rate of FCD using morphometric analysis was superior to conventional visual analysis in the FCD IIa subgroup (82% versus 65%), while no difference was found in the FCD IIb subgroup (92% versus 91%). However, the combination of conventional visual analysis and morphometric analysis provided complementary information and detected 89 out of all 91 FCDs (98%). The combination was significantly superior to conventional visual analysis alone in both subgroups resulting in a higher diagnostic sensitivity (94% versus 65%, P = 0.031 for FCD IIa; 99% versus 91%, P = 0.016 for FCD IIb). In conclusion, the additional application of morphometric MRI analysis increases the diagnostic sensitivity for FCD II in comparison with conventional visual

  13. Can MRI replace DMSA in the detection of renal parenchymal defects in children with urinary tract infections?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavanagh, Eoin C.; Ryan, Stephanie; McCourbrey, Siobhan; O' Connor, Rachel; Donoghue, Veronica [Children' s University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); Awan, Atif [Children' s University Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Dublin (Ireland)

    2005-03-01

    Renal parenchymal defects may be a consequence of urinary tract infections (UTI) in childhood. MRI is a non-radiation imaging modality compared with DMSA scanning. To compare DMSA with MRI for the detection of renal parenchymal defects in children presenting for radiological investigation after a first UTI. Both DMSA and MRI were performed at the same appointment in 37 children (aged 4 months-13 years; mean 4.5 years) with a history of UTI. Both planar and SPECT DMSA were performed. MRI of the kidneys employed axial and coronal T1-, T2- and fat-saturated T1-weighted (T1-W) sequences. Some children had imaging after IV contrast medium. The coronal fat-saturated T1-W sequence was the best sequence and it detected all the findings on MRI. MRI had a sensitivity of 77% and a specificity of 87% for the detection of a scarred kidney using DMSA as the gold standard. MRI diagnosed pyelonephritis in two children that had been interpreted as scarring on DMSA. Renal MRI using a single, coronal, fat-saturated T1-W sequence is a rapid, accurate and minimally invasive technique for the detection of renal scarring that does not employ ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  14. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis bone erosions by 2 different dedicated extremity MRI units and conventional radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer, Anne; Vestergaard, Aage; Døhn, Uffe Møller;

    2008-01-01

    and carpal bones. MagneVu and CR detected 100% and 89%, respectively, of large erosions (OMERACT-RAMRIS-score > 1 on Artoscan) in MCP-joints, and 69% and 15.8% of large erosions in wrists. CONCLUSIONS: Both E-MRI units detected more erosions than CR, particularly due to a higher sensitivity in metacarpal...... heads and carpal bones. The MagneVu detected fewer erosions than the Artoscan, due to a lower average image quality and a smaller proportion of bones being visualized....

  15. Improved detection of event-related functional MRI signals using probability functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagberg, G E; Zito, G; Patria, F; Sanes, J N

    2001-11-01

    Selecting an optimal event distribution for experimental use in event-related fMRI studies can require the generation of large numbers of event sequences with characteristics hard to control. The use of known probability distributions offers the possibility to control event timing and constrain the search space for finding optimal event sequences. We investigated different probability distributions in terms of response estimation (estimation efficiency), detectability (detection power, parameter estimation efficiency, sensitivity to true positives), and false-positive activation. Numerous simulated event sequences were generated selecting interevent intervals (IEI) from the uniform, uniform permuted, Latin square, exponential, binomial, Poisson, chi(2), geometric, and bimodal probability distributions and fixed IEI. Event sequences from the bimodal distribution, like block designs, had the best performance for detection and the poorest for estimation, while high estimation and detectability occurred for the long-decay exponential distribution. The uniform distribution also yielded high estimation efficiency, but probability functions with a long tail toward higher IEI, such as the geometric and the chi(2) distributions, had superior detectability. The distributions with the best detection performance also had a relatively high incidence of false positives, in contrast to the ordered distributions (Latin square and uniform permuted). The predictions of improved sensitivities for distributions with long tails were confirmed with empirical data. Moreover, the Latin square design yielded detection of activated voxels similar to the chi(2) distribution. These results indicate that high detection and suitable behavioral designs have compatibility for application of functional MRI methods to experiments requiring complex designs.

  16. Usefulness of MRI in detecting occult breast cancer associated with Paget's disease of the nipple-areolar complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarria, J J; Lopez-Ruiz, J A; Martin, D; Imaz, I; Martin, M

    2004-12-01

    MRI allows for the detection of mammographically and clinically occult breast neoplasms. We analysed the ability of MRI to detect occult breast cancer in three patients with Paget's disease of the nipple-areolar complex, proven histologically. In all three cases we observed differences in the morphological and dynamic features of healthy and pathological nipples, and we also found enhancement foci in breast tissue, with suspicious kinetic and morphological characteristics, which in the case of two patients corresponded to ductal carcinoma in situ. The detection and location with MRI of underlying neoplastic foci may be of help in choosing the most reasonable and conservative treatment in these patients.

  17. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI improves accuracy for detecting focal splenic involvement in children and adolescents with Hodgkin disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punwani, Shonit; Taylor, Stuart A.; Halligan, Steve [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); University College London Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Cheung, King Kenneth; Skipper, Nicholas [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Bell, Nichola; Humphries, Paul D. [University College London Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Bainbridge, Alan [University College London, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, London (United Kingdom); Groves, Ashley M.; Hain, Sharon F.; Ben-Haim, Simona [University College Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Shankar, Ananth; Daw, Stephen [University College London Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, London (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-15

    Accurate assessment of splenic disease is important for staging Hodgkin lymphoma. The purpose of this study was to assess T2-weighted imaging with and without dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI for evaluation of splenic Hodgkin disease. Thirty-one children with Hodgkin lymphoma underwent whole-body T2-weighted MRI with supplementary DCE splenic imaging, and whole-body PET-CT before and following chemotherapy. Two experienced nuclear medicine physicians derived a PET-CT reference standard for splenic disease, augmented by follow-up imaging. Unaware of the PET-CT, two experienced radiologists independently evaluated MRI exercising a locked sequential read paradigm (T2-weighted then DCE review) and recorded the presence/absence of splenic disease at each stage. Performance of each radiologist was determined prior to and following review of DCE-MRI. Incorrect MRI findings were ascribed to reader (lesion present on MRI but missed by reader) or technical (lesion not present on MRI) error. Seven children had splenic disease. Sensitivity/specificity of both radiologists for the detection of splenic involvement using T2-weighted images alone was 57%/100% and increased to 100%/100% with DCE-MRI. There were three instances of technical error on T2-weighted imaging; all lesions were visible on DCE-MRI. T2-weighted imaging when complemented by DCE-MRI imaging may improve evaluation of Hodgkin disease splenic involvement. (orig.)

  18. Detection of electroporation-induced membrane permeabilization states in the brain using diffusion-weighted MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood, Faisal; Hansen, Rasmus H; Agerholm-Larsen, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    (DW-MRI) as a quantitative method for detecting EP-induced membrane permeabilization of brain tissue using a rat brain model. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty-four anesthetized Sprague-Dawley male rats were electroporated in the right hemisphere, using different voltage levels to induce no permeabilization......-induced permeabilization of brain tissue and to some extent of differentiating NP, TMP and PMP using appropriate scan timing....

  19. Intra-articular membranous interposition detected by MRI in developmental dysplasia of the hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, W.; Itoi, Eiji; Sato, Kozo [Akita Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery

    2000-12-01

    Intra-articular membranous interposition was detected by MRI in the hip joint with residual subluxation of a girl aged 5 years 10 months. This structure, which had low signal intensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images, separated the femoral head from the acetabulum. Histological examination revealed chondrometaplasia, which suggested that this interposition might be transformed to a surface cartilaginous tissue of the secondary acetabulum often observed in residual subluxation of the hip. (orig.)

  20. INTERACTIVE CHANGE DETECTION USING HIGH RESOLUTION REMOTE SENSING IMAGES BASED ON ACTIVE LEARNING WITH GAUSSIAN PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ru

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Although there have been many studies for change detection, the effective and efficient use of high resolution remote sensing images is still a problem. Conventional supervised methods need lots of annotations to classify the land cover categories and detect their changes. Besides, the training set in supervised methods often has lots of redundant samples without any essential information. In this study, we present a method for interactive change detection using high resolution remote sensing images with active learning to overcome the shortages of existing remote sensing image change detection techniques. In our method, there is no annotation of actual land cover category at the beginning. First, we find a certain number of the most representative objects in unsupervised way. Then, we can detect the change areas from multi-temporal high resolution remote sensing images by active learning with Gaussian processes in an interactive way gradually until the detection results do not change notably. The artificial labelling can be reduced substantially, and a desirable detection result can be obtained in a few iterations. The experiments on Geo-Eye1 and WorldView2 remote sensing images demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed method.

  1. [A method of object detection for remote sensing-imagery based on spectral space transformation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gui-Ping; Xiao, Peng-Feng; Feng, Xue-Zhi; Wang, Ke

    2013-03-01

    Object detection is an intermediate link for remote sensing image processing, which is an important guarantee of remote sensing application and services aspects. In view of the characteristics of remotely sensed imagery in frequency domain, a novel object detection algorithm based on spectral space transformation was proposed in the present paper. Firstly, the Fourier transformation method was applied to transform the image in spatial domain into frequency domain. Secondly, the wedge-shaped sample and overlay analysis methods for frequency energy were used to decompose signal into different frequency spectrum zones, and the center frequency values of object's features were acquired as detection marks in frequency domain. Finally, object information was detected with the matched Gabor filters which have direction and frequency selectivity. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm here performs better and it has good detection capability in specific direction as well.

  2. Crop stress detection and classification using hyperspectral remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irby, Jon Trenton

    Agricultural production has observed many changes in technology over the last 20 years. Producers are able to utilize technologies such as site-specific applicators and remotely sensed data to assist with decision making for best management practices which can improve crop production and provide protection to the environment. It is known that plant stress can interfere with photosynthetic reactions within the plant and/or the physical structure of the plant. Common types of stress associated with agricultural crops include herbicide induced stress, nutrient stress, and drought stress from lack of water. Herbicide induced crop stress is not a new problem. However, with increased acreage being planting in varieties/hybrids that contain herbicide resistant traits, herbicide injury to non-target crops will continue to be problematic for producers. With rapid adoption of herbicide-tolerant cropping systems, it is likely that herbicide induced stress will continue to be a major concern. To date, commercially available herbicide-tolerant varieties/hybrids contain traits which allow herbicides like glyphosate and glufosinate-ammonium to be applied as a broadcast application during the growing season. Both glyphosate and glufosinate-ammonium are broad spectrum herbicides which have activity on a large number of plant species, including major crops like non-transgenic soybean, corn, and cotton. Therefore, it is possible for crop stress from herbicide applications to occur in neighboring fields that contain susceptible crop varieties/hybrids. Nutrient and moisture stress as well as stress caused by herbicide applications can interact to influence yields in agricultural fields. If remotely sensed data can be used to accurately identify specific levels of crop stress, it is possible that producers can use this information to better assist them in crop management to maximize yields and protect their investments. This research was conducted to evaluate classification of specific

  3. Limited role of gadolinium to detect active sacroiliitis on MRI in juvenile spondyloarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herregods, N.; Leus, A.; Verstraete, K.; Jans, L. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Ghent (Belgium); Jaremko, J.L. [University of Alberta Hospital, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Baraliakos, X. [Ruhr-University Bochum, Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Herne (Germany); Dehoorne, J. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-11-15

    The aim of this study is to determine the added diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced (CE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared to routine non contrast-enhanced MRI to detect active sacroiliitis in clinically juvenile spondyloarthritis (JSpA). A total of 80 children clinically suspected for sacroiliitis prospectively underwent MRI of the sacroiliac (SI) joints. Axial and coronal T1-weighted (T1), Short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) and fat-saturated T1-weighted gadolinium-DTPA (Gd) contrast-enhanced (T1/Gd) sequences were obtained. The presence of bone marrow edema (BME), capsulitis, enthesitis, high intra-articular STIR signal, synovial enhancement and a global diagnostic impression of the MRI for diagnosis of sacroiliitis was recorded. STIR and T1/Gd sequences had 100 % agreement for depiction of BME, capsulitis and enthesitis. High intra-articular STIR signal was seen in 18/80 (22.5 %) patients, 15 (83 %) of whom also showed synovial enhancement in the T1/Gd sequence. Sensitivity (SN) and specificity (SP) for a clinical diagnosis of JSpA were similar for high STIR signal (SN = 33 %, SP = 85 %) and T1/Gd synovial enhancement (SN = 36 %, SP = 92 %). Positive likelihood ratio (LR+) for JSpA was twice as high for synovial enhancement than high STIR signal (4.5 compared to 2.2). Global diagnostic impression was similar (STIR: SN = 55 %, SP = 87 %, LR + =4.2; T1/Gd: SN = 55 %, SP = 92 %, LR + = 6.9). MRI without contrast administration is sufficient to identify bone marrow edema, capsulitis and retroarticular enthesitis as features of active sacroiliitis in juvenile spondyloarthritis. In selected cases when high STIR signal in the joint is the only finding, gadolinium-enhanced images may help to confirm the presence of synovitis. (orig.)

  4. Progress on detection of liquid explosives using ultra-low field MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, Michelle A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Matlashov, Andrei N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Volegov, Petr L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schuttz, Larry M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baguisa, Shermiyah [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dunkerley, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Magnelind, Per [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Owens, Tuba [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandin, Henrik [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Urbaitis, Algis [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods are widely used in medicine, chemistry and industry. Over the past several years there has been increasing interest in performing NMR and MRI in the ultra-low field (ULF) regime, with measurement field strengths of 10-100 microTesla and pre-polarization fields of 30-50 mTesla. The real-time signal-to-noise ratio for such measurements is about 100. Our group at LANL has built and demonstrated the performance of SQUID-based ULF NMR/MRI instrumentation for classification of materials and detection of liquid explosives via their relaxation properties measured at ULF, using T{sub 1}, and T{sub 2}, and T{sub 1} frequency dispersion. We are also beginning to investigate the performance of induction coils as sensors. Here we present recent progress on the applications of ULF MR to the detection of liquid explosives, in imaging and relaxometry.

  5. Incremental Activation Detection for Real-Time fMRI Series Using Robust Kalman Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI is a technique that enables us to observe human brain activations in real time. However, some unexpected noises that emerged in fMRI data collecting, such as acute swallowing, head moving and human manipulations, will cause much confusion and unrobustness for the activation analysis. In this paper, a new activation detection method for rt-fMRI data is proposed based on robust Kalman filter. The idea is to add a variation to the extended kalman filter to handle the additional sparse measurement noise and a sparse noise term to the measurement update step. Hence, the robust Kalman filter is designed to improve the robustness for the outliers and can be computed separately for each voxel. The algorithm can compute activation maps on each scan within a repetition time, which meets the requirement for real-time analysis. Experimental results show that this new algorithm can bring out high performance in robustness and in real-time activation detection.

  6. Incremental activation detection for real-time fMRI series using robust Kalman filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Yan, Bin; Tong, Li; Wang, Linyuan; Li, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) is a technique that enables us to observe human brain activations in real time. However, some unexpected noises that emerged in fMRI data collecting, such as acute swallowing, head moving and human manipulations, will cause much confusion and unrobustness for the activation analysis. In this paper, a new activation detection method for rt-fMRI data is proposed based on robust Kalman filter. The idea is to add a variation to the extended kalman filter to handle the additional sparse measurement noise and a sparse noise term to the measurement update step. Hence, the robust Kalman filter is designed to improve the robustness for the outliers and can be computed separately for each voxel. The algorithm can compute activation maps on each scan within a repetition time, which meets the requirement for real-time analysis. Experimental results show that this new algorithm can bring out high performance in robustness and in real-time activation detection.

  7. A Tumor-Targeted Nanodelivery System to Improve Early MRI Detection of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen F. Pirollo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of improvements in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI that would enhance sensitivity, leading to earlier detection of cancer and visualization of metastatic disease, is an area of intense exploration. We have devised a tumor-targeting, liposomal nanodelivery platform for use in gene medicine. This systemically administered nanocomplex has been shown to specifically and efficiently deliver both genes and oligonucleotides to primary and metastatic tumor cells, resulting in significant tumor growth inhibition and even tumor regression. Here we examine the effect on MRI of incorporating conventional MRI contrast agent Magnevist® into our anti-transferrin receptor single-chain antibody (TfRscFv liposomal complex. Both in vitro and in an in vivo orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer, we show increased resolution and image intensity with the complexed Magnevist®. Using advanced microscopy techniques (scanning electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy, we also established that the Magnevist® is in fact encapsulated by the liposome in the complex and that the complex still retains its nanodimensional size. These results demonstrate that this TfRscFv-liposome-Magnevist® nanocomplex has the potential to become a useful tool in early cancer detection.

  8. Modeling Chemical Detection Sensitivities of Active and Passive Remote Sensing Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharlemann, E T

    2003-07-28

    During nearly a decade of remote sensing programs under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), LLNL has developed a set of performance modeling codes--called APRS--for both Active and Passive Remote Sensing systems. These codes emphasize chemical detection sensitivity in the form of minimum detectable quantities with and without background spectral clutter and in the possible presence of other interfering chemicals. The codes have been benchmarked against data acquired in both active and passive remote sensing programs at LLNL and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The codes include, as an integral part of the performance modeling, many of the data analysis techniques developed in the DOE's active and passive remote sensing programs (e.g., ''band normalization'' for an active system, principal component analysis for a passive system).

  9. A Summary of Change Detection Technology of Remotely-Sensed Image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Shilun

    2013-01-01

      ABSRACT:This paper will describe three aspects of change detection technology of remotely-sensed images. At first, the process of change detection is presented. Then, the author makes a summary of several common change detection methods and a brief review of the advantages and disadvantages of them. At the end of this paper, the applications and difficulty of current change detection techniques are discussed.

  10. MRI for the detection of anorectal fistulas; MRT in der Diagnostik anorektaler Fisteln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, A.O.; Baumann, T.; Langer, M. [Abt. Roentgendiagnostik, Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany)

    2006-11-15

    MRI is accepted as one of the major diagnostic tools for the detection of anorectal fistulas and abscesses. Noninvasiveness and high accuracy are advantageous hallmarks of this technique. In general, the purpose of imaging anal fistulas is to reduce the risk of recurrence, incontinence and non-healing. To achieve these goals, the applied method must provide the proctologist with detailed information. In this context, MRI acts as a guide for surgeons to accurately plan fistula operations. Another aspect is the follow-up of conservatively treated patients with fistulizing Crohn's disease. In 2000, subtraction MR fistulography was introduced as new imaging technique. This review provides an overview of the entire spectrum of diagnostic modalities for anorectal fistulas with emphasis on subtraction MR fistulography. (orig.)

  11. Frequency Modulation Spectroscopy Modeling for Remote Chemical Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheen, David M.

    2000-09-30

    Frequency modulation (FM) spectroscopy techniques show promise for active infrared remote chemical sensing. FM spectroscopy techniques have reduced sensitivity to optical and electronic noise, and are relatively immune to the effects of various electronic and mechanical drifts. FM systems are responsive to sharp spectral features and can therefore reduce the effects of spectral clutter due to interfering chemicals in the plume or in the atmosphere. The relatively high modulation frequencies used for FM also reduces the effects of albedo (reflectance) and plume variations. Conventional differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems are performance limited by the noise induced by speckle. Analysis presented in this report shows that FM based sensors may reduce the effects of speckle by one to two orders of magnitude. This can result in reduced dwell times and faster area searches, as well as reducing various forms of spatial clutter. FM systems will require a laser system that is continuously tunable at relatively high frequencies (0.1 to 20 MHz). One promising candidate is the quantum-cascade (QC) laser [1, 2]. The QC laser is potentially capable of power levels on the order of 1 Watt and frequency tuning on the order of 3 - 6 GHz, which is the performance level required for FM spectroscopy based remote sensing. In this report we describe a high-level numerical model for an FM spectroscopy based remote sensing system, and application to two unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV) scenarios. A Predator scenario operating at a slant range of 6.5 km with a 10 cm diameter telescope, and a Global Hawk scenario operating at a range of 30 km with a 20 cm diameter telescope, has been assumed to allow estimation of the performance of potential FM systems.

  12. Shoreline change detection from Karwar to Gokarna - South West coast of India using remotely Sensed data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Choudhary, R.; Gowthaman, R.; SanilKumar, V.

    -494 #02060313 Copyright ©2013 CAFET-INNOVA TECHNICAL SOCIETY. All rights reserved. Shoreline change detection from Karwar to Gokarna - South West coast of India using remotely Sensed data RICHA CHOUDHARY 1 , R. GOWTHAMAN 2 AND V. SANIL KUMAR 2 1... years period. Gangavali river mouth has narrowed due to siltation. Significant changes in the geomorphic features like spit growth, braided island, creeks, tidal flat are observed near Kali and Gangavali river mouth. Keywords: Remote sensing...

  13. Building Multiclass Classifiers for Remote Homology Detection and Fold Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-05

    NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS...are thoroughly evaluated for both remote homology prediction and fold recognition using four differ- ent datasets derived from Astral [5]. Our...function may not be the most appropriate as it may lead to models where 5 Table 1: Dataset Statistics. Statistic DS1 DS2 DS3 DS4 ASTRAL filtering 90% 40% 25

  14. Remote visual detection of impacts on the lunar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melosh, H. Jay; Artemjeva, N. A.; Golub, A. P.; Nemchinov, I. V.; Shuvalov, V. V.; Trubetskaya, I. A.

    1993-01-01

    We propose a novel method of remotely observing impacts on the airless Moon that may extend the present data base on meteoroids down to 1 m in diameter. Meteorites or comets of radius approximately 1-100 m are burnt away or dispersed in the atmospheres of the Earth and Venus. However, when such objects strike the Moon they deposit their energy in a small initial volume, forming a plasma plume whose visible and infrared radiation may be visible from the Earth. We consider impacts of model SiO2 projectiles on the surface of an SiO2 model Moon.

  15. Presumptive subarticular stress reactions of the knee: MRI detection and association with meniscal tear patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Lawrence [Diagnostic Radiology Department, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, Room 1C640, 10 Center Drive, MSC 1182, MD 20892-1182, Bethesda (United States); Stanczak, Jeffrey [Fairfax Radiological Consultants, PC, 2722 Merrilee Drive, Suite 230, VA 22031, Fairfax (United States); Boutin, Robert D. [MedTel International, 1430 Spring Hill Road, State 500, VA 22102, Mclean (United States)

    2004-05-01

    MRI detects subchondral marrow findings in painful knees which bear resemblance to spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SONK). Gathering evidence suggests that the primary or predominant pathogenesis of these lesions is physical stress. This study analyzes the patient characteristics and meniscal pathology associated with these lesions - herein referred to as ''presumptive subarticular stress related'' (PSSR) lesions. All patients were scanned using a standardized imaging protocol. The criterion for a PSSR lesion was a subchondral marrow edema pattern encompassing a more focal, low-signal zone adjacent to or contiguous with the subchondral cortex. Patients were identified using an electronic database search of cases reported by one experienced musculoskeletal radiologist. Twenty-five PSSR lesions were identified among 1,948 MRI evaluations of the knee. Twenty-one PSSR lesions occurred in the medial compartment, and four occurred in the lateral compartment. There was no sex predilection. Patients with PSSR lesions were older than other patients undergoing MRI evaluation (mean 66 years versus 52 years, P<0.001). Meniscal tears occurred more commonly in cases with PSSR lesions than in the group as a whole (76% versus 45%, P<0.001). Radial and posterior root tears were more common in knees with PSSR lesions than in other knees with meniscal tears (53% versus 26%, P<0.01). PSSR lesions are associated with meniscal tears and, more specifically, with meniscal tear patterns that dramatically increase contact forces across the knee joint. This observation supports the hypothesis that mechanical stress is important in the pathogenesis of these subarticular lesions that are detected by MRI. (orig.)

  16. A practical MRI technique for detecting Abdominal Aorta Aneurism and Peripheral Arterial Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aykut Aktas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Peripheral Arterial Disease(PAD and abdominal aorta aneurysm(AAA are frequent problems in geriatric population. In DSA, CTA or MRA techniques contrast agents has to be used for diagnosis that can be nephrotoxic for elderly patients. Magnetic resonans imaging (MRI is the most powerful, non-ionising radiological diagnostic tool that has the highest soft tissue contrast resolution. The aim of our study was to investigate the effectivity of MRI by the means of detecting the AAA and PAD in comparison with DSA. Material and Method: After getting ethical commitee approvel and informed consent, we have performed Balanced turbo field echo(B-TFE MRI technique without contrast agent in 1.5 Tesla MRI device before DSA examination. The luminal diameters of renal arteries, infrarenal abdominal aorta, iliac and femoral arteries was measured by using Philips DICOM Viewer R2.2 application. The intraclass corelation coefficient and reliability used to check if the techniques could be used for each other and the t-test was used to measure the differences between them. Results: There has been a high relationship between B-TFE and DSA in detecting the pathologies of larger arteries like aorta. In the case of small arterial pathologies, there is relatively lower relationship between BTFE and DSA. Discussion: For the diagnosis of AAA and PAD, DSA is the gold standart technique but it is invasive and patients have radiation exposure. In the follow up of geriatric patients with larger arterial pathologies B-TFE can be used instead of contrast enhanced MRA and invasive DSA.

  17. Detection of epileptogenic cortical malformations with surface-based MRI morphometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Thesen

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging has revolutionized the detection of structural abnormalities in patients with epilepsy. However, many focal abnormalities remain undetected in routine visual inspection. Here we use an automated, surface-based method for quantifying morphometric features related to epileptogenic cortical malformations to detect abnormal cortical thickness and blurred gray-white matter boundaries. Using MRI morphometry at 3T with surface-based spherical averaging techniques that precisely align anatomical structures between individual brains, we compared single patients with known lesions to a large normal control group to detect clusters of abnormal cortical thickness, gray-white matter contrast, local gyrification, sulcal depth, jacobian distance and curvature. To assess the effects of threshold and smoothing on detection sensitivity and specificity, we systematically varied these parameters with different thresholds and smoothing levels. To test the effectiveness of the technique to detect lesions of epileptogenic character, we compared the detected structural abnormalities to expert-tracings, intracranial EEG, pathology and surgical outcome in a homogeneous patient sample. With optimal parameters and by combining thickness and GWC, the surface-based detection method identified 92% of cortical lesions (sensitivity with few false positives (96% specificity, successfully discriminating patients from controls 94% of the time. The detected structural abnormalities were related to the seizure onset zones, abnormal histology and positive outcome in all surgical patients. However, the method failed to adequately describe lesion extent in most cases. Automated surface-based MRI morphometry, if used with optimized parameters, may be a valuable additional clinical tool to improve the detection of subtle or previously occult malformations and therefore could improve identification of patients with intractable focal epilepsy who may benefit from

  18. Detection and quantification of regional cortical gray matter damage in multiple sclerosis utilizing gradient echo MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cortical gray matter (GM damage is now widely recognized in multiple sclerosis (MS. The standard MRI does not reliably detect cortical GM lesions, although cortical volume loss can be measured. In this study, we demonstrate that the gradient echo MRI can reliably and quantitatively assess cortical GM damage in MS patients using standard clinical scanners. High resolution multi-gradient echo MRI was used for regional mapping of tissue-specific MRI signal transverse relaxation rate values (R2* in 10 each relapsing–remitting, primary-progressive and secondary-progressive MS subjects. A voxel spread function method was used to correct artifacts induced by background field gradients. R2* values from healthy controls (HCs of varying ages were obtained to establish baseline data and calculate ΔR2* values – age-adjusted differences between MS patients and HC. Thickness of cortical regions was also measured in all subjects. In cortical regions, ΔR2* values of MS patients were also adjusted for changes in cortical thickness. Symbol digit modalities (SDMT and paced auditory serial addition (PASAT neurocognitive tests, as well as Expanded Disability Status Score, 25-foot timed walk and nine-hole peg test results were also obtained on all MS subjects. We found that ΔR2* values were lower in multiple cortical GM and normal appearing white matter (NAWM regions in MS compared with HC. ΔR2* values of global cortical GM and several specific cortical regions showed significant (p < 0.05 correlations with SDMT and PASAT scores, and showed better correlations than volumetric measures of the same regions. Neurological tests not focused on cognition (Expanded Disability Status Score, 25-foot timed walk and nine-hole peg tests showed no correlation with cortical GM ΔR2* values. The technique presented here is robust and reproducible. It requires less than 10 min and can be implemented on any MRI scanner. Our results show that quantitative tissue-specific R2

  19. Computer-aided detection in breast MRI: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorrius, Monique D.; Weide, Marijke C.J. der; Ooijen, Peter M.A. van; Pijnappel, Ruud M.; Oudkerk, Matthijs [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiology, Center for Medical Imaging, Hanzeplein 1, PO box 30.001, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-08-15

    To evaluate the additional value of computer-aided detection (CAD) in breast MRI by assessing radiologists' accuracy in discriminating benign from malignant breast lesions. A literature search was performed with inclusion of relevant studies using a commercially available CAD system with automatic colour mapping. Two independent researchers assessed the quality of the studies. The accuracy of the radiologists' performance with and without CAD was presented as pooled sensitivity and specificity. Of 587 articles, 10 met the inclusion criteria, all of good methodological quality. Experienced radiologists reached comparable pooled sensitivity and specificity before and after using CAD (sensitivity: without CAD: 89%; 95% CI: 78-94%, with CAD: 89%; 95%CI: 81-94%) (specificity: without CAD: 86%; 95% CI: 79-91%, with CAD: 82%; 95% CI: 76-87%). For residents the pooled sensitivity increased from 72% (95% CI: 62-81%) without CAD to 89% (95% CI: 80-94%) with CAD, however, not significantly. Concerning specificity, the results were similar (without CAD: 79%; 95% CI: 69-86%, with CAD: 78%; 95% CI: 69-84%). CAD in breast MRI has little influence on the sensitivity and specificity of experienced radiologists and therefore their interpretation remains essential. However, residents or inexperienced radiologists seem to benefit from CAD concerning breast MRI evaluation. (orig.)

  20. Nanoparticle Enhanced MRI Scanning to Detect Cellular Inflammation in Experimental Chronic Renal Allograft Rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Alam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. We investigated whether ultrasmall paramagnetic particles of iron oxide- (USPIO- enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can detect experimental chronic allograft damage in a murine renal allograft model. Materials and Methods. Two cohorts of mice underwent renal transplantation with either a syngeneic isograft or allograft kidney. MRI scanning was performed prior to and 48 hours after USPIO infusion using T2∗-weighted protocols. R2∗ values were calculated to indicate the degree of USPIO uptake. Native kidneys and skeletal muscle were imaged as reference tissues and renal explants analysed by histology and electron microscopy. Results. R2∗ values in the allograft group were higher compared to the isograft group when indexed to native kidney (median 1.24 (interquartile range: 1.12 to 1.36 versus 0.96 (0.92 to 1.04, P<0.01. R2∗ values were also higher in the allograft transplant when indexed to skeletal muscle (6.24 (5.63 to 13.51 compared to native kidney (2.91 (1.11 to 6.46 P<0.05. Increased R2∗ signal in kidney allograft was associated with macrophage and iron staining on histology. USPIO were identified within tissue resident macrophages on electron microscopy. Conclusion. USPIO-enhanced MRI identifies macrophage.

  1. Colorimetric detection of hazardous gases using a remotely operated capturing and processing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes-Robles, Roberto; Moragues, María Esperanza; Vivancos, José-Luis; Ibáñez, Javier; Fraile, Rubén; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón; García-Breijo, Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an electronic system for the automatic detection of hazardous gases. The proposed system implements colorimetric sensing algorithms, thus providing a low-cost solution to the problem of gas sensing. It is remotely operated and it performs the tasks of image capturing and processing, hence obtaining colour measurements in RGB (Red-Green-Blue) space that are subsequently sent to a remote operator via the internet. A prototype of the system has been built to test its performance. Specifically, experiments have been carried out aimed at the detection of CO, CO2, NO, NO2, SO2 and formaldehyde at diverse concentrations by using a chromogenic array composed by 13 active and 2 inert compounds. Statistical analyses of the results reveal a good performance of the electronic system and the feasibility of remote hazardous gas detection using colorimetric sensor arrays.

  2. Regularisation in multi- and hyperspectral remote sensing change detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2005-01-01

    Change detection methods for multi- and hypervariate data look for differences in data acquired over the same area at different points in time. These differences may be due to noise or differences in (atmospheric etc.) conditions at the two acquisition time points. To prevent a change detection m...

  3. Detection of Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaques in Experimental Atherosclerosis with the USPIO-Enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Chun-Mei; Du, Lili; Wu, Wei-Heng; Li, Dong-Ye; Hao, Ji; Gong, Lei; Deng, Liangrong; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Yu

    2015-11-01

    This study's goal was to assess the diagnostic value of the USPIO-(ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detection of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques in abdominal aorta in experimental atherosclerosis. Thirty New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into two groups, Group A and Group B. Each group comprised 15 animals which were fed with high cholesterol diet for 8 weeks and then subjected to balloon-induced endothelial injury of the abdominal aorta. After another 8 weeks, animals in Group B received adenovirus carrying p53 gene that was injected through a catheter into the aortic segments rich in plaques. Two weeks later, all rabbits were challenged with the injection of Chinese Russell's viper venom and histamine. Pre-contrast images and USPIO-enhanced MRI images were obtained after pharmacological triggering with injection of USPIO for 5 days. Blood specimens were taken for biochemical and serological tests at 0 and 18 weeks. Abdominal aorta was histologically studied. The levels of serum ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 were quantified by ELISA. Vulnerable plaques appeared as a local hypo-intense signal on the USPIO-enhanced MRI, especially on T2*-weighted sequences. The signal strength of plaques reached the peak at 96 h. Lipid levels were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in both Group A and B compared with the levels before the high cholesterol diet. The ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 levels were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in Group B compared with Group A. The USPIO-enhanced MRI efficiently identifies vulnerable plaques due to accumulation of USPIO within macrophages in abdominal aorta plaques.

  4. Combined gadoxetic acid and gadofosveset enhanced liver MRI for detection and characterization of liver metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannas, Peter [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Hamburg (Germany); Bookwalter, Candice A.; Ziemlewicz, Tim; Munoz del Rio, Alejandro; Potretzke, Theodora A. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Motosugi, Utaroh [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Yamanashi, Department of Radiology, Yamanashi (Japan); Nagle, Scott K. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Pediatrics, Madison, WI (United States); Reeder, Scott B. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Medicine, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Emergency Medicine, Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-01-15

    To compare gadoxetic acid alone and combined gadoxetic acid/gadofosveset trisodium-enhanced liver MRI for detection of metastases and differentiation of metastases from haemangiomas. Ninety-one patients underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI before and after additional injection of gadofosveset. First, two readers retrospectively identified metastases on gadoxetic acid alone enhanced delayed hepatobiliary phase T1-weighted images together with all other MR images (dynamic images, T2-weighted images, diffusion-weighted images). Second, readers assessed additional T1-weighted images obtained after administration of gadofosveset trisodium. For both interpretations, readers rated lesion conspicuity and confidence in differentiating metastases from haemangiomas. Results were compared using alternative free-response receiver-operating characteristic (AFROC) and conventional ROC methods. Histology and follow-up served as reference standard. There were 145 metastases and 16 haemangiomas. Both readers detected more metastases using combined gadoxetic acid/gadofosveset (reader 1 = 130; reader 2 = 124) compared to gadoxetic acid alone (reader 1 = 104; reader 2 = 103). Sensitivity of combined gadoxetic acid/gadofosveset (reader 1 = 90 %; reader 2 = 86 %) was higher than that of gadoxetic acid alone (reader 1 = 72 %; reader 2 = 71 %, both P < 0.01). AFROC-AUC was higher for the combined technique (0.92 vs. 0.86, P < 0.001). Sensitivity for correct differentiation of metastases from haemangiomas was higher for the combined technique (reader 1 = 98 %; reader 2 = 99 % vs. reader 1 = 86 %; reader 2 = 91 %, both P < 0.01). ROC-AUC was significantly higher for the combined technique (reader 1 = 1.00; reader 2 = 1.00 vs. reader 1 = 0.87; reader 2 = 0.92, both P < 0.01). Combined gadoxetic acid/gadofosveset-enhanced MRI improves detection and characterization of liver metastases compared to gadoxetic acid alone. (orig.)

  5. Comparison of MRI and PET-CT in detecting the loco-regional recurrence of soft tissue sarcomas during surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sun-Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Department of Radiology, Anyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hye Won [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chae, Sun Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong-Seok [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of MRI and PET-CT for the detection of loco-regional recurrences after soft tissue sarcoma (STS) excision. From Dec 2003 to Aug 2014, 394 patients with STSs, who were included in the electronic patient registry for initial or repeated surgery at our hospital, were retrospectively reviewed. We identified 152 patients who underwent regular postoperative follow-ups with both MRI and PET-CT, obtained within a 3 month period of each other. We analyzed differences in the performance of MRI and PET-CT for the diagnosis of loco-regional recurrences using McNemar's test. The receiver-operating characteristic curves and calculations of the area under the curve were used. Twenty patients were found to have a loco-regional recurrence after tumor excision. For MRI and PET-CT, the sensitivities were 90.0 and 95.0 %, and the specificities 97.7 and 95.5 %, respectively, with positive predictive values of 85.7 and 76.0 % and negative predictive values of 98.5 and 99.2 %, respectively. No significant difference was detected between the sensitivities of MRI and PET-CT (p = 0.125). The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve for PET-CT (0.952) was not significantly greater than that for MRI (0.939; p = 0.6). MRI of the area of interest is recommended for evaluation of tumor recurrence after surgical excision of STS. PET-CT was shown to be effective for detection of STS recurrence, and comparable to MRI. However, if PET-CT or MRI findings are inconclusive, the other modality may be helpful in differentiating tumor recurrence from post-therapeutic tissue change. (orig.)

  6. Remote sensing techniques for the detection of soil erosion and the identification of soil conservation practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, R. E.; Griffin, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The following paper is a summary of a number of techniques initiated under the AgRISTARS (Agriculture and Resources Inventory Surveys Through Aerospace Remote Sensing) project for the detection of soil degradation caused by water erosion and the identification of soil conservation practices for resource inventories. Discussed are methods to utilize a geographic information system to determine potential soil erosion through a USLE (Universal Soil Loss Equation) model; application of the Kauth-Thomas Transform to detect present erosional status; and the identification of conservation practices through visual interpretation and a variety of enhancement procedures applied to digital remotely sensed data.

  7. Mobile Passive Optical Imager for Remote Gas Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Tunable filters based on electro-optic effect have shown great potential in detecting gas concentration through obtaining its absorption spectrum. In filter-based...

  8. Columbia - Invasive Species Detection from Remote and Groundbased Mapping

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Columbia NWR has a number of invasive plants that have gone untreated due to lack of staff for detection and mapping. Volunteers can be used to map some areas where...

  9. A Novel GBM Saliency Detection Model Using Multi-Channel MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhashis Banerjee

    Full Text Available The automatic computerized detection of regions of interest (ROI is an important step in the process of medical image processing and analysis. The reasons are many, and include an increasing amount of available medical imaging data, existence of inter-observer and inter-scanner variability, and to improve the accuracy in automatic detection in order to assist doctors in diagnosing faster and on time. A novel algorithm, based on visual saliency, is developed here for the identification of tumor regions from MR images of the brain. The GBM saliency detection model is designed by taking cue from the concept of visual saliency in natural scenes. A visually salient region is typically rare in an image, and contains highly discriminating information, with attention getting immediately focused upon it. Although color is typically considered as the most important feature in a bottom-up saliency detection model, we circumvent this issue in the inherently gray scale MR framework. We develop a novel pseudo-coloring scheme, based on the three MRI sequences, viz. FLAIR, T2 and T1C (contrast enhanced with Gadolinium. A bottom-up strategy, based on a new pseudo-color distance and spatial distance between image patches, is defined for highlighting the salient regions in the image. This multi-channel representation of the image and saliency detection model help in automatically and quickly isolating the tumor region, for subsequent delineation, as is necessary in medical diagnosis. The effectiveness of the proposed model is evaluated on MRI of 80 subjects from the BRATS database in terms of the saliency map values. Using ground truth of the tumor regions for both high- and low- grade gliomas, the results are compared with four highly referred saliency detection models from literature. In all cases the AUC scores from the ROC analysis are found to be more than 0.999 ± 0.001 over different tumor grades, sizes and positions.

  10. Feature analysis for detecting people from remotely sensed images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirmacek, Beril; Reinartz, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel approach using airborne image sequences for detecting dense crowds and individuals. Although airborne images of this resolution range are not enough to see each person in detail, we can still notice a change of color and intensity components of the acquired image in the location where a person exists. Therefore, we propose a local feature detection-based probabilistic framework to detect people automatically. Extracted local features behave as observations of the probability density function (PDF) of the people locations to be estimated. Using an adaptive kernel density estimation method, we estimate the corresponding PDF. First, we use estimated PDF to detect boundaries of dense crowds. After that, using background information of dense crowds and previously extracted local features, we detect other people in noncrowd regions automatically for each image in the sequence. To test our crowd and people detection algorithm, we use airborne images taken over Munich during the Oktoberfest event, two different open-air concerts, and an outdoor festival. In addition, we apply tests on GeoEye-1 satellite images. Our experimental results indicate possible use of the algorithm in real-life mass events.

  11. Remote Sensing Capabilities to Detect Maritime Vessels in Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Rudolph K.; Green, John M.; Huxtable, Barton D.; Rais, Houra

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has the responsibility for conducting research and development for search and rescue as charged under the National Search and Rescue Plan. For over two decades this task has been undertaken by the Search and Rescue Mission Office at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The technology used by the highly successful beacon locating satellite system, Cospas-Sarsat, was conceived and developed at GSFC and is managed by the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Using beacon-less remote sensing to find people and vessels in distress complements the demonstrated life saving capabilities of this satellite system. The Search and Rescue Mission Office has been investigating the use of fully polarimetric synthetic aperture radar to locate crashed aircraft. An overview of this effort and potential maritime applications of Search and Rescue Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) will be presented. The Mission Office has also developed a Laser search and rescue system called L-SAR. The prototype instrument was designed and built by SenSyTech Inc. It specifically targets the location of novel retro-reflective material easily applied to rescue equipment and vessels in distress. An overview of this effort will also be presented.

  12. Jellyfish Patch Detecting Using Low Latitude Remote Sensing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. S.; Jo, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    Jellyfish can be asexual and sexual reproduction depending on the environment, and it has excellent environmental adaptability and reproduction than other sea creatures. If the marine environment become worse, jellyfish can take advantage in the competition for survival. Marine environmental changes caused by rapid climate change, dyke construction and land reclamation will increase the amount of jellyfish and as a result can lead to a various social and economic problems. In this study, jellyfish were observed in coastal area using a low-altitude Helikite remote sensing system for the first time. Helikite is a type of helium balloon plus a kite that can get the data with optical sensors for the desired spatial resolutions by adjusting the altitudes. In addition, it has an advantage that can monitor any objects for a long time at one place as long as the electric power and helium last. In this study, we observed the jellyfish patches using a digital camera in the Chesapeake Bay and estimate populations and size of jellyfish patches through image processing. Research results suggests that we can have long-term real-time observations for not only jellyfish, but also other harmful marine creatures.

  13. Improved detection of localized prostate cancer using co-registered MRI and {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jambor, Ivan, E-mail: ivjamb@utu.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); 2nd Department of Radiology, Comenius University and St. Elisabeth Oncology Institute, Bratislava (Slovakia); Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Borra, Ronald, E-mail: ronald.borra@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Kemppainen, Jukka, E-mail: Jukka.Kemppainen@tyks.fi [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Lepomaeki, Virva, E-mail: Virva.Lepomaki@tyks.fi [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Parkkola, Riitta, E-mail: Riitta.Parkkola@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Dean, Kirsti, E-mail: Kirsti.Dean@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Alanen, Kalle, E-mail: Kalle.Alanen@tyks.fi [Department of Pathology, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Arponen, Eveliina, E-mail: Eveliina.Arponen@utu.fi [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Nurmi, Martti, E-mail: Martti.Nurmi@tyks.fi [Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Aronen, Hannu J., E-mail: Hannu.Aronen@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); and others

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: We aimed to study the ability of contrast enhanced MRI at 1.5 T and {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT, both individually and using fused data, to detect localized prostate cancer. Methods: Thirty-six men with untreated prostate cancer and negative for metastatic disease on pelvic CT and bone scan were prospectively enrolled. A pelvic {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT scan was performed in all patients, and a contrast enhanced MRI scan in 33 patients (6 examinations using both endorectal coil and surface coils, and 27 examinations using surface coils only). After the imaging studies 10 patients underwent prostatectomy and 26 were treated by image guided external beam radiation treatment. Image fusion of co-registered PET and MRI data was performed based on anatomical landmarks visible on CT and MRI using an advanced in-house developed software package. PET/CT, MRI and fused PET/MRI data were evaluated visually and compared with biopsy findings on a lobar level, while a sextant approach was used for patients undergoing prostatectomy. Results: When using biopsy samples as method of reference, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for visual detection of prostate cancer on a lobar level by contrast enhanced MRI was 85%, 37%, 73% and that of {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT 88%, 41%, 74%, respectively. Fusion of PET with MRI data increased sensitivity, specificity and accuracy to 90%, 72% and 85%, respectively. Conclusions: Fusion of sequentially obtained PET/CT and MRI data for the localization of prostate cancer is feasible and superior to the performance of each individual modality alone.

  14. Remote Oil Spill Detection and Monitoring Beneath Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Adam; Marshall, Stephen; Ren, Jinchang; Hwang, Byongjun (Phil); Hagan, Bernard; Stothard, David J. M.

    2016-08-01

    The spillage of oil in Polar Regions is particularly serious due to the threat to the environment and the difficulties in detecting and tracking the full extent of the oil seepage beneath the sea ice. Development of fast and reliable sensing techniques is highly desirable. In this paper hyperspectral imaging combined with signal processing and classification techniques are proposed as a potential tool to detect the presence of oil beneath the sea ice. A small sample, lab based experiment, serving as a proof of concept, resulted in the successful identification of oil presence beneath the thin ice layer as opposed to the other sample with ice only. The paper demonstrates the results of this experiment that granted a financial support to execute full feasibility study of this technology for oil spill detection beneath the sea ice.

  15. Remote logo detection using angle-distance histograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Sungwook; Ok, Jiheon; Baek, Sangwook; Woo, Seongyoun; Lee, Chulhee

    2016-05-01

    Among all the various computer vision applications, automatic logo recognition has drawn great interest from industry as well as various academic institutions. In this paper, we propose an angle-distance map, which we used to develop a robust logo detection algorithm. The proposed angle-distance histogram is invariant against scale and rotation. The proposed method first used shape information and color characteristics to find the candidate regions and then applied the angle-distance histogram. Experiments show that the proposed method detected logos of various sizes and orientations.

  16. Remotely-Sensed Detection of Foreclosure Effects on Residential Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutts, B.; Minn, M.; Pavlovic, N. R.; Greenberg, J. A.; Fraterrigo, J.; Turner, V. K.

    2014-12-01

    This project aims to understand whether the foreclosure crisis of 2007-2010 led to change in yard management with consequences for property and neighborhood land cover. By triangulating across analyses that vary in spatial and temporal resolution, this study examines whether foreclosure has resulted in changes in household and neighborhood vegetation structure. One common hypothesis is that the of financial distress is a reduction in lawn management (mowing, irrigating, and fertilizing ) due to economic constraint, vacancy or abandonment. However, changes in these practices differ across space as they are mediated by individual idiosyncrasies as well as complex social norms encoded in formal and informal institutions. The aim of our broader research project is to gain understanding of how foreclosure changes yard management within the context of these institutions. This poster presents preliminary results of analyses that aim to understand the relationship between foreclosure and land cover change in Maricopa County (Phoenix), Arizona. We synthesize foreclosure data with other social data sources focused on demographics, property characteristics, and vacancy to quantify both general and spatially dependent signatures of foreclosure in remotely-sensed NDVI data from MODIS and LANDSAT. Through results from multiple sources of data, we aim to isolate and describe signals that can be correlated with housing distress and foreclosure-induced vacancy. Arizona is analytically advantageous as area with an arid climate where the vegetation changes resulting from cessation of lawn maintenance are often dramatic and clearly observable. Our preliminary analysis indicates that there are specific NDVI signatures reflecting differing landscape-maintenance responses to foreclosure, supporting our central thesis that foreclosure influences land cover. These results provide a foundation upon which we will engage in both detailed investigation of the environmental effects of this

  17. Feasibility study of contaminant detection for food with ULF-NMR/MRI system using HTS-SQUID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatsukade, Yoshimi, E-mail: hatukade@ens.tut.ac.jp; Tsunaki, Shingo; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Abe, Takayuki; Hatta, Junichi; Tanaka, Saburo

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Feasibility of application of ultra-low field (ULF) NMR/MRI was studied. •ULF-NMR/MRI system utilized HTS-rf-SQUID and permanent magnet of 1.1 T. •Magnetic contaminants in water were successfully detected by NMR measurements. •Non-magnetic contaminants in water were distinguished by 1D-MRI measurements. -- Abstract: We have developed an ultra-low frequency (ULF) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system utilizing an HTS-SQUID for an application of contaminant detection in food and drink. In the system, a permanent magnet of 1.1 T was used to pre-polarize protons in a water sample. We measured NMR signals from water samples with or without various contaminants, such as stainless steel (SUS304), aluminum, and glass balls using the system. In the case that the contaminant was the SUS304 ball, the NMR signal intensity was reduced compared to that from the sample without the contaminant due to the remnant field of the contaminant. One-dimensional (1D) MRIs of the samples were also acquired to detect non-magnetic contaminants. In the 1D MRIs, changes of the MRI spectra were detected, corresponding to positions of the contaminants. These results show that the feasibility of the system to detect various contaminants in foods.

  18. Amide proton transfer-weighted MRI detection of traumatic brain injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Wang, Wenzhu; Jiang, Shanshan; Zhang, Yi; Heo, Hye-Young; Wang, Xianlong; Peng, Yun; Wang, Jian; Zhou, Jinyuan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the capability and uniqueness of amide proton transfer-weighted (APTw) imaging in the detection of primary and secondary injury after controlled cortical impact (CCI)-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rats. Eleven adult rats had craniotomy plus CCI surgery under isoflurane anesthesia. Multi-parameter MRI data were acquired at 4.7 T, at eight time points (1, 6 h, and 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days after TBI). At one and six hours post-injury, average APTw signal intensities decreased significantly in the impacted and peri-lesional areas due to tissue acidosis. A slightly high APTw signal was seen in the core lesion area with respect to the peri-lesional area, which was due to hemorrhage, as shown by T2*w. After the initial drop, the APTw signals dramatically increased in some peri-lesional areas at two and three days post-injury, likely due to the secondary inflammatory response. The use of APTw MRI has the potential to introduce a novel molecular neuroimaging approach for the simultaneous detection of ischemia, hemorrhage, and neuroinflammation in TBI.

  19. [Review of change detection methods using multi-temporal remotely sensed images].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shou-Jing; Wu, Chuan-Qing; Wang, Qiao; Ma, Wan-Dong; Zhu, Li; Yao, Yan-Juan; Wang, Xue-Lei; Wu, Di

    2013-12-01

    With the development of platforms and sensors, continuous repetition of remote sensing observation of the earth surface has been realized, and a mass of multi-source, multi-scale, multi-resolution remote sensing data has been accumulated. Those images have detailedly recorded the changing process of ground objects on the earth, which makes the long term global change research, such as change detection, based on remote sensing become possible, and greatly push forward the research on image processing and application. Although plenty of successful research has been reported, there are still enormous challenges in multi-temporal imagery change detection. A relatively complete mature theoretical system has not formed, and there is still a lack of systematic summary of research progress. Firstly, the current progress in change detection methods using multi-temporal remotely sensed imagery has been reviewed in this paper. Then, the methods are classified into three categories and summarized according to the type and amount of the input data, single-phase post-classification comparison, two-phase comparison, and time series analysis. After that, the possible existing problems in the current development of multi-temporal change detection are analyzed, and the development trend is discussed finally.

  20. Detecting plant metabolic responses induced by ground shock using hyperspectral remote sensing and physiological contact measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickles, W.L.; Cater, G.A.

    1996-12-03

    A series of field experiments were done to determine if ground shock could have induced physiological responses in plants and if the level of the response could be observed. The observation techniques were remote sensing techniques and direct contact physiological measurements developed by Carter for detecting pre-visual plant stress. The remote sensing technique was similar to that used by Pickles to detect what appeared to be ground shock induced plant stress above the 1993 Non Proliferation Experiment`s underground chemical explosion. The experiment was designed to provide direct plant physiological measurements and remote sensing ratio images and from the same plants at the same time. The simultaneous direct and remote sensing measurements were done to establish a ground truth dataset to compare to the results of the hyperspectral remote sensing measurements. In addition, the experiment was designed to include data on what was thought to be the most probable interfering effect, dehydration. The experimental design included investigating the relative magnitude of the shock induced stress effects compared to dehydration effects.

  1. Remote Mine Detection Technologies for Land and Water Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoover, Eddie R.

    1999-05-11

    The detection of mines, both during and after hostilities, is a growing international problem. It limits military operations during wartime and unrecovered mines create tragic consequences for civilians. From a purely humanitarian standpoint an estimated 100 million or more unrecovered mines are located in over 60 countries worldwide. This paper presents an overview of some of the technologies currently being investigated by Sandia National Laboratories for the detection and monitoring of minefields in land and water environments. The three technical areas described in this paper are: 1) the development of new mathematical techniques for combining or fusing the data from multiple sources for enhanced decision-making; 2) an environmental fate and transport (EF&T) analysis approach that is central to improving trace chemical sensing technique; and 3) the investigation of an underwater range imaging device to aid in locating and characterizing mines and other obstacles in coastal waters.

  2. Sensitive change detection for remote sensing monitoring of nuclear treaties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canty, Morton J.; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Schlittenhardt, Jörg

    2005-01-01

    or uninteresting changes, see e.g. (Canty and Schlittenhardt 2001). In our contribution we focus attention on the use of conventional multispectral earth observation satellite platforms with moderate ground resolution (Landsat TM, ASTER, SPOT) to detect changes over wide areas which are relevant to nuclear non......Triggered in part by the advent of high resolution commercial optical satellites, the analysis of open-source satellite imagery has now established itself as an important tool for monitoring nuclear activities throughout the world (Chitumbo et al 2001). Whereas detection of land cover and land use...... the framework of the Global Monitoring for Security and Stability Network of Excellence (GMOSS) initiated by the European Commission. Chitumbo, K., Robb, S., Bunney, J. and Lev\\$\\backslash\\$'e, G., IAEA Satellite imagery and the Department of Safeguards, Proceedings of the Symposium on International Safeguards...

  3. Detection of suspected placental invasion by MRI: Do the results depend on observer’ experience?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alamo, Leonor, E-mail: leonor.alamo@chuv.ch [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Anaye, Anass; Rey, Jannick; Denys, Alban [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Bongartz, Georg [Universitätsspital Basel (Switzerland); Terraz, Sylvain [Hôpitaux Universitaires Genève (Switzerland); Artemisia, Simona; Meuli, Reto; Schmidt, Sabine [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic value of previously described MR features used for detecting suspected placental invasion according to observers’ experience. Materials and methods: Our population included 25 pregnant women (mean age 35.16) investigated by prenatal MRI (1.5 T, T1- and T2-weighted MR-sequences without i.v. contrast), among them 12 with histopathologically proven placental invasion and 13 women (52%) without placental invasion used as control group. Two senior and two junior radiologists blindly and independently reviewed MR-examinations in view of 6 previously defined MR-features indicating presence and degree of placental invasion (placenta increta, accreta or percreta). For each reader the sensibility, specificity, and receiver operating curve (ROC) were calculated. Interobserver agreements between senior and junior readers were determined. Stepwise logistic regression was performed including the 6 MR-features predictive of placental invasion. Results: Demographics between both groups were statistically equivalent. Overall sensitivity and specificity for placental invasion was 90.9% and 75.0% for seniors and 81.8% and 61.8% for juniors, respectively. The best single MR-feature indicating placental invasion was T2-hypointense placental bands (r{sup 2} = 0.28), followed by focally interrupted myometrial border, infiltration of pelvic organs and tenting of the bladder (r{sup 2} = 0.36). Interobserver agreement for detecting placental invasion was 0.64 for seniors and 0.41 for juniors, thus substantial and moderate, respectively. Seniors detected placental invasion and depth of infiltration with significantly higher diagnostic certitude than juniors (p = 0.0002 and p = 0.0282, respectively). Conclusion: MRI can be a reliable and reproducible tool for the detection of suspected placental invasion, but the diagnostic value significantly depends on observers’ experience.

  4. Diagnostic performance of MRI for detection of intestinal fistulas in patients with complicated inflammatory bowel conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, S.; Meuwly, J.Y.; Meuli, R.; Schnyder, P.; Denys, A. [Universitaire Vaudois - CHUV, Service de radiodiagnostic et radiologie interventionnelle, Centre Hospitalier, Lausanne (Switzerland); Chevallier, P. [Hopital Archet II, Imagerie Medicale, Nice (France); Bessoud, B. [Hopital Kremlin-Bicetre, Radiologie Generale, Kremlin-Bicetre (France); Felley, C. [University Hospital, CHUV, Service de Gastroenterologie, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2007-11-15

    The diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection of intestinal fistulas, other than perianal, in patients with known complicated inflammatory bowel conditions (CIBC) was investigated. Our study group consisted of 20 patients (12 women, mean age 43 years) with CIBC, including Crohn's disease (n=13), colonic diverticulitis (n=3), colitis after radiotherapy (n=3) and of postoperative origin (n=1). Eleven surgically proven enteral fistulas were known in ten (50%) of these patients, being of enterovesical (n=3), enterocolic (n=2), enteroenteral (n=2), rectovaginal (n=2), rectovaginovesical (n=1) and of entercutaneous (n=1) localisation. The other ten patients (50%), used as the control group, showed MR features of CIBC, although without any fistulous tract. Multiplanar T1- and T2-weighted sequences had been performed, including gadolinium-enhanced acquisition with fat saturation (1.5 T). MR findings were independently blindly and retrospectively reviewed by three radiologists for the presence and etiology of any fistula, as well as visualization and characterization of the fistulous tract. Results were compared with surgical findings (n=16) and clinical evolution (n=4). Interobserver agreement was calculated. Interobserver agreement kappa for fistula detection was 0.71. Overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for fistula detection were 78.6%, 75% and 77.2%, respectively. Sensitivity for fistula characterization was 80.6%, with visualization of the fistulous tract in all cases, whereby T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced fat-saturated images were considered the most useful sequences. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI is a reliable and reproducible tool for detection of enteral fistulas secondary to inflammatory conditions. (orig.)

  5. A superresolution land-cover change detection method using remotely sensed images with different spatial resolutions

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiaodong; Ling, Feng; Giles M. Foody; Du, Yun

    2016-01-01

    The development of remote sensing has enabled the acquisition of information on land-cover change at different spatial scales. However, a trade-off between spatial and temporal resolutions normally exists. Fine-spatial-resolution images have low temporal resolutions, whereas coarse spatial resolution images have high temporal repetition rates. A novel super-resolution change detection method (SRCD)is proposed to detect land-cover changes at both fine spatial and temporal resolutions with the ...

  6. Configurable automatic detection and registration of fiducial frames for device-to-image registration in MRI-guided prostate interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Junichi; Song, Sang-Eun; Tuncali, Kemal; Tempany, Clare; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel automatic fiducial frame detection and registration method for device-to-image registration in MRI-guided prostate interventions. The proposed method does not require any manual selection of markers, and can be applied to a variety of fiducial frames, which consist of multiple cylindrical MR-visible markers placed in different orientations. The key idea is that automatic extraction of linear features using a line filter is more robust than that of bright spots by thresholding; by applying a line set registration algorithm to the detected markers, the frame can be registered to the MRI. The method was capable of registering the fiducial frame to the MRI with an accuracy of 1.00 +/- 0.73 mm and 1.41 +/- 1.06 degrees in a phantom study, and was sufficiently robust to detect the fiducial frame in 98% of images acquired in clinical cases despite the existence of anatomical structures in the field of view.

  7. Time-of-flight flow imaging using NMR remote detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granwehr, Josef; Harel, Elad; Han, Song-I; Garcia, Sandra; Pines,Alex; Sen, Pabitra N.; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2005-05-05

    A time-of-flight imaging technique is introduced to visualize fluid flow and dispersion through porous media using NMR. As the fluid flows through a sample, the nuclear spin magnetization is modulated by RF pulses and magnetic field gradients to encode the spatial coordinates of the fluid. When the fluid leaves the sample, its magnetization is recorded by a second RF coil. This scheme not only facilitates a time-dependent imaging of fluid flow, it also allows a separate optimization of encoding and detection subsystems to enhance overall sensitivity. The technique is demonstrated by imaging gas flow through a porous rock.

  8. Detection of Harbours from High Resolution Remote Sensing Imagery via Saliency Analysis and Feature Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yetianjian; Pan, Li; Wang, Dagang; Kang, Yifei

    2016-06-01

    Harbours are very important objects in civil and military fields. To detect them from high resolution remote sensing imagery is important in various fields and also a challenging task. Traditional methods of detecting harbours mainly focus on the segmentation of water and land and the manual selection of knowledge. They do not make enough use of other features of remote sensing imagery and often fail to describe the harbours completely. In order to improve the detection, a new method is proposed. First, the image is transformed to Hue, Saturation, Value (HSV) colour space and saliency analysis is processed via the generation and enhancement of the co-occurrence histogram to help detect and locate the regions of interest (ROIs) that is salient and may be parts of the harbour. Next, SIFT features are extracted and feature learning is processed to help represent the ROIs. Then, by using classified feature of the harbour, a classifier is trained and used to check the ROIs to find whether they belong to the harbour. Finally, if the ROIs belong to the harbour, a minimum bounding rectangle is formed to include all the harbour ROIs and detect and locate the harbour. The experiment on high resolution remote sensing imagery shows that the proposed method performs better than other methods in precision of classifying ROIs and accuracy of completely detecting and locating harbours.

  9. A simple method to detect land changes sourcing from overgrazing using remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadavid, G.; Themistocleous, K.; Christoforou, M.; Carmen, B.; Tsaltas, D.; Hadjimitsis, D.

    2013-08-01

    This is a technical paper, in the context of CASCADE project, describing an overgrazed area in Cyprus and how remote sensing techniques can assist the procedure for detecting land degradation sourcing from animal overgrazing. Remote sensing is a tool recently introduced to such studies but indeed very useful and vital. Using satellite images it is possible to retrieve consecutive vegetation indices which can identify if there is any further land-vegetation degradation in a specific area of interest. This is crucial in the procedure for monitoring semi or highly overgrazed areas since this change detection can inform policy makers regarding the status of an area, in terms of degradation. In this paper remotely sensed data is analyzed to detect, in specific areas which are known as overgrazed, to detect if there is a change using three main vegetation indices, namely WDVI, NDVI and SAVI. Change detection techniques are applied on these three vegetation indices maps in order to detect any further areas overgrazing.

  10. A new method of inshore ship detection in high-resolution optical remote sensing images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qifeng; Du, Yaling; Jiang, Yunqiu; Ming, Delie

    2015-10-01

    Ship as an important military target and water transportation, of which the detection has great significance. In the military field, the automatic detection of ships can be used to monitor ship dynamic in the harbor and maritime of enemy, and then analyze the enemy naval power. In civilian field, the automatic detection of ships can be used in monitoring transportation of harbor and illegal behaviors such as illegal fishing, smuggling and pirates, etc. In recent years, research of ship detection is mainly concentrated in three categories: forward-looking infrared images, downward-looking SAR image, and optical remote sensing images with sea background. Little research has been done into ship detection of optical remote sensing images with harbor background, as the gray-scale and texture features of ships are similar to the coast in high-resolution optical remote sensing images. In this paper, we put forward an effective harbor ship target detection method. First of all, in order to overcome the shortage of the traditional difference method in obtaining histogram valley as the segmentation threshold, we propose an iterative histogram valley segmentation method which separates the harbor and ships from the water quite well. Secondly, as landing ships in optical remote sensing images usually lead to discontinuous harbor edges, we use Hough Transform method to extract harbor edges. First, lines are detected by Hough Transform. Then, lines that have similar slope are connected into a new line, thus we access continuous harbor edges. Secondary segmentation on the result of the land-and-sea separation, we eventually get the ships. At last, we calculate the aspect ratio of the ROIs, thereby remove those targets which are not ship. The experiment results show that our method has good robustness and can tolerate a certain degree of noise and occlusion.

  11. Change Detection and Dynamic Analysis Based on Remote Sensing Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzi, G.; Crosetto, M.; Devanthéry, N.; Cuevas, M.; Meng, X.

    2013-08-01

    A radar uses the time elapsed between the transmission and reception of an electromagnetic waveform to locate targets present in the illuminated area. Different objects will reflect the radiation with different intensities and phase. The signal provided by standard radar is a profile of the intensity backscattered from the scene as a function of the distance. The resolution, i.e. the capability to distinguish different targets, is related to instrumental parameters and, for conventional radar, is in the range of tens of centimetres. The elementary sampling volume of a radar measurement is usually called radar bin. A radar image can be obtained when an azimuth and a range resolution is available, and this can be attained in different ways: performing a mechanical scanning of the antenna, the most familiar mode used for surveillance, meteorological radar etc, or modifying its spatial features by changing the characteristics of the radiated signal or finally through a specific processing of the acquired data, as in the case of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). In this paper only 1D data without any cross range resolution are used. The vibration of a target corresponds to a small and rapid variation of the radar-target distance to which the phase of the received signal is related. Coherent radar is able to provide measurements of the phase variation along time exploiting the interferometric technique. The received radar signals permits to retrieve distance variations of the observed objects in the order of small fractions of the transmitted wavelength, by comparing the phase of signals acquired at different times. Use a short span bridge as a test-bed this study investigates the actual capability of a Real Aperture Radar (RAR) interferometer to detect the natural vibration caused by wind or pass pedestrians. It is found that RAR can pick up bridge displacements of a few tens of μm and detect a wide range of vibrations.

  12. Detection of thrombus size and protein content by ex vivo magnetization transfer and diffusion weighted MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phinikaridou Alkystis

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To utilize a rabbit model of plaque disruption to assess the accuracy of different magnetic resonance sequences [T1-weighted (T1W, T2-weighted (T2W, magnetization transfer (MT and diffusion weighting (DW] at 11.7 T for the ex vivo detection of size and composition of thrombus associated with disrupted plaques. Methods Atherosclerosis was induced in the aorta of male New Zealand White rabbits (n = 17 by endothelial denudation and high-cholesterol diet. Subsequently, plaque disruption was induced by pharmacological triggering. Segments of infra-renal aorta were excised fixed in formalin and examined by ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI at 11.7 T and histology. Results MRI at 11.7 T showed that: (i magnetization transfer contrast (MTC and diffusion weighted images (DWI detected thrombus with higher sensitivity compared to T1W and T2W images [sensitivity: MTC = 88.2%, DWI = 76.5%, T1W = 66.6% and T2W = 43.7%, P P (ii MTC and DWI provided a more accurate detection of thrombus area with histology as the gold-standard [underestimation of 6% (MTC and 17.6% (DWI compared to an overestimation of thrombus area of 53.7% and 46.4% on T1W and T2W images, respectively]; (iii the percent magnetization transfer rate (MTR correlated with the fibrin (r = 0.73, P = 0.003 and collagen (r = 0.9, P = 0.004 content of the thrombus. Conclusions The conspicuity of the thrombus was increased on MTC and DW compared to T1W and T2W images. Changes in the %MTR and apparent diffusion coefficient can be used to identify the organization stage of the thrombus.

  13. Detection of hepatocellular carcinoma in gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI with respect to the severity of liver cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ah Yeong; Kim, Young Kon; Lee, Min Woo; Park, Min Jung; Hwang, Jiyoung; Lee, Mi Hee; Lee, Jae Won [Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], e-mail: jmyr@dreamwiz.com

    2012-10-15

    Background As gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) have been widely used for the evaluation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), it is clinically relevant to determine the diagnostic efficacy of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and DWI for detection of HCCs with respect to the severity of liver cirrhosis. Purpose To compare the diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and DWI for detection of HCCs with respect to the severity of liver cirrhosis. Material and Methods A total of 189 patients with 240 HCCs ({<=}3.0 cm) (Child-Pugh A, 81 patients with 90 HCCs; Child-Pugh B, 65 patients with 85 HCCs; Child-Pugh C, 43 patients with 65 HCCs) underwent DWI and gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI at 3.0 T. A gadoxetic acid set (dynamic and hepatobiliary phase plus T2-weighted image) and DWI set (DWI plus unenhanced MRIs) for each Child-Pugh class were analyzed independently by two observers for detecting HCCs using receiver-operating characteristic analysis. The diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity were calculated. Results There was a trend toward decreased diagnostic accuracy for gadoxetic acid and DWI set with respect to the severity of cirrhosis (Child-Pugh A [mean 0.974, 0.961], B [mean 0.904, 0.863], C [mean 0.779, 0.760]). For both observers, the sensitivities of both image sets were highest in Child-Pugh class A (mean 95.6%, 93.9%), followed by class B (mean 83.0%, 77.1%), and class C (mean 60.6%, 60.0%) (P < 0.05). Conclusion In HCC detection, the diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity for gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and DWI were highest in Child-Pugh class A, followed by Child-Pugh class B, and Child-Pugh class C, indicating a tendency toward decreased diagnostic capability with the severity of cirrhosis.

  14. Detecting functional connectivity change points for single-subject fMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribben, Ivor; Wager, Tor D; Lindquist, Martin A

    2013-01-01

    Recently in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies there has been an increased interest in understanding the dynamic manner in which brain regions communicate with one another, as subjects perform a set of experimental tasks or as their psychological state changes. Dynamic Connectivity Regression (DCR) is a data-driven technique used for detecting temporal change points in functional connectivity between brain regions where the number and location of the change points are unknown a priori. After finding the change points, DCR estimates a graph or set of relationships between the brain regions for data that falls between pairs of change points. In previous work, the method was predominantly validated using multi-subject data. In this paper, we concentrate on single-subject data and introduce a new DCR algorithm. The new algorithm increases accuracy for individual subject data with a small number of observations and reduces the number of false positives in the estimated undirected graphs. We also introduce a new Likelihood Ratio test for comparing sparse graphs across (or within) subjects; thus allowing us to determine whether data should be combined across subjects. We perform an extensive simulation analysis on vector autoregression (VAR) data as well as to an fMRI data set from a study (n = 23) of a state anxiety induction using a socially evaluative threat challenge. The focus on single-subject data allows us to study the variation between individuals and may provide us with a deeper knowledge of the workings of the brain.

  15. Brain Tumor Detection and Classification Using Deep Learning Classifier on MRI Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.P. Gladis Pushpa Rathi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI has become an effective tool for clinical research in recent years and has found itself in applications such as brain tumour detection. In this study, tumor classification using multiple kernel-based probabilistic clustering and deep learning classifier is proposed. The proposed technique consists of three modules, namely segmentation module, feature extraction module and classification module. Initially, the MRI image is pre-processed to make it fit for segmentation and de-noising process is carried out using median filter. Then, pre-processed image is segmented using Multiple Kernel based Probabilistic Clustering (MKPC. Subsequently, features are extracted for every segment based on the shape, texture and intensity. After features extraction, important features will be selected using Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA for classification purpose. Finally, deep learning classifier is employed for classification into tumor or non-tumor. The proposed technique is evaluated using sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. The proposed technique results are also compared with existing technique which uses Feed-Forward Back Propagation Network (FFBN. The proposed technique achieved an average sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 0.88, 0.80 and 0.83, respectively with the highest values as about 1, 0.85 and 0.94. Improved results show the efficiency of the proposed technique.

  16. Can Remote Sensing Detect Aquifer Characteristics?: A Case Study in the Guarani Aquifer System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, A. S.; Thomas, B.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    Global water supply resiliency depends on groundwater, especially regions threatened by population growth and climate change. Aquifer characteristics, even as basic as confined versus unconfined, are necessary to prescribe regulations to sustainably manage groundwater supplies. A significant barrier to sustainable groundwater management exists in the difficulties associated with mapping groundwater resources and characteristics at a large spatial scale. This study addresses this challenge by investigating if remote sensing, including with NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), can detect and quantify key aquifer parameters and characteristics. We explore this through a case study in the Guarani Aquifer System (GAS) of South America, validating our remote sensing-based findings against the best available regional estimates. The use of remote sensing to advance the understanding of large aquifers is beneficial to sustainable groundwater management, especially in a trans-boundary system, where consistent information exchange can occur within hydrologic boundaries instead of political boundaries.

  17. Incident and Traffic-Bottleneck Detection Algorithm in High-Resolution Remote Sensing Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M.M. Kahaki

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important methods to solve traffic congestion is to detect the incident state of a roadway. This paper describes the development of a method for road traffic monitoring aimed at the acquisition and analysis of remote sensing imagery. We propose a strategy for road extraction, vehicle detection and incident detection from remote sensing imagery using techniques based on neural networks, Radon transform for angle detection and traffic-flow measurements. Traffic-bottleneck detection is another method that is proposed for recognizing incidents in both offline and real-time mode. Traffic flows and incidents are extracted from aerial images of bottleneck zones. The results show that the proposed approach has a reasonable detection performance compared to other methods. The best performance of the learning system was a detection rate of 87% and a false alarm rate of less than 18% on 45 aerial images of roadways. The performance of the traffic-bottleneck detection method had a detection rate of 87.5%.

  18. Incident and Traffic-Bottleneck Detection Algorithm in High-Resolution Remote Sensing Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed M.M. Kahaki

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available One  of  the  most  important  methods  to  solve  traffic  congestion  is  to detect the incident state of a roadway. This paper describes the development of a method  for  road  traffic  monitoring  aimed  at  the  acquisition  and  analysis  of remote  sensing  imagery.  We  propose  a  strategy  for  road  extraction,  vehicle detection  and incident detection  from remote sensing imagery using techniques based on neural networks, Radon transform  for angle detection and traffic-flow measurements.  Traffic-bottleneck  detection  is  another  method  that  is  proposed for recognizing incidents in both offline and real-time mode. Traffic flows and incidents are extracted from aerial images of bottleneck zones. The results show that the proposed approach has a reasonable detection performance compared to other methods. The best performance of the learning system was a detection rate of 87% and a false alarm rate of less than 18% on 45 aerial images of roadways. The performance of the traffic-bottleneck detection  method had a detection rate of 87.5%.

  19. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSNG OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerry Myers

    2005-04-15

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. The scope of the work involved designing and developing an airborne, optical remote sensor capable of sensing methane and, if possible, ethane for the detection of natural gas pipeline leaks. Flight testing using a custom dual wavelength, high power fiber amplifier was initiated in February 2005. Ophir successfully demonstrated the airborne system, showing that it was capable of discerning small amounts of methane from a simulated pipeline leak. Leak rates as low as 150 standard cubic feet per hour (scf/h) were detected by the airborne sensor.

  20. Joint Change Detection and Image Registration for Optical Remote Sensing Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Luo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this letter, a novel method is proposed for jointly unsupervised change detection and image registration over multi-temporal optical remote sensing images. An iterative energy minimization scheme is employed to extract the pixel opacity. Specifically, we extract the consistent points which provide the initial seed nodes and the feature nodes for random walker image segmentation and image registration, respectively. And the seed nodes will be updated according to the analysis of the changed and unchanged regions. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can perform change detection as well as the state of the art methods. In particular, it can perform change detection rapidly and automatically over unregistered optical remote sensing images.

  1. Breast MRI, digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis: comparison of three methods for early detection of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Roganovic

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and early detection is important for its successful treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of three methods for early detection of breast cancer: breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, digital mammography, and breast tomosynthesis in comparison to histopathology, as well as to investigate the intraindividual variability between these modalities.  We included 57 breast lesions, each detected by three diagnostic modalities: digital mammography, breast MRI, and breast tomosynthesis, and subsequently confirmed by histopathology. Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS was used for characterizing the lesions. One experienced radiologist interpreted all three diagnostic modalities. Twenty-nine of the breast lesions were malignant while 28 were benign. The sensitivity for digital mammography, breast MRI, and breast tomosynthesis, was 72.4%, 93.1%, and 100%, respectively; while the specificity was 46.4%, 60.7%, and 75%, respectively. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC curve analysis showed an overall diagnostic advantage of breast tomosynthesis over both breast MRI and digital mammography. The difference in performance between breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography was significant (p < 0.001, while the difference between breast tomosynthesis and breast MRI was not significant (p = 0.20. 

  2. Cortical microinfarcts detected in vivo on 3 tesla MRI : Clinical and radiological correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dalen, Jan Willem; Scuric, Eva E M; Van Veluw, Susanne J.; Caan, Matthan W A; Nederveen, Aart J.; Biessels, Geert Jan; Van Gool, Willem A.; Richard, Edo

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Cortical microinfarcts (CMIs) are a common postmortem finding associated with vascular risk factors, cognitive decline, and dementia. Recently, CMIs identified in vivo on 7 Tesla MRI also proved retraceable on 3 Tesla MRI. Methods-We evaluated CMIs on 3 Tesla MRI in a populati

  3. Cortical microinfarcts detected in vivo on 3 Tesla MRI: clinical and radiological correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalen, J.W. van; Scuric, E.E.; Veluw, S.J. van; Caan, M.W.; Nederveen, A.J.; Biessels, G.J.; Gool, W.A. van; Richard, E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cortical microinfarcts (CMIs) are a common postmortem finding associated with vascular risk factors, cognitive decline, and dementia. Recently, CMIs identified in vivo on 7 Tesla MRI also proved retraceable on 3 Tesla MRI. METHODS: We evaluated CMIs on 3 Tesla MRI in a popula

  4. DETECTION OF COASTLINE DEFORMATION USING REMOTE SENSING AND GEODETIC SURVEYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sabuncu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The coastal areas are being destroyed due to the usage that effect the natural balance. Unconsciously sand mining from the sea for nearshore nourishment and construction uses are the main ones. Physical interferences for mining of sand cause an ecologic threat to the coastal environment. However, use of marine sand is inevitable because of economic reasons or unobtainable land-based sand resources. The most convenient solution in such a protection–usage dilemma is to reduce negative impacts of sand production from marine. This depends on the accurate determination of criteriaon production place, style, and amount of sand. With this motivation, nearshore geodedic surveying studies performed on Kilyos Campus of Bogazici University located on the Black Sea coast, north of Istanbul, Turkey between 2001-2002. The study area extends 1 km in the longshore. Geodetic survey was carried out in the summer of 2001 to detect the initial condition for the shoreline. Long-term seasonal changes in shoreline positions were determined biannually. The coast was measured with post-processed kinematic GPS. Besides, shoreline change has studied using Landsat imagery between the years 1986-2015. The data set of Landsat 5 imageries were dated 05.08.1986 and 31.08.2007 and Landsat 7 imageries were dated 21.07.2001 and 28.07.2015. Landcover types in the study area were analyzed on the basis of pixel based classification method. Firstly, unsupervised classification based on ISODATA (Iterative Self Organizing Data Analysis Technique has been applied and spectral clusters have been determined that gives prior knowledge about the study area. In the second step, supervised classification was carried out by using the three different approaches which are minimum-distance, parallelepiped and maximum-likelihood. All pixel based classification processes were performed with ENVI 4.8 image processing software. Results of geodetic studies and classification outputs will be

  5. Detection of Coastline Deformation Using Remote Sensing and Geodetic Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabuncu, A.; Dogru, A.; Ozener, H.; Turgut, B.

    2016-06-01

    The coastal areas are being destroyed due to the usage that effect the natural balance. Unconsciously sand mining from the sea for nearshore nourishment and construction uses are the main ones. Physical interferences for mining of sand cause an ecologic threat to the coastal environment. However, use of marine sand is inevitable because of economic reasons or unobtainable land-based sand resources. The most convenient solution in such a protection-usage dilemma is to reduce negative impacts of sand production from marine. This depends on the accurate determination of criteriaon production place, style, and amount of sand. With this motivation, nearshore geodedic surveying studies performed on Kilyos Campus of Bogazici University located on the Black Sea coast, north of Istanbul, Turkey between 2001-2002. The study area extends 1 km in the longshore. Geodetic survey was carried out in the summer of 2001 to detect the initial condition for the shoreline. Long-term seasonal changes in shoreline positions were determined biannually. The coast was measured with post-processed kinematic GPS. Besides, shoreline change has studied using Landsat imagery between the years 1986-2015. The data set of Landsat 5 imageries were dated 05.08.1986 and 31.08.2007 and Landsat 7 imageries were dated 21.07.2001 and 28.07.2015. Landcover types in the study area were analyzed on the basis of pixel based classification method. Firstly, unsupervised classification based on ISODATA (Iterative Self Organizing Data Analysis Technique) has been applied and spectral clusters have been determined that gives prior knowledge about the study area. In the second step, supervised classification was carried out by using the three different approaches which are minimum-distance, parallelepiped and maximum-likelihood. All pixel based classification processes were performed with ENVI 4.8 image processing software. Results of geodetic studies and classification outputs will be presented in this paper.

  6. Breast segmentation in MRI using Poisson surface reconstruction initialized with random forest edge detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Anne L.; Gallego-Ortiz, Cristina; Lu, YingLi

    2016-03-01

    Segmentation of breast tissue in MRI images is an important pre-processing step for many applications. We present a new method that uses a random forest classifier to identify candidate edges in the image and then applies a Poisson reconstruction step to define a 3D surface based on the detected edge points. Using a leave one patient out cross validation we achieve a Dice overlap score of 0.96 +/- 0.02 for T1 weighted non-fat suppressed images in 8 patients. In a second dataset of 332 images acquired using a Dixon sequence, which was not used in training the random classifier, the mean Dice score was 0.90 +/- 0.03. Using this approach we have achieved accurate, robust segmentation results using a very small training set.

  7. Implementing Tumor Detection and Area Calculation in Mri Image of Human Brain Using Image Processing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil L. Bangare

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on the research on Human Brain Tumor which uses the MRI imaging technique to capture the image. In this proposed work Brain Tumor area is calculated to define the Stage or level of seriousness of the tumor. Image Processing techniques are used for the brain tumor area calculation and Neural Network algorithms for the tumor position calculation. Also in the further advancement the classification of the tumor based on few parameters is also expected. Proposed work is divided in to following Modules: Module 1: Image Pre-Processing Module 2: Feature Extraction, Segmentation using K-Means Algorithm and Fuzzy C-Means Algorithm Module 3: Tumor Area calculation & Stage detection Module 4: Classification and position calculation of tumor using Neural Network

  8. Goal-Directed Modulation of Neural Memory Patterns: Implications for fMRI-Based Memory Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uncapher, Melina R; Boyd-Meredith, J Tyler; Chow, Tiffany E; Rissman, Jesse; Wagner, Anthony D

    2015-06-03

    Remembering a past event elicits distributed neural patterns that can be distinguished from patterns elicited when encountering novel information. These differing patterns can be decoded with relatively high diagnostic accuracy for individual memories using multivoxel pattern analysis (MVPA) of fMRI data. Brain-based memory detection--if valid and reliable--would have clear utility beyond the domain of cognitive neuroscience, in the realm of law, marketing, and beyond. However, a significant boundary condition on memory decoding validity may be the deployment of "countermeasures": strategies used to mask memory signals. Here we tested the vulnerability of fMRI-based memory detection to countermeasures, using a paradigm that bears resemblance to eyewitness identification. Participants were scanned while performing two tasks on previously studied and novel faces: (1) a standard recognition memory task; and (2) a task wherein they attempted to conceal their true memory state. Univariate analyses revealed that participants were able to strategically modulate neural responses, averaged across trials, in regions implicated in memory retrieval, including the hippocampus and angular gyrus. Moreover, regions associated with goal-directed shifts of attention and thought substitution supported memory concealment, and those associated with memory generation supported novelty concealment. Critically, whereas MVPA enabled reliable classification of memory states when participants reported memory truthfully, the ability to decode memory on individual trials was compromised, even reversing, during attempts to conceal memory. Together, these findings demonstrate that strategic goal states can be deployed to mask memory-related neural patterns and foil memory decoding technology, placing a significant boundary condition on their real-world utility.

  9. Region of interest extraction based on saliency detection and contrast analysis for remote sensing images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jing; Zhang, Libao; Wang, Shuang

    2016-10-01

    Region of Interest (ROI) extraction is an important component in remote sensing images processing, which is useful for further practical applications such as image compression, image fusion, image segmentation and image registration. Traditional ROI extraction methods are usually prior knowledge-based and depend on a global searching solution which are time consuming and computational complex. Saliency detection which is widely used for ROI extraction from natural scene images in these years can effectively solve the problem of high computation complexity in ROI extraction for remote sensing images as well as retain accuracy. In this paper, a new computational model is proposed to improve the accuracy of ROI extraction in remote sensing images. Considering the characteristics of remote sensing images, we first use lifting wavelet transform based on adaptive direction evaluation (ADE) to obtain multi-scale orientation contrast feature map (MF). Secondly, the features of color are exploited using the information content analysis to provide a color information map (CIM). Thirdly, feature fusion is used to integrate multi-scale orientation contrast features and color information for generating a saliency map. Finally, an adaptive threshold segmentation algorithm is employed to obtain the ROI. Compared with existing models, our method can not only effectively extract detail of the ROIs, but also effectively remove mistaken detection of the inner parts of the ROIs.

  10. Lignin-AuNPs liquid marble for remotely-controllable detection of Pb2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Guocheng; Wang, Xiaoying; Hamel, Jonathan; Zhu, Hongli; Sun, Runcang

    2016-12-01

    This work reported the green and facile fabrication of a versatile lignin-AuNP composite, which was readily and remotely encapsulated to form novel liquid marbles. The marbles can stay suspended in water, and show excellent photothermal conversion properties, as well as visual detection and adsorption towards Pb2+. More importantly, the marbles can simultaneously remotely detect and adsorb Pb2+ via co-precipitation by simply controlling the near infrared (NIR) irradiation. It is believed that the remotely-controllable NIR-responsive lignin-AuNPs liquid marble can be used in Pb2+-related reactions. The liquid marble can be placed in the system at the very beginning of the reaction and stably stays on the surface until the reaction has ended. After reacting, upon remote NIR irradiation, the liquid marble bursts to adsorb Pb2+, and the residual Pb2+ can be collected. This facile manipulation strategy does not use complicated nanostructures or sophisticated equipment, so it has potential applications for channel-free microfluidics, smart microreactors, microengines, and so on.

  11. Does the degree of background enhancement in breast MRI affect the detection and staging of breast cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uematsu, Takayoshi [Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Breast Imaging and Breast Intervention Section, Shizuoka (Japan); Kasami, Masako [Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Department of Pathology, Naga-izumi, Shizuoka (Japan); Watanabe, Junichiro [Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Division of Medical Oncology, Naga-izumi, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of background enhancement on the detection and staging of breast cancer using MRI as an adjunct to mammography or ultrasound. One hundred forty-six bilateral breast MRI examinations were evaluated to assess the extent of a known primary tumour and to problem solve after mammography or ultrasound without adjusting for the phase in the patients' menstrual cycle. The background enhancement was classified into four categories by visual evaluation: minimal, mild, moderate and marked. In total, 131 histologically confirmed abnormal cases (104 malignant and 27 benign) and 15 normal cases were included in the analysis. There was no tumour size-related bias between the groups (p = 0.522). For the primary index tumour, the sensitivities of MRI with minimal/mild and moderate/marked background enhancement were 100% and 76% (p = 0.001), respectively. Thus, the degree of background enhancement did not affect the specificity. For evaluating tumour extent (n = 104), the accuracy of MRI with moderate/marked background enhancement (52%) was significantly lower than that with minimal/mild background enhancement (84%; p = 0.002). The degree of background enhancement affected the detection and staging of breast cancer using MRI. (orig.)

  12. S-Cnn Ship Detection from High-Resolution Remote Sensing Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiqian; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Kao; Feng, Chen; Zhang, Jiadong

    2016-06-01

    Reliable ship detection plays an important role in both military and civil fields. However, it makes the task difficult with high-resolution remote sensing images with complex background and various types of ships with different poses, shapes and scales. Related works mostly used gray and shape features to detect ships, which obtain results with poor robustness and efficiency. To detect ships more automatically and robustly, we propose a novel ship detection method based on the convolutional neural networks (CNNs), called SCNN, fed with specifically designed proposals extracted from the ship model combined with an improved saliency detection method. Firstly we creatively propose two ship models, the "V" ship head model and the "||" ship body one, to localize the ship proposals from the line segments extracted from a test image. Next, for offshore ships with relatively small sizes, which cannot be efficiently picked out by the ship models due to the lack of reliable line segments, we propose an improved saliency detection method to find these proposals. Therefore, these two kinds of ship proposals are fed to the trained CNN for robust and efficient detection. Experimental results on a large amount of representative remote sensing images with different kinds of ships with varied poses, shapes and scales demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of our proposed S-CNN-Based ship detector.

  13. An Optimized Clustering Approach for Automated Detection of White Matter Lesions in MRI Brain Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Anitha

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Settings White Matter lesions (WMLs are small areas of dead cells found in parts of the brain. In general, it is difficult for medical experts to accurately quantify the WMLs due to decreased contrast between White Matter (WM and Grey Matter (GM. The aim of this paper is to
    automatically detect the White Matter Lesions which is present in the brains of elderly people. WML detection process includes the following stages: 1. Image preprocessing, 2. Clustering (Fuzzy c-means clustering, Geostatistical Possibilistic clustering and Geostatistical Fuzzy clustering and 3.Optimization using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO. The proposed system is tested on a database of 208 MRI images. GFCM yields high sensitivity of 89%, specificity of 94% and overall accuracy of 93% over FCM and GPC. The clustered brain images are then subjected to Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO. The optimized result obtained from GFCM-PSO provides sensitivity of 90%, specificity of 94% and accuracy of 95%. The detection results reveals that GFCM and GFCMPSO better localizes the large regions of lesions and gives less false positive rate when compared to GPC and GPC-PSO which captures the largest loads of WMLs only in the upper ventral horns of the brain.

  14. Phase-Sensitive Inversion-Recovery MRI Improves Longitudinal Cortical Lesion Detection in Progressive MS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asaff Harel

    Full Text Available Previous studies comparing phase sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR to double inversion recovery (DIR have demonstrated that use of PSIR improves cross-sectional in vivo detection of cortical lesions (CL in multiple sclerosis. We studied the utility of PSIR in detection/characterization of accrual of CL over time in a 1-year longitudinal study in primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS compared to DIR. PSIR and DIR images were acquired with 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in 25 patients with PPMS and 19 healthy controls at baseline, and after 1 year in 20 patients with PPMS. CL were classified as intracortical, leucocortical or juxtacortical. Lesion counts and volumes were calculated for both time points from both sequences and compared. Correlations with measures of physical and cognitive disability were determined as well as new CL counts and volumes. Compared to DIR, PSIR led to detection of a higher number of CL involving a larger proportion of patients with PPMS both cross-sectionally (p = 0.006, 88% and longitudinally (p = 0.007, 95%, and led to the reclassification of a third of CL seen on DIR at each time point. Interestingly, PSIR was more sensitive to new CL accumulation over time compared to DIR. PSIR is a promising technique to monitor cortical damage and disease progression in patients with PPMS over a short-term follow-up.

  15. Likelihood-Based Hypothesis Tests for Brain Activation Detection From MRI Data Disturbed by Colored Noise: A Simulation Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Dekker, A.J.; Poot, D.H.J.; Bos, R.; Sijbers, J.

    2009-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data that are corrupted by temporally colored noise are generally preprocessed (i.e., prewhitened or precolored) prior to functional activation detection. In this paper, we propose likelihood-based hypothesis tests that account for colored noise directly

  16. Ship-based detection of glyoxal over the remote tropical Pacific Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Sinreich, R.; Coburn, S.; Dix, B.; Volkamer, R.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first detection of glyoxal (CHOCHO) over the remote tropical Pacific Ocean in the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL). The measurements were conducted by means of the University of Colorado Ship Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU SMAX-DOAS) instrument aboard the research vessel Ronald H. Brown. The research vessel was on a cruise in the framework of the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study – Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) and the Tropical...

  17. Ship-based detection of glyoxal over the remote tropical Pacific Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Sinreich, R.; Coburn, S.; Dix, B.; Volkamer, R.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first detection of glyoxal (CHOCHO) over the remote tropical Pacific Ocean in the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL). The measurements were conducted by means of the University of Colorado Ship Multi-Axis Differential Optical Spectroscopy (CU SMAX-DOAS) instrument aboard the research vessel Ronald H. Brown. The research vessel was on a cruise in the framework of the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study – Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) and the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO) ...

  18. Time-delayed contrast-enhanced MRI improves detection of brain metastases: a prospective validation of diagnostic yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Inbar, Or; Xu, Zhiyuan; Dodson, Blair; Rizvi, Tanvir; Durst, Christopher R; Mukherjee, Sugoto; Sheehan, Jason P

    2016-12-01

    The radiological detection of brain metastases (BMs) is essential for optimizing a patient's treatment. This statement is even more valid when stereotactic radiosurgery, a noninvasive image guided treatment that can target BM as small as 1-2 mm, is delivered as part of that care. The timing of image acquisition after contrast administration can influence the diagnostic sensitivity of contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for BM. Investigate the effect of time delayed acquisition after administration of intravenous Gadavist® (Gadobutrol 1 mmol/ml) on the detection of BM. This is a prospective IRB approved study of 50 patients with BM who underwent post-contrast MRI sequences after injection of 0.1 mmol/kg Gadavist® as part of clinical care (time-t0), followed by axial T1 sequences after a 10 min (time-t1) and 20 min delay (time-t2). MRI studies were blindly compared by three neuroradiologists. Single measure intraclass correlation coefficients were very high (0.914, 0.904 and 0.905 for time-t0, time-t1 and time-t2 respectively), corresponding to a reliable inter-observer correlation. The delayed MRI at time-t2 delayed sequences showed a significant and consistently higher diagnostic sensitivity for BM by every participating neuroradiologist and for the entire cohort (p = 0.016, 0.035 and 0.034 respectively). A disproportionately high representation of BM detected on the delayed studies was located within posterior circulation territories (compared to predictions based on tissue volume and blood-flow volumes). Considering the safe and potentially high yield nature of delayed MRI sequences, it should supplement the standard MRI sequences in all patients in need of precise delineation of their intracranial disease.

  19. A Saliency Guided Semi-Supervised Building Change Detection Method for High Resolution Remote Sensing Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Bin; Wang, Yunhong; Liu, Qingjie

    2016-08-27

    Characterizations of up to date information of the Earth's surface are an important application providing insights to urban planning, resources monitoring and environmental studies. A large number of change detection (CD) methods have been developed to solve them by utilizing remote sensing (RS) images. The advent of high resolution (HR) remote sensing images further provides challenges to traditional CD methods and opportunities to object-based CD methods. While several kinds of geospatial objects are recognized, this manuscript mainly focuses on buildings. Specifically, we propose a novel automatic approach combining pixel-based strategies with object-based ones for detecting building changes with HR remote sensing images. A multiresolution contextual morphological transformation called extended morphological attribute profiles (EMAPs) allows the extraction of geometrical features related to the structures within the scene at different scales. Pixel-based post-classification is executed on EMAPs using hierarchical fuzzy clustering. Subsequently, the hierarchical fuzzy frequency vector histograms are formed based on the image-objects acquired by simple linear iterative clustering (SLIC) segmentation. Then, saliency and morphological building index (MBI) extracted on difference images are used to generate a pseudo training set. Ultimately, object-based semi-supervised classification is implemented on this training set by applying random forest (RF). Most of the important changes are detected by the proposed method in our experiments. This study was checked for effectiveness using visual evaluation and numerical evaluation.

  20. Increasing signal amplitude in fiber Bragg grating detection of Lamb waves using remote bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Junghyun; Wells, Brian; Hackney, Drew; Bradford, Philip; Peters, Kara

    2016-07-20

    Networks of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors can serve as structural health monitoring systems for large-scale structures based on the collection of ultrasonic waves. The demodulation of structural Lamb waves using FBG sensors requires a high signal-to-noise ratio because the Lamb waves are of low amplitudes. This paper compares the signal transfer amplitudes between two adhesive mounting configurations for an FBG to detect Lamb waves propagating in an aluminum plate: a directly bonded FBG and a remotely bonded FBG. In the directly bonded FBG case, the Lamb waves create in-plane and out-of-plane displacements, which are transferred through the adhesive bond and detected by the FBG sensor. In the remotely bonded FBG case, the Lamb waves are converted into longitudinal and flexural traveling waves in the optical fiber at the adhesive bond, which propagate through the optical fiber and are detected by the FBG sensor. A theoretical prediction of overall signal attenuation also is performed, which is the combination of material attenuation in the plate and optical fiber and attenuation due to wave spreading in the plate. The experimental results demonstrate that remote bonding of the FBG significantly increases the signal amplitude measured by the FBG.

  1. Real-time progressive hyperspectral remote sensing detection methods for crop pest and diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Taixia; Zhang, Lifu; Peng, Bo; Zhang, Hongming; Chen, Zhengfu; Gao, Min

    2016-05-01

    Crop pests and diseases is one of major agricultural disasters, which have caused heavy losses in agricultural production each year. Hyperspectral remote sensing technology is one of the most advanced and effective method for monitoring crop pests and diseases. However, Hyperspectral facing serial problems such as low degree of automation of data processing and poor timeliness of information extraction. It resulting we cannot respond quickly to crop pests and diseases in a critical period, and missed the best time for quantitative spraying control on a fixed point. In this study, we take the crop pests and diseases as research point and breakthrough, using a self-development line scanning VNIR field imaging spectrometer. Take the advantage of the progressive obtain image characteristics of the push-broom hyperspectral remote sensor, a synchronous real-time progressive hyperspectral algorithms and models will development. Namely, the object's information will get row by row just after the data obtained. It will greatly improve operating time and efficiency under the same detection accuracy. This may solve the poor timeliness problem when we using hyperspectral remote sensing for crop pests and diseases detection. Furthermore, this method will provide a common way for time-sensitive industrial applications, such as environment, disaster. It may providing methods and technical reserves for the development of real-time detection satellite technology.

  2. Detecting functional connectivity change points for single-subject fMRI data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivor eCribben

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies there has been an increased interest in understanding the dynamic manner in which brain regions communicate with one another, as subjects perform a set of experimental tasks or as their psychological state changes. Dynamic Connectivity Regression (DCR is a data-driven technique used for detecting temporal change points in functional connectivity between brain regions where the number and location of the change points are unknown a priori. After finding the change points, DCR estimates a graph or set of relationships between the brain regions for data that falls between pairs of change points. In previous work, the method was predominantly validated using multi-subject data. In this paper, we concentrate on single-subject data and introduce a new DCR algorithm. The new algorithm increases accuracy for individual subject data with a small number of observations and reduces the number of false positives in the estimated undirected graphs. We also introduce a new Likelihood Ratio test for comparing sparse graphs across (or within subjects; thus allowing us to determine whether data should be combined across subjects. We perform an extensive simulation analysis on vector autoregression (VAR data as well as to an fMRI data set from a study (n=23 of a state anxiety induction using a socially evaluative threat challenge. The focus on single-subject data allows us to study the variation between individuals and may provide us with a deeper knowledge of the workings of the brain.

  3. Remote detection of nuclear magnetic resonance with an anisotropic magnetoresistive sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verpillat, F; Ledbetter, M P; Xu, S; Michalak, D J; Hilty, C; Bouchard, L-S; Antonijevic, S; Budker, D; Pines, A

    2008-02-19

    We report the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using an anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensor. A "remote-detection" arrangement was used in which protons in flowing water were prepolarized in the field of a superconducting NMR magnet, adiabatically inverted, and subsequently detected with an AMR sensor situated downstream from the magnet and the adiabatic inverter. AMR sensing is well suited for NMR detection in microfluidic "lab-on-a-chip" applications because the sensors are small, typically on the order of 10 mum. An estimate of the sensitivity for an optimized system indicates that approximately 6 x 10(13) protons in a volume of 1,000 mum(3), prepolarized in a 10-kG magnetic field, can be detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 in a 1-Hz bandwidth. This level of sensitivity is competitive with that demonstrated by microcoils in superconducting magnets and with the projected sensitivity of microfabricated atomic magnetometers.

  4. New radiological material detection technologies for nuclear forensics: Remote optical imaging and graphene-based sensors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Richard Karl [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martin, Jeffrey B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wiemann, Dora K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Choi, Junoh [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Howell, Stephen W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    We developed new detector technologies to identify the presence of radioactive materials for nuclear forensics applications. First, we investigated an optical radiation detection technique based on imaging nitrogen fluorescence excited by ionizing radiation. We demonstrated optical detection in air under indoor and outdoor conditions for alpha particles and gamma radiation at distances up to 75 meters. We also contributed to the development of next generation systems and concepts that could enable remote detection at distances greater than 1 km, and originated a concept that could enable daytime operation of the technique. A second area of research was the development of room-temperature graphene-based sensors for radiation detection and measurement. In this project, we observed tunable optical and charged particle detection, and developed improved devices. With further development, the advancements described in this report could enable new capabilities for nuclear forensics applications.

  5. CAPABILITIES OF REMOTE SENSING HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGES FOR THE DETECTION OF LEAD CONTAMINATION: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Maliki

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Advances in remote sensing technologies are increasingly becoming more useful for resource, ecosystem and agricultural management applications to the extent that these techniques can now also be applied for monitoring of soil contamination and human health risk assessment. While, extensive previous studies have shown that Visible and Near Infrared Spectroscopy (VNIRS in the spectral range 400–2500 nm can be used to quantify various soil constituents simultaneously, the direct determination of metal concentrations by remote sensing and reflectance spectroscopy is not as well examined as other soil parameters. The application of VNIRS, including laboratory hyperpectral measurements, field spectrometer measurements or image spectroscopy, generally achieves a good prediction of metal concentrations when compared to traditional wet chemical methods and has the advantage of being relatively less expensive and faster, allowing chemical assessment of contamination in close to real time. Furthermore, imaging spectroscopy can potentially provide significantly more samples over a larger spatial extent than traditional ground sampling methods. Thus the development of remote sensing techniques (field based and either airborne or satellite hyperspectral imaging can support the monitoring and efficient mapping of metal contamination (in dust and soil for environmental and health impact assessment. This review is concerned with the application of remote sensing and reflectance spectroscopy to the detection of heavy metals and discusses how current methods could be applied for the quantification of Pb contaminated soil surrounding mines and smelters.

  6. Label-free CEST MRI Detection of Citicoline-Liposome Drug Delivery in Ischemic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Huanling; Jablonska, Anna; Li, Yuguo; Cao, Suyi; Liu, Dexiang; Chen, Hanwei; van Zijl, Peter CM; Bulte, Jeff W.M.; Janowski, Miroslaw; Walczak, Piotr; Liu, Guanshu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Citicoline (CDPC) is a natural supplement with well-documented neuroprotective effects in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, we sought to exploit citicoline as a theranostic agent with its inherent chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI signal, which can be directly used as an MRI guidance in the citicoline drug delivery. Our in vitro CEST MRI results showed citicoline has two inherent CEST signals at +1 and +2 ppm, attributed to exchangeable...

  7. Model-free functional MRI analysis for detecting low-frequency functional connectivity in the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wismueller, Axel; Lange, Oliver; Auer, Dorothee; Leinsinger, Gerda

    2010-03-01

    Slowly varying temporally correlated activity fluctuations between functionally related brain areas have been identified by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) research in recent years. These low-frequency oscillations of less than 0.08 Hz appear to play a major role in various dynamic functional brain networks, such as the so-called 'default mode' network. They also have been observed as a property of symmetric cortices, and they are known to be present in the motor cortex among others. These low-frequency data are difficult to detect and quantify in fMRI. Traditionally, user-based regions of interests (ROI) or 'seed clusters' have been the primary analysis method. In this paper, we propose unsupervised clustering algorithms based on various distance measures to detect functional connectivity in resting state fMRI. The achieved results are evaluated quantitatively for different distance measures. The Euclidian metric implemented by standard unsupervised clustering approaches is compared with a non-metric topographic mapping of proximities based on the the mutual prediction error between pixel-specific signal dynamics time-series. It is shown that functional connectivity in the motor cortex of the human brain can be detected based on such model-free analysis methods for resting state fMRI.

  8. Optimization of Visual Tasks for Detecting Visual Cortex Activity in fMRI Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "A. Mirzajani

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: functional magnetic resonance imaging is a useful non-invasive technique for the evaluation and mapping of human brain, especially the visual cortex. One of the most important subjects in this background is optimizing visual stimuli in various forms of visual tasks for acquiring significant and ro-bust signals. Materials and methods: The effects of physical pa-rameters of visual stimuli on 14 healthy volunteers for detecting visual cortical activity were evaluated by functional magnetic resonance imaging. These pa-rameters were temporal frequency (TF, different pat-terns of activation including, square wave and sine wave grating, and two different states of rest includ-ing black and white screens. Results: The results showed that BOLD signal will be maximally in the TF of 8 Hz, and use the black screen in the rest state. However there was not significant difference between square-¬wave and sine-wave grat-ings in producing visual activation in the cortex. Conclusion: Physical parameters of visual tasks are effective in detecting visual cortical activity, and it is necessary to pay attention to them in order to get sig-nificant and robust signal. Visual tasks with TF of 8 Hz and one pattern of square-wave or sine-wave in activation state, and black screen in rest state are op-timally suitable for fMRI studies.

  9. Skull Base Erosion in Nasopharyugeal Careinoma: Detection by MRI%鼻咽癌颅底侵犯的MRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪若弟; 毛明伟

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study MRI characteristics and value in the diagnosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma with skull base erosion. Methods 86 cases of nasopharygeal carcinoma with positive nasopharyngeal pathology and symptoms of skull base erosion were selected. Axial T1WI, T2WI and coronal, sagital T1WI were performed. 47 cases had axial, coronal and sagital T1WI examination post Gd-DTPA injection. Results Areas of skull base involvement were as follow: 56 cases with pterygoid process, 54 with clivus, 28 with foramen ovale (including sphenoid wing), 27 with petrous apex, 1 with occiptal bone. 71 cases had more than one area involvement. There are four patterns in our group: ①Defect in the signal avoid cortex of skull base; ②High signal intensity of marrow was replaced by tumor; ③Contrast enhancement in abnormal bone; ④String like enhancement passing nerve foramen in skull base. 44 cases included intracranial abnormal. Conclusion MRI is the preferred technique in dementstrating skull base involvemetn of nasopharyngeal carcinoman.%目的探讨鼻咽癌颅底侵犯的MRI表现形式及诊断价值。方法选择经鼻咽部病理证实,并有明确颅底或颅神经受损症状的鼻咽癌患者86例。经颅底及鼻咽部轴位T1WI,T2WI和冠位、矢位T1WI扫描。47例行增强后轴、冠、矢位T1WI扫描。结果侵犯翼突者56例,斜坡54例,卵圆孔(包括蝶骨大翼)28例,岩尖27例,枕骨1例。71例有2处以上联合病变。表现形式有:①正常颅底骨皮质无信号带中断;②骨髓内T1高信号脂肪影被肿瘤信号代替;③骨内病灶强化;④穿过颅底神经孔的条状强化影。有颅内侵犯者44例。结论MRI是诊断鼻咽癌颅底侵犯的首选技术。

  10. Tryptophan PET predicts spatial and temporal patterns of post-treatment glioblastoma progression detected by contrast-enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosnyák, Edit; Kamson, David O; Robinette, Natasha L; Barger, Geoffrey R; Mittal, Sandeep; Juhász, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid PET is increasingly utilized for the detection of recurrent gliomas. Increased amino acid uptake is often observed outside the contrast-enhancing brain tumor mass. In this study, we evaluated if non-enhancing PET+ regions could predict spatial and temporal patterns of subsequent MRI progression in previously treated glioblastomas. Twelve patients with a contrast-enhancing area suspicious for glioblastoma recurrence on MRI underwent PET scanning with the amino acid radiotracer alpha-[(11)C]-methyl-L-tryptophan (AMT). Brain regions showing increased AMT uptake in and outside the contrast-enhancing volume were objectively delineated to include high uptake consistent with glioma (as defined by previous studies). Volume and tracer uptake of such non-enhancing PET+ regions were compared to spatial patterns and timing of subsequent progression of the contrast-enhancing lesion, as defined by serial surveillance MRI. Non-enhancing PET+ volumes varied widely across patients and extended up to 24 mm from the edge of MRI contrast enhancement. In ten patients with clear progression of the contrast-enhancing lesion, the non-enhancing PET+ volumes predicted the location of new enhancement, which extended beyond the PET+ brain tissue in six. In two patients, with no PET+ area beyond the initial contrast enhancement, MRI remained stable. There was a negative correlation between AMT uptake in non-enhancing brain and time to subsequent progression (r = -0.77, p = 0.003). Amino acid PET imaging could complement MRI not only for detecting glioma recurrence but also predicting the location and timing of subsequent tumor progression. This could support decisions for surgical intervention or other targeted therapies for recurrent gliomas.

  11. EDGE DETECTION METHOD OF REMOTE SENSING IMAGES BASED ON MATHEMATICAL MORPHOLOGY OF MULTI-STRUCTURE ELEMENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Hui; DU Pei-jun; ZHAO Chang-sheng; SHU Ning

    2004-01-01

    This paper puts forward an effective,specific algorithm for edge detection.Based on multi-structure elements of gray mathematics morphology,in the light of difference between noise and edge shape of RS images,the paper establishes multi-structure elements to detect edge by utilizing the grey form transformation principle.Compared with some classical edge detection operators,such as Sobel Edge Detection Operator,LOG Edge Detection Operator,and Canny Edge Detection Operator,the experiment indicates that this new algorithm possesses very good edge detection ability,which can detect edges more effectively,but its noise-resisting ability is relatively low.Because of the bigger noise of remote sensing image,the authors probe into putting forward other edge detection method based on combination of wavelet directivity checkout technology and small-scale Mathematical Morphology finally.So,position at the edge can be accurately located,the noise can be inhibited to a certain extent and the effect of edge detection is obvious.

  12. Ship Detection of Remote Sensing Image on FRHT and Multi-Points Curvature Based Polygon Approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Luo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the most difficult tasks of ship detection is detecting the ship which is docking at the port in remote sensing image. Traditional methods of automatic detection cannot be used to detect the land/waterboundaries, because both the gray values and textural features of a port are similar to those of the ships which are docking at the port. Therefore, ships cannot be accurately detected in this case. In this study, a novel method of land/water-boundaries detection is proposed, which is based on a polygon approximation method by incorporating two techniques, i.e., Fuzzy Randomized Hough Transform (FRHT and Multi-Points Curvature (MPC. The method considered the feature of human vision that the straight-line of the land/water-boundaries can be detected more accurately and rapidly. With the detection result of land/water-boundaries, ships docking at the port can be accurately detected. The experiment results demonstrate that this method can achieve good result of ship detection.

  13. AN APPLIED RESEARCH ON APPROACH OF DYADIC WAVELET TRANSFORM FOR REMOTE SENSING IMAGE EDGE DETECTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Wei; Xing Guangzhong; Hou Lantian; Qin Qiming; Wang Wenjun

    2006-01-01

    In the edge detection of Remote Sensing (RS) image, the useful detail losing and the spurious edge often appear. To solve the problem, the authors uses the dyadic wavelet to detect the edge of surface features by combining the edge detecting with the multi-resolution analyzing of the wavelet transform. Via the dyadic wavelet decomposing, the RS image of a certain appropriate scale is obtained, and the edge data of the plane and the upright directions are respectively figured out, then the gradient vector module of the surface features is worked out. By tracing them, the authors get the edge data of the object, therefore build the RS image which obtains the checked edge. This method can depress the effect of noise and examine exactly the edge data of the object by rule and line. With an experiment of an RS image which obtains an airport, the authors certificate the feasibility of the application of dyadic wavelet in the object edge detection.

  14. Classification of LULC Change Detection using Remotely Sensed Data for Coimbatore City, Tamilnadu, India

    CERN Document Server

    Babykalpana, Y

    2010-01-01

    Maps are used to describe far-off places . It is an aid for navigation and military strategies. Mapping of the lands are important and the mapping work is based on (i). Natural resource management & development (ii). Information technology ,(iii). Environmental development ,(iv). Facility management and (v). e-governance. The Landuse / Landcover system espoused by almost all Organisations and scientists, engineers and remote sensing community who are involved in mapping of earth surface features, is a system which is derived from the united States Geological Survey (USGS) LULC classification system. The application of RS and GIS involves influential of homogeneous zones, drift analysis of land use integration of new area changes or change detection etc.,National Remote Sensing Agency(NRSA) Govt. of India has devised a generalized LULC classification system respect to the Indian conditions based on the various categories of Earth surface features , resolution of available satellite data, capabilities of se...

  15. Using remote sensing and gis techniques for detecting land cover changes of mangrove habitats in Goa, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nagi, H.M.; Rodrigues, R.S.; ManiMurali, R.; Jagtap, T.G.

    Bulletin, 26 (2014) 21-33 © 2014 Sana’a University ISSN 1684-100X 21 USING REMOTE SENSING AND GIS TECHNIQUES FOR DETECTING LAND COVER CHANGES OF MANGROVE HABITATS IN GOA, INDIA Hisham. M. Nagi 1* , Rouchelle S. Rodrigues 2 , Mani Murali R. 2... in understanding the changes in ESMH and for formulating effective strategies for their conservation and rehabilitation. Key words: Remote sensing, Mangrove, land use pattern, change detection, conservation and rehabilitation. INTRODUCTION Coastal areas...

  16. Detecting Alzheimer’s disease by morphological MRI using hippocampal grading and cortical thickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Coupé, Pierrick; Fonov, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Structural MRI is an important imaging biomarker in Alzheimer’s disease as the cerebral atrophy has been shown to closely correlate with cogni-tive symptoms. Recognizing this, numerous methods have been developed for quantifying the disease related atrophy from MRI over the past decades. Special ...

  17. Early detection of femoral head avascular necrosis by bone SPECT compared to MRI in renal allograft recipients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Do Young; Yang, Seoung Oh; Lee, Hee Kyung; Han, Duck Jong; Shin, Myung Jin [Asan Mecical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    The prevalence of avascular necrosis (AVN) of femoral head in patients who receive immunosuppresive agents after renal transplantation is reported to be 4-29%. Among patients who develop AVN after renal transplantation, 80% become symptomatic within 2 years after transplantation. As the number of renal transplantation has been increased recently, early detection of femoral head AVN is very important because early surgical core decompression of femoral head can prevent collapse of the head. MRI is known to be very sensitive to diagnose femoral head AVN. However in three cases we report here, bone SPECT showed early changes of femoral head AVN, whereas MRI showed no specific abnormality. Case 1. A 53-year-old female received an allograft kidney transplantation in 1994. Preoperative bone scan was normal. She complained of both hip pain on Mar. 18 1997. Bone SPECT showed cold defect in both femoral heads but MRI showed no abnormality. After 3 months, bone SPECT and MRI showed AVN of both femoral heads. She underwent bilateral total hip replacement arthroplasty. AVN of femoral heads was confirmed by microscopic examination. Case 2. A 38-year-old female received an allograft kidney transplantation in Feb. 27 1997. Preoperative bone scan was normal. She ran a fever and creatinine was elevated from 1.2 to 2.8 mg/dL. She took high dose methylprednisolone therapy for acute reanl rejection. After two days, she complained pain in both hip joints and knee joints. Bone SPECT showed cold defects in both femoral heads but MRI showed no abnormality. A follow-up bone SPECT and MRI 20 days later revealed AVN of both femoral heads. Case 3. A 50-year-old male received an allograft kidney transplantation on Jul. 12 1995. Preoperative bone scan was normal. He complained of right hip pain on Jul, 26 1995. His bone SPECT showed cold defects in both femoral heads while MRI showed only minimal hip joint effusion. He also complained of left hip pain on Oct. 2 1995. He was admitted on Mar 17

  18. Gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging for the detection of colorectal liver metastases after neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Mi Hye [Konkuk University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung-Ihn [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hur, Bo Yun [Boramae Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae-You [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Seung-Yong; Yi, Nam-Joon; Suh, Kyung-Suk [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for the detection of colorectal liver metastases (CRLMs) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Our study population comprised 77 patients with 140 CRLMs who underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI within 1 month prior to surgery: group A (without NAC, n = 38) and group B (with NAC, n = 39). Two radiologists independently assessed all MR images and graded their diagnostic confidence for CRLM on a 5-point scale. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity and positive predictive values (PPV) were calculated and compared between the two groups. Diagnostic accuracy of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI in group B was slightly lower than in group A, but a statistically significant difference was not observed (observer 1: A{sub z}, 0.926 in group A, 0.905 in group B; observer 2: A{sub z}, 0.944 in group A, 0.885 in group B; p > 0.05). Sensitivity and PPV of group B were comparable to those of group A (observer 1: sensitivity = 93.5 % vs. 93.6 %, PPV = 95.1 % vs. 86.9 %; observer 2: sensitivity = 96.8 % vs. 91.0 %; PPV = 90.0 % vs. 89.7 %; all p > 0.05). Gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI including DWI provided good diagnostic performance with high sensitivity (>90 %) for the detection of CRLMs, regardless of the influence of NAC. (orig.)

  19. Detecting bugweed (Solanum mauritianum) abundance in plantation forestry using multisource remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peerbhay, Kabir; Mutanga, Onisimo; Lottering, Romano; Bangamwabo, Victor; Ismail, Riyad

    2016-11-01

    The invasive weed Solanum mauritianum (bugweed) has infested large areas of plantation forests in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Bugweed often forms dense infestations and rapidly capitalises on available natural resources hindering the production of forest resources. Precise assessment of bugweed canopy cover, especially at low abundance cover, is essential to an effective weed management strategy. In this study, the utility of AISA Eagle airborne hyperspectral data (393-994 nm) with the new generation Worldview-2 multispectral sensor (427-908 nm) was compared to detect the abundance of bugweed cover within the Hodgsons Sappi forest plantation. Using sparse partial least squares discriminant analysis (SPLS-DA), the best detection results were obtained when performing discrimination using the remotely sensing images combined with LiDAR. Overall classification accuracies subsequently improved by 10% and 11.67% for AISA and Worldview-2 respectively, with improved detection accuracies for bugweed cover densities as low as 5%. The incorporation of LiDAR worked well within the SPLS-DA framework for detecting the abundance of bugweed cover using remotely sensed data. In addition, the algorithm performed simultaneous dimension reduction and variable selection successfully whereby wavelengths in the visible (393-670 nm) and red-edge regions (725-734 nm) of the spectrum were the most effective.

  20. Using biogenic sulfur gases as remotely detectable biosignatures on anoxic planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D; Meadows, Victoria S; Claire, Mark W; Kasting, James F

    2011-06-01

    We used one-dimensional photochemical and radiative transfer models to study the potential of organic sulfur compounds (CS(2), OCS, CH(3)SH, CH(3)SCH(3), and CH(3)S(2)CH(3)) to act as remotely detectable biosignatures in anoxic exoplanetary atmospheres. Concentrations of organic sulfur gases were predicted for various biogenic sulfur fluxes into anoxic atmospheres and were found to increase with decreasing UV fluxes. Dimethyl sulfide (CH(3)SCH(3), or DMS) and dimethyl disulfide (CH(3)S(2)CH(3), or DMDS) concentrations could increase to remotely detectable levels, but only in cases of extremely low UV fluxes, which may occur in the habitable zone of an inactive M dwarf. The most detectable feature of organic sulfur gases is an indirect one that results from an increase in ethane (C(2)H(6)) over that which would be predicted based on the planet's methane (CH(4)) concentration. Thus, a characterization mission could detect these organic sulfur gases-and therefore the life that produces them-if it could sufficiently quantify the ethane and methane in the exoplanet's atmosphere.

  1. Incremental value of diffusion weighted and dynamic contrast enhanced MRI in the detection of locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiation treatment: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akin, Oguz; Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Hricak, Hedvig [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Gultekin, David H. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Zheng, Junting; Moskowitz, Chaya [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States); Pei, Xin; Sperling, Dahlia; Zelefsky, Michael J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Radiation Oncology, New York, NY (United States); Schwartz, Lawrence H. [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-09-15

    To assess the incremental value of diffusion-weighted (DW-MRI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) to T2-weighted MRI (T2WI) in detecting locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy. Twenty-four patients (median age, 70 years) with a history of radiotherapy-treated prostate cancer underwent multi-parametric MRI (MP-MRI) and transrectal prostate biopsy. Two readers independently scored the likelihood of cancer on a 1-5 scale, using T2WI alone and then adding DW-MRI and DCE-MRI. Areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) were estimated at the patient and prostate-side levels. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) from DW-MRI and the K{sup trans}, k{sub ep}, v{sub e}, AUGC90 and AUGC180 from DCE-MRI were recorded. Biopsy was positive in 16/24 (67%) and negative in 8/24 (33%) patients. AUCs for readers 1 and 2 increased from 0.64 and 0.53 to 0.95 and 0.86 with MP-MRI, at the patient level, and from 0.73 and 0.66 to 0.90 and 0.79 with MP-MRI, at the prostate-side level (p values < 0.05). Biopsy-positive and biopsy-negative prostate sides differed significantly in median ADC [1.44 vs. 1.68 (x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s)], median K{sup trans} [1.07 vs. 0.34 (1/min)], and k{sub ep} [2.06 vs 1.0 (1/min)] (p values < 0.05). MP-MRI was significantly more accurate than T2WI alone in detecting locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy. (orig.)

  2. Cardiac MRI. Diagnostic gain of an additional axial SSFP chest sequence for the detection of potentially significant extracardiac findings in the cardiac MRI examination setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roller, F.C.; Schneider, C.; Krombach, G.A. [University Hospital Giessen (Germany). Dept. Radiology; Schuhbaeck, A. [University Hospital Giessen (Germany). Dept. Cardiology; Rolf, A. [Kerckhoff Hospital Bad Nauheim (Germany). Dept. Cardiology

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Cardiac MRI (CMRI) is an effective method for imaging of the heart. The aim of our study was to assess whether an axial chest sequence in addition to the standard CMR examination setting has advantages in the detection of potentially significant extracardiac findings (PSEF). Materials and Methods: 400 consecutive patients were imaged at 1.5 T for clinical reasons. In addition to the standard long and short-axis views, an axial SSFP sequence was obtained covering the thorax from the lung apex to the diaphragm. All sequences were separately evaluated for PSEF. Results: A total of 25 PSEF were diagnosed in 400 patients, including 16 pleural effusions, a pulmonary fibrosis, a spondylodiscitis, ascites, lymphadenopathies, relapse of a mamma carcinoma, growth of adrenal glands metastases and diaphragmatic elevation. All 25 PSEF were detected by reading survey sequences. 24 of the 25 PSEF were detected by the additional SSFP chest sequence as well as the CINE sequences. Conclusion: In our study the additional axial SSFP chest sequence didn't show a benefit in the detection of PSEF. With the survey sequences we were able to detect all PSEF. We conclude that survey images should be assessed for additional findings. (orig.)

  3. Contextualizing Neuro-Collaborations: Reflections on a Transdisciplinary fMRI Lie Detection Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa M. Littlefield

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent neuroscience initiatives (including the E.U.’s Human Brain Project and the U.S.’s BRAIN Initiative have reinvigorated discussions about the possibilities for transdisciplinary collaboration between the neurosciences, the social sciences, and the humanities. As STS scholars have argued for decades, however, such inter- and transdisciplinary collaborations are potentially fraught with tensions between researchers. This essay build on such claims by arguing that the tensions of transdisciplinary research also exist within researchers’ own experiences of working between disciplines – a phenomenon that we call ‘Disciplinary Double Consciousness’ (DDC. Building on previous work that has characterized similar spaces (and especially on the Critical Neuroscience literature, we argue that ‘neuro-collaborations’ inevitably engage researchers in DDC – a phenomenon that allows us to explore the useful dissonance that researchers can experience when working between a home discipline and a secondary discipline. Our case study is a five-year case study in fMRI lie detection involving a transdisciplinary research team made up of social scientists, a neuroscientist, and a humanist. In addition to theorizing neuro-collaborations from the inside-out, this essay presents practical suggestions for developing transdisciplinary infrastructures that could support future neuro-collaborations.

  4. Detection of local recurrent prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy in terms of salvage radiotherapy using dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI without endorectal coil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rischke Hans Christian

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the value of dynamic contrast enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI without endorectal coil (EC in the detection of local recurrent prostate cancer (PC after radical prostatectomy (RP. Material and methods Thirty-three patients with recurrent PC underwent DCE-MRI without EC before salvage radiotherapy (RT. At median 15 (mean 16±4.9, range 12–27 months after completion of RT all patients showed complete biochemical response. Additional follow up post RT DCE-MRI scans were available. Prostate specific antigen (PSA levels at the time of imaging were correlated to the imaging findings. Results In 22/33 patients (67% early contrast enhancing nodules were detected in the post-prostatectomy fossa on pre-RT DCE-MRI images. The average pre-RT PSA level of the 22 patients with positive pre-RT DCE-MRI findings was significantly higher (mean, 0.74±0.64 ng/mL compared to the pre-RT PSA level of the 11 patients with negative pre-RT DCE-MRI (mean, 0.24±0.13 ng/mL (p Conclusions This is the first study that shows that DCE-MRI without EC can detect local recurrent PC with an estimated accuracy of 83% at low PSA levels. All false negative DCE-MRI scans were detected using a PSA cut-off of ≥0.54 ng/mL.

  5. Remote viewing with the artist Ingo Swann: neuropsychological profile, electroencephalographic correlates, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and possible mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persinger, M A; Roll, W G; Tiller, S G; Koren, S A; Cook, C M

    2002-06-01

    In the present study, the artist Ingo Swann, who helped develop the process of remote viewing (awareness of distant objects or places without employing normal senses), was exposed during a single setting of 30 min. to specific patterns of circumcerebral magnetic fields that significantly altered his subjective experiences. Several times during subsequent days, he was asked to sit in a quiet chamber and to sketch and to describe verbally distant stimuli (pictures or places) beyond his normal senses. The proportions of unusual 7-Hz spike and slow wave activity over the occipital lobes per trial were moderately correlated (rho=.50) with the ratings of accuracy between these distal, hidden stimuli and his responses. A neuropsychological assessment and Magnetic Resonance Imaging indicated a different structural and functional organization within the parieto-occipital region of the subject's right hemisphere from organizations typically noted. The results suggest that this type of paranormal phenomenon, often dismissed as methodological artifact or accepted as proofs of spiritual existence, is correlated with neurophysiological processes and physical events. Remote viewing may be enhanced by complex experimentally generated magnetic fields designed to interact with the neuromagnetic "binding factor" of consciousness.

  6. Remote detection of methane with a 1.66-microm diode laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, K; Tai, H

    1992-02-20

    High-sensitivity real-time remote detection of methane in air with a 1.66-microm distributed-feedback diode laser operating at room temperature is demonstrated by laboratory simulations. The laser current was modulated at a high frequency of ~5 MHz, and the laser-center frequency was locked onto a methane-absorption line. The laser light directed toward the probed region was received after one-way transmission or further reflection from a topographic target. The methane absorption was detected by the second-harmonic component in the optical-power variation. The minimum-detectable concentration-path-length product in the transmission scheme was 0.3 part in 10(6) m for a signal averaging time of 1.3 s. In the reflection scheme, the amount of methane could be measured from the ratio of the fundamental and second-harmonic signal intensities independently of the received power.

  7. Remote heartbeat signal detection from visible spectrum recordings based on blind deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Balvinder; Moses, Sophia; Luthra, Megha; Ikonomidou, Vasiliki N.

    2016-05-01

    While recent advances have shown that it is possible to acquire a signal equivalent to the heartbeat from visual spectrum video recordings of the human skin, extracting the heartbeat's exact timing information from it, for the purpose of heart rate variability analysis, remains a challenge. In this paper, we explore two novel methods to estimate the remote cardiac signal peak positions, aiming at a close representation of the R-peaks of the ECG signal. The first method is based on curve fitting (CF) using a modified filtered least mean square (LMS) optimization and the second method is based on system estimation using blind deconvolution (BDC). To prove the efficacy of the developed algorithms, we compared results obtained with the ground truth (ECG) signal. Both methods achieved a low relative error between the peaks of the two signals. This work, performed under an IRB approved protocol, provides initial proof that blind deconvolution techniques can be used to estimate timing information of the cardiac signal closely correlated to the one obtained by traditional ECG. The results show promise for further development of a remote sensing of cardiac signals for the purpose of remote vital sign and stress detection for medical, security, military and civilian applications.

  8. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerry Myers

    2003-11-12

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. This second six-month technical report summarizes the progress made towards defining, designing, and developing the hardware and software segments of the airborne, optical remote methane and ethane sensor. The most challenging task to date has been to identify a vendor capable of designing and developing a light source with the appropriate output wavelength and power. This report will document the work that has been done to identify design requirements, and potential vendors for the light source. Significant progress has also been made in characterizing the amount of light return available from a remote target at various distances from the light source. A great deal of time has been spent conducting laboratory and long-optical path target reflectance measurements. This is important since it helps to establish the overall optical output requirements for the sensor. It also reduces the relative uncertainty and risk associated with developing a custom light source. The data gathered from the optical path testing has been translated to the airborne transceiver design in such areas as: fiber coupling, optical detector selection, gas filters, and software analysis. Ophir will next, summarize the design progress of the transceiver hardware and software development. Finally, Ophir will discuss remaining project issues that may impact the success of the project.

  9. Detection versus location judgments in a hidden pattern task: functional MRI and behavioral correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolster, R Bruce; D'Arcy, Ryan C N; Song, Xiaowei; Runke, Dwayne S; Ryner, Lawrence

    2011-08-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess cortical involvement in a hidden pattern task. The experimental and control conditions involved judgment of the presence/absence versus the position of a complex pattern. Activation specific to hidden pattern identification was concentrated on frontal, dorsal parietal, and mesolimbic cortex. This was consistent not only across individual subjects, but with hidden figures tasks used in previous fMRI investigations. Results suggest that pattern identification relies on a relatively stable neural network controlling selective attention. In combination with fMRI, hidden pattern tasks may be useful in neuropsychological assessment of visual search and object identification.

  10. Sensitivity and specificity of interictal EEG-fMRI for detecting the ictal onset zone at different statistical thresholds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon eTousseyn

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available There is currently a lack of knowledge about EEG-fMRI specificity. Our aim was to define sensitivity and specificity of Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD responses to interictal epileptic spikes during EEG-fMRI for detecting the ictal onset zone (IOZ. We studied 21 refractory focal epilepsy patients who had a well-defined IOZ after a full presurgical evaluation and interictal spikes during EEG-fMRI. Areas of spike-related BOLD changes overlapping the IOZ in patients were considered as true positives; if no overlap was found, they were treated as false negatives. Matched healthy case-controls underwent similar EEG-fMRI in order to determine true negative and false positive fractions. The spike-related regressor of the patient was used in the design matrix of the healthy case-control. Suprathreshold BOLD changes in the brain of controls were considered as false positives, absence of these changes as true negatives. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for different statistical thresholds at the voxel level combined with different cluster size thresholds and represented in receiver operating characteristic (ROC-curves. Additionally, we calculated the ROC-curves based upon the cluster containing the maximal significant activation. We achieved a combination of 100% specificity and 62% sensitivity, using a Z-threshold in the interval 3.4-3.5 and cluster size threshold of 350 voxels. We could obtain higher sensitivity at the expense of specificity. Similar performance was found when using the cluster containing the maximal significant activation. Our data provide a guideline for different EEG-fMRI settings with their respective sensitivity and specificity for detecting the ictal onset zone. The unique cluster containing the maximal significant BOLD activation was a sensitive and specific marker of the ictal onset zone.

  11. A procedure for detection and measurement of interfaces in remotely acquired data using a digital computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, K. H.

    1977-01-01

    A technique developed and evaluated for the detection and measurement of surface feature interfaces in remotely acquired data is described. A computer implementation of this technique has been effected to automatically process categorized data derived from various sources such as the LANDSAT multispectral scanner and other scanner type sensors. The basic elements of the operational theory of the technique are described together with details of the procedure. An example application of the technique to the analysis of tidal shoreline length is given with a breakdown of manpower requirements.

  12. Procedure for detection and measurement of interfaces in remotely acquired data using a digital computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, K. H.

    1976-01-01

    A technique for the detection and measurement of surface feature interfaces in remotely acquired data was developed and evaluated. A computer implementation of this technique was effected to automatically process classified data derived from various sources such as the LANDSAT multispectral scanner and other scanning sensors. The basic elements of the operational theory of the technique are described, followed by the details of the procedure. An example of an application of the technique to the analysis of tidal shoreline length is given with a breakdown of manpower requirements.

  13. Technology Gap Analysis for the Detection of Process Signatures Using Less Than Remote Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, John S.; Atkinson, David A.; Lind, Michael A.; Maughan, A. D.; Kelly, James F.

    2005-01-01

    Although remote sensing methods offer advantages for monitoring important illicit process activities, remote and stand-off technologies cannot successfully detect all important processes with the sensitivity and certainty that is desired. The main scope of the program is observables, with a primary focus on chemical signatures. A number of key process signatures elude remote or stand-off detection for a variety of reasons (e.g., heavy particulate emissions that do not propagate far enough for detection at stand-off distances, semi-volatile chemicals that do not tend to vaporize and remain in the environment near the source, etc.). Some of these compounds can provide persistent, process-specific information that is not available through remote techniques; however, the associated measurement technologies have their own set of advantages, disadvantages and technical challenges that may need to be overcome before additional signature data can be effectively and reliably exploited. The main objective of this report is to describe a process to identify high impact technology gaps for important less-than-remote detection applications. The subsequent analysis focuses on the technology development needed to enable exploitation of important process signatures. The evaluation process that was developed involves three interrelated and often conflicting requirements generation activities: • Identification of target signature chemicals with unique intelligence value and their associated attributes as mitigated by environmentally influenced fate and transport effects (i.e., what can you expect to actually find that has intelligence value, where do you need to look for it and what sensitivity and selectivity do you need to see it) • Identification of end-user deployment scenario possibilities and constraints with a focus on alternative detection requirements, timing issues, logistical consideration, and training requirements for a successful measurement • Identification of

  14. A progressive processing method for breast cancer detection via UWB based on an MRI-derived model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xia; Song, Hang; Wang, Zong-Jie; Wang, Liang

    2014-07-01

    Ultra-wideband (UWB) microwave imaging is a promising method for breast cancer detection based on the large contrast of electric parameters between the malignant tumor and its surrounded normal breast organisms. In the case of multiple tumors being present, the conventional imaging approaches may be ineffective to detect all the tumors clearly. In this paper, a progressive processing method is proposed for detecting more than one tumor. The method is divided into three stages: primary detection, refocusing and image optimization. To test the feasibility of the approach, a numerical breast model is developed based on the realistic magnetic resonance image (MRI). Two tumors are assumed embedded in different positions. Successful detection of a 3.6 mm-diameter tumor at a depth of 42 mm is achieved. The correct information of both tumors is shown in the reconstructed image, suggesting that the progressive processing method is promising for multi-tumor detection.

  15. Detection of Brain Reorganization in Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Using Functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Subtask 1c. Acquire neuropsychological testing of the 40 healthy volunteers (months 3-12). d) Subtask 1d. Determine normative values for fMRI...against the normative mean LI values determined from healthy volunteers (see Subtask 1e.), for language, memory, and visual-motor functions (months 3-21...Subtask 1d. We have determined normative values for fMRI lateralization of language on 25 healthy volunteers ; however, we must now wait until our POMS

  16. Adhesions to Mesh after Ventral Hernia Mesh Repair Are Detected by MRI but Are Not a Cause of Long Term Chronic Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odd Langbach

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of the present study was to perform MRI in patients after ventral hernia mesh repair, in order to evaluate MRI’s ability to detect intra-abdominal adhesions. Materials and Methods. Single-center long term follow-up study of 155 patients operated for ventral hernia with laparoscopic (LVHR or open mesh repair (OVHR, including analyzing medical records, clinical investigation with patient-reported pain (VAS-scale, and MRI. MRI was performed in 124 patients: 114 patients (74% after follow-up, and 10 patients referred for late complaints after ventral mesh repair. To verify the MRI-diagnosis of adhesions, laparoscopy was performed after MRI in a cohort of 20 patients. Results. MRI detected adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall/mesh in 60% of the patients and mesh shrinkage in 20–50%. Adhesions were demonstrated to all types of meshes after both LVHR and OVHR with a sensitivity of 70%, specificity of 75%, positive predictive value of 78%, and negative predictive value of 67%. Independent predictors for formation of adhesions were mesh area as determined by MRI and Charlson index. The presence of adhesions was not associated with more pain. Conclusion. MRI can detect adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall in a fair reliable way. Adhesions are formed both after open and laparoscopic hernia mesh repair and are not associated with chronic pain.

  17. Fuzzy AutoEncode Based Cloud Detection for Remote Sensing Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenfeng Shao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cloud detection of remote sensing imagery is quite challenging due to the influence of complicated underlying surfaces and the variety of cloud types. Currently, most of the methods mainly rely on prior knowledge to extract features artificially for cloud detection. However, these features may not be able to accurately represent the cloud characteristics under complex environment. In this paper, we adopt an innovative model named Fuzzy Autoencode Model (FAEM to integrate the feature learning ability of stacked autoencode networks and the detection ability of fuzzy function for highly accurate cloud detection on remote sensing imagery. Our proposed method begins by selecting and fusing spectral, texture, and structure information. Thereafter, the proposed technique established a FAEM to learn the deep discriminative features from a great deal of selected information. Finally, the learned features are mapped to the corresponding cloud density map with a fuzzy function. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method, 172 Landsat ETM+ images and 25 GF-1 images with different spatial resolutions are used in this paper. For the convenience of accuracy assessment, ground truth data are manually outlined. Results show that the average RER (ratio of right rate and error rate on Landsat images is greater than 29, while the average RER of Support Vector Machine (SVM is 21.8 and Random Forest (RF is 23. The results on GF-1 images exhibit similar performance as Landsat images with the average RER of 25.9, which is much higher than the results of SVM and RF. Compared to traditional methods, our technique has attained higher average cloud detection accuracy for either different spatial resolutions or various land surfaces.

  18. Impact of functional MRI data preprocessing pipeline on default-mode network detectability in patients with disorders of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronache, Adrian; Rosazza, Cristina; Sattin, Davide; Leonardi, Matilde; D'Incerti, Ludovico; Minati, Ludovico

    2013-01-01

    An emerging application of resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) is the study of patients with disorders of consciousness (DoC), where integrity of default-mode network (DMN) activity is associated to the clinical level of preservation of consciousness. Due to the inherent inability to follow verbal instructions, arousal induced by scanning noise and postural pain, these patients tend to exhibit substantial levels of movement. This results in spurious, non-neural fluctuations of the rs-fMRI signal, which impair the evaluation of residual functional connectivity. Here, the effect of data preprocessing choices on the detectability of the DMN was systematically evaluated in a representative cohort of 30 clinically and etiologically heterogeneous DoC patients and 33 healthy controls. Starting from a standard preprocessing pipeline, additional steps were gradually inserted, namely band-pass filtering (BPF), removal of co-variance with the movement vectors, removal of co-variance with the global brain parenchyma signal, rejection of realignment outlier volumes and ventricle masking. Both independent-component analysis (ICA) and seed-based analysis (SBA) were performed, and DMN detectability was assessed quantitatively as well as visually. The results of the present study strongly show that the detection of DMN activity in the sub-optimal fMRI series acquired on DoC patients is contingent on the use of adequate filtering steps. ICA and SBA are differently affected but give convergent findings for high-grade preprocessing. We propose that future studies in this area should adopt the described preprocessing procedures as a minimum standard to reduce the probability of wrongly inferring that DMN activity is absent.

  19. Prostate cancer transrectal HIFU ablation: detection of local recurrences using T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouviere, Olivier; Lyonnet, Denis [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urinary and Vascular Radiology, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon 1, Faculte de medecine Lyon Nord, Lyon (France); Inserm, U556, Lyon (France); Girouin, Nicolas; Glas, Ludivine; Ben Cheikh, Alexandre [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urinary and Vascular Radiology, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon 1, Faculte de medecine Lyon Nord, Lyon (France); Gelet, Albert [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urology, Lyon (France); Inserm, U556, Lyon (France); Mege-Lechevallier, Florence [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Pathology, Lyon (France); Rabilloud, Muriel [Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Biostatistics, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon 1, UMR CNRS, Laboratoire Biostatistiques-Sante, Pierre-Benite (France); Chapelon, Jean-Yves [Inserm, U556, Lyon (France)

    2010-01-15

    The objective was to evaluate T2-weighted (T2w) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI in detecting local cancer recurrences after prostate high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. Fifty-nine patients with biochemical recurrence after prostate HIFU ablation underwent T2-weighted and DCE MRI before transrectal biopsy. For each patient, biopsies were performed by two operators: operator 1 (blinded to MR results) performed random and colour Doppler-guided biopsies (''routine biopsies''); operator 2 obtained up to three cores per suspicious lesion on MRI (''targeted biopsies''). Seventy-seven suspicious lesions were detected on DCE images (n=52), T2w images (n=2) or both (n=23). Forty patients and 41 MR lesions were positive at biopsy. Of the 36 remaining MR lesions, 20 contained viable benign glands. Targeted biopsy detected more cancers than routine biopsy (36 versus 27 patients, p=0.0523). The mean percentages of positive cores per patient and of tumour invasion of the cores were significantly higher for targeted biopsies (p<0.0001). The odds ratios of the probability of finding viable cancer and viable prostate tissue (benign or malignant) at targeted versus routine biopsy were respectively 3.35 (95% CI 3.05-3.64) and 1.38 (95% CI 1.13-1.63). MRI combining T2-weighted and DCE images is a promising method for guiding post-HIFU biopsy towards areas containing recurrent cancer and viable prostate tissue. (orig.)

  20. Full automatic fiducial marker detection on coil arrays for accurate instrumentation placement during MRI guided breast interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippatos, Konstantinos; Boehler, Tobias; Geisler, Benjamin; Zachmann, Harald; Twellmann, Thorsten

    2010-02-01

    With its high sensitivity, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) of the breast is today one of the first-line tools for early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer, particularly in the dense breast of young women. However, many relevant findings are very small or occult on targeted ultrasound images or mammography, so that MRI guided biopsy is the only option for a precise histological work-up [1]. State-of-the-art software tools for computer-aided diagnosis of breast cancer in DCE-MRI data offer also means for image-based planning of biopsy interventions. One step in the MRI guided biopsy workflow is the alignment of the patient position with the preoperative MR images. In these images, the location and orientation of the coil localization unit can be inferred from a number of fiducial markers, which for this purpose have to be manually or semi-automatically detected by the user. In this study, we propose a method for precise, full-automatic localization of fiducial markers, on which basis a virtual localization unit can be subsequently placed in the image volume for the purpose of determining the parameters for needle navigation. The method is based on adaptive thresholding for separating breast tissue from background followed by rigid registration of marker templates. In an evaluation of 25 clinical cases comprising 4 different commercial coil array models and 3 different MR imaging protocols, the method yielded a sensitivity of 0.96 at a false positive rate of 0.44 markers per case. The mean distance deviation between detected fiducial centers and ground truth information that was appointed from a radiologist was 0.94mm.

  1. Remote monitoring and security alert based on motion detection using mobile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganya Devi, K.; Srinivasan, P.

    2016-03-01

    Background model does not have any robust solution and constitutes one of the main problems in surveillance systems. The aim of the paper is to provide a mobile based security to a remote monitoring system through a WAP using GSM modem. It is most designed to provide durability and versatility for a wide variety of indoor and outdoor applications. It is compatible with both narrow and band networks and provides simultaneous image detection. The communicator provides remote control, event driven recording, including pre-alarm and post-alarm and image motion detection. The web cam allowing them to be mounted either to a ceiling or wall without requiring bracket, with the use of web cam. We could continuously monitoring status in the client system through the web. If any intruder arrives in the client system, server will provide an alert to the mobile (what we are set in the message that message send to the authorized person) and the client can view the image using WAP.

  2. Lake Storage Change Automatic Detection by Multi-source Remote Sensing without Underwater Terrain Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Changming

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Focusing on lake underwater terrain unknown and dynamic storage that is difficult to obtain by the traditional methods, a new method is proposed for lake dynamic storage estimation by multi-source and multi-temporal remote sensing without underwater terrain data. The details are as follows. Firstly, extraction dynamic lake boundary through steps by steps adaptive iteration water body detection algorithm from multi-temporal remote sensing imagery. And then, retrieve water level information from ICESat GLAS laser point data. Thirdly, comprehensive utilizing lake area and elevation data, the lake boundary is converted to contour of water by the water level is assigned to the lake boundary line, according to the time and water level information. Fourthly, through the contour line construction TIN (triangulated irregular network model and Kriging interpolation, it is gotten that the simulated three-dimensional lake digital elevation model. Finally, on the basis of simulated DEM, it is calculated that the dynamic lake volume, lake area distribution and water level information. The Bosten lake is selected as a case studying to verify the algorithm. The area and dynamic water storage variations of Bosten lake are detected since 2000. The results show that, the maximum error is 2.21× 108 m3, the minimum error is 0.00002× 108 m3, the average error is 0.044×108 m3, the root mean square is 0.59 and the correlation coefficient reached 0.99.

  3. Ship detection in high spatial resolution remote sensing image based on improved sea-land segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Zhang, Qiaochu; Zhao, Huijie; Dong, Chao; Meng, Lingjie

    2016-10-01

    A new method to detect ship target at sea based on improved segmentation algorithm is proposed in this paper, in which the improved segmentation algorithm is applied to precisely segment land and sea. Firstly, mean value is replaced instead of average variance value in Otsu method in order to improve the adaptability. Secondly, Mean Shift algorithm is performed to separate the original high spatial resolution remote sensing image into several homogeneous regions. At last, the final sea-land segmentation result can be located combined with the regions in preliminary sea-land segmentation result. The proposed segmentation algorithm performs well on the segment between water and land with affluent texture features and background noise, and produces a result that can be well used in shape and context analyses. Ships are detected with settled shape characteristics, including width, length and its compactness. Mean Shift algorithm can smooth the background noise, utilize the wave's texture features and helps highlight offshore ships. Mean shift algorithm is combined with improved Otsu threshold method in order to maximizes their advantages. Experimental results show that the improved sea-land segmentation algorithm on high spatial resolution remote sensing image with complex texture and background noise performs well in sea-land segmentation, not only enhances the accuracy of land and sea boarder, but also preserves detail characteristic of ships. Compared with traditional methods, this method can achieve accuracy over 90 percent. Experiments on Worldview images show the superior, robustness and precision of the proposed method.

  4. Detecting remote evolutionary relationships among proteins by large-scale semantic embedding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain Melvin

    Full Text Available Virtually every molecular biologist has searched a protein or DNA sequence database to find sequences that are evolutionarily related to a given query. Pairwise sequence comparison methods--i.e., measures of similarity between query and target sequences--provide the engine for sequence database search and have been the subject of 30 years of computational research. For the difficult problem of detecting remote evolutionary relationships between protein sequences, the most successful pairwise comparison methods involve building local models (e.g., profile hidden Markov models of protein sequences. However, recent work in massive data domains like web search and natural language processing demonstrate the advantage of exploiting the global structure of the data space. Motivated by this work, we present a large-scale algorithm called ProtEmbed, which learns an embedding of protein sequences into a low-dimensional "semantic space." Evolutionarily related proteins are embedded in close proximity, and additional pieces of evidence, such as 3D structural similarity or class labels, can be incorporated into the learning process. We find that ProtEmbed achieves superior accuracy to widely used pairwise sequence methods like PSI-BLAST and HHSearch for remote homology detection; it also outperforms our previous RankProp algorithm, which incorporates global structure in the form of a protein similarity network. Finally, the ProtEmbed embedding space can be visualized, both at the global level and local to a given query, yielding intuition about the structure of protein sequence space.

  5. Multifunctional fiber-optic microwave links based on remote heterodyne detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gliese, Ulrik Bo; Nielsen, Torben Nørskov; Nielsen, Søren Nørskov

    1998-01-01

    The multifunctionality of microwave links based on remote heterodyne detection (RHD) of signals from a dual-frequency laser transmitter is discussed and experimentally demonstrated in this paper. Typically, direct detection (DD) in conjunction with optical intensity modulation is used to implemen...... carrier to a 9-GHz carrier with penalty-free transmission over 25 km of optical fiber. Finally, the transparent link transmits a standard FM video 7.6-GHz radio-link signal over 25 km of optical fiber without measurable distortion...... fiber-optic microwave links. The resulting links are inherently transparent. As opposed to DD links, RHD links can perform radio-system functionalities such as modulation and frequency conversion in addition to transparency. All of these three functionalities are presented and experimentally...

  6. Landuse and Landcover Change Detection in Lalgudi Block, Tiruchirappalli District - Using Remote Sensing and GIS Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Balaselvakumar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an attempt has been carried out mapping and analysis the landuse and landcover change detection in Lalgudi block of Tiruchirappalli district using remote sensing and GIS techniques. The total area of the study area is 272.2 sq.km. It is located in the central part of Tamil Nadu. Landuse and Landcover change detection maps were generated and classified into agriculture land, built-up land, fallow land, natural vegetation, river sand, water bodies, and scrub without scrub land for the year 1990, 2000 and 2010 based on NRSA classification. Each landuse and landcover has been changed positively and negatively for the three decades, especially agriculture land, sandy area, natural vegetation and fallow land, which is about 19.62%, 6.56%, 13.16% and 14.91 percentages respectively.

  7. A remote sensor for detecting methane based on palladium-decorated single walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Li, Guomin

    2013-07-10

    The remote detection of the concentration of methane at room temperature is performed by a sensor that is configured by the combination of radio frequency identification (RFID), and functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The proposed sensor is schemed as a thin film RFID tag in a polyethylene substrate, on which a metal trace dipole, a metal trace T impedance matching networks, a 0.5 µm-CMOS RF/DC rectifier chipset and a sensor head of palladium-decorated single walled carbon nanotubes (Pd-SWCNTs) are surface mounted in cascade. The performances of the sensor are examined and described by the defined parameters of the received signal strength index (RSSI) and the comparative analog identifier (∆AID). Results validate the sensor's ability to detect molecules of methane at room temperature, showing that the RSSI can increase 4 dB and the ∆AID can increase 3% in response to methane concentrations ranging from zero to 100 ppm.

  8. Stress cine MRI for detection of coronary artery disease; Stress-Cine-MRT zur Primaeridagnostik der koronaren Herzkrankheit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, T.; Hofer, U.; Schild, H. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik; Omran, H. [Medizinische Universitaetsklinik II Bonn (Germany)

    2002-05-01

    Stress testing is the cornerstone in the diagnosis of patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Stress echocardiography has become a well-established modality for the detection of ischemia-induced wall motion abnormalities. However, display and reliable interpretation of stress echocardiography studies are user-dependent, the test reproducibility is low, and 10 to 15% of patients yield suboptimal or non-diagnostic images. Due to its high spatial and contrast resolution, MRI is known to permit an accurate determination of left ventricular function and wall thickness at rest. Early stress MRI studies provided promising results with respect to the detection of CAD. However, the clinical impact was limited due to long imaging time and problematic patient monitoring in the MRI environment. Recent technical improvements - namely ultrafast MR image acquisition - led to a significant reduction of imaging time and improved patient safety. Stress can be induced by physical exercise or pharmacologically by administration of a beta{sub 1}-agonist (dobutamine) or vasodilatator (dipyridamole and adenosine). The best developed and most promising stress MRI technique is a high-dose dobutamine/atropine stress protocol (10, 20, 30, 40 {mu}g/kg/min; optionally 0.25-mg fractions of atropine up to maximal dose 1 mg). Severe complications (myocardial infarction, ventricular fibrillation and sustained tachycardia, cardiogenic shock) may be expected in 0.25% of patients. Currently, data of three high-dose dobutamine stress MRI studies are available, revealing a good sensitivity (83 - 87%) and specificity (83 - 86%) in the assessment of CAD. The direct comparison between echocardiography and MRI for the detection of stress-induced wall motion abnormalities yielded better results for dobutamine-MRI in terms of sensitivity (86.2% vs. 74.3%; p < 0.05) and specificity (85.7% vs. 69.8% p < 0.05) as compared to dobutamine stress echocardiography. The superior results of MRI can

  9. Multi-Scale Change Detection Research of Remotely Sensed Big Data in CyberGIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, J.; Sieber, R.

    2015-12-01

    Big remotely sensed data, the heterogeneity of satellite platforms and file formats along with increasing volumes and velocities, offers new types of analyses. This makes big remotely sensed data a good candidate for CyberGIS, the aim of which is to enable knowledge discovery of big data in the cloud. We apply CyberGIS to feature-based multi-scale land use/cover change (LUCC) detection. There have been attempts to do multi-scale LUCC. However, studies were done with small data and could not consider the mismatch between multi-scale analysis and computational scale. They have yet to consider the possibilities for scalar research across numerous temporal and spatial scales afforded by big data, especially if we want to advance beyond pixel-based analysis and also reduce preprocessing requirements. We create a geospatial cyberinfrastructure (GCI) to handle multi-spatio-temporal scale change detection. We first clarify different meanings of scale in CyberGIS and LUCC to derive a feature scope layer in the GCI based on Stommel modelling. Our analysis layer contains a multi-scale segmentation-based method based on normalized cut image segmentation and wavelet-based image scaling algorithms. Our computer resource utilization layer uses Wang and Armstrong's (2009) method for mainly for memory, I/O and CPU time. Our case is urban-rural change detection in the Greater Montreal Area (5 time periods, 2006-2012, 100 virtual machines), 36,000km2 and varying from 0.6m to 38m resolution. We present a ground truthed accuracy assessment of a change matrix that is composed of 6 feature classes at 12 different spatio-temporal scales, and the performance of the change detection GCI for multi-scale LUCC study. The GCI allows us to extract and coordinate different types of changes by varying spatio-temporal scales from the big imagery datasets.

  10. Study on detection of coastal water environment of China by ocean color remote sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Coastal water environment is essentially enhanced by ocean color which is basically decided by substances concentration in water such as chlorophyll, suspended material and yellow substance. It is very difficult, even not possible, to detect water color by expensive ship routing, because of its temporal and spatial variety of feature and scales in the very complicated dynamical system of coastal water. With the development of satellite technique in the last 20 a, space sensors can be applied to detect ocean color by measuring the spectra of water-leaving radiance. It is proven that ocean color remote sensing is a powerful tool for understanding the process of oceanic biology and physics. Since the 1980s, great attention has been paid to the advanced remote sensing technique in China, especially to development of satellite programs for the coastal water environment. On 7 September 1988, China launched her first polar orbit satellite FY- 1A for meteorological and oceanographic application (water color and temperature) and the second satellite FY- 1B two years later. In May 1999, China launched her second generation environment satellite FY- 1C with higher sensitivies,more channels and stable operation. The special ocean color satellite HY - 1 is planned to be in the orbit in 2001, whose main purpose is to detect the coastal water environment of China seas. China is also developing a very advantageous sensor termed as Chinese moderate imaging spectra radiometer (CMODIS) with 91 channels, which will be a good candidate of the third generation satellite FY-3in 2003.The technical system of ocean color rermote sensing was developed by the Second Institute of Oceanography (SIO), State Oceanic Administration (SOA) in 1997. The system included data receiving, processing, distribution, calibration, validation and application units. The Hangzhou Station of SIO, SOA has the capability to receive FY- 1 and AVHRR data since 1989. It was also a SeaWiFS scientific research station

  11. Object-Oriented Change Detection for Remote Sensing Images Based on Multi-Scale Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenqing; Sui, Haigang; Tu, Jihui

    2016-06-01

    In the process of object-oriented change detection, the determination of the optimal segmentation scale is directly related to the subsequent change information extraction and analysis. Aiming at this problem, this paper presents a novel object-level change detection method based on multi-scale segmentation and fusion. First of all, the fine to coarse segmentation is used to obtain initial objects of different sizes; then, according to the features of the objects, Change Vector Analysis is used to obtain the change detection results of various scales. Furthermore, in order to improve the accuracy of change detection, this paper introduces fuzzy fusion and two kinds of decision level fusion methods to get the results of multi-scale fusion. Based on these methods, experiments are done with SPOT5 multi-spectral remote sensing imagery. Compared with pixel-level change detection methods, the overall accuracy of our method has been improved by nearly 10%, and the experimental results prove the feasibility and effectiveness of the fusion strategies.

  12. Diffusion fMRI detects white-matter dysfunction in mice with acute optic neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsen-Hsuan; Spees, William M; Chiang, Chia-Wen; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Cross, Anne H; Song, Sheng-Kwei

    2014-07-01

    Optic neuritis is a frequent and early symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS). Conventional magnetic resonance (MR) techniques provide means to assess multiple MS-related pathologies, including axonal injury, demyelination, and inflammation. A method to directly and non-invasively probe white-matter function could further elucidate the interplay of underlying pathologies and functional impairments. Previously, we demonstrated a significant 27% activation-associated decrease in the apparent diffusion coefficient of water perpendicular to the axonal fibers (ADC⊥) in normal C57BL/6 mouse optic nerve with visual stimulation using diffusion fMRI. Here we apply this approach to explore the relationship between visual acuity, optic nerve pathology, and diffusion fMRI in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model of optic neuritis. Visual stimulation produced a significant 25% (vs. baseline) ADC⊥ decrease in sham EAE optic nerves, while only a 7% (vs. baseline) ADC⊥ decrease was seen in EAE mice with acute optic neuritis. The reduced activation-associated ADC⊥ response correlated with post-MRI immunohistochemistry determined pathologies (including inflammation, demyelination, and axonal injury). The negative correlation between activation-associated ADC⊥ response and visual acuity was also found when pooling EAE-affected and sham groups under our experimental criteria. Results suggest that reduction in diffusion fMRI directly reflects impaired axonal-activation in EAE mice with optic neuritis. Diffusion fMRI holds promise for directly gauging in vivo white-matter dysfunction or therapeutic responses in MS patients.

  13. Diagnostic performance of CT and MRI on the detection of symptomatic intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula: a meta-analysis with indirect comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yen-Heng [National Taiwan University, Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University Hospital in Taipei and Yuan-Lin Branch, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiology, Hospital and Medical College, Taipei (China); Lin, Hsien-Ho [National Taiwan University, Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Taipei (China); Liu, Hon-Man; Lee, Chung-Wei; Chen, Ya-Fang [National Taiwan University Hospital in Taipei and Yuan-Lin Branch, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiology, Hospital and Medical College, Taipei (China)

    2016-08-15

    This study aims to review the diagnostic performance of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in symptomatic dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF). EMBASE, PubMed, and Cochrane Library were searched until April 2015 for studies which compared CT, MRI, or both with angiography for the detection of DAVF. The diagnostic performances of MRI and CT were indirectly compared using modality as a covariate in the analysis. Thirteen studies met our inclusion criteria. MRI had a sensitivity of 0.90 (95 % confidence interval (CI) = 0.83-0.94) and specificity of 0.94 (95 % CI = 0.90-0.96). CT had a sensitivity of 0.80 (95 % CI = 0.62-0.90) and specificity of 0.87 (95 % CI = 0.74-0.94). MRI showed better diagnostic performance than CT (p = 0.02). Contrast medium use and time-resolved MR angiography did not improve MRI diagnostic performance (p = 0.31 and 0.44, respectively). Both CT and MRI had good diagnostic performance. MRI was better than CT on the detection of symptomatic intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula in the indirect comparison. (orig.)

  14. Wrong detection of ventricular fibrillation in an implantable cardioverter defibrillator caused by the movement near the MRI scanner bore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, Eugenio; Censi, Federica; Triventi, Michele; Mancini, Matteo; Napolitano, Antonio; Genovese, Elisabetta; Cannata, Vittorio; Falsaperla, Rosaria; Calcagnini, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The static magnetic field generated by MRI systems is highly non-homogenous and rapidly decreases when moving away from the bore of the scanner. Consequently, the movement around the MRI scanner is equivalent to an exposure to a time-varying magnetic field at very low frequency (few Hz). For patients with an implanted cardiac stimulators, such as an implantable cardioverter/defibrillator (ICD), the movements inside the MRI environment may thus induce voltages on the loop formed by the leads of the device, with the potential to affect the behavior of the stimulator. In particular, the ICD's detection algorithms may be affected by the induced voltage and may cause inappropriate sensing, arrhythmia detections, and eventually inappropriate ICD therapy.We performed in-vitro measurements on a saline-filled humanshaped phantom (male, 170 cm height), equipped with an MRconditional ICD able to transmit in real-time the detected cardiac activity (electrograms). A biventricular implant was reproduced and the ICD was programmed in standard operating conditions, but with the shock delivery disabled. The electrograms recorded in the atrial, left and right ventricle channels were monitored during rotational movements along the vertical axis, in close proximity of the bore. The phantom was also equipped with an accelerometer and a magnetic field probe to measure the angular velocity and the magnetic field variation during the experiment. Pacing inhibition, inappropriate detection of tachyarrhythmias and of ventricular fibrillation were observed. Pacing inhibition began at an angular velocity of about 7 rad/s, (dB/dt of about 2 T/s). Inappropriate detection of ventricular fibrillation occurred at about 8 rad/s (dB/dt of about 3 T/s). These findings highlight the need for a specific risk assessment of workers with MR-conditional ICDs, which takes into account also effects that are generally not considered relevant for patients, such as the movement around the scanner bore.

  15. In vivo detection of free radicals in mouse septic encephalopathy using molecular MRI and immuno-spin trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towner, Rheal A; Garteiser, Philippe; Bozza, Fernando; Smith, Nataliya; Saunders, Debra; d' Avila, Joana C P; Magno, Flora; Oliveira, Marcus F; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Lupu, Florea; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramirez, Dario C; Gomez-Mejiba, Sandra E; Mason, Ronald P; Castro Faria-Neto, Hugo C

    2013-12-01

    Free radicals are known to play a major role in sepsis. Combined immuno-spin trapping and molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to detect in vivo and in situ levels of free radicals in murine septic encephalopathy after cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). DMPO (5,5-dimethyl pyrroline N-oxide) was injected over 6h after CLP, before administration of an anti-DMPO probe (anti-DMPO antibody bound to albumin-gadolinium-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid-biotin MRI targeting contrast agent). In vitro assessment of the anti-DMPO probe in oxidatively stressed mouse astrocytes significantly decreased T1 relaxation (p free radicals in murine septic encephalopathy.

  16. Detection of volume loss in hippocampal layers in Alzheimer's disease using 7 T MRI: A feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Boutet

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Alzheimer's disease (AD, the hippocampus is an early site of tau pathology and neurodegeneration. Histological studies have shown that lesions are not uniformly distributed within the hippocampus. Moreover, alterations of different hippocampal layers may reflect distinct pathological processes. 7 T MRI dramatically improves the visualization of hippocampal subregions and layers. In this study, we aimed to assess whether 7 T MRI can detect volumetric changes in hippocampal layers in vivo in patients with AD. We studied four AD patients and seven control subjects. MR images were acquired using a whole-body 7 T scanner with an eight channel transmit–receive coil. Hippocampal subregions were manually segmented from coronal T2*-weighted gradient echo images with 0.3 × 0.3 × 1.2 mm3 resolution using a protocol that distinguishes between layers richer or poorer in neuronal bodies. Five subregions were segmented in the region of the hippocampal body: alveus, strata radiatum, lacunosum and moleculare (SRLM of the cornu Ammonis (CA, hilum, stratum pyramidale of CA and stratum pyramidale of the subiculum. We found strong bilateral reductions in the SRLM of the cornu Ammonis and in the stratum pyramidale of the subiculum (p < 0.05, with average cross-sectional area reductions ranging from −29% to −49%. These results show that it is possible to detect volume loss in distinct hippocampal layers using segmentation of 7 T MRI. 7 T MRI-based segmentation is a promising tool for AD research.

  17. Detection of volume loss in hippocampal layers in Alzheimer's disease using 7 T MRI: A feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutet, Claire; Chupin, Marie; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Marrakchi-Kacem, Linda; Epelbaum, Stéphane; Poupon, Cyril; Wiggins, Christopher; Vignaud, Alexandre; Hasboun, Dominique; Defontaines, Bénédicte; Hanon, Olivier; Dubois, Bruno; Sarazin, Marie; Hertz-Pannier, Lucie; Colliot, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), the hippocampus is an early site of tau pathology and neurodegeneration. Histological studies have shown that lesions are not uniformly distributed within the hippocampus. Moreover, alterations of different hippocampal layers may reflect distinct pathological processes. 7 T MRI dramatically improves the visualization of hippocampal subregions and layers. In this study, we aimed to assess whether 7 T MRI can detect volumetric changes in hippocampal layers in vivo in patients with AD. We studied four AD patients and seven control subjects. MR images were acquired using a whole-body 7 T scanner with an eight channel transmit–receive coil. Hippocampal subregions were manually segmented from coronal T2*-weighted gradient echo images with 0.3 × 0.3 × 1.2 mm3 resolution using a protocol that distinguishes between layers richer or poorer in neuronal bodies. Five subregions were segmented in the region of the hippocampal body: alveus, strata radiatum, lacunosum and moleculare (SRLM) of the cornu Ammonis (CA), hilum, stratum pyramidale of CA and stratum pyramidale of the subiculum. We found strong bilateral reductions in the SRLM of the cornu Ammonis and in the stratum pyramidale of the subiculum (p < 0.05), with average cross-sectional area reductions ranging from −29% to −49%. These results show that it is possible to detect volume loss in distinct hippocampal layers using segmentation of 7 T MRI. 7 T MRI-based segmentation is a promising tool for AD research. PMID:25161900

  18. Can the painDETECT Questionnaire score and MRI help predict treatment outcome in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rifbjerg-Madsen, Signe; Christensen, Anton Wulf; Boesen, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    -one aspect of chronic pain. In contrast, other patients report good treatment response, although imaging shows signs of inflammation, which could indicate a possible enhancement of descending pain inhibitory mechanisms. When assessing disease activity in patients with central sensitisation, the commonly used......-modifying antirheumatic drug treatment, or (B) initiating or switching to biological therapy. We anticipate that 100 patients will be enrolled, tested and reassessed after 4 months of treatment. DATA COLLECTION INCLUDES: Clinical data, conventional MRI, DCE-MRI, blood samples and patient-reported outcomes. ETHICS......-inflammatory treatment, to explore the prognostic value of a screening questionnaire for central sensitisation, hand inflammation assessed by conventional MRI, and the interaction between them regarding treatment outcome evaluated by clinical status (DAS28-CRP). For the purpose of further exploratory analyses, dynamic...

  19. Spectral properties of Martian and other planetary glasses and their detection in remotely sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Kevin M.; Mustard, John F.; Parman, Stephen W.; Sklute, Elizabeth C.; Dyar, M. Darby; Cooper, Reid F.

    2017-01-01

    Thirty silicate glasses were synthesized as realistic analogs to those expected to exist on Mars, the Moon, and Mercury. Samples were measured using visible/near-infrared and Mössbauer spectroscopy to determine the effects of varying bulk chemistry, oxygen fugacity, and temperature on spectral properties. For Martian glasses, the fO2 during fusion strongly affects absorption band intensities in the spectra, while bulk chemistry has noticeable secondary effects on absorption band positions. Titanium and iron content drive spectral changes in lunar glasses, where Fe3+ is effectively absent. Iron-free Mercury analog glasses have much higher albedos than all other samples, and their spectral shape is a close match to some pyroclastic deposits on Mercury. Synthetic glass spectra were used as inputs into a spectral unmixing model applied to remote orbital datasets to test for the presence of glass. The model is validated against physical laboratory mixture spectra, as well as previous detections of glass-rich pyroclastic deposits on the Moon. Remote data were then used from suspected impact deposits and possible pyroclastic deposits on Mars as a new application of the model: the results reveal spatially coherent glass-rich material, and the strong spectral match of the synthetic glasses to these remotely sensed data gives new insights into the presence and character of glasses on the Martian surface. The large library of glass spectra generated here, acquired from consistently synthesized and measured samples, can serve as a resource for further studies of volcanic and impact processes on planetary bodies.

  20. Remote detection of artificially triggered avalanches below a fixed avalanche control installation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Herwijnen, Alec; Simioni, Stephan; Schweizer, Juerg

    2014-05-01

    Avalanche control by explosives is widely used as a temporary preventive measure to reduce avalanche hazard. The goal is to artificially trigger smaller less destructive avalanches, by detonating charges either above or on the snow surface. Hand charges are most often used, whereby the explosives are deployed by manually hand tossing or lowering onto the snow slope. Given the inherent dangers and limitations of this type of avalanche control, fixed avalanche control installations are increasingly used. These consist of strategically placed remote controlled installations that generate an explosion above the snow pack in an avalanche starting zone. While fixed installations can be used at any time and minimize the risk to avalanche control personnel, visual confirmation is still required to verify if an avalanche released. In order to remotely detect artificially triggered avalanches, we therefore developed a low-cost seismic monitoring system. We deployed the monitoring system in a ski area above the town of Davos , in the eastern Swiss Alps, below a Gazex installation, a remote controlled installation that generates an air blast by detonating a fuel-air explosive above the snow pack. The monitoring system consists of three vertical component geophones inserted in the ground at approximately 14, 27 and 46 meters from the Gazex installation. Our results show that, despite the relatively low precision of the monitoring equipment, both the detonation and the resulting avalanches can clearly be identified in the seismic data. Specifically, detonations are characterized by short, high amplitude broadband signals, while avalanches generate much longer, low frequency signals. Furthermore, information on the size of the artificially triggered avalanches is also obtained as it directly relates to the duration of the generated seismic signal. The overall goal is to assess the effectiveness of the fixed avalanche control installation with regards to yield (i.e. number of

  1. Development of a high-resolution detection module for the INSERT SPECT/MRI system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busca, Paolo; Fiorini, Carlo; Butt, Arslan D; Occhipinti, Michele; Quaglia, Riccardo; Trigilio, Paolo [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Via Golgi 40, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Nemeth, Gabor; Major, Peter; Bukki, Tamas; Nagy, Kalman [Mediso Medical Imaging Systems, Alsotorokvesz 14, H-1022 Budapest (Hungary); Piemonte, Claudio; Ferri, Alessandro; Gola, Alberto [Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), Via Sommarive, 18, 38123 Trento (Italy); Rieger, Jan [MRI.TOOLS GmbH, Robert-Roessle-Str. 10, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Niendorf, Thoralf [MRI.TOOLS GmbH, Robert-Roessle-Str. 10, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.UniversityF.F.), Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-07-29

    A new multi-modality imaging tool is under development in the framework of the INSERT (Integrated SPECT/MRI for Enhanced Stratification in Radio-chemo Therapy) project, supported by the European Community. The final goal is to develop a custom SPECT apparatus that can be used as an insert for commercially available MRI systems. INSERT is expected to offer more effective and earlier diagnosis with potentially better outcome in survival for the treatment of brain tumors, primarily glioma. Two SPECT prototypes are being developed, one dedicated to preclinical imaging (7 and 9.4 T), the second one dedicated to clinical imaging (3 T).

  2. Remote monostatic detection of radioactive material by laser-induced breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Joshua; Miao, Chenlong; Sprangle, Phillip

    2016-03-01

    This paper analyzes and evaluates a concept for remotely detecting the presence of radioactivity using electromagnetic signatures. The detection concept is based on the use of laser beams and the resulting electromagnetic signatures near the radioactive material. Free electrons, generated from ionizing radiation associated with the radioactive material, cascade down to low energies and attach to molecular oxygen. The resulting ion density depends on the level of radioactivity and can be readily photo-ionized by a low-intensity laser beam. This process provides a controllable source of seed electrons for the further collisional ionization (breakdown) of the air using a high-power, focused, CO2 laser pulse. When the air breakdown process saturates, the ionizing CO2 radiation reflects off the plasma region and can be detected. The time required for this to occur is a function of the level of radioactivity. This monostatic detection arrangement has the advantage that both the photo-ionizing and avalanche laser beams and the detector can be co-located.

  3. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPLINE LEAK DETECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerry Myers

    2004-05-12

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. The third six-month technical report contains a summary of the progress made towards finalizing the design and assembling the airborne, remote methane and ethane sensor. The vendor has been chosen and is on contract to develop the light source with the appropriate linewidth and spectral shape to best utilize the Ophir gas correlation software. Ophir has expanded upon the target reflectance testing begun in the previous performance period by replacing the experimental receiving optics with the proposed airborne large aperture telescope, which is theoretically capable of capturing many times more signal return. The data gathered from these tests has shown the importance of optimizing the fiber optic receiving fiber to the receiving optic and has helped Ophir to optimize the design of the gas cells and narrowband optical filters. Finally, Ophir will discuss remaining project issues that may impact the success of the project.

  4. Detection and classification of different liver lesions: Comparison of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI versus multiphasic spiral CT in a clinical single centre investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Böttcher, Joachim [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, SRH Clinic Gera, Str. des Friedens 122, 07548 Gera (Germany); Hansch, Andreas [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Friedrich-Schiller-University, Jena University Hospital, Erlanger Allee 101, 07740 Jena (Germany); Pfeil, Alexander [Department of Internal Medicine III, Friedrich-Schiller-University, Jena University Hospital, Erlanger Allee 101, 07740 Jena (Germany); Schmidt, Peter [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Friedrich-Schiller-University, Jena University Hospital, Erlanger Allee 101, 07740 Jena (Germany); Malich, Ansgar [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Suedharz Clinic Nordhausen, Dr. Robert-Koch-Str. 39, 99734 Nordhausen (Germany); Schneeweiss, Albrecht [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Friedrich-Schiller-University, Jena University Hospital, Erlanger Allee 101, 07740 Jena (Germany); Maurer, Martin H.; Streitparth, Florian [Department of Radiology, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Campus Virchow Clinic, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Teichgräber, Ulf K. [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Friedrich-Schiller-University, Jena University Hospital, Erlanger Allee 101, 07740 Jena (Germany); Renz, Diane M., E-mail: diane.renz@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Campus Virchow Clinic, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    Objective: To compare the diagnostic efficacy of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) vs. multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for the detection and classification of focal liver lesions, differentiated also for lesion entity and size; a separate analysis of pre- and postcontrast images as well as T2-weighted MRI sequences of focal and exclusively solid lesions was integrated. Methods: Twenty-nine patients with 130 focal liver lesions underwent MDCT (64-detector-row; contrast medium iopromide; native, arterial, portalvenous, venous phase) and MRI (1.5-T; dynamic and tissue-specific phase 20 min after application of Gd-EOB-DTPA). Hepatic lesions were verified against a standard of reference (SOR). CT and MR images were independently analysed by four blinded radiologists on an ordinal 6-point-scale, determining lesion classification and diagnostic confidence. Results: Among 130 lesions, 68 were classified as malignant and 62 as benign by SOR. The detection of malignant and benign lesions differed significantly between combined and postcontrast MRI vs. MDCT; overall detection rate was 91.5% for combined MRI and 80.4% for combined MDCT (p < 0.05). Considering all four readers together, combined MDCT achieved sensitivity of 66.2%, specificity of 79.0%, and diagnostic accuracy of 72.3%; combined MRI reached superior diagnostic efficacy: sensitivity 86.8%, specificity 94.4%, accuracy 90.4% (p < 0.05). Differentiated for lesion size, in particular lesions <20 mm revealed diagnostic benefit by MRI. Postcontrast MRI also achieved higher overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy compared to postcontrast MDCT for focal and exclusively solid liver lesions (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Combined and postcontrast Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI provided significantly higher overall detection rate and diagnostic accuracy, including low inter-observer variability, compared to MDCT in a single centre study.

  5. Detection of Brain Reorganization in Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Using Functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    determination of language dominance in screening for epilepsy surgery: the Wada test and newer noninvasive alternatives. Epilepsia . 2007 Mar;48(3...Hammeke TA, Sabsevitz DS. A comparison of five fMRI protocols for mapping speech comprehension systems. Epilepsia . 2008 Dec;49(12):1980-97. doi: 10.1111

  6. Remote System for Detection of Low-Levels of Methane Based on Photonic Crystal Fibres and Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Carvalho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we described an optical fibre sensing system for detecting low levels of methane. The properties of hollow-core photonic crystal fibres are explored to have a sensing head with favourable characteristics for gas sensing, particularly in what concerns intrinsic readout sensitivity and gas diffusion time in the sensing structure. The sensor interrogation was performed applying the Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy technique, and a portable measurement unit was developed with performance suitable for remote detection of low levels of methane. This portable system has the capacity to simultaneously interrogate four remote photonic crystal fibre sensing heads.

  7. EXTENDED PERFORMANCE HANDHELD AND MOBILE SENSORS FOR REMOTE DETECTION OF NATURAL GAS LEAKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael B. Frish; B. David Green; Richard T. Wainner; Francesca Scire-Scappuzzo; Paul Cataldi; Matthew C. Laderer

    2005-05-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) to advance the state-of-the-art of surveying for leaks of natural gas from transmission and distribution pipelines. The principal project goal was to develop means of deploying on an automotive platform an improved version of the handheld laser-based standoff natural gas leak detector previously developed by PSI and known as the Remote Methane Leak Detector or RMLD. A laser beam which interrogates the air for methane is projected from a spinning turret mounted upon a van. As the van travels forward, the laser beam scans an arc to the front and sides of the van so as to survey across streets and to building walls from a moving vehicle. When excess methane is detected within the arc, an alarm is activated. In this project, we built and tested a prototype Mobile RMLD (MRMLD) intended to provide lateral coverage of 10 m and one lateral scan for every meter of forward motion at forward speeds up to 10 m/s. Using advanced detection algorithms developed as part of this project, the early prototype MRMLD, installed on the back of a truck, readily detected simulated gas leaks of 50 liters per hour. As a supplement to the originally planned project, PSI also participated in a DoE demonstration of several gas leak detection systems at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) during September 2004. Using a handheld RMLD upgraded with the advanced detection algorithms developed in this project, from within a moving vehicle we readily detected leaks created along the 7.4 mile route of a virtual gas transmission pipeline.

  8. Method of remote powering and detecting multiple UWB passive tags in an RFID system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowla, Farid U [Castro Valley, CA; Nekoogar, Faranak [San Ramon, CA; Benzel, David M [Livermore, CA; Dallum, Gregory E [Livermore, CA; Spiridon, Alex [Palo Alto, CA

    2012-05-29

    A new Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), tracking, powering apparatus/system and method using coded Ultra-wideband (UWB) signaling is introduced. The proposed hardware and techniques disclosed herein utilize a plurality of passive UWB transponders in a field of an RFID-radar system. The radar system itself enables multiple passive tags to be remotely powered (activated) at about the same time frame via predetermined frequency UWB pulsed formats. Once such tags are in an activated state, an UWB radar transmits specific "interrogating codes" to put predetermined tags in an awakened status. Such predetermined tags can then communicate by a unique "response code" so as to be detected by an UWB system using radar methods.

  9. Hot-Carrier Seebeck Effect: Diffusion and Remote Detection of Hot Carriers in Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Juan F; Neumann, Ingmar; Costache, Marius V; Valenzuela, Sergio O

    2015-06-10

    We investigate hot carrier propagation across graphene using an electrical nonlocal injection/detection method. The device consists of a monolayer graphene flake contacted by multiple metal leads. Using two remote leads for electrical heating, we generate a carrier temperature gradient that results in a measurable thermoelectric voltage V(NL) across the remaining (detector) leads. Due to the nonlocal character of the measurement, V(NL) is exclusively due to the Seebeck effect. Remarkably, a departure from the ordinary relationship between Joule power P and V(NL), V(NL) ∼ P, becomes readily apparent at low temperatures, representing a fingerprint of hot-carrier dominated thermoelectricity. By studying V(NL) as a function of bias, we directly determine the carrier temperature and the characteristic cooling length for hot-carrier propagation, which are key parameters for a variety of new applications that rely on hot-carrier transport.

  10. Evaluation of course change detection of Ramganga river using remote sensing and GIS, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya Prakash Maurya

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Visibility of Ramganga river course change detection was made using Remote Sensing and GIS in study area among period of forty-one years from 1972 to 2013. Landsat MSS, TM, ETM+, LISS-III satellite images from 1972, 1989, 2000, 2006, and 2013 respectively were used to delineate the historical changes of the river course. This study shows that for a long time this area has been suffering due to erosion problem and shifting characteristics of the Ramganga River. The Ramganga river course has been shifting and the overall shifting is towards the south-west direction in different places which leads to the village erosion. The area has remained undeveloped due to infrastructure damaged by flood, changing course. This study may be helpful for the overall river management and planning for future prevention of food, changing coursing, loss of properties.

  11. On the use of Satellite Remote Sensing and GIS to detect NO2 in the Troposphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Zebitz

    2012-01-01

    This thesis studies the spatio-temporal patterns and trends in NO2 air pollution over Denmark using the satellite remote sensing product OMNO2e retrieved from the OMI instrument on the NASA AURA satellite. These data are related to in situ measurements of NO2 made at four rural and four urban...... are conducted, and it is shown that plumes from major Danish source areas can be detected in all wind directions, and that pollution transported from Europe is seen when the wind has a southern component. Examples of day to day tracking of transport of NO2 are also given to explain two pollution episodes...... stations in the Danish Air Quality Measurement network to find correlation between the two datasets. Clear weekly and annual cycles are found in both datasets and they are shown to be significantly correlated, though with a low correlation coefficient. Analyses of the patterns in different wind directions...

  12. In situ gas sensing using a remotely detectable probe with replaceable insert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sun Do; Ma, Kyungsik; Jeong, Ji Ho; Kim, Gilhwan; Lee, Kwanil; Jeong, Je-Myung; Lee, Sang Bae

    2012-01-16

    We demonstrate a spectroscopic gas sensor using an optical fiber probe with a replaceable insert. The probe consists of a hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber (HC-PBGF) with a core diameter of 10.9 μm and a glass tube where a 2-μm hollow core fiber (HCF) with a gold coated end facet can be inserted. The HCF is designed to function as both a gate where gases can enter the HC-PBGF and a mirror reflecting the guided light back to the HC-PBGF. The opposite distal end of the probe is also designed to be able to regulate the gas pressure within the HC-PBGF for a high gas flow rate, while still transmitting the reflected light to the analysis instrument. The remote sensing probe, we believe, has much potential for detecting gases in hazardous environments.

  13. Hot-Carrier Seebeck Effect: Diffusion and Remote Detection of Hot Carriers in Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Juan F.; Neumann, Ingmar; Costache, Marius V.; Valenzuela, Sergio O.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate hot carrier propagation across graphene using an electrical nonlocal injection/detection method. The device consists of a monolayer graphene flake contacted by multiple metal leads. Using two remote leads for electrical heating, we generate a carrier temperature gradient that results in a measurable thermoelectric voltage VNL across the remaining (detector) leads. Due to the nonlocal character of the measurement, VNL is exclusively due to the Seebeck effect. Remarkably, a departure from the ordinary relationship between Joule power P and VNL, VNL ~ P, becomes readily apparent at low temperatures, representing a fingerprint of hot-carrier dominated thermoelectricity. By studying VNL as a function of bias, we directly determine the carrier temperature and the characteristic cooling length for hot-carrier propagation, which are key parameters for a variety of new applications that rely on hot-carrier transport.

  14. Anomaly Detection Rudiments for the Application of Hyperspectral Sensors in Aerospace Remote Sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Gerald, E-mail: gw25@hw.ac.u, E-mail: gerald.wong@selexgalileo.co [Heriot-Watt University, Riccarton Campus, Edinburgh, EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    Hyperspectral imaging differs from conventional techniques by exploiting the spectral dimensionality of remote scenes. This additional information promotes discrimination of image elements, especially anomalies that are dissimilar with respect to global features. Algorithms for anomaly detection are designed to overcome the inherent difficulty of analysing hypercubes, which are the higher-dimensional analogues of conventional broadband images. Such algorithms are prolific in their variety and design, which could become an obstacle in choice or application for the neophyte researcher in this field. This paper seeks to consolidate this plethora of algorithms into succinct categories for clarity of rudimentary decision making. A duplicate of article 012048 Snapshot hyperspectral imaging and practical applications was originally published here, in error, as article 012051. The present article replaced the duplicate and was published on 18 August 2009.

  15. USING REMOTE SENSING AND GIS-TECHNIQUES IN SOUTH EAST CASPIAN COASTAL CHANGES DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Mousavi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing and GIS techniques have been used to detect the shoreline changes along Miankaleh peninsula promontory of the Gorgan Bay entrance over the last three decades (1975-2002. For this purpose satellite data including LANDSAT ETM+, TM, SPOT, ASTER L1A and RADARSAT have been analyzed. SPOT-Pan data were georeferenced with respect to 1 : 50 000 topographic maps using a Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM projection, then all the needed data sets were registered to the SPOT-Pan image. The hydrological data showed a rapid rise of the Caspian Sea level by 2.6 m between “1975-1996”.

  16. MRI and 1H-MRS detects volumetric and metabolic abnormalities of hippocampal sclerosis in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To further investigate the ability of MRI and 1H-MRS techniques for presurgical evaluation of hippocampal sclerosis. Methods:MRI and 1H-MRS were performed on 30 healthy subjects to determine the confidence levels. Eight patients who were pathologically confirmed hippocampal sclerosis were then studied using the same protocols. The difference of hippocampal formation (DHF) was used to determine atrophy of hippocampus. Areas under the peak of N-acetylaspartate(NAA) ,Creatine(Cr) and Choline (Cho) were measured, and the ratios of NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, and NAA/Cr+Cho were calculated. NAA/Cr+Cho value was applied to localize the seizure focus. Results:Two patients showed hippocampal atrophy according to DHF value. NAA/Cr ratio decreased significantly in ipsilateral hippocampus compared to that in contralateral hippocampus and control subjects(P<0.01). Cho/Cr value increased in both ipsi-and contralateral hippocampus in comparison with that in control subjects(P<0.01). NAA/Cr+Cho ratio, however, significantly reduced in both ipsi-and contralateral hippocampus(P<0.01) with lowest NAA/Cr+Cho ratio in seizure foci. Six patients could be lateralized by reduced and/or asymmetric NAA/Cr+Cho value. Conclusion:1H-MRS should be a promising diagnostic tool to detect neuron abnormality.1H-MRS and MRI complement each other hi presurgical lateralization of epileptogenic lesion in epilepsy patients.

  17. Empirical evaluation of bias field correction algorithms for computer-aided detection of prostate cancer on T2w MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanath, Satish; Palumbo, Daniel; Chappelow, Jonathan; Patel, Pratik; Bloch, B. Nicholas; Rofsky, Neil; Lenkinski, Robert; Genega, Elizabeth; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-03-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), intensity inhomogeneity refers to an acquisition artifact which introduces a non-linear variation in the signal intensities within the image. Intensity inhomogeneity is known to significantly affect computerized analysis of MRI data (such as automated segmentation or classification procedures), hence requiring the application of bias field correction (BFC) algorithms to account for this artifact. Quantitative evaluation of BFC schemes is typically performed using generalized intensity-based measures (percent coefficient of variation, %CV ) or information-theoretic measures (entropy). While some investigators have previously empirically compared BFC schemes in the context of different domains (using changes in %CV and entropy to quantify improvements), no consensus has emerged as to the best BFC scheme for any given application. The motivation for this work is that the choice of a BFC scheme for a given application should be dictated by application-specific measures rather than ad hoc measures such as entropy and %CV. In this paper, we have attempted to address the problem of determining an optimal BFC algorithm in the context of a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme for prostate cancer (CaP) detection from T2-weighted (T2w) MRI. One goal of this work is to identify a BFC algorithm that will maximize the CaP classification accuracy (measured in terms of the area under the ROC curve or AUC). A secondary aim of our work is to determine whether measures such as %CV and entropy are correlated with a classifier-based objective measure (AUC). Determining the presence or absence of these correlations is important to understand whether domain independent BFC performance measures such as %CV , entropy should be used to identify the optimal BFC scheme for any given application. In order to answer these questions, we quantitatively compared 3 different popular BFC algorithms on a cohort of 10 clinical 3 Tesla prostate T2w MRI datasets

  18. Detection, Identification, Location, and Remote Sensing using SAW RFID Sensor Tags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation, we will consider the problem of simultaneous detection, identification, location estimation, and remote sensing for multiple objects. In particular, we will describe the design and testing of a wireless system capable of simultaneously detecting the presence of multiple objects, identifying each object, and acquiring both a low-resolution estimate of location and a high-resolution estimate of temperature for each object based on wireless interrogation of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) radiofrequency identification (RFID) sensor tags affixed to each object. The system is being studied for application on the lunar surface as well as for terrestrial remote sensing applications such as pre-launch monitoring and testing of spacecraft on the launch pad and monitoring of test facilities. The system utilizes a digitally beam-formed planar receiving antenna array to extend range and provide direction-of-arrival information coupled with an approximate maximum-likelihood signal processing algorithm to provide near-optimal estimation of both range and temperature. The system is capable of forming a large number of beams within the field of view and resolving the information from several tags within each beam. The combination of both spatial and waveform discrimination provides the capability to track and monitor telemetry from a large number of objects appearing simultaneously within the field of view of the receiving array. In the presentation, we will summarize the system design and illustrate several aspects of the operational characteristics and signal structure. We will examine the theoretical performance characteristics of the system and compare the theoretical results with results obtained from experiments in both controlled laboratory environments and in the field.

  19. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerry Myers

    2003-05-13

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. This six-month technical report summarizes the progress for each of the proposed tasks, discusses project concerns, and outlines near-term goals. Ophir has completed a data survey of two major natural gas pipeline companies on the design requirements for an airborne, optical remote sensor. The results of this survey are disclosed in this report. A substantial amount of time was spent on modeling the expected optical signal at the receiver at different absorption wavelengths, and determining the impact of noise sources such as solar background, signal shot noise, and electronic noise on methane and ethane gas detection. Based upon the signal to noise modeling and industry input, Ophir finalized the design requirements for the airborne sensor, and released the critical sensor light source design requirements to qualified vendors. Responses from the vendors indicated that the light source was not commercially available, and will require a research and development effort to produce. Three vendors have responded positively with proposed design solutions. Ophir has decided to conduct short path optical laboratory experiments to verify the existence of methane and absorption at the specified wavelength, prior to proceeding with the light source selection. Techniques to eliminate common mode noise were also evaluated during the laboratory tests. Finally, Ophir has included a summary of the potential concerns for project success and has established future goals.

  20. Negative predictive value of multiparametric MRI for prostate cancer detection: Outcome of 5-year follow-up in men with negative findings on initial MRI studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itatani, R., E-mail: banguliao@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1, Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Department of Radiology, Kumamoto Chuo Hospital, 1-5-1, Tainoshima, Kumamoto 862-0965 (Japan); Namimoto, T. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1, Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Atsuji, S.; Katahira, K.; Morishita, S. [Department of Radiology, Kumamoto Chuo Hospital, 1-5-1, Tainoshima, Kumamoto 862-0965 (Japan); Kitani, K.; Hamada, Y. [Department of Urology, Kumamoto Chuo Hospital, 1-5-1, Tainoshima, Kumamoto 862-0965 (Japan); Kitaoka, M. [Department of Pathology, Kumamoto Chuo Hospital, 1-5-1, Tainoshima, Kumamoto 862-0965 (Japan); Nakaura, T. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Amakusa Medical Center, Kameba 854-1, Amakusa, Kumamoto 863-0046 (Japan); Yamashita, Y. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1, Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We assess the negative predictive value of multiparametric MRI for prostate cancer. • Patients with positive prostate biopsy findings were defined as false-negative. • Patients with negative initial prostate biopsy findings were followed up for 5 years. • The negative predictive value was 89.6% for significant prostate cancer. • MRI is a useful tool to rule out significant prostate cancer before biopsy. - Abstract: Objective: To assess the clinical negative predictive value (NPV) of multiparametric MRI (mp-MRI) for prostate cancer in a 5-year follow-up. Materials and methods: One hundred ninety-three men suspected of harboring prostate cancer with negative MRI findings were included. Patients with positive transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy findings were defined as false-negative. Patients with negative initial TRUS-guided biopsy findings were followed up and only patients with negative findings by digital rectal examination, MRI, and repeat biopsy and no increase in PSA at 5-year follow-up were defined as “clinically negative”. The clinical NPV of mp-MRI was calculated. For quantitative analysis, mean signal intensity on T2-weighted images and the mean apparent diffusion coefficient value on ADC maps of the initial MRI studies were compared between peripheral-zone (PZ) cancer and the normal PZ based on pathologic maps of patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy. Results: The clinical NPV of mp-MRI was 89.6% for significant prostate cancer. Small cancers, prostatitis, and benign prostatic hypertrophy masking prostate cancer returned false-negative results. Quantitative analysis showed that there was no significant difference between PZ cancer and the normal PZ. Conclusion: The mp-MRI revealed a high clinical NPV and is a useful tool to rule out clinically significant prostate cancer before biopsy.

  1. In newly diagnosed breast cancer, screening MRI of the contralateral breast detects mammographically occult cancer, even in elderly women: the mayo clinic in Florida experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Johnny Ray; Vallow, Laura A; DePeri, Elizabeth R; McNeil, Rebecca B; Feigel, Deborah G; Amar, Surabhi; Buskirk, Steven J; Perez, Edith A

    2010-01-01

    The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer is somewhat controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of synchronous, occult contralateral breast cancer detected by MRI but not by mammography or clinical breast examination in women with newly diagnosed breast cancer, including those aged 70 years or older at our institution. MRI results for women with newly diagnosed breast cancer who underwent bilateral breast MRI after negative mammography and clinical examination between February 2003 and November 2007 at Mayo Clinic in Florida were reviewed. The prevalence of pathologically confirmed contralateral carcinoma diagnosed solely by MRI was determined and analyzed in the context of age, family history, menopausal status, breast density, and primary-tumor characteristics. Logistic regression was used to explore the association between contralateral carcinoma and potential patient risk factors. A total of 425 women were evaluated, of whom 129 (30%) were aged 70 years or older. A contralateral biopsy was recommended and performed solely on the basis of MRI in 72 of the 425 women (17%). Sixteen of these 72 women (22%) had pathologically confirmed carcinoma, including seven in the older subgroup. The prevalence of clinically and mammographically occult contralateral carcinoma detected by MRI was 3.8% (16/425) overall and 5.4% (7/129) in the group of older women. When potential risk factors for contralateral breast cancer were evaluated, postmenopausal status was the only significant predictor of contralateral cancer detected by MRI (p = 0.016). We concluded that contralateral breast screening with MRI should be considered in postmenopausal women with newly diagnosed breast cancer, even those aged 70 years or older at diagnosis.

  2. River Detection in Remotely Sensed Imagery Using Gabor Filtering and Path Opening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Yang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Detecting rivers from remotely sensed imagery is an initial yet important step in space-based river studies. This paper proposes an automatic approach to enhance and detect complete river networks. The main contribution of this work is the characterization of rivers according to their Gaussian-like cross-sections and longitudinal continuity. A Gabor filter was first employed to enhance river cross-sections. Rivers are better discerned from the image background after filtering but they can be easily corrupted owing to significant gray variations along river courses. Path opening, a flexible morphological operator, was then used to lengthen the river channel continuity and suppress noise. Rivers were consistently discerned from the image background after these two-step processes. Finally, a global threshold was automatically determined and applied to create binary river masks. River networks of the Yukon Basin and the Greenland Ice Sheet were successfully detected in two Landsat 8 OLI panchromatic images using the proposed method, yielding a high accuracy (~97.79%, a high true positive rate (~94.33%, and a low false positive rate (~1.76%. Furthermore, experimental tests validated the high capability of the proposed method to preserve river network continuity.

  3. Embedded DSP-based telehealth radar system for remote in-door fall detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garripoli, Carmine; Mercuri, Marco; Karsmakers, Peter; Jack Soh, Ping; Crupi, Giovanni; Vandenbosch, Guy A E; Pace, Calogero; Leroux, Paul; Schreurs, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Telehealth systems and applications are extensively investigated nowadays to enhance the quality-of-care and, in particular, to detect emergency situations and to monitor the well-being of elderly people, allowing them to stay at home independently as long as possible. In this paper, an embedded telehealth system for continuous, automatic, and remote monitoring of real-time fall emergencies is presented and discussed. The system, consisting of a radar sensor and base station, represents a cost-effective and efficient healthcare solution. The implementation of the fall detection data processing technique, based on the least-square support vector machines, through a digital signal processor and the management of the communication between radar sensor and base station are detailed. Experimental tests, for a total of 65 mimicked fall incidents, recorded with 16 human subjects (14 men and two women) that have been monitored for 320 min, have been used to validate the proposed system under real circumstances. The subjects' weight is between 55 and 90 kg with heights between 1.65 and 1.82 m, while their age is between 25 and 39 years. The experimental results have shown a sensitivity to detect the fall events in real time of 100% without reporting false positives. The tests have been performed in an area where the radar's operation was not limited by practical situations, namely, signal power, coverage of the antennas, and presence of obstacles between the subject and the antennas.

  4. Upscaling of spectroradiometer data for stress detection in orchards with remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempeneers, Pieter; De Backer, Steve; Delalieux, Stephanie; Sterckx, Sindy; Debruyn, Walter; Coppin, Pol; Scheunders, Paul

    2004-10-01

    This paper studies the detection of vegetation stress in orchards via remote sensing. During previous research, it was shown that stress can be detected reliably on hyperspectral reflectances of the fresh leaves, using a generic wavelet based hyperspectral classification. In this work, we demonstrate the capability to detect stress from airborne/spaceborne hyperspectral sensors by upscaling the leaf reflectances to top of atmosphere (TOA) radiances. Several data sets are generated, measuring the foliar reflectance with a portable field spectroradiometer, covering different time periods, fruit variants and stress types. We concentrated on the Jonagold and Golden Delicious apple trees, induced with mildew and nitrogen deficiency. First, a directional homogeneous canopy reflectance model (ACRM) is applied on these data sets for simulating top of canopy (TOC) spectra. Then, the TOC level is further upscaled to TOA, using the atmospheric radiative transfer model MODTRAN4. To simulate hyperspectral imagery acquired with real airborne/spaceborne sensors, the spectrum is further filtered and subsampled to the available resolution. Using these simulated upscaled TOC and TOA spectra in classification, we will demonstrate that there is still a differentiation possible between stresses and non-stressed trees. Furthermore, results show it is possible to train a classifier with simulated TOA data, to make a classification of real hyperspectral imagery over the orchard.

  5. Transient and sustained BOLD signal time courses affect the detection of emotion-related brain activation in fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paret, Christian; Kluetsch, Rosemarie; Ruf, Matthias; Demirakca, Traute; Kalisch, Raffael; Schmahl, Christian; Ende, Gabriele

    2014-12-01

    A tremendous amount of effort has been dedicated to unravel the functional neuroanatomy of the processing and regulation of emotion, resulting in a well-described picture of limbic, para-limbic and prefrontal regions involved. Studies applying functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) often use the block-wise presentation of stimuli with affective content, and conventionally model brain activation as a function of stimulus or task duration. However, there is increasing evidence that regional brain responses may not always translate to task duration and rather show stimulus onset-related transient time courses. We assume that brain regions showing transient responses cannot be detected in block designs using a conventional fMRI analysis approach. At the same time, the probability of detecting these regions with conventional analyses may be increased when shorter stimulus timing or a more intense stimulation during a block is used. In a within-subject fMRI study, we presented aversive pictures to 20 healthy subjects and investigated the effect of experimental design (i.e. event-related and block design) on the detection of brain activation in limbic and para-limbic regions of interest of emotion processing. In addition to conventional modeling of sustained activation during blocks of stimulus presentation, we included a second response function into the general linear model (GLM), suited to detect transient time courses at block onset. In the conventional analysis, several regions like the amygdala, thalamus and periaqueductal gray were activated irrespective of design. However, we found a positive BOLD response in the anterior insula (AI) in event-related but not in block-design analyses. GLM analyses suggest that this difference may result from a transient response pattern which cannot be captured by the conventional fMRI analysis approach. Our results indicate that regions with a transient response profile like the AI can be missed in block designs if analyses

  6. Supervised Sub-Pixel Mapping for Change Detection from Remotely Sensed Images with Different Resolutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Wu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the relatively low temporal resolutions of high spatial resolution (HR remotely sensed images, land-cover change detection (LCCD may have to use multi-temporal images with different resolutions. The low spatial resolution (LR images often have high temporal repetition rates, but they contain a large number of mixed pixels, which may seriously limit their capability in change detection. Soft classification (SC can produce the proportional fractions of land-covers, on which sub-pixel mapping (SPM can construct fine resolution land-cover maps to reduce the low-spatial-resolution-problem to some extent. Thus, in this paper, sub-pixel land-cover change detection with the use of different resolution images (SLCCD_DR is addressed based on SC and SPM. Previously, endmember combinations within pixels are ignored in the LR image, which may result in flawed fractional differences. Meanwhile, the information of a known HR land-cover map is insignificantly treated in the SPM models, which leads to a reluctant SLCCD_DR result. In order to overcome these issues, a novel approach based on a back propagation neural network (BPNN with different resolution images (BPNN_DR is proposed in this paper. Firstly, endmember variability per pixel is considered during the SC process to ensure the high accuracy of the derived proportional fractional difference image. After that, the BPNN-based SPM model is constructed by a complete supervised framework. It takes full advantage of the prior known HR image, whether it predates or postdates the LR image, to train the BPNN, so that a sub-pixel change detection map is generated effectively. The proposed BPNN_DR is compared with four state-of-the-art methods at different scale factors. The experimental results using both synthetic data and real images demonstrated that it can outperform with a more detailed change detection map being produced.

  7. A suspicious breast lesion detected by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and pathologically confirmed as capillary hemangioma: A case report and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Lian He; Li, Qing Chang; Xu, Hong Tao; Wang, Xin; Wang, En Hua [The First Affiliated Hospital and College of Basic Medical Sciences, China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Ma, Shuang [Dept. of Neurology, Sheng Jing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang (China)

    2013-12-15

    Breast capillary hemangioma is a type of benign vascular tumor which is rarely seen. Little is known about its presentation on dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Here, we describe a case of suspicious breast lesion detected by DCE-MRI and pathologically confirmed as capillary hemangioma. Our case indicates that a small mass with a superficial location, clear boundary, and homogeneous enhancement on DCE-MRI indicates the possible diagnosis of hemangioma, whereby even the lesion presents a washout type curve.

  8. Usefulness of MRI detection of cervical spine and brain injuries in the evaluation of abusive head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadom, Nadja [Children' s National Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Khademian, Zarir; Vezina, Gilbert; Shalaby-Rana, Eglal [Children' s National Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Rice, Amy [Independent Consultant (Biostatistics), Chevy Chase, MD (United States); Hinds, Tanya [Children' s National Medical Center, Child and Adolescent Protection Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-07-15

    statistically significant relationship with a study outcome of abusive head trauma or help discriminate between accidental and abusive head trauma. Of the 30 children with supratentorial brain injury, 16 (53%) had a bilateral hypoxic-ischemic pattern. There was a statistically significant relationship between bilateral hypoxic-ischemic brain injury pattern and abusive head trauma (P < 0.05). In addition, the majority (81%) of children with bilateral hypoxic-ischemic brain injuries had cervical injuries. Although detection of cervical spine injuries by MRI does not discriminate between accidental and abusive head trauma, it can help to distinguish a traumatic from non-traumatic intracranial subdural hemorrhage. Cervical MRI should be considered in children with acute intracranial bleeds and otherwise non-contributory history, physical examination and ophthalmological findings. There is a statistically significant relationship between diffuse hypoxic-ischemic brain injury patterns and abusive head trauma. The high incidence of cervical injuries in children with hypoxic-ischemic injuries suggests a causal relationship. Overall, increased utilization of brain and spine MRI in children being evaluated for abusive head trauma can be helpful. (orig.)

  9. Implementing Tumor Detection and Area Calculation in Mri Image of Human Brain Using Image Processing Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Sunil L. Bangare; Madhura Patil

    2015-01-01

    This paper is based on the research on Human Brain Tumor which uses the MRI imaging technique to capture the image. In this proposed work Brain Tumor area is calculated to define the Stage or level of seriousness of the tumor. Image Processing techniques are used for the brain tumor area calculation and Neural Network algorithms for the tumor position calculation. Also in the further advancement the classification of the tumor based on few parameters is also expected. Proposed wor...

  10. Accuracy of abdominal ultrasound and MRI for detection of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziech, Manon L.W.; Smets, Anne M.J.B.; Lavini, Cristina; Caan, Matthan W.A.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Bipat, Shandra; Stoker, Jaap [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hummel, Thalia Z.; Benninga, Marc A.; Kindermann, Angelika [Emma Children' s Hospital, Academic Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nievelstein, Rutger A.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Roelofs, Joris J.T.H. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-11-15

    Endoscopy is currently the primary diagnostic technique for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children. To assess the accuracy of US and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease and for distinguishing Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis in comparison to a reference standard. Consecutive children with suspected IBD underwent diagnostic workup including ileocolonoscopy and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy as the reference standard, abdominal US, and MR enterography and colonography at 3 T. The protocol included a dynamic contrast-enhanced 3-D sequence. Sensitivity, specificity and kappa values were calculated for one ultrasonographer and two MRI observers. We included 28 children (15 boys) with mean age 14 years (range 10-17 years). The diagnosis was IBD in 23 children (72%), including 12 with Crohn disease, 10 with ulcerative colitis and 1 with indeterminate colitis. For the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease the sensitivity was 55% for US and 57% (both observers) for MR entero- and colonography, and the specificity was 100% for US and 100% (observer 1) and 75% (observer 2) for MR entero- and colonography. Combined MRI and US had sensitivity and specificity of 70% and 100% (observer 1) and 74% and 80% (observer 2), respectively. With the addition of a dynamic contrast-enhanced MR sequence, the sensitivity increased to 83% and 87%. US and MRI could only distinguish between Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis when terminal ileum lesions were present. US and MR entero- and colonography have a high accuracy for diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease in children but cannot be used to distinguish Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. (orig.)

  11. Detection of multifocal osteonecrosis in an adolescent with dermatomyositis using whole-body MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Tania C.M.; Terreri, Maria Teresa A.; Hilario, Maria Odete E. [Federal University of Sao Paulo, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Allergy, Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lederman, Henrique [Federal University of Sao Paulo, Image Diagnosis Department, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Kaste, Sue C. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Osteonecrosis is a well-recognized complication of corticosteroid use resulting in significant morbidity, often requiring surgical intervention. Whole-body MRI is a promising method that allows imaging of the whole patient in a reasonable time without the use of ionizing radiation. This technique has the potential for evaluating nonmalignant multifocal skeletal disease like osteonecrosis. This case highlights the value of whole-body MR in an adolescent with dermatomyositis who developed multifocal osteonecrosis. (orig.)

  12. Checkmark: a sign for the detection of iliopsoas pathology on MRI of the hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eshed, Iris; Inbar, Yael; Hertz, Marjorie; Apter, Sara (Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv Univ., Tel Aviv (Israel)), e-mail: iris.eshed@sheba.health.gov.il

    2010-06-15

    Background: The iliopsoas compartment can be involved in many different disease processes with a wide variety of symptoms that may simulate avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head. The psoas muscle merges with the iliacus to form a checkmark (v) shape in the coronal MRI plane, with normal muscle intensities, on both sides of the spine. Purpose: To evaluate whether abnormality of this checkmark shape (obliteration or abnormal intensity), the checkmark sign, can be used as a simple indicator of iliopsoas pathologies on MR examinations performed for suspected AVN of the hip. Material and Methods: A total of 75 hip MRI examinations performed during 2007 for suspected AVN (male:female ratio, 44:31; average age, 41 years) were retrospectively assessed. The iliopsoas compartment was assessed on the coronal T1 and T2 fat saturated sequences for the presence of the checkmark sign by a consensus of two readers. Results: Twenty-six patients had signs of AVN and 49 patients had either other hip findings or normal hips. A normal checkmark shape was observed in all but two examinations. Obliteration of the checkmark shape, a positive checkmark sign, in those two was due to psoas compartment pathology (infection and hematoma of the iliopsoas compartment). Conclusion: A positive checkmark sign (abnormal shape or intensity) can serve as a clue for unsuspected iliopsoas pathology when evaluating MRI of the hip in patients with suspected AVN

  13. Vascular Differences Detected by MRI for Metastatic Versus Nonmetastatic Breast and Prostate Cancer Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaver M. Bhujwalla

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have linked vascular density, identified in histologic sections, to “metastatic risk.” Functional information of the vasculature, not readily available from histologic sections, can be obtained with contrast-enhanced MRI to exploit for therapy or metastasis prevention. Our aims were to determine if human breast and prostate cancer xenograffs preselected for differences in invasive and metastatic characteristics established correspondingly different vascular volume and permeability, quantified here with noninvasive MRI of the intravascular contrast agent albumin-GdDTPA. Tumor vascular volume and permeability of human breast and prostate cancer xenografts were characterized using MRI. Parallel studies confirmed the invasive behavior of these cell lines. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression in the cell lines was measured using ELISA and Western blots. Metastasis to the lungs was evaluated with spontaneous as well as experimental assay. Metastatic tumors formed vasculature with significantly higher permeability or vascular volume (P < .05, two-sided unpaired t test. The permeability profile matched VEGF expression. Within tumors, regions of high vascular volume usually exhibited low permeability whereas regions of low vascular volume exhibited high permeability. We observed that although invasion was necessary, without adequate vascularization it was not sufficient for metastasis to occur.

  14. ROLE OF MULTIPARAMETRIC MRI IN THE DETECTION AND LOCALIZATION OF EARLY-STAGE PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Akhverdieva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of prostate cancer (PC diagnosis using multipatametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was evaluated. Unlike most of investigations of the similar problem, this trial provides an objective assessment applying the method of statistical analysis - binary logistic regression. It used data on 166 patients, including primary patients (with suspected PC, as well as patients with the established diagnosis of PC, those with a history of negative biopsy, and those with suspected recurrent PC. Some patients underwent target biopsy, the results of which were then employed for statistical processing. The data of the analysis showed that the sensitivity, specificity, and total accuracy of the method using the created model of binary logistic regression at the separation value of 0.625 were 75.0, 85.2, and 79.7%, respectively. The efficiency of diffusion-weighted images (DWI with varying weighing degree by water molecule diffusion (b factor on MRI systems with different magnetic field strength (1.5 and 3 Tesla was also evaluated. There were no statistically significant differences in normalized absolute signal intensity as to the contralateral gland portion in DWI with b factors of 1000 and 2000 between the MRI systems with a magnetic field strength of 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla.

  15. Comparison of abdominal MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging to {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in detection of neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid-Tannwald, Christine; Schmid-Tannwald, Christoph M.; Neumann, Ralph; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schramm, Nicolai; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Rist, Carsten [Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Morelli, John N. [Scott and White Hospital Temple, Department of Radiology, Temple, TX (United States); Haug, Alexander R.; Jansen, Nathalie [Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate contrast-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI (DW MRI), and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in the detection of intermediate to well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors (NET) of the pancreas. Eighteen patients with pathologically proven pancreatic NET who underwent MRI including DW MRI and PET/CT within 6 weeks of each other were included in this retrospective study. Two radiologists evaluated T2-weighted (T2w), T2w + DW MRI, T2w + contrast-enhanced T1-weighted (CE T1w) MR images, and PET/CT for NET detection. The sensitivity and level of diagnostic confidence were compared among modalities using McNemar's test and a Wilcoxon signed rank test. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) of pancreatic NETs and normal pancreatic tissue were compared with Student's t test. Of the NETs, 8/23 (34.8 %) and 9/23 (39.1 %) were detected on T2w images by observers 1 and 2, respectively. Detection rates improved significantly by combining T2w images with DW MRI (observer 1: 14/23 = 61 %; observer 2: 15/23 = 65.2 %; p < 0.05) or CE T1w images (observer 1: 14/23 = 61 %; observer 2: 15/23 = 65.2 %; p < 0.05). Detection rates of pancreatic NET with PET/CT (both observers: 23/23 = 100 %) were statistically significantly higher than with MRI (p < 0.05). The mean ADC value of NET (1.02 {+-} 0.26 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) was statistically significantly lower than that of normal pancreatic tissue (1.48 {+-} 0.39 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s). DW MRI is a valuable adjunct to T2w imaging and comparable to CE T1w imaging in pancreatic NET detection, quantitatively differentiating between NET and normal pancreatic tissue with ADC measurements. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT is more sensitive than MRI in the detection of pancreatic NET. (orig.)

  16. Factors affecting the sensitivity and detection limits of MRI, CT, and SPECT for multimodal diagnostic and therapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seevinck, Peter R; Seppenwoolde, Jan-Henry; de Wit, Tim C; Nijsen, Johannes F W; Beekman, Freek J; van Het Schip, Alfred D; Bakker, Chris J G

    2007-05-01

    Noninvasive imaging techniques like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) play an increasingly important role in the diagnostic workup and treatment of cancerous disease. In this context, a distinct trend can be observed towards the development of contrast agents and radiopharmaceuticals that open up perspectives on a multimodality imaging approach, involving all three aforementioned techniques. To promote insight into the potentialities of such an approach, we prepared an overview of the strengths and limitations of the various imaging techniques, in particular with regard to their capability to quantify the spatial distribution of a multimodal diagnostic agent. To accomplish this task, we used a two-step approach. In the first step, we examined the situation for a particular therapeutic anti-cancer agent with multimodal imaging opportunities, viz. holmium-loaded microspheres (HoMS). Physical phantom experiments were performed to enable a comparative evaluation of the three modalities assuming the use of standard equipment, standard clinical scan protocols, and signal-known-exactly conditions. These phantom data were then analyzed so as to obtain first order estimates of the sensitivity and detection limits of MRI, CT and SPECT for HoMS. In the second step, the results for HoMS were taken as a starting point for a discussion of the factors affecting the sensitivity and detection limits of MRI, CT and SPECT for multimodal agents in general. In this, emphasis was put on the factors that must be taken into account when extrapolating the findings for HoMS to other diagnostic tasks, other contrast agents, other experimental conditions, and other scan protocols.

  17. A hyper-temporal remote sensing protocol for detecting ecosystem disturbance, classifying ecological state, and assessing soil resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyper-temporal remote sensing is capable of detecting detailed information on vegetation dynamics relating to plant functional types (PFT), a useful proxy for estimating soil physical and chemical properties. A central concept of PFT is that plant morphological and physiological adaptations are link...

  18. Remote Sensing Plant Stress Using Combined Fluorescence and Reflectance Measurements for Early Detection of Defoliants within the Battlefield Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    Sensing Imagery, Instituto de Agricultura Sostenible, Córdoba, Spain Young, D.R. 2007. Leaf to landscape in a barrier island environment.” Workshop...on Vegetation Stress Detection with Remote Sensing Imagery, Instituto de Agricultura Sostenible, Córdoba, Spain Young, D.R. and J.C. Naumann. 2007

  19. IMAGING IN PEDIATRIC EPILEPSY: SPECTRUM OF ABNORMAL ITIES DETECTED ON MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachna

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate role of radio-imaging, with emphasis o n MRI in comparison to other modalities, in patients of paediatric age gro up presenting with epilepsy and correlate it with clinical findings in Bundelkhand region. METHODS: Prospective data was obtained from evaluation of patients presenting with epilepsy in paediatric OPD and IPD, between 2010 and 2012. A total of 271 patients presenting with epilepsy (> 2 episodes of seizures were included. CBC, Chest X-ray and CSF analysis were also performed for clinical evalu ation as per need. Neurosonogram was done in 41 children below age of 1year (15.1%, Head CT was ob tained in 167 (61.7%, MRI in all cases. EEG was done in all cases, except in 5 cases of trauma. Epilepsy provoked by causes such as fever, electrolyte imbalance and dehydration were excluded . RESULTS: We observed that generalized seizures were more common presentation, followed by partial seizures, mostly complex. Majority had more than 2 episodes of seizures at the time of presentation. MRI revealed positive findings in 191 cases (70.4% and CT in 64 cases (38.3% of 167 done. MRI had positive findings in 35 cases (34.0% of 103 with normal CT scan. Most common cau se of epilepsy in this region was found to be CNS tuberculosis (Tuberculomas, 15.7% & TBM, 14.6% , followed by Neurocysticercosis (11.0%, Encephalitis (7.9%, Demyelination (6.8%, Gliosis with or without Encephalomalacia (6.8%, Periventricular leukomalacia (5.2%, Infarct (4.7% & porencephaly (3.7%. Rare causes observed were leukodystrophy (7cases, intra-axial bleed (4 case and extra-axial bleed (5case, heterotopias (4 case, abscess (2case and Phakomatosis (Tuberou s Sclerosis, 1 case. CONCLUSION: Since most of the seizures begin in paediatric age-group, whic h is crucial time for physical, psychosocial & mental growth, it is essential to evaluate the dive rse varieties of aetiologies and manage patient accordingly. MRI thus proves to be the best for alm ost

  20. Influence of imaging and histological factors on prostate cancer detection and localisation on multiparametric MRI: a prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratan, Flavie [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urinary and Vascular Radiology, Lyon (France); Inserm, U1032, LabTau, Lyon (France); Niaf, Emilie [Inserm, U1032, LabTau, Lyon (France); CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); Melodelima, Christelle [Universite Joseph Fourier, Laboratoire d' Ecologie Alpine, CNRS UMR 5553, BP 53, Grenoble (France); Chesnais, Anne Laure; Mege-Lechevallier, Florence [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Pathology, Lyon (France); Souchon, Remi [Inserm, U1032, LabTau, Lyon (France); Colombel, Marc [Universite de Lyon, Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1, Faculte de Medecine Lyon Est, Lyon (France); Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urology, Lyon (France); Rouviere, Olivier [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urinary and Vascular Radiology, Lyon (France); Inserm, U1032, LabTau, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon, Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1, Faculte de Medecine Lyon Est, Lyon (France); Hopital E. Herriot, Service de Radiologie Urinaire et Vasculaire, Pavillon P, Lyon Cedex 03 (France)

    2013-07-15

    To assess factors influencing prostate cancer detection on multiparametric (T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and dynamic contrast-enhanced) MRI. One hundred and seventy-five patients who underwent radical prostatectomy were included. Pre-operative MRI performed at 1.5 T (n = 71) or 3 T (n = 104), with (n = 58) or without (n = 117) an endorectal coil were independently interpreted by two radiologists. A five-point subjective suspicion score (SSS) was assigned to all focal abnormalities (FAs). MR findings were then compared with whole-mount sections. Readers identified 192-214/362 cancers, with 130-155 false positives. Detection rates for tumours of <0.5 cc (cm{sup 3}), 0.5-2 cc and >2 cc were 33-45/155 (21-29 %), 15-19/35 (43-54 %) and 8-9/12 (67-75 %) for Gleason {<=}6, 17/27 (63 %), 42-45/51 (82-88 %) and 34/35 (97 %) for Gleason 7 and 4/5 (80 %), 13/14 (93 %) and 28/28 (100 %) for Gleason {>=}8 cancers respectively. At multivariate analysis, detection rates were influenced by tumour Gleason score, histological volume, histological architecture and location (P < 0.0001), but neither by field strength nor coils used for imaging. The SSS was a significant predictor of both malignancy of FAs (P < 0.005) and aggressiveness of tumours (P < 0.00001). Detection rates were significantly influenced by tumour characteristics, but neither by field strength nor coils used for imaging. The SSS significantly stratified the risk of malignancy of FAs and aggressiveness of detected tumours. (orig.)

  1. Remote detection of magmatic water in Bullialdus Crater on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klima, R.; Cahill, J.; Hagerty, J.; Lawrence, D.

    2013-09-01

    Once considered dry compared with Earth, laboratory analyses of igneous components of lunar samples have suggested that the Moon's interior is not entirely anhydrous. Water and hydroxyl have also been detected from orbit on the lunar surface, but these have been attributed to nonindigenous sources, such as interactions with the solar wind. Magmatic lunar volatiles--evidence for water indigenous to the lunar interior--have not previously been detected remotely. Here we analyse spectroscopic data from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) and report that the central peak of Bullialdus Crater is significantly enhanced in hydroxyl relative to its surroundings. We suggest that the strong and localized hydroxyl absorption features are inconsistent with a surficial origin. Instead, they are consistent with hydroxyl bound to magmatic minerals that were excavated from depth by the impact that formed Bullialdus Crater. Furthermore, estimates of thorium concentration in the central peak using data from the Lunar Prospector orbiter indicate an enhancement in incompatible elements, in contrast to the compositions of water-bearing lunar samples. We suggest that the hydroxyl-bearing material was excavated from a magmatic source that is distinct from that of samples analysed thus far.

  2. Insect detection and nitrogen management for irrigated potatoes using remote sensing from small unmanned aircraft systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, E. Raymond; Rondon, Silvia I.; Hamm, Philip B.; Turner, Robert W.; Bruce, Alan E.; Brungardt, Josh J.

    2016-05-01

    Remote sensing with small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) has potential applications in agriculture because low flight altitudes allow image acquisition at very high spatial resolution. We set up experiments at the Oregon State University Hermiston Agricultural Research and Extension Center with different platforms and sensors to assess advantages and disadvantages of sUAS for precision farming. In 2013, we conducted an experiment with 4 levels of N fertilizer, and followed the changes in the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) over time. In late June, there were no differences in chlorophyll content or leaf area index (LAI) among the 3 higher application rates. Consistent with the field data, only plots with the lowest rate of applied N were distinguished by low NDVI. In early August, N deficiency was determined by NDVI, but it was too late to mitigate losses in potato yield and quality. Populations of the Colorado potato beetle (CPB) may rapidly increase, devouring the shoots, thus early detection and treatment could prevent yield losses. In 2014, we conducted an experiment with 4 levels of CPB infestation. Over one day, damage from CPB in some plots increased from 0 to 19%. A visual ranking of damage was not correlated with the total number of CPB or treatment. Plot-scale vegetation indices were not correlated with damage, although the damaged area determined by object-based feature extraction was highly correlated. Methods based on object-based image analysis of sUAS data have potential for early detection and reduced cost.

  3. Remote Sensing of Mycorrhizae? Detection of Mycorrhizal Association from Canopy Spectral Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, J. B.; Sweeney, S.; Brzostek, E. R.; Evans, T. P.; Bourg, N. A.; Phillips, R.

    2014-12-01

    Nearly all tree species form symbiotic relationships with one of two types of mycorrzhae—arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi. AM- and ECM-dominated forests often have distinct nutrient economies, and there is strong interest in mapping or detecting mycorrhizae over large areas. We explored remotely sensed tree canopy spectral properties to "detect" underlying mycorrhizal association across a gradient of AM- and ECM-dominated forest plots. We used a combination of principal components analysis and statistical mining of reflectance and band differencing across moderate/high-resolution Landsat data in conjunction with phenological signals from stitched seasonal time series and topographic features. This approach was trained and validated against measurements of tree species and mycorrhizal association across more than 60,000 trees throughout the central and eastern US. Using this approach, we were able to predict 81% of the variation in mycorrhizal association (p<0.001). Differences in phenological characteristics between AM- and ECM-associated trees drove the relatively high prediction skill.

  4. Remote detection of magmatic water in Bullialdus crater on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klima, Rachel L.; Cahill, John; Hagerty, Justin J.; Lawrence, David

    2013-01-01

    Once considered dry compared with Earth, laboratory analyses of igneous components of lunar samples have suggested that the Moon’s interior is not entirely anhydrous. Water and hydroxyl have also been detected from orbit on the lunar surface, but these have been attributed to nonindigenous sources, such as interactions with the solar wind. Magmatic lunar volatiles—evidence for water indigenous to the lunar interior—have not previously been detected remotely. Here we analyse spectroscopic data from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) and report that the central peak of Bullialdus Crater is significantly enhanced in hydroxyl relative to its surroundings. We suggest that the strong and localized hydroxyl absorption features are inconsistent with a surficial origin. Instead, they are consistent with hydroxyl bound to magmatic minerals that were excavated from depth by the impact that formed Bullialdus Crater. Furthermore, estimates of thorium concentration in the central peak using data from the Lunar Prospector orbiter indicate an enhancement in incompatible elements, in contrast to the compositions of water-bearing lunar samples. We suggest that the hydroxyl-bearing material was excavated from a magmatic source that is distinct from that of samples analysed thus far.

  5. A Remote Sensor for Detecting Methane Based on Palladium-Decorated Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guomin Li

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The remote detection of the concentration of methane at room temperature is performed by a sensor that is configured by the combination of radio frequency identification (RFID, and functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs. The proposed sensor is schemed as a thin film RFID tag in a polyethylene substrate, on which a metal trace dipole, a metal trace T impedance matching networks, a 0.5 µm-CMOS RF/DC rectifier chipset and a sensor head of palladium-decorated single walled carbon nanotubes (Pd-SWCNTs are surface mounted in cascade. The performances of the sensor are examined and described by the defined parameters of the received signal strength index (RSSI and the comparative analog identifier (∆AID. Results validate the sensor’s ability to detect molecules of methane at room temperature, showing that the RSSI can increase 4 dB and the ∆AID can increase 3% in response to methane concentrations ranging from zero to 100 ppm.

  6. Northwestern Black Sea coastal zone environmental changes detection by satellite remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoran, Maria A.

    2004-02-01

    The Romanian North Western coastal and shelf zones of the Black Sea and Danube delta are a mosaic of complex, interacting ecosystems, rich natural resources and socio-economic activity. Dramatic changes in the Black Sea's ecosystem and resources are due to natural and anthropogenic causes (increase in the nutrient and pollutant load of rivers input, industrial and municipal wastewater pollution along the coast, and dumping on the open sea). A scientific management system for protection, conservation and restoration must be based on reliable information on bio-geophysical and geomorphologic processes, coastal erosion, sedimentation dynamics, mapping of macrophyte fields, water quality, climatic change effects. A multitemporal data set consisting of LANDSAT MSS, TM and SAR ERS-1 images was used for comparing and mapping landcover change via change detection. Synergetic use of quasi-simultaneously acquired multi-sensor data may therefore allow for a better approach of change detection of coastal area. The main aim of this paper is to conduct a comprehensive analysis based on existing historical and more recent in situ and remote sensing data to establish the link between phytoplankton bloom development, increasing erosion and diminishing of beaches and related coastal zone harmful phenomena.

  7. Electromagnetic material changes for remote detection and monitoring: a feasibility study: Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCloy, John S.; Jordan, David V.; Kelly, James F.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Campbell, Luke W.

    2009-09-01

    A new concept for radiation detection is proposed, allowing a decoupling of the sensing medium and the readout. An electromagnetic material, such as a magnetic ceramic ferrite, is placed near a source to be tracked such as a shipping container. The electromagnetic material changes its properties, in this case its magnetic permeability, as a function of radiation. This change is evident as a change in reflection frequency and magnitude when probed using a microwave/millimeter-wave source. This brief report discusses modeling of radiation interaction of various candidate materials using a radiation detector modeling code Geant4, system design considerations for the remote readout, and some theory of the material interaction physics. The theory of radiation change in doped magnetic insulator ferrites such as yttrium iron garnet (YIG) seems well founded based on literature documentation of the photomagnetic effect. The literature also suggests sensitivity of permittivity to neutrons in some ferroelectrics. Research to date indicates that experimental demonstration of these effects in the context of radiation detection is warranted.

  8. Land use land cover change detection using remote sensing application for land sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakeristanan, Maha Letchumy; Md Said, Md Azlin

    2012-09-01

    Land falls into the category of prime resources. Land use and land cover changes are identified as the prime issue in global environmental changes. Thus, it is necessary to initiate the land change detection process for land sustainability as well as to develop a competent land use planning. Tropical country like Malaysia has been experiencing land use and land cover changes rapidly for the past few decades. Thus, an attempt was made to detect the land use and land cover changes in the capital of the Selangor, Malaysia, Shah Alam over 20 years period (1990 - 2010). The study has been done through remote sensing approach using Earth Sat imagery of December 1990 and SPOT satellite imageries of March 2000 and December 2010. The current study resulted that the study area experienced land cover changes rapidly where the forest area occupied about 24.4% of Shah Alam in 1990 has decreased to 13.6% in 2010. Built up land have increased to 29.18% in 2010 from 12.47% in 1990. Other land cover classes such as wet land, wasteland and agricultural land also have undergone changes. Efficient land management and planning is necessary for land sustainability in Shah Alam.

  9. A Hybrid Remote Sensing Approach for Detecting the Florida Red Tide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, G. A.; Minnett, P. J.; Banzon, V.; Baringer, W.

    2008-12-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) have caused major worldwide economic losses commonly linked with health problems for humans and wildlife. In the Eastern Gulf of Mexico the toxic marine dinoflagellate Karenia brevis is responsible for nearly annual, massive red tides causing fish kills, shellfish poisoning, and acute respiratory irritation in humans: the so-called Florida Red Tide. Near real-time satellite measurements could be an effective method for identifying HABs. The use of space-borne data would be a highly desired, low-cost technique offering the remote and accurate detection of K. brevis blooms over the West Florida Shelf, bringing tremendous societal benefits to the general public, scientific community, resource managers and medical health practitioners. An extensive in situ database provided by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's Research Institute was used to examine the long-term accuracy of two satellite- based algorithms at detecting the Florida Red Tide. Using MODIS data from 2002 to 2006, the two algorithms are optimized and their accuracy assessed. It has been found that the sequential application of the algorithms results in improved predictability characteristics, correctly identifying ~80% of the cases (for both sensitivity and specificity, as well as overall accuracy), and exhibiting strong positive (70%) and negative (86%) predictive values.

  10. Lab-on-a-chip reactor imaging with unprecedented chemical resolution by Hadamard-encoded remote detection NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telkki, Ville-Veikko; Zhivonitko, Vladimir V; Selent, Anne; Scotti, Gianmario; Leppäniemi, Jarmo; Franssila, Sami; Koptyug, Igor V

    2014-10-13

    The development of microfluidic processes requires information-rich detection methods. Here we introduce the concept of remote detection exchange NMR spectroscopy (RD-EXSY), and show that, along with indirect spatial information extracted from time-of-flight data, it provides unique information about the active regions, reaction pathways, and intermediate products in a lab-on-a-chip reactor. Furthermore, we demonstrate that direct spatial resolution can be added to RD-EXSY efficiently by applying the principles of Hadamard spectroscopy.

  11. Usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection of the lesions of gestational trophoblastic disease; Comparison with computed tomography and digital subtraction angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Satoshi; Akahori, Taiichiro; Mochizuki, Matsuto; Kono, Michio (Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-02-01

    Twenty patients with gestational trophoblastic disease (GTN) were examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA), to evaluate their usefulness in the diagnosis of the disease. The lesions of hydatidiform mole were mainly composed of molar vesicles, dilated vessels and hemorrhage which were depicted as small round high intensity lesions on the T2-weighted images and as tree-like low intensity lesions and high or low intensity lesions of various shapes in the T1-, T2-weighted images. These MRI findings closely corresponded to the histopathological findings. On the other hand, CT findings obtained with hydatidiform mole were characterized by filling defects or a small round low density area on contrast enhanced images. The detection ratio for intramural lesions of invasive mole and choriocarcinoma by MRI was 83% (5/6), while that by CT was 50% (3/6). The obliteration of the junctional zone and interruption of the myometrium observed in MRI were significant signs suggesting intramural invasion of the disease. In fact, these signs in MRI were observed in all of the six cases of invasive mole or choriocarcinoma examined. In conclusion, MRI is a powerful means for the determining the intramural invasive mole and choriocarcinoma. Thus more accurate diagnosis of GTN will be obtained with the combined use of MRI and DSA. (author).

  12. Can we detect water stressed areas in forest thanks thermal infrared remote sensing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourtier, Marie; Chanzy, André; Bes, Bernard; Mariotte, Nicolas

    2010-05-01

    water stress signal. The amplitude of the signal, between wet and dry conditions, is at an average of 3 °C. Thus, by analysing the temporal evolution of this signal, thermal infrared is an interesting tool to detect water stress and identify different levels of stress between forest areas. Duchemin B., D. Guyon, J.P. Lagouarde, 1998. Potential and limits of NOAA-AVHRR temporal composite data forr phenology and water stress monitoring of temperate forest ecosystems. International Journal of remote sensing, volume: 20, 5, p 23. Duchemin B., Lagouarde J.P., 1998. Apport des capteurs satellitaires à large champ pour l'estimation de variables de fonctionnement des écosystèmes forestiers tempérés. Thesis. p120. Pierce L. L., Running S.W., Riggs G.A., 1990. Remote detection of canopy water stress in coniferous forests unsing the NS001 Thematic Mapper Simulator and the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner. Photogrammetric engineering and remote sensing, volume: 56, 1, p 8.

  13. Detection of Shoreline and Land Cover Changes around Rosetta Promontory, Egypt, Based on Remote Sensing Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Masria

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Rosetta Promontory, Egypt has been suffering from a continuous erosion problem. The dramatic retreatment was observed during the last century. It is basically due to the construction of Aswan High Dam in 1964, which reduced the flow and sediment discharges. In this paper, four Landsat images (two Thematic Mapper and two Enhanced Thematic Mapper covering the period from 1984 to 2014 were used. These Landsat images were radio-metrically and geometrically corrected, and then, multi-temporal post-classification analysis was performed to detect land cover changes, extracting shoreline positions to estimate shoreline change rates of the Nile delta coast around Rosetta Promontory. This method provides a viable means for examining long-term shoreline changes. Four categories, including seawater, developed (agriculture and urban, sabkhas (salt-flat, and undeveloped areas, were selected to evaluate their temporal changes by comparing the four selected images. Supervised classification technique was used with support vector machine algorithm to detect temporal changes. The overall accuracy assessment of this method ranged from 97% to 100%. In addition, the shoreline was extracted by applying two different techniques. The first method is based on a histogram threshold of Band 5, and the other uses the combination of histogram threshold of Band 5 and two band ratios (Band 2/Band 4 and Band 2/Band 5. For land cover change detection from 1984 to 2014, it was found that the developed area that increased by 9% although the land in the study area has been contracted by 1.6% due to coastal erosion. The shoreline retreat rate has decreased more than 70% from 1984 to 2014. Nevertheless, it still suffers from significant erosion with a maximum rate of 37 m/year. In comparison to ground survey and different remote sensing techniques, the established trend of shoreline change extracted using histogram threshold was found to be closely consistent with these studies

  14. Using nonlinear models in fMRI data analysis: model selection and activation detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneux, Thomas; Faugeras, Olivier

    2006-10-01

    There is an increasing interest in using physiologically plausible models in fMRI analysis. These models do raise new mathematical problems in terms of parameter estimation and interpretation of the measured data. In this paper, we show how to use physiological models to map and analyze brain activity from fMRI data. We describe a maximum likelihood parameter estimation algorithm and a statistical test that allow the following two actions: selecting the most statistically significant hemodynamic model for the measured data and deriving activation maps based on such model. Furthermore, as parameter estimation may leave much incertitude on the exact values of parameters, model identifiability characterization is a particular focus of our work. We applied these methods to different variations of the Balloon Model (Buxton, R.B., Wang, E.C., and Frank, L.R. 1998. Dynamics of blood flow and oxygenation changes during brain activation: the balloon model. Magn. Reson. Med. 39: 855-864; Buxton, R.B., Uludağ, K., Dubowitz, D.J., and Liu, T.T. 2004. Modelling the hemodynamic response to brain activation. NeuroImage 23: 220-233; Friston, K. J., Mechelli, A., Turner, R., and Price, C. J. 2000. Nonlinear responses in fMRI: the balloon model, volterra kernels, and other hemodynamics. NeuroImage 12: 466-477) in a visual perception checkerboard experiment. Our model selection proved that hemodynamic models better explain the BOLD response than linear convolution, in particular because they are able to capture some features like poststimulus undershoot or nonlinear effects. On the other hand, nonlinear and linear models are comparable when signals get noisier, which explains that activation maps obtained in both frameworks are comparable. The tools we have developed prove that statistical inference methods used in the framework of the General Linear Model might be generalized to nonlinear models.

  15. Peptide-based MRI contrast agent and near-infrared fluorescent probe for intratumoral legumain detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Jen; Wu, Shou-Cheng; Chen, Chung-Yung; Tzou, Shey-Cherng; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Huang, Ying-Fang; Yuan, Shyng-Shiou; Wang, Yun-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that intratumoral legumain promotes tumorigenesis. To monitor legumain activity in tumors, we developed a new MRI contrast agent ([Gd-NBCB-TTDA-Leg(L)]) and a NIR fluorescence probe (CyTE777-Leg(L)-CyTE807). The MRI contrast agent was prepared by introduction of cyclobutyl and benzyl group residues to TTDA (3,6,10-tri(carboxymethyl)-3,6,10-triaza-dodecanedioic acid), followed by the attachment of a legumain-specific substrate peptide (Leg(L)). The NIR fluorescence probe was designed by conjugating two NIR fluorochromes (CyTE777 and CyTE807) with Leg(L). Peptide cleavage of the MRI contrast agent by legumain can increase its hydrophobicity and promote rotational correlation time (τ(R)). Peptide cleavage of the NIR probes by the legumain relieves the self quench of the probe. Peptide cleavage of the MRI contrast agent and the NIR fluorescence probe by legumain were confirmed by T1 relaxometric studies and by fluorescence studies, respectively. In vivo MR images showed that [Gd-NBCB-TTDA-Leg(L)] attained 55.3 fold (254.2% versus 4.6%, at 2.0 h post-injection) higher imaging enhancement, as compared with control contrast agent bearing a noncleaveable peptide ([Gd-NBCB-TTDA-Leg(D)], in the CT-26 (legumain(+)) tumors. Similarly, optical imaging probe CyTE777-Leg(L)-CyTE807 attained 15.2 fold (3.34 × 10(9) photons/min versus 0.22 × 10(9) photons/min, at 24.0 h post-injection) higher imaging enhancement in the CT-26 (legumain(+)) tumors, compared to a NIR control probe (CyTE777-Leg(D)-CyTE807). These data indicate that the [Gd-NBCB-TTDA-Leg(L)] and the CyTE777-Leg(L)-CyTE807 probes may be promising tools to image the legumain-expressing cancers for diagnoses and targeted treatments.

  16. MRI at 3 Tesla detects no evidence for ischemic brain damage in intensively treated patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, Stephan A.; O' Regan, Declan P.; Fitzpatrick, Julie; Hajnal, Joseph V. [Hammersmith Hospital Campus, Imaging Sciences Department, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Neuwirth, Clare; Potter, Elizabeth; Tosi, Isabella; Naoumova, Rossi P. [MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Clinical Research Facility, London (United Kingdom); Hammersmith Hospital, Lipid Clinic, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is considered a model disease for excessive plasma cholesterol levels. Patients with untreated homozygous FH have a markedly increased risk for premature atherosclerosis. The frequency and extent of ischemic brain damage detectable by high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after long-term intensive treatment are unknown. In a case control study, five patients with homozygous FH (one male and four females; mean age: 23.6 {+-} 9.2, range: 12-36 years; mean pre-treatment serum total cholesterol level: 26.9 {+-} 3.24 mmol/L; all patients with documented atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid arteries) and five age- and sex-matched healthy controls were studied. All patients had been on maximal lipid-lowering medication since early childhood, and four of them were also on treatment with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis at bi-weekly intervals. Brain MRI was performed at 3 Tesla field strength with fluid-attenuated T2-weighted inversion recovery and T1-weighted spin-echo MR pulse sequences and subsequently evaluated by two independent readers. The maximal lipid-lowering treatment reduced the total serum cholesterol by more than 50% in the patients, but their serum concentrations were still 3.6-fold higher than those found in the controls (11.9 {+-} 4.2 vs. 4.5 {+-} 0.5 mmol/L; p < 0.0047). No brain abnormality was observed in any of the patients with homozygous FH. Homozygous FH patients on intensive cholesterol-lowering therapy have no evidence of ischemic brain damage at 3 Tesla MRI despite the remaining high cholesterol levels. (orig.)

  17. Computer-aided detection of prostate cancer in T2-weighted MRI within the peripheral zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampun, Andrik; Zheng, Ling; Malcolm, Paul; Tiddeman, Bernie; Zwiggelaar, Reyer

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we propose a prostate cancer computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system and suggest a set of discriminant texture descriptors extracted from T2-weighted MRI data which can be used as a good basis for a multimodality system. For this purpose, 215 texture descriptors were extracted and eleven different classifiers were employed to achieve the best possible results. The proposed method was tested based on 418 T2-weighted MR images taken from 45 patients and evaluated using 9-fold cross validation with five patients in each fold. The results demonstrated comparable results to existing CAD systems using multimodality MRI. We achieved an area under the receiver operating curve (A z ) values equal to 90.0%+/- 7.6% , 89.5%+/- 8.9% , 87.9%+/- 9.3% and 87.4%+/- 9.2% for Bayesian networks, ADTree, random forest and multilayer perceptron classifiers, respectively, while a meta-voting classifier using average probability as a combination rule achieved 92.7%+/- 7.4% .

  18. A cloud detection algorithm-generating method for remote sensing data at visible to short-wave infrared wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lin; Mi, Xueting; Wei, Jing; Wang, Jian; Tian, Xinpeng; Yu, Huiyong; Gan, Ping

    2017-02-01

    To realize highly precise and automatic cloud detection from multi-sensors, this paper proposes a cloud detection algorithm-generating (CDAG) method for remote sensing data from visible to short-wave infrared (SWIR) bands. Hyperspectral remote sensing data with high spatial resolution were collected and used as a pixel dataset of cloudy and clear skies. In this paper, multi-temporal AVIRIS (Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer) data with 224 bands at visible to SWIR wavelengths and a 20 m spatial resolution were used for the dataset. Based on the pixel dataset, pixels of different types of clouds and land cover were distinguished artificially and used for the simulation of multispectral sensors. Cloud detection algorithms for the multispectral remote sensing sensors were then generated based on the spectral differences between the cloudy and clear-sky pixels distinguished previously. The possibility of assigning a pixel as cloudy was calculated based on the reliability of each method. Landsat 8 OLI (Operational Land Imager), MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) Terra and Suomi NPP VIIRS (Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer) were used for the cloud detection test with the CDAG method, and the results from each sensor were compared with the corresponding artificial results, demonstrating an accurate detection rate of more than 85%.

  19. Integrated microchip incorporating atomic magnetometer and microfluidic channel for NMR and MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, Micah P.; Savukov, Igor M.; Budker, Dmitry; Shah, Vishal K.; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John; Michalak, David J.; Xu, Shoujun; Pines, Alexander

    2011-08-09

    An integral microfluidic device includes an alkali vapor cell and microfluidic channel, which can be used to detect magnetism for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Small magnetic fields in the vicinity of the vapor cell can be measured by optically polarizing and probing the spin precession in the small magnetic field. This can then be used to detect the magnetic field of in encoded analyte in the adjacent microfluidic channel. The magnetism in the microfluidic channel can be modulated by applying an appropriate series of radio or audio frequency pulses upstream from the microfluidic chip (the remote detection modality) to yield a sensitive means of detecting NMR and MRI.

  20. Diagnostic performance of 3D TSE MRI versus 2D TSE MRI of the knee at 1.5 T, with prompt arthroscopic correlation, in the detection of meniscal and cruciate ligament tears*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaeté; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Lorenzato, Mário Müller; Salim, Rodrigo; Kfuri-Junior, Maurício; Crema, Michel Daoud

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the diagnostic performance of the three-dimensional turbo spin-echo (3D TSE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique with the performance of the standard two-dimensional turbo spin-echo (2D TSE) protocol at 1.5 T, in the detection of meniscal and ligament tears. Materials and Methods Thirty-eight patients were imaged twice, first with a standard multiplanar 2D TSE MR technique, and then with a 3D TSE technique, both in the same 1.5 T MRI scanner. The patients underwent knee arthroscopy within the first three days after the MRI. Using arthroscopy as the reference standard, we determined the diagnostic performance and agreement. Results For detecting anterior cruciate ligament tears, the 3D TSE and routine 2D TSE techniques showed similar values for sensitivity (93% and 93%, respectively) and specificity (80% and 85%, respectively). For detecting medial meniscal tears, the two techniques also had similar sensitivity (85% and 83%, respectively) and specificity (68% and 71%, respectively). In addition, for detecting lateral meniscal tears, the two techniques had similar sensitivity (58% and 54%, respectively) and specificity (82% and 92%, respectively). There was a substantial to almost perfect intraobserver and interobserver agreement when comparing the readings for both techniques. Conclusion The 3D TSE technique has a diagnostic performance similar to that of the routine 2D TSE protocol for detecting meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament tears at 1.5 T, with the advantage of faster acquisition. PMID:27141127

  1. Diagnostic performance of 3D TSE MRI versus 2D TSE MRI of the knee at 1.5 T, with prompt arthroscopic correlation, in the detection of meniscal and cruciate ligament tears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Abaeté Chagas-Neto

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To compare the diagnostic performance of the three-dimensional turbo spin-echo (3D TSE magnetic resonance imaging (MRI technique with the performance of the standard two-dimensional turbo spin-echo (2D TSE protocol at 1.5 T, in the detection of meniscal and ligament tears. Materials and Methods: Thirty-eight patients were imaged twice, first with a standard multiplanar 2D TSE MR technique, and then with a 3D TSE technique, both in the same 1.5 T MRI scanner. The patients underwent knee arthroscopy within the first three days after the MRI. Using arthroscopy as the reference standard, we determined the diagnostic performance and agreement. Results: For detecting anterior cruciate ligament tears, the 3D TSE and routine 2D TSE techniques showed similar values for sensitivity (93% and 93%, respectively and specificity (80% and 85%, respectively. For detecting medial meniscal tears, the two techniques also had similar sensitivity (85% and 83%, respectively and specificity (68% and 71%, respectively. In addition, for detecting lateral meniscal tears, the two techniques had similar sensitivity (58% and 54%, respectively and specificity (82% and 92%, respectively. There was a substantial to almost perfect intraobserver and interobserver agreement when comparing the readings for both techniques. Conclusion: The 3D TSE technique has a diagnostic performance similar to that of the routine 2D TSE protocol for detecting meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament tears at 1.5 T, with the advantage of faster acquisition.

  2. Remote sensing-based detection and quantification of roadway debris following natural disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axel, Colin; van Aardt, Jan A. N.; Aros-Vera, Felipe; Holguín-Veras, José

    2016-05-01

    Rapid knowledge of road network conditions is vital to formulate an efficient emergency response plan following any major disaster. Fallen buildings, immobile vehicles, and other forms of debris often render roads impassable to responders. The status of roadways is generally determined through time and resource heavy methods, such as field surveys and manual interpretation of remotely sensed imagery. Airborne lidar systems provide an alternative, cost-effective option for performing network assessments. The 3D data can be collected quickly over a wide area and provide valuable insight about the geometry and structure of the scene. This paper presents a method for automatically detecting and characterizing debris in roadways using airborne lidar data. Points falling within the road extent are extracted from the point cloud and clustered into individual objects using region growing. Objects are classified as debris or non-debris using surface properties and contextual cues. Debris piles are reconstructed as surfaces using alpha shapes, from which an estimate of debris volume can be computed. Results using real lidar data collected after a natural disaster are presented. Initial results indicate that accurate debris maps can be automatically generated using the proposed method. These debris maps would be an invaluable asset to disaster management and emergency response teams attempting to reach survivors despite a crippled transportation network.

  3. Remote sensing for greenhouse detection from stereo pairs of WorldView-2 satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Aguilar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The successful launch of the first very high resolution (VHR satellites capable of capturing panchromatic imagery of the land surface with ground sample distance even lower than 1 m (e.g. IKONOS in 1999 or QuickBird in 2001 marked the beginning of a wholly new age in remote sensing. On January 4, 2010, images of WorldView-2 were placed on the market. Possibly it is the most sophisticated commercial VHR satellite currently orbiting the Earth and the exploitation of its data poses a challenge to researchers worldwide. Moreover, the practice of under plastic agriculture had a great development in the Mediterranean area during the past 60 years, especially in Almeria, acting as a key economic driver in the area. The goal of this work is the automatic greenhouse mapping by using Object Based Image Analysis (OBIA. The required input data will be a pan-sharpened orthoimage and a normalized digital surface model (nDSM for objects, both products generated from a WorldView-2 stereo pair. The attained results show that the very high resolution 8-band multispectral and the nDSM data improve the greenhouses automatic detection. In this way, overall accuracies higher than 90% can be achieved.

  4. Single Pulse Remote Raman Detection of Minerals and Organics Under Illuminated Condition from 10 Meters Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, A. K.; Sharma, S. K.; Lucey, P. G.

    2005-01-01

    A directly coupled portable remote Raman instrument developed by the University of Hawaii has been shown here to identify several minerals, chemicals and organics from a distance of 10 m using a single laser pulse in a well illuminated background. Raman spectra, obtained during a very short period of time, of common minerals e.g., dolomite, calcite, marble, barite, gypsum, quarts, rutile, fluorapatite etc. clearly show Raman features which could be used as fingerprints for mineral identification. Raman features of organics such as benzene, cyclohexane, 2-propanol, naphthalene, etc. and other chemicals containing various functional groups like oxides, silicates, sulphates, nitrates, phosphates and carbonates were also easily detected. Ability to measure Raman spectra with a single laser pulse would be promising for future space missions where power consumption is critical and a rapid survey of the minerals with moderate to high Raman cross section might be desirable for selecting rocks that would provide high scientific return or for acquiring rocks for sample return to the Earth.

  5. Investigation of remote sensing to detect near-surface groundwater on irrigated lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryland, D. W.; Schmer, F. A.; Moore, D. G.

    1975-01-01

    The application of remote sensing techniques was studied for detecting areas with high water tables in irrigated agricultural lands. Aerial data were collected by the LANDSAT-1 satellite and aircraft over the Kansas/Bostwick Irrigation District in Republic and Jewell Counties, Kansas. LANDSAT-1 data for May 12 and August 10, 1973, and aircraft flights (midday and predawn) on August 10 and 11, 1973, and June 25 and 26, 1974, were obtained. Surface and water table contour maps and active observation well hydrographs were obtained from the Bureau of Reclamation for use in the analysis. Results of the study reveal that LANDSAT-1 data (May MSS band 6 and August MSS band 7) correlate significantly (0.01 level) with water table depth for 144 active observation wells located throughout the Kansas/Bostwick Irrigation District. However, a map of water table depths of less than 1.83 meters prepared from the LANDSAT-1 data did not compare favorably with a map of seeped lands of less than 1.22 m (4 feet) to the water table. Field evaluation of the map is necessary for a complete analysis. Analysis of three fields on a within or single-field basis for the 1973 LANDSAT-1 data also showed significant correlation results.

  6. Application of Multispectral and Hyperspectral Remote Sensing For Detection of Freshwater Harmful Algal Blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudela, R. M.; Accorsi, E.; Austerberry, D.; Palacios, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    Freshwater Cyanobacterial Harmful algal blooms (CHABs) represent a pressing and apparently increasing threat to both human and environmental health. In California, toxin producing blooms of several species, including Aphanizomenon, Microcystis, Lyngbya, and Anabaena are common; toxins from these blooms have been linked to impaired drinking water, domestic and wild animal deaths, and increasing evidence for toxin transfer to coastal marine environments, including the death of several California sea otters, a threatened marine species. California scientists and managers are under increasing pressure to identify and mitigate these potentially toxic blooms, but point-source measurements and grab samples have been less than effective. There is increasing awareness that these toxic events are both spatially widespread and ephememeral, leading to the need for better monitoring methods applicable to large spatial and temporal scales. Based on monitoring in several California water bodies, it appears that Aphanizomenon blooms frequently precede dangerous levels of toxins from Microcystis. We are exploring new detection methods for identifying CHABs and potentially distinguishing between blooms of the harmful cyanobacteria Aphanizomenon and Microcystis using remote sensing reflectance from a variety of airborne and satellite sensors. We suggest that Aphanizomenon blooms could potentially be used as an early warning of more highly toxic subsequent blooms, and that these methods, combined with better toxin monitoring, can lead to improved understanding and prediction of CHABs by pinpointing problematic watersheds.

  7. A Scale-Driven Change Detection Method Incorporating Uncertainty Analysis for Remote Sensing Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Hao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Change detection (CD based on remote sensing images plays an important role in Earth observation. However, the CD accuracy is usually affected by sunlight and atmospheric conditions and sensor calibration. In this study, a scale-driven CD method incorporating uncertainty analysis is proposed to increase CD accuracy. First, two temporal images are stacked and segmented into multiscale segmentation maps. Then, a pixel-based change map with memberships belonging to changed and unchanged parts is obtained by fuzzy c-means clustering. Finally, based on the Dempster-Shafer evidence theory, the proposed scale-driven CD method incorporating uncertainty analysis is performed on the multiscale segmentation maps and the pixel-based change map. Two experiments were carried out on Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+ and SPOT 5 data sets. The ratio of total errors can be reduced to 4.0% and 7.5% for the ETM+ and SPOT 5 data sets in this study, respectively. Moreover, the proposed approach outperforms some state-of-the-art CD methods and provides an effective solution for CD.

  8. Sensitivity of whole-body CT and MRI versus projection radiography in the detection of osteolyses in patients with monoclonal plasma cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Maya B., E-mail: m.mueller-wolf@dkfz.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (Dkfz), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Murray, Fritz, E-mail: fritz.murray@hotmail.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); Kilk, Kerstin, E-mail: k_fechtner@hotmail.com [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); Hillengass, Jens, E-mail: jens.hillengass@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Haematology, Oncology, Rheumatology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Delorme, Stefan, E-mail: s.delorme@dkfz-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (Dkfz), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Heiss, Christiane, E-mail: c.heiss@dkfz-heidelberg.de [Department of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center (Dkfz), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Neben, Kai, E-mail: k.neben@klinikum-mittelbaden.de [Department of Haematology, Oncology, Rheumatology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Goldschmidt, Hartmut, E-mail: hartmut.goldschmidt@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Haematology, Oncology, Rheumatology, University Hospital Heidelberg and National Center for Tumour Diseases, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich, E-mail: hu.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); and others

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To compare sensitivity of whole-body Computed Tomography (wb-CT) and whole-body Magnetic Resonance Imaging (wb-MRI) with Projection Radiography (PR) regarding each method's ability to detect osteolyses in patients with monoclonal plasma cell disease. Patients and methods: The bone status of 171 patients was evaluated. All patients presented with multiple myeloma (MM) of all stages, monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS) or solitary plasmacytoma. Two groups were formed. Group A consisted of 52 patients (26 females, 26 males) with an average age of 62 years (range, 45–89 years) who received, both, PR and wb-CT as part of their diagnostic work-up. Group B comprised 119 patients (58 females, 61 males) averaging 57 years of age (range, 20–80 years) who received, both, PR and wb-MRI. Two experienced radiologists were blinded regarding the disease status and assessed the number and location of osteolyses in consensus. A distinction was made between axial and extra-axial lesions. Results: In group A, wb-CT revealed osteolyses in 12 patients (23%) that were not detected in PR. CT was superior in detecting lesions in patients with osteopenia and osteoporosis. Compared with PR, wb-CT was significantly more sensitive in detecting osteolyses than PR (p < 0.001). This was particularly true for axial lesions. Additionally, CT revealed clinically relevant incidental findings in 33 patients (63%). In group B, wb-MRI revealed lesions in 19 patients (16%) that were not detected in PR. All lesions detected by PR were also detected by wb-MRI and wb-CT. Wb-MRI and wb-CT are each superior to PR in detecting axial lesions. Conclusion: Wb-CT can detect 23% more focal lesions than PR, especially in the axial skeleton. Therefore, this imaging method should be preferred over PR in the diagnostic work-up and staging of patients with monoclonal plasma cell disease.

  9. Impact of functional MRI data preprocessing pipeline on default-mode network detectability in patients with disorders of consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian eAndronache

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available An emerging application of resting-state functional MRI is the study of patients with disorders of consciousness (DoC, where integrity of default-mode network (DMN activity is associated to the clinical level of preservation of consciousness. Due to the inherent inability to follow verbal instructions, arousal induced by scanning noise and postural pain, these patients tend to exhibit substantial levels of movement. This results in spurious, non-neural fluctuations of the blood-oxygen level-dependent (BOLD signal, which impair the evaluation of residual functional connectivity. Here, the effect of data preprocessing choices on the detectability of the DMN was systematically evaluated in a representative cohort of 30 clinically and etiologically heterogeneous DoC patients and 33 healthy controls. Starting from a standard preprocessing pipeline, additional steps were gradually inserted, namely band-pass filtering, removal of co-variance with the movement vectors, removal of co-variance with the global brain parenchyma signal, rejection of realignment outlier volumes and ventricle masking. Both independent-component analysis (ICA and seed-based analysis (SBA were performed, and DMN detectability was assessed quantitatively as well as visually. The results of the present study strongly show that the detection of DMN activity in the sub-optimal fMRI series acquired on DoC patients is contingent on the use of adequate filtering steps. ICA and SBA are differently affected but give convergent findings for high-grade preprocessing. We propose that future studies in this area should adopt the described preprocessing procedures as a minimum standard to reduce the probability of wrongly inferring that DMN activity is absent.

  10. Rare Variant of Vastus Medialis Detected in vivo by Ultrasound and Confirmed by High-resolution MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjafield, Anastasia; Howe, Franklyn A; Killingback, Alban; Adds, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This report describes an unusual incidental finding during ultrasound investigation of the vastus medialis muscle. Volunteers underwent ultrasound scanning as part of an on-going investigation into the architecture of the vastus medialis muscle. [Subjects and Methods] The distal thighs of forty-one subjects were scanned using the Philips iU22 US system. An unusual muscle morphology was detected bilaterally in one subject, who then underwent a 3T Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scan in order to further investigate the muscle morphology. The subject in question was a 32 year-old female who suffers from recurrent bilateral patellar dislocations. [Results] The MRI scan confirmed the ultrasound findings, and indicated the presence of the vastus medialis in two layers, with the VML continuing deep, separate from the VMO. [Conclusion] Although this rare variant has been been reported in previous cadaveric studies, we believe this to be the first report in the literature of this morphology in vivo. The biomechanical implications of this muscle arrangement are unknown, but it may not be without significance that this individual suffers from recurrent patellar dislocations. PMID:24567699

  11. A CAD system based on multi-parametric analysis for cancer prostate detection on DCE-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzetti, Simone; De Luca, Massimo; Bracco, Christian; Vignati, Anna; Giannini, Valentina; Stasi, Michele; Russo, Filippo; Armando, Enrico; Agliozzo, Silvano; Regge, Daniele

    2011-03-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems using dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) data may be developed to help localize prostate cancer and guide biopsy, avoiding random sampling of the whole gland. The purpose of this study is to present a DCE-MRI CAD system, which calculates the likelihood of malignancy in a given area of the prostate by combining model-based and model-free parameters. The dataset includes 10 patients with prostate cancer, with a total of 13 foci of adenocarcinoma. The post-processing is based on the following steps: testing of registration quality, noise filtering, and extracting the proposed features needed to the CAD. Parameters with the best performance in discriminating between normal and cancer regions are selected by computing the area under the ROC curve, and by evaluating the correlation between pairs of features. A 6-dimensional parameters vector is generated for each pixel and fed into a Bayesian classifier, in which the output is the probability of malignancy. The classification performance is estimated using the leave-one-out method. The resulting area under the ROC curve is 0.899 (95%CI:0.893-0.905); sensitivity and specificity are 82.4% and 82.1% respectively at the best cut-off point (0.352). Preliminary results show that the system is accurate in detecting areas of the gland that are involved by tumor. Further studies will be necessary to confirm these promising preliminary results.

  12. Remote Sensing of Martian Terrain Hazards via Visually Salient Feature Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Milli, S.; Shaukat, A.; Spiteri, C.; Gao, Y.

    2014-04-01

    The main objective of the FASTER remote sensing system is the detection of rocks on planetary surfaces by employing models that can efficiently characterise rocks in terms of semantic descriptions. The proposed technique abates some of the algorithmic limitations of existing methods with no training requirements, lower computational complexity and greater robustness towards visual tracking applications over long-distance planetary terrains. Visual saliency models inspired from biological systems help to identify important regions (such as rocks) in the visual scene. Surface rocks are therefore completely described in terms of their local or global conspicuity pop-out characteristics. These local and global pop-out cues are (but not limited to); colour, depth, orientation, curvature, size, luminance intensity, shape, topology etc. The currently applied methods follow a purely bottom-up strategy of visual attention for selection of conspicuous regions in the visual scene without any topdown control. Furthermore the choice of models used (tested and evaluated) are relatively fast among the state-of-the-art and have very low computational load. Quantitative evaluation of these state-ofthe- art models was carried out using benchmark datasets including the Surrey Space Centre Lab Testbed, Pangu generated images, RAL Space SEEKER and CNES Mars Yard datasets. The analysis indicates that models based on visually salient information in the frequency domain (SRA, SDSR, PQFT) are the best performing ones for detecting rocks in an extra-terrestrial setting. In particular the SRA model seems to be the most optimum of the lot especially that it requires the least computational time while keeping errors competitively low. The salient objects extracted using these models can then be merged with the Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) generated from the same navigation cameras in order to be fused to the navigation map thus giving a clear indication of the rock locations.

  13. Detection and mapping of oil-contaminated soils by remote sensing of laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luedeker, Wilhelm; Guenther, Kurt P.; Dahn, Hans-Guenter

    1995-10-01

    The contamination of soil by aromatic mineral hydrocarbons (MHC) (e.g., gasoline, oil, etc.) has become a severe environmental problem because not only men, animals, and plants are threatened but also the water and air. With the unification of Germany a great number of suspected contaminated sites in the new countries were registered. An estimation of the German Federal Ministry of Environment (BMU) counts 180,000 areas contaminated with different pollutants, 55,000 are situated in the former GDR. On military settlements for example more than fifty percent of the chemicals are MHCs. Hence one can get an idea of the importance of soil pollution by hydrocarbons. Other zones contaminated due to carelessness or accidents are civil petrolstations, airports, refineries, pipelines, and traffic disasters. At the present time for most of these areas the contamination is assumed due to recent use. Due to the large extension of the problem an estimation and evaluation of the potential hazard for the environment is difficult and expensive to perform. In the case of an actual endangering the total area must be mapped in detail resulting in increasing costs for the owner. Nevertheless it is necessary to find reliable timesaving areal mapping and monitoring methods. One opportunity presented in this paper is the application of remote sensing by laser induced fluorescence from an airborne platform. It promises to fulfill these requirements in a sufficiently fast manner with very high spatial resolution. The access to the pollutant detection is the specific laser induced fluorescence emitted by the MHC (finger print). The present work shows the requirements for a helicopterborne lidar system for MHC mapping and how the detected signals are to be evaluated and interpreted.

  14. Surface biosignatures of exo-earths: remote detection of extraterrestrial life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Siddharth; Paulino-Lima, Ivan G; Kent, Ryan; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Rothschild, Lynn

    2015-03-31

    Exoplanet discovery has made remarkable progress, with the first rocky planets having been detected in the central star's liquid water habitable zone. The remote sensing techniques used to characterize such planets for potential habitability and life rely solely on our understanding of life on Earth. The vegetation red edge from terrestrial land plants is often used as a direct signature of life, but it occupies only a small niche in the environmental parameter space that binds life on present-day Earth and has been widespread for only about 460 My. To more fully exploit the diversity of the one example of life known, we measured the spectral characteristics of 137 microorganisms containing a range of pigments, including ones isolated from Earth's most extreme environments. Our database covers the visible and near-infrared to the short-wavelength infrared (0.35-2.5 µm) portions of the electromagnetic spectrum and is made freely available from biosignatures.astro.cornell.edu. Our results show how the reflectance properties are dominated by the absorption of light by pigments in the visible portion and by strong absorptions by the cellular water of hydration in the infrared (up to 2.5 µm) portion of the spectrum. Our spectral library provides a broader and more realistic guide based on Earth life for the search for surface features of extraterrestrial life. The library, when used as inputs for modeling disk-integrated spectra of exoplanets, in preparation for the next generation of space- and ground-based instruments, will increase the chances of detecting life.

  15. A fully Bayesian approach to the parcel-based detection-estimation of brain activity in fMRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makni, S. [Univ Oxford, John Radcliffe Hosp, Oxford Ctr Funct Magnet Resonance Imaging Brain, Oxford OX3 9DU (United Kingdom); Idier, J. [IRCCyN CNRS, Nantes (France); Vincent, T.; Ciuciu, P. [CEA, NeuroSpin, Gif Sur Yvette (France); Vincent, T.; Dehaene-Lambertz, G.; Ciuciu, P. [Inst Imagerie Neurofonctionnelle, IFR 49, Paris (France); Thirion, B. [INRIA Futurs, Orsay (France); Dehaene-Lambertz, G. [INSERM, NeuroSpin, U562, Gif Sur Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    Within-subject analysis in fMRI essentially addresses two problems, i. e., the detection of activated brain regions in response to an experimental task and the estimation of the underlying dynamics, also known as the characterisation of Hemodynamic response function (HRF). So far, both issues have been treated sequentially while it is known that the HRF model has a dramatic impact on the localisation of activations and that the HRF shape may vary from one region to another. In this paper, we conciliate both issues in a region-based joint detection-estimation framework that we develop in the Bayesian formalism. Instead of considering function basis to account for spatial variability, spatially adaptive General Linear Models are built upon region-based non-parametric estimation of brain dynamics. Regions are first identified as functionally homogeneous parcels in the mask of the grey matter using a specific procedure [Thirion, B., Flandin, G., Pinel, P., Roche, A., Ciuciu, P., Poline, J.B., August 2006. Dealing with the shortcomings of spatial normalization: Multi-subject parcellation of fMRI datasets. Hum. Brain Mapp. 27 (8), 678-693.]. Then, in each parcel, prior information is embedded to constrain this estimation. Detection is achieved by modelling activating, deactivating and non-activating voxels through mixture models within each parcel. From the posterior distribution, we infer upon the model parameters using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques. Bayesian model comparison allows us to emphasize on artificial datasets first that inhomogeneous gamma-Gaussian mixture models outperform Gaussian mixtures in terms of sensitivity/specificity trade-off and second that it is worthwhile modelling serial correlation through an AR(1) noise process at low signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio. Our approach is then validated on an fMRI experiment that studies habituation to auditory sentence repetition. This phenomenon is clearly recovered as well as the hierarchical temporal

  16. Real-time MRI navigated US: Role in diagnosis and guided biopsy of incidental breast lesions and axillary lymph nodes detected on breast MRI but not on second look US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pons, Elena Pastor, E-mail: elenapastorpons@gmail.com; Azcón, Francisco Miras, E-mail: frmiaz00@gmail.com; Casas, María Culiañez, E-mail: mariacc1980@gmail.com; Meca, Salvador Martínez, E-mail: isalvaa@hotmail.com; Espona, José Luis García, E-mail: gespona@hotmail.com

    2014-06-15

    Objectives: To prospectively evaluate the accuracy of real-time ultrasound combined with supine-MRI using volume navigation technique (RtMR-US) in diagnosis and biopsy of incidental breast lesions (ILSM) and axillary lymph nodes (LNSM) suspicious of malignancy on contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI). Materials and methods: Five hundred and seventy-seven women were examined using breast CE-MRI. Those with incidental breast lesions not identified after second-look ultrasound (US) were recruited for RtMR-US. Biopsy was performed in ILSM. Breast lesions were categorized with BI-RADS system and Fisher’ exact test. Axillary lymph nodes morphology was described. To assess efficacy of RtMR-US, diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, detection rate and Kappa index of conventional-US and RtMR-US were calculated. Results: Forty-three lesions were detected on CE-MRI before navigation. Eighteen were carcinomas and 25 ILSM. Of these, 21 underwent a RtMR-US. Detection rate on RtMR-US (90.7%) was higher than on conventional-US (43%) (p < 0.001). Agreement between both techniques was low (k = 0.138). Twenty ILSM and 2 LNSM were biopsied. Sixty-five percent were benign (100% of BI-RADS3 and 56% of BI-RADS4-5). Diagnostic performance of RtMR-US identifying malignant nodules for overall lesions and for the subgroup of ILSM was respectively: sensitivity 96.3% and 100%, specificity 18.8% and 30.7%, positive predictive value 66.7% and 43.7%, negative predictive value 75% and 100%. In addition RtMR-US enabled biopsy of 2 metastatic lymph nodes. Conclusions: Real time-US with supine-MRI using a volume navigation technique increases the detection of ILSM. RtMR-US may be used to detect occult breast carcinomas and to assess cancer extension, preventing unnecessary MRI-guided biopsies and sentinel lymph node biopsies. Incidental lesions BI-RADS 3 non-detected on conventional-US are probably benign.

  17. Radiographically occult femoral and pelvic fractures are not mutually exclusive: a review of fractures detected by MRI following low-energy trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szewczyk-Bieda, Magdalena; Thomas, Naveena; Oliver, Thomas Barry [Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Department of Clinical Radiology, Dundee, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to review the MRI examinations of a large group of low-energy trauma patients in whom pelvic MRI had detected radiographically occult fractures, in order to characterize prevailing fracture patterns and determine how often co-existing proximal femoral and pelvic fractures were observed. All patients having pelvic MRI over 5 years were identified. Word-search software selected 269 MRI reports containing the term 'fracture'. Further scrutiny identified 168 with diagnosis of fracture. MRI request and imaging record review identified 102 low-energy trauma cases that had MRI for clinical suspicion of fracture despite normal radiographs. Sixty-six cases were excluded for the following reasons: no expressed clinical suspicion of occult fracture; history suggesting high-energy trauma; skeletal co-morbidity hindering acute fracture identification; interval more than 2 weeks between radiographs and MRI. The 102 study MRI examinations, which employed a limited two-sequence protocol, were reviewed. Any fracture that had not been appreciated on radiographs was recorded and characterized as femoral, pelvic, or co-existing femoral and pelvic fractures. The 102 study cases had a median age of 82 years. The median interval between pelvic radiographs and MRI was 3 days. MRI showed undiagnosed femoral fracture in 48/102 cases (47.1%), sacral fracture in 41/102 (40.2%), and pubic fracture in 55/102 (53.9%). In 11/102 cases (10.8%), MRI showed undiagnosed fractures of both proximal femur and pelvic ring (seven sacral, six pubic bone, two other site fractures). In 10/11 cases with co-existing femoral and pelvic fractures, the femoral fracture was incomplete. Limited pelvic MRI found a high prevalence of radiographically occult femoral and pelvic fractures in low-energy trauma patients, with clinical suspicion of fracture despite normal radiographs. Co-existing occult femoral and pelvic ring fractures were commonly observed, and in such cases, the

  18. The diagnostic performance of radiography for detection of osteoarthritis-associated features compared with MRI in hip joints with chronic pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Li [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Hayashi, Daichi; Guermazi, Ali [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Hunter, David J. [University of Sydney, Department of Medicine, Sydney (Australia); Li, Ling [New England Baptist Hospital, Division of Research, Boston, MA (United States); Winterstein, Anton; Bohndorf, Klaus [Klinikum Augsburg, Department of Radiology, Augsburg (Germany); Roemer, Frank W. [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Klinikum Augsburg, Department of Radiology, Augsburg (Germany); University of Erlangen, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of radiography for the detection of MRI-detected osteoarthritis-associated features in various articular subregions of the hip joint. Forty-four patients with chronic hip pain (mean age, 63.3 {+-} 9.5 years), who were part of the Hip Osteoarthritis MRI Scoring (HOAMS) cohort, underwent both weight-bearing anteroposterior pelvic radiography and 1.5 T MRI. The HOAMS study was a prospective observational study involving 52 subjects, conducted to develop a semiquantitative MRI scoring system for hip osteoarthritis features. In the present study, eight subjects were excluded because of a lack of radiographic assessment. On radiography, the presence of superior and medial joint space narrowing, superior and inferior acetabular/femoral osteophytes, acetabular subchondral cysts, and bone attrition of femoral head was noted. On MRI, cartilage, osteophytes, subchondral cysts, and bone attrition were evaluated in the corresponding locations. Diagnostic performance of radiography was compared with that of MRI, and the area under curve (AUC) was calculated for each pathological feature. Compared with MRI, radiography provided high specificity (0.76-0.90) but variable sensitivity (0.44-0.78) for diffuse cartilage damage (using JSN as an indirect marker), femoral osteophytes, acetabular subchondral cysts and bone attrition of the femoral head, and a low specificity (0.42 and 0.58) for acetabular osteophytes. The AUC of radiography for detecting overall diffuse cartilage damage, marginal osteophytes, subchondral cysts and bone attrition was 0.76, 0.78, 0.67, and 0.82, respectively. Diagnostic performance of radiography is good for bone attrition, fair for marginal osteophytes and cartilage damage, but poor for subchondral cysts. (orig.)

  19. Incidentally detected enhancing lesions found in breast MRI: analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient and T2 signal intensity significantly improves specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arponen, Otso; Masarwah, Amro; Taina, Mikko [Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio University Hospital, Diagnostic Imaging Centre, Department of Clinical Radiology, PO Box 1777, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine, Department of Clinical Radiology, PO Box 1777, Kuopio (Finland); Sutela, Anna; Koenoenen, Mervi; Hakumaeki, Juhana; Sudah, Mazen [Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio University Hospital, Diagnostic Imaging Centre, Department of Clinical Radiology, PO Box 1777, Kuopio (Finland); Sironen, Reijo [Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Pathology, PO Box 1777, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine, Clinical Pathology and Forensic Medicine, PO Box 1777, Kuopio (Finland); University of Eastern Finland, Cancer Center of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland); Vanninen, Ritva [Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio University Hospital, Diagnostic Imaging Centre, Department of Clinical Radiology, PO Box 1777, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital, University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine, Department of Clinical Radiology, PO Box 1777, Kuopio (Finland); University of Eastern Finland, Cancer Center of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland)

    2016-12-15

    To evaluate the value of adding T2- and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to the BI-RADS registered classification in MRI-detected lesions. This retrospective study included 112 consecutive patients who underwent 3.0T structural breast MRI with T2- and DWI on the basis of EUSOMA recommendations. Morphological and kinetic features, T2 signal intensity (T2 SI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) findings were assessed. Thirty-three (29.5 %) patients (mean age 57.0 ± 12.7 years) had 36 primarily MRI-detected incidental lesions of which 16 (44.4 %) proved to be malignant. No single morphological or kinetic feature was associated with malignancy. Both low T2 SI (P = 0.009) and low ADC values (≤0.87 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}s{sup -1}, P < 0.001) yielded high specificity (80.0 %/80.0 %). The BI-RADS classification supplemented with information from DWI and T2-WI improved the diagnostic performance of the BI-RADS classification as sensitivity remained 100 % and specificity improved from 30 % to 65.0 %. The numbers of false positive lesions declined from 39 % (N = 14) to 19 % (N = 7). MRI-detected incidental lesions may be challenging to characterize as they have few specific malignancy indicating features. The specificity of MRI can be improved by incorporating T2 SI and ADC values into the BI-RADS assessment. (orig.)

  20. Probability of malignancy for lesions detected on breast MRI: a predictive model incorporating BI-RADS imaging features and patient characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMartini, Wendy B.; Gutierrez, Robert L.; Peacock, Sue; Lehman, Constance D. [University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Breast Imaging, Seattle, WA (United States); Kurland, Brenda F. [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Clinical Statics, 1100 Fairview Avenue North, PO Box 19024, Seattle, WA (United States); Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA (United States); Blackmore, C.C. [Virginia Mason Medical Center, Department of Radiology, 1100 9th Avenue, PO Box 900, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2011-08-15

    To predict the probability of malignancy for MRI-detected breast lesions with a multivariate model incorporating patient and lesion characteristics. Retrospective review of 2565 breast MR examinations from 1/03-11/06. BI-RADS 3, 4 and 5 lesions initially detected on MRI for new cancer or high-risk screening were included and outcomes determined by imaging, biopsy or tumor registry linkage. Variables were indication for MRI, age, lesion size, BI-RADS lesion type and kinetics. Associations with malignancy were assessed using generalized estimating equations and lesion probabilities of malignancy were calculated. 855 lesions (155 malignant, 700 benign) were included. Strongest associations with malignancy were for kinetics (washout versus persistent; OR 4.2, 95% CI 2.5-7.1) and clinical indication (new cancer versus high-risk screening; OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.7-5.1). Also significant were age > = 50 years, size > = 10 mm and lesion-type mass. The most predictive model (AUC 0.70) incorporated indication, size and kinetics. The highest probability of malignancy (41.1%) was for lesions on MRI for new cancer, > = 10 mm with washout. The lowest (1.2%) was for lesions on high-risk screening, <10 mm with persistent kinetics. A multivariate model shows promise as a decision support tool in predicting malignancy for MRI-detected breast lesions. (orig.)

  1. MRI-detectable changes in mouse brain structure induced by voluntary exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Lindsay S; Steadman, Patrick E; Jones, Carly E; Laliberté, Christine L; Dazai, Jun; Lerch, Jason P; Stefanovic, Bojana; Sled, John G

    2015-06-01

    Physical exercise, besides improving cognitive and mental health, is known to cause structural changes in the brain. Understanding the structural changes that occur with exercise as well as the neuroanatomical correlates of a predisposition for exercise is important for understanding human health. This study used high-resolution 3D MR imaging, in combination with deformation-based morphometry, to investigate the macroscopic changes in brain structure that occur in healthy adult mice following four weeks of voluntary exercise. We found that exercise induced changes in multiple brain structures that are involved in motor function and learning and memory including the hippocampus, dentate gyrus, stratum granulosum of the dentate gyrus, cingulate cortex, olivary complex, inferior cerebellar peduncle and regions of the cerebellum. In addition, a number of brain structures, including the hippocampus, striatum and pons, when measured on MRI prior to the start of exercise were highly predictive of subsequent exercise activity. Exercise tended to normalize these pre-existing differences between mice.

  2. MRI detection of hypointense brain lesions in patients with multiple sclerosis: T1 spin-echo vs. gradient-echo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuy, Sheena L.; Tauhid, Shahamat; Kim, Gloria; Chu, Renxin; Tummala, Subhash [Departments of Neurology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Laboratory for Neuroimaging Research, Partners MS Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Hurwitz, Shelley [Departments of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Bakshi, Rohit, E-mail: rbakshi@bwh.harvard.edu [Departments of Neurology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Laboratory for Neuroimaging Research, Partners MS Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Departments of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Compared T1SE and T1GE in detecting hypointense brain lesions in MS patients. • T1GE detected a higher cerebral lesion volume and number than T1SE. • T1SE correlated significantly with disability, while T1GE did not. • Hypointense lesions on T1SE and T1GE are not interchangeable in patients with MS. - Abstract: Objective: Compare T1 spin-echo (T1SE) and T1 gradient-echo (T1GE) sequences in detecting hypointense brain lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS). Background: Chronic hypointense lesions on T1SE MRI scans are a surrogate of severe demyelination and axonal loss in MS. The role of T1GE images in the detection of such lesions has not been clarified. Design/methods: In 45 patients with MS [Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score (mean ± SD) 3.5 ± 2.0; 37 relapsing-remitting (RR); 8 secondary progressive (SP)], cerebral T1SE, T1GE, and T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) images were acquired on a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Images were re-sampled to axial 5 mm slices before directly comparing lesion detectability using Jim (v.7, Xinapse Systems). Statistical methods included Wilcoxon signed rank tests to compare sequences and Spearman correlations to test associations. Results: Considering the entire cohort, T1GE detected a higher lesion volume (5.90 ± 6.21 vs. 4.17 ± 4.84 ml, p < 0.0001) and higher lesion number (27.82 ± 20.66 vs. 25.20 ± 20.43, p < 0.05) than T1SE. Lesion volume differences persisted when considering RR and SP patients separately (both p < 0.01). A higher lesion number by T1GE was seen only in the RR group (p < 0.05). When comparing correlations between lesion volume and overall neurologic disability (EDSS score), T1SE correlated with EDSS (Spearman r = 0.29, p < 0.05) while T1GE (r = 0.23, p = 0.13) and FLAIR (r = 0.24, p = 0.12) did not. Conclusion: Our data suggest that hypointense lesions on T1SE and T1GE are not interchangeable in patients with MS. Based on these results, we hypothesize that T1GE

  3. Combined molecular MRI and immuno-spin-trapping for in vivo detection of free radicals in orthotopic mouse GL261 gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towner, Rheal A; Smith, Nataliya; Saunders, Debra; De Souza, Patricia Coutinho; Henry, Leah; Lupu, Florea; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Mason, Ronald P; Gomez-Mejiba, Sandra E; Ramirez, Dario C

    2013-12-01

    Free radicals play a major role in gliomas. By combining immuno-spin-trapping (IST) and molecular magnetic resonance imaging (mMRI), in vivo levels of free radicals were detected within mice bearing orthotopic GL261 gliomas. The nitrone spin trap DMPO (5,5-dimethyl pyrroline N-oxide) was administered prior to injection of an anti-DMPO probe (anti-DMPO antibody covalently bound to a bovine serum albumin (BSA)-Gd (gadolinium)-DTPA (diethylene triamine penta acetic acid)-biotin MRI contrast agent) to trap tumor-associated free radicals. mMRI detected the presence of anti-DMPO adducts by either a significant sustained increase (pfree radicals from a glioma model.

  4. Detection, Identification, Location, and Remote Sensing Using SAW RFID Sensor Tags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Richard J.; Kennedy, Timothy F.; Williams, Robert M.; Fink, Patrick W.; Ngo, Phong H.

    2009-01-01

    The Electromagnetic Systems Branch (EV4) of the Avionic Systems Division at NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX is studying the utility of surface acoustic wave (SAW) radiofrequency identification (RFID) tags for multiple wireless applications including detection, identification, tracking, and remote sensing of objects on the lunar surface, monitoring of environmental test facilities, structural shape and health monitoring, and nondestructive test and evaluation of assets. For all of these applications, it is anticipated that the system utilized to interrogate the SAW RFID tags may need to operate at fairly long range and in the presence of considerable multipath and multiple-access interference. Towards that end, EV4 is developing a prototype SAW RFID wireless interrogation system for use in such environments called the Passive Adaptive RFID Sensor Equipment (PARSED) system. The system utilizes a digitally beam-formed planar receiving antenna array to extend range and provide direction-of-arrival information coupled with an approximate maximum-likelihood signal processing algorithm to provide near-optimal estimation of both range and temperature. The system is capable of forming a large number of beams within the field of view and resolving the information from several tags within each beam. The combination of both spatial and waveform discrimination provides the capability to track and monitor telemetry from a large number of objects appearing simultaneously within the field of view of the receiving array. In this paper, we will consider the application of the PARSEQ system to the problem of simultaneous detection, identification, localization, and temperature estimation for multiple objects. We will summarize the overall design of the PARSEQ system and present a detailed description of the design and performance of the signal detection and estimation algorithms incorporated in the system. The system is currently configured only to measure temperature

  5. Joint estimation of shape and deformation for the detection of lesions in dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Byung-Woo

    2013-11-01

    We propose a mathematical framework for simultaneously delineating the boundary of object and estimating its temporal motion in the application of lesion detection in a dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) breast MRI sequence where both the appearance and the shape of region of interest is assumed to change in time. A unified energy functional for a joint segmentation and registration is proposed based on the assumption that the statistical properties of dynamic intensity curves within a region of interest are homogeneous. Our algorithm is designed to provide the morphological properties of the enhanced region and its dynamic intensity profiles, called kinetic signatures, in the analysis of DCE imagery since these features are considered as significant cues in understanding images. The proposed energy comprises a combination of a segmentation energy and a registration energy. The segmentation energy is developed based on a convex formulation being insensitive to the initialization. The registration energy is designed to compensate motion artifacts that are usually involved in the temporal imaging procedure. The major objective of this work is to provide a mathematical framework for a joint segmentation and registration on a dynamic sequence of images, and we demonstrate the mutual benefit of the estimation of temporal deformations for the registration step and the localization of regions of interest for the segmentation step. The effectiveness of the developed algorithm has been demonstrated on a number of clinical DCE breast MRI data in the application of breast lesion detection and the results show its potential to improve the accuracy and the efficiency in the diagnosis of breast cancer.

  6. Semi-automatic detection of Gd-DTPA-saline filled capsules for colonic transit time assessment in MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrer, Christian; Kirchhoff, Sonja; Keil, Andreas; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Mussack, Thomas; Lienemann, Andreas; Reiser, Maximilian; Navab, Nassir

    2008-03-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders result in a significant number of consultations in primary care facilities. Chronic constipation and diarrhea are regarded as two of the most common diseases affecting between 2% and 27% of the population in western countries 1-3. Defecatory disorders are most commonly due to dysfunction of the pelvic floor or the anal sphincter. Although an exact differentiation of these pathologies is essential for adequate therapy, diagnosis is still only based on a clinical evaluation1. Regarding quantification of constipation only the ingestion of radio-opaque markers or radioactive isotopes and the consecutive assessment of colonic transit time using X-ray or scintigraphy, respectively, has been feasible in clinical settings 4-8. However, these approaches have several drawbacks such as involving rather inconvenient, time consuming examinations and exposing the patient to ionizing radiation. Therefore, conventional assessment of colonic transit time has not been widely used. Most recently a new technique for the assessment of colonic transit time using MRI and MR-contrast media filled capsules has been introduced 9. However, due to numerous examination dates per patient and corresponding datasets with many images, the evaluation of the image data is relatively time-consuming. The aim of our study was to develop a computer tool to facilitate the detection of the capsules in MRI datasets and thus to shorten the evaluation time. We present a semi-automatic tool which provides an intensity, size 10, and shape-based 11,12 detection of ingested Gd-DTPA-saline filled capsules. After an automatic pre-classification, radiologists may easily correct the results using the application-specific user interface, therefore decreasing the evaluation time significantly.

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of 3T conventional shoulder MRI in the detection of the long head of the biceps tendon tears associated with rotator cuff tendon tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ro Woon; Choi, Soo-Jung; Ahn, Jae Hong; Shin, Dong Rock; Kang, Chae Hoon [University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Asan Foundation, Gangneung Asan Hospital, Gangneung-si, Gangwon-do (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Man Ho [Andong Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Andong-si, Gyeongsangbuk-do (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ki Won [University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Asan Foundation, Gangneung Asan Hospital, Gangneung-si, Gangwon-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance (DP) of 3T (3 Tesla field strength) conventional shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) tears in association with rotator cuff tendon tears. This study included 80 consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic surgery for rotator cuff tendon tears. Two radiologists independently evaluated the preoperative 3T shoulder MRI for the presence of LHBT tears. The DP of MRI was evaluated using the results of arthroscopy as the reference standard. We also evaluated the DP of several MR signs of LHBT in detection of partial LHBT tears. Arthroscopic examination revealed 35 partial and 5 complete tears. According to the results of evaluation by reviewers 1 and 2, shoulder MRI exhibited sensitivities of 77.14 and 80 % and specificities of 71.11 and 73.33 % in detection of partial LHBT tears and sensitivities of 80 and 100 % and a specificity of 100% (both) in detection of complete LHBT tears. In detecting partial LHBT tears, increased T2 signal intensity of the LHBT exhibited high sensitivities (reviewers 1 and 2; 82.85 and 80 %, respectively) and the presence of intratendinous defects or C-signs exhibited the highest specificities (reviewers 1 and 2; 95.55 and 93.33 %, respectively), followed by abnormalities in shape and outer margins of the LHBT (reviewers 1 and 2; 91.11 and 82 %; 91.11 and 86.66 %, respectively). Non-contrast-enhanced 3T shoulder MRI is potentially highly accurate in detection of complete LHBT tears, but moderately accurate in detection of partial LHBT tears. (orig.)

  8. Neural Activity Elicited by a Cognitive Task can be Detected in Single-Trials with Simultaneous Intracerebral EEG-fMRI Recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saignavongs, Mani; Ciumas, Carolina; Petton, Mathilde; Bouet, Romain; Boulogne, Sébastien; Rheims, Sylvain; Carmichael, David W; Lachaux, Jean-Philippe; Ryvlin, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that it is feasible to record simultaneously intracerebral EEG (icEEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in patients with epilepsy. While it has mainly been used to explore the hemodynamic changes associated with epileptic spikes, this approach could also provide new insight into human cognition. However, the first step is to ensure that cognitive EEG components, that have lower amplitudes than epileptic spikes, can be appropriately detected under fMRI. We compared the high frequency activities (HFA, 50-150[Formula: see text]Hz) elicited by a reading task in icEEG-only and subsequent icEEG-fMRI in the same patients ([Formula: see text]), implanted with depth electrodes. Comparable responses were obtained, with 71% of the recording sites that responded during the icEEG-only session also responding during the icEEG-fMRI session. For all the remaining sites, nearby clusters (distant of 7[Formula: see text]mm or less) also demonstrated significant HFA increase during the icEEG-fMRI session. Significant HFA increases were also observable at the single-trial level in icEEG-fMRI recordings. Our results show that low-amplitude icEEG signal components such as cognitive-induced HFAs can be reliably recorded with simultaneous fMRI. This paves the way for the use of icEEG-fMRI to address various fundamental and clinical issues, notably the identification of the neural correlates of the BOLD signal.

  9. Contribution of the hepatobiliary phase of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI to Dynamic MRI in the detection of hypovascular small ({<=}2 cm) HCC in cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golfieri, Rita; Renzulli, Matteo; Lucidi, Vincenzo; Corcioni, Beniamino [University of Bologna, Radiology Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant' Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Trevisani, Franco [University of Bologna, Unit of Semeiotica, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant' Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Bolondi, Luigi [University of Bologna, Unit of Internal Medicine, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant' Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    To prospectively assess the additional value of the hepatobiliary (HB) phase of Gd-EOB-DTPA-MRI in identifying and characterising small ({<=}2 cm) hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) undetermined in dynamic phases alone because of their atypical features, according to the AASLD criteria. 127 cirrhotic patients were evaluated with Gd-EOB-DTPA-MRI in two sets: unenhanced and dynamic phases; unenhanced, dynamic and HB phases. Sixty-two out of 215 nodules (29%) were atypical in 42 patients (33%). 62 atypical nodules were reported at histology: high-grade dysplastic nodules (HGDN)/early HCC (n = 20), low-grade DN (LGDN) (n = 21), regenerative nodules (n = 17) and nodular regenerative hyperplasia (n = 4). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive value (PPV, NPV) were increased by the addition of the HB phase: 88.4-99.4%, 88-95%, 88-98.5%, 97-99%, and 65-97.5%, respectively. Twenty atypical nodules were malignant (32%), 19 of which were characterised only during the HB phase. The HB phase is 11% more sensitive in the classification of HGDN/early HCC than dynamic MRI, with an added value of 32.5% in the NPV. The high incidence (33%) of atypical nodules and their frequent malignancy (32%) suggest the widespread employment of Gd-EOB-DTPA-MRI in the follow-up of small nodules ({<=}2 cm) in cirrhosis. (orig.)

  10. Unsupervised change detection in VHR remote sensing imagery - an object-based clustering approach in a dynamic urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichtle, Tobias; Geiß, Christian; Wurm, Michael; Lakes, Tobia; Taubenböck, Hannes

    2017-02-01

    Monitoring of changes is one of the most important inherent capabilities of remote sensing. The steadily increasing amount of available very-high resolution (VHR) remote sensing imagery requires highly automatic methods and thus, largely unsupervised concepts for change detection. In addition, new procedures that address this challenge should be capable of handling remote sensing data acquired by different sensors. Thereby, especially in rapidly changing complex urban environments, the high level of detail present in VHR data indicates the deployment of object-based concepts for change detection. This paper presents a novel object-based approach for unsupervised change detection with focus on individual buildings. First, a principal component analysis together with a unique procedure for determination of the number of relevant principal components is performed as a predecessor for change detection. Second, k-means clustering is applied for discrimination of changed and unchanged buildings. In this manner, several groups of object-based difference features that can be derived from multi-temporal VHR data are evaluated regarding their discriminative properties for change detection. In addition, the influence of deviating viewing geometries when using VHR data acquired by different sensors is quantified. Overall, the proposed workflow returned viable results in the order of κ statistics of 0.8-0.9 and beyond for different groups of features, which demonstrates its suitability for unsupervised change detection in dynamic urban environments. With respect to imagery from different sensors, deviating viewing geometries were found to deteriorate the change detection result only slightly in the order of up to 0.04 according to κ statistics, which underlines the robustness of the proposed approach.

  11. Oil and gas reservoir exploration based on hyperspectral remote sensing and super-low-frequency electromagnetic detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qiming; Zhang, Zili; Chen, Li; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Chengye

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a method that combined hyperspectral remote sensing with super-low-frequency (SLF) electromagnetic detection to extract oil and gas reservoir characteristics from surface to underground, for the purpose of determining oil and gas exploration target regions. The study area in Xinjiang Karamay oil-gas field, China, was investigated. First, a Hyperion dataset was used to extract altered minerals (montmorillonite, chlorite, and siderite), which were comparatively verified by field survey and spectral measurement. Second, the SLF electromagnetic datasets were then acquired where the altered minerals were distributed. An inverse distance weighting method was utilized to acquire two-dimensional profiles of the electrical feature distribution of different formations on the subsurface. Finally, existing geological data, field work, and the results derived from Hyperion images and SLF electromagnetic datasets were comprehensively analyzed to confirm the oil and gas exploration target region. The results of both hyperspectral remote sensing and SLF electromagnetic detection had a good consistency with the geological materials in this study. This paper demonstrates that the combination of hyperspectral remote sensing and SLF electromagnetic detection is suitable for the early exploration of oil and gas reservoirs, which is characterized by low exploration costs, large exploration areas, and a high working efficiency.

  12. Detection of 12.5% and 25% Salt Reduction in Bread in a Remote Indigenous Australian Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Emma; Clarke, Rozlynne; Jaenke, Rachael; Brimblecombe, Julie

    2016-03-16

    Food reformulation is an important strategy to reduce the excess salt intake observed in remote Indigenous Australia. We aimed to examine whether 12.5% and 25% salt reduction in bread is detectable, and, if so, whether acceptability is changed, in a sample of adults living in a remote Indigenous community in the Northern Territory of Australia. Convenience samples were recruited for testing of reduced-salt (300 and 350 mg Na/100 g) versus Standard (~400 mg Na/100 g) white and wholemeal breads (n = 62 for white; n = 72 for wholemeal). Triangle testing was used to examine whether participants could detect a difference between the breads. Liking of each bread was also measured; standard consumer acceptability questionnaires were modified to maximise cultural appropriateness and understanding. Participants were unable to detect a difference between Standard and reduced-salt breads (all p values > 0.05 when analysed using binomial probability). Further, as expected, liking of the breads was not changed with salt reduction (all p values > 0.05 when analysed using ANOVA). Reducing salt in products commonly purchased in remote Indigenous communities has potential as an equitable, cost-effective and sustainable strategy to reduce population salt intake and reduce risk of chronic disease, without the barriers associated with strategies that require individual behaviour change.

  13. Detection of 12.5% and 25% Salt Reduction in Bread in a Remote Indigenous Australian Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma McMahon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Food reformulation is an important strategy to reduce the excess salt intake observed in remote Indigenous Australia. We aimed to examine whether 12.5% and 25% salt reduction in bread is detectable, and, if so, whether acceptability is changed, in a sample of adults living in a remote Indigenous community in the Northern Territory of Australia. Convenience samples were recruited for testing of reduced-salt (300 and 350 mg Na/100 g versus Standard (~400 mg Na/100 g white and wholemeal breads (n = 62 for white; n = 72 for wholemeal. Triangle testing was used to examine whether participants could detect a difference between the breads. Liking of each bread was also measured; standard consumer acceptability questionnaires were modified to maximise cultural appropriateness and understanding. Participants were unable to detect a difference between Standard and reduced-salt breads (all p values > 0.05 when analysed using binomial probability. Further, as expected, liking of the breads was not changed with salt reduction (all p values > 0.05 when analysed using ANOVA. Reducing salt in products commonly purchased in remote Indigenous communities has potential as an equitable, cost-effective and sustainable strategy to reduce population salt intake and reduce risk of chronic disease, without the barriers associated with strategies that require individual behaviour change.

  14. Detectability of low and intermediate or high risk prostate cancer with combined T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doo, Kyung Won; Sung, Deuk Jae; Park, Beom Jin; Kim, Min Ju; Cho, Sung Bum; Oh, Yu Whan [Department of Radiology, Anam Hospital, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Young Hwii [College of Medicine, Department of Urology, Anam Hospital, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Kyung Sook [College of Medicine, Department of Biostatistics, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    To evaluate the incremental value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in combination with T2-weighted imaging to detect low (Gleason score, {<=} 6) and intermediate or high risk (Gleason score, {>=} 7) prostate cancer. Fifty-one patients who underwent MRI before prostatectomy were evaluated. Two readers independently scored the probability of tumour in eight regions of prostate on T2-weighted images (T2WI) and T2WI combined with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. Data were divided into two groups - low risk and intermediate or high risk prostate cancer - and correlated with histopathological results. Diagnostic performance parameters, areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUCs) and interreader agreement were calculated. For both readers, AUCs of combined T2WI and ADC maps were greater than those of T2WI in intermediate or high risk (reader 1, 0.887 vs. 0.859; reader 2, 0.732 vs 0.662, P < 0.05) prostate cancers, but not in low risk (reader 1, 0.719 vs 0.725; reader 2, 0.685 vs. 0.680, P > 0.05) prostate cancers. Weighted {kappa} value of combined T2WI and ADC maps was 0.689. The addition of DWI to T2-weighted imaging improves the accuracy of detecting intermediate or high risk prostate cancers, but not for low risk prostate cancer detection. (orig.)

  15. The performance of MRI in detecting subarticular bone erosion of sacroiliac joint in patients with spondyloarthropathy: A comparison with X-ray and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Libin [Department of Radiology, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing (China); Huang, Zhenguo, E-mail: zhuang680911@163.com [Department of Radiology, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing (China); Zhang, Xuezhe [Department of Radiology, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing (China); Chan, Queenie [Philips Healthcare, Hong Kong (China); Xu, Yanyan [Department of Radiology, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing (China); Wang, Guochun [Department of Rheumatology, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing (China); Wang, Wu [Department of Radiology, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • MRI 3D-WS-bSSFP sequence has high spatial resolution and short scanning time. • This is the first time this sequence was applied to detect bone erosion of SI joint. • Its performance was compared with other commonly used diagnostic methods. • Result shows that this sequence is better than X-ray and T1W in the detection of bone erosion. • This sequence can be considered an alternative to CT in showing erosion in SpA patients. - Abstract: Objective: To assess the sensitivity and specificity of detecting subarticular bone erosion of sacroiliac (SI) joint in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA) using MRI three-dimensional water selective balanced steady-state free precession sequence (3D-WS-bSSFP) and T1-weighted (T1W) sequence. Materials and methods: Radiography, CT and MRI of SI joint from 43 SpA patients were retrospectively analyzed. MRI examination sequences include T1W, short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and 3D-WS-bSSFP. Two radiologists, blinded to clinical data, independently determined bone erosion at bilateral sacral and iliac sides of the SI joint on radiography, CT, T1W and 3D-WS-bSSFP respectively. X{sup 2} test was used to compare the sensitivity of detecting bone erosion among different diagnostic methods. Results: Of the 86 sacral and 86 iliac articular surfaces from the 43 cases, radiography, CT, MRI T1W and 3D-WS-bSSFP showed the presence of bone erosion in 40, 74, 50 and 71 articular surfaces respectively. CT and MRI 3D-WS-bSSFP demonstrated similar sensitivity (x{sup 2} = 0.11, P = 0.74), and both were superior to radiography (x{sup 2} = 15.17, P < 0.01 and x{sup 2} = 12.78, P < 0.01, respectively) and T1W (x{sup 2} = 7.26, P < 0.01 and x{sup 2} = 5.62, P < 0.05). Using CT diagnosis as the gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity of detecting bone erosion for MRI 3D-WS-bSSFP and T1W sequences were 91.8%, 96.9%, and 60.8%, 94.9% respectively. Conclusion: MRI 3D-WS-bSSFP sequence is associated with short scanning time

  16. SQUID-Detected MRI in the Limit of Zero Static Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelso, Nathan Dean [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2009-12-14

    This thesis describes an implementation of the so-called"zero-field MRI" (ZFMRI) pulse sequence, which allows for imaging in an arbitrarily low B0 field. The ZFMRI sequence created an effective unidirectional gradient field by using a train of pi pulses to average out the concomitant gradient components during encoding. The signals were acquired using a low-transition temperature dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (low-Tc dc SQUID) coupled to a first-order axial gradiometer. The experiments were carried out in a liquid helium dewar which was magnetically shielded with a single-layer mu-metal can around the outside and a superconducting Pb can contained within the helium space. We increased the filling factor of the custom-made, double-walled Pyrex insert by placing the liquid alcohol sample, at a temperature of approximately -50 degrees C, at the center of one loop of the superconducting gradiometer, which was immersed in the helium bath.

  17. Applications in Bioastronautics and Bioinformatics: Early Radiation Cataracts Detected by Noninvasive, Quantitative, and Remote Means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; King, James F.; Giblin, Frank J.

    2000-01-01

    Human exploration of Mars is a key goal in NASA's exploration planning in the next 20 years. Maintaining crew health and good vision is certainly an important aspect of achieving a successful mission. Continuous radiation exposure is a risk factor for radiation-induced cataracts in astronauts because radiation exposure in space travel has the potential of accelerating the aging process (ref. 1). A patented compact device (ref. 2) based on the technique of dynamic light scattering (DLS) was designed for monitoring an astronaut's ocular health during long-duration space travel. This capability of early diagnosis, unmatched by any other clinical technique in use today, may enable prompt initiation of preventive/curative therapy. An Internet web-based system integrating photon correlation data and controlling the hardware to monitor cataract development in vivo at a remote site in real time (teleophthalmology) is currently being developed. The new technology detects cataracts very early (at the molecular level). Cataract studies onboard the International Space Station will be helpful in quantifying any adverse effect of radiation to ocular health. The normal lens in a human eye, situated behind the cornea, is a transparent tissue. It contains 35 wt % protein and 65 wt % water. Aging, disease (e.g., diabetes), smoking, dehydration, malnutrition, and exposure to ultraviolet light and ionizing radiation can cause agglomeration of the lens proteins. Protein aggregation can take place anywhere in the lens, causing lens opacity. The aggregation and opacification could produce nuclear (central portion of the lens) or cortical (peripheral) cataracts. Nuclear and posterior subcapsular (the membrane's capsule surrounds the whole lens) cataracts, being on the visual optical axis of the eye, cause visual impairment that can finally lead to blindness. The lens proteins, in their native state, are small in size. As a cataract develops, this size grows from a few nanometers

  18. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - chest; Magnetic resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI ... healthy enough to filter the contrast. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  19. Lobular neoplasia detected in MRI-guided core biopsy carries a high risk for upgrade: a study of 63 cases from four different institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Thaer; Kumar, Prasanna R; Li, Zaibo; Karabakhtsian, Rouzan G; Sanati, Souzan; Chen, Xiwei; Wang, Dan; Liu, Song; Reig, Beatriu

    2016-01-01

    There are certain criteria to recommend surgical excision for lobular neoplasia diagnosed in mammographically detected core biopsy. The aims of this study are to explore the rate of upgrade of lobular neoplasia detected in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided biopsy and to investigate the clinicopathological and radiological features that could predict upgrade. We reviewed 1655 MRI-guided core biopsies yielding 63 (4%) cases of lobular neoplasia. Key clinical features were recorded. MRI findings including mass vs non-mass enhancement and the reason for biopsy were also recorded. An upgrade was defined as the presence of invasive carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ in subsequent surgical excision. The overall rate of lobular neoplasia in MRI-guided core biopsy ranged from 2 to 7%, with an average of 4%. A total of 15 (24%) cases had an upgrade, including 5 cases of invasive carcinoma and 10 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ. Pure lobular neoplasia was identified in 34 cases, 11 (32%) of which had upgrade. In this group, an ipsilateral concurrent or past history of breast cancer was found to be associated with a higher risk of upgrade (6/11, 55%) than contralateral breast cancer (1 of 12, 8%; P=0.03). To our knowledge, this is the largest series of lobular neoplasia diagnosed in MRI-guided core biopsy. The incidence of lobular neoplasia is relatively low. Lobular neoplasia detected in MRI-guided biopsy carries a high risk for upgrade warranting surgical excision. However, more cases from different types of institutions are needed to verify our results.

  20. Does functional MRI detect activation in white matter?A review of emerging evidence, issues, and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodie Reanna Gawryluk

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is a non-invasive technique that allows for visualization of activated brain regions. Until recently, fMRI studies have focused on gray matter. There are two main reasons white matter fMRI remains controversial: 1 the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD fMRI signal depends on cerebral blood flow and volume, which are lower in white matter than gray matter and 2 fMRI signal has been associated with post-synaptic potentials (mainly localized in gray matter as opposed to action potentials (the primary type of neural activity in white matter. Despite these observations, there is no direct evidence against measuring fMRI activation in white matter and reports of fMRI activation in white matter continue to increase. The questions underlying white matter fMRI activation are important. White matter fMRI activation has the potential to greatly expand the breadth of brain connectivity research, as well as improve the assessment and diagnosis of white matter and connectivity disorders. The current review provides an overview of the motivation to investigate white matter fMRI activation, as well as the published evidence of this phenomenon. We speculate on possible neurophysiologic bases of white matter fMRI signals, and discuss potential explanations for why reports of white matter fMRI activation are relatively scarce. We end with a discussion of future basic and clinical research directions in the study of white matter fMRI.

  1. An Optimized Clustering Approach for Automated Detection of White Matter Lesions in MRI Brain Images

    OpenAIRE

    Anitha, M.; P. Tamije Selvy

    2012-01-01

    Settings White Matter lesions (WMLs) are small areas of dead cells found in parts of the brain. In general, it is difficult for medical experts to accurately quantify the WMLs due to decreased contrast between White Matter (WM) and Grey Matter (GM). The aim of this paper is to
    automatically detect the White Matter Lesions which is present in the brains of elderly people. WML detection process includes the following stages: 1. Image preprocessing, 2. Clustering (Fuzzy c-means cluste...

  2. Aiming for a shorter rheumatoid arthritis MRI protocol: can contrast-enhanced MRI replace T2 for the detection of bone marrow oedema?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stomp, Wouter; Bloem, Johan L.; Reijnierse, Monique [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Krabben, Annemarie; Heijde, Desiree van der; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Helm-van Mil, Annette H.M. van der [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, P.O. Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-10-15

    To determine whether T1 post-gadolinium chelate images (T1Gd) can replace T2-weighted images (T2) for evaluating bone marrow oedema (BME), thereby allowing a shorter magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In 179 early arthritis patients and 43 advanced RA patients, wrist and metacarpophalangeal joints were examined on a 1.5-T extremity MRI system with a standard protocol (coronal T1, T2 fat-saturated and coronal and axial T1 fat-saturated after Gd). BME was scored according to OMERACT RAMRIS by two observers with and without T2 images available. Agreement was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for semi-quantitative scores and test characteristics with T2 images as reference. Agreement between scores based on T2 and T1Gd images was excellent ICC (0.80-0.99). At bone level, sensitivity and specificity of BME on T1Gd compared to T2 were high for both patient groups and both readers (all ≥80 %). T1Gd and T2 images are equally suitable for evaluating BME. Because contrast is usually administered to assess (teno)synovitis, a short MRI protocol of T1 and T1Gd is sufficient in RA. (orig.)

  3. Detection and quantification of angiogenesis in experimental valve disease with integrin-targeted nanoparticles and 19-fluorine MRI/MRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Huiying

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angiogenesis is a critical early feature of atherosclerotic plaque development and may also feature prominently in the pathogenesis of aortic valve stenosis. It has been shown that MRI can detect and quantify specific molecules of interest expressed in cardiovascular disease and cancer by measuring the unique fluorine signature of appropriately targeted perfluorocarbon (PFC nanoparticles. In this study, we demonstrated specific binding of ανβ3 integrin targeted nanoparticles to neovasculature in a rabbit model of aortic valve disease. We also showed that fluorine MRI could be used to detect and quantify the development of neovasculature in the excised aortic valve leaflets. Methods New Zealand White rabbits consumed a cholesterol diet for ~180 days and developed aortic valve thickening, inflammation, and angiogenesis mimicking early human aortic valve disease. Rabbits (n = 7 were treated with ανβ3 integrin targeted PFC nanoparticles or control untargeted PFC nanoparticles (n = 6. Competitive inhibition in vivo of nanoparticle binding (n = 4 was tested by pretreatment with targeted nonfluorinated nanoparticles followed 2 hours later by targeted PFC nanoparticles. 2 hours after treatment, aortic valves were excised and 19F MRS was performed at 11.7T. Integrated 19F spectral peaks were compared using a one-way ANOVA and Hsu's MCB (multiple comparisons with the best post hoc t test. In 3 additional rabbits treated with ανβ3 integrin targeted PFC nanoparticles, 19F spectroscopy was performed on a 3.0T clinical scanner. The presence of angiogenesis was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Results Valves of rabbits treated with targeted PFC nanoparticles had 220% more fluorine signal than valves of rabbits treated with untargeted PFC nanoparticles (p νβ3 integrin staining revealed the presence of neovasculature within the valve leaflets. Conclusion Integrin-targeted PFC nanoparticles specifically detect early angiogenesis

  4. Spinal fMRI during proprioceptive and tactile tasks in healthy subjects: activity detected using cross-correlation, general linear model and independent component analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valsasina, P.; Agosta, F.; Filippi, M. [Scientific Institute Ospedale San Raffaele, Neuroimaging Research Unit, Milan (Italy); Caputo, D. [Scientific Institute Fondazione Don Gnocchi, Department of Neurology, Milan (Italy); Stroman, P.W. [Queen' s University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Centre for Neuroscience Studies, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Functional MRI (fMRI) of the spinal cord is able to provide maps of neuronal activity. Spinal fMRI data have been analyzed in previous studies by calculating the cross-correlation (CC) between the stimulus and the time course of every voxel and, more recently, by using the general linear model (GLM). The aim of this study was to compare three different approaches (CC analysis, GLM and independent component analysis (ICA)) for analyzing fMRI scans of the cervical spinal cord. We analyzed spinal fMRI data from healthy subjects during a proprioceptive and a tactile stimulation by using two model-based approaches, i.e., CC analysis between the stimulus shape and the time course of every voxel, and the GLM. Moreover, we applied independent component analysis, a model-free approach which decomposes the data in a set of source signals. All methods were able to detect cervical cord areas of activity corresponding to the expected regions of neuronal activations. Model-based approaches (CC and GLM) revealed similar patterns of activity. ICA could identify a component correlated to fMRI stimulation, although with a lower statistical threshold than model-based approaches, and many components, consistent across subjects, which are likely to be secondary to noise present in the data. Model-based approaches seem to be more robust for estimating task-related activity, whereas ICA seems to be useful for eliminating noise components from the data. Combined use of ICA and GLM might improve the reliability of spinal fMRI results. (orig.)

  5. Utilization of combined remote sensing techniques to detect environmental variables influencing malaria vector densities in rural West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The use of remote sensing has found its way into the field of epidemiology within the last decades. With the increased sensor resolution of recent and future satellites new possibilities emerge for high resolution risk modeling and risk mapping. Methods A SPOT 5 satellite image, taken during the rainy season 2009 was used for calculating indices by combining the image's spectral bands. Besides the widely used Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) other indices were tested for significant correlation against field observations. Multiple steps, including the detection of surface water, its breeding appropriateness for Anopheles and modeling of vector imagines abundance, were performed. Data collection on larvae, adult vectors and geographic parameters in the field, was amended by using remote sensing techniques to gather data on altitude (Digital Elevation Model = DEM), precipitation (Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission = TRMM), land surface temperatures (LST). Results The DEM derived altitude as well as indices calculations combining the satellite's spectral bands (NDTI = Normalized Difference Turbidity Index, NDWI Mac Feeters = Normalized Difference Water Index) turned out to be reliable indicators for surface water in the local geographic setting. While Anopheles larvae abundance in habitats is driven by multiple, interconnected factors - amongst which the NDVI - and precipitation events, the presence of vector imagines was found to be correlated negatively to remotely sensed LST and positively to the cumulated amount of rainfall in the preceding 15 days and to the Normalized Difference Pond Index (NDPI) within the 500 m buffer zone around capture points. Conclusions Remotely sensed geographical and meteorological factors, including precipitations, temperature, as well as vegetation, humidity and land cover indicators could be used as explanatory variables for surface water presence, larval development and imagines densities. This modeling

  6. Utilization of combined remote sensing techniques to detect environmental variables influencing malaria vector densities in rural West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dambach Peter

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The use of remote sensing has found its way into the field of epidemiology within the last decades. With the increased sensor resolution of recent and future satellites new possibilities emerge for high resolution risk modeling and risk mapping. Methods A SPOT 5 satellite image, taken during the rainy season 2009 was used for calculating indices by combining the image's spectral bands. Besides the widely used Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI other indices were tested for significant correlation against field observations. Multiple steps, including the detection of surface water, its breeding appropriateness for Anopheles and modeling of vector imagines abundance, were performed. Data collection on larvae, adult vectors and geographic parameters in the field, was amended by using remote sensing techniques to gather data on altitude (Digital Elevation Model = DEM, precipitation (Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission = TRMM, land surface temperatures (LST. Results The DEM derived altitude as well as indices calculations combining the satellite's spectral bands (NDTI = Normalized Difference Turbidity Index, NDWI Mac Feeters = Normalized Difference Water Index turned out to be reliable indicators for surface water in the local geographic setting. While Anopheles larvae abundance in habitats is driven by multiple, interconnected factors - amongst which the NDVI - and precipitation events, the presence of vector imagines was found to be correlated negatively to remotely sensed LST and positively to the cumulated amount of rainfall in the preceding 15 days and to the Normalized Difference Pond Index (NDPI within the 500 m buffer zone around capture points. Conclusions Remotely sensed geographical and meteorological factors, including precipitations, temperature, as well as vegetation, humidity and land cover indicators could be used as explanatory variables for surface water presence, larval development and imagines

  7. Detection and mapping of delays in early cortical folding derived from in utero MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habas, Piotr A.; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Scott, Julia A.; Kim, Kio; Roosta, Ahmad; Rousseau, Francois; Barkovich, A. James; Glenn, Orit A.; Studholme, Colin

    2011-03-01

    Understanding human brain development in utero and detecting cortical abnormalities related to specific clinical conditions is an important area of research. In this paper, we describe and evaluate methodology for detection and mapping of delays in early cortical folding from population-based studies of fetal brain anatomies imaged in utero. We use a general linear modeling framework to describe spatiotemporal changes in curvature of the developing brain and explore the ability to detect and localize delays in cortical folding in the presence of uncertainty in estimation of the fetal age. We apply permutation testing to examine which regions of the brain surface provide the most statistical power to detect a given folding delay at a given developmental stage. The presented methodology is evaluated using MR scans of fetuses with normal brain development and gestational ages ranging from 20.57 to 27.86 weeks. This period is critical in early cortical folding and the formation of the primary and secondary sulci. Finally, we demonstrate a clinical application of the framework for detection and localization of folding delays in fetuses with isolated mild ventriculomegaly.

  8. Detection of bone marrow and extramedullary involvement in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma by whole-body MRI: comparison with bone and {sup 67}Ga scintigraphies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iizuka-Mikami, Masami; Nagai, Kiyohisa; Yoshida, Koji; Tamada, Tsutomu; Imai, Shigeki; Kajihara, Yasumasa; Fukunaga, Masao [Department of Radiology, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, 701-0192, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan); Sugihara, Takashi; Suetsugu, Yoshimasa; Mikami, Makoto [Department of Hematology, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, 701-0192, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan)

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic potential of whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) for the detection of bone marrow and extramedullary involvement in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. WB-MRI, which was performed on 34 patients, consisted of the recording of T1-weighted spin-echo images and a fast STIR sequence covering the entire skeleton. The WB-MRI findings for bone marrow and extramedullary involvement were compared with those from {sup 67}Ga and bone scintigraphies and bone marrow biopsy results. Two MRI specialists reviewed the WB-MRI results and two expert radiologists in the field of nuclear medicine reviewed the bone and {sup 67}Ga scintigraphy findings. Bone marrow and extramedullary involvement of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were confirmed by follow-up radiographs and CT and/or a histological biopsy. The detection rate of WB-MRI was high. More bone marrow involvement was detected by biopsy, and more lesions were detected by scintigraphies. In total, 89 lesions were detected by WB-MRI, whereas 15 were found by biopsy, 5 by {sup 67}Ga scintigraphy, and 14 by bone scintigraphy. WB-MRI could also detect more extramedullary lesions than {sup 67}Ga scintigraphy; i.e., 72 lesions were detected by WB-MRI, whereas 54 were discovered by {sup 67}Ga scintigraphy. WB-MRI is useful for evaluating the involvement of bone marrow and extramedullary lesions throughout the skeleton in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. (orig.)

  9. Wavelet entropy and directed acyclic graph support vector machine for detection of patients with unilateral hearing loss in MRI scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuihua Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available (Aim Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL is correlated to many neurodegenerative disease. Now more and more computer vision based methods are using to detect it in an automatic way. (Materials We have in total 49 subjects, scanned by 3.0T MRI (Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany. The subjects contain 14 patients with right-sided hearing loss (RHL, 15 patients with left-sided hearing loss (LHL, and 20 healthy controls (HC. (Method We treat this as a three-class classification problem: RHL, LHL, and HC. Wavelet entropy (WE was selected from the magnetic resonance images of each subjects, and then submitted to a directed acyclic graph support vector machine (DAG-SVM. (Results The 10 repetition results of 10-fold cross validation shows 3-level decomposition will yield an overall accuracy of 95.10% for this three-class classification problem, higher than feedforward neural network, decision tree, and naive Bayesian classifier. (Conclusions This computer-aided diagnosis system is promising. We hope this study can attract more computer vision method for detecting hearing loss.

  10. Detection and Monitoring of E-Waste Contamination through Remote Sensing and Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garb, Yaakov; Friedlander, Lonia

    2015-04-01

    Electronic waste (e-waste) is one of today's fastest growing waste streams, and also one of the more problematic, as this end-of-life product contains precious metals mixed with and embedded in a variety of low value and potentially harmful plastic and other materials. This combination creates a powerful incentive for informal value chains that transport, extract from, and dispose of e-waste materials in far-ranging and unregulated ways, and especially in settings where regulation and livelihood alternatives are sparse, most notably in areas of India, China, and Africa. E-waste processing is known to release a variety of contaminants, such as heavy metals and persistent organic pollutants, including flame retardants, dioxins and furans. In several sites, where the livelihoods of entire communities are dependent on e-waste processing, the resulting contaminants have been demonstrated to enter the hydrological system and food chain and have serious health and ecological effects. In this paper we demonstrate for the first time the usefulness of multi-spectral remote sensing imagery to detect and monitor the release and possibly the dispersal of heavy metal contaminants released in e-waste processing. While similar techniques have been used for prospecting or for studying heavy metal contamination from mining and large industrial facilities, we suggest that these techniques are of particular value in detecting contamination from the more dispersed, shifting, and ad-hoc kinds of release typical of e-waste processing. Given the increased resolution and decreased price of multi-spectral imagery, such techniques may offer a remarkably cost-effective and rapidly responsive means of assessing and monitoring this kind of contamination. We will describe the geochemical and multi-spectral image-processing principles underlying our approach, and show how we have applied these to an area in which we have a detailed, multi-temporal, spatially referenced, and ground

  11. MRI and low back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backache - MRI; Low back pain - MRI; Lumbar pain - MRI; Back strain - MRI; Lumbar radiculopathy - MRI; Herniated intervertebral disk - MRI; Prolapsed intervertebral disk - MRI; Slipped disk - MRI; Ruptured ...

  12. Ship-based detection of glyoxal over the remote tropical Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinreich, R.; Coburn, S.; Dix, B.; Volkamer, R.

    2010-12-01

    We present the first detection of glyoxal (CHOCHO) over the remote tropical Pacific Ocean in the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL). The measurements were conducted by means of the University of Colorado Ship Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU SMAX-DOAS) instrument aboard the research vessel Ronald H. Brown. The research vessel was on a cruise in the framework of the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study - Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) and the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO) projects lasting from October 2008 through January 2009 (74 days at sea). The CU SMAX-DOAS instrument features a motion compensation system to characterize the pitch and roll of the ship and to compensate for ship movements in real time. We found elevated mixing ratios of up to 140 ppt CHOCHO located inside the MBL up to 3000 km from the continental coast over biologically active upwelling regions of the tropical Eastern Pacific Ocean. This is surprising since CHOCHO is very short lived (atmospheric life time ~2 h) and highly water soluble (Henry's Law constant H = 4.2 × 105 M/atm). This CHOCHO cannot be explained by transport of it or its precursors from continental sources. Rather, the open ocean must be a source for CHOCHO to the atmosphere. Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM) photochemistry in surface waters is a source for Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere, e.g. acetaldehyde. The extension of this mechanism to very soluble gases, like CHOCHO, is not straightforward since the air-sea flux is directed from the atmosphere into the ocean. For CHOCHO, the dissolved concentrations would need to be extremely high in order to explain our gas-phase observations by this mechanism (40-70 μM CHOCHO, compared to ~0.01 μM acetaldehyde and 60-70 μM DOM). Further, while there is as yet no direct measurement of VOCs in our study area, measurements of the CHOCHO precursors isoprene, and/or acetylene over phytoplankton bloom areas in other parts of the oceans are too

  13. Ship-based detection of glyoxal over the remote tropical Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sinreich

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the first detection of glyoxal (CHOCHO over the remote tropical Pacific Ocean in the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL. The measurements were conducted by means of the University of Colorado Ship Multi-Axis Differential Optical Spectroscopy (CU SMAX-DOAS instrument aboard the research vessel Ronald H. Brown. The research vessel was on a cruise in the framework of the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study – Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx and the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO projects lasting from October 2008 through January 2009 (74 days at sea. The CU SMAX-DOAS instrument features a motion compensation system to characterize the pitch and roll of the ship and to compensate for ship movements in real time. We found elevated mixing ratios of up to 170 ppt CHOCHO located inside the MBL up to 3000 km from the continental coast over biologically active upwelling regions of the tropical Eastern Pacific Ocean. This is surprising since CHOCHO is very short lived (atmospheric life time ~2 h and highly water soluble (Henry's Law constant H=4.2×105 M/atm. This CHOCHO cannot be explained by transport of it or its precursors from continental sources. Rather, the open ocean is a source for CHOCHO to the atmosphere. Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM photochemistry in surface waters is a source for Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs to the atmosphere, e.g. acetaldehyde. The extension of this mechanism to very soluble gases, like CHOCHO, is not straightforward since the air-sea flux is directed from the atmosphere into the ocean. For CHOCHO, the dissolved concentrations would need to be extremely high in order to explain our gas-phase observations by this mechanism (40–70 μM CHOCHO, compared to ~0.01 μM acetaldehyde and 60–70 μM DOM. Further, while there is as yet no direct measurement of VOCs in our study area, measurements of the CHOCHO precursors isoprene, and/or acetylene over phytoplankton bloom areas in other parts of the

  14. A robust active contour edge detection algorithm based on local Gaussian statistical model for oil slick remote sensing image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yu; Wang, Yaxuan; Liu, Jianxin; Liu, Zhaoxia

    2015-08-01

    Edge detection is a crucial method for the location and quantity estimation of oil slick when oil spills on the sea. In this paper, we present a robust active contour edge detection algorithm for oil spill remote sensing images. In the proposed algorithm, we define a local Gaussian data fitting energy term with spatially varying means and variances, and this data fitting energy term is introduced into a global minimization active contour (GMAC) framework. The energy function minimization is achieved fast by a dual formulation of the weighted total variation norm. The proposed algorithm avoids the existence of local minima, does not require the definition of initial contour, and is robust to weak boundaries, high noise and severe intensity inhomogeneity exiting in oil slick remote sensing images. Furthermore, the edge detection of oil slick and the correction of intensity inhomogeneity are simultaneously achieved via the proposed algorithm. The experiment results have shown that a superior performance of proposed algorithm over state-of-the-art edge detection algorithms. In addition, the proposed algorithm can also deal with the special images with the object and background of the same intensity means but different variances.

  15. Joint Multi-Image Saliency Analysis for Region of Interest Detection in Optical Multispectral Remote Sensing Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Chen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The automatic detection of regions of interest (ROI is useful for remote sensing image analysis, such as land cover classification, object recognition, image compression, and various computer vision related applications. Recently, approaches based on visual saliency have been utilized for ROI detection. However, most existing methods focus on detecting ROIs from a single image, which generally cannot precisely extract ROIs against a complicated background or exclude images with no ROIs. In this paper, we propose a joint multi-image saliency (JMS algorithm to simultaneously extract the common ROIs in a set of optical multispectral remote sensing images with the additional ability to identify images that do not contain the common ROIs. First, bisecting K-means clustering on the entire image set allows us to extract the global correspondence among multiple images in RGB and CIELab color spaces. Second, clusterwise saliency computation aggregating global color and shape contrast efficiently assigns common ROIs with high saliency, while effectively depressing interfering background that is salient only within its own image. Finally, binary ROI masks are generated by thresholding saliency maps. In addition, we construct an edge-preserving JMS model through edge-preserving mask optimization strategy, so as to facilitate the generation of a uniformly highlighted ROI mask with sharp borders. Experimental results demonstrate the advantages of our model in detection accuracy consistency and runtime efficiency.

  16. Improved focal liver lesion detection by increasing flip angle during gadoxetic acid-enhancement in MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Se Jy [Dept. of Medical science Graduate school, Chonnam National University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Keun [Dept. of Radiotechnology, Gwang-ju Health university, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To study the differences of focal liver lesion image detection at 3 minute, 10 minute and 15 minute time points on gadoxetic acid (GA)’s enhanced MR imaging with a flip angle (FA) of 30° compared with a 11°. The subjects were 69 patients evaluated with GA enhanced MR imaging with 3.0T MR scanner. The patients are total 35(23 men and 7 women at the mean age of 60.4 years), hepatocellular carcinoma(23) and metastsis(12) except for normal, cyst and hemangioma. After GA was injected, FA 11° and 30° images were obtained at 3 minute, 10 minute and 15 minute time points respectively. After quantitative and qualitative assessment of each image was done, statistical analysis was performed by using the independent sample T-test. From both quantitative and qualitative assessment of 3 minute and 10 minute MR images after the injection of GA, FA 30° images was found to be superior than FA 11°, but there were no statistical significance. However, at 15 minute time point, Statistically significant FA 30° image(p<0.05) was better than FA 11° therefore, the FA 30° improves the focal liver lesion detection. FA 30° of MR image can detect liver lesion more sensitively than the existing FA11° image after GA contrast enhancement at 15 minute time point.

  17. Does low-field dedicated extremity MRI (E-MRI) reliably detect RA bone erosions? A comparison of two different E-MRI units and conventional radiography with high resolution CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer, Anne; Ejbjerg, Bo; Albrecht-Beste, Elisabeth;

    2008-01-01

    underwent, within 2 weeks, CR, CT and two E-MRI (Esaote Biomedica; Artoscan and MagneVu; MV1000) examination of one hand. In all modalities each bone of wrist and (MCP) joints was blindedly evaluated for erosions. Furthermore, MagneVu images were assessed for the proportion of each bone being visualized...

  18. Does low-field dedicated extremity MRI (E-MRI) reliably detect bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis? A comparison of two different E-MRI units and conventional radiography with high-resolution CT scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer-Jensen, A; Ejbjerg, B; Albrecht-Beste, E;

    2008-01-01

    underwent CR, CT and two E-MRI examinations (Esaote Biomedica Artoscan and MagneVu MV1000) of one hand during a 2-week period. In all modalities, each bone of the wrist and MCP joints was blindly evaluated for erosions. MagneVu images were also assessed for the proportion of each bone being visualised...

  19. Whole-body MRI in the detection of bone marrow infiltration in patients with plasma cell neoplasms in comparison to the radiological skeletal survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghanem, Nadir; Lohrmann, Christian; Pache, Gregor; Uhl, Markus; Saueressig, Ulrich; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Engelhardt, Monika [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Hematology and Oncology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    To compare the diagnostic value of whole-body MRI versus radiological skeletal survey (RSS) in staging patients with plasma cell neoplasms (PCN) and to evaluate the possible therapeutic impact of the replacement of RSS by whole-body MRI. Fifty-four patients with PCN [multiple myeloma (MM), n=47; monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS), n=7] were studied by whole-body MRI and RSS in a monocenter prospective analysis from August 2002 to May 2004. The MRIs were performed using a rolling table platform ''AngioSURF'' for unlimited field of view with a 1.5-T system (Magnetom Sonata/Maestro Class, Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany). A coronal STIR sequence (TR5500-4230/TE102-94/TI160) was used for imaging of the different body regions, including the head, neck, thorax, abdomen, pelvis and upper and lower extremities. The RSS consisted of eight different projections of the axial and appendicular skeleton. In 41/54 (74%) patients, the results of the whole-body MRI and RSS were concordant. In 11/54 (20%) patients, both imaging techniques were negative. Bone involvement was observed in 30/54 (55%) patients; however, whole-body MRI revealed this more extensively than the RSS in 27/30 (90%) patients with concordant positive imaging findings. In 3/30 (10%) patients, both imaging techniques demonstrated a similar extent of bone marrow infiltration. In 10/54 (19%) patients, the whole-body MRI was superior to RSS in detecting bone marrow infiltration, whereas the RSS was negative. In 3/54 (6%) patients, the RSS was proven to be false positive by the clinical course, whereas the whole-body MRI was truly negative. Whole-body MRI is a fast and highly effective method for staging PCN patients by the use of a rolling table platform. Moreover, it is more sensitive and specific than RSS and reveals bone marrow infiltration and extensive disease more reliably. Therefore, whole-body MRI should be performed as an additional method of exactly

  20. Assessment of the diagnostic value of dual-energy CT and MRI in the detection of iatrogenically induced injuries of anterior cruciate ligament in a porcine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fickert, S.; Niks, M.; Lehmann, L. [University Medical Center Mannheim, Center of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Mannheim (Germany); Dinter, D.J.; Hammer, M.; Weckbach, S.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Jochum, S. [University Medical Center Mannheim, Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Mannheim (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the standard of reference for the non-invasive evaluation of ligament injuries of the knee. The development of dual-energy CT (DE-CT) made it possible to differentiate between tissues of different density by two simultaneous CT measurements with different tube voltages. This approach enables DE-CT to discriminate ligament structures without intra-articular contrast media injection. The aims of this study were on the one hand to determine the delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and on the other hand to assess the diagnostic value of DE-CT and MRI in the detection of iatrogenically induced injury of the ACL in a porcine knee joint model. Twenty porcine hind legs, which were placed in a preformed cast in order to achieve a standardized position, were scanned using DE-CT. Thereafter, a 1.5-T MRI using a standard protocol was performed. The imaging procedures were repeated with the same parameters after inducing defined lesions (total or partial incision) on the ACL arthroscopically. After post-processing, two radiologists and two orthopedic surgeons first analyzed the delineation of the ACL and then, using a consensus approach, the iatrogenically induced lesions. The result of the arthrotomy was defined as the standard of reference. The ACL could be visualized both on DE-CT and MRI in 100% of the cases. As for the MRI, the sensitivity and specificity of detecting the cruciate ligament lesion respectively compared with the defined arthrotomy was 66.7% and 78.6% for intact cruciate ligaments, 100% and 75% in the case of a complete lesion, 33.3% and 78.6% for lesions of the anteromedial bundle, and 0% and 100% for lesions of the posterolateral bundle. In comparison, DE-CT demonstrated a sensitivity and specificity of 66.7% and 71.4% in the case of intact cruciate ligaments, 75% and 68.8% in the case of completely discontinued ACLs, 0% and 92.9% in the case of lesions of the anteromedial bundle, and 25% and 87.5% in the

  1. Detection and quantification of remote microglial activation in rodent models of focal ischaemia using the TSPO radioligand CLINDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arlicot, Nicolas [Universite Francois Rabelais de Tours, CHRU de Tours (France). UMR Inserm U 930, CNRS ERL 3106; UFR Sciences Pharmaceutiques, Laboratoire de Biophysique, Tours (France); Petit, Edwige; Toutain, Jerome; Divoux, Didier; Roussel, Simon; Bernaudin, Myriam [Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA CYCERON, Caen (France). Equipe CERVOxy ' ' Hypoxie et Physiopathologie cerebrovasculaire' ' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS; Katsifis, Andrew [ANSTO, Radiopharmaceuticals Research Institute, Menai (Australia); Bodard, Sylvie; Guilloteau, Denis; Chalon, Sylvie [Universite Francois Rabelais de Tours, CHRU de Tours (France). UMR Inserm U 930, CNRS ERL 3106

    2010-12-15

    Neuroinflammation is involved in stroke pathophysiology and might be imaged using radioligands targeting the 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO). We studied microglial reaction in brain areas remote from the primary lesion site in two rodent models of focal cerebral ischaemia (permanent or transient) using [{sup 125}I]-CLINDE, a promising TSPO single photon emission computed tomography radioligand. In a mouse model of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), ex vivo autoradiographic studies demonstrated, besides in the ischaemic territory, accumulation of [{sup 125}I]-CLINDE in the ipsilateral thalamus with a binding that progressed up to 3 weeks after MCAO. [{sup 125}I]-CLINDE binding markedly decreased in animals pre-injected with either unlabelled CLINDE or PK11195, while no change was observed with flumazenil pre-treatment, demonstrating TSPO specificity. In rats subjected to transient MCAO, [{sup 125}I]-CLINDE binding in the ipsilateral thalamus and substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) was significantly higher than that in contralateral tissue. Moreover, [{sup 125}I]-CLINDE binding in the thalamus and SNr was quantitatively correlated to the ischaemic volume assessed by MRI in the cortex and striatum, respectively. Clinical consequences of secondary neuronal degeneration in stroke might be better treated thanks to the discrimination of neuronal processes using in vivo molecular imaging and potent TSPO radioligands like CLINDE to guide therapeutic interventions. (orig.)

  2. Ship detection and classification in high-resolution remote sensing imagery using shape-driven segmentation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Chao; Tan, Yihua; Cai, Huajie; Tian, Jinwen

    2009-10-01

    High-resolution remote sensing imagery provides an important data source for ship detection and classification. However, due to shadow effect, noise and low-contrast between objects and background existing in this kind of data, traditional segmentation approaches have much difficulty in separating ship targets from complex sea-surface background. In this paper, we propose a novel coarse-to-fine segmentation strategy for identifying ships in 1-meter resolution imagery. This approach starts from a coarse segmentation by selecting local intensity variance as detection feature to segment ship objects from background. After roughly obtaining the regions containing ship candidates, a shape-driven level-set segmentation is used to extract precise boundary of each object which is good for the following stages such as detection and classification. Experimental results show that the proposed approach outperforms other algorithms in terms of recognition accuracy.

  3. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other ... that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the patient. ...

  4. Experimental evidence for spring and autumn windows for the detection of geobotanical anomalies through the remote sensing of overlying vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labovitz, M. L.; Masuoka, E. J.; Bell, R.; Nelson, R. F.; Larsen, C. A.; Hooker, L. K.; Troensegaard, K. W.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that in many regions of the world, vegetation is the predominant factor influencing variation in reflected energy in the 0.4-2.5 micron region of the spectrum. Studies have, therefore, been conducted regarding the utility of remote sensing for detecting changes in vegetation which could be related to the presence of mineralization. The present paper provides primarily a report on the results of the second year of a multiyear study of geobotanical-remote-sensing relationships as developed over areas of sulfide mineralization. The field study has a strong experimental design basis. It is proceeded by first delineating the boundaries of a large geographic region which satisfied a set of previously enumerated field-site criteria. Within this region, carefully selected pairs of mineralized and nonmineralized test sites were examined over the growing season. The experiment is to provide information about the spectral and temporal resolutions required for remote-sensing-geobotanical exploration. The obtained results are evaluated.

  5. In-Vivo Detection and Tracking of T Cells in Various Organs in a Melanoma Tumor Model by 19F-Fluorine MRS/MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Christine; Yoshihara, Hikari A. I.; Dilek, Nahzli; Leignadier, Julie; Irving, Melita; Mieville, Pascal; Helm, Lothar; Michielin, Olivier; Schwitter, Juerg

    2016-01-01

    Background 19F-MRI and 19F-MRS can identify specific cell types after in-vitro or in-vivo 19F-labeling. Knowledge on the potential to track in-vitro 19F-labeled immune cells in tumor models by 19F-MRI/MRS is scarce. Aim To study 19F-based MR techniques for in-vivo tracking of adoptively transferred immune cells after in-vitro 19F-labeling, i.e. to detect and monitor their migration non-invasively in melanoma-bearing mice. Methods Splenocytes (SP) were labeled in-vitro with a perfluorocarbon (PFC) and IV-injected into non-tumor bearing mice. In-vitro PFC-labeled ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cells from the T cell receptor-transgenic line OT-1, activated with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies (Tact) or OVA-peptide pulsed antigen presenting cells (TOVA-act), were injected into B16 OVA melanoma-bearing mice. The distribution of the 19F-labelled donor cells was determined in-vivo by 19F-MRI/MRS. In-vivo 19F-MRI/MRS results were confirmed by ex-vivo 19F-NMR and flow cytometry. Results SP, Tact, and TOVA-act were successfully PFC-labeled in-vitro yielding 3x1011-1.4x1012 19F-atoms/cell in the 3 groups. Adoptively transferred 19F-labeled SP, TOVA-act, and Tact were detected by coil-localized 19F-MRS in the chest, abdomen, and left flank in most animals (corresponding to lungs, livers, and spleens, respectively, with highest signal-to-noise for SP vs TOVA-act and Tact, p<0.009 for both). SP and Tact were successfully imaged by 19F-MRI (n = 3; liver). These in-vivo data were confirmed by ex-vivo high-resolution 19F-NMR-spectroscopy. By flow cytometric analysis, however, TOVA-act tended to be more abundant versus SP and Tact (liver: p = 0.1313; lungs: p = 0.1073; spleen: p = 0.109). Unlike 19F-MRI/MRS, flow cytometry also identified transferred immune cells (SP, Tact, and TOVA-act) in the tumors. Conclusion SP, Tact, and TOVA-act were successfully PFC-labeled in-vitro and detected in-vivo by non-invasive 19F-MRS/MRI in liver, lung, and spleen. The portion of 19F-labeled T cells

  6. Multivariate classification of structural MRI data detects chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Hoameng; Brown, Justin E; Johnson, Kevin A; Younger, Jarred; Hush, Julia; Mackey, Sean

    2014-04-01

    Chronic low back pain (cLBP) has a tremendous personal and socioeconomic impact, yet the underlying pathology remains a mystery in the majority of cases. An objective measure of this condition, that augments self-report of pain, could have profound implications for diagnostic characterization and therapeutic development. Contemporary research indicates that cLBP is associated with abnormal brain structure and function. Multivariate analyses have shown potential to detect a number of neurological diseases based on structural neuroimaging. Therefore, we aimed to empirically evaluate such an approach in the detection of cLBP, with a goal to also explore the relevant neuroanatomy. We extracted brain gray matter (GM) density from magnetic resonance imaging scans of 47 patients with cLBP and 47 healthy controls. cLBP was classified with an accuracy of 76% by support vector machine analysis. Primary drivers of the classification included areas of the somatosensory, motor, and prefrontal cortices--all areas implicated in the pain experience. Differences in areas of the temporal lobe, including bordering the amygdala, medial orbital gyrus, cerebellum, and visual cortex, were also useful for the classification. Our findings suggest that cLBP is characterized by a pattern of GM changes that can have discriminative power and reflect relevant pathological brain morphology.

  7. In vivo noninvasive detection of Brown Adipose Tissue through intermolecular zero-quantum MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa T Branca

    Full Text Available The recent discovery of active Brown Adipose Tissue (BAT in adult humans has opened new avenues for obesity research and treatment, as reduced BAT activity seem to be implicated in human energy imbalance, diabetes, and hypertension. However, clinical applications are currently limited by the lack of non-invasive tools for measuring mass and function of this tissue in humans. Here we present a new magnetic resonance imaging method based on the normally invisible intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence (1H MR signal. This method, which doesn't require special hardware modifications, can be used to overcome partial volume effect, the major limitation of MR-based approaches that are currently being investigated for the detection of BAT in humans. With this method we can exploit the characteristic cellular structure of BAT to selectively image it, even when (as in humans it is intimately mixed with other tissues. We demonstrate and validate this method in mice using PET scans and histology. We compare this methodology with conventional (1H MR fat fraction methods. Finally, we investigate its feasibility for the detection of BAT in humans.

  8. In vivo noninvasive detection of Brown Adipose Tissue through intermolecular zero-quantum MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branca, Rosa T; Zhang, Le; Warren, Warren S; Auerbach, Edward; Khanna, Arjun; Degan, Simone; Ugurbil, Kamil; Maronpot, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The recent discovery of active Brown Adipose Tissue (BAT) in adult humans has opened new avenues for obesity research and treatment, as reduced BAT activity seem to be implicated in human energy imbalance, diabetes, and hypertension. However, clinical applications are currently limited by the lack of non-invasive tools for measuring mass and function of this tissue in humans. Here we present a new magnetic resonance imaging method based on the normally invisible intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence (1)H MR signal. This method, which doesn't require special hardware modifications, can be used to overcome partial volume effect, the major limitation of MR-based approaches that are currently being investigated for the detection of BAT in humans. With this method we can exploit the characteristic cellular structure of BAT to selectively image it, even when (as in humans) it is intimately mixed with other tissues. We demonstrate and validate this method in mice using PET scans and histology. We compare this methodology with conventional (1)H MR fat fraction methods. Finally, we investigate its feasibility for the detection of BAT in humans.

  9. On reduction of risks in UXO and mine detection using remote sensing systems and related synthetic image simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostater, Charles R., Jr.

    2005-06-01

    It is important to understand remote sensing systems and associated platforms in the context of autonomous or semi-autonomous designs for (robotic & mechatronics) that may be affect the motion control or stabilization aspects of the imagery, scan lines or fixed points scanned. This need can be most easily conceived as being related to the reduction of risks associated with false detection as well as the risks associated with hardware and software failure and risks associated with the actual operation of sensor and platform in dangerous environments. Thus safety is ultimately our concern when it comes to risk assessment. This paper will describe (a) remote sensing systems, (b) platforms (fixed and mobile, as well as to demonstrate (c) the value of thinking in terms of scalability as well as modularity in the design and application of new systems and (d) creation of synthetic signatures obtained for detection of targets in the aquatic environment. New systems - sensing systems as well as autonomous or semiautonomous robotic and mechatronic systems will be essential to secure domestic preparedness for humanitarian reasons as well as for demining and UXO detection. These same systems hold tremendous value, if thoughtfully designed for other applications which include environmental monitoring and surveillance.

  10. Computer-Aided Detection and diagnosis for prostate cancer based on mono and multi-parametric MRI: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaître, Guillaume; Martí, Robert; Freixenet, Jordi; Vilanova, Joan C; Walker, Paul M; Meriaudeau, Fabrice

    2015-05-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most diagnosed cancer of men all over the world. In the last few decades, new imaging techniques based on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have been developed to improve diagnosis. In practise, diagnosis can be affected by multiple factors such as observer variability and visibility and complexity of the lesions. In this regard, computer-aided detection and computer-aided diagnosis systems have been designed to help radiologists in their clinical practice. Research on computer-aided systems specifically focused for prostate cancer is a young technology and has been part of a dynamic field of research for the last 10 years. This survey aims to provide a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art in this lapse of time, focusing on the different stages composing the work-flow of a computer-aided system. We also provide a comparison between studies and a discussion about the potential avenues for future research. In addition, this paper presents a new public online dataset which is made available to the research community with the aim of providing a common evaluation framework to overcome some of the current limitations identified in this survey.

  11. Heart-induced movements in the thorax as detected by MRI

    CERN Document Server

    Solberg, Lars Erik; Fosse, Erik; Hol, Per Kristian

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide information for the use of radar in diagnostics a qualitative map of movements in the thorax has been obtained. This map was based on magnetic resonance image sequences of a human thorax during suspended respiration. The movements were measured using two distinct techniques. Segmentation provided measures of aorta dilatation and displacements, and image edge detection indicated other movements. The largest heart movements were found in the anterior and left regions of the heart with in-plane displacements on the order of 1 cm and which caused lung vessels displacements on the order of 2-3mm especially on the left side due to the heart ventricular. Mechanical coupling between the heart and aorta caused aorta displacements and shape distortions. Despite this coupling, aorta dilatations most likely reflected blood pressure variations.

  12. Regional brain stem atrophy in idiopathic Parkinson's disease detected by anatomical MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubault, Thomas; Brambati, Simona M; Degroot, Clotilde; Kullmann, Benoît; Strafella, Antonio P; Lafontaine, Anne-Louise; Chouinard, Sylvain; Monchi, Oury

    2009-12-10

    Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the dysfunction of dopaminergic dependent cortico-basal ganglia loops and diagnosed on the basis of motor symptoms (tremors and/or rigidity and bradykinesia). Post-mortem studies tend to show that the destruction of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra constitutes an intermediate step in a broader neurodegenerative process rather than a unique feature of Parkinson's disease, as a consistent pattern of progression would exist, originating from the medulla oblongata/pontine tegmentum. To date, neuroimaging techniques have been unable to characterize the pre-symptomatic stages of PD. However, if such a regular neurodegenerative pattern were to exist, consistent damages would be found in the brain stem, even at early stages of the disease. We recruited 23 PD patients at Hoenn and Yahr stages I to II of the disease and 18 healthy controls (HC) matched for age. T1-weighted anatomical scans were acquired (MPRAGE, 1 mm3 resolution) and analyzed using an optimized VBM protocol to detect white and grey matter volume reduction without spatial a priori. When the HC group was compared to the PD group, a single cluster exhibited statistical difference (p<0.05 corrected for false detection rate, 4287 mm3) in the brain stem, between the pons and the medulla oblongata. The present study provides in-vivo evidence that brain stem damage may be the first identifiable stage of PD neuropathology, and that the identification of this consistent damage along with other factors could help with earlier diagnosis in the future. This damage could also explain some non-motor symptoms in PD that often precede diagnosis, such as autonomic dysfunction and sleep disorders.

  13. Regional brain stem atrophy in idiopathic Parkinson's disease detected by anatomical MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Jubault

    Full Text Available Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the dysfunction of dopaminergic dependent cortico-basal ganglia loops and diagnosed on the basis of motor symptoms (tremors and/or rigidity and bradykinesia. Post-mortem studies tend to show that the destruction of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra constitutes an intermediate step in a broader neurodegenerative process rather than a unique feature of Parkinson's disease, as a consistent pattern of progression would exist, originating from the medulla oblongata/pontine tegmentum. To date, neuroimaging techniques have been unable to characterize the pre-symptomatic stages of PD. However, if such a regular neurodegenerative pattern were to exist, consistent damages would be found in the brain stem, even at early stages of the disease. We recruited 23 PD patients at Hoenn and Yahr stages I to II of the disease and 18 healthy controls (HC matched for age. T1-weighted anatomical scans were acquired (MPRAGE, 1 mm3 resolution and analyzed using an optimized VBM protocol to detect white and grey matter volume reduction without spatial a priori. When the HC group was compared to the PD group, a single cluster exhibited statistical difference (p<0.05 corrected for false detection rate, 4287 mm3 in the brain stem, between the pons and the medulla oblongata. The present study provides in-vivo evidence that brain stem damage may be the first identifiable stage of PD neuropathology, and that the identification of this consistent damage along with other factors could help with earlier diagnosis in the future. This damage could also explain some non-motor symptoms in PD that often precede diagnosis, such as autonomic dysfunction and sleep disorders.

  14. Blink Reflex as a Complementary Test to MRI in Early Detection of Brainstem Infarctions: Comparison of Blink Reflex Abnormalities in Anterior Versus Posterior Circulation Strokes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Basiri

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early detection of vertebro-basilar insufficiency is of paramount importance. Brain MRI was the only method of diagnosis for many years, but in addition to high cost and delay in report, it may not detect all brain stem lesions. In this study Blink reflex (BR was evaluated as a complementary test to MRI. Methods: Fifty-four patients were studied [27 anterior circulation stroke patients (ACSP and 27 posterior circulation stroke patients (PCSP]. MRI was performed within the first week after the onset of stroke. Nineteen age and sex matched healthy people enrolled as controls. BR was performed within the first 24 hours of the onset. Frequency of abnormal blink reflex in ACSP and PCSP was compared with MRI findings. Then abnormal responses in two groups were compared by chi-square test. Results: In both ACSP and PCSP, two patients had normal BR responses, and in 25 patients R1 or R2 components of blink responses were absent or prolonged (92.5%. R1was absent or delayed in 16 PCSP, but it was abnormal in only two ACSP (P < 0.001. Abnormal R2 responses were detected in 22 PCSP and 24 ACSP. Conclusion: BR abnormalities had high correlation with MRI findings in PCSP (92.5% BR can be performed within the first 24 hours of onset of stroke, and its results is available immediately. This test is easy to perform and comfortable for the patient, has low cost, and is available every where. Therefore we introduced BR as a complementary (but not replacing test to MRI in early detection of brainstem infarctions. Comparison of BR responses in ACSP and PCSP showed that abnormalities of R1 responses had high accuracy in differentiation between anterior and posterior circulation strokes. We concluded that BR responses not only can detect brainstem infarctions rapidly and readily in its early stages, but also can differentiate ACSP from PCSP with high accuracy. Keywords: Blink Reflex, Anterior Circulation Stroke, Posterior Circulation Stroke Patients

  15. Edge detection of remote sensing image based on nonlinear intensity of curved surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张连蓬; 刘国林; 江涛

    2003-01-01

    A new edge detector based on the nonlinear intensity of curved surface was proposed. The edge detector describes the largest curvature and the smallest curvature of curved surface, therefore it can reflect the real largest direction of image edge jump. By the new edge detector, it is convenient to calculate the curvature in any direction of the curved surface and the curvature can be used in the identification of edge direction and the feature extraction of objects on remote sensing image.

  16. Application of remote sensing for prediction and detection of thermal pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veziroglu, T. N.; Lee, S. S.

    1974-01-01

    The first phase is described of a three year project for the development of a mathematical model for predicting thermal pollution by use of remote sensing measurements. A rigid-lid model was developed, and results were obtained for different wind conditions at Biscayne Bay in South Florida. The design of the measurement system was completed, and instruments needed for the first stage of experiment were acquired, tested, and calibrated. A preliminary research flight was conducted.

  17. In Vivo Detection of Reduced Purkinje Cell Fibers with Diffusion MRI Tractography in Children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Won eJeong

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Postmortem neuropathology studies report reduced number and size of Purkinje cells (PC in a majority of cerebellum specimens from persons with autism spectrum disorders (ASD. In this study using diffusion weighted MRI, we investigated whether structural changes related to decreased number and size of PC could be detected in vivo by measuring streamlines connecting the posterior-lateral region of the cerebellar cortex to the dentate nucleus using an independent component analysis with a ball and stick model (ICA+BSM. The tractography was performed in 14 typically developing children (TD and 15 children with ASD, using a cerebellar cortex seed region (crus I and II and two sorting regions, the dorsal dentate nucleus (DDN and the ventral dentate nucleus (VDN. Decreased numbers of streamlines were found in the children with ASD in the pathway connecting cerebellar cortex to right VDN (p-value = 0.015. Reduced fractional anisotropy values were observed in pathways connecting the cerebellar cortex to the right DDN (p-value=0.008, the right VDN (p-value=0.010 and left VDN (p-value=0.020 in children with ASD compared to the TD group. In an analysis of single subjects, reduced FA in the pathway connecting cerebellar cortex to the right VDN was found in 73% of the children in the ASD group using a threshold of 3 standards errors of the TD group. The detection of diffusion changes in cerebellum may provide an in vivo biomarker of Purkinje cell pathology in children with ASD.

  18. Finding a way in: a review and practical evaluation of fMRI and EEG for detection and assessment in disorders of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Amabilis H; Connolly, John F

    2013-09-01

    Diagnoses and assessments of cognitive function in disorders of consciousness (DOC) are notoriously prone to error due to their reliance on behavioural measures. As a result, researchers have turned to functional neuroimaging and electrophysiological techniques with the goal of developing more effective methods of detecting awareness and assessing cognition in these patients. This article reviews functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroenchphalography (EEG)-based studies of cognition and consciousness in DOC, including assessment of basic sensory, perceptual, language, and emotional processing; studies for detection of conscious awareness; paradigms for the establishment of communication in the absence of behaviour; and functional connectivity studies. The advantages and limitations of fMRI and EEG-based measures are examined as research and clinical tools in this population and an explanation offered for the rediscovery of the unique advantages of EEG in the study of DOC.

  19. In vivo detection of free radicals using molecular MRI and immuno-spin trapping in a mouse model for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towner, Rheal A; Smith, Nataliya; Saunders, Debra; Lupu, Florea; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; West, Melinda; Ramirez, Dario C; Gomez-Mejiba, Sandra E; Bonini, Marcelo G; Mason, Ronald P; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Hensley, Kenneth

    2013-10-01

    Free radicals associated with oxidative stress play a major role in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). By combining immuno-spin trapping and molecular magnetic resonance imaging, in vivo trapped radical adducts were detected in the spinal cords of SOD1(G93A)-transgenic (Tg) mice, a model for ALS. For this study, the nitrone spin trap DMPO (5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide) was administered (ip) over 5 days before administration (iv) of an anti-DMPO probe (anti-DMPO antibody covalently bound to an albumin-gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid-biotin MRI contrast agent) to trap free radicals. MRI was used to detect the presence of the anti-DMPO radical adducts by a significant sustained increase in MR signal intensities (p radical adducts in an ALS model. This novel, noninvasive, in vivo diagnostic method can be applied to investigate the involvement of free radical mechanisms in ALS rodent models.

  20. Focal liver lesions detection and characterization: The advantages of gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stefano; Palmucci

    2014-01-01

    Since its clinical introduction, several studies in literature have investigated gadolinium ethoxybenzhyl diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid or gadoxetic acid(Gd-EOB-DTPA) properties. Following contrast injection, it provides dynamic vascular phases(arterial, portal and equilibrium phases) and hepatobiliary phase, the latter due to its uptake by functional hepatocytes. The main advantages of Gd-EOB-DTPA of focal liver lesion detection and characterization are discussed in this paper. Namely, we focus on the possibility of distinguishing focal nodular hyperplasia(FNH) from hepatic adenoma(HA), the identification of early hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) and the pre-operative assessment of metastasis in liver parenchyma. Regarding the differentiation between FNH and HA, adenoma typically appears hypointense in hepatobiliary phase, whereas FNH is isointense or hyperintense to the surrounding hepatic parenchyma. As for the identification of early HCCs, many papers recently published in literature have emphasized the contribution of hepatobiliary phase in the characterization of nodules without a typical hallmark of HCC. Atypical nodules(no hypervascularizaton observed on arterial phase and/or no hypovascular appearance on portal phase) with low signal intensity in the hepatobiliary phase, have a high probability of malignancy. Finally, regarding the evaluation of focal hepatic metastases, magnetic resonance pre-operative assessment using gadoxetic acid allows for more accurate diagnosis.

  1. Collagen fibers mediate MRI-detected water diffusion and anisotropy in breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkad, Samata; Zhang, Jiangyang; Akhbardeh, Alireza; Jacob, Desmond; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Solaiyappan, Meiyappan; Jacobs, Michael A; Raman, Venu; Leibfritz, Dieter; Glunde, Kristine; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2016-10-01

    Collagen 1 (Col1) fibers play an important role in tumor interstitial macromolecular transport and cancer cell dissemination. Our goal was to understand the influence of Col1 fibers on water diffusion, and to examine the potential of using noninvasive diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to indirectly detect Col1 fibers in breast lesions. We previously observed, in human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenografts engineered to fluoresce under hypoxia, relatively low amounts of Col1 fibers in fluorescent hypoxic regions. These xenograft tumors together with human breast cancer samples were used here to investigate the relationship between Col1 fibers, water diffusion and anisotropy, and hypoxia. Hypoxic low Col1 fiber containing regions showed decreased apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) compared to normoxic high Col1 fiber containing regions. Necrotic high Col1 fiber containing regions showed increased ADC with decreased FA values compared to normoxic viable high Col1 fiber regions that had increased ADC with increased FA values. A good agreement of ADC and FA patterns was observed between in vivo and ex vivo images. In human breast cancer specimens, ADC and FA decreased in low Col1 containing regions. Our data suggest that a decrease in ADC and FA values observed within a lesion could predict hypoxia, and a pattern of high ADC with low FA values could predict necrosis. Collectively the data identify the role of Col1 fibers in directed water movement and support expanding the evaluation of DTI parameters as surrogates for Col1 fiber patterns associated with specific tumor microenvironments as companion diagnostics and for staging.

  2. A systematic review and meta-analysis of diagnostic test of MRA versus MRI for detection superior labrum anterior to posterior lesions type II-VII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arirachakaran, Alisara; Pituckanotai, Kwanchai [Police General Hospital, Orthopedics Department, Bangkok (Thailand); Boonard, Manusak [Khon Kean University, Department of Orthopaedics, Faculty of Medicine, Khonkaen (Thailand); Chaijenkij, Kornkit [Mahidol University, Orthopedics Department, College of Sports Science and Technology, Bangkok (Thailand); Prommahachai, Akom [Udon Thani Hospital, Orthopedic Department, Udonthani (Thailand); Kongtharvonskul, Jatupon [Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Section for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2017-02-15

    To determine the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in superior labrum anterior to posterior lesions (type II-VII) of the shoulder. PubMed and Scopus search engines, an electronic search of articles was performed from inception to February 19, 2016. Diagnostic performance of index tests was compared by the summary area under receiver operator characteristic curve (AUROC). In all, 117 of 493 studies were eligible and 32 studies (2,013 shoulders) and 11 studies (1,498 shoulders) were evaluated with MRA and MRI. The summary sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratio (positive and negative) and AUROC were 0.87 (95 % confidence interval, CI: 0.82, 0.91), 0.92 (95 %CI: 0.85, 0.95), 10.28 (95 %CI: 5.84, 18.08), 0.14 (95 %CI: 0.10, 0.20) and 0.94 (95 %CI: 0.92, 0.96) respectively for MRA, and 0.76 (95 %CI: 0.61, 0.86), 0.87 (95 %CI: 0.71, 0.95), 5.89 (95 %CI: 2.5, 13.86), 0.28 (95 %CI: 0.17, 0.47) and 0.94 (95 %CI: 0.92, 0.96) respectively for MRI. The diagnostic performance of MRA was superior to MRI by both direct and indirect comparisons for the detection of SLAP lesions. (orig.)

  3. Role of MRI in detecting involvement of the uterine internal os in uterine cervical cancer: Systematic review of diagnostic test accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boer, Peter de, E-mail: p.deboer@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Centre (AMC), University of Amsterdam (UvA), Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Adam, Judit A. [Department of Radiology, AMC, UvA (Netherlands); Department of Nuclear Medicine, AMC, UvA (Netherlands); Buist, Marrije R. [Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, AMC, UvA (Netherlands); Vijver, Marc J. van de [Department of Pathology, AMC, UvA (Netherlands); Rasch, Coen R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Centre (AMC), University of Amsterdam (UvA), Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Stoker, Jaap; Bipat, Shandra [Department of Radiology, AMC, UvA (Netherlands); Stalpers, Lukas J.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Centre (AMC), University of Amsterdam (UvA), Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: In patients with uterine cervical cancer, pretreatment recognition of uterine extension is crucial in treatment decision-making for fertility-sparing surgery and for target delineation in radiotherapy. Although MRI is generally considered the most reliable method, its value for detecting involvement of the uterine internal os is unclear. Methods: Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases were systematically searched (January 1997–December 2012) for MRI studies that measured the accuracy of involvement of the uterine internal os compared to histopathology as reference standard in patients with uterine cervical cancer. Data were assessed using the QUADAS tool. Accuracy concerned either involvement (yes/no) of the uterine internal os, or measuring invasion distance toward the uterine corpus. Results: Two retrospective and two prospective studies described 366 patients diagnosed with uterine cervical cancer FIGO stage IIB or below, in whom 64 (17%) had uterine internal os involvement. For three studies the summary estimates of specificity, sensitivity, negative predictive value (NPV), positive predictive value (PPV), and accuracy were 91%, 97%, 99%, 79% and 95%, respectively; one study had an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.8. Conclusion: MRI has a high level of accuracy; however, data are limited and for validation a large prospective study is needed that compares actual measurements on MRI with histopathological examination.

  4. Three-Dimensional Expansion of a Dynamic Programming Method for Boundary Detection and Its Application to Sequential Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Chuan Cheng

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a fast 3D dynamic programming expansion to find a shortest surface in a 3D matrix. This algorithm can detect boundaries in an image sequence. Using phantom image studies with added uniform distributed noise from different SNRs, the unsigned error of this proposed method is investigated. Comparing the automated results to the gold standard, the best averaged relative unsigned error of the proposed method is 0.77% (SNR = 20 dB, and its corresponding parameter values are reported. We further apply this method to detect the boundary of the real superficial femoral artery (SFA in MRI sequences without a contrast injection. The manual tracings on the SFA boundaries are performed by well-trained experts to be the gold standard. The comparisons between the manual tracings and automated results are made on 16 MRI sequences (800 total images. The average unsigned error rate is 2.4% (SD = 2.0%. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can perform qualitatively better than the 2D dynamic programming for vessel boundary detection on MRI sequences.

  5. "Eyes Open - Eyes Closed" EEG/fMRI data set including dedicated "Carbon Wire Loop" motion detection channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Johan; Pampel, André; van Someren, Eus; Ramautar, Jennifer; van der Werf, Ysbrand; Gomez-Herrero, German; Lepsien, Jöran; Hellrung, Lydia; Hinrichs, Hermann; Möller, Harald; Walter, Martin

    2016-06-01

    This data set contains electroencephalography (EEG) data as well as simultaneous EEG with functional magnetic resonance imaging (EEG/fMRI) data. During EEG/fMRI, the EEG cap was outfitted with a hardware-based add-on consisting of carbon-wire loops (CWL). These yielded six extra׳CWL׳ signals related to Faraday induction of these loops in the main magnetic field "Measurement and reduction of motion and ballistocardiogram artefacts from simultaneous EEG and fMRI recordings" (Masterton et al., 2007) [1]. In this data set, the CWL data make it possible to do a direct regression approach to deal with the BCG and specifically He artifact. The CWL-EEG/fMRI data in this paper has been recorded on two MRI scanners with different Helium pump systems (4 subjects on a 3 T TIM Trio and 4 subjects on a 3T VERIO). Separate EEG/fMRI data sets have been recorded for the helium pump ON as well as the helium pump OFF conditions. The EEG-only data (same subjects) has been recorded for a motion artifact-free reference EEG signal outside of the scanner. This paper also links to an EEGlab "EEGLAB: an open source toolbox for analysis of single-trial EEG dynamics including independent component analysis" (Delorme and Makeig, 2004) [2] plugin to perform a CWL regression approach to deal with the He pump artifact, as published in the main paper "Carbon-wire loop based artifact correction outperforms post-processing EEG/fMRI corrections-A validation of a real-time simultaneous EEG/fMRI correction method" (van der Meer et al., 2016) [3].

  6. Automatic solution for detection, identification and biomedical monitoring of a cow using remote sensing for optimised treatment of cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevgeny Beiderman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we show how a novel photonic remote sensing system assembled on a robotic platform can extract vital biomedical parameters from cattle including their heart beating, breathing and chewing activity. The sensor is based upon a camera and a laser using selfinterference phenomena. The whole system intends to provide an automatic solution for detection, identification and biomedical monitoring of a cow. The detection algorithm is based upon image processing involving probability map construction. The identification algorithms involve well known image pattern recognition techniques. The sensor is used on top of an automated robotic platform in order to support animal decision making. Field tests and computer simulated results are presented.

  7. Effects of artificial lighting on the detection of plant stress with spectral reflectance remote sensing in bioregenerative life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuerger, Andrew C.; Richards, Jeffrey T.

    2006-09-01

    Plant-based life support systems that utilize bioregenerative technologies have been proposed for long-term human missions to both the Moon and Mars. Bioregenerative life support systems will utilize higher plants to regenerate oxygen, water, and edible biomass for crews, and are likely to significantly lower the ‘equivalent system mass’ of crewed vehicles. As part of an ongoing effort to begin the development of an automatic remote sensing system to monitor plant health in bioregenerative life support modules, we tested the efficacy of seven artificial illumination sources on the remote detection of plant stresses. A cohort of pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L.) were grown 42 days at 25 °C, 70% relative humidity, and 300 μmol m-2 s-1 of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; from 400 to 700 nm). Plants were grown under nutritional stresses induced by irrigating subsets of the plants with 100, 50, 25, or 10% of a standard nutrient solution. Reflectance spectra of the healthy and stressed plants were collected under seven artificial lamps including two tungsten halogen lamps, plus high pressure sodium, metal halide, fluorescent, microwave, and red/blue light emitting diode (LED) sources. Results indicated that several common algorithms used to estimate biomass and leaf chlorophyll content were effective in predicting plant stress under all seven illumination sources. However, the two types of tungsten halogen lamps and the microwave illumination source yielded linear models with the highest residuals and thus the highest predictive capabilities of all lamps tested. The illumination sources with the least predictive capabilities were the red/blue LEDs and fluorescent lamps. Although the red/blue LEDs yielded the lowest residuals for linear models derived from the remote sensing data, the LED arrays used in these experiments were optimized for plant productivity and not the collection of remote sensing data. Thus, we propose that if adjusted to optimize the

  8. Climate and infectious disease: use of remote sensing for detection of Vibrio cholerae by indirect measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobitz, B.; Beck, L.; Huq, A.; Wood, B.; Fuchs, G.; Faruque, A. S.; Colwell, R.

    2000-01-01

    It has long been known that cholera outbreaks can be initiated when Vibrio cholerae, the bacterium that causes cholera, is present in drinking water in sufficient numbers to constitute an infective dose, if ingested by humans. Outbreaks associated with drinking or bathing in unpurified river or brackish water may directly or indirectly depend on such conditions as water temperature, nutrient concentration, and plankton production that may be favorable for growth and reproduction of the bacterium. Although these environmental parameters have routinely been measured by using water samples collected aboard research ships, the available data sets are sparse and infrequent. Furthermore, shipboard data acquisition is both expensive and time-consuming. Interpolation to regional scales can also be problematic. Although the bacterium, V. cholerae, cannot be sensed directly, remotely sensed data can be used to infer its presence. In the study reported here, satellite data were used to monitor the timing and spread of cholera. Public domain remote sensing data for the Bay of Bengal were compared directly with cholera case data collected in Bangladesh from 1992-1995. The remote sensing data included sea surface temperature and sea surface height. It was discovered that sea surface temperature shows an annual cycle similar to the cholera case data. Sea surface height may be an indicator of incursion of plankton-laden water inland, e.g., tidal rivers, because it was also found to be correlated with cholera outbreaks. The extensive studies accomplished during the past 25 years, confirming the hypothesis that V. cholerae is autochthonous to the aquatic environment and is a commensal of zooplankton, i.e., copepods, when combined with the findings of the satellite data analyses, provide strong evidence that cholera epidemics are climate-linked.

  9. The role of FDG-PET, HMPAO-SPET and MRI in the detection of brain involvement in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao Chiahung [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); Lan Jungliang [Division of Rheumatology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); ChangLai Shengping [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chung-Shan Medical and Dental College, Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); Liao Kokaung [Electron Microscopic Laboratory, Chung-Shan Medical and Dental College, Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); Yen Rouhfang; Chieng Poonung [Department of Nuclear Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1999-02-01

    Involvement of the brain is one of the most important complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE); however, its diagnosis is difficult due to the lack of effective imaging methods. We combined three brain imaging modalities - positron emission tomography with fluorine-18 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG-PET), single-photon emission computed tomography with technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO-SPET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) - in order to detect brain involvement in SLE. Thirty-seven SLE patients, aged 22-45 years, were divided into three groups. Group 1 (G1) consisted of ten patients with major neuropsychiatric manifestations; group 2 (G2) consisted of 15 patients with minor manifestations; and group 3 (G3) consisted of 12 patients without manifestations. FDG-PET findings were abnormal in 51% of patients: 90% of G1, 67% of G2 and 0% of G3 patients respectively. HMPAO-SPET findings were abnormal in 62% of patients: 100% of G1, 73% of G2 and 17% of G3 patients respectively. MRI findings were abnormal in 35% of patients: 70% of G1, 40% of G2 and 0% of G3 patients respectively. Grey matter was more commonly involved than white matter; 62% of patients presented with lesions in the cerebral cortex, 27% with lesions in the basal ganglion, 5% with lesions in the cerebellum, and 19% with lesions in white matter. No white matter lesions were found on FDG-PET or HMPAO-SPET. However, in 19% of patients, MRI demonstrated abnormally high signal lesions in white matter. Forty-three percent of cases had positive serum anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA). However, ACA was not related to FDG-PET, HMPAO-SPET or MRI findings. It may be concluding that HMPAO-SPET is a more sensitive tool for detecting brain involvement in SLE patients when compared with FDG-PET or MRI. However, MRI is necessary for detecting lesions in white matter. (orig.) With 3 figs., 2 tabs., 46 refs.

  10. Automated detection of breast tumor in MRI and comparison of kinetic features for assessing tumor response to chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, Faranak; Tan, Maxine; Zheng, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced breast magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is used increasingly in diagnosis of breast cancer and assessment of treatment efficacy in current clinical practice. The purpose of this preliminary study is to develop and test a new quantitative kinetic image feature analysis method and biomarker to predict response of breast cancer patients to neoadjuvant chemotherapy using breast MR images acquired before the chemotherapy. For this purpose, we developed a computer-aided detection scheme to automatically segment breast areas and tumors depicting on the sequentially scanned breast MR images. From a contrast-enhancement map generated by subtraction of two image sets scanned pre- and post-injection of contrast agent, our scheme computed 38 morphological and kinetic image features from both tumor and background parenchymal regions. We applied a number of statistical data analysis methods to identify effective image features in predicting response of the patients to the chemotherapy. Based on the performance assessment of individual features and their correlations, we applied a fusion method to generate a final image biomarker. A breast MR image dataset involving 68 patients was used in this study. Among them, 25 had complete response and 43 had partially response to the chemotherapy based on the RECIST guideline. Using this image feature fusion based biomarker, the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve is AUC = 0.850±0.047. This study demonstrated that a biomarker developed from the fusion of kinetic image features computed from breast MR images acquired pre-chemotherapy has potentially higher discriminatory power in predicting response of the patients to the chemotherapy.

  11. MRI Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from ...

  12. Shoulder MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  13. Meta-Analysis of the Detection of Plant Pigment Concentrations Using Hyperspectral Remotely Sensed Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingfeng Huang

    Full Text Available Passive optical hyperspectral remote sensing of plant pigments offers potential for understanding plant ecophysiological processes across a range of spatial scales. Following a number of decades of research in this field, this paper undertakes a systematic meta-analysis of 85 articles to determine whether passive optical hyperspectral remote sensing techniques are sufficiently well developed to quantify individual plant pigments, which operational solutions are available for wider plant science and the areas which now require greater focus. The findings indicate that predictive relationships are strong for all pigments at the leaf scale but these decrease and become more variable across pigment types at the canopy and landscape scales. At leaf scale it is clear that specific sets of optimal wavelengths can be recommended for operational methodologies: total chlorophyll and chlorophyll a quantification is based on reflectance in the green (550-560nm and red edge (680-750nm regions; chlorophyll b on the red, (630-660nm, red edge (670-710nm and the near-infrared (800-810nm; carotenoids on the 500-580nm region; and anthocyanins on the green (550-560nm, red edge (700-710nm and near-infrared (780-790nm. For total chlorophyll the optimal wavelengths are valid across canopy and landscape scales and there is some evidence that the same applies for chlorophyll a.

  14. Environmental data analysis and remote sensing for early detection of dengue and malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Z.; Roytman, Leonid; Kadik, Abdelhamid; Rosy, Dilara A.

    2014-06-01

    Malaria and dengue fever are the two most common mosquito-transmitted diseases, leading to millions of serious illnesses and deaths each year. Because the mosquito vectors are sensitive to environmental conditions such as temperature, precipitation, and humidity, it is possible to map areas currently or imminently at high risk for disease outbreaks using satellite remote sensing. In this paper we propose the development of an operational geospatial system for malaria and dengue fever early warning; this can be done by bringing together geographic information system (GIS) tools, artificial neural networks (ANN) for efficient pattern recognition, the best available ground-based epidemiological and vector ecology data, and current satellite remote sensing capabilities. We use Vegetation Health Indices (VHI) derived from visible and infrared radiances measured by satellite-mounted Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRR) and available weekly at 4-km resolution as one predictor of malaria and dengue fever risk in Bangladesh. As a study area, we focus on Bangladesh where malaria and dengue fever are serious public health threats. The technology developed will, however, be largely portable to other countries in the world and applicable to other disease threats. A malaria and dengue fever early warning system will be a boon to international public health, enabling resources to be focused where they will do the most good for stopping pandemics, and will be an invaluable decision support tool for national security assessment and potential troop deployment in regions susceptible to disease outbreaks.

  15. Detecting nutrients deficiencies of oil palm trees using remotely sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzukhi, Faradina; Liyana Elahami, Aina; Norashikin Bohari, Sharifah

    2016-06-01

    Oil palm plantation management involve crucial role for the farmers. The remote sensing imagery has widely used nowadays in order to monitor oil palm tree in plantation. To pact with the problem, the use of vegetation indices analysis on satellite image on plantation will examine the ability of spectral data in determining the greenness of the trees. Vegetation Indices are used for estimating the crops and vegetation variables by using visible and nearinfrared region (NIR) from the electromagnetic spectrum. The healthy tree will display very low reflectance and transmitted in visible region and very high reflectance transmitted in NIR. The chlorophyll absorption in reflectance and normalizes pigment chlorophyll vegetation indexes will show a loss of chlorophyll pigment compared to healthy oil palm trees. Besides, pH. value and soil nutrient will be examined to determine their effect towards the trees. In addition, the laboratory test sample is done to analyse the pH. value and major nutrient status of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) together with their relationship with the remotely sensed data.

  16. Detection of physiological changes after exercise via a remote optophysiological imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Hu, Sijung; Azorin-Peris, Vicente; Zheng, Jia; Greenwald, Stephen; Chambers, Jonathon; Zhu, Yisheng

    2011-03-01

    A study of blood perfusion mapping was performed with a remote opto-physiological imaging (OPI) system coupling a sensitive CMOS camera and a custom-built resonant cavity light emitting diode (RCLED) ringlight. The setup is suitable for the remote assessment of blood perfusion in tissue over a wide range of anatomical locations. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the reliability and stability of the OPI system when measuring a cardiovascular variable of clinical interest, in this case, heart rate. To this end, the non-contact and contact photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals obtained from the OPI system and conventional PPG sensor were recorded simultaneously from each of 12 subjects before and after 5-min of cycling exercise. The time-frequency representation (TFR) method was used to visualize the time-dependent behavior of the signal frequency. The physiological parameters derived from the images captured by the OPI system exhibit comparable functional characteristics to those taken from conventional contact PPG pulse waveform measurements in both the time and frequency domains. Finally and more importantly, a previously developed opto-physiological model was employed to provide a 3-D representation of blood perfusion in human tissue which could provide a new insight into clinical assessment and diagnosis of circulatory pathology in various tissue segments.

  17. Modeling absorption spectra for detection of the combustion products of jet engines by laser remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitsekhovskaya, Olga K; Kashirskii, Danila E; Egorov, Oleg V; Shefer, Olga V

    2016-05-10

    The absorption spectra of exhaust gases (H2O, CO, CO2, NO, NO2, and SO2) and aerosol (soot and Al2O3) particles were modeled at different temperatures for the first time and suitable spectral ranges were determined for conducting laser remote sensing of the combustion products of jet engines. The calculations were conducted on the basis of experimental concentrations of the substances and the sizes of the aerosol particles. The temperature and geometric parameters of jet engine exhausts were also taken from the literature. The absorption spectra were obtained via the line-by-line method, making use of the spectral line parameters from the authors' own high-temperature databases (for NO2 and SO2 gases) and the HITEMP 2010 database, and taking into account atmospheric transmission. Finally, the theoretical absorption spectra of the exhaust gases were plotted at temperatures of 400, 700, and 1000 K, and the impact of aerosol particles on the total exhaust spectra was estimated in spectral ranges suitable for remote sensing applications.

  18. Remote detection of human toxicants in real time using a human-optimized, bioluminescent bacterial luciferase gene cassette bioreporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Dan; Webb, James; Ripp, Steven; Patterson, Stacey; Sayler, Gary

    2012-06-01

    Traditionally, human toxicant bioavailability screening has been forced to proceed in either a high throughput fashion using prokaryotic or lower eukaryotic targets with minimal applicability to humans, or in a more expensive, lower throughput manner that uses fluorescent or bioluminescent human cells to directly provide human bioavailability data. While these efforts are often sufficient for basic scientific research, they prevent the rapid and remote identification of potentially toxic chemicals required for modern biosecurity applications. To merge the advantages of high throughput, low cost screening regimens with the direct bioavailability assessment of human cell line use, we re-engineered the bioluminescent bacterial luciferase gene cassette to function autonomously (without exogenous stimulation) within human cells. Optimized cassette expression provides for fully endogenous bioluminescent production, allowing continuous, real time monitoring of the bioavailability and toxicology of various compounds in an automated fashion. To access the functionality of this system, two sets of bioluminescent human cells were developed. The first was programed to suspend bioluminescent production upon toxicological challenge to mimic the non-specific detection of a toxicant. The second induced bioluminescence upon detection of a specific compound to demonstrate autonomous remote target identification. These cells were capable of responding to μM concentrations of the toxicant n-decanal, and allowed for continuous monitoring of cellular health throughout the treatment process. Induced bioluminescence was generated through treatment with doxycycline and was detectable upon dosage at a 100 ng/ml concentration. These results demonstrate that leveraging autonomous bioluminescence allows for low-cost, high throughput direct assessment of toxicant bioavailability.

  19. Moving object detection method using H.263 video coded data for remote surveillance systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Atsushi; Hata, Toshihiko; Ozaki, Minoru

    1998-12-01

    This paper describes a moving object detection method using H.263 coded data. For video surveillance systems, it is necessary to detect unusual states because there are a lot of cameras in the system and video surveillance is tedious in normal states. We examine the information extracted from H.263 coded data and propose a method of detecting alarm events from that information. Our method consists of two steps. In the first step, using motion vector information, a moving object can be detected based on the vector's size and the similarities between the vectors in one frame and the two adjoining frames. In the second step, using DCT coefficients, the detection errors caused by the change of the luminous intensity can be eliminated based on the characteristics of the H.263's DCT coefficients. Thus moving objects are detected by analyzing the motion vectors and DCT coefficients, and we present some experimental results that show the effectiveness of our method.

  20. Ultra-sensitive molecular MRI of cerebrovascular cell activation enables early detection of chronic central nervous system disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagne, Axel; Gauberti, Maxime; Macrez, Richard; Jullienne, Amandine; Briens, Aurélien; Raynaud, Jean-Sébastien; Louin, Gaelle; Buisson, Alain; Haelewyn, Benoit; Docagne, Fabian; Defer, Gilles; Vivien, Denis; Maubert, Eric

    2012-11-01

    Since endothelial cells can be targeted by large contrast-carrying particles, molecular imaging of cerebrovascular cell activation is highly promising to evaluate the underlying inflammation of the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, we aimed to demonstrate that molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cerebrovascular cell activation can reveal CNS disorders in the absence of visible lesions and symptoms. To this aim, we optimized contrast carrying particles targeting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and MRI protocols through both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Although, pre-contrast MRI images failed to reveal the ongoing pathology, contrast-enhanced MRI revealed hypoperfusion-triggered CNS injury in vascular dementia, unmasked amyloid-induced cerebrovascular activation in Alzheimer's disease and allowed monitoring of disease activity during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Moreover, contrast-enhanced MRI revealed the cerebrovascular cell activation associated with known risk factors of CNS disorders such as peripheral inflammation, ethanol consumption, hyperglycemia and aging. By providing a dramatically higher sensitivity than previously reported methods and molecular contrast agents, the technology described in the present study opens new avenues of investigation in the field of neuroinflammation.

  1. Remote Sensing and Modeling of Landslides: Detection, Monitoring and Risk Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschbaum, Dalia; Fukuoka, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Landslides are one of the most pervasive hazards in the world, resulting in more fatalities and economic damage than is generally recognized_ Occurring over an extensive range of lithologies, morphologies, hydrologies, and climates, mass movements can be triggered by intense or prolonged rainfall, seismicity, freeze/thaw processes, and antbropogertic activities, among other factors. The location, size, and timing of these processes are characteristically difficult to predict and assess because of their localized spatial scales, distribution, and complex interactions between rainfall infiltration, hydromechanical properties of the soil, and the underlying surface composition. However, the increased availability, accessibility, and resolution of remote sensing data offer a new opportunity to explore issues of landslide susceptibility, hazard, and risk over a variety of spatial scales. This special issue presents a series of papers that investigate the sources, behavior, and impacts of different mass movement types using a diverse set of data sources and evaluation methodologies.

  2. Detecting land use changes affected by human activities using remote sensing (Case study: Karkheh River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Maddah

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Population growth and abundant activities in order to achieve maximum well-being has forced human to make a lot of changes in the nature. These changes will be cost-effective when they have the minimum damage on the landscape. One of the activities that human did for obtaining the water and preventing flood was making the dam in the track of running water. Since the dam is established until its impoundment and after impoundment, the condition of ecosystem and the appearance of the upstream and downstream of the dam will undergo changes. In this study, using satellite data and remote sensing, these changes have been studied and the landuse changes in vegetation, arid land, water level and residential and non-residential lands is measured in 1998 and 2014 using Maximum Likelihood method and support vector machine.

  3. A STUDY FOR REMOTE DETECTION OF INDUSTRIAL EFFLUENTS’ EFFECT ON RICE USING THERMAL IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dehnavi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Rice is one of the most important nutritious grains all over the world, so that only in some parts of Asia more than 300 million acres allocated for cultivating this product. Therefore, qualitative and quantitative management of this product is of great importance in commercial, political and financial viewpoints. Rice plant is very influenced by physical and chemical characteristics of irrigation water, due to its specific kind of planting method. Hence, chemically-polluted waters which received by plant can change in live plants and their products. Thus, a very high degree of treatment will be required if the effluent discharges to rice plants. Current waters receive a variety of land-based water pollutants ranging from industrial wastes to excess sediments. One of the most hazardous wastes are chemicals that are toxic. Some factories discharge their effluents directly into a water body. So, what would happen for rice plant or its product if this polluted water flow to paddies? Is there any remotely-based method to study for this effect? Are surface temperature distributions (thermal images useful in this context? The first goal in this research is thus to investigate the effect of a simulated textile factory’s effluent sample on the rice product. The second goal is to investigate whether the polluted plant can be identified by means of thermal remote sensing or not. The results of this laboratory research have proven that the presence of industrial wastewater cause a decrease in plant’s product and its f-cover value, also some changes in radiant temperature.

  4. Solid state NMR, MRI and Sir Peter Mansfield: (1) from broad lines to narrow and back again; and (2) a highly tenuous link to landmine detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garroway, A N

    1999-12-01

    The contributions of Sir Peter Mansfield to MRI are rooted in solid state NMR. I summarize some of the important contributions of Sir Peter to that field, provide a glimpse of the state of the art in multiple-pulse line-narrowing in the early 1970s, and indicate how the earliest MRI efforts at Nottingham flowed from solid state NMR. These line-narrowing methods, providing control over the Hamiltonian governing the dynamics of nuclear spins, continue to evolve and to find new uses. I indicate how some methods and ideas from solid state NMR of the 1970s are at present applied to the detection of explosives in landmines by nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR).

  5. Pollen Bearing Honey Bee Detection in Hive Entrance Video Recorded by Remote Embedded System for Pollination Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babic, Z.; Pilipovic, R.; Risojevic, V.; Mirjanic, G.

    2016-06-01

    Honey bees have crucial role in pollination across the world. This paper presents a simple, non-invasive, system for pollen bearing honey bee detection in surveillance video obtained at the entrance of a hive. The proposed system can be used as a part of a more complex system for tracking and counting of honey bees with remote pollination monitoring as a final goal. The proposed method is executed in real time on embedded systems co-located with a hive. Background subtraction, color segmentation and morphology methods are used for segmentation of honey bees. Classification in two classes, pollen bearing honey bees and honey bees that do not have pollen load, is performed using nearest mean classifier, with a simple descriptor consisting of color variance and eccentricity features. On in-house data set we achieved correct classification rate of 88.7% with 50 training images per class. We show that the obtained classification results are not far behind from the results of state-of-the-art image classification methods. That favors the proposed method, particularly having in mind that real time video transmission to remote high performance computing workstation is still an issue, and transfer of obtained parameters of pollination process is much easier.

  6. Remote sensing change detection and process analysis of long-term land use change and human impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiming; Li, Baolin; Chen, Yumin

    2011-11-01

    This study investigates environmental change over a 30-year period and attempts to gain a better understanding of human impacts on an arid environment and their consequences for regional development. Multitemporal remotely sensed imagery was acquired and integrated to establish the basis for change detection and process analysis. Land cover changes were investigated in two categories, namely categorical change using image classification and quantitative change using a vegetation index. The results show that human-induced land cover changes have been minor in this remote area. However, the pace of growth of human-induced change has been accelerating since the early 1990s. The analysis of the multi-temporal vegetation index also shows no overall trend of rangeland deterioration, although local change of vegetation cover caused by human activities was noticeable. The results suggest that the current trend of rapid growth may not be sustainable and that the implementation of effective counter-measures for environmentally sound development is a rather urgent matter.

  7. Application of Remote Sensing Detection and GIS in Analysis of Vegetation Pattern Dynamics in the Yellow River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Chuangye; Liu Gaohuan

    2008-01-01

    Regional vegetation pattern dynamics has a great im-pact on ecosystem and climate change. Remote sensing data and geographical information system (GIS) analysis were widely used in the detection of vegetation pattern dynamics. In this study, the Yellow River Delta was selected as the study area. By using 1986, 1993, 1996, 1999 and 2005 remote sensing data as basic informa-tion resource, with the support of GIS, a wetland vegetation spa-tial information dataset was built up. Through selecting the land-scape metrics such as class area (CA), class percent of landscape (PL), number of patch (NP), largest patch index (LPI) and mean patch size (MPS) etc., the dynamics of vegetation pattern was analyzed. The result showed that the change of vegetation pattern is significant from 1986 to 2005. From 1986-1999, the area of the vegetation, the percent of vegetation, LPI and MPS decreased, the NP increased, the vegetation pattern tends to be fragmental. The decrease in vegetation area may well be explained by the fact of the nature environment evolution (Climate change and decrease in Yellow River runoff) and the increase in the population in the Yellow River Delta. However, from 1999-2005, the area of the vegetation, the percent of vegetation, LPI and MPS increased, while the NP decreased. This trend of restoration may be due to the implementation of water resources regulation for the Yellow River Delta since 1999.

  8. A computer-aided detection system for rheumatoid arthritis MRI data interpretation and quantification of synovial activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubassove, Olga; Boesen, Mikael; Cimmino, Marco A;

    2009-01-01

    RATIONAL AND OBJECTIVE: Disease assessment and follow-up of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients require objective evaluation and quantification. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has a large potential to supplement such information for the clinician, however, time spent on data reading...... and interpretation slow down development in this area. Existing scoring systems of especially synovitis are too rigid and insensitive to measure early treatment response and quantify inflammation. This study tested a novel automated, computer system for analysis of dynamic MRI data acquired from patients with RA...

  9. Pulsed spectrometer for nuclear quadrupole resonance for remote detection of nitrogen in explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anferov, V. P.; Mozjoukhine, G. V.; Fisher, R.

    2000-04-01

    We describe a pulsed spectrometer for detection of nuclear quadrupole resonance on the nuclei of nitrogen N-14 with fast Fourier transform. The use of a multipulse sequence, four channel system for data registration and processing permits detection of the nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) signal in the presence of strong interference and the piezo effect. Using this spectrometer we registered the NQR signal from an explosive sample of 150 g (92% RDX) at a distance of 22 cm, and the time of detection was 81 s.

  10. Remotely-sensed detection of effects of extreme droughts on gross primary production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicca, Sara; Balzarolo, Manuela; Filella, Iolanda; Granier, André; Herbst, Mathias; Knohl, Alexander; Longdoz, Bernard; Mund, Martina; Nagy, Zoltan; Pintér, Krisztina; Rambal, Serge; Verbesselt, Jan; Verger, Aleixandre; Zeileis, Achim; Zhang, Chao; Peñuelas, Josep

    2016-06-01

    Severe droughts strongly impact photosynthesis (GPP), and satellite imagery has yet to demonstrate its ability to detect drought effects. Especially changes in vegetation functioning when vegetation state remains unaltered (no browning or defoliation) pose a challenge to satellite-derived indicators. We evaluated the performance of different satellite indicators to detect strong drought effects on GPP in a beech forest in France (Hesse), where vegetation state remained largely unaffected while GPP decreased substantially. We compared the results with three additional sites: a Mediterranean holm oak forest (Puéchabon), a temperate beech forest (Hainich), and a semi-arid grassland (Bugacpuszta). In Hesse, a three-year reduction in GPP following drought was detected only by the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI). The Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) also detected this drought effect, but only after normalization for absorbed light. In Puéchabon normalized PRI outperformed the other indicators, while the short-term drought effect in Hainich was not detected by any tested indicator. In contrast, most indicators, but not PRI, captured the drought effects in Bugacpuszta. Hence, PRI improved detection of drought effects on GPP in forests and we propose that PRI normalized for absorbed light is considered in future algorithms to estimate GPP from space.

  11. On the detection of adobe buried archaeological structures using multiscale remote sensing techniques : Piramide Naranja in Cahuachi (Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, N.; Rizzo, E.; Lasaponara, R.; Orefici, G.

    2009-04-01

    The detection of buried adobe structures is a crucial issue for the remote sensing (ground, aerial and satellite) applied to archaeology for the widespread of sun-dried earth as building material in several ancient civilizations in Central and Southern America, Middle East and North Africa. Moreover it is complex, due to the subtle contrast existing between the archaeological features and the surrounding, especially in arid setting, as in the case of the well know Nazca Ceremonial Centre of Cahuachi, located in the desert of Nazca (Southern Peru) . During the last two decades of excavations adobe monuments dating back from the 6th century B.C. to the 4th century A.D have been highlighted by the Centro de Estudios Arqueológicos Precolombinos (CEAP), an italian-peruvian mission directed by Giuseppe Orefici. Actually, the archaeologists are excavating and restoring the core of the Ceremonial centre where is located a great pyramid (kown as Gran Piramide). Beginning from 2007 the two institutes of CNR, IMAA and IBAM, have been involved by CEAP, in order to provide a scientific and technological support for the archaeological research. Therefore, a multi-scale approach based on the integration of aerial and satellite remote sensing with geophysical techniques was employed in order to provide data useful for archaeological excavations. The abstract refers to the last investigations performed on a mound, known as "Piramide Naranja", during the 2008. The processing of an aerial imagery time series and two QuickBird satellite images acquired in 2002 and 2005, allowed for identifying some features related to shallow and buried structures. Such features were verified by means of geophysical prospections, performed by using the magnetometric method which observed changes in the magnetic field within the first few metres beneath the subsurface detecting buried walls and anomalies linked to ceramic deposits referable to possible tombs. Finally, the integration of all data

  12. Feasibility of remote sensing for detecting thermal pollution. Part 1: Feasibility study. Part 2: Implementation plan. [coastal ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veziroglu, T. N.; Lee, S. S.

    1973-01-01

    A feasibility study for the development of a three-dimensional generalized, predictive, analytical model involving remote sensing, in-situ measurements, and an active system to remotely measure turbidity is presented. An implementation plan for the development of the three-dimensional model and for the application of remote sensing of temperature and turbidity measurements is outlined.

  13. [Remote passive detection of flame temperature of solid propellant adulterating nanoparticles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-ming; Zhang, Lin; Li, Yan; Liu, Bing-ping; Wang, Xiao-fei; Wang, Jun-de

    2006-03-01

    The flame temperature of three kinds of solid propellants was measured by passive remote sensing FTIR with the resolution of 1 cm(-1). These three kinds of solid propellants are adulterate nano-scale metal oxide particles, adulterate normal metal oxide particles, and propellant without any adulterations. The main components of the solid propellant are nitrocellulose and nitroglycerin. The metallic oxides, including 6 nm CuO, 56 nm Fe2O3, 16 nm NiO, and correspondingly the normal particles, were adulterated into the solid propellants respectively. The flame temperature was calculated through the fine structure of the emission fundamental band of H2O at 2.75 microm. The results of the flame temperature of the solid propellants adulterating nano-scale CuO, Fe2O3 and NiO are 3089, 3193 and 3183 K, respectively. The temperatures of the three kinds of solid propellants were compared, and it was shown that there is no obvious difference in the flame temperature among the three kinds of solid propellants.

  14. Application of remote sensing for prediction and detection of thermal pollution, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veziroglu, T. N.; Lee, S. S.

    1975-01-01

    The development of a predictive mathematical model for thermal pollution in connection with remote sensing measurements was continued. A rigid-lid model has been developed and its application to far-field study has been completed. The velocity and temperature fields have been computed for different atmospheric conditions and for different boundary currents produced by tidal effects. In connection with the theoretical work, six experimental studies of the two sites in question (Biscayne Bay site and Hutchinson Island site) have been carried out. The temperature fields obtained during the tests at the Biscayne Bay site have been compared with the predictions of the rigid-lid model and these results are encouraging. The rigid-lid model is also being applied to near-field study. Preliminary results for a simple case have been obtained and execution of more realistic cases has been initiated. The development of a free-surface model also been initiated. The governing equations have been formulated and the computer programs have been written.

  15. Variability of Yellow River turbid plume detected with satellite remote sensing during water-sediment regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kai; Zou, Tao; Jiang, Dejuan; Tang, Cheng; Zhang, Hua

    2017-03-01

    Water Sediment Regulations (WSRs) of the Yellow River (YR) have fundamentally altered the dynamics of freshwater and sediment transport in YR estuary and might profoundly affect water quality and ecosystem of the adjacent Bohai Sea. In this study, empirical algorithms were established to infer sea surface salinity and turbidity of YR plume using on surface reflectance products of MODIS and GOCI satellites in combination with observations from hydrographic surveys during the 2014 WSR event. Inter- and intraday variability of salinity and turbidity were quantitatively assessed and correlated with external forces including river discharge, tides, Coriolis force, and wind-driven circulation. The results revealed the enhanced offshore extension of turbid plume as WSR drastically increased freshwater and sediment discharge to river mouth. During WSR event, the area of low salinity plume (0.12sr-1) occupied a maximum area of 162 km2. Intraday variation observed from geostationary GOCI data clearly illustrated the dominance of tidal current on short term dispersal pattern of freshwater and sediment plume. In comparison, wind field dominated the seasonal variation in flume transport but had insignificant impact on short term river plume dynamic during WSR. Overall, this study demonstrated that the spatial and temporal dynamic of YR plume was successfully captured by satellite remote sensing, which provided an effective tool for evaluating the environmental and ecological impact of WSRs.

  16. Evaluation of Different Change Detection Techniques in Forestry for Improvement of Spatial Objects Extraction Algorithms by Very High Resolution Remote Sensing Digital Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, N.

    2013-09-01

    Earth observations which are being useable by spatial analysis ability play an important role in detecting, management and solving environmental problems such as climate changes, deforestation, disasters, land use, water resource and carbon cycle. Remote sensing technology in combination with geospatial information system (GIS) can render reliable information on vegetation cover. Satellite Remote sensed data and GIS for land cover/use with its changes is a key to many diverse applications such as Forestry. Change detection can be defined as the process of identifying differences in the state of an object or phenomenon by observing it at different times. The analysis of the spatial extent and temporal change of vegetation cover (Forest) by using remotely sensed data is critically importance to natural resource management sciences. The main aim of this review paper is to go through the different change detection methods and algorithms based on very high resolution remote sensing imagery data, evaluate the quality of the spatial individual crown cover extraction in forests with high density, analyse, compare the results by optimized performance of control data for the same objects to provide the improvement in technique for detection and improve the mathematical sides of the change detection algorithms for high dense forests regions with different boundaries.

  17. Highway Traffic Incident Detection using High-Resolution Aerial Remote Sensing Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed M.M. Kahaki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: As vehicle population increases, Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS become more significant and mandatory in today’s overpopulated world. Vital problems in transportation such as mobility and safety of transportation are considered more, especially in metropolitans and highways. The main road traffic monitoring aims are: the acquisition and analysis of traffic figures, such as number of vehicles, incident detection and automatic driver warning systems are developed mainly for localization and safety purposes. Approach: The objective of this investigation was to propose a strategy for road extraction and incident detection using aerial images. Real time extraction and localization of roadways in an satellite image is an emerging research field which can applied to vision-based traffic controlling and unmanned air vehicles navigation. Results: The results of the proposed incident detection algorithm show that it has good detection performance, the maximum angle of vehicles applied for incidet detection is 45 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso

  18. Airborne Optical and Thermal Remote Sensing for Wildfire Detection and Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S. Allison

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available For decades detection and monitoring of forest and other wildland fires has relied heavily on aircraft (and satellites. Technical advances and improved affordability of both sensors and sensor platforms promise to revolutionize the way aircraft detect, monitor and help suppress wildfires. Sensor systems like hyperspectral cameras, image intensifiers and thermal cameras that have previously been limited in use due to cost or technology considerations are now becoming widely available and affordable. Similarly, new airborne sensor platforms, particularly small, unmanned aircraft or drones, are enabling new applications for airborne fire sensing. In this review we outline the state of the art in direct, semi-automated and automated fire detection from both manned and unmanned aerial platforms. We discuss the operational constraints and opportunities provided by these sensor systems including a discussion of the objective evaluation of these systems in a realistic context.

  19. Airborne Optical and Thermal Remote Sensing for Wildfire Detection and Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Robert S.; Johnston, Joshua M.; Craig, Gregory; Jennings, Sion

    2016-01-01

    For decades detection and monitoring of forest and other wildland fires has relied heavily on aircraft (and satellites). Technical advances and improved affordability of both sensors and sensor platforms promise to revolutionize the way aircraft detect, monitor and help suppress wildfires. Sensor systems like hyperspectral cameras, image intensifiers and thermal cameras that have previously been limited in use due to cost or technology considerations are now becoming widely available and affordable. Similarly, new airborne sensor platforms, particularly small, unmanned aircraft or drones, are enabling new applications for airborne fire sensing. In this review we outline the state of the art in direct, semi-automated and automated fire detection from both manned and unmanned aerial platforms. We discuss the operational constraints and opportunities provided by these sensor systems including a discussion of the objective evaluation of these systems in a realistic context. PMID:27548174

  20. DETECTION OF TSUNAMI RADIATION AT ILLAPEL, CHILE ON 2015-9-16 BY REMOTE SENSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank C Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have detected the Tsunami Radiation generated by the 8.3 magnitude seaquake at Illapel, Chile on 2015-9-16 at the following wavelengths: 3.9 μm, 6.5 μm, 10.7 μm, and 13.3 μm. No radiation is detected at 0.63 μm, which is in the visible spectrum. The Tsunami Signals that we have observed did not decay within 44 minutes. From the satellite the Peru-Chilean Trench is visible in infrared space. In order to facilitate research in this field we attach the MATLAB code in an Appendix.

  1. Detection of understory bamboo in giant panda habitats using an indirect remote sensing approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bian, B.M.; Wang, T.; Liu, Y.F.; Fei, T.; Skidmore, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    The bamboo is the exclusive food of the wild giant pandas. Detection of the bamboo forest in giant panda habitat will help scientists further understand the spatial distribution pattern of giant pandas and their habitats. Moreover, it provides crucial scientific evidence for estimating habitat suita

  2. Detection and monitoring of super sandstorm and its impacts on Arabian Sea-Remote sensing approach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kunte, P.D.; Aswini, M.A.

    supply and biological responses. Marine Chemistry. 120, 128–143. Bullard, J., Baddock, M., McTainsh, G., Leys, J., 2006. Sub-basin scale dust source geomorphology detected using MODIS. Geophys. Res. Lett. 35(15), L1504. Choobari, O.A, Zawar-Reza, A...

  3. A Dual-Mode UWB Wireless Platform with Random Pulse Length Detection for Remote Patient Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reyes, Carlos; Bisbe, Sergi; Shen, Ming

    2013-01-01

    on a single hardware platform, but it is capable of both monitoring and data transmission. This is achieved by employing a new random pulse length detection method that allows data transmission by using a modulated monitoring signal. To prove the proposed concept a test system has been built, using commercial...

  4. Remotely-sensed detection of effects of extreme droughts on gross primary production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vicca, Sara; Balzarolo, Manuela; Filella, Iolanda; Granier, André; Herbst, Mathias; Knohl, Alexander; Longdoz, Bernard; Mund, Martina; Nagy, Zoltan; Pintér, Krisztina; Rambal, Serge; Verbesselt, Jan; Verger, Aleixandre; Zeileis, Achim; Zhang, Chao; Peñuelas, Josep

    2016-01-01

    Severe droughts strongly impact photosynthesis (GPP), and satellite imagery has yet to demonstrate its ability to detect drought effects. Especially changes in vegetation functioning when vegetation state remains unaltered (no browning or defoliation) pose a challenge to satellite-derived indicators

  5. Monitoring and remote failure detection of grid-connected PV systems based on satellite observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drews, A.; Lorenz, E.; Betcke, J.; Heinemann, D. [Oldenburg University, Institute of Physics, Carl-von-Ossietzky-Str. 9-11, 26129 Oldenburg (Germany); de Keizer, A.C.; van Sark, W.G.J.H.M. [University of Utrecht, Copernicus Institute, Department of Science, Technology, and Society, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Beyer, H.G. [University of Applied Sciences Magdeburg-Stendal (FH), Institute of Electrical Engineering, Breitscheidstr. 2, 39114 Magdeburg (Germany); Heydenreich, W.; Wiemken, E. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Stettler, S.; Toggweiler, P. [Enecolo AG, Lindhofstr. 52, 8617 Moenchaltorf (Switzerland); Bofinger, S.; Schneider, M.; Heilscher, G. [Meteocontrol GmbH, Spicherer Strasse 48, 86157 Augsburg (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    Small grid-connected photovoltaic systems up to 5 kW{sub p} are often not monitored because advanced surveillance systems are not economical. Hence, some system failures which lead to partial energy losses stay unnoticed for a long time. Even a failure that results in a larger energy deficit can be difficult to detect by PV laymen due to the fluctuating energy yields. Within the EU project PVSAT-2, a fully automated performance check has been developed to assure maximum energy yields and to optimize system maintenance for small grid-connected PV systems. The aim is the early detection of system malfunctions and changing operating conditions to prevent energy and subsequent financial losses for the operator. The developed procedure is based on satellite-derived solar irradiance information that replaces on-site measurements. In conjunction with a simulation model the expected energy yield of a PV system is calculated. In case of the occurrence of a defined difference between the simulated and actual energy yield, an automated failure detection routine searches for the most probable failure sources and notifies the operator. This paper describes the individual components of the developed procedure - the satellite-derived irradiance, the used PV simulation model, and the principles of the automated failure detection routine. Moreover, it presents results of an 8-months test phase with 100 PV systems in three European countries. (author)

  6. A device for the remote detection of alpha emitters under field conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simakov, AB

    2005-01-01

    The portable DOP device was designed for the ecological monitoring of the radiation of alpha radioactive nuclides, such as plutonium, uranium, radium, etc. Under field conditions, it can detect alpha emitters at distances of up to 0.5 m. The device's performance data are as follows: the lower thresh

  7. The value of a rapid contrast-enhanced angio-MRI protocol in the detection of head and neck paragangliomas in SDHx mutations carriers: a retrospective study on behalf of the PGL.EVA investigators*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gravel, Guillaume; Hernigou, Anne [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Radiologie, Paris (France); Niccoli, Patricia [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire la Timone, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Marseille, Service d' Endocrinologie, Diabete et Maladies Metaboliques, Marseille (France); Rohmer, Vincent [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire d' Angers, Service d' Endocrinologie, Diabetologie, Nutrition, Angers (France); LUNAM Universite, INSERM, U1063, Angers (France); Moulin, Guy [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire la Timone, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Marseille, Service de Radiologie, Marseille (France); Borson-Chazot, Francoise [Federation d' Endocrinologie, Hospices civils de Lyon, Groupement Hospitalier Est, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon, Faculte de Medecine Lyon-Est, Lyon (France); Cancer Research Center of Lyon, INSERM UMR1052, UMR CNRS 5286, Lyon (France); Rousset, Pascal [Hospices civils de Lyon, Groupement Hospitalier Est, Service de Radiologie, Lyon (France); Pasco-Papon, Anne [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire d' Angers, Service de Radiologie, Angers (France); Marcus, Claude [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Reims, Service de Radiologie, Reims (France); Dubrulle, Frederique [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Lille, Service de Radiologie, Lille (France); Gouya, Herve [Hopital Cochin, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Radiologie, Paris (France); Bidault, Francois [Institut Gustave Roussy, Service de Radiologie, Villejuif (France); Dupas, Benoit [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nantes, Service de Radiologie, Nantes (France); Gabrillargues, Jean [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Clermont-Ferrand, Service de Neuroradiologie, Clermont Ferrand (France); Caumont-Prim, Aurore [Unite d' Epidemiologie et de Recherche Clinique, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Paris (France); Centre d' investigation Epidemiologique 4, INSERM, Paris (France); Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Genetique, Paris (France); Paris Cardiovascular Research Center, INSERM, UMR970, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Faculte de Medecine, Paris (France); Halimi, Philippe [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Radiologie, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Faculte de Medecine, Paris (France)

    2016-06-15

    To assess the performance of a simplified MRI protocol consisting of a contrast-enhanced three-dimensional MR angiography (CE-MRA) in association with a post-contrast T1-weighted sequence (T1WIV) for the detection of HNPGLs in SDHx mutation carriers. This retrospective sub-study is based on the multicenter PGL.EVA cohort, which prospectively enrolled SDHx mutation carriers from 2005 to 2009; 157 index cases or relatives were included. CE-MRA and the T1WIV images were read solely with knowledge of the clinical data but blind to the diagnosis. Sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios for the simplified MRI protocol were compared to the full MRI protocol reading results and to the gold standard status obtained through the consensus of an expert committee. The sensitivity and specificity of the readings of the simplified MRI protocol were, respectively, 88.7 % (95 % CI = 78.1-95.3) and 93.7 % (95 % CI = 86.8-97.7) versus 80.7 % (95 % CI = 68.6-89.6) and 94.7 % (95 % CI = 88.1-98.3) for the readings of the full MRI protocol. The simplified post-contrast MRI with shorter duration (5 to 10 minutes) showed no performance difference compared to the lengthy standard full MRI and can be proposed for the detection of head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGLs) in SDHx mutation carriers. (orig.)

  8. Narrow CSF space at high convexity and high midline areas in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus detected by axial and coronal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Makoto [Iwate Medical University, Department of Radiology, Morioka (Japan); Honda, Satoshi [St. Luke' s International Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Yuasa, Tatsuhiko; Iwamura, Akihide [Kohnodai Hospital, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Neurology, Ichikawa (Japan); Shibata, Eri [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neuropsychiatry, Morioka (Japan); Ohba, Hideki [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurology, Morioka (Japan)

    2008-02-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the performance of axial and coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting the narrowing of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space at the high convexity and high midline areas, which is speculated to be one of the clinical characteristics of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH). We retrospectively examined axial and coronal T1-weighted images of 14 iNPH patients and 12 age-matched controls. The narrowness of the CSF space at the high convexity/midline was blindly evaluated by five raters using a continuous confidence rating scale for receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Axial and coronal imaging accurately determined the presence of the narrow cisterns/sulci at the high convexity/midline and was capable of predicting probable/definite iNPH with a high degree of accuracy. there were also no significant differences in the detection of this finding between the axial and coronal images. Both axial and coronal T1-weighted MRI can detect the narrow CSF space at the high convexity/midline accurately and may therefore facilitate clinicians in choosing a management strategy for iNPH patients. (orig.)

  9. Detection of pollution-induced forest decline in the Kola Peninsula using remote sensing and mathematical modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigina, Olga

    1998-07-01

    Forests on the Kola Peninsula in Northern Russia grow close to the northern tree line. They are subjected to both natural and anthropogenic stress factors. The Cu-Ni smelter 'Severonikel' (Lat. 67 deg 55'N; Long. 32 deg 57'E) near Monchegorsk is one of the two major sources of sulphur dioxide and heavy metals emissions on the Kola Peninsula. These emissions have caused significant deterioration of the surrounding vegetation. The thesis demonstrates how methods of Remote sensing, ground survey and mathematical modelling can be integrated for monitoring of the smelter's environmental impact on the surrounding vegetation: ground truth data are used for calibration of remote-sensed data, which further serve to verify mathematical models. The study aims were: * to estimate the scale of airborne sulphur pollution from the smelting industry on the Kola Peninsula and its effect on vegetation; * to assess spatial extent of the forest decline in the 'Severonikel' smelter impact zone; * to display dynamics of the forest damage area in spatial and temporal perspective; * to validate the Gaussian plume sector model and the IIASA forest impact model as components of the analysis of forest damage. The Regional Acidification Information and Simulation model (RAINS) was applied to calculate sulphur deposition and loads in Fennoscandia in order to assess the contribution of the Kola sources to the deposition pattern in the region. The percentage of the ecosystems where the critical load had been exceeded was calculated. For more detailed assessments, calculations based on local and meso-scale models were made. Landsat-MSS summer images from 1978, 1986 and 1992 and a Landsat -TM image from 1996 were used for change-detection analyses. The methods applied were bandwise histogram matching and subsequent differencing. An unsupervised classification of land-cover was made using the 1996 Landsat-TM image. In situ observations of vegetation type and

  10. Remote detection of heated ethanol plumes by airborne passive Fourier transform infrared spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarumi, Toshiyasu; Small, Gary W; Combs, Roger J; Kroutil, Robert T

    2003-11-01

    Methodology is developed for the automated detection of heated plumes of ethanol vapor with airborne passive Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. Positioned in a fixed-wing aircraft in a downward-looking mode, the spectrometer is used to detect ground sources of ethanol vapor from an altitude of 2000-3000 ft. Challenges to the use of this approach for the routine detection of chemical plumes include (1) the presence of a constantly changing background radiance as the aircraft flies, (2) the cost and complexity of collecting the data needed to train the classification algorithms used in implementing the plume detection, and (3) the need for rapid interferogram scans to minimize the ground area viewed per scan. To address these challenges, this work couples a novel ground-based data collection and training protocol with the use of signal processing and pattern recognition methods based on short sections of the interferogram data collected by the spectrometer. In the data collection, heated plumes of ethanol vapor are released from a portable emission stack and viewed by the spectrometer from ground level against a synthetic background designed to simulate a terrestrial radiance source. Classifiers trained with these data are subsequently tested with airborne data collected over a period of 2.5 years. Two classifier architectures are compared in this work: support vector machines (SVM) and piecewise linear discriminant analysis (PLDA). When applied to the airborne test data, the SVM classifiers perform best, failing to detect ethanol in only 8% of the cases in which it is present. False detections occur at a rate of less than 0.5%. The classifier performs well in spite of differences between the backgrounds associated with the ground-based and airborne data collections and the instrumental drift arising from the long time span of the data collection. Further improvements in classification performance are judged to require increased sophistication in the ground

  11. Integrating Remote Sensing and Proximal Sensors for the Detection of Soil Moisture and Salinity Variability in Coastal Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yan; SHI Zhou; ZHOU Lian-qing; JIN Xi; TIAN Yan-feng; TENG Hong-fen

    2013-01-01

    Soil moisture and salinity are two crucial coastal saline soil variables, which influence the soil quality and agricultural productivity in the reclaimed coastal region. Accurately characterizing the spatial variability of these soil parameters is critical for the rational development and utilization of tideland resources. In the present study, the spatial variability of soil moisture and salinity in the reclaimed area of Hangzhou gulf, Shangyu City, Zhejiang Province, China, was detected using the data acquired from radar image and the proximal sensor EM38. Soil moisture closely correlates radar scattering coefficient, and a simplified inversion model was built based on a backscattering coefficient extracted from multi-polarization data of ALOS/PALSAR and in situ soil moisture measured by a time domain reflectometer to detect soil moisture variations. The result indicated a higher accuracy of soil moisture inversion by the HH polarization mode than those by the HV mode. Soil salinity is reflected by soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa). Further, ECa can be rapidly detected by EM38 equipment in situ linked with GPS for characterizing the spatial variability of soil salinity. Based on the strong spatial variability and interactions of soil moisture and salinity, a cokriging interpolation method with auxiliary variable of backscattering coefficient was adopted to map the spatial variability of ECa. When compared with a map of ECa interpolated by the ordinary kriging method, detail was revealed and the accuracy was increased by 15.3%. The results conclude that the integrating active remote sensing and proximal sensors EM38 are effective and acceptable approaches for rapidly and accurately detecting soil moisture and salinity variability in coastal areas, especially in the subtropical coastal zones of China with frequent heavy cloud cover.

  12. Improved detection of remote homologues using cascade PSI-BLAST: influence of neighbouring protein families on sequence coverage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Kaushik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Development of sensitive sequence search procedures for the detection of distant relationships between proteins at superfamily/fold level is still a big challenge. The intermediate sequence search approach is the most frequently employed manner of identifying remote homologues effectively. In this study, examination of serine proteases of prolyl oligopeptidase, rhomboid and subtilisin protein families were carried out using plant serine proteases as queries from two genomes including A. thaliana and O. sativa and 13 other families of unrelated folds to identify the distant homologues which could not be obtained using PSI-BLAST. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have proposed to start with multiple queries of classical serine protease members to identify remote homologues in families, using a rigorous approach like Cascade PSI-BLAST. We found that classical sequence based approaches, like PSI-BLAST, showed very low sequence coverage in identifying plant serine proteases. The algorithm was applied on enriched sequence database of homologous domains and we obtained overall average coverage of 88% at family, 77% at superfamily or fold level along with specificity of ~100% and Mathew's correlation coefficient of 0.91. Similar approach was also implemented on 13 other protein families representing every structural class in SCOP database. Further investigation with statistical tests, like jackknifing, helped us to better understand the influence of neighbouring protein families. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study suggests that employment of multiple queries of a family for the Cascade PSI-BLAST searches is useful for predicting distant relationships effectively even at superfamily level. We have proposed a generalized strategy to cover all the distant members of a particular family using multiple query sequences. Our findings reveal that prior selection of sequences as query and the presence of neighbouring families can be important for

  13. Multispectral Radiometric Analysis of Façades to Detect Pathologies from Active and Passive Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Del Pozo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a radiometric study to recognize pathologies in façades of historical buildings by using two different remote sensing technologies covering part of the visible and very near infrared spectrum (530–905 nm. Building materials deteriorate over the years due to different extrinsic and intrinsic agents, so assessing these affections in a non-invasive way is crucial to help preserve them since in many cases they are valuable and some have been declared monuments of cultural interest. For the investigation, passive and active remote acquisition systems were applied operating at different wavelengths. A 6-band Mini-MCA multispectral camera (530–801 nm and a FARO Focus3D terrestrial laser scanner (905 nm were used with the dual purpose of detecting different materials and damages on building façades as well as determining which acquisition system and spectral range is more suitable for this kind of studies. The laser scan points were used as base to create orthoimages, the input of the two different classification processes performed. The set of all orthoimages from both sensors was classified under supervision. Furthermore, orthoimages from each individual sensor were automatically classified to compare results from each sensor with the reference supervised classification. Higher overall accuracy with the FARO Focus3D, 74.39%, was obtained with respect to the Mini MCA6, 66.04%. Finally, after applying the radiometric calibration, a minimum improvement of 24% in the image classification results was obtained in terms of overall accuracy.

  14. Urban Change Detection of Pingtan City based on Bi-temporal Remote Sensing Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degang, JIANG; Jinyan, XU; Yikang, GAO

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a pair of SPOT 5-6 images with the resolution of 0.5m is selected. An object-oriented classification method is used to the two images and five classes of ground features were identified as man-made objects, farmland, forest, waterbody and unutilized land. An auxiliary ASTER GDEM was used to improve the classification accuracy. And the change detection based on the classification results was performed. Accuracy assessment was carried out finally. Consequently, satisfactory results were obtained. The results show that great changes of the Pingtan city have been detected as the expansion of the city area and the intensity increase of man-made buildings, roads and other infrastructures with the establishment of Pingtan comprehensive experimental zone. Wide range of open sea area along the island coast zones has been reclaimed for port and CBDs construction.

  15. Avalanche Debris Detection Using Satellite- and Drone Based Radar and Optical Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckerstorfer, M.; Malnes, E.; Vickers, H.; Solbø, S. A.; Tøllefsen, A.

    2014-12-01

    The mountainous fjord landscape in the county of Troms, around its capital Tromsø in Northern Norway is prone to high avalanche activity during the snow season. Large avalanches pose a hazard to infrastructure, such as buildings and roads, located between the steep mountainsides and the fjords. A prolonged cold spell during January and February 2014 was followed by rapid new-snow loading during March 2014, inducing a significant avalanche cycle with many spontaneous, size D4 avalanches that affected major transport veins. During and shortly after the avalanche cycle of March 2014, we obtained 11 Radarsat-2 Ultrafine mode scenes, chosen according to reported avalanche activity. We further collected four Radarsat-2 ScanSAR mode scenes and two Landsat-8 scenes covering the entire county of Troms. For one particular avalanche, we obtained a drone-based orthophoto, from which a DEM of the avalanche debris surface was derived, using structure-from-motion photogrammetry. This enabled us to calculate the debris volume accurately. We detected avalanche debris in the radar images visually, by applying two detection algorithms that make use of the increased backscatter in avalanche debris. This backscatter increase is a product of increased snow water equivalent and surface roughness, roughly of the order of 3 dB. In addition, we applied a multi-temporal approach by repeatedly detecting avalanche debris at different acquisition times, as well as a multi-sensor approach, covering similar areas with different sensors. This multi-temporal and multi-sensor approach enabled us to map the spatial extent and magnitude of the March 2014 avalanche cycle in the county Troms. With ESA's Sentinel-1 satellite, providing high-resolution, large swath radar images with a short repeat cycle, a complete avalanche record for a forecasting region could become feasible. In this first test season, we detected more than 550 avalanches that were released during a one-month period over an area of

  16. Neural Network Combination by Fuzzy Integral for Robust Change Detection in Remotely Sensed Imagery

    OpenAIRE

    Nemmour Hassiba; Chibani Youcef

    2005-01-01

    Combining multiple neural networks has been used to improve the decision accuracy in many application fields including pattern recognition and classification. In this paper, we investigate the potential of this approach for land cover change detection. In a first step, we perform many experiments in order to find the optimal individual networks in terms of architecture and training rule. In the second step, different neural network change detectors are combined using a method based on the no...

  17. Remote Detection of the Electric Field Change Induced at the Seismic Wave Front from the Start of Fault Rupturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukio Fujinawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Seismic waves are generally observed through the measurement of undulating elastic ground motion. We report the remote detection of the Earth's electric field variations almost simultaneously with the start of fault rupturing at about 100 km from the fault region using a special electric measurement. The rare but repeated detection indicates that the phenomenon is real. The characteristic time of diffusion is almost instantaneous, that is, less than 1 second to travel 100 km, more than ten times faster than ordinary seismic P wave propagation. We suggest that the measured electric field changes are produced by the electrokinetic effect through increased pore water pressure of the seismic pulse. It is also suggested that the long range propagation is due to the surface wave mode confined near the interface of the different conductivity. The length scale of the finite strength of the electric field is 16 km, 160 km for electric conductivity of 0.01, 0.001, Sm−1, respectively. This phenomenon suggests a new seismic sensing method and a new earthquake early warning system providing more seconds of lead time.

  18. Detection of Seagrass Distribution Changes from 1991 to 2006 in Xincun Bay, Hainan, with Satellite Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoyu Yang

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Seagrass distribution is a very important index for costal management and protection. Seagrass distribution changes can be used as indexes to analyze the reasons for the changes. In this paper, in situ hyperspectral observation and satellite images of QuickBird, CBERS (China Brazil Earth Resources Satellite data and Landsat data were used to retrieve bio-optical models and seagrass (Enhalus acoroides,Thalassia hemperichii distribution in Xincun Bay, Hainan province, and seagrass distribution changes from 1991 to 2006 were analyzed. Hyperspectral results showed that the spectral bands at 555, 635, 650 and 675 nm are sensitive to leaf area index (LAI. Seagrass detection with QuickBird was more accurate than that with Landsat TM and CBERS; five classes could be classified clearly and used as correction for seagrass remote sensing data from Landsat TM and CBERS. In order to better describe seagrass distribution changes, the seagrass distribution area was divided as three regions: region A connected with region B in 1991, however it separated in 1999 and was wholly separated in 2001; seagrass in region C shrank gradually and could not be detected in 2006. Analysis of the reasons for seagrass reduction indicated it was mainly affected by aquaculture and typhoons and in recent years, by land use changes.

  19. Genetic Particle Swarm Optimization-Based Feature Selection for Very-High-Resolution Remotely Sensed Imagery Object Change Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; Chen, Yunhao; Jiang, Weiguo

    2016-07-30

    In the field of multiple features Object-Based Change Detection (OBCD) for very-high-resolution remotely sensed images, image objects have abundant features and feature selection affects the precision and efficiency of OBCD. Through object-based image analysis, this paper proposes a Genetic Particle Swarm Optimization (GPSO)-based feature selection algorithm to solve the optimization problem of feature selection in multiple features OBCD. We select the Ratio of Mean to Variance (RMV) as the fitness function of GPSO, and apply the proposed algorithm to the object-based hybrid multivariate alternative detection model. Two experiment cases on Worldview-2/3 images confirm that GPSO can significantly improve the speed of convergence, and effectively avoid the problem of premature convergence, relative to other feature selection algorithms. According to the accuracy evaluation of OBCD, GPSO is superior at overall accuracy (84.17% and 83.59%) and Kappa coefficient (0.6771 and 0.6314) than other algorithms. Moreover, the sensitivity analysis results show that the proposed algorithm is not easily influenced by the initial parameters, but the number of features to be selected and the size of the particle swarm would affect the algorithm. The comparison experiment results reveal that RMV is more suitable than other functions as the fitness function of GPSO-based feature selection algorithm.

  20. Detection of seagrass distribution changes from 1991 to 2006 in xincun bay, hainan, with satellite remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dingtian; Yang, Chaoyu

    2009-01-01

    Seagrass distribution is a very important index for costal management and protection. Seagrass distribution changes can be used as indexes to analyze the reasons for the changes. In this paper, in situ hyperspectral observation and satellite images of QuickBird, CBERS (China Brazil Earth Resources Satellite data) and Landsat data were used to retrieve bio-optical models and seagrass (Enhalus acoroides, Thalassia hemperichii) distribution in Xincun Bay, Hainan province, and seagrass distribution changes from 1991 to 2006 were analyzed. Hyperspectral results showed that the spectral bands at 555, 635, 650 and 675 nm are sensitive to leaf area index (LAI). Seagrass detection with QuickBird was more accurate than that with Landsat TM and CBERS; five classes could be classified clearly and used as correction for seagrass remote sensing data from Landsat TM and CBERS. In order to better describe seagrass distribution changes, the seagrass distribution area was divided as three regions: region A connected with region B in 1991, however it separated in 1999 and was wholly separated in 2001; seagrass in region C shrank gradually and could not be detected in 2006. Analysis of the reasons for seagrass reduction indicated it was mainly affected by aquaculture and typhoons and in recent years, by land use changes.

  1. Optimizing detection of RDX vapors using designed experiments for remote sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, Robert G.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Warner, Marvin G.

    2014-03-24

    Abstract: This paper presents results of experiments performed to study the effect of four factors on the detection of RDX vapors from desorption into an atmospheric flow tube mass spectrometer (AFT-MS). The experiments initially included four independent factors: gas flow rate, desorption current, solvent evaporation time and RDX mass. The values of three detection responses, peak height, peak width, and peak area were recorded but only the peak height response was analyzed. Results from the first block of experiments indicated that solvent evaporation time was not statistically significant. A second round of experiments was performed using flow rate, current, and RDX mass as factors and the results were used to create a model to predict conditions resulting in maximum peak height. Those conditions were confirmed experimentally and used to obtain data for a calibration model. The calibration model represented RDX amounts ranging from 1 to 25 pg desorbed into an air flow of 7 L/min. Air samples from a shipping container that held 2 closed explosive storage magazines were collected on metal filaments for varying amounts for time ranging from 5 to 90 minutes. RDX was detected from all of the filaments sampled by desorption into the AFT-MS. From the calibration model, RDX vapor concentrations within the shipping container were calculated to be in the range of 1 to 50 parts-per-quadrillion from data collected on 2 separate days.

  2. Evaluation of a Nonrigid Motion Compensation Technique Based on Spatiotemporal Features for Small Lesion Detection in Breast MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Steinbruecker

    2012-01-01

    the performance of a new nonrigid motion correction algorithm based on the optical flow method. For each of the small lesions, we extracted morphological and dynamical features describing both global and local shape, and kinetics behavior. In this paper, we compare the performance of each extracted feature set under consideration of several 2D or 3D motion compensation parameters for the differential diagnosis of enhancing lesions in breast MRI. Based on several simulation results, we determined the optimal motion compensation parameters. Our results have shown that motion compensation can improve the classification results. The results suggest that the computerized analysis system based on the non-rigid motion compensation technique and spatiotemporal features has the potential to increase the diagnostic accuracy of MRI mammography for small lesions and can be used as a basis for computer-aided diagnosis of breast cancer with MR mammography.

  3. Fat/water separation in MRI. Detection of bone marrow reactions in patients with degenerative disc disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assheuer, J.; Lenz, G.; Lenz, W.; Gottschlich, K.W.; Schulitz, K.P.

    1987-07-01

    We examined 410 patients with lumbar disc degeneration. In 23% fat suppressing IR sequences and phase contrast techniques displayed marrow reactions in subchondral bone adjacent to the affected discs. Only in some cases conventional MRI sequences were able to depict these marrow reactions. CT, plain X-ray and scintigraphy did not show marrow changes. Bacterial infection was excluded. Histological analysis showed substitution of haematopoietic marrow by fatty tissue, necrobiosis and increase in mucoid extracellular fluid.

  4. A computer-aided detection system for rheumatoid arthritis MRI data interpretation and quantification of synovial activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubassova, Olga, E-mail: olga@imageanalysis.org.u [Image Analysis Ltd., The Waterfront, Old Mill Lane, Saltaire BD17 7EZ (United Kingdom); Boesen, Mikael, E-mail: parker@frh.regionh.d [Parker Institute, Frederiksberg Hospital, Nordre Fasanvej 57, 2000 Frederiksberg, Copenhagen (Denmark); Cimmino, Marco A., E-mail: cimmino@unige.i [Clinica Reumatologica, DI.M.I., Universita di Genova, Viale Benedetto XV, 6, 16129 Genova (Italy); Bliddal, Henning [Parker Institute, Frederiksberg Hospital, Nordre Fasanvej 57, 2000 Frederiksberg, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2010-06-15

    Rational and objective: Disease assessment and follow-up of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients require objective evaluation and quantification. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has a large potential to supplement such information for the clinician, however, time spent on data reading and interpretation slow down development in this area. Existing scoring systems of especially synovitis are too rigid and insensitive to measure early treatment response and quantify inflammation. This study tested a novel automated, computer system for analysis of dynamic MRI data acquired from patients with RA, Dynamika-RA, which incorporates efficient data processing and analysis techniques. Materials and methods: 140 MRI scans from hands and wrists of 135 active RA patients and 5 healthy controls were processed using Dynamika-RA and evaluated with RAMRIS. To reduce patient motion artefacts, MRI data were processed using Dynamika-RA, which removed motion in 2D and 3D planes. Then synovial enhancement was visualised and qualified using a novel fully automated voxel-by-voxel analysis based algorithm. This algorithm was used to replace traditional region-of-interest (ROI) and subtraction methods, yielding observer independent quantitative results. Results: Conventional scoring performed by an observer took 30-45 min per dataset. Dynamika-RA reduced motion artefacts, visualised inflammation and quantified disease activity in less than 3 min. Data processing allowed increasing signal to noise ratio by a factor 3. Due to fully automated procedure of data processing, there was no intertest variation in the results. Conclusions: Algorithms incorporated into Dynamika-RA allow for the significant enhancement of data quality through eliminating motion artefacts and reduction of time for evaluation of synovial inflammation.

  5. Curcumin-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles for detecting amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease mice using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kwok Kin; Chan, Pui Shan; Fan, Shujuan; Kwan, Siu Ming; Yeung, King Lun; Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J; Chow, Albert Hee Lum; Wu, Ed X; Baum, Larry

    2015-03-01

    Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) can be performed with the assistance of amyloid imaging. The current method relies on positron emission tomography (PET), which is expensive and exposes people to radiation, undesirable features for a population screening method. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is cheaper and is not radioactive. Our approach uses magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) made of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) conjugated with curcumin, a natural compound that specifically binds to amyloid plaques. Coating of curcumin-conjugated MNPs with polyethylene glycol-polylactic acid block copolymer and polyvinylpyrrolidone by antisolvent precipitation in a multi-inlet vortex mixer produces stable and biocompatible curcumin magnetic nanoparticles (Cur-MNPs) with mean diameter MRI) of Tg2576 mouse brains after injection of Cur-MNPs, and no plaques could be found in non-transgenic mice. Immunohistochemical examination of the mouse brains revealed that Cur-MNPs were co-localized with amyloid plaques. Thus, Cur-MNPs have the potential for non-invasive diagnosis of AD using MRI.

  6. Remote sensing and hydrogeological methodologies for irrigation canal leakage detection: the Osasco and Fossano test sites (NorthWestern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, Luigi; Clemente, Paolo; De Luca, Domenico Antonio; Dino, Giovanna; Lasagna, Manuela

    2013-04-01

    irrigation channel were conducted. Then the canals seepage rates were estimated using inflow-outflow tests and tests with double-tracer, an adaptation from QUEST method (Rieckermann and Gujer, 2002). This approach allowed an experimental calibration and validation of the satellite images analysis. The applied multidisciplinary approach seem to be a promising way for a good general screening for a rapid detection of irrigation channels water losses. References Hotchkiss, R.H., Wingert, C.B., Kelly, W.E., 2001. Determining irrigation canal seepage with electrical resistivity. ASCE J. Irrig. Drain 127, 20-26. Huang Y and Fipps G. (2002). Thermal Imaging of Canals for Remote Detection of Leaks: Evaluation in the United Irrigation District. Technical Report. Biological and Agricultural Engineering Department, Texas A&M University. Huang Y, Fipps G, Maas S, Fletcher R. (2005). Airborne multispectral remote sensing imaging for detecting irrigation canal leaks in the lower rio grande valley - 20th Biennial Workshop on Aerial Photography, Videography, and High Resolution Digital Imagery for Resource Assessment October 4-6, Weslaco, Texas. Rieckermann J., Gujer W. (2002) - Quantifying Exfiltration from Leaky Sewers with Artificial Tracers - Proceedings of the International Conference on "Sewer Operation and Maintenance. 2002", Bradford, UK.

  7. A hybrid change detection analysis using high-resolution remote sensing image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Q. Q.; Liu, Z. J.; Yang, M. Z.; Ren, H. C.; Song, C.; Li, F. F.

    2016-11-01

    In order to reduce noise and improve the accuracy of the final change results, in this paper, we presented a hybrid change detection method based on combining pixel- and object-schemes, Firstly, the method obtained the orthogonal difference images using the pixel-based iteratively reweighted multivariate alteration detection (IR-MAD) algorithm, additionally in the process of iterative weighting, we applied the regularized scheme to stable the generalized characteristic equation for the multispectral data. Consequently, image segmentation algorithm was used to extract the image objects where the changes occurred. Finally, object-based classification method was applied to determinate the types of changes. In order to validate the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed approach, a simple case was done by using the Horgos Port local multi-temporal and multispectral high-resolution image data in Xinjiang. Compared to the pixel-level IR-MAD, the experimental results showed that the overall accuracy has been improved, moreover successfully reduced noise and pseudo small changes in the final result.

  8. Detecting river sediments to assess hazardous materials at volcanic lake using advanced remote sensing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saepuloh, Asep; Fitrianingtyas, Chintya

    2016-05-01

    The Toba Caldera formed from large depression of Quaternary volcanism is a remarkable feature at the Earth surface. The last Toba super eruptions were recorded around 73 ka and produced the Youngest Toba Tuff about 2,800 km3. Since then, there is no record of significant volcanic seismicity at Toba Volcanic Complex (TVC). However, the hydrothermal activities are still on going as presented by the existence of hot springs and alteration zones at the northwest caldera. The hydrothermal fluids probably containing some chemical compositions mixed with surficial water pollutant and contaminated the Toba Lake. Therefore, an environmental issues related to the existence of chemical composition and degradation of water clearness in the lake had been raised in the local community. The pollutant sources are debatable between natural and anthropogenic influences because some human activities grow rapidly at and around the lake such as hotels, tourisms, husbandry, aquaculture, as well as urbanization. Therefore, obtaining correct information about the source materials floating at the surface of the Toba Lake is crucial for environmental and hazard mitigation purposes. Overcoming the problem, we presented this paper to assess the source possibility of floating materials at Toba Lake, especially from natural sources such as hydrothermal activities of TVC and river stream sediments. The Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) techniques using atmospherically corrected of Landsat-8 and colour composite of Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR) were used to map the distribution of floating materials. The seven ground truth points were used to confirm the correctness of proposed method. Based on the SAM and PolSAR techniques, we could detect the interface of hydrothermal fluid at the lake surfaces. Various distributions of stream sediment were also detected from the river mouth to the lake. The influence possibilities of the upwelling process from the bottom floor of Toba Lake were also

  9. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the remote detection of explosives at level of fingerprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaviva, S.; Palucci, A.; Lazic, V.; Menicucci, I.; Nuvoli, M.; Pistilli, M.; De Dominicis, L.

    2016-04-01

    We report the results of the application of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for the detection of some common military explosives and theirs precursors deposited on white varnished car's external and black car's internal or external plastic. The residues were deposited by an artificial silicon finger, to simulate material manipulation by terrorists when preparing a car bomb, leaving traces of explosives on the parts of a car. LIBS spectra were acquired by using a first prototype laboratory stand-off device, developed in the framework of the EU FP7 313077 project EDEN (End-user driven DEmo for CBRNe). The system operates at working distances 8-30 m and collects the LIBS in the spectral range 240-840 nm. In this configuration, the target was moved precisely in X-Y direction to simulate the scanning system, to be implemented successively. The system is equipped with two colour cameras, one for wide scene view and another for imaging with a very high magnification, capable to discern fingerprints on a target. The spectral features of each examined substance were identified and compared to those belonging to the substrate and the surrounding air, and those belonging to possible common interferents. These spectral differences are discussed and interpreted. The obtained results show that the detection and discrimination of nitro-based compounds like RDX, PETN, ammonium nitrate (AN), and urea nitrate (UN) from organic interfering substances like diesel, greasy lubricants, greasy adhesives or oils in fingerprint concentration, at stand-off distance of some meters or tenths of meters is feasible.

  10. Eye-safe UV Raman spectroscopy for remote detection of explosives and their precursors in fingerprint concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaviva, S.; Angelini, F.; Chirico, R.; Palucci, A.; Nuvoli, M.; Schnuerer, F.; Schweikert, W.; Romolo, F. S.

    2014-10-01

    We report the results of Raman investigation performed at stand-off distance between 6-10 m with a new apparatus, capable to detect traces of explosives with surface concentrations similar to those of a single fingerprint. The device was developed as part of the RADEX prototype (RAman Detection of EXplosives) and is capable of detecting the Raman signal with a single laser shot of few ns (10-9 s) in the UV range (wavelength 266 nm), in conditions of safety for the human eye. This is because the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) for the human eye is established to be 3 mJ/cm2 in this wavelength region and pulse duration. Samples of explosives (PETN, TNT, Urea Nitrate, Ammonium Nitrate) were prepared starting from solutions deposited on samples of common fabrics or clothing materials such as blue jeans, leather, polyester or polyamide. The deposition process takes place via a piezoelectric-controlled plotter device, capable of producing drops of welldefined volume, down to nanoliters, on a surface of several cm2, in order to carefully control the amount of explosive released to the tissue and thus simulate a slight stain on a garment of a potential terrorist. Depending on the type of explosive sampled, the detected density ranges from 0.1 to 1 mg/cm2 and is comparable to the density measured in a spot on a dress or a bag due to the contact with hands contaminated with explosives, as it could happen in the preparation of an improvised explosive device (IED) by a terrorist. To our knowledge the developed device is at the highest detection limits nowadays achievable in the field of eyesafe, stand-off Raman instruments. The signals obtained show some vibrational bands of the Raman spectra of our samples with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), allowing us to identify with high sensitivity (high number of True Positives) and selectivity (low number of False Positives) the explosives, so that the instrument could represent the basis for an automated and remote monitoring

  11. MRI of the Prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Prostate Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate ... limitations of MRI of the Prostate? What is MRI of the Prostate? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  12. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for automatic detection of foci @]@of residual or recurrent disease after prostatectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, N.A.; Orman, Amber; Abramowitz, Matthew; Pollack, Alan; Stoyanova, Radka [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Miami, FL (United States); Padgett, Kyle [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Miami, FL (United States); University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); Casillas, Victor [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); Punnen, Sanoj [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Urology, Miami, FL (United States)

    2017-01-15

    This study aimed to develop an automated procedure for identifying suspicious foci of residual/recurrent disease in the prostate bed using dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI (DCE-MRI) in prostate cancer patients after prostatectomy. Data of 22 patients presenting for salvage radiotherapy (RT) with an identified gross tumor volume (GTV) in the prostate bed were analyzed retrospectively. An unsupervised pattern recognition method was used to analyze DCE-MRI curves from the prostate bed. Data were represented as a product of a number of signal-vs.-time patterns and their weights. The temporal pattern, characterized by fast wash-in and gradual wash-out, was considered the ''tumor'' pattern. The corresponding weights were thresholded based on the number (1, 1.5, 2, 2.5) of standard deviations away from the mean, denoted as DCE1.0,.., DCE2.5, and displayed on the T2-weighted MRI. The resultant four volumes were compared with the GTV and maximum pre-RT prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. Phar