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Sample records for remote calcium responses

  1. Magnetically responsive calcium carbonate microcrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhrullin, Rawil F; Bikmullin, Aidar G; Nurgaliev, Danis K

    2009-09-01

    Here we report the fabrication of magnetically responsive calcium carbonate microcrystals produced by coprecipitation of calcium carbonate in the presence of citrate-stabilized iron oxide nanoparticles. We demonstrate that the calcite microcrystals obtained possess superparamagnetic properties due to incorporated magnetite nanoparticles and can be manipulated by an external magnetic field. The microcrystals doped with magnetic nanoparticles were utilized as templates for the fabrication of hollow polyelectrolyte microcapsules, which retain the magnetic properties of the sacrificial cores and might be spatially manipulated using a permanent magnet, thus providing the magnetic-field-facilitated delivery and separation of materials templated on magnetically responsive calcite microcrystals.

  2. Calcium response to vitamin D supplementation

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    Francisco R. Spivacow

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies show the importance of serum vitamin D sufficient levels to prevent multiple chronic diseases. However, vitamin D supplementation and its effects on urine calcium excretion remain controversial. The objective of this prospective and interventional study was to evaluate urine calcium excretion in women with normal calciuria or hypercalciuria, once serum vitamin D sufficiency was achieved. We studied 63 women with idiopathic hypercalciuria, (9 with renal lithiasis and 50 normocalciuric women. Both groups had serum vitamin D levels low (deficiency or insufficiency. Baseline urine calcium excretion was measured before being supplemented with vitamin D2 or D3 weekly or vitamin D3 100.000 IU monthly. Once serum vitamin D levels were corrected achieving at least 30 ng/ml, a second urine calcium excretion was obtained. Although in the whole sample we did not observe significant changes in urine calcium excretion according to the way of supplementation, some of those with weekly supplementation had significant higher urine calcium excretion, 19% (n = 12 of hypercalciuric women and 12% (n = 6 of the normocalciuric group. Monthly doses, also showed higher urine calcium excretion in 40% of hypercalciuric women (n = 4/10 and in 44% (n = 4/9 of the renal lithiasis hypercalciuric patients. In conclusion, different ways of vitamin D supplementation and adequate serum levels are safe in most patients, although it should be taken into account a subgroup, mainly with monthly loading doses, that could increase the calciuria significantly eventually rising renal lithiasis risk or bone mass loss, if genetically predisposed.

  3. Calcium-Responsive Liposomes via a Synthetic Lipid Switch.

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    Lou, Jinchao; Carr, Adam J; Watson, Alexa J; Mattern-Schain, Samuel I; Best, Michael D

    2018-03-07

    Liposomal drug delivery would benefit from enhanced control over content release. Here, we report a novel avenue for triggering release driven by chemical composition using liposomes sensitized to calcium-a target chosen due to its key roles in biology and disease. To demonstrate this principle, we synthesized calcium-responsive lipid switch 1, designed to undergo conformational changes upon calcium binding. The conformational change perturbs membrane integrity, thereby promoting cargo release. This was shown through fluorescence-based release assays via dose-dependent response depending on the percentage of 1 in liposomes, with minimal background leakage in controls. DLS experiments indicated dramatic changes in particle size upon treatment of liposomes containing 1 with calcium. In a comparison of ten naturally occurring metal cations, calcium provided the greatest release. Finally, STEM images showed significant changes in liposome morphology upon treatment of liposomes containing 1 with calcium. These results showcase lipid switches driven by molecular recognition principles as an exciting avenue for controlling membrane properties. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Remote sensing for oil spill detection and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelhardt, F.R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use of remote sensing for marine oil spill detection and response. The surveillance and monitoring of discharges, and the main elements of effective surveillance are discussed. Tactical emergency response and the requirements for selecting a suitable remote sensing approach, airborne remote sensing systems, and the integration of satellite and airborne imaging are examined. Specifications of satellite surveillance systems potentially usable for oil spill detection, and specifications of airborne remote sensing systems suitable for oil spill detection, monitoring and supplemental actions are tabulated, and a schema of integrated satellite-airborne remote sensing (ISARS) is presented. (UK)

  5. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You can get decent amounts of calcium from baked beans, navy beans, white beans, and others. Canned fish. You're in luck if you like sardines and canned salmon with bones. Almond milk. Working Calcium Into Your ...

  6. Calcium-responsive contractility during fertilization in sea urchin eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack, Christianna; Lucero, Amy J; Shuster, Charles B

    2006-04-01

    Fertilization triggers a reorganization of oocyte cytoskeleton, and in sea urchins, there is a dramatic increase in cortical F-actin. However, the role that myosin II plays during fertilization remains largely unexplored. Myosin II is localized to the cortical cytoskeleton both before and after fertilization and to examine myosin II contractility in living cells, Lytechinus pictus eggs were observed by time-lapse microscopy. Upon sperm binding, a cell surface deflection traversed the egg that was followed by and dependent on the calcium wave. The calcium-dependence of surface contractility could be reproduced in unfertilized eggs, where mobilization of intracellular calcium in unfertilized eggs under compression resulted in a marked contractile response. Lastly, inhibition of myosin II delayed absorption of the fertilization cone, suggesting that myosin II not only responds to the same signals that activate eggs but also participates in the remodeling of the cortical actomyosin cytoskeleton during the first zygotic cell cycle. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Leptin's effect on taste bud calcium responses and transmitter secretion.

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    Meredith, Tricia L; Corcoran, Alan; Roper, Stephen D

    2015-05-01

    Leptin, a peptide hormone released by adipose tissue, acts on the hypothalamus to control cravings and appetite. Leptin also acts to decrease taste responses to sweet substances, though there is little detailed information regarding where leptin acts in the taste transduction cascade. The present study examined the effects of leptin on sweet-evoked responses and neuro transmitter release from isolated taste buds. Our results indicate that leptin moderately decreased sweet-evoked calcium mobilization in isolated mouse taste buds. We also employed Chinese hamster ovary biosensor cells to examine taste transmitter release from isolated taste buds. Leptin reduced ATP and increased serotonin release in response to sweet stimulation. However, leptin has no effect on bitter-evoked transmitter release, further showing that the action of leptin is sweet specific. Our results support those of previous studies, which state that leptin acts on taste tissue via the leptin receptor, most likely on Type II (Receptor) cells, but also possibly on Type III (Presynaptic) cells. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Factors affecting the remotely sensed response of coniferous forest plantations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danson, F.M.; Curran, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Remote sensing of forest biophysical properties has concentrated upon forest sites with a wide range of green vegetation amount and thereby leaf area index and canopy cover. However, coniferous forest plantations, an important forest type in Europe, are managed to maintain a large amount of green vegetation with little spatial variation. Therefore, the strength of the remotely sensed signal will, it is hypothesized, be determined more by the structure of this forest than by its cover. Airborne Thematic Mapper (ATM) and SPOT-1 HRV data were used to determine the effects of this structural variation on the remotely sensed response of a coniferous forest plantation in the United Kingdom. Red and near infrared radiance were strongly and negatively correlated with a range of structural properties and with the age of the stands but weakly correlated with canopy cover. A composite variable, related to the volume of the canopy, accounted for over 75% of the variation in near infrared radiance. A simple model that related forest structural variables to the remotely sensed response was used to understand and explain this response from a coniferous forest plantation

  9. Inflammatory cell response to calcium phosphate biomaterial particles: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velard, Frédéric; Braux, Julien; Amedee, Joëlle; Laquerriere, Patrice

    2013-02-01

    Bone is a metabolically active and highly organized tissue consisting of a mineral phase of hydroxyapatite (HA) and amorphous calcium phosphate (CaP) crystals deposited in an organic matrix. One objective of bone tissue engineering is to mimic the chemical and structural properties of this complex tissue. CaP ceramics, such as sintered HA and beta-tricalcium phosphate, are widely used as bone substitutes or prosthesis coatings because of their osteoconductive properties. These ceramic interactions with tissues induce a cell response that can be different according to the composition of the material. In this review, we discuss inflammatory cell responses to CaP materials to provide a comprehensive overview of mechanisms governing the integration or loosening of implants, which remains a major concern in tissue engineering. A focus on the effects of the functionalization of CaP biomaterials highlights potential ways to increase tissue integration and limit rejection processes. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Calcium absorption response to cholecalciferol supplementation in hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Laura A G; Zena, Mohsen; Lund, Richard; Heaney, Robert P

    2013-06-01

    Recent understanding of extrarenal production of calcitriol has led to the use of more vitamin D supplementation in CKD populations. This paper reports the effect of cholecalciferol supplementation on calcium absorption. Paired calcium absorption tests were done before and after 12-13 weeks of 20,000 IU weekly cholecalciferol supplementation in 30 participants with stage 5 CKD on hemodialysis. The study was conducted from April to December of 2011. Calcium absorption was tested with a standardized meal containing 300 mg calcium carbonate intrinsically labeled with (45)Ca; 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D were measured. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D rose from 14.2 ng/ml (11.5-18.5) at baseline to 49.3 ng/ml (42.3-58.1) at the end of the study (P<0.001). 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D rose from 15.1 (10.5-18.8) pg/ml at baseline to 20.5 (17.0-24.7) pg/ml at the end of the study (P<0.001). The median baseline calcium absorption was 12% (7%-17%) and 12% (7%-16%) at the end of study. Patients with stage 5 CKD on hemodialysis had very low calcium absorption values at baseline, and cholecalciferol supplementation that raised 25(OH)D levels to 50 ng/ml had no effect on calcium absorption.

  11. Calcium carbonate production response to future ocean warming and acidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Pinsonneault

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions are acidifying the ocean, affecting calcification rates in pelagic organisms, and thereby modifying the oceanic carbon and alkalinity cycles. However, the responses of pelagic calcifying organisms to acidification vary widely between species, contributing uncertainty to predictions of atmospheric CO2 and the resulting climate change. At the same time, ocean warming caused by rising CO2 is expected to drive increased growth rates of all pelagic organisms, including calcifiers. It thus remains unclear whether anthropogenic CO2 emissions will ultimately increase or decrease pelagic calcification rates. Here, we assess the importance of this uncertainty by introducing a dependence of calcium carbonate (CaCO3 production on calcite saturation state (ΩCaCO3 in an intermediate complexity coupled carbon-climate model. In a series of model simulations, we examine the impact of several variants of this dependence on global ocean carbon cycling between 1800 and 3500 under two different CO2 emissions scenarios. Introducing a calcification-saturation state dependence has a significant effect on the vertical and surface horizontal alkalinity gradients, as well as on the removal of alkalinity from the ocean through CaCO3 burial. These changes result in an additional oceanic uptake of carbon when calcification depends on ΩCaCO3 (of up to 270 Pg C, compared to the case where calcification does not depend on acidification. In turn, this response causes a reduction of global surface air temperature of up to 0.4 °C in year 3500. Different versions of the model produced varying results, and narrowing this range of uncertainty will require better understanding of both temperature and acidification effects on pelagic calcifiers. Nevertheless, our results suggest that alkalinity observations can be used

  12. Remote Sensing of Surficial Process Responses to Extreme Meteorological Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakenridge, G. Robert

    1997-01-01

    Changes in the frequency and magnitude of extreme meteorological events are associated with changing environmental means. Such events are important in human affairs, and can also be investigated by orbital remote sensing. During the course of this project, we applied ERS-1, ERS-2, Radarsat, and an airborne sensor (AIRSAR-TOPSAR) to measure flood extents, flood water surface profiles, and flood depths. We established a World Wide Web site (the Dartmouth Flood Observatory) for publishing remote sensing-based maps of contemporary floods worldwide; this is also an online "active archive" that presently constitutes the only global compilation of extreme flood events. We prepared an article for EOS concerning SAR imaging of the Mississippi Valley flood; an article for the International Journal of Remote Sensing on measurement of a river flood wave using ERS-2, began work on an article (since completed and published) on the Flood Observatory for a Geoscience Information Society Proceedings volume, and presented lectures at several Geol. Soc. of America Natl. Meetings, an Assoc. of Amer. Geographers Natl. Meeting, and a Binghamton Geomorphology Symposium (all on SAR remote sensing of the Mississippi Valley flood). We expanded in-house modeling capabilities by installing the latest version of the Army Corps of Engineers RMA two-dimensional hydraulics software and BYU Engineering Graphics Lab's Surface Water Modeling System (finite elements based pre- and post-processors for RMA work) and also added watershed modeling software. We are presently comparing the results of the 2-d flow models with SAR image data. The grant also supported several important upgrades of pc-based remote sensing infrastructure at Dartmouth. During work on this grant, we collaborated with several workers at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Remote Sensing/GIS laboratory (for flood inundation mapping and modeling; particularly of the Illinois River using the AIRSAR/TOPSAR/ERS-2 combined data), with Dr

  13. Comparative study on in vivo response of porous calcium carbonate composite ceramic and biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Fupo; Ren, Weiwei; Tian, Xiumei; Liu, Wei; Wu, Shanghua; Chen, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study, robust calcium carbonate composite ceramics (CC/PG) were prepared by using phosphate-based glass (PG) as an additive, which showed good cell response. In the present study the in vivo response of porous CC/PG was compared to that of porous biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics (BCP), using a rabbit femoral critical-size grafting model. The materials degradation and bone formation processes were evaluated by general observation, X-ray radiography, micro-computed tomography, and histological examination. The results demonstrated excellent biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, and progressive degradation of CC/PG and BCP. Although the in vitro degradation rate of CC/PG was distinctly faster than that of BCP, at 4 week post-implantation, the bone generation and material degradation of CC/PG were less than those of BCP. Nevertheless, at postoperative week 8, the increment of bone formation and material degradation of CC/PG was pronouncedly larger than that of BCP. These results show that CC/PG is a potential resorbable bone graft aside from the traditional synthetic ones. - Highlights: • A calcium carbonate composite ceramic (CC/PG) was acquired. • The in vivo response of CC/PG and biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) was compared. • CC/PG showed faster in vitro degradation rate compared to BCP. • CC/PG showed less in vivo degradation and bone formation than BCP at week 4. • CC/PG had larger increment of degradation and bone formation than BCP at week 8.

  14. Comparative study on in vivo response of porous calcium carbonate composite ceramic and biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Fupo, E-mail: fphebm@126.com [School of Electromechanical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Ren, Weiwei [School of Electromechanical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Tian, Xiumei [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Sciences, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510182 (China); Liu, Wei; Wu, Shanghua [School of Electromechanical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Chen, Xiaoming, E-mail: xmchenw@126.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Sciences, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510182 (China)

    2016-07-01

    In a previous study, robust calcium carbonate composite ceramics (CC/PG) were prepared by using phosphate-based glass (PG) as an additive, which showed good cell response. In the present study the in vivo response of porous CC/PG was compared to that of porous biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics (BCP), using a rabbit femoral critical-size grafting model. The materials degradation and bone formation processes were evaluated by general observation, X-ray radiography, micro-computed tomography, and histological examination. The results demonstrated excellent biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, and progressive degradation of CC/PG and BCP. Although the in vitro degradation rate of CC/PG was distinctly faster than that of BCP, at 4 week post-implantation, the bone generation and material degradation of CC/PG were less than those of BCP. Nevertheless, at postoperative week 8, the increment of bone formation and material degradation of CC/PG was pronouncedly larger than that of BCP. These results show that CC/PG is a potential resorbable bone graft aside from the traditional synthetic ones. - Highlights: • A calcium carbonate composite ceramic (CC/PG) was acquired. • The in vivo response of CC/PG and biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) was compared. • CC/PG showed faster in vitro degradation rate compared to BCP. • CC/PG showed less in vivo degradation and bone formation than BCP at week 4. • CC/PG had larger increment of degradation and bone formation than BCP at week 8.

  15. Bell-shaped calcium-response curves of lns(l,4,5)P3- and calcium-gated channels from endoplasmic reticulum of cerebellum

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    Bezprozvanny, Llya; Watras, James; Ehrlich, Barbara E.

    1991-06-01

    RELEASE of calcium from intracellular stores occurs by two pathways, an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)-gated channel1-3 and a calcium-gated channel (ryanodine receptor)4-6. Using specific antibodies, both receptors were found in Purkinje cells of cerebellum7,8. We have now compared the functional properties of the channels corresponding to the two receptors by incorporating endoplasmic reticulum vesicles from canine cerebellum into planar bilayers. InsP3-gated channels were observed most frequently. Another channel type was activated by adenine nucleotides or caffeine, inhibited by ruthenium red, and modified by ryanodine, characteristics of the ryanodine receptor/channel6. The open probability of both channel types displayed a bell-shaped curve for dependence on calcium. For the InsP3-gated channel, the maximum probability of opening occurred at 0.2 µM free calcium, with sharp decreases on either side of the maximum. Maximum activity for the ryanodine receptor/channel was maintained between 1 and 100 µM calcium. Thus, within the physiological range of cytoplasmic calcium, the InsP3-gated channel itself allows positive feed-back and then negative feedback for calcium release, whereas the ryanodine receptor/channel behaves solely as a calcium-activated channel. The existence in the same cell of two channels with different responses to calcium and different ligand sensitivities provides a basis for complex patterns of intracellular calcium regulation.

  16. Analysis and effects of cytosolic free calcium increases in response to elicitors in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecourieux, David; Mazars, Christian; Pauly, Nicolas; Ranjeva, Raoul; Pugin, Alain

    2002-10-01

    Cell suspensions obtained from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia plants stably expressing the apoaequorin gene were used to analyze changes in cytosolic free calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)](cyt)) in response to elicitors of plant defenses, particularly cryptogein and oligogalacturonides. The calcium signatures differ in lag time, peak time, intensity, and duration. The intensities of both signatures depend on elicitor concentration and extracellular calcium concentration. Cryptogein signature is characterized by a long-sustained [Ca(2+)](cyt) increase that should be responsible for sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, microtubule depolymerization, defense gene activation, and cell death. The [Ca(2+)](cyt) increase in elicitor-treated cells first results from a calcium influx, which in turns leads to calcium release from internal stores and additional Ca(2+) influx. H(2)O(2) resulting from the calcium-dependent activation of the NADPH oxidase also participates in [Ca(2+)](cyt) increase and may activate calcium channels from the plasma membrane. Competition assays with different elicitins demonstrate that [Ca(2+)](cyt) increase is mediated by cryptogein-receptor interaction.

  17. Blunted neuronal calcium response to hypoxia in naked mole-rat hippocampus.

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    Bethany L Peterson

    Full Text Available Naked mole-rats are highly social and strictly subterranean rodents that live in large communal colonies in sealed and chronically oxygen-depleted burrows. Brain slices from naked mole-rats show extreme tolerance to hypoxia compared to slices from other mammals, as indicated by maintenance of synaptic transmission under more hypoxic conditions and three fold longer latency to anoxic depolarization. A key factor in determining whether or not the cellular response to hypoxia is reversible or leads to cell death may be the elevation of intracellular calcium concentration. In the present study, we used fluorescent imaging techniques to measure relative intracellular calcium changes in CA1 pyramidal cells of hippocampal slices during hypoxia. We found that calcium accumulation during hypoxia was significantly and substantially attenuated in slices from naked mole-rats compared to slices from laboratory mice. This was the case for both neonatal (postnatal day 6 and older (postnatal day 20 age groups. Furthermore, while both species demonstrated more calcium accumulation at older ages, the older naked mole-rats showed a smaller calcium accumulation response than even the younger mice. A blunted intracellular calcium response to hypoxia may contribute to the extreme hypoxia tolerance of naked mole-rat neurons. The results are discussed in terms of a general hypothesis that a very prolonged or arrested developmental process may allow adult naked mole-rat brain to retain the hypoxia tolerance normally only seen in neonatal mammals.

  18. Blunted neuronal calcium response to hypoxia in naked mole-rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Bethany L; Larson, John; Buffenstein, Rochelle; Park, Thomas J; Fall, Christopher P

    2012-01-01

    Naked mole-rats are highly social and strictly subterranean rodents that live in large communal colonies in sealed and chronically oxygen-depleted burrows. Brain slices from naked mole-rats show extreme tolerance to hypoxia compared to slices from other mammals, as indicated by maintenance of synaptic transmission under more hypoxic conditions and three fold longer latency to anoxic depolarization. A key factor in determining whether or not the cellular response to hypoxia is reversible or leads to cell death may be the elevation of intracellular calcium concentration. In the present study, we used fluorescent imaging techniques to measure relative intracellular calcium changes in CA1 pyramidal cells of hippocampal slices during hypoxia. We found that calcium accumulation during hypoxia was significantly and substantially attenuated in slices from naked mole-rats compared to slices from laboratory mice. This was the case for both neonatal (postnatal day 6) and older (postnatal day 20) age groups. Furthermore, while both species demonstrated more calcium accumulation at older ages, the older naked mole-rats showed a smaller calcium accumulation response than even the younger mice. A blunted intracellular calcium response to hypoxia may contribute to the extreme hypoxia tolerance of naked mole-rat neurons. The results are discussed in terms of a general hypothesis that a very prolonged or arrested developmental process may allow adult naked mole-rat brain to retain the hypoxia tolerance normally only seen in neonatal mammals.

  19. Exogenous Calcium Enhances the Photosystem II Photochemistry Response in Salt Stressed Tall Fescue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangyang; Bi, Aoyue; Amombo, Erick; Li, Huiying; Zhang, Liang; Cheng, Cheng; Hu, Tao; Fu, Jinmin

    2017-01-01

    Calcium enhances turfgrass response to salt stress. However, little is known about PSII photochemical changes when exogenous calcium was applied in salinity-stressed turfgrass. Here, we probe into the rearrangements of PSII electron transport and endogenous ion accumulation in tall fescue ( Festuca arundinacea Schreber) treated with exogenous calcium under salt stress. Three-month-old seedlings of genotype "TF133" were subjected to the control (CK), salinity (S), salinity + calcium nitrate (SC), and salinity + ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (SE). Calcium nitrate and ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid was used as exogenous calcium donor and calcium chelating agent respectively. At the end of a 5-day duration treatment, samples in SC regime had better photochemistry performance on several parameters than salinity only. Such as the Area (equal to the plastoquinone pool size), N (number of [Formula: see text] redox turnovers until F m is reached), ψE 0 , or δRo (Efficiencdy/probability with which a PSII trapped electron is transferred from Q A to Q B or PSI acceptors), ABS/RC (Absorbed photon flux per RC). All the above suggested that calcium enhanced the electron transfer of PSII (especially beyond [Formula: see text]) and prevented reaction centers from inactivation in salt-stressed tall fescue. Furthermore, both grass shoot and root tissues generally accumulated more C, N, Ca 2+ , and K + in the SC regime than S regime. Interrelated analysis indicated that ψE 0 , δRo, ABS/RC, C, and N content in shoots was highly correlated to each other and significantly positively related to Ca 2+ and K + content in roots. Besides, high salt increased ATP6E and CAMK2 transcription level in shoot at 1 and 5 day, respectively while exogenous calcium relieved it. In root, CAMK2 level was reduced by Salinity at 5 day and exogenous calcium recovered it. These observations involved in electron transport capacity and ion accumulation assist in understanding better the protective role

  20. Exogenous Calcium Enhances the Photosystem II Photochemistry Response in Salt Stressed Tall Fescue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyang Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Calcium enhances turfgrass response to salt stress. However, little is known about PSII photochemical changes when exogenous calcium was applied in salinity-stressed turfgrass. Here, we probe into the rearrangements of PSII electron transport and endogenous ion accumulation in tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreber treated with exogenous calcium under salt stress. Three-month-old seedlings of genotype “TF133” were subjected to the control (CK, salinity (S, salinity + calcium nitrate (SC, and salinity + ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (SE. Calcium nitrate and ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid was used as exogenous calcium donor and calcium chelating agent respectively. At the end of a 5-day duration treatment, samples in SC regime had better photochemistry performance on several parameters than salinity only. Such as the Area (equal to the plastoquinone pool size, N (number of QA- redox turnovers until Fm is reached, ψE0, or δRo (Efficiencdy/probability with which a PSII trapped electron is transferred from QA to QB or PSI acceptors, ABS/RC (Absorbed photon flux per RC. All the above suggested that calcium enhanced the electron transfer of PSII (especially beyond QA- and prevented reaction centers from inactivation in salt-stressed tall fescue. Furthermore, both grass shoot and root tissues generally accumulated more C, N, Ca2+, and K+ in the SC regime than S regime. Interrelated analysis indicated that ψE0, δRo, ABS/RC, C, and N content in shoots was highly correlated to each other and significantly positively related to Ca2+ and K+ content in roots. Besides, high salt increased ATP6E and CAMK2 transcription level in shoot at 1 and 5 day, respectively while exogenous calcium relieved it. In root, CAMK2 level was reduced by Salinity at 5 day and exogenous calcium recovered it. These observations involved in electron transport capacity and ion accumulation assist in understanding better the protective role of exogenous calcium in tall

  1. Calcium influx determines the muscular response to electrotransfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Pernille Højman; Brolin, Camilla; Gissel, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    expression analyses and histology, we showed a clear association between Ca(2+) influx and muscular response. Moderate Ca(2+) influx induced by HVLV pulses results in activation of pathways involved in immediate repair and hypertrophy. This response could be attenuated by intramuscular injection of EGTA...... low-voltage pulse (HVLV), either alone or in combination with injection of DNA. Mice and rats were anesthetized before pulsing. At the times given, animals were killed, and intact tibialis cranialis muscles were excised for analysis. Uptake of Ca(2+) was assessed using (45)Ca as a tracer. Using gene...

  2. Accidental periapical extrusion of non-setting calcium hydroxide: Unusual bone response and management

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    Divya S Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Premixed non-setting calcium hydroxide is frequently used as interim root canal dressing in endodontically involved permanent teeth and as obturating paste in deciduous teeth in pediatric dentistry. Wide apex in both cases makes it more prone for deliberate extrusion especially when applied with pressure delivery systems. Contrary to common belief the mix was not resorbed in two years with the complaint of insufficiency in mastication. Large mass of calcium hydroxide in bone delayed healing process even after its removal. The present case report intends to demonstrate unusual behavior of bone in response to oily non-setting preparation of calcium hydroxide. Therefore its application with pressure syringe should be reconsidered in pediatric dentistry.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as calcium-responsive MRI contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Pengfei; Shen, Zhiwei; Zhang, Baolin; Wang, Jun; Wu, Renhua

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • SPIONs were conjugated with EGTA by EDC/sulfo-NHS method. • The presence of Ca"2"+ induced the aggregation of EGTA-SPIONs. • The aggregation of EGTA-SPIONs increased the T2 relaxation time. • EGTA-SPIONs can be used for the calcium imaging with MRI. - Abstract: Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as T2 contrast agents have great potential to sense calcium ion (Ca"2"+) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here we prepared calcium-responsive SPIONs for MRI, formed by combining poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and polyethylenimine (PEI) coated iron oxide nanoparticle (PEI/PEG-SPIONs) contrast agents with the straightforward calcium-sensing compound EGTA (ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid). EGTA was conjugated onto PEI/PEG-SPIONs using EDC/sulfo-NHS method. EGTA-SPIONs were characterized using TEM, XPS, DSL, TGA and SQUIID. DSL results show that the SPIONs aggregate in the presence of Ca"2"+. MRI analyses indicate that the water proton T2 relaxation rates in HEPES suspensions of the EGTA-SPIONs significantly increase with the calcium concentration because the SPIONs aggregate in the presence of Ca"2"+. The T2 values decreased 25% when Ca"2"+ concentration decreased from 1.2 to 0.8 mM. The aggregation of EGTA-SPIONs could be reversed by EDTA. EGTA-SPIONs have potential as smart contrast agents for Ca"2"+-sensitive MRI.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as calcium-responsive MRI contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Pengfei [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Nonferrous Metals and Specific Materials Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Technology, Jian Gan Road 12, Guilin 541004 (China); Shen, Zhiwei [Second Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Dong Xia North Road, Shantou 515041,China (China); Zhang, Baolin, E-mail: baolinzhang@ymail.com [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Nonferrous Metals and Specific Materials Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Technology, Jian Gan Road 12, Guilin 541004 (China); Wang, Jun [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Nonferrous Metals and Specific Materials Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Technology, Jian Gan Road 12, Guilin 541004 (China); Wu, Renhua, E-mail: rhwu@stu.edu.cn [Second Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Dong Xia North Road, Shantou 515041,China (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • SPIONs were conjugated with EGTA by EDC/sulfo-NHS method. • The presence of Ca{sup 2+} induced the aggregation of EGTA-SPIONs. • The aggregation of EGTA-SPIONs increased the T2 relaxation time. • EGTA-SPIONs can be used for the calcium imaging with MRI. - Abstract: Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as T2 contrast agents have great potential to sense calcium ion (Ca{sup 2+}) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here we prepared calcium-responsive SPIONs for MRI, formed by combining poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and polyethylenimine (PEI) coated iron oxide nanoparticle (PEI/PEG-SPIONs) contrast agents with the straightforward calcium-sensing compound EGTA (ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid). EGTA was conjugated onto PEI/PEG-SPIONs using EDC/sulfo-NHS method. EGTA-SPIONs were characterized using TEM, XPS, DSL, TGA and SQUIID. DSL results show that the SPIONs aggregate in the presence of Ca{sup 2+}. MRI analyses indicate that the water proton T2 relaxation rates in HEPES suspensions of the EGTA-SPIONs significantly increase with the calcium concentration because the SPIONs aggregate in the presence of Ca{sup 2+}. The T2 values decreased 25% when Ca{sup 2+} concentration decreased from 1.2 to 0.8 mM. The aggregation of EGTA-SPIONs could be reversed by EDTA. EGTA-SPIONs have potential as smart contrast agents for Ca{sup 2+}-sensitive MRI.

  5. Systemic antibody response to nano-size calcium phospate biocompatible adjuvant adsorbed HEV-71 killed vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Saeed, Mohamed Ibrahim; Omar, Abd Rahaman; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Elkhidir, Isam Mohamed; Sekawi, Zamberi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Since 1980s, human enterovirus-71 virus (HEV-71) is one of the common infectious disease in Asian Pacific region since late 1970s without effective commercial antiviral or protective vaccine is unavailable yet. The work examines the role of vaccine adjuvant particle size and the route of administration on postvaccination antibody response towards HEV-71 vaccine adsorbed to calcium phosphate (CaP) adjuvant. Materials and Methods First, CaP nano-particles were compared to a commercial m...

  6. Serum calcium response following oral zinc oxide administrations in dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilsing-Hansen, T; Jørgensen, R J; Thilsing, Trine

    2001-01-01

    Six non-pregnant cows were allocated into 3 groups. Group 1 comprised a pair of lactating cows, whereas groups 2 and 3 each comprised a pair of non-lactating cows. The cows in groups 1 and 2 were dosed intraruminally by stomach tube with zinc oxide at 120 mg Zn per kg of bodyweight at weekly...... intervals for a period of 33 days. Each cow received a total of 4 doses of zinc oxide. Group 3 served as non-treated control group. Blood samples were collected from all 6 cows daily. Serum was analysed for concentration of calcium. Within 12-24 h of each zinc oxide administration the serum calcium...... of the hypocalcaemic response decreased with the number of zinc oxide dosings. This effect was explained as a response from the stimulation of the calcium homeostatic mechanisms. In the Zn dosed non-lactating cows responses were similar but less clear. The perspective of these findings is discussed in relation...

  7. Impact of calcium-sensitive dyes on the beating properties and pharmacological responses of human iPS-derived cardiomyocytes using the calcium transient assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopljar, Ivan; Hermans, An N; Teisman, Ard; Gallacher, David J; Lu, Hua Rong

    Calcium-based screening of hiPS-CMs is a useful preclinical safety evaluation platform with the ability to generate robust signals that facilitates high-throughput screening and data analysis. However, due to the potential inherent toxicities, it is important to understand potential effects of different calcium-sensitive dyes on the hiPS-CMs model. We compared three calcium-sensitive fluorescence dyes (Cal520, ACTOne and Calcium 5) for their impact on the variability, the beating properties and the pharmacological responses of hiPS-CMs using the Hamamatsu FDSS/μCell imaging platform. Direct effects of three dyes on the electrophysiological properties of hiPS-CMs were evaluated with the multi-electrode array (MEA) Axion Maestro platform. We propose a specific experimental protocol for each dye which gives the most optimal assay conditions to minimize variability and possible adverse effects. We showed that Cal520 had the smallest effect on hiPS-CMs together with the longest-lasting stable amplitude signal (up to 4 h). Although all dyes had a (minor) acute effect on hiPS-CMs, in the form of reduced beat rate and prolonged field potential duration, the selection of the dye did not influence the pharmacological response of four cardioactive drugs (dofetilide, moxifloxacin, nimodipine and isoprenaline). In conclusion, we have documented that different calcium sensitive dyes have only minor direct (acute) effects on hiPS-CMs with Cal520 showing the least effects and the longest lasting signal amplitude. Importantly, drug-induced pharmacological responses in hiPS-CMs were comparable between the three dyes. These findings should help further improve the robustness of the hiPS-CMs-based calcium transient assay as a predictive, preclinical cardiac safety evaluation tool. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cell response of calcium phosphate based ceramics, a bone substitute material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Marchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize calcium phosphate ceramics with different Ca/P ratios and evaluate cell response of these materials for use as a bone substitute. Bioceramics consisting of mixtures of hydroxyapatite (HAp and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP powders in different proportions were pressed and sintered. The physical and chemical properties of these bioceramics were then characterized. Characterization of the biological properties of these materials was based on analysis of cell response using cultured fibroblasts. The number of cells attached to the samples was counted from SEM images of samples exposed to cell culture solution for different periods. These data were compared by analysis of variance (ANOVA complemented by the Tukey's test. The TCP sample had higher surface roughness and lower density. The adherence and growth of FMM1 cells on samples from all groups was studied. Even though the different calcium based ceramics exhibited properties which made them suitable as bone substitutes, those with higher levels of β-TCP revealed improved cell growth on their surfaces. These observations indicated two-phase calcium phosphate based materials with a β-TCP surface layer to be a promising bone substitute.

  9. Long-term In Vivo Calcium Imaging of Astrocytes Reveals Distinct Cellular Compartment Responses to Sensory Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stobart, Jillian L; Ferrari, Kim David; Barrett, Matthew J P; Stobart, Michael J; Looser, Zoe J; Saab, Aiman S; Weber, Bruno

    2018-01-01

    Localized, heterogeneous calcium transients occur throughout astrocytes, but the characteristics and long-term stability of these signals, particularly in response to sensory stimulation, remain unknown. Here, we used a genetically encoded calcium indicator and an activity-based image analysis scheme to monitor astrocyte calcium activity in vivo. We found that different subcellular compartments (processes, somata, and endfeet) displayed distinct signaling characteristics. Closer examination of individual signals showed that sensory stimulation elevated the number of specific types of calcium peaks within astrocyte processes and somata, in a cortical layer-dependent manner, and that the signals became more synchronous upon sensory stimulation. Although mice genetically lacking astrocytic IP3R-dependent calcium signaling (Ip3r2-/-) had fewer signal peaks, the response to sensory stimulation was sustained, suggesting other calcium pathways are also involved. Long-term imaging of astrocyte populations revealed that all compartments reliably responded to stimulation over several months, but that the location of the response within processes may vary. These previously unknown characteristics of subcellular astrocyte calcium signals provide new insights into how astrocytes may encode local neuronal circuit activity. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Barcoding T Cell Calcium Response Diversity with Methods for Automated and Accurate Analysis of Cell Signals (MAAACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergé, Arnauld; Bernard, Anne-Marie; Phélipot, Marie-Claire; Bertaux, Nicolas; Fallet, Mathieu; Grenot, Pierre; Marguet, Didier; He, Hai-Tao; Hamon, Yannick

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a series of experimental procedures enabling sensitive calcium monitoring in T cell populations by confocal video-microscopy. Tracking and post-acquisition analysis was performed using Methods for Automated and Accurate Analysis of Cell Signals (MAAACS), a fully customized program that associates a high throughput tracking algorithm, an intuitive reconnection routine and a statistical platform to provide, at a glance, the calcium barcode of a population of individual T-cells. Combined with a sensitive calcium probe, this method allowed us to unravel the heterogeneity in shape and intensity of the calcium response in T cell populations and especially in naive T cells, which display intracellular calcium oscillations upon stimulation by antigen presenting cells. PMID:24086124

  11. Food, water, and fault lines: Remote sensing opportunities for earthquake-response management of agricultural water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Jenna; Ustin, Susan; Sandoval-Solis, Samuel; O'Geen, Anthony Toby

    2016-01-01

    Earthquakes often cause destructive and unpredictable changes that can affect local hydrology (e.g. groundwater elevation or reduction) and thus disrupt land uses and human activities. Prolific agricultural regions overlie seismically active areas, emphasizing the importance to improve our understanding and monitoring of hydrologic and agricultural systems following a seismic event. A thorough data collection is necessary for adequate post-earthquake crop management response; however, the large spatial extent of earthquake's impact makes challenging the collection of robust data sets for identifying locations and magnitude of these impacts. Observing hydrologic responses to earthquakes is not a novel concept, yet there is a lack of methods and tools for assessing earthquake's impacts upon the regional hydrology and agricultural systems. The objective of this paper is to describe how remote sensing imagery, methods and tools allow detecting crop responses and damage incurred after earthquakes because a change in the regional hydrology. Many remote sensing datasets are long archived with extensive coverage and with well-documented methods to assess plant-water relations. We thus connect remote sensing of plant water relations to its utility in agriculture using a post-earthquake agrohydrologic remote sensing (PEARS) framework; specifically in agro-hydrologic relationships associated with recent earthquake events that will lead to improved water management. - Highlights: • Remote sensing to improve agricultural disaster management • Introduce post-earthquake agrohydrologic remote sensing (PEARS) framework • Apply PEARS framework to 2010 Maule Earthquake in Central Chile

  12. Food, water, and fault lines: Remote sensing opportunities for earthquake-response management of agricultural water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Jenna, E-mail: jmmartin@ucdavis.edu; Ustin, Susan; Sandoval-Solis, Samuel; O' Geen, Anthony Toby

    2016-09-15

    Earthquakes often cause destructive and unpredictable changes that can affect local hydrology (e.g. groundwater elevation or reduction) and thus disrupt land uses and human activities. Prolific agricultural regions overlie seismically active areas, emphasizing the importance to improve our understanding and monitoring of hydrologic and agricultural systems following a seismic event. A thorough data collection is necessary for adequate post-earthquake crop management response; however, the large spatial extent of earthquake's impact makes challenging the collection of robust data sets for identifying locations and magnitude of these impacts. Observing hydrologic responses to earthquakes is not a novel concept, yet there is a lack of methods and tools for assessing earthquake's impacts upon the regional hydrology and agricultural systems. The objective of this paper is to describe how remote sensing imagery, methods and tools allow detecting crop responses and damage incurred after earthquakes because a change in the regional hydrology. Many remote sensing datasets are long archived with extensive coverage and with well-documented methods to assess plant-water relations. We thus connect remote sensing of plant water relations to its utility in agriculture using a post-earthquake agrohydrologic remote sensing (PEARS) framework; specifically in agro-hydrologic relationships associated with recent earthquake events that will lead to improved water management. - Highlights: • Remote sensing to improve agricultural disaster management • Introduce post-earthquake agrohydrologic remote sensing (PEARS) framework • Apply PEARS framework to 2010 Maule Earthquake in Central Chile.

  13. Application of Response Surface Methodology to study the effect of different calcium sources in fish muscle-alginate restructured products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena María Moreno

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Sodium alginate needs the presence of calcium ions to gelify. For this reason, the contribution of the calcium source in a fish muscle mince added by sodium alginate, makes gelification possible, resulting a restructured fish product. The three different calcium sources considered were: Calcium Chloride (CC; Calcium Caseinate (CCa; and Calcium lactate (CLa. Several physical properties were analyzed, including mechanical properties, colour and cooking loss. Response Surface Methodology (RSM was used to determine the contribution of different calcium sources to a restructured fish muscle. The calcium source that modifies the system the most is CC. A combination of CC and sodium alginate weakened mechanical properties as reflected in the negative linear contribution of sodium alginate. Moreover, CC by itself increased lightness and cooking loss. The mechanical properties of restructured fish muscle elaborated were enhanced by using CCa and sodium alginate, as reflected in the negative linear contribution of sodium alginate. Also, CCa increased cooking loss. The role of CLa combined with sodium alginate was not so pronounced in the system discussed here.

  14. Gel chromatography of immunoextracted plasma calcitonin in response to the calcium clamp in healthy males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucht, E.; Toerring, O.; Sjoeberg, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay (RIA) was developed for immunoreactive calcitonin (iCT) in human plasma. Antibodies against synthetic human calcitonin (hCT) coupled to bovine serum albumin (BSA) were raised in rabbits and were directed against the carboxy terminal part of CT. The detection limit of the assay was 8 pg/ml. In 7 males the iCT response to a calcium-clamp was studied. Blood was collected at 0,30 and 60 min after the start of the calcium infusion. iCT was measured directly in plasma and in extracts obtained after purification of plasma iCT by means of immobilized CT antiboides. There was a good correlation between iCT in plasma samples and extracts, r = 0.993, n = 14 (P< 0.001). Dilution curves of extracts and plasma were parallel with the hCT standard curves. Gel chromatography of the extracts on Sephadex G-50 and G-75 disclosed heterogeneity of iCT in normal plasma during basal conditions as well as during calcium stimulation. Thirty min after the start of the calcium clamp all molecular forms, most likely constituting monomeric and dimeric CT and larger forms, were increased, while after 60 min iCT seemed to constitute predominantly forms larger than monomeric TCY. Basal levels of unextracted iCT in healthy males (n = 44, 37 +/- 10 years) were 15 +/- 9 pg-equivalents/ml (mean +/- SD), which was higher than in females (n = 40, 32 +/- 9 years) 11 +/- 4 pg-equivalents/ml (P < 0.05). (author)

  15. Calcium phosphate thin films enhance the response of human mesenchymal stem cells to nanostructured titanium surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mura M McCafferty

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of biomaterial surfaces possessing the topographical cues that can promote mesenchymal stem cell recruitment and, in particular, those capable of subsequently directing osteogenic differentiation is of increasing importance for the advancement of tissue engineering. While it is accepted that it is the interaction with specific nanoscale topography that induces mesenchymal stem cell differentiation, the potential for an attendant bioactive chemistry working in tandem with such nanoscale features to enhance this effect has not been considered to any great extent. This article presents a study of mesenchymal stem cell response to conformal bioactive calcium phosphate thin films sputter deposited onto a polycrystalline titanium nanostructured surface with proven capability to directly induce osteogenic differentiation in human bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells. The sputter deposited surfaces supported high levels of human bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cell adherence and proliferation, as determined by DNA quantification. Furthermore, they were also found to be capable of directly promoting significant levels of osteogenic differentiation. Specifically, alkaline phosphatase activity, gene expression and immunocytochemical localisation of key osteogenic markers revealed that the nanostructured titanium surfaces and the bioactive calcium phosphate coatings could direct the differentiation towards an osteogenic lineage. Moreover, the addition of the calcium phosphate chemistry to the topographical profile of the titanium was found to induce increased human bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cell differentiation compared to that observed for either the titanium or calcium phosphate coating without an underlying nanostructure. Hence, the results presented here highlight that a clear benefit can be achieved from a surface engineering strategy that combines a defined surface topography with an attendant, conformal

  16. Inflammation alters AMPA-stimulated calcium responses in dorsal striatal D2 but not D1 spiny projection neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winland, Carissa D; Welsh, Nora; Sepulveda-Rodriguez, Alberto; Vicini, Stefano; Maguire-Zeiss, Kathleen A

    2017-11-01

    Neuroinflammation precedes neuronal loss in striatal neurodegenerative diseases and can be exacerbated by the release of proinflammatory molecules by microglia. These molecules can affect trafficking of AMPARs. The preferential trafficking of calcium-permeable versus impermeable AMPARs can result in disruptions of [Ca 2+ ] i and alter cellular functions. In striatal neurodegenerative diseases, changes in [Ca 2+ ] i and L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) have been reported. Therefore, this study sought to determine whether a proinflammatory environment alters AMPA-stimulated [Ca 2+ ] i through calcium-permeable AMPARs and/or L-type VGCCs in dopamine-2- and dopamine-1-expressing striatal spiny projection neurons (D2 and D1 SPNs) in the dorsal striatum. Mice expressing the calcium indicator protein, GCaMP in D2 or D1 SPNs, were utilized for calcium imaging. Microglial activation was assessed by morphology analyses. To induce inflammation, acute mouse striatal slices were incubated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here we report that LPS treatment potentiated AMPA responses only in D2 SPNs. When a nonspecific VGCC blocker was included, we observed a decrease of AMPA-stimulated calcium fluorescence in D2 but not D1 SPNs. The remaining agonist-induced [Ca 2+ ] i was mediated by calcium-permeable AMPARs because the responses were completely blocked by a selective calcium-permeable AMPAR antagonist. We used isradipine, the highly selective L-type VGCC antagonist to determine the role of L-type VGCCs in SPNs treated with LPS. Isradipine decreased AMPA-stimulated responses selectively in D2 SPNs after LPS treatment. Our findings suggest that dorsal striatal D2 SPNs are specifically targeted in proinflammatory conditions and that L-type VGCCs and calcium-permeable AMPARs are important mediators of this effect. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. [Optimization of riboflavin sodium phosphate loading to calcium alginate floating microspheres by response surface methodology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, An-yang; Fan, Tian-yuan

    2009-12-18

    To investigate the preparation, optimization and in vitro properties of riboflavin sodium phosphate floating microspheres. The floating microspheres composed of riboflavin sodium phosphate and calcium alginate were prepared using ion gelatin-oven drying method. The properties of the microspheres were investigated, including the buoyancy, release, appearance and entrapment efficiency. The formulation was optimized by response surface methodology (RSM). The optimized microspheres were round. The entrapment efficiency was 57.49%. All the microspheres could float on the artificial gastric juice over 8 hours. The release of the drug from the microspheres complied with Fick's diffusion.

  18. Use of digitonin permeabilization for characterization of calcium incorporated into. beta. cells in response to glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesslen, N [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    1985-01-01

    ..beta.. cell-rich pancreatic islets were used to characterize /sup 45/Ca uptake into pools with different sensitivities to permeabilization with digitonin. The plasma and secretory granule membranes were among the membranes most sensitive to digitonin treatment whereas the mitochondria were more resistant. Most of the /sup 45/Ca incorporated in response to glucose was found in a fraction released after exposure to a high concentration of digitonin. The results suggest that glucose promotes active sequestration of calcium in mitochondria and that the uptake of /sup 45/Ca in the secretory granules in secondary to a raised cytosolic Ca/sup 2 +/ activity.

  19. Thermoluminescent response of calcium di aluminate intrinsic and doped with Cr3+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceron R, P. V.; Vallejo H, M. A.; Sosa A, M. A.; Montes R, E.; Diaz G, J. A. I.; Diaz T, L. A.

    2017-10-01

    In numerous studies the thermoluminescent response (Tl) of aluminum oxide has been presented in which various dopants have been incorporated to increase the number of defects and thus modify their dosimetric properties. In related materials such as aluminates have been doped with trivalent ions and their optical characteristics have been determined. Due to this background, the motivation to study the aluminates as possible thermoluminescent dosimeters arises. In this work the synthesis of intrinsic calcium aluminate powders and doped with Cr 3+ is presented by the combustion method, to elaborate pellets and evaluate their Tl response with different radiation sources. The material obtained was characterized by XRD, X-ray fluorescence and UV-Vis; it was found to belong to the monoclinic phase of calcium di aluminate (CaAl 4 O 7 ) with a crystal size of 55 nm, the presence of Cr 3+ in the crystal lattice was also observed. The samples showed a good response Tl for UV radiation, X-rays from a 70 kV source and for Co-60 gammas. The results found show that CaAl 4 O 7 is a good candidate to study its dosimetric properties. (Author)

  20. Kokumi Substances, Enhancers of Basic Tastes, Induce Responses in Calcium-Sensing Receptor Expressing Taste Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Yutaka; Yasuda, Reiko; Kuroda, Motonaka; Eto, Yuzuru

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we reported that calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a receptor for kokumi substances, which enhance the intensities of salty, sweet and umami tastes. Furthermore, we found that several γ-glutamyl peptides, which are CaSR agonists, are kokumi substances. In this study, we elucidated the receptor cells for kokumi substances, and their physiological properties. For this purpose, we used Calcium Green-1 loaded mouse taste cells in lingual tissue slices and confocal microscopy. Kokumi substances, applied focally around taste pores, induced an increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in a subset of taste cells. These responses were inhibited by pretreatment with the CaSR inhibitor, NPS2143. However, the kokumi substance-induced responses did not require extracellular Ca2+. CaSR-expressing taste cells are a different subset of cells from the T1R3-expressing umami or sweet taste receptor cells. These observations indicate that CaSR-expressing taste cells are the primary detectors of kokumi substances, and that they are an independent population from the influenced basic taste receptor cells, at least in the case of sweet and umami. PMID:22511946

  1. Inherited Variation in Cytokine, Acute Phase Response, and Calcium Metabolism Genes Affects Susceptibility to Infective Endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia V. Ponasenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis (IE is a septic inflammation of the endocardium. Recognition of microbial patterns, cytokine and acute phase responses, hemostasis features, and alterations in plasma lipid and calcium profile all have been reported to affect pathogenesis and clinical course of IE. Having recruited 123 patients with IE and 300 age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched healthy blood donors, we profiled their genomic DNA for 35 functionally significant polymorphisms within the 22 selected genes involved in the abovementioned pathways, with the further genetic association analysis. We found that the G/A genotype of the rs1143634 polymorphism within the IL1B gene, the G/T genotype of the rs3212227 polymorphism within the IL12B gene, the A/G genotype of the rs1130864 polymorphism within the CRP gene, and the G allele of the rs1801197 polymorphism within the CALCR gene were associated with a decreased risk of IE whereas the T/T genotype of the rs1205 polymorphism within the CRP gene was associated with a higher risk of IE. Furthermore, heterozygous genotypes of the rs1143634 and rs3212227 polymorphisms were associated with the higher plasma levels of IL-1β and IL-12, respectively. Our results indicate that inherited variation in the cytokine, acute phase response, and calcium metabolism pathways may be linked to IE.

  2. Inherited Variation in Cytokine, Acute Phase Response, and Calcium Metabolism Genes Affects Susceptibility to Infective Endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkovskaya, Natalia V.; Kondyukova, Natalia V.; Odarenko, Yuri N.; Kazachek, Yana V.; Tsepokina, Anna V.; Barbarash, Leonid S.

    2017-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a septic inflammation of the endocardium. Recognition of microbial patterns, cytokine and acute phase responses, hemostasis features, and alterations in plasma lipid and calcium profile all have been reported to affect pathogenesis and clinical course of IE. Having recruited 123 patients with IE and 300 age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched healthy blood donors, we profiled their genomic DNA for 35 functionally significant polymorphisms within the 22 selected genes involved in the abovementioned pathways, with the further genetic association analysis. We found that the G/A genotype of the rs1143634 polymorphism within the IL1B gene, the G/T genotype of the rs3212227 polymorphism within the IL12B gene, the A/G genotype of the rs1130864 polymorphism within the CRP gene, and the G allele of the rs1801197 polymorphism within the CALCR gene were associated with a decreased risk of IE whereas the T/T genotype of the rs1205 polymorphism within the CRP gene was associated with a higher risk of IE. Furthermore, heterozygous genotypes of the rs1143634 and rs3212227 polymorphisms were associated with the higher plasma levels of IL-1β and IL-12, respectively. Our results indicate that inherited variation in the cytokine, acute phase response, and calcium metabolism pathways may be linked to IE. PMID:28659664

  3. Effect of tyrosine kinase blockade on norepinephrine-induced cytosolic calcium response in rat afferent arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsson, Max; Arendshorst, William J

    2004-01-01

    We used genistein (Gen) and tyrphostin 23 (Tyr-23) to evaluate the importance of tyrosine phosphorylation in norepinephrine (NE)-induced changes in intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in rat afferent arterioles. [Ca(2+)](i) was measured in microdissected arterioles using...... ratiometric photometry of fura 2 fluorescence. The control [Ca(2+)](i) response to NE (1 microM) consisted of a rapid initial peak followed by a plateau phase sustained above baseline. Pretreatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor Tyr-23 (50 microM, 10 min) caused a slow 40% increase in baseline [Ca(2+)](i...... of nifedipine and Tyr-23 were not additive. Nifedipine had no inhibitory effect after Tyr-23 pretreatment, indicating Tyr-23 inhibition of Ca(2+) entry. Another tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Gen (5 and 50 microM), did not affect baseline [Ca(2+)](i). High-dose Gen inhibited the peak and plateau response to NE...

  4. A role for barley calcium-dependent protein kinase CPK2a in the response to drought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Cieśla

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the drought tolerance of crops is one of the most challenging goals in plant breeding. To improve crop productivity during periods of water deficit, it is essential to understand the complex regulatory pathways that adapt plant metabolism to environmental conditions. Among various plant hormones and second messengers, calcium ions are known to be involved in drought stress perception and signaling. Plants have developed specific calcium-dependent protein kinases that convert calcium signals into phosphorylation events. In this study we attempted to elucidate the role of a calcium-dependent protein kinase in the drought stress response of barley (Hordeum vulgare L., one of the most economically important crops worldwide. The ongoing barley genome project has provided useful information about genes potentially involved in the drought stress response, but information on the role of calcium-dependent kinases is still limited. We found that the gene encoding the calcium-dependent protein kinase HvCPK2a was significantly upregulated in response to drought. To better understand the role of HvCPK2a in drought stress signaling, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis plants that overexpressed the corresponding coding sequence. Overexpressing lines displayed drought sensitivity, reduced nitrogen balance index, an increase in total chlorophyll content and decreased relative water content. In addition, in vitro kinase assay experiments combined with mass spectrometry allowed HvCPK2a autophosphorylation sites to be identified. Our results suggest that HvCPK2a is a dual-specificity calcium-dependent protein kinase that functions as a negative regulator of the drought stress response in barley.

  5. Pharmacological analysis of calcium transients in response to gravity vector change in Arabidopsis hypocotyls and petioles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, M.; Furuichi, T.; Tatsumi, H.; Sokabe, M.

    Plants regulate their growth and morphology in response to gravity field known as gravitropism in general In the process of gravitropism gravity sensing will form the critical earliest event which is supposed to take place in specialized cells statocytes such as columella cells and shoot endodermal cells Although gravistimulation is assumed to be converted into certain intracellular signals the underlying transduction mechanisms have hardly been explored One of the potential candidates for the intracellular signals is an increase in the cytoplasmic free calcium concentration Ca 2 c Here we measured Ca 2 c changes induced by gravistimulation in seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana expressing aequorin as a calcium reporter When a plate of seedlings was turned through 180 r Ca 2 c transiently increased within 50 s and decayed exponentially with a time constant of ca 60 s The amplitude of the Ca 2 c increase was independent of the angular velocity of the rotation The Ca 2 c increase was reversibly blocked by extracellularly applied potential mechanosensitive channel blockers La 3 Gd 3 or a Ca 2 chelator BAPTA indicating that it arose from Ca 2 -influx via Ca 2 -permeable channel s on the plasma membrane Furthermore the Ca 2 c increase was attenuated by actin-disrupting drugs latrunculin B cytochalasin B but not by microtuble-disrupting drugs oryzalin nocodazole indicating that the activation of

  6. Calcium sensing in exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Wu, Bingbing; Han, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    an increase in intracellular calcium levels. Besides the triggering role, calcium signaling modulates the precise amount and kinetics of vesicle release. Thus, it is a central question to understand the molecular machineries responsible for calcium sensing in exocytosis. Here we provide an overview of our...... current understanding of calcium sensing in neurotransmitter release and hormone secretion....

  7. [Optimization of calcium alginate floating microspheres loading aspirin by artificial neural networks and response surface methodology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, An-yang; Fan, Tian-yuan

    2010-04-18

    To investigate the preparation and optimization of calcium alginate floating microspheres loading aspirin. A model was used to predict the in vitro release of aspirin and optimize the formulation by artificial neural networks (ANNs) and response surface methodology (RSM). The amounts of the material in the formulation were used as inputs, while the release and floating rate of the microspheres were used as outputs. The performances of ANNs and RSM were compared. ANNs were more accurate in prediction. There was no significant difference between ANNs and RSM in optimization. Approximately 90% of the optimized microspheres could float on the artificial gastric juice over 4 hours. 42.12% of aspirin was released in 60 min, 60.97% in 120 min and 78.56% in 240 min. The release of the drug from the microspheres complied with Higuchi equation. The aspirin floating microspheres with satisfying in vitro release were prepared successfully by the methods of ANNs and RSM.

  8. Emergency Response Damage Assessment using Satellite Remote Sensing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clandillon, Stephen; Yésou, Hervé; Schneiderhan, Tobias; de Boissezon, Hélène; de Fraipont, Paul

    2013-04-01

    During disasters rescue and relief organisations need quick access to reliable and accurate information to be better equipped to do their job. It is increasingly felt that satellites offer a unique near real time (NRT) tool to aid disaster management. A short introduction to the International Charter 'Space and Major Disasters', in operation since 2000 promoting worldwide cooperation among member space agencies, will be given as it is the foundation on which satellite-based, emergency response, damage assessment has been built. Other complementary mechanisms will also be discussed. The user access, triggering mechanism, an essential component for this user-driven service, will be highlighted with its 24/7 single access point. Then, a clear distinction will be made between data provision and geo-information delivery mechanisms to underline the user need for geo-information that is easily integrated into their working environments. Briefly, the path to assured emergency response product quality will be presented beginning with user requirements, expressed early-on, for emergency response value-adding services. Initiatives were then established, supported by national and European institutions, to develop the sector, with SERTIT and DLR being key players, providing support to decision makers in headquarters and relief teams in the field. To consistently meet the high quality levels demanded by users, rapid mapping has been transformed via workflow and quality control standardisation to improve both speed and quality. As such, SERTIT located in Alsace, France, and DLR/ZKI from Bavaria, Germany, join their knowledge in this presentation to report about recent standards as both have ISO certified their rapid mapping services based on experienced, well-trained, 24/7 on-call teams and established systems providing the first crisis analysis product in 6 hours after satellite data reception. The three main product types provided are then outlined: up-to-date pre

  9. Calcium Phosphate as a Key Material for Socially Responsible Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuk Uskoković

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Socially responsible technologies are designed while taking into consideration the socioeconomic, geopolitical and environmental limitations of regions in which they will be implemented. In the medical context, this involves making therapeutic platforms more accessible and affordable to patients in poor regions of the world wherein a given disease is endemic. This often necessitates going against the reigning trend of making therapeutic nanoparticles ever more structurally complex and expensive. However, studies aimed at simplifying materials and formulations while maintaining the functionality and therapeutic response of their more complex counterparts seldom provoke a significant interest in the scientific community. In this review we demonstrate that such compositional simplifications are meaningful when it comes to the design of a solution for osteomyelitis, a disease that is in its natural, non-postoperative form particularly prevalent in the underdeveloped parts of the world wherein poverty, poor sanitary conditions, and chronically compromised defense lines of the immune system are the norm. We show that calcium phosphate nanoparticles, which are inexpensive to make, could be chemically designed to possess the same functionality as a hypothetic mixture additionally composed of: (a a bone growth factor; (b an antibiotic for prophylactic or anti-infective purposes; (c a bisphosphonate as an antiresorptive compound; (d a viral vector to enable the intracellular delivery of therapeutics; (e a luminescent dye; (f a radiographic component; (g an imaging contrast agent; (h a magnetic domain; and (i polymers as viscous components enabling the injectability of the material and acting as carriers for the sustained release of a drug. In particular, calcium phosphates could: (a produce tunable drug release profiles; (b take the form of viscous and injectable, self-setting pastes; (c be naturally osteo-inductive and inhibitory for osteoclastogenesis

  10. Using Remote Sensing Mapping and Growth Response to Environmental Variability to Aide Aquatic Invasive Plant Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David L.; Schlick, Greg; Genovese, Vanessa; Wilson, Kenneth D.

    2018-01-01

    Management of aquatic weeds in complex watersheds and river systems present many challenges to assessment, planning and implementation of management practices for floating and submerged aquatic invasive plants. The Delta Region Areawide Aquatic Weed Project (DRAAWP), a USDA sponsored area-wide project, is working to enhance planning, decision-making and operational efficiency in the California Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Satellite and airborne remote sensing are used map (area coverage and biomass density), direct operations, and assess management impacts on plant communities. Archived satellite records enable review of results following previous climate and management events and aide in developing long-term strategies. Examples of remote sensing aiding effectiveness of aquatic weed management will be discussed as well as areas for potential technological improvement. Modeling at local and watershed scales using the SWAT modeling tool provides insight into land-use effects on water quality (described by Zhang in same Symposium). Controlled environment growth studies have been conducted to quantify the growth response of invasive aquatic plants to water quality and other environmental factors. Environmental variability occurs across a range of time scales from long-term climate and seasonal trends to short-term water flow mediated variations. Response time for invasive species response are examined at time scales of weeks, day, and hours using a combination of study duration and growth assessment techniques to assess water quality, temperature (air and water), nitrogen, phosphorus, and light effects. These provide response parameters for plant growth models in response to the variation and interact with management and economic models associated with aquatic weed management. Plant growth models are to be informed by remote sensing and applied spatially across the Delta to balance location and type of aquatic plant, growth response to altered environments and

  11. Dietary calcium intake and Renin Angiotensin System polymorphisms alter the blood pressure response to aerobic exercise: a randomized control design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsongalis Gregory J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary calcium intake and the renin angiotensin system (RAS regulate blood pressure (BP by modulating calcium homeostasis. Despite similar BP regulatory effects, the influence of dietary calcium intake alone and combined with RAS polymorphisms on the BP response following acute aerobic exercise (i.e., postexercise hypotension has not been studied. Thus, we examined the effect of dietary calcium intake and selected RAS polymorphisms on postexercise hypotension. Methods Subjects were men (n = 50, 43.8 ± 1.3 yr with high BP (145.3 ± 1.5/85.9 ± 1.1 mm Hg. They completed three experiments: non-exercise control and two cycle bouts at 40% and 60% of maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max. Subjects provided 3 d food records on five protocol-specific occasions. Dietary calcium intake was averaged and categorized as low (1R A/C were analyzed with molecular methods. Genotypes were reduced from three to two: ACE II/ID and ACE DD; or AT1R AA and AT1R CC/AC. Repeated measure ANCOVA tested if BP differed among experiments, dietary calcium intake level and RAS polymorphisms. Results Systolic BP (SBP decreased 6 mm Hg after 40% and 60% VO2max compared to non-exercise control for 10 h with LowCa (p 2max versus non-exercise control for 10 h among ACE II/ID (6 mm Hg and AT1R AA (8 mm Hg; and by 8 mm Hg after 40% VO2max among ACE DD and AT1R CC/CA (p 2max compared to non-exercise control for 10 h (p 2max (p ≥ 0.05. Conclusion SBP decreased after exercise compared to non-exercise control among men with low but not high dietary calcium intake. Dietary calcium intake interacted with the ACE I/D and AT1R A/C polymorphisms to further modulate postexercise hypotension. Interactions among dietary calcium intake, exercise intensity and RAS polymorphisms account for some of the variability in the BP response to exercise.

  12. Rapid response to Ebola outbreaks in remote areas - Liberia, July-November 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kateh, Francis; Nagbe, Thomas; Kieta, Abraham; Barskey, Albert; Gasasira, Alex Ntale; Driscoll, Anne; Tucker, Anthony; Christie, Athalia; Karmo, Ben; Scott, Colleen; Bowah, Collin; Barradas, Danielle; Blackley, David; Dweh, Emmanuel; Warren, Felicia; Mahoney, Frank; Kassay, Gabriel; Calvert, Geoffrey M; Castro, Georgina; Logan, Gorbee; Appiah, Grace; Kirking, Hannah; Koon, Hawa; Papowitz, Heather; Walke, Henry; Cole, Isaac B; Montgomery, Joel; Neatherlin, John; Tappero, Jordan W; Hagan, Jose E; Forrester, Joseph; Woodring, Joseph; Mott, Joshua; Attfield, Kathleen; DeCock, Kevin; Lindblade, Kim A; Powell, Krista; Yeoman, Kristin; Adams, Laura; Broyles, Laura N; Slutsker, Laurence; Larway, Lawrence; Belcher, Lisa; Cooper, Lorraine; Santos, Marjorie; Westercamp, Matthew; Weinberg, Meghan Pearce; Massoudi, Mehran; Dea, Monica; Patel, Monita; Hennessey, Morgan; Fomba, Moses; Lubogo, Mutaawe; Maxwell, Nikki; Moonan, Patrick; Arzoaquoi, Sampson; Gee, Samuel; Zayzay, Samuel; Pillai, Satish; Williams, Seymour; Zarecki, Shauna Mettee; Yett, Sheldon; James, Stephen; Grube, Steven; Gupta, Sundeep; Nelson, Thelma; Malibiche, Theophil; Frank, Wilmont; Smith, Wilmot; Nyenswah, Tolbert

    2015-02-27

    West Africa is experiencing its first epidemic of Ebola virus disease (Ebola). As of February 9, Liberia has reported 8,864 Ebola cases, of which 3,147 were laboratory-confirmed. Beginning in August 2014, the Liberia Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MOHSW), supported by CDC, the World Health Organization (WHO), and others, began systematically investigating and responding to Ebola outbreaks in remote areas. Because many of these areas lacked mobile telephone service, easy road access, and basic infrastructure, flexible and targeted interventions often were required. Development of a national strategy for the Rapid Isolation and Treatment of Ebola (RITE) began in early October. The strategy focuses on enhancing capacity of county health teams (CHT) to investigate outbreaks in remote areas and lead tailored responses through effective and efficient coordination of technical and operational assistance from the MOHSW central level and international partners. To measure improvements in response indicators and outcomes over time, data from investigations of 12 of 15 outbreaks in remote areas with illness onset dates of index cases during July 16-November 20, 2014, were analyzed. The times to initial outbreak alerts and durations of the outbreaks declined over that period while the proportions of patients who were isolated and treated increased. At the same time, the case-fatality rate in each outbreak declined. Implementation of strategies, such as RITE, to rapidly respond to rural outbreaks of Ebola through coordinated and tailored responses can successfully reduce transmission and improve outcomes.

  13. Comparison of the adjuvant activity of aluminum hydroxide and calcium phosphate on the antibody response towards Bothrops asper snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, Hidekel; Herrera, María; Rojas, Leonardo; Villalta, Mauren; Vargas, Mariángela; Leiguez, Elbio; Teixeira, Catarina; Estrada, Ricardo; Gutiérrez, José María; León, Guillermo; Montero, Mavis L

    2014-01-01

    The adjuvanticity of aluminum hydroxide and calcium phosphate on the antibody response in mice towards the venom of the snake Bothrops asper was studied. It was found that, in vitro, most of the venom proteins are similarly adsorbed by both mineral salts, with the exception of some basic phospholipases A2, which are better adsorbed by calcium phosphate. After injection, the adjuvants promoted a slow release of the venom, as judged by the lack of acute toxicity when lethal doses of venom were administered to mice. Leukocyte recruitment induced by the venom was enhanced when it was adsorbed on both mineral salts; however, venom adsorbed on calcium phosphate induced a higher antibody response towards all tested HPLC fractions of the venom. On the other hand, co-precipitation of venom with calcium phosphate was the best strategy for increasing: (1) the capacity of the salt to couple venom proteins in vitro; (2) the venom ability to induce leukocyte recruitment; (3) phagocytosis by macrophages; and (4) a host antibody response. These findings suggest that the chemical nature is not the only one determining factor of the adjuvant activity of mineral salts.

  14. USGS Provision of Near Real Time Remotely Sensed Imagery for Emergency Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B. K.

    2014-12-01

    The use of remotely sensed imagery in the aftermath of a disaster can have an important impact on the effectiveness of the response for many types of disasters such as floods, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, and other natural or human-induced disasters. Ideally, responders in areas that are commonly affected by disasters would have access to archived remote sensing imagery plus the ability to easily obtain the new post event data products. The cost of obtaining and storing the data and the lack of trained professionals who can process the data into a mapping product oftentimes prevent this from happening. USGS Emergency Operations provides remote sensing and geospatial support to emergency managers by providing access to satellite images from numerous domestic and international space agencies including those affiliated with the International Charter Space and Major Disasters and their space-based assets and by hosting and distributing thousands of near real time event related images and map products through the Hazards Data Distribution System (HDDS). These data may include digital elevation models, hydrographic models, base satellite images, vector data layers such as roads, aerial photographs, and other pre and post disaster data. These layers are incorporated into a Web-based browser and data delivery service, the Hazards Data Distribution System (HDDS). The HDDS can be made accessible either to the general public or to specific response agencies. The HDDS concept anticipates customer requirements and provides rapid delivery of data and services. This presentation will provide an overview of remotely sensed imagery that is currently available to support emergency response operations and examples of products that have been created for past events that have provided near real time situational awareness for responding agencies.

  15. The Calcium Sensor CBL-CIPK Is Involved in Plant’s Response to Abiotic Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Nuruzzaman Manik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stress halts the physiological and developmental process of plant. During stress condition, CBL-CIPK complex is identified as a primary element of calcium sensor to perceive environmental signals. Recent studies established that this complex regulates downstream targets like ion channels and transporters in adverse stages conditions. Crosstalks between the CBL-CIPK complex and different abiotic stresses can extend our research area, which can improve and increase the production of genetically modified crops in response to abiotic stresses. How this complex links with environmental signals and creates adjustable circumstances under unfavorable conditions is now one of the burning issues. Diverse studies are already underway to delineate this signalling mechanism underlying different interactions. Therefore, up to date experimental results should be concisely published, thus paving the way for further research. The present review will concisely recapitulate the recent and ongoing research progress of positive ions (Mg2+, Na+, and K+, negative ions (NO3-, PO4-, and hormonal signalling, which are evolving from accumulating results of analyses of CBL and CIPK loss- or gain-of-function experiments in different species along with some progress and perspectives of our works. In a word, this review will give one step forward direction for more functional studies in this area.

  16. Response Surface Methodology for Biodiesel Production Using Calcium Methoxide Catalyst Assisted with Tetrahydrofuran as Cosolvent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichaonn Chumuang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was performed to optimize a heterogeneous calcium methoxide (Ca(OCH32 catalyzed transesterification process assisted with tetrahydrofuran (THF as a cosolvent for biodiesel production from waste cooking oil. Response surface methodology (RSM with a 5-level-4-factor central composite design was applied to investigate the effect of experimental factors on the percentage of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME conversion. A quadratic model with an analysis of variance obtained from the RSM is suggested for the prediction of FAME conversion and reveals that 99.43% of the observed variation is explained by the model. The optimum conditions obtained from the RSM were 2.83 wt% of catalyst concentration, 11.6 : 1 methanol-to-oil molar ratio, 100.14 min of reaction time, and 8.65% v/v of THF in methanol concentration. Under these conditions, the properties of the produced biodiesel satisfied the standard requirement. THF as cosolvent successfully decreased the catalyst concentration, methanol-to-oil molar ratio, and reaction time when compared with biodiesel production without cosolvent. The results are encouraging for the application of Ca(OCH32 assisted with THF as a cosolvent for environmentally friendly and sustainable biodiesel production.

  17. Remote activation of a microactuator using a photo-responsive nanoparticle-polymer composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeberoff, Anthony

    Stimulus response materials are a class of novel materials that are currently being explored in various technologies, including biomedical devices and components, food packaging, fabrics, energy harvesting and conversion, and other elementary components such as sensors and actuators. Hybrid organic-inorganic materials such as nanoparticle-polymer composites are attractive candidates as their properties can be significantly tuned for particular applications where selectivity and localized responses are critical factors. In this work we developed and optimized a photo-responsive microactuator that can operate selectively to a specific wavelength of light. The photo-responsive microactuator is comprised of monodispersed microspheres that contain gold nanoparticles. Upon irradiation, these microspheres transduce optical energy to thermal energy, driving a localized phase change in the matrix in which they are embedded. Our remotely powered microactuator can be further realized in applications where decoupling the physical connection of the energy/control source from the actuating component is necessary.

  18. Differential expression of calcium/calmodulin-regulated SlSRs in response to abiotic and biotic stresses in tomato fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tianbao; Peng, Hui; Whitaker, Bruce D; Jurick, Wayne M

    2013-07-01

    Calcium has been shown to enhance stress tolerance, maintain firmness and reduce decay in fruits. Previously we reported that seven tomato SlSRs encode calcium/calmodulin-regulated proteins, and that their expressions are developmentally regulated during fruit development and ripening, and are also responsive to ethylene. To study their expressions in response to stresses encountered during postharvest handling, tomato fruit at the mature-green stage was subjected to chilling and wounding injuries, infected with Botrytis cinerea and treated with salicylic acid or methyl jasmonate. Gene expression studies revealed that the seven SlSRs differentially respond to different stress signals. SlSR2 was the only gene upregulated by all the treatments. SlSR4 acted as a late pathogen-induced gene; it was upregulated by salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate, but downregulated by cold treatment. SlSR3L was cold- and wound-responsive and was also induced by salicylic acid. SlSR1 and SlSR1L were repressed by cold, wounding and pathogen infection, but were upregulated by salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate. Overall, results of these expression studies indicate that individual SlSRs have distinct roles in responses to the specific stress signals, and SlSRs may act as a coordinator(s) connecting calcium-mediated signaling with other stress signal transduction pathways during fruit ripening and storage. © 2013 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  19. R and D strategy on remote response technology for emergency situations of nuclear facilities in KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kyung Min; Cho, Jae Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Eom, Heung Seup; Seo, Yong Chil; Shin, Hoch Ul; Lee, Sung Uk; Kim, Chang Hoi; Jeong, Seung Ho; Kim, Seung Ho

    2012-01-01

    Generally speaking, robotic technologies are anticipated to be very useful for hazardous works in nuclear facilities because robotic systems are relatively immune to radiation exposure. But the application of robotic systems for such environments has not been increasing during past 20 years. Applying highly reliable and conservative 'defense in depth' concepts in the design and construction of NPPs, there is very little probability of accidents occurring or radioactive materials being released into the environments. As a precaution, however NPPs are prepared with emergency response procedures and routinely conduct exercises for post accident circumstances based on these procedures. The last year's accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant promotes the needs for remote response technologies based on mobile robotic system to recognize the internal status and mitigate the unanticipated events of nuclear power plants in emergency situations. For initial observation of reactor buildings two robots named 'PackBot' were used because the internal conditions were unknown so as to allow human workers for entrance into the reactor building. But there were severe limitations for the robots to perform the given tasks from various obstacles and poor visibility inside though they provided crucial information such as views of internal structures, dose level and temperature that supported the decision for human worker's entrance. The application of robots for emergency response tasks for post accidents in nuclear facilities is not a new concept. Robots were sent to recover the damaged reactor at Chernobyl where human workers could have received a lifetime dose of radiation in minutes. Based on NRC's TMI 2 Cleanup Program, several robots were built in the 1980s to help gather information and remove debris from a reactor at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant that partially melted down in 1979. A robot was used for several years equipped with various tools allowing

  20. R and D strategy on remote response technology for emergency situations of nuclear facilities in KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kyung Min; Cho, Jae Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Eom, Heung Seup; Seo, Yong Chil; Shin, Hoch Ul; Lee, Sung Uk; Kim, Chang Hoi; Jeong, Seung Ho; Kim, Seung Ho [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Generally speaking, robotic technologies are anticipated to be very useful for hazardous works in nuclear facilities because robotic systems are relatively immune to radiation exposure. But the application of robotic systems for such environments has not been increasing during past 20 years. Applying highly reliable and conservative 'defense in depth' concepts in the design and construction of NPPs, there is very little probability of accidents occurring or radioactive materials being released into the environments. As a precaution, however NPPs are prepared with emergency response procedures and routinely conduct exercises for post accident circumstances based on these procedures. The last year's accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant promotes the needs for remote response technologies based on mobile robotic system to recognize the internal status and mitigate the unanticipated events of nuclear power plants in emergency situations. For initial observation of reactor buildings two robots named 'PackBot' were used because the internal conditions were unknown so as to allow human workers for entrance into the reactor building. But there were severe limitations for the robots to perform the given tasks from various obstacles and poor visibility inside though they provided crucial information such as views of internal structures, dose level and temperature that supported the decision for human worker's entrance. The application of robots for emergency response tasks for post accidents in nuclear facilities is not a new concept. Robots were sent to recover the damaged reactor at Chernobyl where human workers could have received a lifetime dose of radiation in minutes. Based on NRC's TMI 2 Cleanup Program, several robots were built in the 1980s to help gather information and remove debris from a reactor at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant that partially melted down in 1979. A robot was used for several years

  1. Pre-treatment of soybean plants with calcium stimulates ROS responses and mitigates infection by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfaoui, Arbia; El Hadrami, Abdelbasset; Daayf, Fouad

    2018-01-01

    Considering the high incidence of white mold caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in a variety of field crops and vegetables, different control strategies are needed to keep the disease under economical threshold. This study assessed the effect of foliar application of a calcium formulation on disease symptoms, oxalic acid production, and on the oxidative stress metabolism in soybean plants inoculated with each of two isolates of the pathogen that have contrasting aggressiveness (HA, highly-aggressive versus WA, weakly-aggressive). Changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in soybean plants inoculated with S. sclerotiorum isolates were assessed at 6, 24, 48 and 72 h post inoculation (hpi). Generation of ROS including hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), anion superoxide (O 2 - ) and hydroxyl radical (OH) was evaluated. Inoculation with the WA isolate resulted in more ROS accumulation compared to the HA isolate. Pre-treatment with the calcium formulation restored ROS production in plants inoculated with the HA isolate. We also noted a marked decrease in oxalic acid content in the leaves inoculated with the HA isolate in presence of calcium, which coincided with an increase in plant ROS production. The expression patterns of genes involved in ROS detoxification in response to the calcium treatments and/or inoculation with S. Sclerotiorum isolates were monitored by RT-qPCR. All of the tested genes showed a higher expression in response to inoculation with the WA isolate. The expression of most genes tested peaked at 6 hpi, which preceded ROS accumulation in the soybean leaves. Overall, these data suggest that foliar application of calcium contributes to a decrease in oxalic acid production and disease, arguably via modulation of the ROS metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. In vitro degradation and cell response of calcium carbonate composite ceramic in comparison with other synthetic bone substitute materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Fupo; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Fanwen; Zhu, Jixiang; Tian, Xiumei; Chen, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    The robust calcium carbonate composite ceramics (CC/PG) can be acquired by fast sintering calcium carbonate at a low temperature (650 °C) using a biocompatible, degradable phosphate-based glass (PG) as sintering agent. In the present study, the in vitro degradation and cell response of CC/PG were assessed and compared with 4 synthetic bone substitute materials, calcium carbonate ceramic (CC), PG, hydroxyapatite (HA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) ceramics. The degradation rates in decreasing order were as follows: PG, CC, CC/PG, β-TCP, and HA. The proliferation of rat bone mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) cultured on the CC/PG was comparable with that on CC and PG, but inferior to HA and β-TCP. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of rMSCs on CC/PG was lower than PG, comparable with β-TCP, but higher than HA. The rMSCs on CC/PG and PG had enhanced gene expression in specific osteogenic markers, respectively. Compared to HA and β-TCP, the rMSCs on the CC/PG expressed relatively lower level of collagen I and runt-related transcription factor 2, but showed more considerable expression of osteopontin. Although CC, PG, HA, and β-TCP possessed impressive performances in some specific aspects, they faced extant intrinsic drawbacks in either degradation rate or mechanical strength. Based on considerable compressive strength, moderate degradation rate, good cell response, and being free of obvious shortcoming, the CC/PG is promising as another choice for bone substitute materials. - Highlights: • A calcium carbonate composite ceramic (CC/PG) was acquired. • The in vitro degradation and cell response of CC/PG were compared to 4 materials. • The CC/PG showed moderate degradation rate. • The CC/PG exhibited good cell response. • The CC/PG was free of obvious drawback compared to other materials

  3. Presenilin 1 mutation decreases both calcium and contractile responses in cerebral arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussay, Xavier; Morel, Jean-Luc; Biendon, Nathalie; Rotureau, Lolita; Legeron, François-Pierre; Boutonnet, Marie-Charlotte; Cho, Yoon H; Macrez, Nathalie

    2017-10-01

    Mutations or upregulation in presenilin 1 (PS1) gene are found in familial early-onset Alzheimer's disease or sporadic late-onset Alzheimer's disease, respectively. PS1 has been essentially studied in neurons and its mutation was shown to alter intracellular calcium (Ca 2+ ) signals. Here, we showed that PS1 is expressed in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of mouse cerebral arteries, and we assessed the effects of the deletion of exon 9 of PS1 (PS1dE9) on Ca 2+ signals and contractile responses of vascular SMC. Agonist-induced contraction of cerebral vessels was significantly decreased in PS1dE9 both in vivo and ex vivo. Spontaneous activity of Ca 2+ sparks through ryanodine-sensitive channels (RyR) was unchanged, whereas the RyR-mediated Ca 2+ -release activated by caffeine was shorter in PS1dE9 SMC when compared with control. Moreover, PS1dE9 mutation decreased the caffeine-activated capacitive Ca 2+ entry, and inhibitors of SERCA pumps reversed the effects of PS1dE9 on Ca 2+ signals. PS1dE9 mutation also leads to the increased expression of SERCA3, phospholamban, and RyR3. These results show that PS1 plays a crucial role in the cerebrovascular system and the vascular reactivity is decreased through altered Ca 2+ signals in PS1dE9 mutant mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Association of estrogen receptor-alpha and vitamin D receptor genotypes with therapeutic response to calcium in postmenopausal Chinese women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-lin ZHANG; Yue-juan QIN; Qi-ren HUANG; Jin-wei HE; Miao LI; Qi ZHOU; Yun-qiu HU; Yu-juan LIU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the correlation between calcium treatment in postmenopausal women and estrogen receptoralpha (ER-alpha) Xba Ⅰ and Pvu Ⅱ genotype and vitamin D receptor (VDR) Apa Ⅰ genotype. METHODS: One hundred fifteen postmenopausal Chinese women of Han population were enrolled and treated with calcichew-D3(1000 mg calcium and 400 U vitamin D3) daily for 1 year. At entry and after 1 year treatment, the bone mineral density (BMD), serum and urinary bone turnover biochemical markers were evaluated. ER-alpha and VDR genotype were analyzed using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. RESULTS: After 1 year of calcium supplementation, a significant increase of BMD and a marked reduction in serum ALP and PTH levels, and a significant increase of serum 25-(OH) vitamin D level were observed (P<0.01 or P<0.05). At entry and after 1 year of treatment, no significant association was found between Xba Ⅰ, Pvu Ⅱ, and Apa Ⅰ genotypes and BMD in L1-4,Neck, and Troch, and all bone turnover marker levels. However, the percentage of change (median, QR) in Neck BMD was significantly different in homozygous XX [-4.14 (from -6.54 to -1.34)] in comparison with Xx [1.72(from -1.12 to 3.20)] (P<0.001) or xx [1.22 (from -1.74 to 3.06)] Xba Ⅰ ER-alpha genotype (P=0.001).CONCLUSION: Women with ER-α Xba Ⅰ genotype XX may have a higher risk of relatively fast bone mass loss in femoral neck after menopause and that they may have a poor responsiveness to calcium supplementation. The changes in BMD are not associated with ER-alpha Pvu Ⅱ genotype and VDR Apa Ⅰ genotype after 1 year of calcium supplementation.

  5. Involvement of plasma membrane calcium influx in bacterial induction of the K+/H+ and hypersensitive responses in tobacco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, M.M.; Keppler, L.D.; Orlandi, E.W.; Baker, C.J.; Mischke, C.F.

    1990-01-01

    An early event in the hypersensitive response of tobacco to Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae is the initiation of a K + /H + response characterized by specific plasma membrane K + efflux, extracellular alkalinization, and intracellular acidification. We investigated the role of calcium in induction of these host responses. Suspension-cultured tobacco cells exhibited a baseline Ca 2+ influx of 0.02 to 0.06 micromole per gram per hour as determined from 45 Ca 2+ uptake. Following bacterial inoculation, uptake rates began to increase coincidently with onset of the K + /H + response. Rates increased steadily for 2 to 3 hours, reaching 0.5 to 1 micromole per gram per hour. This increased Ca 2+ influx was prevented by EGTA and calcium channel blockers such as La 3+ , Co 2+ , and Cd 2+ but not by verapamil and nifedipine. Lanthanum, cobalt, cadmium, and EGTA inhibited the K + /H + response in both suspension-cultured cells and leaf discs and prevented hypersensitive cell death in leaf discs. We conclude that increase plasmalemma Ca 2+ influx is required for the K + /H + and hypersensitive responses in tobacco

  6. Designing Financial Instruments for Rapid Flood Response Using Remote Sensed and Archival Hazard and Exposure Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lall, U.; Allaire, M.; Ceccato, P.; Haraguchi, M.; Cian, F.; Bavandi, A.

    2017-12-01

    Catastrophic floods can pose a significant challenge for response and recovery. A key bottleneck in the speed of response is the availability of funds to a country or regions finance ministry to mobilize resources. Parametric instruments, where the release of funs is tied to the exceedance of a specified index or threshold, rather than to loss verification are well suited for this purpose. However, designing and appropriate index, that is not subject to manipulation and accurately reflects the need is a challenge, especially in developing countries which have short hydroclimatic and loss records, and where rapid land use change has led to significant changes in exposure and hydrology over time. The use of long records of rainfall from climate re-analyses, flooded area and land use from remote sensing to design and benchmark a parametric index considering the uncertainty and representativeness of potential loss is explored with applications to Bangladesh and Thailand. Prospects for broader applicability and limitations are discussed.

  7. Bone response adjacent to calcium phosphate electrostatic spray deposition coated implants: an experimental study in goats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manders, P.J.D.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Jansen, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A new technique to deposit calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings onto titanium substrates has been developed recently. This electrostatic spray deposition (ESD) technique seems to be very promising. It appears to have clinical advantages such as an inexpensive and simple set-up, high

  8. Calcium-dependent behavioural responses to acute copper exposure in Oncorhynchus mykiss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, S.B.; Svendsen, Jon Christian; Aarestrup, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Using rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, the present study demonstrated that: (1) calcium (Ca) increased the range of copper (Cu) concentrations that O. mykiss avoided; (2) Ca conserved the maintenance of pre-exposure swimming activity during inescapable acute (10 min) Cu exposure. Data showed th...

  9. Multi-factor challenge/response approach for remote biometric authentication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Assam, Hisham; Jassim, Sabah A.

    2011-06-01

    Although biometric authentication is perceived to be more reliable than traditional authentication schemes, it becomes vulnerable to many attacks when it comes to remote authentication over open networks and raises serious privacy concerns. This paper proposes a biometric-based challenge-response approach to be used for remote authentication between two parties A and B over open networks. In the proposed approach, a remote authenticator system B (e.g. a bank) challenges its client A who wants to authenticate his/her self to the system by sending a one-time public random challenge. The client A responds by employing the random challenge along with secret information obtained from a password and a token to produce a one-time cancellable representation of his freshly captured biometric sample. The one-time biometric representation, which is based on multi-factor, is then sent back to B for matching. Here, we argue that eavesdropping of the one-time random challenge and/or the resulting one-time biometric representation does not compromise the security of the system, and no information about the original biometric data is leaked. In addition to securing biometric templates, the proposed protocol offers a practical solution for the replay attack on biometric systems. Moreover, we propose a new scheme for generating a password-based pseudo random numbers/permutation to be used as a building block in the proposed approach. The proposed scheme is also designed to provide protection against repudiation. We illustrate the viability and effectiveness of the proposed approach by experimental results based on two biometric modalities: fingerprint and face biometrics.

  10. Exposure Assessment and Inflammatory Response Among Workers Producing Calcium Carbonate Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ling

    Problem: Nanotechnology is one of the most rapidly growing fields of science and engineering, and its applications have expanded to numerous research and industrial sectors, from consumer products to medicine to energy. Nano-materials and nanotechnology promise substantial benefits. However, there are many uncertainties and concerns regarding human health and the environment. Numerous toxicological studies on animals and cells in vitro have demonstrated that nanomaterials could cause various adverse health effects, including inflammation, oxidative stress, fibrosis and mutagenesis in the lungs, and cardiovascular and nervous system impairment. Objectives: The overall objective of this study was to characterize particulate exposures in a calcium carbonate nanoparticle manufacturing facility, investigate possible respiratory and cardiovascular effects, and explore the plausibility of an inflammatory mechanism. The associations between exposure level and various health outcomes were investigated. Methodology: Each job was characterized by mass, number and surface area concentration. Job classification was performed based on ranking of the exposure level and statistical models. Lung function tests, exhaled NO and blood pressure (BP) were measured before and after the workshift in the year of 2011. Inflammatory cytokines from induced sputum were measured cross-sectionally in the year of 2011. Data of lung function tests and blood pressure were collected cross-sectionally in the year of 2012. The associations between each exposure metric and health measures in 2012 were investigated. Only mass concentration was linked to both 2011 and 2012 health outcomes. Results: The sampling and analytic methodology used in the study presents the potential to characterize nanoparticle exposure for a variety of operational processes. We found the highest mass exposure occurred at bagging job whereas the highest number and surface area concentration was found at modification

  11. Quantum correlations responsible for remote state creation: strong and weak control parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronin, S. I.; Zenchuk, A. I.

    2017-03-01

    We study the quantum correlations between the two remote qubits (sender and receiver) connected by the transmission line (homogeneous spin-1/2 chain) depending on the parameters of the sender's and receiver's initial states (control parameters). We consider two different measures of quantum correlations: the entanglement (a traditional measure) and the informational correlation (based on the parameter exchange between the sender and receiver). We find the domain in the control parameter space yielding (i) zero entanglement between the sender and receiver during the whole evolution period and (ii) non-vanishing informational correlation between the sender and receiver, thus showing that the informational correlation is responsible for the remote state creation. Among the control parameters, there are the strong parameters (which strongly effect the values of studied measures) and the weak ones (whose effect is negligible), therewith the eigenvalues of the initial state are given a privileged role. We also show that the problem of small entanglement (concurrence) in quantum information processing is similar (in certain sense) to the problem of small determinants in linear algebra. A particular model of 40-node spin-1/2 communication line is presented.

  12. Graphics metafile interface to ARAC emergency response models for remote workstation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawver, B.S.

    1985-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Response Advisory Capability models are executed on computers at a central computer center with the output distributed to accident advisors in the field. The output of these atmospheric diffusion models are generated as contoured isopleths of concentrations. When these isopleths are overlayed with local geography, they become a useful tool to the accident site advisor. ARAC has developed a workstation that is located at potential accident sites. The workstation allows the accident advisor to view color plots of the model results, scale those plots and print black and white hardcopy of the model results. The graphics metafile, also known as Virtual Device Metafile (VDM) allows the models to generate a single device independent output file that is partitioned into geography, isoopleths and labeling information. The metafile is a very compact data storage technique that is output device independent. The metafile frees the model from either generating output for all known graphic devices or requiring the model to be rerun for additional graphic devices. With the partitioned metafile ARAC can transmit to the remote workstation the isopleths and labeling for each model. The geography database may not change and can be transmitted only when needed. This paper describes the important features of the remote workstation and how these features are supported by the device independent graphics metafile

  13. Remotely Sensed Northern Vegetation Response to Changing Climate: Growing Season and Productivity Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, S.; Park, Taejin; Choi, Sungho; Bi, Jian; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Myneni, Ranga

    2016-01-01

    Vegetation growing season and maximum photosynthetic state determine spatiotemporal variability of seasonal total gross primary productivity of vegetation. Recent warming induced impacts accelerate shifts on growing season and physiological status over Northern vegetated land. Thus, understanding and quantifying these changes are very important. Here, we first investigate how vegetation growing season and maximum photosynthesis state are evolved and how such components contribute on inter-annual variation of seasonal total gross primary productivity. Furthermore, seasonally different response of northern vegetation to changing temperature and water availability is also investigated. We utilized both long-term remotely sensed data to extract larger scale growing season metrics (growing season start, end and duration) and productivity (i.e., growing season summed vegetation index, GSSVI) for answering these questions. We find that regionally diverged growing season shift and maximum photosynthetic state contribute differently characterized productivity inter-annual variability and trend. Also seasonally different response of vegetation gives different view of spatially varying interaction between vegetation and climate. These results highlight spatially and temporally varying vegetation dynamics and are reflective of biome-specific responses of northern vegetation to changing climate.

  14. Attenuated response of L-type calcium current to nitric oxide in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozmaritsa, Nadiia; Christ, Torsten; Van Wagoner, David R; Haase, Hannelore; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Matschke, Klaus; Ravens, Ursula

    2014-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) synthesized by cardiomyocytes plays an important role in the regulation of cardiac function. Here, we studied the impact of NO signalling on calcium influx in human right atrial myocytes and its relation to atrial fibrillation (AF). Right atrial appendages (RAAs) were obtained from patients in sinus rhythm (SR) and AF. The biotin-switch technique was used to evaluate endogenous S-nitrosylation of the α1C subunit of L-type calcium channels. Comparing SR to AF, S-nitrosylation of Ca(2+) channels was similar. Direct effects of the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP) on L-type calcium current (ICa,L) were studied in cardiomyocytes with standard voltage-clamp techniques. In SR, ICa,L increased with SNAP (100 µM) by 48%, n/N = 117/56, P < 0.001. The SNAP effect on ICa,L involved activation of soluble guanylate cyclase and protein kinase A. Specific inhibition of phosphodiesterase (PDE)3 with cilostamide (1 µM) enhanced ICa,L to a similar extent as SNAP. However, when cAMP was elevated by PDE3 inhibition or β-adrenoceptor stimulation, SNAP reduced ICa,L, pointing to cGMP-cAMP cross-regulation. In AF, the stimulatory effect of SNAP on ICa,L was attenuated, while its inhibitory effect on isoprenaline- or cilostamide-stimulated current was preserved. cGMP elevation with SNAP was comparable between the SR and AF group. Moreover, the expression of PDE3 and soluble guanylate cyclase was not reduced in AF. NO exerts dual effects on ICa,L in SR with an increase of basal and inhibition of cAMP-stimulated current, and in AF NO inhibits only stimulated ICa,L. We conclude that in AF, cGMP regulation of PDE2 is preserved, but regulation of PDE3 is lost.

  15. Calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007477.htm Calcium supplements To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. WHO SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the ...

  16. Mitochondrial dysfunction is responsible for the intestinal calcium absorption inhibition induced by menadione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchionatti, Ana M; Perez, Adriana V; Diaz de Barboza, Gabriela E; Pereira, Beatriz M; Tolosa de Talamoni, Nori G

    2008-02-01

    Menadione (MEN) inhibits intestinal calcium absorption by a mechanism not completely understood. The aim of this work was to find out the role of mitochondria in this inhibitory mechanism. Hence, normal chicks treated with one i.p. dose of MEN were studied in comparison with controls. Intestinal calcium absorption was measured by the in situ ligated intestinal segment technique. GSH, oxidoreductase activities from the Krebs cycle and enzymes of the antioxidant system were measured in isolated mitochondria. Mitochondrial membrane potential was measured by a flow cytometer technique. DNA fragmentation and cytochrome c localization were determined by immunocytochemistry. Data indicate that in 30 min, MEN decreases intestinal Ca(2+) absorption, which returns to the control values after 10 h. GSH was only decreased for half an hour, while the activity of malate dehydrogenase and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase was diminished for 48 h. Mn(2+)-superoxide dismutase activity was increased in 30 min, whereas the activity of catalase and glutathione peroxidase remained unaltered. DNA fragmentation and cytochrome c release were maximal in 30 min, but were recovered after 15 h. In conclusion, MEN inhibits intestinal Ca(2+) absorption by mitochondrial dysfunction as revealed by GSH depletion and alteration of the permeability triggering the release of cytochrome c and DNA fragmentation.

  17. Influence of morphology and topography on potentiometric response of magnesium and calcium sensitive PEDOT films doped with adenosine triphosphate (ATP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paczosa-Bator, B.; Peltonen, J.; Bobacka, J.; Lewenstam, A.

    2006-01-01

    Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) films doped with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) are used to study the biologically relevant competitive magnesium and calcium ion-exchange at ATP membrane sites. It is shown, by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), that the surface topography and morphology of the PEDOT-ATP films determines the quality of their potentiometric response. More smooth and less rough films result in better potentiometric characteristics, particularly in a faster response. The topography/morphology of the PEDOT-ATP films is influenced by conditions during electrodeposition (electrochemical method of deposition, pH, concentration of electrolytes) and post-deposition soaking (including net-time of soaking), as evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX)

  18. The early asthmatic response is associated with glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondria activity as revealed by proteomic analysis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Yu-Dong

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inhalation of allergens by allergic asthmatics results in the early asthmatic response (EAR, which is characterized by acute airway obstruction beginning within a few minutes. The EAR is the earliest indicator of the pathological progression of allergic asthma. Because the molecular mechanism underlying the EAR is not fully defined, this study will contribute to a better understanding of asthma. Methods In order to gain insight into the molecular basis of the EAR, we examined changes in protein expression patterns in the lung tissue of asthmatic rats during the EAR using 2-DE/MS-based proteomic techniques. Bioinformatic analysis of the proteomic data was then performed using PPI Spider and KEGG Spider to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism. Results In total, 44 differentially expressed protein spots were detected in the 2-DE gels. Of these 44 protein spots, 42 corresponded to 36 unique proteins successfully identified using mass spectrometry. During subsequent bioinformatic analysis, the gene ontology classification, the protein-protein interaction networking and the biological pathway exploration demonstrated that the identified proteins were mainly involved in glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondrial activity. Using western blot and semi-quantitative RT-PCR, we confirmed the changes in expression of five selected proteins, which further supports our proteomic and bioinformatic analyses. Conclusions Our results reveal that the allergen-induced EAR in asthmatic rats is associated with glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondrial activity, which could establish a functional network in which calcium binding may play a central role in promoting the progression of asthma.

  19. Changes in energetic metabolism of Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca, Planorbidae in response to exogenous calcium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. D. Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcium is considered an essential element for the metabolism of aquatic snail Biomphalaria glabrata (Say, 1818, intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni Sambon, 1907 in Brazil, and represents a limiting factor to its distribution and adaptation to the environment. This study investigated the effect of different concentrations of exogenous CaCO3 on the energetic metabolism of B. glabrata for better understanding the physiological interference of chemical elements dissolved in the environment with the physiology of this species. Sixty-day-old snails were distributed into six groups, five exposed to different concentrations of CaCO3 (20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 mg/L and a control group. The exposure to CaCO3 was assessed over time, with analysis of 15 snails of each group in the following intervals: 1, 14, 21 or 30 days for hemolymph extraction. Concentrations of calcium and glucose in the hemolymph were determined by commercial kits, and organic acids were extracted using an ion exchange column and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Concentration of calcium in the hemolymph showed no significant difference (p>0.05 from the control group and between the concentrations tested. Concentration of glucose decreased (p<0.05 in the treatments of exposure to 20 and 40 mg/L and increased when exposed to 80 and 100 mg/L CaCO3 compared to control and to other concentrations tested over 30 days. The organic acids pyruvate, oxaloacetate, citrate, succinate, fumarate, beta-hydroxybutyrate and lactate presented increased concentrations, while propionate and acetoacetate, decreased concentrations, when exposed to CaCO3 compared to control. Considering the influence of different periods of exposure to CaCO3, on the 14th day, there were stronger alterations in the metabolism of B. glabrata. In conclusion, exposure to CaCO3 reduced the concentration of glucose, which is metabolized into pyruvate, the final product of glycolysis, and also

  20. A sensor for calcium uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sean; Meyer, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria — the cell’s power plants — increase their energy production in response to calcium signals in the cytoplasm. A regulator of the elusive mitochondrial calcium channel has now been identified. PMID:20844529

  1. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals different molecular mechanisms of Bacillus coagulans 2-6 response to sodium lactate and calcium lactate during lactic acid production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiayang Qin

    Full Text Available Lactate production is enhanced by adding calcium carbonate or sodium hydroxide during fermentation. However, Bacillus coagulans 2-6 can produce more than 180 g/L L-lactic acid when calcium lactate is accumulated, but less than 120 g/L L-lactic acid when sodium lactate is formed. The molecular mechanisms by which B. coagulans responds to calcium lactate and sodium lactate remain unclear. In this study, comparative transcriptomic methods based on high-throughput RNA sequencing were applied to study gene expression changes in B. coagulans 2-6 cultured in non-stress, sodium lactate stress and calcium lactate stress conditions. Gene expression profiling identified 712 and 1213 significantly regulated genes in response to calcium lactate stress and sodium lactate stress, respectively. Gene ontology assignments of the differentially expressed genes were performed. KEGG pathway enrichment analysis revealed that 'ATP-binding cassette transporters' were significantly affected by calcium lactate stress, and 'amino sugar and nucleotide sugar metabolism' was significantly affected by sodium lactate stress. It was also found that lactate fermentation was less affected by calcium lactate stress than by sodium lactate stress. Sodium lactate stress had negative effect on the expression of 'glycolysis/gluconeogenesis' genes but positive effect on the expression of 'citrate cycle (TCA cycle' genes. However, calcium lactate stress had positive influence on the expression of 'glycolysis/gluconeogenesis' genes and had minor influence on 'citrate cycle (TCA cycle' genes. Thus, our findings offer new insights into the responses of B. coagulans to different lactate stresses. Notably, our RNA-seq dataset constitute a robust database for investigating the functions of genes induced by lactate stress in the future and identify potential targets for genetic engineering to further improve L-lactic acid production by B. coagulans.

  2. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals different molecular mechanisms of Bacillus coagulans 2-6 response to sodium lactate and calcium lactate during lactic acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jiayang; Wang, Xiuwen; Wang, Landong; Zhu, Beibei; Zhang, Xiaohua; Yao, Qingshou; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Lactate production is enhanced by adding calcium carbonate or sodium hydroxide during fermentation. However, Bacillus coagulans 2-6 can produce more than 180 g/L L-lactic acid when calcium lactate is accumulated, but less than 120 g/L L-lactic acid when sodium lactate is formed. The molecular mechanisms by which B. coagulans responds to calcium lactate and sodium lactate remain unclear. In this study, comparative transcriptomic methods based on high-throughput RNA sequencing were applied to study gene expression changes in B. coagulans 2-6 cultured in non-stress, sodium lactate stress and calcium lactate stress conditions. Gene expression profiling identified 712 and 1213 significantly regulated genes in response to calcium lactate stress and sodium lactate stress, respectively. Gene ontology assignments of the differentially expressed genes were performed. KEGG pathway enrichment analysis revealed that 'ATP-binding cassette transporters' were significantly affected by calcium lactate stress, and 'amino sugar and nucleotide sugar metabolism' was significantly affected by sodium lactate stress. It was also found that lactate fermentation was less affected by calcium lactate stress than by sodium lactate stress. Sodium lactate stress had negative effect on the expression of 'glycolysis/gluconeogenesis' genes but positive effect on the expression of 'citrate cycle (TCA cycle)' genes. However, calcium lactate stress had positive influence on the expression of 'glycolysis/gluconeogenesis' genes and had minor influence on 'citrate cycle (TCA cycle)' genes. Thus, our findings offer new insights into the responses of B. coagulans to different lactate stresses. Notably, our RNA-seq dataset constitute a robust database for investigating the functions of genes induced by lactate stress in the future and identify potential targets for genetic engineering to further improve L-lactic acid production by B. coagulans.

  3. Coronary flow response to remote ischemic preconditioning is preserved in old cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillo, Elpidio; Migale, Monica; Balestrini, Fabrizio; Postacchini, Demetrio; Bustacchini, Silvia; Lattanzio, Fabrizia; Antonelli-Incalzi, Raffaele

    2017-10-20

    The effect of remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) on coronary flow in elderly cardiac patients has not been investigated yet. Thus, we aimed to study the change of coronary flow subsequent to RIPC in old patients with heart diseases and to identify its main correlates. Ninety-five elderly patients (aged ≥ 65 years) accessing cardiac rehabilitation ward underwent transthoracic ultrasound evaluation of peak diastolic flow velocity of left anterior descending artery. Measurements of coronary flow velocity were performed on baseline and after an RIPC protocol (three cycles of 5 min ischemia of right arm alternating 5 min reperfusion). Differences between subjects with coronary flow velocity change over or equal the 75° percentile (high-responders) and subjects with a coronary flow velocity change under the 75° percentile (low-responders) were assessed. In enrolled elderly heart patients, coronary flow velocity significantly augmented from baseline after RIPC [0.23 m/s (0.18-0.28) vs 0.27 m/s (0.22-0.36); p < 0.001 by Wilcoxon test]. High-responders to RIPC were significantly younger and in better functional status than low-responders. Heart failure resulted as the main variable associated with impairment of RIPC responsiveness (R 2  = 0.202; p = 0.002)]. Our sample of old cardiac patients presented a significant median increment of coronary flow velocity after RIPC. The magnitude of the observed change of coronary flow velocity was comparable to that previously described in healthy subjects. The coronary response to RIPC was attenuated by heart failure. Further research should define whether such RIPC responsiveness is associated with cardioprotection and carries prognostic implications.

  4. Effect of enzymatic degradation of chitosan in polyhydroxybutyrate/chitosan/calcium phosphate composites on in vitro osteoblast response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giretova, Maria; Medvecky, Lubomir; Stulajterova, Radoslava; Sopcak, Tibor; Briancin, Jaroslav; Tatarkova, Monika

    2016-12-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate/chitosan/calcium phosphate composites are interesting biomaterials for utilization in regenerative medicine and they may by applied in reconstruction of deeper subchondral defects. Insufficient informations were found in recent papers about the influence of lysozyme degradation of chitosan in calcium phosphate/chitosan based composites on in vitro cytotoxicity and proliferation activity of osteoblasts. The effect of enzymatic chitosan degradation on osteoblasts proliferation was studied on composite films in which the porosity of origin 3D scaffolds was eliminated and the surface texture was modified. The significantly enhanced proliferation activity with faster population growth of osteoblasts were found on enzymatically degraded biopolymer composite films with α-tricalcium phosphate and nanohydroxyapatite. No cytotoxicity of composite films prepared from lysozyme degraded scaffolds containing a large fraction of low molecular weight chitosans (LMWC), was revealed after 10 days of cultivation. Contrary to above in the higher cytotoxicity origin untreated nanohydroxyapatite films and porous composite scaffolds. The results showed that the synergistic effect of surface distribution, morphology of nanohydroxyapatite particles, microtopography and the presence of LMWC due to chitosan degradation in composite films were responsible for compensation of the cytotoxicity of nanohydroxyapatite composite films or porous composite scaffolds.

  5. Remote sensing analysis of riparian vegetation response to desert marsh restoration in the Mexican Highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Laura M.; Villarreal, Miguel; Pulliam, H. Ronald; Minckley, Robert L.; Gass, Leila; Tolle, Cindy; Coe, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Desert marshes, or cienegas, are extremely biodiverse habitats imperiled by anthropogenic demands for water and changing climates. Given their widespread loss and increased recognition, remarkably little is known about restoration techniques. In this study, we examine the effects of gabions (wire baskets filled with rocks used as dams) on vegetation in the Cienega San Bernardino, in the Arizona, Sonora portion of the US-Mexico border, using a remote-sensing analysis coupled with field data. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), used here as a proxy for plant biomass, is compared at gabion and control sites over a 27-year period during the driest months (May/June). Over this period, green-up occurred at most sites where there were gabions and at a few of the control sites where gabions had not been constructed. When we statistically controlled for differences among sites in source area, stream order, elevation, and interannual winter rainfall, as well as comparisons of before and after the initiation of gabion construction, vegetation increased around gabions yet did not change (or decreased) where there were no gabions. We found that NDVI does not vary with precipitation inputs prior to construction of gabions but demonstrates a strong response to precipitation after the gabions are built. Field data describing plant cover, species richness, and species composition document increases from 2000 to 2012 and corroborate reestablished biomass at gabions. Our findings validate that gabions can be used to restore riparian vegetation and potentially ameliorate drought conditions in a desert cienega.

  6. Calcium absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlmark, B.; Reizenstein, P.; Dudley, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    The methods most commonly used to measure the absorption and retention of orally administered calcium are reviewed. Nearly all make use of calcium radioisotopes. The magnitude of calcium absorption and retention depends upon the chemical form and amount of calcium administered, and the clinical and nutritional status of the subject; these influences are briefly surveyed. (author)

  7. Rayleigh radiance computations for satellite remote sensing: accounting for the effect of sensor spectral response function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Menghua

    2016-05-30

    To understand and assess the effect of the sensor spectral response function (SRF) on the accuracy of the top of the atmosphere (TOA) Rayleigh-scattering radiance computation, new TOA Rayleigh radiance lookup tables (LUTs) over global oceans and inland waters have been generated. The new Rayleigh LUTs include spectral coverage of 335-2555 nm, all possible solar-sensor geometries, and surface wind speeds of 0-30 m/s. Using the new Rayleigh LUTs, the sensor SRF effect on the accuracy of the TOA Rayleigh radiance computation has been evaluated for spectral bands of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite and the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS)-1, showing some important uncertainties for VIIRS-SNPP particularly for large solar- and/or sensor-zenith angles as well as for large Rayleigh optical thicknesses (i.e., short wavelengths) and bands with broad spectral bandwidths. To accurately account for the sensor SRF effect, a new correction algorithm has been developed for VIIRS spectral bands, which improves the TOA Rayleigh radiance accuracy to ~0.01% even for the large solar-zenith angles of 70°-80°, compared with the error of ~0.7% without applying the correction for the VIIRS-SNPP 410 nm band. The same methodology that accounts for the sensor SRF effect on the Rayleigh radiance computation can be used for other satellite sensors. In addition, with the new Rayleigh LUTs, the effect of surface atmospheric pressure variation on the TOA Rayleigh radiance computation can be calculated precisely, and no specific atmospheric pressure correction algorithm is needed. There are some other important applications and advantages to using the new Rayleigh LUTs for satellite remote sensing, including an efficient and accurate TOA Rayleigh radiance computation for hyperspectral satellite remote sensing, detector-based TOA Rayleigh radiance computation, Rayleigh radiance calculations for high altitude

  8. Student Response to Remote-Online Case-Based Learning: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicklen, Peter; Keating, Jennifer L; Maloney, Stephen

    2016-03-22

    Case-based learning (CBL) typically involves face-to-face interaction in small collaborative groups with a focus on self-directed study. To our knowledge, no published studies report an evaluation of Web conferencing in CBL. The primary aim of this study was to explore student perceptions and attitudes in response to a remote-online case-based learning (RO-CBL) experience. This study took place over a 2-week period in 2013 at Monash University, Victoria, Australia. A third year cohort (n=73) of physiotherapy students was invited to participate. Students were required to participate in 2 training sessions, followed by RO-CBL across 2 sessions. The primary outcome of interest was the student feedback on the quality of the learning experience during RO-CBL participation. This was explored with a focus group and a survey. Most students (68/73) completed the postintervention survey (nonparticipation rate 8%). RO-CBL was generally well received by participants, with 59% (40/68) of participates stating that they'd like RO-CBL to be used in the future and 78% (53/68) of participants believing they could meet the CBL's learning objectives via RO-CBL. The 4 key themes relevant to student response to RO-CBL that emerged from the focus groups and open-ended questions on the postintervention survey were how RO-CBL compared to expectations, key benefits of RO-CBL including flexibility and time and cost savings, communication challenges in the online environment compared to face-to-face, and implications of moving to an online platform. Web conferencing may be a suitable medium for students to participate in CBL. Participants were satisfied with the learning activity and felt they could meet the CBL's learning objectives. Further study should evaluate Web conferencing CBL across an entire semester in regard to student satisfaction, perceived depth of learning, and learning outcomes.

  9. Regional aerosol emissions and temperature response: Local and remote climate impacts of regional aerosol forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinschal, Anna; Ekman, Annica; Hansson, Hans-Christen

    2017-04-01

    Emissions of anthropogenic aerosols vary substantially over the globe and the short atmospheric residence time of aerosols leads to a highly uneven radiative forcing distribution, both spatially and temporally. Regional aerosol radiative forcing can, nevertheless, exert a large influence on the temperature field away from the forcing region through changes in heat transport or the atmospheric or ocean circulation. Moreover, the global temperature response distribution to aerosol forcing may vary depending on the geographical location of the forcing. In other words, the climate sensitivity in one region can vary depending on the location of the forcing. The surface temperature distribution response to changes in sulphate aerosol forcing caused by sulphur dioxide (SO2) emission perturbations in four different regions is investigated using the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM). The four regions, Europe, North America, East and South Asia, are all regions with historically high aerosol emissions and are relevant from both an air-quality and climate policy perspective. All emission perturbations are defined relative to the year 2000 emissions provided for the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5. The global mean temperature change per unit SO2 emission change is similar for all four regions for similar magnitudes of emissions changes. However, the global temperature change per unit SO2 emission in simulations where regional SO2 emission were removed is substantially higher than that obtained in simulations where regional SO2 emissions were increased. Thus, the climate sensitivity to regional SO2 emissions perturbations depends on the magnitude of the emission perturbation in NorESM. On regional scale, on the other hand, the emission perturbations in different geographical locations lead to different regional temperature responses, both locally and in remote regions. The results from the model simulations are used to construct regional temperature potential

  10. The response of high and low polyamine producing cell lines to aluminum and calcium stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridev Mohapatra; Smita Cherry; Rakesh Minocha; Rajtilak Majumdar; Palaniswamy Thangavel; Stephanie Long; Subhash C. Minocha

    2010-01-01

    The diamine putrescine (Put) has been shown to accumulate in tree leaves in response to high Al and low Ca in the soil, leading to the suggestion that this response may provide a physiological advantage to leaf cells under conditions of Al stress. The increase in Put is reversed by Ca supplementation in the soil. Using two cell lines of poplar (Populus nigra...

  11. The application of remote sensing techniques to create a Black Sea coastal response strategy for oil spill response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, R.; Hanlon, W.

    1998-01-01

    The application of remote satellite imaging, coupled with Geographic Information System (GIS) technology has been used to create coastal maps enhanced with environmental information. The use of such techniques for oil spill response requires the development of practical applications to assist responders with real-time decision making. In a joint effort with regional navies for Black Sea spill contingency planning, the US Navy has developed methods by which a quick, accurate, and economical application of existing technology can be used to produce data rich maps for a large area of interest. This combines various existing techniques to create practical applications and usable documents for oil spill planners and responders. Existing environmental data on a selected area of the Black Sea coastal zone was collected and this information was sorted, harmonized and transposed onto a rectified multispectral satellite image of the area in a GIS format. Multispectral analysis was performed on the image to locate environmentally distinct zones. The resulting multi-layered GIS map provides a useful representation of coastal environmental sensitivities, and in many ways surpasses conventional GIS systems. The satellite image provides an accurate and realtime map of the area while the multispectral data precisely locates common ecosystems, such as wetlands and forests. This allows for the rapid prioritization of coastal areas and the ability to pinpoint specific areas for protection. The resulting process provides emergency responders the ability to quickly and economically create a data rich GIS. This system will provide reliable, timely information for protection strategies, identifying environmental and public risks, and offer a basis by which to measure spill impacts and recovery techniques, especially in areas where environmental reference data is limited. (author)

  12. Response of stem cells from different origins to biphasic calcium phosphate bioceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Sonja E; Glickman, Robert; da Silva, Wagner N; Arinzeh, Treena L; Kerkis, Irina

    2015-08-01

    Biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) bioceramics have been successfully applied in a broad variety of presentation forms and with different ratios of hydroxyapatite (HA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP). BCPs have been loaded with stem cells from different origins for bone tissue engineering purposes, but evidence of stem cell behavior on different compositions (various HA/β-TCP ratios) and physical features of BCPs is limited. We compared the adhesion, proliferation, viability and osteogenic potential of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on granular BCPs with equal HA/β-TCP ratio of diverse particle sizes and on porous blocks which had different chemical compositions. In addition, the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs was compared to adipose-derived (ADSC) and dental pulp (DPSC) stem cells, as well as to pre-osteoblasts on a particulate BCP. MSCs growing on granular BCPs demonstrated increased number as compared to MSCs growing on blocks. Cells proliferated to a greater extent on small granular BCPs, while large granular BCPs and blocks promoted cell differentiation. Surprisingly, the expression of genes involved in osteogenesis was upregulated in MSCs on bioceramics in basal medium which indicates that BCPs may have osteoinductive potential. This was confirmed with the upregulation of osteochondrogenic markers, at different time points, when stem cells from various tissues were grown on the BCP. This study demonstrates that BCPs, depending on their physical features and chemical composition, modulate stem cell behavior, and that stem cells from different origins are inherently distinct in their gene expression profile and can be triggered toward osteochondrogenic fate by BCPs.

  13. Nature and origin of the calcium asymmetry-arising during gravitropic response in etiolated pea epicotyls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migliaccio, F.; Galston, A.W.

    1987-01-01

    Seven day old etiolated pea epicotyls were loaded symmetrically with 3 H-indole 3-acetic acid (IAA) or 45 Ca 2+ , then subjected to 1.5 hours of 1g gravistimulation. Epidermal peels taken from top and bottom surfaces after 90 minutes showed an increase in IAA on the lower side and of Ca 2+ on the upper side. Inhibitors of IAA movement (TIBA, 9-hydroxyfluorene carboxylic acid) block the development of both IAA and Ca 2+ asymmetries, but substances known to interfere with normal Ca 2+ transport do not significantly alter either IAA or Ca 2+ asymmetries. These substances, however, are active in modifying both Ca 2+ uptake and efflux through oat and pea leaf protoplast membranes. The authors conclude that the 45 Ca 2+ fed to pea epicotyls occurs largely in the cell wall, and that auxin movement is primary and Ca 2+ movement secondary in gravitropism. They hypothesize that apoplastic Ca 2+ changes during the graviresponse because it is displaced by H + secreted through auxin-induced proton release. This proposed mechanism is supported by localized pH experiments, in which filter paper soaked in various buffers was applied to one side of a carborundum-abraded epicotyls. Buffer at pH 3 increased calcium loss from the side to which it is applied, whereas pH 7 buffer decreases it. Moreover, 10 micromolar IAA and 1 micromolar fusicoccin, which promote H + efflux, increase Ca 2+ release from pea epicotyl segments, whereas cycloheximide, which inhibits H + efflux, has the reverse effect

  14. A remotely operated drug delivery system with an electrolytic pump and a thermo-responsive valve

    KAUST Repository

    Yi, Ying

    2015-07-22

    Implantable drug delivery devices are becoming attractive due to their abilities of targeted and controlled dose release. Currently, two important issues are functional lifetime and non-controlled drug diffusion. In this work, we present a drug delivery device combining an electrolytic pump and a thermo-responsive valve, which are both remotely controlled by an electromagnetic field (40.5 mT and 450 kHz). Our proposed device exhibits a novel operation mechanism for long-term therapeutic treatments using a solid drug in reservoir approach. Our device also prevents undesired drug liquid diffusions. When the electromagnetic field is on, the electrolysis-induced bubble drives the drug liquid towards the Poly (N-Isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) valve that consists of PNIPAM and iron micro-particles. The heat generated by the iron micro-particles causes the PNIPAM to shrink, resulting in an open valve. When the electromagnetic field is turned off, the PNIPAM starts to swell. In the meantime, the bubbles are catalytically recombined into water, reducing the pressure inside the pumping chamber, which leads to the refilling of the fresh liquid from outside the device. A catalytic reformer is included, allowing more liquid refilling during the limited valve\\'s closing time. The amount of body liquid that refills the drug reservoir can further dissolve the solid drug, forming a reproducible drug solution for the next dose. By repeatedly turning on and off the electromagnetic field, the drug dose can be cyclically released, and the exit port of the device is effectively controlled.

  15. Some Reliability Considerations of UGV for Remote-response in Nuclear Emergency Situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Heungseop; Cho, Jaiwan; Jeong, Kyungmin

    2013-01-01

    In Fukushima disaster, a number of different UGVs, such as Packbots, Warriors, Quince, and Survey Runner, are used for monitoring, collecting data, inspection, and cleaning up. In utilizing UGVs in a nuclear emergency situation, one of serious problems is reliability of UGVs which is not sufficient yet for required mission completion. In this paper we surveyed failures and reliability of field UGVs and draw some important reliability considerations of UGVs for remote-response in a nuclear emergency situation. We think that the findings in this study will be helpful for developers or researchers of UGVs for nuclear emergency situations. We studied failures and reliability of UGVs used in search/rescue, military, and nuclear field by literature survey. The results showed that a state of art field UGVs can't be expected to complete an entire mission without failures, which leads to needs of reliability improvement of them. Though part of failure data from the surveyed studies were not enough detailed to get reliability matrix, some meaningful insights were found through analysis. Based on these insights, we draw some important considerations for reliability improvement of UGVs for an NPP emergency situation, and those reliability considerations are classified according to life cycle of a UGV for developers and researchers. Finally, there were not reported failures related to radiation environments in surveyed literature, but radiation tolerant control boards and sensors are easily anticipated in a NPP emergency situation. Therefore studies about the radiation-tolerant design and the use of radiation-tolerant components also should be considered for high reliability of UGVs for a NPP application

  16. A remotely operated drug delivery system with an electrolytic pump and a thermo-responsive valve

    KAUST Repository

    Yi, Ying; Zaher, Amir; Yassine, Omar; Kosel, Jü rgen; Foulds, Ian G.

    2015-01-01

    Implantable drug delivery devices are becoming attractive due to their abilities of targeted and controlled dose release. Currently, two important issues are functional lifetime and non-controlled drug diffusion. In this work, we present a drug delivery device combining an electrolytic pump and a thermo-responsive valve, which are both remotely controlled by an electromagnetic field (40.5 mT and 450 kHz). Our proposed device exhibits a novel operation mechanism for long-term therapeutic treatments using a solid drug in reservoir approach. Our device also prevents undesired drug liquid diffusions. When the electromagnetic field is on, the electrolysis-induced bubble drives the drug liquid towards the Poly (N-Isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) valve that consists of PNIPAM and iron micro-particles. The heat generated by the iron micro-particles causes the PNIPAM to shrink, resulting in an open valve. When the electromagnetic field is turned off, the PNIPAM starts to swell. In the meantime, the bubbles are catalytically recombined into water, reducing the pressure inside the pumping chamber, which leads to the refilling of the fresh liquid from outside the device. A catalytic reformer is included, allowing more liquid refilling during the limited valve's closing time. The amount of body liquid that refills the drug reservoir can further dissolve the solid drug, forming a reproducible drug solution for the next dose. By repeatedly turning on and off the electromagnetic field, the drug dose can be cyclically released, and the exit port of the device is effectively controlled.

  17. Post-ischaemic changes in the response time of oxygen consumption to demand in the isolated rat heart are mediated partly by calcium and glycolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurbier, C. J.; Ince, C.

    2002-01-01

    This study examined whether different durations of ischaemia (I) and reperfusion (R) altered the kinetics of O-2 consumption-to-demand matching and the contribution of changes in calcium and metabolic pathways to possible alterations. The response time of mitochondrial O-2 consumption (t(mito)) to a

  18. Imbalance of morphofunctional responses of Jurkat T lymphoblasts at short-term culturing with relief zinc- or copper-containing calcium phosphate coating on titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinova, L S; Shupletsova, V V; Dunets, N A; Khaziakhmatova, O G; Yurova, K A; Khlusova, M Yu; Slepchenko, G B; Cherempey, E G; Sharkeev, Yu P; Komarova, E G; Sedelnikova, M B; Khlusov, I A

    2017-01-01

    Morphofunctional response of Jurkat T cells that were cultured for 24 h on substrates prepared from commercially pure titanium with relief microarc bilateral calcium phosphate coating containing copper or zinc was studied. Changes in the concentration of essential trace elements contained in this coating can cause significant imbalance of molecular processes of differentiation, secretion, apoptosis, and necrosis and reduce tumor cell survival.

  19. Strontium-Doped Calcium Phosphate and Hydroxyapatite Granules Promote Different Inflammatory and Bone Remodelling Responses in Normal and Ovariectomised Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wei; Emanuelsson, Lena; Norlindh, Birgitta; Omar, Omar; Thomsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The healing of bone defects may be hindered by systemic conditions such as osteoporosis. Calcium phosphates, with or without ion substitutions, may provide advantages for bone augmentation. However, the mechanism of bone formation with these materials is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the healing process in bone defects implanted with hydroxyapatite (HA) or strontium-doped calcium phosphate (SCP) granules, in non-ovariectomised (non-OVX) and ovariectomised (OVX) rats. After 0 (baseline), six and 28d, bone samples were harvested for gene expression analysis, histology and histomorphometry. Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), at six days, was higher in the HA, in non-OVX and OVX, whereas interleukin-6 (IL-6), at six and 28d, was higher in SCP, but only in non-OVX. Both materials produced a similar expression of the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). Higher expression of osteoclastic markers, calcitonin receptor (CR) and cathepsin K (CatK), were detected in the HA group, irrespective of non-OVX or OVX. The overall bone formation was comparable between HA and SCP, but with topological differences. The bone area was higher in the defect centre of the HA group, mainly in the OVX, and in the defect periphery of the SCP group, in both non-OVX and OVX. It is concluded that HA and SCP granules result in comparable bone formation in trabecular bone defects. As judged by gene expression and histological analyses, the two materials induced different inflammatory and bone remodelling responses. The modulatory effects are associated with differences in the spatial distribution of the newly formed bone. PMID:24376855

  20. Arabidopsis calcium-dependent protein kinase AtCPK1 plays a positive role in salt/drought-stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kui; Peng, Lu; Liu, Yingying; Yao, Rundong; Liu, Zhibin; Li, Xufeng; Yang, Yi; Wang, Jianmei

    2018-03-25

    The calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) play vital roles in plant response to various environmental stimuli. Here, we investigated the function of Arabidopsis AtCPK1 in response to salt and drought stress. The loss-of-function cpk1 mutant displayed hypersensitive to salt and drought stress, whereas overexpressing AtCPK1 in Arabidopsis plants significantly enhanced the resistance to salt or drought stress. The reduced or elevated tolerance of cpk1 mutant and AtCPK1-overexpressing lines was confirmed by the changes of proline, malondialdehyde (MDA) and H 2 O 2 . Real-time PCR analysis revealed that the expression of several stress-inducible genes (RD29A, COR15A, ZAT10, APX2) down-regulated in cpk1 mutant and up-regulated in AtCPK1-overexpressing plants. These results are likely to indicate that AtCPK1 positively regulates salt and drought stress in Arabidopsis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Calcium - ionized

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diuretics Thrombocytosis (high platelet count) Tumors Vitamin A excess Vitamin D excess Lower-than-normal levels may be due to: Hypoparathyroidism Malabsorption Osteomalacia Pancreatitis Renal failure Rickets Vitamin D deficiency Alternative Names Free calcium; Ionized calcium ...

  2. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Calcium is needed by the body for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also ... to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in ...

  3. Cyclic mononucleotides modulate potassium and calcium flux responses to H2O2 in Arabidopsis roots

    KAUST Repository

    Ordoñ ez, Natalia Maria; Marondedze, Claudius; Thomas, Ludivine; Pasqualini, Stefania; Shabala, Lana; Shabala, Sergey; Gehring, Christoph A

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic mononucleotides are messengers in plant stress responses. Here we show that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induces rapid net K+-efflux and Ca2+-influx in Arabidopsis roots. Pre-treatment with either 10 μM cAMP or cGMP for 1 or 24 h does

  4. The Federal Oil Spill Team for Emergency Response Remote Sensing (FOSTERRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stough, T.; Jones, C. E.; Leifer, I.; Lindsay, F. E.; Murray, J. J.; Ramirez, E. M.; Salemi, A.; Streett, D.

    2014-12-01

    Oil spills can cause enormous ecological and economic devastation, necessitating application of the best science and technology available, for which remote sensing plays a critical role in detection and monitoring of oil spills. The FOSTERRS interagency working group seeks to ensure that during an oil spill, remote sensing assets (satellite/aircraft) and analysis techniques are quickly, effectively and seamlessly available to oil spills responders. FOSTERRS enables cooperation between agencies with core environmental remote sensing assets and capabilities and academic and industry experts to act as an oil spill remote sensing information clearinghouse. The US government and its collaborators have a broad variety of aircraft and satellite sensors, imagery interrogation techniques and other technology that can provide indispensable remote sensing information to agencies, emergency responders and the public during an oil spill. Specifically, FOSTERRS will work to ensure that (1) suitable aircraft and satellite imagery and radar observations are quickly made available in a manner that can be integrated into oil spill detection and mitigation efforts, (2) existing imagery interrogation techniques are in the hands of those who will provide the 24 x 7 operational support and (3) efforts are made to develop new technology where the existing techniques do not provide oil spills responders with important information they need. The FOSTERRS mission goal places it in an ideal place for identification of critical technological needs, and identifying bottlenecks in technology acceptance. The core FOSTERRS team incorporates representation for operations and science for agencies with relevant instrumental and platform assets (NASA, NOAA, USGS, NRL). FOSTERRS membership will open to a wide range of end-user agencies and planned observer status from industry and academic experts, and eventually international partners. Through these collaborations, FOSTERRS facilitates interagency

  5. Fusing Mobile In Situ Observations and Satellite Remote Sensing of Chemical Release Emissions to Improve Disaster Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira Leifer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemical release disasters have serious consequences, disrupting ecosystems, society, and causing significant loss of life. Mitigating the destructive impacts relies on identification and mapping, monitoring, and trajectory forecasting. Improvements in sensor capabilities are enabling airborne and spacebased remote sensing to support response activities. Key applications are improving transport models in complex terrain and improved disaster response.Chemical release disasters have serious consequences, disrupting ecosystems, society, and causing significant loss of life. Mitigating the destructive impacts relies on identification and mapping, monitoring, and trajectory forecasting. Improvements in sensor capabilities are enabling airborne and space-based remote sensing to support response activities. Key applications are improving transport models in complex terrain and improved disaster response.Understanding urban atmospheric transport in the Los Angeles Basin, where topographic influences on transport patterns are significant, was improved by leveraging the Aliso Canyon leak as an atmospheric tracer. Plume characterization data was collected by the AutoMObile trace Gas (AMOG Surveyor, a commuter car modified for science. Mobile surface in situ CH4 and winds were measured by AMOG Surveyor under Santa Ana conditions to estimate an emission rate of 365±30% Gg yr-1. Vertical profiles were collected by AMOG Surveyor by leveraging local topography for vertical profiling to identify the planetary boundary layer at ~700 m. Topography significantly constrained plume dispersion by up to a factor of two. The observed plume trajectory was used to validate satellite aerosol optical depth-inferred atmospheric transport, which suggested the plume first was driven offshore, but then veered back towards land. Numerical long-range transport model predictions confirm this interpretation. This study demonstrated a novel application of satellite aerosol remote

  6. Cyclic mononucleotides modulate potassium and calcium flux responses to H2O2 in Arabidopsis roots

    KAUST Repository

    Ordoñez, Natalia Maria

    2014-02-13

    Cyclic mononucleotides are messengers in plant stress responses. Here we show that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induces rapid net K+-efflux and Ca2+-influx in Arabidopsis roots. Pre-treatment with either 10 μM cAMP or cGMP for 1 or 24 h does significantly reduce net K+-leakage and Ca2+-influx, and in the case of the K+-fluxes, the cell permeant cyclic mononucleotides are more effective. We also examined the effect of 10 μM of the cell permeant 8-Br-cGMP on the Arabidopsis microsomal proteome and noted a specific increase in proteins with a role in stress responses and ion transport, suggesting that cGMP is sufficient to directly and/or indirectly induce complex adaptive changes to cellular stresses induced by H2O2. © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Viewing marine bacteria, their activity and response to environmental drivers from orbit: satellite remote sensing of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, D Jay; Ford, Tim E; Colwell, Rita R; Baker-Austin, Craig; Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime; Subramaniam, Ajit; Capone, Douglas G

    2014-04-01

    Satellite-based remote sensing of marine microorganisms has become a useful tool in predicting human health risks associated with these microscopic targets. Early applications were focused on harmful algal blooms, but more recently methods have been developed to interrogate the ocean for bacteria. As satellite-based sensors have become more sophisticated and our ability to interpret information derived from these sensors has advanced, we have progressed from merely making fascinating pictures from space to developing process models with predictive capability. Our understanding of the role of marine microorganisms in primary production and global elemental cycles has been vastly improved as has our ability to use the combination of remote sensing data and models to provide early warning systems for disease outbreaks. This manuscript will discuss current approaches to monitoring cyanobacteria and vibrios, their activity and response to environmental drivers, and will also suggest future directions.

  8. Calcium hydroxide associated with a new vehicle: Psidium cattleianum leaf extracts. Tissue response evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego VALENTIM

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate edemogenic activity and subcutaneous inflammatory reaction induced by Psidium cattleianum leaf extracts associated with Ca(OH2. Thirty male Wistar rats, split equally into three groups [aqueous extract + Ca(OH2; ethanolic extract + Ca(OH2; and propylene glycol + Ca(OH2], were assessed every 3 h or 6 h (five animals in each period. Under general anesthesia, 0.2 mL of 1% Evans blue per 100 g of body weight was injected into the penile vein and each combination to be evaluated was subcutaneously injected into the dorsal region 30 min thereafter. Edemogenic activity was analyzed by spectrophotometry (λ=630 nm. For inflammatory reaction analysis, 50 rats received four polyethylene tubes (three experimental groups and an empty tube (control group. The assessments were made at 7, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days, followed by hematoxylin-eosin staining and by the assignment of scores for evaluation of tissue response intensity. Ethanolic extract + Ca(OH2 yielded the largest edemogenic activity at 3 h. Intergroup differences at 6 h were not significant. The histological analysis showed progressive repair over time (p<0.05 and aqueous and ethanolic extracts produced similar responses to those of the control and Ca(OH2 + propylene glycol groups. Psidium cattleianum leaf extracts used as Ca(OH2 vehicles evoked similar tissue response when compared to Ca(OH2 associated with propylene glycol.

  9. Cytoplasmic Calcium Increases in Response to Changes in the Gravity Vector in Hypocotyls and Petioles of Arabidopsis Seedlings1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Masatsugu; Furuichi, Takuya; Tatsumi, Hitoshi; Sokabe, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    Plants respond to a large variety of environmental signals, including changes in the gravity vector (gravistimulation). In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings, gravistimulation is known to increase the cytoplasmic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]c). However, organs responsible for the [Ca2+]c increase and the underlying cellular/molecular mechanisms remain to be solved. In this study, using Arabidopsis seedlings expressing apoaequorin, a Ca2+-sensitive luminescent protein in combination with an ultrasensitive photon counting camera, we clarified the organs where [Ca2+]c increases in response to gravistimulation and characterized the physiological and pharmacological properties of the [Ca2+]c increase. When the seedlings were gravistimulated by turning 180°, they showed a transient biphasic [Ca2+]c increase in their hypocotyls and petioles. The second peak of the [Ca2+]c increase depended on the angle but not the speed of rotation, whereas the initial peak showed diametrically opposite characters. This suggests that the second [Ca2+]c increase is specific for changes in the gravity vector. The potential mechanosensitive Ca2+-permeable channel (MSCC) inhibitors Gd3+ and La3+, the Ca2+ chelator 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), and the endomembrane Ca2+-permeable channel inhibitor ruthenium red suppressed the second [Ca2+]c increase, suggesting that it arises from Ca2+ influx via putative MSCCs in the plasma membrane and Ca2+ release from intracellular Ca2+ stores. Moreover, the second [Ca2+]c increase was attenuated by actin-disrupting drugs cytochalasin B and latrunculin B but not by microtubule-disrupting drugs oryzalin and nocodazole, implying that actin filaments are partially involved in the hypothetical activation of Ca2+-permeable channels. These results suggest that the second [Ca2+]c increase via MSCCs is a gravity response in the hypocotyl and petiole of Arabidopsis seedlings. PMID:18055589

  10. Local electric stimulation causes conducted calcium response in rat interlobular arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsson, Max; Gustafsson, Finn; Andreasen, Ditte

    2002-01-01

    microscope. Local electrical pulse stimulation (200 ms, 100 V) was administered by means of an NaCl-filled microelectrode (0.7-1 M(Omega)) juxtaposed to one end of the vessel. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) was measured with an image system at a site approximately 500 microm from......The purpose of the present study was to investigate the conducted Ca(2+) response to local electrical stimulation in isolated rat interlobular arteries. Interlobular arteries were isolated from young Sprague-Dawley rats, loaded with fura 2, and attached to pipettes in a chamber on an inverted...

  11. Unique responsiveness of angiosperm stomata to elevated CO2 explained by calcium signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Brodribb

    Full Text Available Angiosperm and conifer tree species respond differently when exposed to elevated CO2, with angiosperms found to dynamically reduce water loss while conifers appear insensitive. Such distinct responses are likely to affect competition between these tree groups as atmospheric CO2 concentration rises. Seeking the mechanism behind this globally important phenomenon we targeted the Ca(2+-dependent signalling pathway, a mediator of stomatal closure in response to elevated CO2, as a possible explanation for the differentiation of stomatal behaviours. Sampling across the diversity of vascular plants including lycophytes, ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms we show that only angiosperms possess the stomatal behaviour and prerequisite genetic coding, linked to Ca(2+-dependent stomatal signalling. We conclude that the evolution of Ca(2+-dependent stomatal signalling gives angiosperms adaptive benefits in terms of highly efficient water use, but that stomatal sensitivity to high CO2 may penalise angiosperm productivity relative to other plant groups in the current era of soaring atmospheric CO2.

  12. Volcanic ash supply to the surface ocean – remote sensing of biological responses and their wider biogeochemical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. Browning

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transient micronutrient enrichment of the surface ocean can enhance phytoplankton growth rates and alter microbial community structure with an ensuing spectrum of biogeochemical feedbacks. Strong phytoplankton responses to micronutrients supplied by volcanic ash have been reported recently. Here we: (i synthesize findings from these recent studies; (ii report the results of a new remote sensing study of ash fertilization; and (iii calculate theoretical bounds of ash-fertilized carbon export. Our synthesis highlights that phytoplankton responses to ash do not always simply mimic that of iron amendment; the exact mechanisms for this are likely biogeochemically important but are not yet well understood. Inherent optical properties of ash-loaded seawater suggest rhyolitic ash biases routine satellite chlorophyll-a estimation upwards by more than an order of magnitude for waters with 0.5 mg chlorophyll-a m-3. For this reason post-ash-deposition chlorophyll-a changes in oligotrophic waters detected via standard Case 1 (open ocean algorithms should be interpreted with caution. Remote sensing analysis of historic events with a bias less than a factor of 2 provided limited stand-alone evidence for ash-fertilization. Confounding factors were poor coverage, incoherent ash dispersal, and ambiguity ascribing biomass changes to ash supply over other potential drivers. Using current estimates of iron release and carbon export efficiencies, uncertainty bounds of ash-fertilized carbon export for 3 events are presented. Patagonian iron supply to the Southern Ocean from volcanic eruptions is less than that of windblown dust on thousand year timescales but can dominate supply at shorter timescales. Reducing uncertainties in remote sensing of phytoplankton response and nutrient release from ash are avenues for enabling assessment of the oceanic response to large-scale transient nutrient enrichment.

  13. Nile Basin Vegetation Response and Vulnerability to Climate Change: A Multi-Sensor Remote Sensing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yitayew, M.; Didan, K.; Barreto-munoz, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Nile Basin is one of the world's water resources hotspot that is home to over 437 million people in ten riparian countries with 54% or 238 millions live directly within the basin. The basin like all other basins of the world is facing water resources challenges exacerbated by climate change and increased demand. Nowadays any water resource management action in the basin has to assess the impacts of climate change to be able to predict future water supply and also to help in the negotiation process. Presently, there is a lack of basin wide weather networks to understand sensitivity of the vegetation cover to the impacts of climate change. Vegetation plays major economic and ecological functions in the basin and provides key services ranging from pastoralism, agricultural production, firewood, habitat and food sources for the rich wildlife, as well as a major role in the carbon cycle and climate regulation of the region. Under the threat of climate change and the incessant anthropogenic pressure the distribution and services of the region's ecosystems are projected to change The goal of this work is to assess and characterize how the basin vegetation productivity, distribution, and phenology have changed over the last 30+ years and what are the key climatic drivers of this change. This work makes use of a newly generated multi-sensor long-term land surface data set about vegetation and phenology. Vegetation indices derived from remotely sensed surface reflectance data are commonly used to characterize phenology or vegetation dynamics accurately and with enough spatial and temporal resolution to support change detection. We used more than 30 years of vegetation index and growing season data from AVHRR and MODIS sensors compiled by the Vegetation Index and Phenology laboratory (VIP LAB) at the University of Arizona. Available climate data about precipitation and temperature for the corresponding 30 years period is also used for this analysis. We looked at the

  14. An environmental scan of emergency response systems and services in remote First Nations communities in Northern Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mew, E J; Ritchie, S D; VanderBurgh, D; Beardy, J L; Gordon, J; Fortune, M; Mamakwa, S; Orkin, A M

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 24,000 Ontarians live in remote Indigenous communities with no road access. These communities are a subset of Nishnawbe Aski Nation (NAN), a political grouping of 49 First Nations communities in Northern Ontario, Canada. Limited information is available regarding the status of emergency care in these communities. We aimed to understand emergency response systems, services, and training in remote NAN communities. We used an environmental scan approach to compile information from multiple sources including community-based participatory research. This included the analysis of data collected from key informant interviews (n=10) with First Nations community health leaders and a multi-stakeholder roundtable meeting (n=33) in October 2013. Qualitative analysis of the interview data revealed four issues related to emergency response systems and training: (1) inequity in response capacity and services, (2) lack of formalised dispatch systems, (3) turnover and burnout in volunteer emergency services, and (4) challenges related to first aid training. Roundtable stakeholders supported the development of a community-based emergency care system to address gaps. Existing first response, paramedical, and ambulance service models do not meet the unique geographical, epidemiological and cultural needs in most NAN communities. Sustainable, context-appropriate, and culturally relevant emergency care systems are needed.

  15. Gene expression changes of single skeletal muscle fibers in response to modulation of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Chemello

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU gene codifies for the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM channel responsible for mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. Cytosolic Ca2+ transients are involved in sarcomere contraction through cycles of release and storage in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. In addition cytosolic Ca2+ regulates various signaling cascades that eventually lead to gene expression reprogramming. Mitochondria are strategically placed in close contact with the ER/SR, thus cytosolic Ca2+ transients elicit large increases in the [Ca2+] of the mitochondrial matrix ([Ca2+]mt. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake regulates energy production and cell survival. In addition, we recently showed that MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake controls skeletal muscle trophism. In the same report, we dissected the effects of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake on gene expression through microarray gene expression analysis upon modulation of MCU expression by in vivo AAV infection. Analyses were performed on single skeletal muscle fibers at two time points (7 and 14 days post-AAV injection. Raw and normalized data are available on the GEO database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/ (GSE60931.

  16. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Response to Zinc, Magnesium, and Calcium Deficiency in Specific Cell Types of Arabidopsis Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichiro Fukao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The proteome profiles of specific cell types have recently been investigated using techniques such as fluorescence activated cell sorting and laser capture microdissection. However, quantitative proteomic analysis of specific cell types has not yet been performed. In this study, to investigate the response of the proteome to zinc, magnesium, and calcium deficiency in specific cell types of Arabidopsis thaliana roots, we performed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics using GFP-expressing protoplasts collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Protoplasts were collected from the pGL2-GFPer and pMGP-GFPer marker lines for epidermis or inner cell lines (pericycle, endodermis, and cortex, respectively. To increase the number of proteins identified, iTRAQ-labeled peptides were separated into 24 fractions by OFFGFEL electrophoresis prior to high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, 1039 and 737 proteins were identified and quantified in the epidermal and inner cell lines, respectively. Interestingly, the expression of many proteins was decreased in the epidermis by mineral deficiency, although a weaker effect was observed in inner cell lines such as the pericycle, endodermis, and cortex. Here, we report for the first time the quantitative proteomics of specific cell types in Arabidopsis roots.

  17. In vivo characterization of a smart MRI agent that displays an inverse response to calcium concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamedov, Ilgar; Canals, Santiago; Henig, Jörg; Beyerlein, Michael; Murayama, Yusuke; Mayer, Hermann A; Logothetis, Nikos K; Angelovski, Goran

    2010-12-15

    Contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that exhibit sensitivity toward specific ions or molecules represent a challenging but attractive direction of research. Here a Gd(3+) complex linked to an aminobis(methylenephosphonate) group for chelating Ca(2+) was synthesized and investigated. The longitudinal relaxivity (r(1)) of this complex decreases during the relaxometric titration with Ca(2+) from 5.76 to 3.57 mM(-1) s(-1) upon saturation. The r(1) is modulated by changes in the hydration number, which was confirmed by determination of the luminescence emission lifetimes of the analogous Eu(3+) complex. The initial in vivo characterization of this responsive contrast agent was performed by means of electrophysiology and MRI experiments. The investigated complex is fully biocompatible, having no observable effect on neuronal function after administration into the brain ventricles or parenchyma. Distribution studies demonstrated that the diffusivity of this agent is significantly lower compared with that of gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA).

  18. Growth Response of White Shrimp (Litopenaeus Vannamei) Reared in Low Salinity Medium, Fed Different Protein and Calcium Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Kaligis, Erly

    2015-01-01

    The white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) has been an important commercial shrimp species in Indonesia. This species is tolerance to low salinity therefore, it is important to develop its aquaculture. The purpose of this study was to study the effect of protein and calcium levels in diet on growth performance of the white shrimp post larvae. A factorial experiment at three levels of dietary protein (25, 35, 45%) and three levels of calcium (0, 2, 4%) with three replicates were used in this expe...

  19. The total synthesis of calcium atorvastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Luiz C; Vieira, Adriano S; Barreiro, Eliezer J

    2016-02-21

    A practical and convergent asymmetric route to calcium atorvastatin (1) is reported. The synthesis of calcium atorvastatin (1) was performed using the remote 1,5-anti asymmetric induction in the boron-mediated aldol reaction of β-alkoxy methylketone (4) with pyrrolic aldehyde (3) as a key step. Calcium atorvastatin was obtained from aldehyde (3) after 6 steps, with a 41% overall yield.

  20. The metabolic impact of β-hydroxybutyrate on neurotransmission: Reduced glycolysis mediates changes in calcium responses and KATP channel receptor sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Trine Meldgaard; Ploug, K.B.; Iversen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    -hydroxybutyrate might change neuronal function as there is a known coupling between metabolism and neurotransmission. The purpose of this study was to shed light on the effects of the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate on glycolysis and neurotransmission in cultured murine glutamatergic neurons. Previous studies have shown...... an effect of β-hydroxybutyrate on glucose metabolism, and the present study further specified this by showing attenuation of glycolysis when β-hydroxybutyrate was present in these neurons. In addition, the NMDA receptor-induced calcium responses in the neurons were diminished in the presence of β...... to a combination of glucose and R-β-hydroxybutyrate in cultured neurons. Using the latter combination, glycolysis was diminished, NMDA receptor-induced calcium responses were lower, and the KATP channel blocker glibenclamide caused a higher transmitter release....

  1. Security and emergency response for a remote distributed reactor fleet in Canada's far north

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.

    2013-01-01

    The far north has become an area of great interest to SMR developers in the last several years. Remote and isolated communities with some small exceptions have not been the traditional territory for nuclear reactors. The technology however has now reached the point where their deployment in some of these nontraditional areas can now be considered possible. We do need to ask what would be the challenges of providing security and emergency support in these regions, and how could it be done effectively and cost efficiently? (author)

  2. Data-intensive multispectral remote sensing of the nighttime Earth for environmental monitoring and emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhizhin, M; Poyda, A; Velikhov, V; Novikov, A; Polyakov, A

    2016-01-01

    All Most of the remote sensing applications rely on the daytime visible and infrared images of the Earth surface. Increase in the number of satellites, their spatial resolution as well as the number of the simultaneously observed spectral bands ensure a steady growth of the data volumes and computational complexity in the remote sensing sciences. Recent advance in the night time remote sensing is related to the enhanced sensitivity of the on-board instruments and to the unique opportunity to observe “pure” emitters in visible infrared spectra without contamination from solar heat and reflected light. A candidate set of the night-time emitters observable from the low-orbiting and geostationary satellites include steady state and temporal changes in the city and traffic electric lights, fishing boats, high-temperature industrial objects such as steel mills, oil cracking refineries and power plants, forest and agricultural fires, gas flares, volcanic eruptions and similar catastrophic events. Current satellite instruments can detect at night 10 times more of such objects compared to daytime. We will present a new data-intensive workflow of the night time remote sensing algorithms for map-reduce processing of visible and infrared images from the multispectral radiometers flown by the modern NOAA/NASA Suomi NPP and the USGS Landsat 8 satellites. Similar radiometers are installed on the new generation of the US geostationary GOES-R satellite to be launched in 2016. The new set of algorithms allows us to detect with confidence and track the abrupt changes and long-term trends in the energy of city lights, number of fishing boats, as well as the size, geometry, temperature of gas flares and to estimate monthly and early flared gas volumes by site or by country. For real-time analysis of the night time multispectral satellite images with global coverage we need gigabit network, petabyte data storage and parallel compute cluster with more than 20 nodes. To meet the

  3. Synergistic effects of bisphosphonate and calcium phosphate nanoparticles on peri-implant bone responses in osteoporotic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Hamdan S; Bosco, Ruggero; Both, Sanne K; Iafisco, Michele; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G; Jansen, John A; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P

    2014-07-01

    The prevalence of osteoporosis will increase within the next decades due to the aging world population, which can affect the bone healing response to dental and orthopedic implants. Consequently, local drug targeting of peri-implant bone has been proposed as a strategy for the enhancement of bone-implant integration in osteoporotic conditions. In the present study, an established in-vivo femoral condyle implantation model in osteoporotic and healthy bone is used to analyze the osteogenic capacity of titanium implants coated with bisphosphonate (BP)-loaded calcium phosphate nanoparticles (nCaP) under compromised medical conditions. After 4 weeks of implantation, peri-implant bone volume (%BV; by μCT) and bone area (%BA; by histomorphometry) were significantly increased within a distance of 500 μm from implant surfaces functionalized with BP compared to control implants in osteoporotic and healthy conditions. Interestingly, the deposition of nCaP/BP coatings onto implant surfaces increased both peri-implant bone contact (%BIC) and volume (%BV) compared to the deposition of nCaP or BP coatings individually, in osteoporotic and healthy conditions. The results of real-time PCR revealed similar osteogenic gene expression levels to all implant surfaces at 4-weeks post-implantation. In conclusion, simultaneous targeting of bone formation (by nCaP) and bone resorption (by BP) using nCaP/BP surface coatings represents an effective strategy for synergistically improvement of bone-implant integration, especially in osteoporotic conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A histological evaluation of bone tissue response to a sealer based on calcium hydroxide: An experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Marija

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/Objective. The success of endodontic treatment depends on the effective removal of root content, the elimination of infection, and the hermetical sealing of the root system using a compatible material. The objective of this paper was to evaluate the tissue response to the implant of endodontic material based on calcium hydroxide into the bone in the artificially prepared defect in a rat mandible. Methods. The research was carried out on 40 Wistar rats. The artificial defect was made between the midline and the mental foramen on the left side of the mandible. The prepared defect was left to heal spontaneously in animals of the control group, while among the animals of the experimental group the sealer Apexit (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Lichtenstein was implanted into the experimental defect. The tissue samples consisting of the experimental field and the surrounding bone were microscopically analyzed with a light microscope. Results. During the initial phase, 15 days after the implantation, signs of chronic inflammation were noted and expansion of the Volkmann’s and Haversian canals. On the 30th day after the implantation, osteosynthetic activity and filling with newly-formed bone were noted. Changes were also noted in cement lines in the wider region of the experimental defect. Sixty days following the implantation, the bone was gradually remodeled. Ninety days after the implantation, a restitutio ad integrum was noted. Conclusion. Apexit does not lead to any disruptions in normal reparation processes nor in morphofunctional relations in bone tissue during the remodeling phase. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 175061: The antioxidant protection and potentials for differentiation and regeneration of mesenchymal stem cells from different tissues during the aging process

  5. ROS and calcium signaling mediated pathways involved in stress responses of the marine microalgae Dunaliella salina to enhanced UV-B radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinxin; Tang, Xuexi; Wang, Ming; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Bin; Wang, You

    2017-08-01

    UV-B ray has been addressed to trigger common metabolic responses on marine microalgae, however, the upstream events responsible for these changes in marine microalgae are poorly understood. In the present study, a species of marine green microalgae Dunaliella salina was exposed to a series of enhanced UV-B radiation ranging from 0.25 to 1.00 KJ·m -2 per day. The role of ROS and calcium signaling in the D. salina responses to UV-B was discussed. Results showed that enhanced UV-B radiation markedly decreased the cell density in a dose-dependent manner, but the contents of protein and glycerol that were essential for cell growth increased. It suggested that it was cell division instead of cell growth that UV-B exerted negative effects on. The subcellular damages on nuclei and plasmalemma further evidenced the hypothesis. The nutrient absorption was affected with UV-B exposure, and the inhibition on PO 4 3- uptake was more serious compared to NO 3 - uptake. UV-B radiation promoted reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) contents, decreased the redox status and altered the antioxidant enzyme activities. The addition of the ROS scavenger and the glutathione biosynthesis precursor N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) alleviated the stress degree, implying ROS-mediated pathway was involved in the stress response to UV-B radiation. Transient increase in Ca 2+ -ATPase was triggered simultaneously with UV-B exposure. Meanwhile, the addition of an intracellular free calcium chelator aggravated the damage of cell division, but exogenous calcium and ion channel blocker applications did not, inferring that endogenously initiated calcium signaling played roles in response to UV-B. Cross-talk analysis showed a relatively clear relationship between ROS inhibition and Ca 2+ -ATPase suppression, and a relation between Ca 2+ inhibition and GPx activity change was also observed. It was thus presumed that ROS-coupled calcium signaling via the

  6. Calcium Signaling in Taste Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medler, Kathryn F.

    2014-01-01

    The sense of taste is a common ability shared by all organisms and is used to detect nutrients as well as potentially harmful compounds. Thus taste is critical to survival. Despite its importance, surprisingly little is known about the mechanisms generating and regulating responses to taste stimuli. All taste responses depend on calcium signals to generate appropriate responses which are relayed to the brain. Some taste cells have conventional synapses and rely on calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels. Other taste cells lack these synapses and depend on calcium release to formulate an output signal through a hemichannel. Beyond establishing these characteristics, few studies have focused on understanding how these calcium signals are formed. We identified multiple calcium clearance mechanisms that regulate calcium levels in taste cells as well as a calcium influx that contributes to maintaining appropriate calcium homeostasis in these cells. Multiple factors regulate the evoked taste signals with varying roles in different cell populations. Clearly, calcium signaling is a dynamic process in taste cells and is more complex than has previously been appreciated. PMID:25450977

  7. Remote sensing of fire severity: linking post-fire reflectance data with physiological responses in two western conifer species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, A. M.; Smith, A. M.; Kolden, C.; Apostol, K. G.; Boschetti, L.

    2014-12-01

    Fire is a common disturbance in forested ecosystems in the western U.S. and can be responsible for long-term impacts on vegetation and soil. An improved understanding of how ecosystems recover after fire is necessary so that land managers can plan for and mitigate the effects of these disturbances. Although several studies have attempted to link fire intensity with severity, direct links between spectral indices of severity and key physiological changes in vegetation are not well understood. We conducted an assessment of how two western conifer species respond to four fire radiative energy treatments, with spectra acquired pre- and up to a month post-burn. After transforming the spectral data into Landsat 8 equivalent reflectance, burn severity indices commonly used in the remote sensing community were compared to concurrent physiological measurements including gas exchange and photosynthetic rate. Preliminary results indicate significant relationships between several fire severity indices and physiological responses measured in the conifer seedlings.

  8. Calcium waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Lionel F

    2008-04-12

    Waves through living systems are best characterized by their speeds at 20 degrees C. These speeds vary from those of calcium action potentials to those of ultraslow ones which move at 1-10 and/or 10-20 nm s(-1). All such waves are known or inferred to be calcium waves. The two classes of calcium waves which include ones with important morphogenetic effects are slow waves that move at 0.2-2 microm s(-1) and ultraslow ones. Both may be propagated by cycles in which the entry of calcium through the plasma membrane induces subsurface contraction. This contraction opens nearby stretch-sensitive calcium channels. Calcium entry through these channels propagates the calcium wave. Many slow waves are seen as waves of indentation. Some are considered to act via cellular peristalsis; for example, those which seem to drive the germ plasm to the vegetal pole of the Xenopus egg. Other good examples of morphogenetic slow waves are ones through fertilizing maize eggs, through developing barnacle eggs and through axolotl embryos during neural induction. Good examples of ultraslow morphogenetic waves are ones during inversion in developing Volvox embryos and across developing Drosophila eye discs. Morphogenetic waves may be best pursued by imaging their calcium with aequorins.

  9. Just-in-time vaccines: Biomineralized calcium phosphate core-immunogen shell nanoparticles induce long-lasting CD8(+) T cell responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weibin; Moguche, Albanus O; Chiu, David; Murali-Krishna, Kaja; Baneyx, François

    2014-04-01

    Distributed and on-demand vaccine production could be game-changing for infectious disease treatment in the developing world by providing new therapeutic opportunities and breaking the refrigeration "cold chain". Here, we show that a fusion protein between a calcium phosphate binding domain and the model antigen ovalbumin can mineralize a biocompatible adjuvant in a single step. The resulting 50 nm calcium phosphate core-immunogen shell particles are comparable to soluble protein in inducing ovalbumin-specific antibody response and class switch recombination in mice. However, single dose vaccination with nanoparticles leads to higher expansion of ovalbumin-specific CD8(+) T cells upon challenge with an influenza virus bearing the ovalbumin-derived SIINFEKL peptide, and these cells produce high levels of IFN-γ. Furthermore, mice exhibit a robust antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell recall response when challenged with virus 8 months post-immunization. These results underscore the promise of immunogen-controlled adjuvant mineralization for just-in-time manufacturing of effective T cell vaccines. This paper reports that a fusion protein between a calcium phosphate binding domain and the model antigen ovalbumin can mineralize into a biocompatible adjuvant in a single step, enabling distributed and on-demand vaccine production and eliminating the need for refrigeration of vaccines. The findings highlight the possibility of immunogen-controlled adjuvant mineralization for just-in-time manufacturing of effective T cell vaccines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Human oocyte calcium analysis predicts the response to assisted oocyte activation in patients experiencing fertilization failure after ICSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer-Buitrago, M; Dhaenens, L; Lu, Y; Bonte, D; Vanden Meerschaut, F; De Sutter, P; Leybaert, L; Heindryckx, B

    2018-01-10

    Can human oocyte calcium analysis predict fertilization success after assisted oocyte activation (AOA) in patients experiencing fertilization failure after ICSI? ICSI-AOA restores the fertilization rate only in patients displaying abnormal Ca2+ oscillations during human oocyte activation. Patients capable of activating mouse oocytes and who showed abnormal Ca2+ profiles after mouse oocyte Ca2+ analysis (M-OCA), have variable responses to ICSI-AOA. It remains unsettled whether human oocyte Ca2+ analysis (H-OCA) would yield an improved accuracy to predict fertilization success after ICSI-AOA. Sperm activation potential was first evaluated by MOAT. Subsequently, Ca2+ oscillatory patterns were determined with sperm from patients showing moderate to normal activation potential based on the capacity of human sperm to generate Ca2+ responses upon microinjection in mouse and human oocytes. Altogether, this study includes a total of 255 mouse and 122 human oocytes. M-OCA was performed with 16 different sperm samples before undergoing ICSI-AOA treatment. H-OCA was performed for 11 patients who finally underwent ICSI-AOA treatment. The diagnostic accuracy to predict fertilization success was calculated based on the response to ICSI-AOA. Patients experiencing low or total failed fertilization after conventional ICSI were included in the study. All participants showed moderate to high rates of activation after MOAT. Metaphase II (MII) oocytes from B6D2F1 mice were used for M-OCA. Control fertile sperm samples were used to obtain a reference Ca2+ oscillation profile elicited in human oocytes. Donated human oocytes, non-suitable for IVF treatments, were collected and vitrified at MII stage for further analysis by H-OCA. M-OCA and H-OCA predicted the response to ICSI-AOA in 8 out of 11 (73%) patients. Compared to M-OCA, H-OCA detected the presence of sperm activation deficiencies with greater sensitivity (75 vs 100%, respectively). ICSI-AOA never showed benefit to overcome

  11. Using Tree-Rings and Remote Sensing to Investigate Forest Productivity Response to Landscape Fragmentation in Northeastern Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouini, N.; Lepley, K. S.; Messaoudene, M.

    2017-12-01

    Remote sensing and dendrochronology are valuable tools in the face of climate change and land use change, yet the connection between these resources remains largely unexploited. Research on forest fragmentation is mainly focused on animal groups, while our work focuses on tree communities. We link tree-rings and remotely-sensed Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) using seasonal correlation analysis to investigate forest primary productivity response to fragmentation. Tree core samples from Quercus afares have been taken from two sites within the Guerrouche Forest in northeastern Algeria. The first site is located within a very fragmented area while the second site is intact. Fragmentation is estimated to have occurred with the construction of a road in 1930. We find raw tree-ring width chronologies from each site reveal growth release in the disturbed site after 1930. The means of each chronology for the 1930 to 2016 period are statistically different (p < 0.01). Based on these preliminary results we hypothesize that reconstructed primary productivity (NDVI) will be higher in the fragmented site after fragmentation took place.

  12. The genetic background affects the vascular response in T-type calcium channels 3.2 deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Per; Hansen, Pernille B L

    2016-01-01

    -type channels are the dominant Ca(2+) entry pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells, however, T-type calcium channels are also expressed in the cardiovascular system where they play a functional role in the regulation of both contraction and vasodilation in (Chen et al. 2003; Hansen et al. 2001). This article...... is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  13. Responses of milk quality to roasted soybeans, calcium soap and organic mineral supplementation in dairy cattle diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adawiah

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Milk quality is affected by feed nutrient either macronutrient or micronutrient. Roasted soayabeans and calcium soap were to increase supply by pas protein and fat to dairy cattle. Thus, organic mineral was to increase bioavailability of feed mineral to animal. The objective of this study was to evaluate roasted soybean, mineral soap and organic mineral supplementation on milk quality of dairy cattle. Twenty lactating Frisian Holstein cows (initial weight 361.4 ± 40.39 kg were assigned into a randomized complete block design with 5 treatments and 4 blocks. The treatments were A: basal diet, B: A + roasted soybean, C: B + calcium soap of corn oil, D: C + calcium soap of corn oil, E: C + calcium soap of fish oil. The experimental diets were offered for 9 and 2 weeks preliminary. The results of the experiment showed that milk protein and lactose were not affected by diets. Milk dry matter of cows fed A, B, and D diets were higher (P<0.05 than those of fed C and E diets. Milk fat of cows fed A, B and D diets were higher (P<0.05 than those of fed C and E diets. Milk density of cows fed B and E diets were higher (p<0.05 than those of fed A, C and D diets. Milk TPC of cows fed B diet were higher (0.05 than those of fed A, C, D, and E diets. It is concluded that milk quality especially milk protein and lactose concentration are not affected by roasted soyabeans, Ca-soap, and organic mineral. Calcium soap of fish oil and organic mineral decrease population of milk bacteria.

  14. Effect of golden needle mushroom (Flammulina velutipes) stem waste on laying performance, calcium utilization, immune response and serum immunity at early phase of production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfuz, Shad; Song, Hui; Liu, Zhongjun; Liu, Xinyu; Diao, Zipeng; Ren, Guihong; Guo, Zhixin; Cui, Yan

    2018-05-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of golden needle mushroom ( Flammulina velutipes ) stem waste (FVW), on organic eggs production, calcium utilization, antibody response, serum immunoglobulin, and serum cytokine concentration at early phase of production in laying hens. A total 210, 19 weeks old aged ISA Brown layers were randomly assigned into 5 equal treatment groups, with 7 replications of 6 hens each. Dietary treatment included a standard basal diet as control; antibiotic (0.05% flavomycin); 2% FVW; 4% FVW; and 6% FVW. The experimental duration was 10 weeks. There was no significant differences (p>0.05) on hen day egg production, egg weight, egg mass, feed intake, and feed conversion ratio (FCR) among experimental groups. Unmarketable eggs were significantly lower (pcontrol group. The calcium retention and calcium in egg shell deposition were significantly higher (pcontrol and antibiotic groups. Antibody titers against Newcastle diseases were significantly higher (pcontrol and antibiotic groups. Serum immunoglobulin sIgA was significantly higher (pcontrol and antibiotic groups. Serum cytokine concentration interleukin-2 (IL-2) was significantly higher (pcontrol and antibiotic groups; IL-4 was significantly higher (pcontrol. F. velutipes mushroom waste can be used as a novel substitute for antibiotic for organic egg production and sound health status in laying hens.

  15. Calcium Electroporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gibot, Laure; Madi, Moinecha

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill...... efficacy-and normal cell sensitivity. METHODS: Using a 3D spheroid cell culture model we have tested the effect of calcium electroporation and electrochemotherapy using bleomycin on three different human cancer cell lines: a colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT29), a bladder transitional cell carcinoma (SW780......), and a breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB231), as well as on primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF-n). RESULTS: The results showed a clear reduction in spheroid size in all three cancer cell spheroids three days after treatment with respectively calcium electroporation (p

  16. Mobile pediatric neurosurgery: rapid response neurosurgery for remote or urgent pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owler, Brian K; Carmo, Kathryn A Browning; Bladwell, Wendy; Fa'asalele, T Arieta; Roxburgh, Jane; Kendrick, Tina; Berry, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Time-critical neurosurgical conditions require urgent operative treatment to prevent death or neurological deficits. In New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory patients' distance from neurosurgical care is often great, presenting a challenge in achieving timely care for patients with acute neurosurgical conditions. A protocol was developed to facilitate consultant neurosurgery locally. Children with acute, time-critical neurosurgical emergencies underwent operations in hospitals that do not normally offer neurosurgery. The authors describe the developed protocol, the outcome of its use, and the lessons learned in the 9 initial cases where the protocol has been used. Three cases are discussed in detail. Nine children were treated by a neurosurgeon at 5 rural hospitals, and 2 children were treated at a smaller metropolitan hospital. Road ambulance, fixed wing aircraft, and medical helicopters were used to transport the Newborn and Paediatric Emergency Transport Service (NETS) team, neurosurgeon, and patients. In each case, the time to definitive neurosurgical intervention was significantly reduced. The median interval from triage at the initial hospital to surgical start time was 3:55 hours, (interquartile range [IQR] 03:29-05:20 hours). The median distance traveled to reach a patient was 232 km (range 23-637 km). The median interval from the initial NETS call requesting patient retrieval to surgical start time was 3:15 hours (IQR 00:47-03:37 hours). The estimated median "time saved" was approximately 3:00 hours (IQR 1:44-3:15 hours) compared with the travel time to retrieve the child to the tertiary center: 8:31 hours (IQR 6:56-10:08 hours). Remote urgent neurosurgical interventions can be performed safely and effectively. This practice is relevant to countries where distance limits urgent access for patients to tertiary pediatric care. This practice is lifesaving for some children with head injuries and other acute neurosurgical conditions.

  17. Live-cell calcium imaging of adherent and non-adherent GL261 cells reveals phenotype-dependent differences in drug responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Averey D; Daniels, Richard L

    2017-08-02

    The tumor-derived GL261 cell line is used as a model for studying glioblastoma and other high-grade gliomas, and can be cultured adherently or as free-floating aggregates known as neurospheres. These different culture conditions give rise to distinct phenotypes, with increased tumorigenicity displayed by neurosphere-cultured cells. An important technique for understanding GL261 pathobiology is live cell fluorescent imaging of intracellular calcium. However, live cell imaging of GL261 neurospheres presents a technical challenge, as experimental manipulations where drugs are added to the extracellular media cause the cells to move during analysis. Here we present a method to immobilize GL261 neurospheres with low melting point agarose for calcium imaging using the fluorescent calcium sensor fura-2. GL261 cells were obtained from the NCI-Frederick Cancer Research Tumor Repository and cultured as adherent cells or induced to form neurospheres by placing freshly trypsinized cells into serum-free media containing fibroblast growth factor 2, epidermal growth factor, and B-27 supplement. Prior to experiments, adherent cells were loaded with fura-2 and cultured on 8-well chamber slides. Non-adherent neurospheres were first loaded with fura-2, placed in droplets onto an 8-well chamber slide, and finally covered with a thin layer of low melting point agarose to immobilize the cells. Ratiometric pseudocolored images were obtained during treatment with ATP, capsaicin, or vehicle control. Cells were marked as responsive if fluorescence levels increased more than 30% above baseline. Differences between treatment groups were tested using Student's t-tests and one-way ANOVA. We found that cellular responses to pharmacological treatments differ based on cellular phenotype. Adherent cells and neurospheres both responded to ATP with a rise in intracellular calcium. Notably, capsaicin treatment led to robust responses in GL261 neurospheres but not adherent cells. We demonstrate the use

  18. Combinations of physiologic estrogens with xenoestrogens alter calcium and kinase responses, prolactin release, and membrane estrogen receptor trafficking in rat pituitary cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Cheryl S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xenoestrogens such as alkylphenols and the structurally related plastic byproduct bisphenol A have recently been shown to act potently via nongenomic signaling pathways and the membrane version of estrogen receptor-α. Though the responses to these compounds are typically measured individually, they usually contaminate organisms that already have endogenous estrogens present. Therefore, we used quantitative medium-throughput screening assays to measure the effects of physiologic estrogens in combination with these xenoestrogens. Methods We studied the effects of low concentrations of endogenous estrogens (estradiol, estriol, and estrone at 10 pM (representing pre-development levels, and 1 nM (representing higher cycle-dependent and pregnancy levels in combinations with the same levels of xenoestrogens in GH3/B6/F10 pituitary cells. These levels of xenoestrogens represent extremely low contamination levels. We monitored calcium entry into cells using Fura-2 fluorescence imaging of single cells. Prolactin release was measured by radio-immunoassay. Extracellular-regulated kinase (1 and 2 phospho-activations and the levels of three estrogen receptors in the cell membrane (ERα, ERβ, and GPER were measured using a quantitative plate immunoassay of fixed cells either permeabilized or nonpermeabilized (respectively. Results All xenoestrogens caused responses at these concentrations, and had disruptive effects on the actions of physiologic estrogens. Xenoestrogens reduced the % of cells that responded to estradiol via calcium channel opening. They also inhibited the activation (phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinases at some concentrations. They either inhibited or enhanced rapid prolactin release, depending upon concentration. These latter two dose-responses were nonmonotonic, a characteristic of nongenomic estrogenic responses. Conclusions Responses mediated by endogenous estrogens representing different life stages are

  19. Calcium in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Schwartau

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the review on the role of calcium in many physiological processes of plant organisms, including growth and development, protection from pathogenic influences, response to changing environmental factors, and many other aspects of plant physiology. Initial intake of calcium ions is carried out by Ca2+-channels of plasma membrane and they are further transported by the xylem owing to auxins’ attractive ability. The level of intake and selectivity of calcium transport to ove-ground parts of the plant is controlled by a symplast. Ca2+enters to the cytoplasm of endoderm cells through calcium channels on the cortical side of Kaspary bands, and is redistributed inside the stele by the symplast, with the use of Ca2+-АТPases and Ca2+/Н+-antiports. Owing to regulated expression and activity of these calcium transporters, calclum can be selectively delivered to the xylem. Important role in supporting calcium homeostasis is given to the vacuole which is the largest depo of calcium. Regulated quantity of calcium movement through the tonoplast is provided by a number of potential-, ligand-gated active transporters and channels, like Ca2+-ATPase and Ca2+/H+ exchanger. They are actively involved in the inactivation of the calcium signal by pumping Ca2+ to the depo of cells. Calcium ATPases are high affinity pumps that efficiently transfer calcium ions against the concentration gradient in their presence in the solution in nanomolar concentrations. Calcium exchangers are low affinity, high capacity Ca2+ transporters that are effectively transporting calcium after raising its concentration in the cell cytosol through the use of protons gradients. Maintaining constant concentration and participation in the response to stimuli of different types also involves EPR, plastids, mitochondria, and cell wall. Calcium binding proteins contain several conserved sequences that provide sensitivity to changes in the concentration of Ca2+ and when you

  20. Radioresistant Spodoptera frugiperda 9 insect cells display excessive resistance to 'endoplasmic reticulum' stress and calcium disturbances via pre-emptive activation of unfolded protein response pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guleria, Ayushi; Chandna, Sudhir

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) performs multiple cellular functions such as proper folding of newly synthesized proteins and calcium homeostasis. ER stress triggers unfolded protein response (UPR) that attempts to restore normal ER function and resists damage-induced cell death. Lepidopteran Sf9 insect cells (derived from Spodoptera frugiperda) display 100-200 times higher radioresistance than mammalian cells. We have earlier reported that gamma-radiation doses <1000 Gy fail to trigger increase in cytosolic calcium in Sf9 cells, indicating resilience to calcium/ ER disturbances

  1. The use of a non-standard high calcium fly ash in concrete and its response to accelerated curing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atis, C. D.

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available An experimental work was carried out to investigate the use of a non-standard high calcium fly ash in concrete. The response of the same fly ash to the accelerated curing was also explored. With three different cementitious material contents, a total of 48 concretes were produced. The water/ cement ratios were varied from 0.40 to 0.87. Compressive strengths of the moist cured cube specimens cast from the concrete mixtures made with 0%, 15%, 30% and 45% replacement of normal Portland cement with fly ash were measured at 28 days and 3 months. Accelerated compressive strengths were also measured using warmwater method and boiling-water method in accordance with the relevant ASTM and Turkish Standards. Despite the fact that the fly ash used was a non-standard, the laboratory test results showed that it could be utilized in concrete production at a replacement level between 15% and 30% by weight basis because fly ash concrete developed comparable or higher compressive strength than that of corresponding normal Portland cement concrete. The laboratory test results also indicated that the accelerated curing could be used to predict the compressive strength of fly ash concrete with 85% correlation coefficient. The amount of fly ash was found to be immaterial in the strength prediction. The relation between warm-water method and boiling-water method was of linear form with 93% correlation coefficient.

    Se llevó a cabo un trabajo experimental para investigar el uso de una ceniza volante de alto contenido en cal en el hormigón, la cual no cumple las especificaciones recogidas en norma. También, se estudió el comportamiento de la ceniza bajo un curado acelerado. Se elaboraron un total de 48 hormigones con tres proporciones diferentes de material cementante. Las relaciones agua/cemento (a/c usadas estaban comprendidas entre 0,40 y 0,87. A 28 días y 3 meses de curado, se determinaron las resistencias a compresión de probetas cúbicas de hormig

  2. The Urban Fabric of the City as Its Affects Thermal Energy Responses Derived from Remote Sensing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The physical geography of the city affects numerous aspects of its interlinked biophysical, social, and land-atmosphere characteristics - those attributes that come together to form the total urban environment. One approach to studying the multitude of interactions that occur as a result of urbanization is to view the city from a systems ecology perspective, where energy and material cycle into and out of the urban milieu. Thus, the urban ecosystem is synergistic in linking land, air, water, and living organisms in a vast network of interrelated physical, human, and biological process. Given the number and the shear complexity of the exchanges and, ultimately, their effects, that occur within the urban environment, we are focusing our research on looking at how the morphology or urban fabric of the city, drives thermal energy exchanges across the urban landscape. The study of thermal energy attributes for different cities provides insight into how thermal fluxes and characteristics are partitioned across the city landscape in response to each city's morphology. We are using thermal infrared remote sensing data obtained at a high spatial resolution from aircraft, along with satellite data, to identify and quantify thermal energy characteristics for 4 U.S. cities: Atlanta, GA, Baton Rouge, LA, Salt Lake City, UT, and Sacramento, CA. Analysis of how thermal energy is spatially distributed across the urban landscapes for these cities provides a unique perspective for understanding how the differing morphology of cities forces land-atmosphere exchanges, such as the urban heat island effect, as well as related meteorological and air quality interactions. Keyword: urban ecosystems, remote sensing, urban heat island

  3. Pertussis outbreak in Papua New Guinea: the challenges of response in a remote geo-topographical setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Lagani

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A large outbreak of pertussis was detected during March 2011 in Goilala, a remote district of the Central Province in Papua New Guinea, characterized by rugged topography with no road access from the provincial headquarters. This outbreak investigation highlights the difficulties in reporting and responding to outbreaks in these settings.Method: The suspected pertussis cases, reported by health workers from the Ononge health centre area, were investigated and confirmed for the presence of Bordetella pertussis DNA using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR method.Results: There were 205 suspected pertussis cases, with a case-fatality rate (CFR of 3%. All cases were unvaccinated. The Central Province conducted a response vaccination programme providing 65% of children less than five years of age with diphtheria–pertussis-tetanus-HepB-Hib vaccine at a cost of US$ 12.62 per child.Discussion: The incurred cost of vaccination in response to this outbreak was much higher than the US$ 3.80 per child for routine outreach patrol. To prevent further outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases in these areas, local health centres must ensure routine vaccination is strengthened through the “Reaching Every District” initiative of the National Department of Health.

  4. Features of the temperature response to a double cuff-occlusion of the upper limbs: remote ischemic preconditioning aspect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagaidachnyi, A. A.; Fomin, A. V.; Mayskov, D. I.; Skripal, A. V.; Usanov, D. A.

    2018-04-01

    The essence of the phenomenon of ischemic preconditioning is increasing myocardium resistance to long periods of ischemia that occurs after several short ischemia-reperfusion periods. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the temperature and vascular response in double brachial occlusions and to assess the prospects of using this maneuver for remote ischemic preconditioning. Infrared thermography-based measurements were used to assess hemodynamics both left and right hands during the baseline, ischemia and hyperemia periods. Double ischemia with a period of 2 min was implemented by a cuff compression of the brachial artery of the right hand. A study group was constituted of eight men and six women without cardiovascular abnormalities at the age of 22 to 35 years. As a result, we have determined that a temperature and vascular response to ischemia of right hand is accompanied by the vascular reaction of the contralateral left hand, especially after the inflation and deflation of the cuff. These vascular reactions are reproducible, systemic and appear to be at least neurological in nature. An experimental confirmation of the systemic vascular «training effect» after multiple brachial ischemia-reperfusion periods is a subject of further investigations.

  5. Calcium dynamics in vascular smooth muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Amberg, Gregory C.; Navedo, Manuel F.

    2013-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells are ultimately responsible for determining vascular luminal diameter and blood flow. Dynamic changes in intracellular calcium are a critical mechanism regulating vascular smooth muscle contractility. Processes influencing intracellular calcium are therefore important regulators of vascular function with physiological and pathophysiological consequences. In this review we discuss the major dynamic calcium signals identified and characterized in vascular smooth muscle cells....

  6. Protein, Calcium, Zinc, and Iron Contents of Finger Millet Grain Response to Varietal Differences and Phosphorus Application in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wekha N. Wafula

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to investigate the influence of phosphorus fertilizers on the concentrations of nutrients, particularly calcium, protein, zinc, and iron in finger millet grains grown in different agro-ecologies in Kenya. The on-station experiments were carried out at Kiboko (Eastern Kenya, Kakamega, and Alupe (Western Kenya in 2015 during the short and long rainy seasons. The trials were laid out in a randomized complete block design (RCBD in a 4 × 3 factorial arrangement with three replicates. The treatments comprised of four levels of phosphorus (0, 12.5, 25.0 and 37.5 kg ha−1 P2O5 and three finger millet varieties (U-15, P-224 and a local variety. Application of phosphorus significantly (p ≤ 0.05 increased the protein content of finger millet grain in varieties in all the three sites. Variety U-15 had the highest protein content (11.0% at 25 kg ha−1 P2O5 with the control (zero P on variety P-224 eliciting the lowest (4.4% at Kiboko. At Kakamega, the 25 kg ha−1 P2O5 treatment with U-15 variety had the highest protein content (15.3% while the same variety at 12.5 kg ha−1 P2O5 rate elicited the highest protein content (15.0% at Alupe. Phosphorus application significantly enhanced the nutritional quality of finger millet grains specifically protein, calcium, iron, and zinc. Variety P-224 had the highest calcium content in all sites and highest iron content at Kakamega while the local varieties had the highest zinc content in all sites. The varieties responded differently to each quality component but generally, based on the protein content, the 25 kg ha−1 P2O5 is recommended.

  7. Calcium-dependent protein kinase 21 phosphorylates 14-3-3 proteins in response to ABA signaling and salt stress in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yixing; Zhou, Xiaojin; Chang, Shu; Chu, Zhilin; Wang, Hanmeng; Han, Shengcheng; Wang, Yingdian

    2017-12-02

    The calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are a class of plant-specific kinase that directly bind Ca 2+ and mediate the calcium-signaling pathways to play important physiological roles in growth and development. The rice genome contains 31 CDPK genes, one of which, OsCPK21, is known to modulate the abscisic acid (ABA) and salt stress responses in this crop; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation are largely unknown. In the present study, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening, glutathione S-transferase pull-down, co-immunoprecipitation, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays to confirm the interaction between OsCPK21 and one of its putative targets, Os14-3-3 (OsGF14e). We used an in vitro kinase assay and site-directed mutagenesis to verify that OsCPK21 phosphorylates OsGF14e at Tyr-138. We used real-time PCR to reveal that several ABA and salt inducible genes were more highly expressed in the OsCPK21-OE and OsGF14e WT-OE plants than in the mutant OsGF14e Y138A-OE and wild-type plants. These results suggest that OsCPK21 phosphorylates OsGF14e to facilitate the response to ABA and salt stress. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Just-in-time vaccines: Biomineralized calcium phosphate core-immunogen shell nanoparticles induce long-lasting CD8+ T cell responses in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weibin; Moguche, Albanus; Chiu, David; Murali-Krishna, Kaja; Baneyx, François

    2014-01-01

    Distributed and on-demand vaccine production could be game-changing for infectious disease treatment in the developing world by providing new therapeutic opportunities and breaking the refrigeration “cold chain”. Here, we show that a fusion protein between a calcium phosphate binding domain and the model antigen ovalbumin can mineralize a biocompatible adjuvant in a single step. The resulting 50 nm calcium phosphate core-immunogen shell particles are comparable to soluble protein in inducing ovalbumin-specific antibody response and class switch recombination in mice. However, single dose vaccination with nanoparticles leads to higher expansion of ovalbumin-specific CD8+ T cells upon challenge with an influenza virus bearing the ovalbumin-derived SIINFEKL peptide, and these cells produce high levels of IFN-γ. Furthermore, mice exhibit a robust antigen-specific CD8+ T cell recall response when challenged with virus 8 months post-immunization. These results underscore the promise of immunogen-controlled adjuvant mineralization for just-in-time manufacturing of effective T cell vaccines. PMID:24275478

  9. Rice calcium-dependent protein kinase OsCPK17 targets plasma membrane intrinsic protein and sucrose phosphate synthase and is required for a proper cold stress response

    KAUST Repository

    Almadanim, M. Cecília

    2017-01-19

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are involved in plant tolerance mechanisms to abiotic stresses. Although CDPKs are recognized as key messengers in signal transduction, the specific role of most members of this family remains unknown. Here we test the hypothesis that OsCPK17 plays a role in rice cold stress response by analyzing OsCPK17 knockout, silencing, and overexpressing rice lines under low temperature. Altered OsCPK17 gene expression compromises cold tolerance performance, without affecting the expression of key cold stress-inducible genes. A comparative phosphoproteomic approach led to the identification of six potential in vivo OsCPK17 targets, which are associated with sugar and nitrogen metabolism, and with osmotic regulation. To test direct interaction, in vitro kinase assays were performed, showing that the sucrose phosphate synthase OsSPS4, and the aquaporin OsPIP2;1/OsPIP2;6 are phosphorylated by OsCPK17 in a calcium-dependent manner. Altogether, our data indicates that OsCPK17 is required for a proper cold stress response in rice, likely affecting the activity of membrane channels and sugar metabolism.

  10. Satellite and Aerial Remote Sensing in Support of Disaster Response Operations Conducted by the Texas Division of Emergency Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, G. L.; Tapley, B. D.; Bettadpur, S. V.; Howard, T.; Porter, B.; Smith, S.; Teng, L.; Tapley, C.

    2014-12-01

    The effective use of remote sensing products as guidance to emergency managers and first responders during field operations requires close coordination and communication with state-level decision makers, incident commanders and the leaders of individual strike teams. Information must be tailored to meet the needs of different emergency support functions and must contain current (ideally near real-time) data delivered in standard formats in time to influence decisions made under rapidly changing conditions. Since 2003, a representative of the University of Texas Center for Space Research (CSR) has served as a member of the Governor's Emergency Management Council and has directed the flow of information from remote sensing observations and high performance computing modeling and simulations to the Texas Division of Emergency Management in the State Operations Center. The CSR team has supported response and recovery missions resulting from hurricanes, tornadoes, flash floods, wildfires, oil spills and other natural and man-made disasters in Texas and surrounding states. Through web mapping services, state emergency managers and field teams have received threat model forecasts, real-time vehicle tracking displays and imagery to support search-and-clear operations before hurricane landfall, search-and-rescue missions following floods, tactical wildfire suppression, pollution monitoring and hazardous materials detection. Data servers provide near real-time satellite imagery collected by CSR's direct broadcast receiving system and post data products delivered during activations of the United Nations International Charter on Space and Major Disasters. In the aftermath of large-scale events, CSR is charged with tasking state aviation resources, including the Air National Guard and Texas Civil Air Patrol, to acquire geolocated aerial photography of the affected region for wide area damage assessment. A data archive for each disaster is available online for years following

  11. Assessment of runoff response to landscape changes in the San Pedro subbasin (Nayarit, Mexico) using remote sensing data and GIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Guzmán, Rafael; Ruiz-Luna, Arturo; Berlanga-Robles, César Alejandro

    2008-10-01

    Results on runoff estimates as a response to land-use and land-cover changes are presented. We used remote sensing and GIS techniques with rainfall time-series data, spatial ancillary information, and the curve-number method (NRCS-CN) to assess the runoff response in the San Pedro subbasin. Thematic maps with eight land-cover classes derived from satellite imagery classification (1973, 1990, and 2000) and hydrologic soil-group maps were used as the input for the runoff calculation. About 20% to 25% of the subbasin landscape has changed since 1973, mainly as consequence of the growth of agriculture. Forest is the main cover, although further analyses indicate that forest is degrading from good to poor conditions when evaluated as a function of the spectral response. Soils with low infiltration rates, classified as the hydrological soil-group "C", were dominant in the area (52%). The overlaying of all the hydrological soil groups with the land-use map produced a total of 43 hydro-group and land-use categories for which runoff was calculated using the curve-number method. Estimates of total runoff volumes (26 x 10(6) m3) were similar for the three dates analyzed in spite of landscape changes, but there were temporal variations among the hydro-group and land-use categories as a consequence. Changes are causing the rise of covers with high runoff potential and the increase of runoff depth is expected, but it can be reversed by different management of subbasin hydro-groups and land-use units.

  12. Get Enough Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Calcium Print This Topic En español Get Enough Calcium Browse Sections The Basics Overview Foods and Vitamins ... women, don't get enough calcium. How much calcium do I need every day? Women: If you ...

  13. Calcium - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Female urinary tract Male urinary tract Calcium urine test References Bringhurst FR, Demay MB, Kronenberg HM. Hormones and disorders of mineral metabolism. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg HM, eds. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology . 13th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ...

  14. Comparison of physical, chemical and cellular responses to nano- and micro-sized calcium silicate/poly(epsilon-caprolactone) bioactive composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jie; Heo, S J; Kim, D H; Kim, S E; Hyun, Y T; Shin, Jung-Woog

    2008-06-06

    In this study, we fabricated nano-sized calcium silicate/poly(epsilon-caprolactone) composite (n-CPC) and micro-sized calcium silicate/poly(epsilon-caprolactone) composite (m-CPC). The composition, mechanical properties, hydrophilicity and degradability of both n-CPC and m-CPC were determined, and in vitro bioactivity was evaluated by investigating apatite forming on their surfaces in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, cell responses to the two kinds of composites were comparably investigated. The results indicated that n-CPC has superior hydrophilicity, compressive strength and elastic modulus properties compared with m-CPC. Both n-CPC and m-CPC exhibited good in vitro bioactivity, with different morphologies of apatite formation on their surfaces. The apatite layer on n-CPC was more homogeneous and compact than on m-CPC, due to the elevated levels of calcium and silicon concentrations in SBF from n-CPC throughout the 14-day soaking period. Significantly higher levels of attachment and proliferation of MG63 cells were observed on n-CPC than on m-CPC, and significantly higher levels of alkaline phosphatase activity were observed in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) on n-CPC than on m-CPC after 7 days. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed that hMSCs were in intimate contact with both n-CPC and m-CPC surfaces, and significantly cell adhesion, spread and growth were observed on n-CPC and m-CPC. These results indicated that both n-CPC and m-CPC have the ability to support cell attachment, growth, proliferation and differentiation, and also yield good bioactivity and biocompatibility.

  15. A novel pH-responsive hydrogel-based on calcium alginate engineered by the previous formation of polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) intended to vaginal administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Natália Noronha; Perez, Taciane Alvarenga; Pedreiro, Liliane Neves; Prezotti, Fabíola Garavello; Boni, Fernanda Isadora; Cardoso, Valéria Maria de Oliveira; Venâncio, Tiago; Gremião, Maria Palmira Daflon

    2017-10-01

    This work aimed to develop a calcium alginate hydrogel as a pH responsive delivery system for polymyxin B (PMX) sustained-release through the vaginal route. Two samples of sodium alginate from different suppliers were characterized. The molecular weight and M/G ratio determined were, approximately, 107 KDa and 1.93 for alginate_S and 32 KDa and 1.36 for alginate_V. Polymer rheological investigations were further performed through the preparation of hydrogels. Alginate_V was selected for subsequent incorporation of PMX due to the acquisition of pseudoplastic viscous system able to acquiring a differential structure in simulated vaginal microenvironment (pH 4.5). The PMX-loaded hydrogel (hydrogel_PMX) was engineered based on polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) formation between alginate and PMX followed by crosslinking with calcium chloride. This system exhibited a morphology with variable pore sizes, ranging from 100 to 200 μm and adequate syringeability. The hydrogel liquid uptake ability in an acid environment was minimized by the previous PECs formation. In vitro tests evidenced the hydrogels mucoadhesiveness. PMX release was pH-dependent and the system was able to sustain the release up to 6 days. A burst release was observed at pH 7.4 and drug release was driven by an anomalous transport, as determined by the Korsmeyer-Peppas model. At pH 4.5, drug release correlated with Weibull model and drug transport was driven by Fickian diffusion. The calcium alginate hydrogels engineered by the previous formation of PECs showed to be a promising platform for sustained release of cationic drugs through vaginal administration.

  16. Monitoring responses of Mason Pine to acid rain in China based on remote sensing vegetation index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Jiaxin; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Xiuying; Wang, Ying; Hou, Chunliang

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1970s, acid rain has remained in the public spotlight in both Europe and the United States and recently has emerged as an important problem in other regions such as Southeast Asia. To reveal responses of Masson Pine to acid rain during a long time series in central China, we used the interpolation dataset of acid rain and the Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS) normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data to derive the monthly pH and NDVI trajectories based on acidity gradients from 1992 to 2006. Then we analyzed inter-annual and seasonal variation of vegetation growth by improved sinusoidal fitting and regression analysis. In the environment of strong acidity and moderate acidity, the growth of Masson Pine was inhibited during the study period, while the slight acidity promoted growth of Masson Pine to some extent. For the multi-year monthly changing trend of NDVI, late spring to mid autumn, the NDVI showed a decreasing trend, especially in June, while from late autumn to the following spring, the NDVI showed a rising tendency, specifically in December and March

  17. Remote RemoteRemoteRemote sensing potential for sensing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Remote RemoteRemoteRemote sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing potential for sensing p. A Ngie, F Ahmed, K Abutaleb ...

  18. Cu2+, Co2+ and Cr3+ doping of a calcium phosphate cement influences materials properties and response of human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schamel, Martha; Bernhardt, Anne; Quade, Mandy; Würkner, Claudia; Gbureck, Uwe; Moseke, Claus; Gelinsky, Michael; Lode, Anja

    2017-04-01

    The application of biologically active metal ions to stimulate cellular reactions is a promising strategy to accelerate bone defect healing. Brushite-forming calcium phosphate cements were modified with low doses of Cu 2+ , Co 2+ and Cr 3+ . The modified cements released the metal ions in vitro in concentrations which were shown to be non-toxic for cells. The release kinetics correlated with the solubility of the respective metal phosphates: 17-45 wt.-% of Co 2+ and Cu 2+ , but calcium and phosphate ions with cell culture medium. In case of cements modified with 50mmol Cr 3+ /mol β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), XRD and SEM analyses revealed a significant amount of monetite and a changed morphology of the cement matrix. Cell culture experiments with human mesenchymal stromal cells indicated that the observed cell response is not only influenced by the released metal ions but also by changed cement properties. A positive effect of modifications with 50mmol Cr 3+ or 10mmol Cu 2+ per mol β-TCP on cell behaviour was observed in indirect and direct culture. Modification with Co 2+ resulted in a clear suppression of cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. In conclusion, metal ion doping of the cement influences cellular activities in addition to the effect of released metal ions by changing properties of the ceramic matrix. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Teaching wilderness first aid in a remote First Nations community: the story of the Sachigo Lake Wilderness Emergency Response Education Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Karen; Orkin, Aaron; VanderBurgh, David; Beardy, Jackson

    2012-01-01

    To understand how community members of a remote First Nations community respond to an emergency first aid education programme. A qualitative study involving focus groups and participant observation as part of a community-based participatory research project, which involved the development and implementation of a wilderness first aid course in collaboration with the community. Twenty community members participated in the course and agreed to be part of the research focus groups. Three community research partners validated and reviewed the data collected from this process. These data were coded and analysed using open coding. Community members responded to the course in ways related to their past experiences with injury and first aid, both as individuals and as members of the community. Feelings of confidence and self-efficacy related access to care and treatment of injury surfaced during the course. Findings also highlighted how the context of the remote First Nations community influenced the delivery and development of course materials. Developing and delivering a first aid course in a remote community requires sensitivity towards the response of participants to the course, as well as the context in which it is being delivered. Employing collaborative approaches to teaching first aid can aim to address these unique needs. Though delivery of a first response training programme in a small remote community will probably not impact the morbidity and mortality associated with injury, it has the potential to impact community self-efficacy and confidence when responding to an emergency situation.

  20. T-type calcium channel antagonism decreases motivation for nicotine and blocks nicotine- and cue-induced reinstatement for a response previously reinforced with nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uslaner, Jason M; Vardigan, Joshua D; Drott, Jason M; Uebele, Victor N; Renger, John J; Lee, Ariel; Li, Zhaoxia; Lê, A D; Hutson, Pete H

    2010-10-15

    Recent evidence suggests an involvement of T-type calcium channels in the effects of drugs of abuse. We examined the influence of the novel, potent, and selective T-type calcium channel antagonist [2-(4-cyclopropylphenyl)-N-((1R)-1-{5-[2,2,2-trifluoroethyl]oxo}pyridine-2-yl)ethyl]acetamide] (TTA-A2) (.3, 1, or 3 mg/kg) on motivation for nicotine, as measured by nicotine self-administration on a progressive ratio (PR) schedule, and nicotine- and cue-induced reinstatement for a response previously reinforced with nicotine delivery (n = 11 or 12 Long Evans rats/group). Furthermore, we examined the specificity of the TTA-A2 effects by characterizing its influence on PR responding for food (in the absence or presence of nicotine-potentiated responding), food- versus nicotine-induced cue-potentiated reinstatement for a response previously reinforced by food administration (n = 11 or 12 Wistar Hannover rats/group), and its ability to induce a conditioned place aversion. TTA-A2 dose-dependently decreased self-administration of nicotine on a PR schedule and the ability of both nicotine and a cue paired with nicotine to reinstate responding. The effects were specific for nicotine's incentive motivational properties, as TTA-A2 did not influence responding for food on a PR schedule but did attenuate the ability of nicotine to potentiate responding for food. Likewise, TTA-A2 did not alter food-induced cue-potentiated reinstatement for a response previously reinforced by food but did decrease nicotine-induced cue-potentiated reinstatement. Finally, TTA-A2 did not produce an aversive state, as indicated by a lack of ability to induce conditioned place aversion. These data suggest that T-type calcium channel antagonists have potential for alleviating nicotine addiction by selectively decreasing the incentive motivational properties of nicotine. Copyright © 2010 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Structures of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases reveal mechanism of activation by calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernimont, Amy K; Artz, Jennifer D.; Jr, Patrick Finerty; Lin, Yu-Hui; Amani, Mehrnaz; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tempel, Wolfram; Mackenzie, Farrell; Chau, Irene; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David; Hui, Raymond (Toronto); (WU-MED)

    2010-09-21

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have pivotal roles in the calcium-signaling pathway in plants, ciliates and apicomplexan parasites and comprise a calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK)-like kinase domain regulated by a calcium-binding domain in the C terminus. To understand this intramolecular mechanism of activation, we solved the structures of the autoinhibited (apo) and activated (calcium-bound) conformations of CDPKs from the apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. In the apo form, the C-terminal CDPK activation domain (CAD) resembles a calmodulin protein with an unexpected long helix in the N terminus that inhibits the kinase domain in the same manner as CaMKII. Calcium binding triggers the reorganization of the CAD into a highly intricate fold, leading to its relocation around the base of the kinase domain to a site remote from the substrate binding site. This large conformational change constitutes a distinct mechanism in calcium signal-transduction pathways.

  2. Calcium paradox and calcium entry blockers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Slade, A.M.; Nayler, W.G.; Meijler, F.L.

    1984-01-01

    Reperfusion of isolated hearts with calcium-containing solution after a short period of calcium-free perfusion results in irreversible cell damage (calcium paradox). This phenomenon is characterized by an excessive influx of calcium into the cells, the rapid onset of myocardial contracture,

  3. Tachycardia in response to remote capsaicin injection as a model for nociception in the ball python (Python regius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Catherine J A; James, Lauren E; Bertelsen, Mads F; Wang, Tobias

    2016-07-01

    To quantify the effect of subcutaneous (SC) capsaicin injection on heart rate (HR) in ball pythons (Python regius) and to assess the efficacy of two opioids (morphine and butorphanol) in modifying this response. Prospective, randomized, unmatched study. Eleven mixed-sex, captive-bred ball pythons. Snakes were randomly assigned to three groups (n = 6) by intramuscular premedication: 1) control: saline (0.9 mL); 2) morphine (10 mg kg(-1) ); and 3) butorphanol (10 mg kg(-1) ). Three snakes were tested twice and another two were tested three times in different treatments administered 1 month apart. Under isoflurane anaesthesia, snakes were instrumented with SC electrocardiogram (ECG) electrodes and an SC catheter for remote stimulus delivery. After recovery from anaesthesia, all snakes, in visual and audial isolation from the experimenter, received a sham stimulus of saline (0.4 mL) via the SC catheter. A nociceptive stimulus of SC capsaicin (3 mg in 0.2 mL saline with 7% Tween 80) was then applied by catheter at 7 hours after premedication. In a subset (n = 3), two sham injections (saline 0.2 mL) preceded the capsaicin treatment. HR was recorded via ECG, and changes in HR (ΔHR) from baseline were calculated for all stimulations. Capsaicin injection was associated with a significant increase in HR [peak ΔHR: saline group: 8.8 ± 7.1 beats minute(-1) ; capsaicin group: 21.1 ± 5.8 beats minute(-1) (p = 0.0055)] and integrated ΔHR as a function of time. The administration of morphine or butorphanol 7 hours prior to nociception failed to significantly reduce the peak and integrated ΔHR. Butorphanol caused marked, long-lasting sedation as assessed by muscle tone. The HR response to an SC capsaicin injection can serve as a nociceptive model in P. regius. Morphine and butorphanol administration did not reduce HR response to capsaicin stimulation but produced significantly different effects on pre-stimulation HR and sedation. © 2015 Association

  4. The metabolic impact of β-hydroxybutyrate on neurotransmission: Reduced glycolysis mediates changes in calcium responses and KATP channel receptor sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Trine M; Ploug, Kenneth B; Iversen, Anne; Jensen, Anders A; Jansen-Olesen, Inger

    2015-03-01

    Glucose is the main energy substrate for neurons, and ketone bodies are known to be alternative substrates. However, the capacity of ketone bodies to support different neuronal functions is still unknown. Thus, a change in energy substrate from glucose alone to a combination of glucose and β-hydroxybutyrate might change neuronal function as there is a known coupling between metabolism and neurotransmission. The purpose of this study was to shed light on the effects of the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate on glycolysis and neurotransmission in cultured murine glutamatergic neurons. Previous studies have shown an effect of β-hydroxybutyrate on glucose metabolism, and the present study further specified this by showing attenuation of glycolysis when β-hydroxybutyrate was present in these neurons. In addition, the NMDA receptor-induced calcium responses in the neurons were diminished in the presence of β-hydroxybutyrate, whereas a direct effect of the ketone body on transmitter release was absent. However, the presence of β-hydroxybutyrate augmented transmitter release induced by the KATP channel blocker glibenclamide, thus giving an indirect indication of the involvement of KATP channels in the effects of ketone bodies on transmitter release. Energy metabolism and neurotransmission are linked and involve ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP ) channels. However, it is still unclear how and to what degree available energy substrate affects this link. We investigated the effect of changing energy substrate from only glucose to a combination of glucose and R-β-hydroxybutyrate in cultured neurons. Using the latter combination, glycolysis was diminished, NMDA receptor-induced calcium responses were lower, and the KATP channel blocker glibenclamide caused a higher transmitter release. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  5. Estimation of presynaptic calcium currents and endogenous calcium buffers at the frog neuromuscular junction with two different calcium fluorescent dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samigullin, Dmitry; Fatikhov, Nijaz; Khaziev, Eduard; Skorinkin, Andrey; Nikolsky, Eugeny; Bukharaeva, Ellya

    2014-01-01

    At the frog neuromuscular junction, under physiological conditions, the direct measurement of calcium currents and of the concentration of intracellular calcium buffers-which determine the kinetics of calcium concentration and neurotransmitter release from the nerve terminal-has hitherto been technically impossible. With the aim of quantifying both Ca(2+) currents and the intracellular calcium buffers, we measured fluorescence signals from nerve terminals loaded with the low-affinity calcium dye Magnesium Green or the high-affinity dye Oregon Green BAPTA-1, simultaneously with microelectrode recordings of nerve-action potentials and end-plate currents. The action-potential-induced fluorescence signals in the nerve terminals developed much more slowly than the postsynaptic response. To clarify the reasons for this observation and to define a spatiotemporal profile of intracellular calcium and of the concentration of mobile and fixed calcium buffers, mathematical modeling was employed. The best approximations of the experimental calcium transients for both calcium dyes were obtained when the calcium current had an amplitude of 1.6 ± 0.08 pA and a half-decay time of 1.2 ± 0.06 ms, and when the concentrations of mobile and fixed calcium buffers were 250 ± 13 μM and 8 ± 0.4 mM, respectively. High concentrations of endogenous buffers define the time course of calcium transients after an action potential in the axoplasm, and may modify synaptic plasticity.

  6. Estimation of presynaptic calcium currents and endogenous calcium buffers at the frog neuromuscular junction with two different calcium fluorescent dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry eSamigullin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At the frog neuromuscular junction, under physiological conditions, the direct measurement of calcium currents and of the concentration of intracellular calcium buffers—which determine the kinetics of calcium concentration and neurotransmitter release from the nerve terminal—has hitherto been technically impossible. With the aim of quantifying both Ca2+ currents and the intracellular calcium buffers, we measured fluorescence signals from nerve terminals loaded with the low-affinity calcium dye Magnesium Green or the high-affinity dye Oregon Green BAPTA-1, simultaneously with microelectrode recordings of nerve-action potentials and end-plate currents. The action-potential-induced fluorescence signals in the nerve terminals developed much more slowly than the postsynaptic response. To clarify the reasons for this observation and to define a spatiotemporal profile of intracellular calcium and of the concentration of mobile and fixed calcium buffers, mathematical modeling was employed. The best approximations of the experimental calcium transients for both calcium dyes were obtained when the calcium current had an amplitude of 1.6 ± 0.08 рА and a half-decay time of 1.2 ± 0.06 ms, and when the concentrations of mobile and fixed calcium buffers were 250 ± 13 µM and 8 ± 0.4 mM, respectively. High concentrations of endogenous buffers define the time course of calcium transients after an action potential in the axoplasm, and may modify synaptic plasticity.

  7. Calcium signals in olfactory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tareilus, E; Noé, J; Breer, H

    1995-11-09

    Laser scanning confocal microscopy in combination with the fluorescent calcium indicators Fluo-3 and Fura-Red was employed to estimate the intracellular concentration of free calcium ions in individual olfactory receptor neurons and to monitor temporal and spatial changes in the Ca(2+)-level upon stimulation. The chemosensory cells responded to odorants with a significant increase in the calcium concentration, preferentially in the dendritic knob. Applying various stimulation paradigma, it was found that in a population of isolated cells, subsets of receptor neurons display distinct patterns of responsiveness.

  8. The alpha hemolysin of Escherichia Coli power the metabolism oxidative of neutrophils human beings in response to the peptide chemotactic FMLP: comparison with the ionophore of calcium A23187

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, J.

    2000-01-01

    The calcium ionophore ionomycin primes polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) for increased superoxide production upon stimulation with the chemotactic peptide FMLP (Helman Finkel, T. et al J Biol Chem 1987; 262: 12589-12596) In this investigation we assessed the effect of PMN priming with either alpha hemolysin (AH) or the calcium ionophore A23187, both of which increase intracellular calcium, on the oxidative metabolism of PMN (as measured by chemiluminescence) in response to secondary stimulation with FMLP. Both A23187 and AH priming increased, the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence in response to secondary stimulation with FMLP, indicating overstimulation of PMLP oxidative metabolism. Additional experiments using lucigenin as chemiluminescence enhancer showed that A23187, but not AH priming of PMN, increased superoxide release in a manner similar to that reported for ionomycin. These results are discussed in reference to infectious processes involving hemolytic E. coli (Author) [es

  9. The skeletal deformity in response of dietary phosphorus and calcium level in the Caspian roach (Rutilus rutilus caspicus larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Ahmadivand

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal deformities are a common problem in fish hatcheries and commercial farms that affect growth, development and survival as well as the market value of the final product. Among the nutritional components, phosphorus (P and calcium (Ca are of special interest as they are directly involved in the development and maintenance of the skeletal system. Hence, the present study was carried out to investigate the effects of dietary P and Ca on the skeletal deformity, growth and carcass composition the Caspian roach (Rutilus rutilus caspicus larvae. In this study, six semi-purified diets were formulated. The diets A, B, C, D and E were supplemented with 0.0, 0.4, 0.8, 1.2 and 1.6% available P supplied as a 1:1mixture of NaH2Po4/KH2Po4. These five diets were supplemented with 1% Ca, supplied as CaCo3. Diets F was Ca-free and supplemented with 0.8% available P served as control level of P. Each diet was randomly assigned to triplicate groups of fish, and each group was stocked with 30 larvae and fed three times a day for 60 days. At the end experiment, there was no significant effect of dietary P (0 to 1.6% or Ca (0 or 1% supplementation on growth performance such as weight gain and FCR, carcass moisture, P and Ca. However, a significant difference found between treatments in carcass ash. Analysis of length, height and area of vertebrae in two regions of the vertebral column showed no significant difference between the dietary treatments. The skeletal abnormalities were highest incidence in the Caspian roach fed with a low P. Kyphosis placement of vertebrae was the most frequent abnormality.

  10. Remote Research

    CERN Document Server

    Tulathimutte, Tony

    2011-01-01

    Remote studies allow you to recruit subjects quickly, cheaply, and immediately, and give you the opportunity to observe users as they behave naturally in their own environment. In Remote Research, Nate Bolt and Tony Tulathimutte teach you how to design and conduct remote research studies, top to bottom, with little more than a phone and a laptop.

  11. Monitoring of single-cell responses in the optic tectum of adult zebrafish with dextran-coupled calcium dyes delivered via local electroporation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Kassing

    Full Text Available The zebrafish (Danio rerio has become one of the major animal models for in vivo examination of sensory and neuronal computation. Similar to Xenopus tadpoles neural activity in the optic tectum, the major region controlling visually guided behavior, can be examined in zebrafish larvae by optical imaging. Prerequisites of these approaches are usually the transparency of larvae up to a certain age and the use of two-photon microscopy. This principle of fluorescence excitation was necessary to suppress crosstalk between signals from individual neurons, which is a critical issue when using membrane-permeant dyes. This makes the equipment to study neuronal processing costly and limits the approach to the study of larvae. Thus there is lack of knowledge about the properties of neurons in the optic tectum of adult animals. We established a procedure to circumvent these problems, enabling in vivo calcium imaging in the optic tectum of adult zebrafish. Following local application of dextran-coupled dyes single-neuron activity of adult zebrafish can be monitored with conventional widefield microscopy, because dye labeling remains restricted to tens of neurons or less. Among the neurons characterized with our technique we found neurons that were selective for a certain pattern orientation as well as neurons that responded in a direction-selective way to visual motion. These findings are consistent with previous studies and indicate that the functional integrity of neuronal circuits in the optic tectum of adult zebrafish is preserved with our staining technique. Overall, our protocol for in vivo calcium imaging provides a useful approach to monitor visual responses of individual neurons in the optic tectum of adult zebrafish even when only widefield microscopy is available. This approach will help to obtain valuable insight into the principles of visual computation in adult vertebrates and thus complement previous work on developing visual circuits.

  12. Presynaptic calcium signalling in cerebellar mossy fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Jörntell, Henrik; Midtgaard, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Whole-cell recordings were obtained from mossy fibre terminals in adult turtles in order to characterize the basic membrane properties. Calcium imaging of presynaptic calcium signals was carried out in order to analyse calcium dynamics and presynaptic GABA B inhibition. A tetrodotoxin (TTX......)-sensitive fast Na(+) spike faithfully followed repetitive depolarizing pulses with little change in spike duration or amplitude, while a strong outward rectification dominated responses to long-lasting depolarizations. High-threshold calcium spikes were uncovered following addition of potassium channel blockers....... Calcium imaging using Calcium-Green dextran revealed a stimulus-evoked all-or-none TTX-sensitive calcium signal in simple and complex rosettes. All compartments of a complex rosette were activated during electrical activation of the mossy fibre, while individual simple and complex rosettes along an axon...

  13. Seasonal Variations in Mercury's Dayside Calcium Exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Cassidy, Timothy A.; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2014-01-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer on the MESSENGER spacecraft has observed calcium emission in Mercury's exosphere on a near-daily basis since March 2011. During MESSENGER's primary and first extended missions (March 2011 - March 2013) the dayside calcium exosphere was measured over eight Mercury years. We have simulated these data with a Monte Carlo model of exospheric source processes to show that (a) there is a persistent source of energetic calcium located in the dawn equatorial region, (b) there is a seasonal dependence in the calcium source rate, and (c) there are no obvious year-to-year variations in the near-surface dayside calcium exosphere. Although the precise mechanism responsible for ejecting the calcium has not yet been determined, the most likely process is the dissociation of Ca-bearing molecules produced in micrometeoroid impact plumes to form energetic, escaping calcium atoms.

  14. Remote Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Khorram, Siamak; Koch, Frank H; van der Wiele, Cynthia F

    2012-01-01

    Remote Sensing provides information on how remote sensing relates to the natural resources inventory, management, and monitoring, as well as environmental concerns. It explains the role of this new technology in current global challenges. "Remote Sensing" will discuss remotely sensed data application payloads and platforms, along with the methodologies involving image processing techniques as applied to remotely sensed data. This title provides information on image classification techniques and image registration, data integration, and data fusion techniques. How this technology applies to natural resources and environmental concerns will also be discussed.

  15. Deletion of the Intestinal Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump, Isoform 1, Atp2b1, in Mice is Associated with Decreased Bone Mineral Density and Impaired Responsiveness to 1, 25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Zachary C.; Craig, Theodore A.; Filoteo, Adelaida G.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.; Cartwright, Elizabeth J.; Neyses, Ludwig; Strehler, Emanuel E.; Kumar, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    The physiological importance of the intestinal plasma membrane calcium pump, isoform 1, (Pmca1, Atp2b1), in calcium absorption and homeostasis has not been previously demonstrated in vivo. Since global germ-line deletion of the Pmca1 in mice is associated with embryonic lethality, we selectively deleted the Pmca1 in intestinal absorptive cells. Mice with loxP sites flanking exon 2 of the Pmca1 gene (Pmca1fl/fl) were crossed with mice expressing Cre recombinase in the intestine under control of the villin promoter to give mice in which the Pmca1 had been deleted in the intestine (Pmca1EKO mice). Pmca1EKO mice were born at a reduced frequency and were small at the time of birth when compared to wild-type (Wt) litter mates. At two months of age, Pmca1EKO mice fed a 0.81% calcium, 0.34% phosphorus, normal vitamin D diet had reduced whole body bone mineral density (P <0.037), and reduced femoral bone mineral density (P <0.015). There was a trend towards lower serum calcium and higher serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3) concentrations in Pmca1EKO mice compared to Wt mice but the changes were not statistically significant. The urinary phosphorus/creatinine ratio was increased in Pmca1EKO mice (P <0.004). Following the administration of 200 ng of 1α,25(OH)2D3 intraperitoneally to Wt mice, active intestinal calcium transport increased ∼2-fold, whereas Pmca1EKO mice administered an equal amount of 1α,25(OH)2D3 failed to show an increase in active calcium transport. Deletion of the Pmca1 in the intestine is associated with reduced growth and bone mineralization, and a failure to up-regulate calcium absorption in response to 1α,25(OH)2D3. PMID:26392310

  16. Time-sensitive remote sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Lippitt, Christopher; Coulter, Lloyd

    2015-01-01

    This book documents the state of the art in the use of remote sensing to address time-sensitive information requirements. Specifically, it brings together a group of authors who are both researchers and practitioners, who work toward or are currently using remote sensing to address time-sensitive information requirements with the goal of advancing the effective use of remote sensing to supply time-sensitive information. The book addresses the theoretical implications of time-sensitivity on the remote sensing process, assessments or descriptions of methods for expediting the delivery and improving the quality of information derived from remote sensing, and describes and analyzes time-sensitive remote sensing applications, with an emphasis on lessons learned. This book is intended for remote sensing scientists, practitioners (e.g., emergency responders or administrators of emergency response agencies), and students, but will also be of use to those seeking to understand the potential of remote sensing to addres...

  17. Calcium blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003477.htm Calcium blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The calcium blood test measures the level of calcium in the blood. ...

  18. Calcium source (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getting enough calcium to keep bones from thinning throughout a person's life may be made more difficult if that person has ... as a tendency toward kidney stones, for avoiding calcium-rich food sources. Calcium deficiency also effects the ...

  19. Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Fast Facts The risk of ... young people, too. Proper diagnosis depends on detecting calcium pyrophosphate crystals in the fluid of an affected ...

  20. Calcium carbonate overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: Antacids (Tums, Chooz) Mineral supplements Hand lotions Vitamin and mineral supplements Other products may also contain ...

  1. Calcium and bones (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human ... body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their structure. Calcium is essential for the ...

  2. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... Calcium hydroxide ... These products contain calcium hydroxide: Cement Limewater Many industrial solvents and cleaners (hundreds to thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement ...

  3. Effect of lowering dietary calcium intake on fractional whole body calcium retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson-Hughes, B.; Stern, D.T.; Shipp, C.C.; Rasmussen, H.M.

    1988-01-01

    Although fractional calcium absorption is known to vary inversely with calcium intake, the extent and timing of individual hormonal and calcium absorption responses to altered calcium intake have not been defined. We measured fractional whole body retention of orally ingested 47 Ca, an index of calcium absorption, in nine normal women after they had eaten a 2000-mg calcium diet for 8 weeks and a 300-mg calcium diet for 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks. After the diet change, serum intact PTH (32.2% increase; P = 0.005), serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25-(OH)2D; 43.8% increase; P = 0.003], and fractional whole body calcium retention (42.8% increase; P = 0.004) increased within 1 week. Although the PTH and calcium retention responses remained fairly constant throughout the low calcium intake period, serum 1,25-(OH)2D concentrations declined toward baseline after week 1. Thus, the late increase in calcium retention may have resulted from calcium absorption that was independent of 1,25-(OH)2D stimulation

  4. Synergistic effects of bisphosphonate and calcium phosphate nanoparticles on peri-implant bone responses in osteoporotic rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alghamdi, H.S.A.; Bosco, R.; Both, S.K.; Iafisco, M.; Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.; Jansen, J.A.; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of osteoporosis will increase within the next decades due to the aging world population, which can affect the bone healing response to dental and orthopedic implants. Consequently, local drug targeting of peri-implant bone has been proposed as a strategy for the enhancement of

  5. Calcium in Urine Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... K. Brunner & Suddarth's Handbook of Laboratory and Diagnostic Tests. 2 nd Ed, Kindle. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; c2014. Calcium, Serum; Calcium and Phosphates, Urine; ...

  6. Transcellular transport of calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terepka, A R; Coleman, J R; Armbrecht, H J; Gunter, T E

    1976-01-01

    Studies of two calcium transporting epithelia, embryonic chick chorioallantoic membrane and the small intestine of rat and chick, have strongly suggested that the transfer of calcium across a cell involves processes distinctly different from intracellular calcium ion regulation. In the proposed model, transcellular calcium transport is considered as a specialized process developed only by certain cells in those tissues charged with bulk transfer of calcium. The overall effect of the endocytotic mechanism is bulk calcium movement across a cell, protection of mitochondria from exposure to high concentrations of calcium, and the avoidance of wide and potentially toxic fluctuations in cytosol ionic calcium levels. (MFB)

  7. Is bone equally responsive to calcium and vitamins D intake from food vs. supplements? Use of 41Ca tracer kinetic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Few interventions directly compare equivalent calcium and vitamin D from dairy vs. supplements on the same bone outcomes. The radioisotope calcium-41 (41Ca) holds promise as a tracer method to directly measure changes in bone resorption with differing dietary interventions. Objective: U...

  8. Regulation of the endoplasmic reticulum calcium storage during the unfolded protein response--significance in tissue ischemia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treiman, Marek

    2002-01-01

    for the protein folding pathway require Ca(2+) binding for their activity. A number of factors, including Ca(2+) depletion, may interfere with the folding pathway within the ER, with a potential for cell injury through an accumulation of malfolded protein aggregates. The Unfolded Protein Response involves...... a transcriptional upregulation of a number of the ER-resident folding helper proteins and becomes triggered when the folding pathway is blocked. To be effective, these upregulated proteins require a sufficient supply of Ca(2+) cofactor within the ER lumen. In tissue ischemia, where the availablity of this cofactor...

  9. Exopolysaccharides regulate calcium flow in cariogenic biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varenganayil, Muth M.; Decho, Alan W.

    2017-01-01

    Caries-associated biofilms induce loss of calcium from tooth surfaces in the presence of dietary carbohydrates. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) provide a matrix scaffold and an abundance of primary binding sites within biofilms. The role of EPS in binding calcium in cariogenic biofilms is only partially understood. Thus, the aim of the present study is to investigate the relationship between the calcium dissolution rates and calcium tolerance of caries-associated bacteria and yeast as well as to examine the properties of EPS to quantify its binding affinity for dissolved calcium. Calcium dissolution was measured by dissolution zones on Pikovskaya’s agar. Calcium tolerance was assessed by isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC) by adding CaCl2 to the bacterial cultures. Acid-base titration and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to identify possible functional groups responsible for calcium binding, which was assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Lactobacillus spp. and mutans streptococci demonstrated calcium dissolution in the presence of different carbohydrates. All strains that demonstrated high dissolution rates also revealed higher rates of calcium tolerance by IMC. In addition, acidic functional groups were predominantly identified as possible binding sites for calcium ions by acid-base titration and FTIR. Finally, ITC revealed EPS to have a higher binding affinity for calcium compared, for example, to lactic acid. In conclusion, this study illustrates the role of EPS in terms of the calcium tolerance of cariogenic microbiota by determining the ability of EPS to control free calcium concentrations within the biofilms as a self-regulating mode of action in the pathogenesis of dental caries. PMID:29023506

  10. Exopolysaccharides regulate calcium flow in cariogenic biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Astasov-Frauenhoffer

    Full Text Available Caries-associated biofilms induce loss of calcium from tooth surfaces in the presence of dietary carbohydrates. Exopolysaccharides (EPS provide a matrix scaffold and an abundance of primary binding sites within biofilms. The role of EPS in binding calcium in cariogenic biofilms is only partially understood. Thus, the aim of the present study is to investigate the relationship between the calcium dissolution rates and calcium tolerance of caries-associated bacteria and yeast as well as to examine the properties of EPS to quantify its binding affinity for dissolved calcium. Calcium dissolution was measured by dissolution zones on Pikovskaya's agar. Calcium tolerance was assessed by isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC by adding CaCl2 to the bacterial cultures. Acid-base titration and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy were used to identify possible functional groups responsible for calcium binding, which was assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC. Lactobacillus spp. and mutans streptococci demonstrated calcium dissolution in the presence of different carbohydrates. All strains that demonstrated high dissolution rates also revealed higher rates of calcium tolerance by IMC. In addition, acidic functional groups were predominantly identified as possible binding sites for calcium ions by acid-base titration and FTIR. Finally, ITC revealed EPS to have a higher binding affinity for calcium compared, for example, to lactic acid. In conclusion, this study illustrates the role of EPS in terms of the calcium tolerance of cariogenic microbiota by determining the ability of EPS to control free calcium concentrations within the biofilms as a self-regulating mode of action in the pathogenesis of dental caries.

  11. Calcium, essential for health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez de Victoria, Emilio

    2016-07-12

    Calcium (Ca) is the most abundant mineral element in our body. It accounts for about 2% of body weight. The functions of calcium are: a) functions skeletal and b) regulatory functions. Bone consists of a protein matrix that mineralizes mainly with calcium (the most abundant), phosphate and magnesium, for it is essential an adequate dietary intake of Ca, phosphorus and vitamin D. The ionic Ca (Ca2+) is essential to maintain and / or perform different specialized functions of, virtually, all body cells cellular. Because of its important functions Ca2+ must be closely regulated, keeping plasma concentrations within narrow ranges. For this reason there is an accurate response against hypocalcemia or hypercalcemia in which the parathormone, calcitriol, calcitonin and vitamin K are involved. Ca intakes in the Spanish population are low in a significant percentage of the older adult’s population, especially in women. The main source of Ca in the diet is milk and milk derivatives. Green leafy vegetables, fruits and legumes can be important sources of Ca in a Mediterranean dietary pattern. The bioavailability of dietary Ca depends on physiological and dietary factors. Physiological include age, physiological status (gestation and lactation) Ca and vitamin D status and disease. Several studies relate Ca intake in the diet and various diseases, such as osteoporosis, cancer, cardiovascular disease and obesity.

  12. TMBIM3/GRINA is a novel unfolded protein response (UPR) target gene that controls apoptosis through the modulation of ER calcium homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Rivera, D; Armisén, R; Colombo, A; Martínez, G; Eguiguren, A L; Díaz, A; Kiviluoto, S; Rodríguez, D; Patron, M; Rizzuto, R; Bultynck, G; Concha, M L; Sierralta, J; Stutzin, A; Hetz, C

    2012-06-01

    Transmembrane BAX inhibitor motif-containing (TMBIM)-6, also known as BAX-inhibitor 1 (BI-1), is an anti-apoptotic protein that belongs to a putative family of highly conserved and poorly characterized genes. Here we report the function of TMBIM3/GRINA in the control of cell death by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Tmbim3 mRNA levels are strongly upregulated in cellular and animal models of ER stress, controlled by the PERK signaling branch of the unfolded protein response. TMBIM3/GRINA synergies with TMBIM6/BI-1 in the modulation of ER calcium homeostasis and apoptosis, associated with physical interactions with inositol trisphosphate receptors. Loss-of-function studies in D. melanogaster demonstrated that TMBIM3/GRINA and TMBIM6/BI-1 have synergistic activities against ER stress in vivo. Similarly, manipulation of TMBIM3/GRINA levels in zebrafish embryos revealed an essential role in the control of apoptosis during neuronal development and in experimental models of ER stress. These findings suggest the existence of a conserved group of functionally related cell death regulators across species beyond the BCL-2 family of proteins operating at the ER membrane.

  13. cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Inhibition Extends the Upper Temperature Limit of Stimulus-Evoked Calcium Responses in Motoneuronal Boutons of Drosophila melanogaster Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krill, Jennifer L; Dawson-Scully, Ken

    2016-01-01

    While the mammalian brain functions within a very narrow range of oxygen concentrations and temperatures, the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has employed strategies to deal with a much wider range of acute environmental stressors. The foraging (for) gene encodes the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), has been shown to regulate thermotolerance in many stress-adapted species, including Drosophila, and could be a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of hyperthermia in mammals. Whereas previous thermotolerance studies have looked at the effects of PKG variation on Drosophila behavior or excitatory postsynaptic potentials at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), little is known about PKG effects on presynaptic mechanisms. In this study, we characterize presynaptic calcium ([Ca2+]i) dynamics at the Drosophila larval NMJ to determine the effects of high temperature stress on synaptic transmission. We investigated the neuroprotective role of PKG modulation both genetically using RNA interference (RNAi), and pharmacologically, to determine if and how PKG affects presynaptic [Ca2+]i dynamics during hyperthermia. We found that PKG activity modulates presynaptic neuronal Ca2+ responses during acute hyperthermia, where PKG activation makes neurons more sensitive to temperature-induced failure of Ca2+ flux and PKG inhibition confers thermotolerance and maintains normal Ca2+ dynamics under the same conditions. Targeted motoneuronal knockdown of PKG using RNAi demonstrated that decreased PKG expression was sufficient to confer thermoprotection. These results demonstrate that the PKG pathway regulates presynaptic motoneuronal Ca2+ signaling to influence thermotolerance of presynaptic function during acute hyperthermia.

  14. Remote Drying in the North Atlantic as a Common Response to Precessional Changes and CO2 Increase Over Land

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Patrick [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division; Kravitz, Ben [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division; Lu, Jian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division; Leung, L. Ruby [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division

    2018-04-16

    Here we demonstrate that changes of the North Atlantic subtropical high (NASH) and its regional rainfall pattern during mid-Holocene precessional changes and idealized 4xCO2 increase can both be understood as a remote response to changes in the African and Indian monsoon systems. Despite different sources and patterns of radiative forcing (increase in CO2 concentration vs. changes in orbital parameters), we find that the pattern of energy, circulation, and rainfall responses in the Northern Hemisphere summer subtropics are very similar in the two forcing scenarios because both are dominated by the same land-sea heating contrast in response to the forcing. An increase in energy input over land drives a westward displacement of the coupled NASH-monsoon circulation, consistent with increased precipitation in the Afro-Asia region and decreased precipitation in the America-Atlantic region. Ultimately, this study underscores the importance of land heating in dictating remote drying through zonal shifts of the subtropical circulation.

  15. Activity-Dependent Calcium, Oxygen, and Vascular Responses in a Mouse Model of Familial Hemiplegic Migraine Type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khennouf, Lila; Gesslein, Bodil; Lind, Barbara Lykke

    2016-01-01

    it with assessment of local field potentials by electrophysiological recordings, cerebral blood flow by laser Doppler flowmetry, and oxygen consumption with measurement of the oxygen tissue tension. Results: During spreading depression, the evoked increase in cytosolic Ca2+ was larger and faster in FHM1 mice than...... wild-type (WT) mice. It was accompanied by larger increases in oxygen consumption in FHM1 mice, leading to tissue anoxia, but moderate hypoxia, in WT mice. In comparison, before CSD, Ca2+ and hemodynamic responses to somatosensory stimulations were smaller in FHM1 mice than WT mice and almost abolished...... after CSD. The CSD-induced Ca2+ changes were mitigated by the CaV2.1 gating modifier, tert-butyl dihydroquinone. Interpretation: Our findings suggest that tissue anoxia might be a mechanism for prolonged aura in FHM1. Reduced Ca2+ signals during normal network activity in FHM1 as compared to WT mice may...

  16. Critical role of gap junction communication, calcium and nitric oxide signaling in bystander responses to focal photodynamic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calì, Bianca; Ceolin, Stefano; Ceriani, Federico; Bortolozzi, Mario; Agnellini, Andrielly H R; Zorzi, Veronica; Predonzani, Andrea; Bronte, Vincenzo; Molon, Barbara; Mammano, Fabio

    2015-04-30

    Ionizing and nonionizing radiation affect not only directly targeted cells but also surrounding "bystander" cells. The underlying mechanisms and therapeutic role of bystander responses remain incompletely defined. Here we show that photosentizer activation in a single cell triggers apoptosis in bystander cancer cells, which are electrically coupled by gap junction channels and support the propagation of a Ca2+ wave initiated in the irradiated cell. The latter also acts as source of nitric oxide (NO) that diffuses to bystander cells, in which NO levels are further increased by a mechanism compatible with Ca(2+)-dependent enzymatic production. We detected similar signals in tumors grown in dorsal skinfold chambers applied to live mice. Pharmacological blockade of connexin channels significantly reduced the extent of apoptosis in bystander cells, consistent with a critical role played by intercellular communication, Ca2+ and NO in the bystander effects triggered by photodynamic therapy.

  17. Response surface methodology based extraction of Tribulus terrestris leads to an upsurge of antilithiatic potential by inhibition of calcium oxalate crystallization processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Jyoti; Tandon, Simran; Gupta, Varun; Nayyar, Jasamrit; Singla, Surinder Kumar; Tandon, Chanderdeep

    2017-01-01

    Tribulus terrestris has significant antilithiatic efficacy established via both in vitro as well as in vivo studies and is used in numerous anti-urolithiatic herbal formulations viz. Cystone, Uriflow, Uritone and Neeri. However, to fully utilize its antilithiatic potential, the influence of different extraction parameters on antilithiatic ability of T. terrestris aqueous extract needs elucidation. Thus, the current study was undertaken using statistically optimized extraction conditions for aqueous extract preparation. Response surface methodology was employed to observe the influence of three variables i.e. temperature (°C), time (h) and solid: liquid ratio (S: L) on the extraction yield (%) and protein content (mg/g) of T. terrestris aqueous extract. RSM results revealed that the high S:L ratio, low temperature and reduced incubation time were optimal conditions for aqueous extraction. Under such extraction conditions the protein content reached the value of 26.6±1.22 mg/g and the obtained extraction yield was 27.32±1.62%. The assessment of antilithiatic activity of 4 selected extracts (AE1-4), revealed enhanced nucleation and aggregation inhibition of calcium oxalate crystals with AE1 and AE2, which in addition significantly altered the size and morphology of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals compared to AE3 and AE4. In vitro cell culture based studies on renal epithelial cells (MDCK, NRK-52E and PK 15) proved that the AE1 showed higher cytoprotective potency by increasing cell viability as compared to the oxalate treated group. The free radical scavenging activity of aqueous extract lowered the reactive oxygen specie’s induced damage and potentially reduced the signals of programmed cell death due to oxalate injury. In addition, modulation of the COM crystal morphology was enhanced by AE1 as compared to AE2. The FTIR and GC-MS analysis of AE1, showed the presence of biomolecules which could aid in the attenuation of lithiatic process. In the light

  18. Response surface methodology based extraction of Tribulus terrestris leads to an upsurge of antilithiatic potential by inhibition of calcium oxalate crystallization processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Jyoti; Tandon, Simran; Gupta, Varun; Nayyar, Jasamrit; Singla, Surinder Kumar; Tandon, Chanderdeep

    2017-01-01

    Tribulus terrestris has significant antilithiatic efficacy established via both in vitro as well as in vivo studies and is used in numerous anti-urolithiatic herbal formulations viz. Cystone, Uriflow, Uritone and Neeri. However, to fully utilize its antilithiatic potential, the influence of different extraction parameters on antilithiatic ability of T. terrestris aqueous extract needs elucidation. Thus, the current study was undertaken using statistically optimized extraction conditions for aqueous extract preparation. Response surface methodology was employed to observe the influence of three variables i.e. temperature (°C), time (h) and solid: liquid ratio (S: L) on the extraction yield (%) and protein content (mg/g) of T. terrestris aqueous extract. RSM results revealed that the high S:L ratio, low temperature and reduced incubation time were optimal conditions for aqueous extraction. Under such extraction conditions the protein content reached the value of 26.6±1.22 mg/g and the obtained extraction yield was 27.32±1.62%. The assessment of antilithiatic activity of 4 selected extracts (AE1-4), revealed enhanced nucleation and aggregation inhibition of calcium oxalate crystals with AE1 and AE2, which in addition significantly altered the size and morphology of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals compared to AE3 and AE4. In vitro cell culture based studies on renal epithelial cells (MDCK, NRK-52E and PK 15) proved that the AE1 showed higher cytoprotective potency by increasing cell viability as compared to the oxalate treated group. The free radical scavenging activity of aqueous extract lowered the reactive oxygen specie's induced damage and potentially reduced the signals of programmed cell death due to oxalate injury. In addition, modulation of the COM crystal morphology was enhanced by AE1 as compared to AE2. The FTIR and GC-MS analysis of AE1, showed the presence of biomolecules which could aid in the attenuation of lithiatic process. In the light

  19. Response surface methodology based extraction of Tribulus terrestris leads to an upsurge of antilithiatic potential by inhibition of calcium oxalate crystallization processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Kaushik

    Full Text Available Tribulus terrestris has significant antilithiatic efficacy established via both in vitro as well as in vivo studies and is used in numerous anti-urolithiatic herbal formulations viz. Cystone, Uriflow, Uritone and Neeri. However, to fully utilize its antilithiatic potential, the influence of different extraction parameters on antilithiatic ability of T. terrestris aqueous extract needs elucidation. Thus, the current study was undertaken using statistically optimized extraction conditions for aqueous extract preparation. Response surface methodology was employed to observe the influence of three variables i.e. temperature (°C, time (h and solid: liquid ratio (S: L on the extraction yield (% and protein content (mg/g of T. terrestris aqueous extract. RSM results revealed that the high S:L ratio, low temperature and reduced incubation time were optimal conditions for aqueous extraction. Under such extraction conditions the protein content reached the value of 26.6±1.22 mg/g and the obtained extraction yield was 27.32±1.62%. The assessment of antilithiatic activity of 4 selected extracts (AE1-4, revealed enhanced nucleation and aggregation inhibition of calcium oxalate crystals with AE1 and AE2, which in addition significantly altered the size and morphology of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM crystals compared to AE3 and AE4. In vitro cell culture based studies on renal epithelial cells (MDCK, NRK-52E and PK 15 proved that the AE1 showed higher cytoprotective potency by increasing cell viability as compared to the oxalate treated group. The free radical scavenging activity of aqueous extract lowered the reactive oxygen specie's induced damage and potentially reduced the signals of programmed cell death due to oxalate injury. In addition, modulation of the COM crystal morphology was enhanced by AE1 as compared to AE2. The FTIR and GC-MS analysis of AE1, showed the presence of biomolecules which could aid in the attenuation of lithiatic process. In

  20. Calcium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, C.W.; Nestor, O.H.

    1989-01-01

    A new process for producing large, single, oriented crystals of calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ) has been developed which overcomes the limitations of current growing methods. This process has been reduced to practice and has yielded oriented crystals 17.5 x 17.5 x 5 cm 3 . Currently nearing completion is a system for producing 35 x 35 x 7.5 cm 3 single crystals. A scale up to one-meter-square is considered feasible. This crystal growing process makes possible the fabrication of very large CaF 2 windows. Suitability for very high power lasers, however, requires attention to properties beyond mere size. A process to generate higher purity growth stock (starting material) was also developed. The additional purification of the growth stock contributes to lower bulk absorption, the absence of color centers and increased radiation hardness. Also identified were several specific impurities which correlate with radiation hardness. A correlation was found between color centers induced by laser radiation and ionizing radiation. Other CaF 2 crystal properties such as tensile strength, absorption and laser damage thresholds were studied and are discussed

  1. Use of response surface methodology for development of new microwell-based spectrophotometric method for determination of atrovastatin calcium in tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wani Tanveer A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Response surface methodology by Box–Behnken design employing the multivariate approach enables substantial improvement in the method development using fewer experiments, without wastage of large volumes of organic solvents, which leads to high analysis cost. This methodology has not been employed for development of a method for analysis of atorvastatin calcium (ATR-Ca. Results The present research study describes the use of in optimization and validation of a new microwell-based UV-Visible spectrophotometric method of for determination of ATR-Ca in its tablets. By the use of quadratic regression analysis, equations were developed to describe the behavior of the response as simultaneous functions of the selected independent variables. Accordingly, the optimum conditions were determined which included concentration of 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ, time of reaction and temperature. The absorbance of the colored-CT complex was measured at 460 nm by microwell-plate absorbance reader. The method was validated, in accordance with ICH guidelines for accuracy, precision, selectivity and linearity (r² = 0.9993 over the concentration range of 20–200 μg/ml. The assay was successfully applied to the analysis of ATR-Ca in its pharmaceutical dosage forms with good accuracy and precision. Conclusion The assay described herein has great practical value in the routine analysis of ATR-Ca in quality control laboratories, as it has high throughput property, consumes minimum volume of organic solvent thus it offers the reduction in the exposures of the analysts to the toxic effects of organic solvents, environmentally friendly "Green" approach and reduction in the analysis cost by 50-fold.

  2. Use of response surface methodology for development of new microwell-based spectrophotometric method for determination of atrovastatin calcium in tablets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Response surface methodology by Box–Behnken design employing the multivariate approach enables substantial improvement in the method development using fewer experiments, without wastage of large volumes of organic solvents, which leads to high analysis cost. This methodology has not been employed for development of a method for analysis of atorvastatin calcium (ATR-Ca). Results The present research study describes the use of in optimization and validation of a new microwell-based UV-Visible spectrophotometric method of for determination of ATR-Ca in its tablets. By the use of quadratic regression analysis, equations were developed to describe the behavior of the response as simultaneous functions of the selected independent variables. Accordingly, the optimum conditions were determined which included concentration of 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ), time of reaction and temperature. The absorbance of the colored-CT complex was measured at 460 nm by microwell-plate absorbance reader. The method was validated, in accordance with ICH guidelines for accuracy, precision, selectivity and linearity (r² = 0.9993) over the concentration range of 20–200 μg/ml. The assay was successfully applied to the analysis of ATR-Ca in its pharmaceutical dosage forms with good accuracy and precision. Conclusion The assay described herein has great practical value in the routine analysis of ATR-Ca in quality control laboratories, as it has high throughput property, consumes minimum volume of organic solvent thus it offers the reduction in the exposures of the analysts to the toxic effects of organic solvents, environmentally friendly "Green" approach) and reduction in the analysis cost by 50-fold. PMID:23146143

  3. RNA-Seq analysis identifies potential modulators of gravity response in Ceratopteris spores: Evidence for modulation by calcium pumps and apyrase activity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gravity regulates the magnitude and direction of a trans-cell calcium current in germinating spores of Ceratopteris richardii. Blocking this current with nifedipine...

  4. Rice calcium-dependent protein kinase OsCPK17 targets plasma membrane intrinsic protein and sucrose phosphate synthase and is required for a proper cold stress response

    KAUST Repository

    Almadanim, M. Cecí lia; Alexandre, Bruno M.; Rosa, Margarida T.G.; Sapeta, Helena; Leitã o, Antó nio E.; Ramalho, José C.; Lam, TuKiet T.; Negrã o, Só nia; Abreu, Isabel A.; Oliveira, M. Margarida

    2017-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are involved in plant tolerance mechanisms to abiotic stresses. Although CDPKs are recognized as key messengers in signal transduction, the specific role of most members of this family remains unknown. Here

  5. Electrophysiological evidence for voltage-gated calcium channel 2 (Cav2) modulation of mechano- and thermosensitive spinal neuronal responses in a rat model of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, W; Patel, R; Dickenson, A H

    2015-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) remains one of the greatest healthcare burdens in western society, with chronic debilitating pain-dominating clinical presentation yet therapeutic strategies are inadequate in many patients. Development of better analgesics is contingent on improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms mediating OA pain. Voltage-gated calcium channels 2.2 (Cav2.2) play a critical role in spinal nociceptive transmission, therefore blocking Cav2.2 activity represents an attractive opportunity for OA pain treatment, but the only available licensed Cav2.2 antagonist ziconitide (PrilatTM) is of limited use. TROX-1 is an orally available, use dependent and state-selective Cav2 antagonist, exerting its analgesic effect primarily via Cav2.2 blockade, with an improved therapeutic window compared with ziconitide. Using a rat model of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA), 2 mg, induced OA we used in vivo electrophysiology to assess the effects of spinal or systemic administration of TROX-1 on the evoked activity of wide dynamic range spinal dorsal horn neurons in response to electrical, natural mechanical (dynamic brush and von Frey 2, 8, 26 and 6 g) and thermal (40, 45 and 45 °C) stimuli applied to the peripheral receptive field. MIA injection into the knee joint resulted in mechanical hypersensitivity of the ipsilateral hind paw and weight-bearing asymmetry. Spinal administration of TROX-1 (0.1 and 1 μg/50 μl) produced a significant dose-related inhibition of dynamic brush, mechanical (von Frey filament (vF) 8, 26 and 60 g) and noxious thermal-(45 and 48 °C) evoked neuronal responses in MIA rats only. Systemic administration of TROX-1 produced a significant inhibition of the mechanical-(vF 8, 26 and 60 g) evoked neuronal responses in MIA rats. TROX-1 did not produce any significant effect on any neuronal measure in Sham controls. Our in vivo electrophysiological results demonstrate a pathological state-dependent effect of TROX-1, which suggests an increased functional

  6. The role of integrin αv in proliferation and differentiation of human dental pulp cell response to calcium silicate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chi-Jr; Hsu, Hsin-I; Lin, Chi-Chang; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Wu, Buor-Chang; Kao, Chia-Tze; Shie, Ming-You

    2014-11-01

    It has been proved that integrin αv activity is related to cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and organ development. However, the biological functions of integrin αv in human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on silicate-based materials have not been explored. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of integrin αv in the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs cultured with the effect of calcium silicate (CS) cement and β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) cement. In this study, hDPCs were cultured on CS and TCP materials, and we evaluated fibronectin (FN) secretion and integrin αv expression during the cell attachment stage. After small interfering RNA transfection targeting integrin αv, the proliferation and odontogenesis differentiation behavior of hDPCs were analyzed. The results indicate that CS releases Si ion-increased FN secretion and adsorption, which promote cell attachment more effectively than TCP. The CS cement facilitates FN and αv subintegrin expression. However, the FN adsorption and integrin expression of TCP are similar to that observed in the control dish. Integrin αv small interfering RNA inhibited odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs with the decreased formation of mineralized nodules on CS. It also down-regulated the protein expression of multiple markers of odontogenesis and the expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein protein. These results establish composition-dependent differences in integrin binding and its effectiveness as a mechanism regulating cellular responses to biomaterial surface. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Enhanced expression of a calcium-dependent protein kinase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Among the downstream targets of calcium in plants, calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) form an interesting class of kinases which are activated by calcium binding. They have been implicated in a diverse array of responses to hormonal and environmental stimuli. In order to dissect the role of CDPKs in the moss ...

  8. Using Satellite Remote Sensing and Household Survey Data to Assess Human Health and Nutrition Response to Environmental Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Molly E.; Grace, Kathryn; Shively, Gerald; Johnson, Kiersten B.; Carroll, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Climate change and degradation of ecosystem services functioning may threaten the ability of current agricultural systems to keep up with demand for adequate and inexpensive food and for clean water, waste disposal and other broader ecosystem services. Human health is likely to be affected by changes occurring across multiple geographic and time scales. Impacts range from increasing transmissibility and the range of vector-borne diseases, such as malaria and yellow fever, to undermining nutrition through deleterious impacts on food production and concomitant increases in food prices. This paper uses case studies to describe methods that make use of satellite remote sensing and Demographic and Health Survey data to better understand individual-level human health and nutrition outcomes. By bringing these diverse datasets together, the connection between environmental change and human health outcomes can be described through new research and analysis.

  9. Analysis of Cross-Seasonal Spectral Response from Kettle Holes: Application of Remote Sensing Techniques for Chlorophyll Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Lennartz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Kettle holes, small inland water bodies usually less than 1 ha in size, are subjected to pollution, drainage, and structural alteration by intensive land use practices. This study presents the analysis of spectral signatures from kettle holes based on in situ water sampling and reflectance measurements in application for chlorophyll estimation. Water samples and surface reflectance from kettle holes were collected from 6 ponds in 15 field campaigns (5 in 2007 and 10 in 2008, resulting in a total of 80 spectral datasets. We assessed the existing semi-empirical algorithms to determine chlorophyll content for different types of kettle holes using seasonal and cross-seasonal volume reflectance and derivative spectra. Based on this analysis and optical properties of water leaving reflectance from kettle holes, the following typology of the remote signal interpretation was proposed: Submerged vegetation, Phytoplankton dominated and Mixed type.

  10. Contracture of Slow Striated Muscle during Calcium Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Richard L.; Hein, Manfred M.

    1963-01-01

    When deprived of calcium the slow striated muscle fibers of the frog develop reversible contractures in either hypertonic or isotonic solutions. While calcium deprivation continues because of a flowing calcium-free solution the muscles relax slowly and completely. Restoration of calcium during contracture relaxes the muscle promptly to initial tension. When relaxed during calcium lack the return of calcium does not change tension and the muscle stays relaxed. When contractures are induced by solutions containing small amounts of calcium relaxation does not occur or requires several hours. The rate of tension development depends upon the rate at which calcium moves outward since the contractures develop slower in low concentrations of calcium and are absent or greatly slowed in a stagnant calcium-free solution. Withdrawal of calcium prevents the contractile responses to ACh, KCl, or electrical stimulation through the nerve. Muscles return to their original excitability after calcium is restored. Origin of the contractures is unrelated to nerve activity since they are maximal during transmission failure from calcium lack, occur in denervated muscles, and are not blocked by high concentrations of d-tubocurarine, procaine, or atropine. The experiments also indicate that the contractures do not originate from repetitive activity of muscle membranes. The findings are most simply explained by relating the outward movement of calcium as a link for initiating contraction in slow type striated muscle. PMID:14065284

  11. Pollutant tracking for 3 Western North Atlantic sea grasses by remote sensing: Preliminary diminishing white light responses of Thalassia testudinum, Halodule wrightii, and Zostera marina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorhaug, Anitra; Berlyn, Graeme P.; Poulos, Helen M.; Goodale, Uromi M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Sea grass accessory pigments are more important than Chl at medium to low light intensity. • Partial absorption changes in Thalassia and also in Halodule at low intensity visible light ranges. • NDVI and chlNDI do not detect these changes or low light responses of sea grasses. • Intertidal sea grasses are less stressed than the subtidal species at low and high light. • Chl b is an important photosynthetic pigment in tropical/subtropical species. - Abstract: Sea grasses are foundation species for estuarine ecosystems. The available light for sea grasses diminishes rapidly during pollutant spills, effluent releases, disturbances such as intense riverine input, and tidal changes. We studied how sea grasses’ remote-sensing signatures and light-capturing ability respond to short term light alterations. In vivo responses were measured over the entire visible-light spectra to diminishing white-light on whole-living-plants’ spectral reflectance, including 6 h of full oceanic-light fluences from 10% to 100%. We analyzed differences by various reflectance indices. We compared the sea grasses species responses of tropical vs. temperate and intertidals (Halodule wrightii, and Zostera marina) vs. subtidal (Thalassia testudinum). Reflectance diminished with decreasing light intensity that coincided with greater accessory pigment stimulation (anthocyanin, carotenoids, xanthins). Chlorophyll a and Chlorophyll b differed significantly among species (Thalassia vs. Halodule). Photosynthetic efficiency diminished at high light intensities. The NDVI index was inadequate to perceive these differences. Our results demonstrate the leaf-level utility of data to remote sensing for mapping sea grass and sea grass stress

  12. Near Real-Time Use of Optical Remote Sensing and Synthetic Aperture Radar for Response to Central U.S. Flooding in Late April-Early May 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, J. R.; Schultz, L. A.; Jones, M.; Molthan, A.; Arko, S. A.; Hogenson, K.; Meyer, F. J.

    2017-12-01

    In late April and early May 2017, heavy rainfall across Missouri led to extensive flooding along the Missouri and Mississippi River basins in the Central United States. Determining the extent of flooding is critical for response organizations to properly deploy personnel and other assets involved in preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery efforts. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) relies on geospatial flood extent data, among other data, to estimate the impacts to population and infrastructure in order to prepare and engage response activities in support of the affected states and communities. To assist FEMA in mapping flood extent in a near real-time, the NASA Earth Science Disasters Program coordinates a multi-NASA center response to provide satellite imagery and products to FEMA during major flood events to supplement their analysis tools and capabilities. Scientists at the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center at Marshall Space Flight Center, who led this particular response, have been working with the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) at the University of Alaska Fairbanks to provide synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery and derived flood products to FEMA's geospatial response team in support of flooding events. Combined, these efforts helped to provide preliminary flood mapping to FEMA from a broad constellation of remote sensors. The presentation will describe the various products available throughout the response event, post-event collaborations examining these products in comparison to additional modeling and data collection by FEMA, training needs to improve product use, and more efficient methods for data delivery. Lessons learned will highlight opportunities for future work and improvement, and guide other ongoing efforts to develop collaborations that would also support other domestic emergency response activities, such as those led by the National Guard Bureau, which assists individual state Guard units.

  13. Compositional effects on the formation of a calcium phosphate layer and the response of osteoblast-like cells on polymer-bioactive glass composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Helen H; Tang, Amy; Oh, Seong Cheol; Spalazzi, Jeffrey P; Dionisio, Kathie

    2005-11-01

    Biodegradable polymer-ceramic composites are attractive systems for bone tissue engineering applications. These composites have the combined advantages of the component phases, as well as the inherent ease in optimization where desired material properties can be tailored in a well-controlled manner. This study focuses on the optimization of a polylactide-co-glycolide (PLAGA) and 45S5 bioactive glass (BG) composite for bone tissue engineering. The first objective is to examine the effects of composition or overall BG content on the formation of a Ca-P layer on the PLAGA-BG composite. It is expected that with increasing BG content (0%, 10%, 25%, 50% by weight), the required incubation time in a simulated body fluid (SBF) for the composite to form a detectable surface Ca-P layer will decrease. Both the kinetics and the chemistry will be determined using SEM+EDAX, FTIR, and mu-CT methods. Solution phosphorous and calcium concentrations will also be measured. The second objective of the study is to determine the effects of BG content on the maturation of osteoblast-like cells on the PLAGA-BG composite. It is hypothesized that mineralization will increase with increasing BG content, and the composite will support the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts. Specifically, cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization will be monitored as a function of BG content (0%, 10%, 50% by weight) and culturing time. It was found that the kinetics of Ca-P layer formation and the resulting Ca-P chemistry were dependent on BG content. The response of human osteoblast-like cells to the PLAGA-BG composite was also a function of BG content. The 10% and 25% BG composite supported greater osteoblast growth and differentiation compared to the 50% BG group. The results of this study suggest that there is a threshold BG content which is optimal for osteoblast growth, and the interactions between PLAGA and BG may modulate the kinetics of Ca-P formation and the

  14. Calcium and magnesium determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, S.K.

    1982-01-01

    The roles of calcium and magnesium in human health and disease have been extensively studied. Calcium and magnesium have been determined in biological specimens by atomic absorption spectroscopy using stiochiometric nitrous oxide-acetylene flame

  15. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002649.htm Fenoprofen calcium overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal ...

  16. Calcium channel blocker overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002580.htm Calcium-channel blocker overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Calcium-channel blockers are a type of medicine used ...

  17. Remote Voice Detection System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blackmon, Fletcher A

    2007-01-01

    A device and system to remotely detect vocalizations of speech. The skin located on the throat region of a speaking person or a reflective layer on the skin on the throat region vibrates in response to vocalizations of speech by the person...

  18. Calcium and Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  19. Calcium en cardioplegie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Meijler, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Coronary perfusion with a calcium-free solution, followed by reperfusion with a calcium containing solution, may result in acute myocardial cell death and in irreversible loss of the e1ectrical and mechanical activity of the heart. This phenomenon is known as the calcium paradox. A number of

  20. Offloading social care responsibilities: recent experiences of local voluntary organisations in a remote urban centre in British Columbia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Neil; Rosenberg, Mark; Clasby, Rachael

    2007-07-01

    Services offered by voluntary organisations are an integral but often overlooked component of health and social care. Of late, there has been a renewed interest in voluntary welfare provision as a viable alternative to state and market. Recent developments in welfare provision in Canada appear to have brought greater social care roles for the voluntary sector at the same time as new and arguably more restrictive funding and accountability mechanisms are being imposed by different arms of the state. To explore these issues more closely, the present paper examines the impressions and experiences of voluntary and formal sector providers of services for senior citizens and people with disabilities in a remote urban centre (population less than 100 000) in the interior of British Columbia, Canada. Two important operational pressures provide the context of the analysis: (1) reform of provincial government funding and regulation of voluntary services; and (2) the restructuring of welfare provision, especially in the areas of health care and social services. The authors found evidence of an escalating incursion of the state into local voluntary sector affairs that needs to be understood in the context of long-standing institutional links between government and 'professional' voluntary welfare provision in British Columbia. The results point to three important directions in contemporary local voluntary provision: (1) an emerging ethos of accountability, efficiency and competition in voluntary provision; (2) increasing pressure to centralise volunteer services; and consequently, (3) the potential erosion of flexibility and personalisation that are seen to characterise the voluntary sector.

  1. Calcium and Bone Metabolism Indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lu

    2017-01-01

    Calcium and inorganic phosphate are of critical importance for many body functions, thus the regulations of their plasma concentrations are tightly controlled by the concerted actions of reabsorption/excretion in the kidney, absorption in the intestines, and exchange from bone, the major reservoir for calcium and phosphate in the body. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH) 2 D) control calcium homeostasis, whereas PTH, 1,25(OH) 2 D, and bone-derived fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF 23) control phosphate homeostasis. Hypoparathyroidism can cause hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia, whereas deficient vitamin D actions can cause osteomalacia in adults and rickets in children. Hyperparathyroidism, alternatively, can cause hypercalcemia and hypophosphatemia. Laboratory tests of calcium, phosphate, PTH, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D are very useful in the diagnosis of abnormalities associated with calcium and/or phosphate metabolisms. Bone is constantly remodeled throughout life in response to mechanical stress and a need for calcium in extracellular fluids. Metabolic bone diseases such as osteoporosis, osteomalacia in adults or rickets in children, and renal osteodystrophy develop when bone resorption exceeds bone formation. Bone turnover markers (BTM) such as serum N-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (P1NP) and C-terminal collagen cross-link (CTX) may be useful in predicting future fracture risk or monitoring the response to anti-resorptive therapy. There is a need to standardize sample collection protocols because certain BTMs exhibit large circadian variations and tend to be influenced by food intakes. In the United States, a project to standardize BTM sample collection protocols and to establish the reference intervals for serum P1NP and serum CTX is ongoing. We anticipate the outcome of this project to shine lights on the standardization of BTM assays, sample collection protocols, reference intervals in relation to age, sex, and ethnic

  2. Methane mitigation with corn oil and calcium sulfate, responses on whole animal energy and nitrogen balance in dairy cattle consuming reduced-fat distillers grains plus solubles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addition of fat and calcium sulfate to diets fed to ruminants has been shown to reduce methane production, but these factors have not shown effects on energy balance. A study using 16 multiparous (8 Holstein and 8 Jersey) (78 ± 15 DIM) (mean ± SD) lactating dairy cows was conducted to determine how ...

  3. Subcutaneous tissue response and osteogenic performance of calcium phosphate nanoparticle-enriched hydrogels in the tibial medullary cavity of guinea pigs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongio, M; van den Beucken, J; Nejadnik, M.R.; Tahmasebi Birgani, Zeinab; Habibovic, Pamela; Kinard, L.A.; Kasper, F.K.; Mikos, A.G.; Leeuwenburg, S.C.G.; Jansen, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) (OPF)-based hydrogels were tested for the first time as injectable bone substitute materials. The primary feature of the material design was the incorporation of calcium phosphate (CaP) nanoparticles within the polymeric matrix in order to

  4. Clarification of serotonin-induced effects in peripheral artery disease observed through the femoral artery response in models of diabetes and vascular occlusion: The role of calcium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanović, Marko; Prostran, Milica; Janković, Radmila; Radenković, Miroslav

    2017-07-01

    Recent findings have demonstrated that serotonin is an important participant in the development and progression of peripheral artery diseases. Taking this into consideration, the goals of this study were to investigate the effects of serotonin on isolated Wistar rat femoral arteries in both healthy and diabetic animals, with and without artery occlusion, with a particular focus on determining the role of calcium in this process. Contraction experiments with serotonin on intact and denuded femoral artery rings, in the presence or absence of nifedipine and ouabain (both separately, or in combination), as well as Ca 2+ -free Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate solution were performed. The serotonin-induced results were concentration dependent, but only in healthy animals. The endothelium-dependent contraction of the femoral artery was assessed. In healthy animals, the endothelium-reliant part of contraction was dependent on the extracellular calcium, while the smooth muscle-related part was instead dependent on the intracellular calcium. In diabetic animals, both nifedipine and ouabain influenced serotonin-induced vascular effects by blocking intracellular calcium pathways. However, this was diminished after the simultaneous administration of both blockers. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Calcium- and Nitric Oxide-Dependent Nuclear Accumulation of Cytosolic Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase in Response to Long Chain Bases in Tobacco BY-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testard, Ambroise; Da Silva, Daniel; Ormancey, Mélanie; Pichereaux, Carole; Pouzet, Cécile; Jauneau, Alain; Grat, Sabine; Robe, Eugénie; Brière, Christian; Cotelle, Valérie; Mazars, Christian; Thuleau, Patrice

    2016-10-01

    Sphinganine or dihydrosphingosine (d18:0, DHS), one of the most abundant free sphingoid long chain bases (LCBs) in plants, is known to induce a calcium-dependent programmed cell death (PCD) in plants. In addition, in tobacco BY-2 cells, it has been shown that DHS triggers a rapid production of H 2 O 2 and nitric oxide (NO). Recently, in analogy to what is known in the animal field, plant cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPC), a ubiquitous enzyme involved in glycolysis, has been suggested to fulfill other functions associated with its oxidative post-translational modifications such as S-nitrosylation on cysteine residues. In particular, in mammals, stress signals inducing NO production promote S-nitrosylation of GAPC and its subsequent translocation into the nucleus where the protein participates in the establishment of apoptosis. In the present study, we investigated the behavior of GAPC in tobacco BY-2 cells treated with DHS. We found that upon DHS treatment, an S-nitrosylated form of GAPC accumulated in the nucleus. This accumulation was dependent on NO production. Two genes encoding GAPCs, namely Nt(BY-2)GAPC1 and Nt(BY-2)GAPC2, were cloned. Transient overexpression of Nt(BY-2)GAPC-green fluorescent protein (GFP) chimeric constructs indicated that both proteins localized in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus. Mutating into serine the two cysteine residues thought to be S-nitrosylated in response to DHS did not modify the localization of the proteins, suggesting that S-nitrosylation of GAPCs was probably not necessary for their nuclear relocalization. Interestingly, using Förster resonance energy transfer experiments, we showed that Nt(BY-2)GAPCs interact with nucleic acids in the nucleus. When GAPCs were mutated on their cysteine residues, their interaction with nucleic acids was abolished, suggesting a role for GAPCs in the protection of nucleic acids against oxidative stress. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on

  6. Photosynthetic and growth response of sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) mature trees and seedlings to calcium, magnesium, and nitrogen additions in the Catskill Mountains, NY, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momen, Bahram; Behling, Shawna J; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Sullivan, Joseph H

    2015-01-01

    Decline of sugar maple in North American forests has been attributed to changes in soil calcium (Ca) and nitrogen (N) by acidic precipitation. Although N is an essential and usually a limiting factor in forests, atmospheric N deposition may cause N-saturation leading to loss of soil Ca. Such changes can affect carbon gain and growth of sugar maple trees and seedlings. We applied a 22 factorial arrangement of N and dolomitic limestone containing Ca and Magnesium (Mg) to 12 forest plots in the Catskill Mountain region of NY, USA. To quantify the short-term effects, we measured photosynthetic-light responses of sugar maple mature trees and seedlings two or three times during two summers. We estimated maximum net photosynthesis (An-max) and its related light intensity (PAR at An-max), apparent quantum efficiency (Aqe), and light compensation point (LCP). To quantify the long-term effects, we measured basal area of living mature trees before and 4 and 8 years after treatment applications. Soil and foliar chemistry variables were also measured. Dolomitic limestone increased Ca, Mg, and pH in the soil Oe horizon. Mg was increased in the B horizon when comparing the plots receiving N with those receiving CaMg. In mature trees, foliar Ca and Mg concentrations were higher in the CaMg and N+CaMg plots than in the reference or N plots; foliar Ca concentration was higher in the N+CaMg plots compared with the CaMg plots, foliar Mg was higher in the CaMg plots than the N+CaMg plots; An-max was maximized due to N+CaMg treatment; Aqe decreased by N addition; and PAR at An-max increased by N or CaMg treatments alone, but the increase was maximized by their combination. No treatment effect was detected on basal areas of living mature trees four or eight years after treatment applications. In seedlings, An-max was increased by N+CaMg addition. The reference plots had an open herbaceous layer, but the plots receiving N had a dense monoculture of common woodfern in the

  7. Photosynthetic and Growth Response of Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) Mature Trees and Seedlings to Calcium, Magnesium, and Nitrogen Additions in the Catskill Mountains, NY, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momen, Bahram; Behling, Shawna J; Lawrence, Greg B; Sullivan, Joseph H

    2015-01-01

    Decline of sugar maple in North American forests has been attributed to changes in soil calcium (Ca) and nitrogen (N) by acidic precipitation. Although N is an essential and usually a limiting factor in forests, atmospheric N deposition may cause N-saturation leading to loss of soil Ca. Such changes can affect carbon gain and growth of sugar maple trees and seedlings. We applied a 22 factorial arrangement of N and dolomitic limestone containing Ca and Magnesium (Mg) to 12 forest plots in the Catskill Mountain region of NY, USA. To quantify the short-term effects, we measured photosynthetic-light responses of sugar maple mature trees and seedlings two or three times during two summers. We estimated maximum net photosynthesis (An-max) and its related light intensity (PAR at An-max), apparent quantum efficiency (Aqe), and light compensation point (LCP). To quantify the long-term effects, we measured basal area of living mature trees before and 4 and 8 years after treatment applications. Soil and foliar chemistry variables were also measured. Dolomitic limestone increased Ca, Mg, and pH in the soil Oe horizon. Mg was increased in the B horizon when comparing the plots receiving N with those receiving CaMg. In mature trees, foliar Ca and Mg concentrations were higher in the CaMg and N+CaMg plots than in the reference or N plots; foliar Ca concentration was higher in the N+CaMg plots compared with the CaMg plots, foliar Mg was higher in the CaMg plots than the N+CaMg plots; An-max was maximized due to N+CaMg treatment; Aqe decreased by N addition; and PAR at An-max increased by N or CaMg treatments alone, but the increase was maximized by their combination. No treatment effect was detected on basal areas of living mature trees four or eight years after treatment applications. In seedlings, An-max was increased by N+CaMg addition. The reference plots had an open herbaceous layer, but the plots receiving N had a dense monoculture of common woodfern in the forest floor

  8. Remote viewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, C

    1988-04-15

    Remote viewing is the supposed faculty which enables a percipient, sited in a closed room, to describe the perceptions of a remote agent visiting an unknown target site. To provide convincing demonstration of such a faculty poses a range of experimental and practical problems, especially if feedback to the percipient is allowed after each trial. The precautions needed are elaborate and troublesome; many potential loopholes have to be plugged and there will be strong temptations to relax standards, requiring exceptional discipline and dedication by the experimenters. Most reports of remote viewing experiments are rather superficial and do not permit assessment of the experimental procedures with confidence; in many cases there is clear evidence of particular loopholes left unclosed. Any serious appraisal of the evidence would have to go beyond the reports. Meanwhile the published evidence is far from compelling, and certainly insufficient to justify overthrow of well-established scientific principles.

  9. Use of remote monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournel, E; Gouilloux, C

    1977-01-01

    Paper traces the development of remote monitoring devices, since their first appearance for safety purposes. Discusses their uses in coal mines: working and safety (definitions); sources and channels of information (transmission of information by automatic or verbal means); mine control stations; duties and responsibilities of persons in charge. Examines the contribution made by remote monitoring to management in production sector. Gives examples of assistance given to production management showing a very advantageous result on balance, by their use. The use of computers in real time and in batched mode is compared. Discusses their use in monitoring mine atmosphere. Very favorable results have already been obtained in France and abroad. The broadening scope and future of remote monitoring is considered.

  10. Preliminary Evidence of Reduced Urge to Cough and Cough Response in Four Individuals following Remote Traumatic Brain Injury with Tracheostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Silverman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cough and swallow protect the lungs and are frequently impaired following traumatic brain injury (TBI. This project examined cough response to inhaled capsaicin solution challenge in a cohort of four young adults with a history of TBI within the preceding five years. All participants had a history of tracheostomy with subsequent decannulation and dysphagia after their injuries (resolved for all but one participant. Urge to cough (UTC and cough response were measured and compared to an existing database of normative cough response data obtained from 32 healthy controls (HCs. Participants displayed decreased UTC and cough responses compared to HCs. It is unknown if these preliminary results manifest as a consequence of disrupted sensory (afferent projections, an inability to perceive or discriminate cough stimuli, disrupted motor (efferent response, peripheral weakness, or any combination of these factors. Future work should attempt to clarify if the observed phenomena are borne out in a larger sample of individuals with TBI, determine the relative contributions of central versus peripheral nervous system structures to cough sensory perceptual changes following TBI (should they exist, and formulate recommendations for systematic screening and assessment of cough sensory perception in order to facilitate rehabilitative efforts. This project is identified with the National Clinical Trials NCT02240329.

  11. Calcium Signaling Pathway Is Associated with the Long-Term Clinical Response to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI and SSRI with Antipsychotics in Patients with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidehiro Umehara

    Full Text Available Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI are established first-line pharmacological treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD, while antipsychotics are used as an augmentation strategy for SSRI in OCD patients who have either no response or a partial response to SSRI treatment. The goal of the present study was to identify genetic variants and pathways that are associated with the long-term clinical response of OCD patients to SSRI or SSRI with antipsychotics.We first performed a genome-wide association study of 96 OCD patients to examine genetic variants contributing to the response to SSRI or SSRI with antipsychotics. Subsequently, we conducted pathway-based analyses by using Improved Gene Set Enrichment Analysis for Genome-wide Association Study (i-GSEA4GWAS to examine the combined effects of genetic variants on the clinical response in OCD.While we failed to detect specific genetic variants associated with clinical responses to SSRI or to SSRI with an atypical antipsychotic at genome-wide levels of significance, we identified 8 enriched pathways for the SSRI treatment response and 5 enriched pathways for the treatment response to SSRI with an antipsychotic medication. Notably, the calcium signaling pathway was identified in both treatment responses.Our results provide novel insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the variability in clinical response to SSRI and SSRI with antipsychotics in OCD patients.

  12. Calcium absorption and achlorhydria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recker, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    Defective absorption of calcium has been thought to exist in patients with achlorhydria. The author compared absorption of calcium in its carbonate form with that in a pH-adjusted citrate form in a group of 11 fasting patients with achlorhydria and in 9 fasting normal subjects. Fractional calcium absorption was measured by a modified double-isotope procedure with 0.25 g of calcium used as the carrier. Mean calcium absorption (+/- S.D.) in the patients with achlorhydria was 0.452 +/- 0.125 for citrate and 0.042 +/- 0.021 for carbonate (P less than 0.0001). Fractional calcium absorption in the normal subjects was 0.243 +/- 0.049 for citrate and 0.225 +/- 0.108 for carbonate (not significant). Absorption of calcium from carbonate in patients with achlorhydria was significantly lower than in the normal subjects and was lower than absorption from citrate in either group; absorption from citrate in those with achlorhydria was significantly higher than in the normal subjects, as well as higher than absorption from carbonate in either group. Administration of calcium carbonate as part of a normal breakfast resulted in completely normal absorption in the achlorhydric subjects. These results indicate that calcium absorption from carbonate is impaired in achlorhydria under fasting conditions. Since achlorhydria is common in older persons, calcium carbonate may not be the ideal dietary supplement

  13. Multiparameter imaging of calcium and abscisic acid and high-resolution quantitative calcium measurements using R-GECO1-mTurquoise in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waadt, Rainer; Krebs, Melanie; Kudla, Jörg; Schumacher, Karin

    2017-10-01

    Calcium signals occur in specific spatio-temporal patterns in response to various stimuli and are coordinated with, for example, hormonal signals, for physiological and developmental adaptations. Quantification of calcium together with other signalling molecules is required for correlative analyses and to decipher downstream calcium-decoding mechanisms. Simultaneous in vivo imaging of calcium and abscisic acid has been performed here to investigate the interdependence of the respective signalling processes in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Advanced ratiometric genetically encoded calcium indicators have been generated and in vivo calcium calibration protocols were established to determine absolute calcium concentration changes in response to auxin and ATP. In roots, abscisic acid induced long-term basal calcium concentration increases, while auxin triggered rapid signals in the elongation zone. The advanced ratiometric calcium indicator R-GECO1-mTurquoise exhibited an increased calcium signal resolution compared to commonly used Förster resonance energy transfer-based indicators. Quantitative calcium measurements in Arabidopsis root tips using R-GECO1-mTurquoise revealed detailed maps of absolute calcium concentration changes in response to auxin and ATP. Calcium calibration protocols using R-GECO1-mTurquoise enabled high-resolution quantitative imaging of resting cytosolic calcium concentrations and their dynamic changes that revealed distinct hormonal and ATP responses in roots. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  14. Synthesis of calcium hydroxyapatite from calcium carbonate and different orthophosphate sources: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham Minh, Doan; Lyczko, Nathalie; Sebei, Haroun; Nzihou, Ange; Sharrock, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Calcium hydroxyapatite was synthesized from CaCO 3 and four orthophosphates. ► Only H 3 PO 4 led to the complete precipitation of orthophosphate species. ► H 3 PO 4 was also the most efficient for calcium dissolution. ► Reaction pathway was dissolution-precipitation accompanied by agglomeration step. - Abstract: The synthesis of calcium hydroxyapatite (Ca-HA) starting from calcium carbonate and different orthophosphate sources, including orthophosphoric acid, potassium, sodium and ammonium dihydrogen orthophosphates, was investigated under ambient conditions. The reaction started with calcium carbonate dissolution in an acid medium, followed by rapid precipitation of calcium cations with orthophosphate species to form calcium phosphate based particles which were in the size range of 0.4–1 μm. These particles then agglomerated into much larger ones, up to 350 μm in diameter (aggregates). These aggregates possessed an unstable porous structure which was responsible for the porosity of the final products. The highest specific surface area and pore volume were obtained with potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate. On the other hand, orthophosphoric acid led to the highest dissolution of calcium carbonate and the complete precipitation of orthophosphate species. Under ambient conditions, calcium phosphate based solid products of low crystallinity were formed. Different intermediates were identified and a reaction pathway proposed.

  15. Integration of observations, modelling approaches and remote sensing to address ecosystem response to climate change and disturbance in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falge, Eva; Brümmer, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Park, South Africa, Setting up individual-based models to predict ecosystem dynamics under (post-) disturbance management, Monitoring vegetation amount and heterogeneity using remotely sensed images and aerial photography over several decades to examine time series of land cover change, and Investigations of livelihood strategies with focus on carbon balance components to develop sustainable management strategies for disturbed ecosystems and land use change. Despite recent advances, major innovations in understanding carbon cycle, greenhouse gases, air quality and measures of adaptation to and mitigation of climate change are still limited by the lack of global accessibility and comparability of relevant data (open data issues), long-term and sustainable interdisciplinary and trans-institutional research collaborations, and ongoing effective dialogues on multiple levels (policy, science, society).

  16. Lipophilic Chemicals from Diesel Exhaust Particles Trigger Calcium Response in Human Endothelial Cells via Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Non-Genomic Signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bendik C. Brinchmann

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs affects endothelial function and may contribute to the development of atherosclerosis and vasomotor dysfunction. As intracellular calcium concentration [Ca2+]i is considered important in myoendothelial signalling, we explored the effects of extractable organic matter from DEPs (DEP-EOM on [Ca2+]i and membrane microstructure in endothelial cells. DEP-EOM of increasing polarity was obtained by pressurized sequential extraction of DEPs with n-hexane (n-Hex-EOM, dichloromethane (DCM-EOM, methanol, and water. Chemical analysis revealed that the majority of organic matter was extracted by the n-Hex- and DCM-EOM, with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons primarily occurring in n-Hex-EOM. The concentration of calcium was measured in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1 using micro-spectrofluorometry. The lipophilic n-Hex-EOM and DCM-EOM, but not the more polar methanol- and water-soluble extracts, induced rapid [Ca2+]i increases in HMEC-1. n-Hex-EOM triggered [Ca2+]i increase from intracellular stores, followed by extracellular calcium influx consistent with store operated calcium entry (SOCE. By contrast, the less lipophilic DCM-EOM triggered [Ca2+]i increase via extracellular influx alone, resembling receptor operated calcium entry (ROCE. Both extracts increased [Ca2+]i via aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR non-genomic signalling, verified by pharmacological inhibition and RNA-interference. Moreover, DCM-EOM appeared to induce an AhR-dependent reduction in the global plasma membrane order, as visualized by confocal fluorescence microscopy. DCM-EOM-triggered [Ca2+]i increase and membrane alterations were attenuated by the membrane stabilizing lipid cholesterol. In conclusion, lipophilic constituents of DEPs extracted by n-hexane and DCM seem to induce rapid AhR-dependent [Ca2+]i increase in HMEC-1 endothelial cells, possibly involving both ROCE and SOCE-mediated mechanisms. The semi-lipophilic fraction

  17. Calcium channel blocker poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Brvar

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium channel blockers act at L-type calcium channels in cardiac and vascular smooth muscles by preventing calcium influx into cells with resultant decrease in vascular tone and cardiac inotropy, chronotropy and dromotropy. Poisoning with calcium channel blockers results in reduced cardiac output, bradycardia, atrioventricular block, hypotension and shock. The findings of hypotension and bradycardia should suggest poisoning with calcium channel blockers.Conclusions: Treatment includes immediate gastric lavage and whole-bowel irrigation in case of ingestion of sustainedrelease products. All patients should receive an activated charcoal orally. Specific treatment includes calcium, glucagone and insulin, which proved especially useful in shocked patients. Supportive care including the use of catecholamines is not always effective. In the setting of failure of pharmacological therapy transvenous pacing, balloon pump and cardiopulmonary by-pass may be necessary.

  18. Dengue and Calcium

    OpenAIRE

    Shivanthan, Mitrakrishnan C; Rajapakse, Senaka

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is potentially fatal unless managed appropriately. No specific treatment is available and the mainstay of treatment is fluid management with careful monitoring, organ support, and correction of metabolic derangement. Evidence with regards to the role of calcium homeostasis in dengue is limited. Low blood calcium levels have been demonstrated in dengue infection and hypocalcemia maybe more pronounced in more severe forms. The cause of hypocalcemia is likely to be multifactorial. Calcium...

  19. Glider and remote sensing observations of the upper ocean response to an extended shallow coastal diversion of wastewater effluent

    KAUST Repository

    Seegers, Bridget N.; Teel, Elizabeth N.; Kudela, Raphael M.; Caron, David A.; Jones, Burton

    2016-01-01

    The Orange County Sanitation District (OCSD) diverted wastewater discharge (5.3 × 108 l d−1) from its primary deep (56 m) outfall 8 km offshore, to a secondary shallower (16 m) outfall 1.6 km offshore for a period of three weeks. It was anticipated that the low salinity and density of the effluent would cause it to rise to the surface with limited dilution, elevating nutrient concentrations in near-surface waters and stimulating phytoplankton blooms in the region. Three Teledyne Webb Slocum gliders and a Liquid Robotics surface wave glider were deployed on transects near the outfalls to acquire high spatial and temporal coverage of physical and chemical parameters before, during, and after the wastewater diversion. Combined autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) and MODIS-Aqua satellite ocean color data indicated that phytoplankton biomass increased in the upper water column in response to the diversion, but that the magnitude of the response was spatially patchy and significantly less than expected. Little evidence of the plume or its effects was detectable 72 h following the diversion. The effluent plume exhibited high rates of dilution and mixed throughout the upper 20 m and occasionally throughout the upper 40 m during the diversion. Rapid plume advection and dilution appeared to contribute to the muted impact of the nutrient-rich effluent on the phytoplankton community in this coastal ecosystem.

  20. Glider and remote sensing observations of the upper ocean response to an extended shallow coastal diversion of wastewater effluent

    KAUST Repository

    Seegers, Bridget N.

    2016-06-21

    The Orange County Sanitation District (OCSD) diverted wastewater discharge (5.3 × 108 l d−1) from its primary deep (56 m) outfall 8 km offshore, to a secondary shallower (16 m) outfall 1.6 km offshore for a period of three weeks. It was anticipated that the low salinity and density of the effluent would cause it to rise to the surface with limited dilution, elevating nutrient concentrations in near-surface waters and stimulating phytoplankton blooms in the region. Three Teledyne Webb Slocum gliders and a Liquid Robotics surface wave glider were deployed on transects near the outfalls to acquire high spatial and temporal coverage of physical and chemical parameters before, during, and after the wastewater diversion. Combined autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) and MODIS-Aqua satellite ocean color data indicated that phytoplankton biomass increased in the upper water column in response to the diversion, but that the magnitude of the response was spatially patchy and significantly less than expected. Little evidence of the plume or its effects was detectable 72 h following the diversion. The effluent plume exhibited high rates of dilution and mixed throughout the upper 20 m and occasionally throughout the upper 40 m during the diversion. Rapid plume advection and dilution appeared to contribute to the muted impact of the nutrient-rich effluent on the phytoplankton community in this coastal ecosystem.

  1. Glider and remote sensing observations of the upper ocean response to an extended shallow coastal diversion of wastewater effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seegers, Bridget N.; Teel, Elizabeth N.; Kudela, Raphael M.; Caron, David A.; Jones, Burton H.

    2017-02-01

    The Orange County Sanitation District (OCSD) diverted wastewater discharge (5.3 × 108 l d-1) from its primary deep (56 m) outfall 8 km offshore, to a secondary shallower (16 m) outfall 1.6 km offshore for a period of three weeks. It was anticipated that the low salinity and density of the effluent would cause it to rise to the surface with limited dilution, elevating nutrient concentrations in near-surface waters and stimulating phytoplankton blooms in the region. Three Teledyne Webb Slocum gliders and a Liquid Robotics surface wave glider were deployed on transects near the outfalls to acquire high spatial and temporal coverage of physical and chemical parameters before, during, and after the wastewater diversion. Combined autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) and MODIS-Aqua satellite ocean color data indicated that phytoplankton biomass increased in the upper water column in response to the diversion, but that the magnitude of the response was spatially patchy and significantly less than expected. Little evidence of the plume or its effects was detectable 72 h following the diversion. The effluent plume exhibited high rates of dilution and mixed throughout the upper 20 m and occasionally throughout the upper 40 m during the diversion. Rapid plume advection and dilution appeared to contribute to the muted impact of the nutrient-rich effluent on the phytoplankton community in this coastal ecosystem.

  2. Calcium Channel Blockers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Certain calcium channel blockers interact with grapefruit products. Kaplan NM, et al. Treatment of hypertension: Drug therapy. In: Kaplan's Clinical Hypertension. 11th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Wolters Kluwer ...

  3. An inverse-modelling approach for frequency response correction of capacitive humidity sensors in ABL research with small remotely piloted aircraft (RPA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildmann, N.; Kaufmann, F.; Bange, J.

    2014-09-01

    The measurement of water vapour concentration in the atmosphere is an ongoing challenge in environmental research. Satisfactory solutions exist for ground-based meteorological stations and measurements of mean values. However, carrying out advanced research of thermodynamic processes aloft as well, above the surface layer and especially in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), requires the resolution of small-scale turbulence. Sophisticated optical instruments are used in airborne meteorology with manned aircraft to achieve the necessary fast-response measurements of the order of 10 Hz (e.g. LiCor 7500). Since these instruments are too large and heavy for the application on small remotely piloted aircraft (RPA), a method is presented in this study that enhances small capacitive humidity sensors to be able to resolve turbulent eddies of the order of 10 m. The sensor examined here is a polymer-based sensor of the type P14-Rapid, by the Swiss company Innovative Sensor Technologies (IST) AG, with a surface area of less than 10 mm2 and a negligible weight. A physical and dynamical model of this sensor is described and then inverted in order to restore original water vapour fluctuations from sensor measurements. Examples of flight measurements show how the method can be used to correct vertical profiles and resolve turbulence spectra up to about 3 Hz. At an airspeed of 25 m s-1 this corresponds to a spatial resolution of less than 10 m.

  4. Hydrological response to land cover changes and human activities in arid regions using a geographic information system and remote sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shereif H Mahmoud

    Full Text Available The hydrological response to land cover changes induced by human activities in arid regions has attracted increased research interest in recent decades. The study reported herein assessed the spatial and quantitative changes in surface runoff resulting from land cover change in the Al-Baha region of Saudi Arabia between 1990 and 2000 using an ArcGIS-surface runoff model and predicted land cover and surface runoff depth in 2030 using Markov chain analysis. Land cover maps for 1990 and 2000 were derived from satellite images using ArcGIS 10.1. The findings reveal a 26% decrease in forest and shrubland area, 28% increase in irrigated cropland, 1.5% increase in sparsely vegetated land and 0.5% increase in bare soil between 1990 and 2000. Overall, land cover changes resulted in a significant decrease in runoff depth values in most of the region. The decrease in surface runoff depth ranged from 25-106 mm/year in a 7020-km2 area, whereas the increase in such depth reached only 10 mm/year in a 243-km2 area. A maximum increase of 73 mm/year was seen in a limited area. The surface runoff depth decreased to the greatest extent in the central region of the study area due to the huge transition in land cover classes associated with the construction of 25 rainwater harvesting dams. The land cover prediction revealed a greater than twofold increase in irrigated cropland during the 2000-2030 period, whereas forest and shrubland are anticipated to occupy just 225 km2 of land area by 2030, a significant decrease from the 747 km2 they occupied in 2000. Overall, changes in land cover are predicted to result in an annual increase in irrigated cropland and dramatic decline in forest area in the study area over the next few decades. The increase in surface runoff depth is likely to have significant implications for irrigation activities.

  5. Acidosis and Urinary Calcium Excretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, R Todd; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Chambrey, Régine

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is associated with increased urinary calcium excretion and related sequelae, including nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis. The increased urinary calcium excretion induced by metabolic acidosis predominantly results from increased mobilization of calcium out of bone and inhibi...

  6. Calcium D-saccharate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, André Castilho; Hedegaard, Martina Vavrusova; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2016-01-01

    Molar conductivity of saturated aqueous solutions of calcium d-saccharate, used as a stabilizer of beverages fortified with calcium d-gluconate, increases strongly upon dilution, indicating complex formation between calcium and d-saccharate ions, for which, at 25 °C, Kassoc = 1032 ± 80, ΔHassoc......° = -34 ± 6 kJ mol-1, and ΔSassoc° = -55 ± 9 J mol-1 K-1, were determined electrochemically. Calcium d-saccharate is sparingly soluble, with a solubility product, Ksp, of (6.17 ± 0.32) × 10-7 at 25 °C, only moderately increasing with the temperature: ΔHsol° = 48 ± 2 kJ mol-1, and ΔSassoc° = 42 ± 7 J mol-1...... K-1. Equilibria in supersaturated solutions of calcium d-saccharate seem only to adjust slowly, as seen from calcium activity measurements in calcium d-saccharate solutions made supersaturated by cooling. Solutions formed by isothermal dissolution of calcium d-gluconate in aqueous potassium d...

  7. Influences of doping mesoporous magnesium silicate on water absorption, drug release, degradability, apatite-mineralization and primary cells responses to calcium sulfate based bone cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Zhengrong; Wang, Sicheng; Weng, Weizong; Chen, Xiao; Cao, Liehu; Wei, Jie; Shin, Jung-Woog; Su, Jiacan

    2017-01-01

    In this study, composite cements containing mesoporous magnesium silicate (m-MS) and calcium sulfate (CS) were fabricated. The results revealed that the setting time of the m-MS/CS composite cements (m-MSC) slightly prolonged with the increase of m-MS content while the compressive strength suffered a little loss. The doping of m-MS improved the water absorption, drug release (vancomycin) and degradability of the m-MSC in Tris-HCl solution (pH = 7.4). In addition, addition of m-MS facilitated the apatite-mineralization of m-MSC in simulated body fluid (SBF), indicating good bioactivity. For cell cultural experiments, the results revealed that the m-MSC promoted the cells adhesion and proliferation, and improved the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of MC3T3-E1 cells, revealing good cytocompatibility. It could be suggested that the m-MSC might be promising cements biomaterials for bone tissue regeneration. - Highlights: • The mesoporous magnesium silicate and calcium sulfate composite was fabricated. • The composite possessed good water absorption and drug release of vancomycin. • The bioactive composite could enhance the in vivo apatite formation in SBF. • The composite promoted cell adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation.

  8. Influences of doping mesoporous magnesium silicate on water absorption, drug release, degradability, apatite-mineralization and primary cells responses to calcium sulfate based bone cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Zhengrong [Department of Trauma Orthopaedics, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); The Department of Orthopaedics, Jing' an District Centre Hospital of Shanghai (Huashan Hospital Fudan University Jing' An Branch), 200040 (China); Wang, Sicheng [Department of Trauma Orthopaedics, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, Zhongye Hospital, Shanghai 200941 (China); Weng, Weizong; Chen, Xiao; Cao, Liehu [Department of Trauma Orthopaedics, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wei, Jie [Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Shin, Jung-Woog [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Inje University, Gimhae, 621749 (Korea, Republic of); Su, Jiacan, E-mail: jiacansu@sina.com [Department of Trauma Orthopaedics, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2017-06-01

    In this study, composite cements containing mesoporous magnesium silicate (m-MS) and calcium sulfate (CS) were fabricated. The results revealed that the setting time of the m-MS/CS composite cements (m-MSC) slightly prolonged with the increase of m-MS content while the compressive strength suffered a little loss. The doping of m-MS improved the water absorption, drug release (vancomycin) and degradability of the m-MSC in Tris-HCl solution (pH = 7.4). In addition, addition of m-MS facilitated the apatite-mineralization of m-MSC in simulated body fluid (SBF), indicating good bioactivity. For cell cultural experiments, the results revealed that the m-MSC promoted the cells adhesion and proliferation, and improved the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of MC3T3-E1 cells, revealing good cytocompatibility. It could be suggested that the m-MSC might be promising cements biomaterials for bone tissue regeneration. - Highlights: • The mesoporous magnesium silicate and calcium sulfate composite was fabricated. • The composite possessed good water absorption and drug release of vancomycin. • The bioactive composite could enhance the in vivo apatite formation in SBF. • The composite promoted cell adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation.

  9. Calcium metabolism in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Matos, Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    Calcium is one of the most important plasma constituents in mammals and birds. It provides structural strength and support (bones and eggshell) and plays vital roles in many of the biochemical reactions in the body. The control of calcium metabolism in birds is highly efficient and closely regulated in a number of tissues, primarily parathyroid gland, intestine, kidney, and bone. The hormones with the greatest involvement in calcium regulation in birds are parathyroid hormone, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (calcitriol), and estrogen, with calcitonin playing a minor and uncertain role. The special characteristics of calcium metabolism in birds, mainly associated with egg production, are discussed, along with common clinical disorders secondary to derangements in calcium homeostasis.

  10. Angiotensin effects on calcium and steroidogenesis in adrenal glomerulosa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, M.E.; Siegel, F.L.; Hadjokas, N.E.; Goodfriend, T.L.

    1985-01-01

    We investigated the role of cellular calcium pools in angiotensin II-stimulated aldosterone synthesis in bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells. Angiotensin II decreased the size of the exchangeable cell calcium pool by 34%, consistent with previous observations that angiotensin II causes decreased uptake of 45 Ca+2 into cells and increased efflux of 45 Ca+2 from preloaded cells. Atomic absorption spectroscopy showed that angiotension II caused a decrease of 21% in total cellular calcium. Angiotensin II caused efflux of 45 Ca+2 in the presence of EGTA and retarded uptake of 45 Ca+2 when choline was substituted for sodium, suggesting that hormone effects on calcium pools do not involve influx of trigger calcium or sodium. Cells incubated in calcium-free buffer and 0.1 mM or 0.5 mM EGTA synthesized reduced (but still significant) amounts of the steroid in response to hormone. Cells incubated in increasing concentrations of extracellular calcium contained increasing amounts of intracellular calcium and synthesized increasing amounts of aldosterone in response to angiotensin II. These results point to the participation of intracellular calcium pools in angiotensin II-stimulated steroidogenesis and the importance of extracellular calcium in maintaining these pools

  11. Remotely controllable liquid marbles

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lianbin

    2012-07-26

    Liquid droplets encapsulated by self-organized hydrophobic particles at the liquid/air interface - liquid marbles - are prepared by encapsulating water droplets with novel core/shell-structured responsive magnetic particles, consisting of a responsive block copolymer-grafted mesoporous silica shell and magnetite core (see figure; P2VP-b-PDMS: poly(2-vinylpyridine-b- dimethylsiloxane)). Desirable properties of the liquid marbles include that they rupture upon ultraviolet illumination and can be remotely manipulated by an external magnetic field. 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. HYPERTHERMIA, INTRACELLULAR FREE CALCIUM AND CALCIUM IONOPHORES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEGE, GJJ; WIERENGA, PK; KAMPINGA, HH; KONINGS, AWT

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that heat-induced increase of intracellular calcium does not correlate with hyperthermic cell killing. Six different cell lines were investigated; in four (EAT, HeLa S3, L5178Y-R and L5178Y-S) heat treatments killing 90% of the cells did not affect the levels of intracellular free

  13. NOAA Coastal Mapping Remote Sensing Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Remote Sensing Division is responsible for providing data to support the Coastal Mapping Program, Emergency Response efforts, and the Aeronautical Survey Program...

  14. Release of superoxide and change in morphology by neutrophils in response to phorbol esters: antagonism by inhibitors of calcium-binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    The ability of phorbol derivatives to function as stimulating agents for superoxide (O2-) release by guinea pig neutrophils has been evaluated and compared to the known ability of each compound to activate protein kinase C. Those that activate the kinase also stimulate O2- release, while those that are inactive with respect to the kinase have no effect on O2- release. The same correlation was observed with respect to the ability of phorbol esters to induce morphological changes in neutrophils, i.e., vesiculation and reduction in granule content. Certain phenothiazines and naphthalene sulfonamides that are known antagonists of calcium-binding proteins blocked both phorbol ester-induced O2- release and morphological changes in these cells. PMID:2993312

  15. Calcium binding properties of calcium dependent protein kinase 1 (CaCDPK1) from Cicer arietinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Ajay Kumar; Jayabaskaran, Chelliah

    2015-05-01

    Calcium plays a crucial role as a secondary messenger in all aspects of plant growth, development and survival. Calcium dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are the major calcium decoders, which couple the changes in calcium level to an appropriate physiological response. The mechanism by which calcium regulates CDPK protein is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the interactions of Ca(2+) ions with the CDPK1 isoform of Cicer arietinum (CaCDPK1) using a combination of biophysical tools. CaCDPK1 has four different EF hands as predicted by protein sequence analysis. The fluorescence emission spectrum of CaCDPK1 showed quenching with a 5 nm red shift upon addition of calcium, indicating conformational changes in the tertiary structure. The plot of changes in intensity against calcium concentrations showed a biphasic curve with binding constants of 1.29 μM and 120 μM indicating two kinds of binding sites. Isothermal calorimetric (ITC) titration with CaCl2 also showed a biphasic curve with two binding constants of 0.027 μM and 1.7 μM. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra showed two prominent peaks at 208 and 222 nm indicating that CaCDPK1 is a α-helical rich protein. Calcium binding further increased the α-helical content of CaCDPK1 from 75 to 81%. Addition of calcium to CaCDPK1 also increased fluorescence of 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (ANS) indicating exposure of hydrophobic surfaces. Thus, on the whole this study provides evidence for calcium induced conformational changes, exposure of hydrophobic surfaces and heterogeneity of EF hands in CaCDPK1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Current perspective on remote sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, R.H.

    1992-01-01

    Surveillance and tracking of oil spills has been a feature of most spill response situations for many years. The simplest and most direct method uses visual observations from an aircraft and hand-plotting of the data on a map. This technique has proven adequate for most small spills and for responses in fair weather. As the size of the spill increases or the weather deteriorates, there is a need to augment visual aerial observations with remote sensing methods. Remote sensing and its associated systems are one of the most technically complex and sophisticated elements of an oil spill response. During the past few years, a number of initiatives have been undertaken to use contemporary electronic and computing systems to develop new and improved remote sensing systems

  17. DIHYDROPYRIDINE CALCIUM- CHANNELBLOCKERSFOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Furthermore, the controversy over the role of calci~-channel blockers as first-line ..... group trials while fully accounting for placebo effects as well as interindividual ..... Reducing calcium overload in the ischemic brain. N Engl JMed. 1999; 341 ...

  18. Calcium and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... calcium-set tofu edamame (soybeans) broccoli, collard greens, kale, chard, Chinese cabbage, and other leafy greens almonds ... more dark green, leafy vegetables (such as broccoli, kale, collard greens, or Chinese cabbage) with meals. Kids ...

  19. Detection of photospheric calcium in a DBA white dwarf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenyon, S.J.; Shipman, H.L.; Sion, E.M.; Aannestad, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    The detection of photospheric calcium absorption lines in the white dwarf star G200-39 (DBAZ4) is reported. The abundance of calcium relative to that of hydrogen is approximately solar, a result which lends support to the hypothesis that accretion of interstellar matter is responsible for hybrid composition white dwarfs. 21 references

  20. Modular remote radiation monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacerda, Fabio; Farias, Marcos S.; Aghina, Mauricio A.C.; Oliveira, Mauro V.

    2013-01-01

    The Modular Remote Radiation Monitor (MRRM) is a novel radiation monitor suitable for monitoring environmental exposure to ionizing radiation. It is a portable compact-size low-power microprocessor-based electronic device which provides its monitoring data to other electronic systems, physically distant from it, by means of an electronic communication channel, which can be wired or wireless according to the requirements of each application. Besides its low-power highly-integrated circuit design, the Modular Remote Radiation Monitor is presented in a modular architecture, which promotes full compliance to the technical requirements of different applications while minimizing cost, size and power consumption. Its communication capability also supports the implementation of a network of multiple radiation monitors connected to a supervisory system, capable of remotely controlling each monitor independently as well as visualizing the radiation levels from all monitors. A prototype of the MRRM, functionally equivalent to the MRA-7027 radiation monitor, was implemented and connected to a wired MODBUS network of MRA-7027 monitors, responsible for monitoring ionizing radiation inside Argonauta reactor room at Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear. Based on the highly positive experimental results obtained, further design is currently underway in order to produce a consumer version of the MRRM. (author)

  1. Calcium binding by dietary fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, W.P.T.; Branch, W.J.; Southgate, D.A.T.

    1978-01-01

    Dietary fibre from plants low in phytate bound calcium in proportion to its uronic-acid content. This binding by the non-cellulosic fraction of fibre reduces the availability of calcium for small-intestinal absorption, but the colonic microbial digestion of uronic acids liberates the calcium. Thus the ability to maintain calcium balance on high-fibre diets may depend on the adaptive capacity on the colon for calcium. (author)

  2. Effect of calcium with and without probiotic, lactose, or both on organ and body weights, immune response and caecal microbiota in moulted laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastar, B; Khosravi, A; Boldajie, F; Ghoorchi, T

    2016-04-01

    A total of 72 laying hens were used to investigate the effect of probiotic and lactose on body weight loss, tibia ash, antibody production against sheep red blood cell (SRBC), heterophile-to-lymphocyte (H/L) ratio and gut microbiota in a common moulting method for 14 d. Hens were randomly allocated to 6 experimental groups consisting of (i) full feed (FF), (ii) feed withdrawal (FW), (iii) FW with calcium (Ca), (iv) FW with Ca and offering 7 g/lit lactose in drinking water (CaL), (v) FW with Ca and offering 1 g/lit probiotic in drinking water (CaP), and (vi) FW with Ca and offering a mixture of lactose and probiotic in drinking water (CaLP). The results showed body weight loss in all FW groups were more than 25% that was significantly higher than FF group (p lactose numerically and probiotic alone significantly resulted in decrease of this ratio (p lactose could significantly reduce this population (p lactose was effective in maintaining caecal microbiota balance and improving immunity in hens exposed to moulting. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. A model of propagating calcium-induced calcium release mediated by calcium diffusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backx, P. H.; de Tombe, P. P.; van Deen, J. H.; Mulder, B. J.; ter Keurs, H. E.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of sudden local fluctuations of the free sarcoplasmic [Ca++]i in cardiac cells on calcium release and calcium uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was calculated with the aid of a simplified model of SR calcium handling. The model was used to evaluate whether propagation of calcium

  4. [Calcium suppletion for patients who use gastric acid inhibitors: calcium citrate or calcium carbonate?].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, H.J. de; Gans, R.O.; Huls, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Various calcium supplements are available for patients who have an indication for calcium suppletion. American guidelines and UpToDate recommend prescribing calcium citrate to patients who use antacids The rationale for this advice is that water-insoluble calcium carbonate needs acid for adequate

  5. Remote possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, J.

    1995-01-01

    The impact that wireless communications has had for gas and oil producers was discussed. Wireless communication, which has been replacing the traditional formats of radio and telephone data networks, has proved to be cheaper, smaller, and faster than creating privately owned communication networks. With highly developed supervisory control and data acquisition systems - combined with cellular or satellite technology - information from drill sites can be online at the corporate headquarters instantaneously. Eighty percent of Canada's land mass is beyond reach of traditional wireline and wireless services. Research into advanced communications, including telecommunication and mobile applications, yielded lucrative results for service providers such as BCTel, SaskTel, Bell Mobility and AGT. The latest data transmission technology is the cellular digital packet data (CDPD) which will operate over existing cellular networks. However, unlike circuit-switched cellular, CDPD technology provides an airlink where data is secure. It will be available to the marketplace over the course of the coming year. Among other advantages, CDPD will allow producers to remotely monitor production information and downtime alarms from wells and compressor stations. It will also provide fleet operators with the means to monitor operating vital signs on rolling stock

  6. Reconstructing the evolution of a deep seated rockslide (Marzell) and its response to glacial retreat based on historic and remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fey, Christine; Wichmann, Volker; Zangerl, Christian

    2017-12-01

    In this study a combination of different topographic data from historic topographic maps and remote sensing is used to reconstruct and monitor the behaviour of the high alpine ice contact rockslide system Marzell and its response to glacial debuttressing in the Eastern Alps. Topographic data from archives (historical topographic maps, national glacier inventories, aerial images, orthoimages and ALS data) and data from monitoring campaigns (geodetic measurements, terrestrial laser scanning and UAV imaging campaigns) are processed to georeferenced images and/or elevation data, respectively. The data from different data sources is compiled and analysed with the aim to i) reconstruct the extent, thickness and volume changes of the glacier since 1893 and ii) to analyse the rockslide deformation evolution by extracting information about the displacement direction, dip angle, velocity and partial failure of rockslide slabs since 1951. The rockslide is compound of different rockslide slabs which move downwards as rigid blocks along basal shear zones. The analyses and interpretation of the data suggest a rotational type of rockslide failure mechanisms. The rockslide activity correlates with the ice volume loss at the adjacent part of the glacier. In the period between 1971 and 1997 the annual average rockslide activity was about 0.05 m/a and the annual average ice thickness loss was 0.1 m/a. Since the end of the last century the annual average ice thickness loss increased dramatically to 5 m/a. In that period the rockslide activity accelerated. The highest rockslide activity (up to 1.5 m/a) was observed in the 2000s when half of the slope toe was exposed because of glacier retreat. Since 2010 a deceleration of the rockslide can be observed. In the vicinity of the rockslide the glacier almost disappeared and lost 99.88% of its ice volume between 1893 and 2014. The geomorphological and geological information gathered about the rockslide evolution and the glacier retreat form

  7. Taking Responsibility on Publishing the Controversial Paper “On the Misdiagnosis of Surface Temperature Feedbacks from Variations in Earth’s Radiant Energy Balance” by Spencer and Braswell, Remote Sens. 2011, 3(8, 1603-1613

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Wagner

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Peer-reviewed journals are a pillar of modern science. Their aim is to achieve highest scientific standards by carrying out a rigorous peer review that is, as a minimum requirement, supposed to be able to identify fundamental methodological errors or false claims. Unfortunately, as many climate researchers and engaged observers of the climate change debate pointed out in various internet discussion fora, the paper by Spencer and Braswell [1] that was recently published in Remote Sensing is most likely problematic in both aspects and should therefore not have been published. After having become aware of the situation, and studying the various pro and contra arguments, I agree with the critics of the paper. Therefore, I would like to take the responsibility for this editorial decision and, as a result, step down as Editor-in-Chief of the journal Remote Sensing. [...

  8. Probabilistic encoding of stimulus strength in astrocyte global calcium signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Wayne; Reusch, Katharina; Tilunaite, Agne; Russell, Noah A; Thul, Rüdiger; Bellamy, Tomas C

    2016-04-01

    Astrocyte calcium signals can range in size from subcellular microdomains to waves that spread through the whole cell (and into connected cells). The differential roles of such local or global calcium signaling are under intense investigation, but the mechanisms by which local signals evolve into global signals in astrocytes are not well understood, nor are the computational rules by which physiological stimuli are transduced into a global signal. To investigate these questions, we transiently applied receptor agonists linked to calcium signaling to primary cultures of cerebellar astrocytes. Astrocytes repetitively tested with the same stimulus responded with global signals intermittently, indicating that each stimulus had a defined probability for triggering a response. The response probability varied between agonists, increased with agonist concentration, and could be positively and negatively modulated by crosstalk with other signaling pathways. To better understand the processes determining the evolution of a global signal, we recorded subcellular calcium "puffs" throughout the whole cell during stimulation. The key requirement for puffs to trigger a global calcium wave following receptor activation appeared to be the synchronous release of calcium from three or more sites, rather than an increasing calcium load accumulating in the cytosol due to increased puff size, amplitude, or frequency. These results suggest that the concentration of transient stimuli will be encoded into a probability of generating a global calcium response, determined by the likelihood of synchronous release from multiple subcellular sites. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Developing equipment for AGR remote visual inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, P.W.; Walton, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    The Remote Inspection Group is part of the CEGB's Generation Development and Construction Division, and has responsibility for the design, development, procurement, testing and setting to work of the equipment provided to carry out routine remote visual inspections of its AGRs. This equipment includes both the viewing devices and the necessary placement equipment. (author)

  10. Cu{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+} and Cr{sup 3+} doping of a calcium phosphate cement influences materials properties and response of human mesenchymal stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schamel, Martha [Department for Functional Materials in Medicine and Dentistry, University of Würzburg, Pleicherwall 2, 97070 Würzburg (Germany); Bernhardt, Anne; Quade, Mandy; Würkner, Claudia [Centre for Translational Bone, Joint and Soft Tissue Research, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus and Faculty of Medicine of Technische Universität Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Gbureck, Uwe; Moseke, Claus [Department for Functional Materials in Medicine and Dentistry, University of Würzburg, Pleicherwall 2, 97070 Würzburg (Germany); Gelinsky, Michael [Centre for Translational Bone, Joint and Soft Tissue Research, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus and Faculty of Medicine of Technische Universität Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Lode, Anja, E-mail: anja.lode@tu-dresden.de [Centre for Translational Bone, Joint and Soft Tissue Research, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus and Faculty of Medicine of Technische Universität Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany)

    2017-04-01

    The application of biologically active metal ions to stimulate cellular reactions is a promising strategy to accelerate bone defect healing. Brushite-forming calcium phosphate cements were modified with low doses of Cu{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+} and Cr{sup 3+}. The modified cements released the metal ions in vitro in concentrations which were shown to be non-toxic for cells. The release kinetics correlated with the solubility of the respective metal phosphates: 17–45 wt.-% of Co{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+}, but < 1 wt.-% of Cr{sup 3+} were released within 28 days. Moreover, metal ion doping led to alterations in the exchange of calcium and phosphate ions with cell culture medium. In case of cements modified with 50 mmol Cr{sup 3+}/mol β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP), XRD and SEM analyses revealed a significant amount of monetite and a changed morphology of the cement matrix. Cell culture experiments with human mesenchymal stromal cells indicated that the observed cell response is not only influenced by the released metal ions but also by changed cement properties. A positive effect of modifications with 50 mmol Cr{sup 3+} or 10 mmol Cu{sup 2+} per mol β-TCP on cell behaviour was observed in indirect and direct culture. Modification with Co{sup 2+} resulted in a clear suppression of cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. In conclusion, metal ion doping of the cement influences cellular activities in addition to the effect of released metal ions by changing properties of the ceramic matrix. - Highlights: • A brushite-forming calcium phosphate cement was modified by doping with bioactive Cu{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+} and Cr{sup 3+} ions. • The metal ions were integrated in the cement matrix, setting was not affected. • The modified cements released the metal ions in doses non-toxic for cells. • Modification with Cr{sup 3+} ions enhanced the biocompatibility of the cement.

  11. A Corporate Responsibility? The Constitution of Fly-in, Fly-out Mining Companies as Governance Partners in Remote, Mine-Affected Localities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheshire, Lynda

    2010-01-01

    In some remote parts of Australia, mining companies have positioned themselves as central actors in governing nearby affected communities by espousing notions of "voluntary partnerships for sustainability" between business, government and community. It is argued in this paper that the nature and extent of mining company interventions in…

  12. Variations in the patterns of soil organic carbon mineralization and microbial communities in response to exogenous application of rice straw and calcium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Shuzhen; Huang, Yuan; Ge, Yunhui; Su, Yirong; Xu, Xinwen; Wang, Yongdong; He, Xunyang

    2016-01-01

    The addition of exogenous inorganic carbon (CaCO 3 ) and organic carbon has an important influence on soil organic carbon (SOC) mineralization in karst soil, but the microbial mechanisms underlying the SOC priming effect are poorly understood. We conducted a 100-day incubation experiment involving four treatments of the calcareous soil in southwestern China's karst region: control, 14 C-labeled rice straw addition, 14 C-labeled CaCO 3 addition, and a combination of 14 C-labeled rice straw and CaCO 3 . Changes in soil microbial communities were characterized using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis with polymerase chain reaction (PCR-DGGE) and real-time quantitative PCR (q-PCR). Both 14 C-rice straw and Ca 14 CO 3 addition stimulated SOC mineralization, suggesting that organic and inorganic C affected SOC stability. Addition of straw alone had no significant effect on bacterial diversity; however, when the straw was added in combination with calcium carbonate, it had an inhibitory effect on bacterial and fungal diversity. At the beginning of the experimental period, exogenous additives increased bacterial abundance, although at the end of the 100-day incubation bacterial community abundance had gradually declined. Incubation time, exogenous input, and their interaction significantly affected SOC mineralization (in terms of priming and the cumulative amount of mineralization), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), and microbial community abundance and diversity. Moreover, the key factors influencing SOC mineralization were MBC, bacterial diversity, and soil pH. Overall, these findings support the view that inorganic C is involved in soil C turnover with the participation of soil microbial communities, promoting soil C cycling in the karst region. - Highlights: • Different patterns of 14 C-rice straw and Ca 14 CO 3 addition on positive priming effects of SOC mineralization. • Inorganic C is involved in soil C cycling with the participation of soil microbial

  13. Nitric oxide-dependent activation of CaMKII increases diastolic sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release in cardiac myocytes in response to adrenergic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Jerry; Tang, Lifei; Roof, Steve R; Velmurugan, Sathya; Millard, Ashley; Shonts, Stephen; Wang, Honglan; Santiago, Demetrio; Ahmad, Usama; Perryman, Matthew; Bers, Donald M; Mohler, Peter J; Ziolo, Mark T; Shannon, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous calcium waves in cardiac myocytes are caused by diastolic sarcoplasmic reticulum release (SR Ca(2+) leak) through ryanodine receptors. Beta-adrenergic (β-AR) tone is known to increase this leak through the activation of Ca-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII) and the subsequent phosphorylation of the ryanodine receptor. When β-AR drive is chronic, as observed in heart failure, this CaMKII-dependent effect is exaggerated and becomes potentially arrhythmogenic. Recent evidence has indicated that CaMKII activation can be regulated by cellular oxidizing agents, such as reactive oxygen species. Here, we investigate how the cellular second messenger, nitric oxide, mediates CaMKII activity downstream of the adrenergic signaling cascade and promotes the generation of arrhythmogenic spontaneous Ca(2+) waves in intact cardiomyocytes. Both SCaWs and SR Ca(2+) leak were measured in intact rabbit and mouse ventricular myocytes loaded with the Ca-dependent fluorescent dye, fluo-4. CaMKII activity in vitro and immunoblotting for phosphorylated residues on CaMKII, nitric oxide synthase, and Akt were measured to confirm activity of these enzymes as part of the adrenergic cascade. We demonstrate that stimulation of the β-AR pathway by isoproterenol increased the CaMKII-dependent SR Ca(2+) leak. This increased leak was prevented by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase 1 but not nitric oxide synthase 3. In ventricular myocytes isolated from wild-type mice, isoproterenol stimulation also increased the CaMKII-dependent leak. Critically, in myocytes isolated from nitric oxide synthase 1 knock-out mice this effect is ablated. We show that isoproterenol stimulation leads to an increase in nitric oxide production, and nitric oxide alone is sufficient to activate CaMKII and increase SR Ca(2+) leak. Mechanistically, our data links Akt to nitric oxide synthase 1 activation downstream of β-AR stimulation. Collectively, this evidence supports the hypothesis that CaMKII is

  14. Variations in the patterns of soil organic carbon mineralization and microbial communities in response to exogenous application of rice straw and calcium carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Shuzhen [Key Laboratory of Agro-ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha 410125 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Huanjiang Observation and Research Station for Karst Ecosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Huangjiang 547100 (China); Huang, Yuan [Key Laboratory of Agro-ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha 410125 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); Ge, Yunhui [Key Laboratory of Agro-ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha 410125 (China); College of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Su, Yirong [Key Laboratory of Agro-ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha 410125 (China); Huanjiang Observation and Research Station for Karst Ecosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Huangjiang 547100 (China); Xu, Xinwen; Wang, Yongdong [Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); He, Xunyang, E-mail: hbhpjhn@isa.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Agro-ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha 410125 (China); Huanjiang Observation and Research Station for Karst Ecosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Huangjiang 547100 (China)

    2016-11-15

    The addition of exogenous inorganic carbon (CaCO{sub 3}) and organic carbon has an important influence on soil organic carbon (SOC) mineralization in karst soil, but the microbial mechanisms underlying the SOC priming effect are poorly understood. We conducted a 100-day incubation experiment involving four treatments of the calcareous soil in southwestern China's karst region: control, {sup 14}C-labeled rice straw addition, {sup 14}C-labeled CaCO{sub 3} addition, and a combination of {sup 14}C-labeled rice straw and CaCO{sub 3}. Changes in soil microbial communities were characterized using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis with polymerase chain reaction (PCR-DGGE) and real-time quantitative PCR (q-PCR). Both {sup 14}C-rice straw and Ca{sup 14}CO{sub 3} addition stimulated SOC mineralization, suggesting that organic and inorganic C affected SOC stability. Addition of straw alone had no significant effect on bacterial diversity; however, when the straw was added in combination with calcium carbonate, it had an inhibitory effect on bacterial and fungal diversity. At the beginning of the experimental period, exogenous additives increased bacterial abundance, although at the end of the 100-day incubation bacterial community abundance had gradually declined. Incubation time, exogenous input, and their interaction significantly affected SOC mineralization (in terms of priming and the cumulative amount of mineralization), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), and microbial community abundance and diversity. Moreover, the key factors influencing SOC mineralization were MBC, bacterial diversity, and soil pH. Overall, these findings support the view that inorganic C is involved in soil C turnover with the participation of soil microbial communities, promoting soil C cycling in the karst region. - Highlights: • Different patterns of {sup 14}C-rice straw and Ca{sup 14}CO{sub 3} addition on positive priming effects of SOC mineralization. • Inorganic C is involved in

  15. Intact calcium signaling in adrenergic-deficient embryonic mouse hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peoples, Jessica N; Taylor, David G; Katchman, Alexander N; Ebert, Steven N

    2018-01-22

    Mouse embryos that lack the ability to produce the adrenergic hormones, norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI), due to disruption of the dopamine beta-hydroxylase (Dbh -/- ) gene inevitably perish from heart failure during mid-gestation. Since adrenergic stimulation is well-known to enhance calcium signaling in developing as well as adult myocardium, and impairments in calcium signaling are typically associated with heart failure, we hypothesized that adrenergic-deficient embryonic hearts would display deficiencies in cardiac calcium signaling relative to adrenergic-competent controls at a developmental stage immediately preceding the onset of heart failure, which first appears beginning or shortly after mouse embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5). To test this hypothesis, we used ratiometric fluorescent calcium imaging techniques to measure cytosolic calcium transients, [Ca 2+ ] i in isolated E10.5 mouse hearts. Our results show that spontaneous [Ca 2+ ] i oscillations were intact and robustly responded to a variety of stimuli including extracellular calcium (5 mM), caffeine (5 mM), and NE (100 nM) in a manner that was indistinguishable from controls. Further, we show similar patterns of distribution (via immunofluorescent histochemical staining) and activity (via patch-clamp recording techniques) for the major voltage-gated plasma membrane calcium channel responsible for the L-type calcium current, I Ca,L , in adrenergic-deficient and control embryonic cardiac cells. These results demonstrate that despite the absence of vital adrenergic hormones that consistently leads to embryonic lethality in vivo, intracellular and extracellular calcium signaling remain essentially intact and functional in embryonic mouse hearts through E10.5. These findings suggest that adrenergic stimulation is not required for the development of intracellular calcium oscillations or extracellular calcium signaling through I Ca,L and that aberrant calcium signaling does not likely contribute

  16. Role of vitamin D3 active metabolites in the regulation of calcium metabolism in hypokinetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeev, I.N.; Afonin, B.V.; Blazhevich, N.V.

    1985-01-01

    The rats exposed to prolonged hypokinesia showed hypocalciemia, lower PTH and higher calcitonin concentrations in the serum, decreased calcium absorption in the small intestine, and a trend toward nephro- and arteriocalcinosis. Prophylactic administration of 24, 25-hydroxy D 3 , 1, 25-hydroxy D 3 and their combinations enhanced calcium absorption and alleviated hypocalciemia. The changes in the hormonal regulation of calcium homeostasis can be viewed as a factor responsible for calcium metabolic disorders associated with hypokinesia

  17. Calcium ferrite formation from the thermolysis of calcium tris (maleato)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    For preparing calcium ferrite, calcium tris (maleato) ferrate(III) precursor was prepared by mixing aqueous solutions of iron(III) maleate, calcium maleate and maleic acid. Various physico-chemical techniques i.e. TG, DTG, DTA, Mössbauer, XRD, IR etc have been used to study the decomposition behaviour from ambient to ...

  18. FT-Raman spectroscopic study of calcium-rich and magnesium-rich carbonate minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Howell G M; Villar, Susana E Jorge; Jehlicka, Jan; Munshi, Tasnim

    2005-08-01

    Calcium and magnesium carbonates are important minerals found in sedimentary environments. Although sandstones are the most common rock colonized by endolith organisms, the production of calcium and magnesium carbonates is important in survival strategies of organisms and as a source for the removal of oxalate ions. Extremophile organisms in some situations may convert or destroy carbonates of calcium and magnesium, which gives important information about the conditions under which these organisms can survive. The identification on the surface of Mars of 'White Rock' formations, in Juventae Chasma or Sabaea Terra, as possibly carbonate rocks makes the study of these minerals a prerequisite of remote Martian exploration. Here, we show the protocol for the identification by Raman spectroscopy of different calcium and magnesium carbonates and we present a database of relevance in the search for life, extinct or extant, on Mars; this will be useful for the assessment of data obtained from remote, miniaturized Raman spectrometers now proposed for Mars exploration.

  19. Children's Bone Health and Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Pinterest Email Print Children's Bone Health and Calcium: Condition Information What is bone health and how ... straight, walk, run, and lead an active life. Calcium is one of the key dietary building blocks ...

  20. Calcium – how and why?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    biological processes because of its unusual physical and chemical properties. 1. History of calcium ... cellular roles of calcium has established the importance of this ion ..... Ca2+ ion, for example in regulating enzyme activity (Price. 1975 ...

  1. Teaching wilderness first aid in a remote First Nations community: the story of the Sachigo Lake Wilderness Emergency Response Education Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Karen Born; Aaron Orkin; David VanderBurgh; Jackson Beardy

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To understand how community members of a remote First Nations community respond to an emergency first aid education programme. Study design. A qualitative study involving focus groups and participant observation as part of a communitybased participatory research project, which involved the development and implementation of a wilderness first aid course in collaboration with the community. Methods. Twenty community members participated in the course and agreed to be part of the rese...

  2. Project implementation plan: ASTD remote deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CRASS, D.W.

    1999-01-01

    This document is the project implementation plan for the ASTD Remote Deployment Project. The Plan identifies the roles and responsibilities for the project and defines the integration between the ASTD Project and the B-Cell Cleanout Project

  3. Solar Imagery - Chromosphere - Calcium

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of full-disk images of the sun in Calcium (Ca) II K wavelength (393.4 nm). Ca II K imagery reveal magnetic structures of the sun from about 500...

  4. Remote monitoring for international safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupree, S.A.; Sonnier, C.S.

    1999-01-01

    Remote monitoring is not a new technology, and its application to safeguards-relevant activities has been examined for a number of years. On behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy and international partners, remote monitoring systems have been emplaced in nuclear facilities and laboratories in various parts of the world. The experience gained from these Geld trials of remote monitoring systems has shown the viability of the concept of using integrated monitoring systems. Although a wide variety of sensors has been used in the remote monitoring field trials conducted to date, the possible range of instrumentation that might be used has scarcely been touched. As the technology becomes widespread, large amounts of data will become available to inspectors responsible for safeguards activities at the sites. Effective use of remote monitoring will require processing, archiving, presenting, and assessing of these data. To provide reasonable efficiency in the application of this technology, data processing should be done in a careful and organized manner. The problem will be not an issue of poring over scant records but of surviving under a deluge of information made possible by modern technology Fortunately, modem technology, which created the problem of the data glut, is available to come to the assistance of those inundated by data. Apart from the technological problems, one of the most important aspects of remote monitoring is the potential constraint related to the transmission of data out of a facility or beyond national borders. Remote monitoring across national borders can be seriously considered only in the context of a comprehensive, transparent, and open implementation regime. (author)

  5. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of the uranium including calcium. Time resolved measurement spectroscopic analysis (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akaoka, Katsuaki; Maruyama, Youichiro; Oba, Masaki; Miyabe, Masabumi; Otobe, Haruyoshi; Wakaida, Ikuo

    2010-05-01

    For the remote analysis of low DF TRU (Decontamination Factor Transuranic) fuel, Laser Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied to uranium oxide including a small amount of calcium oxide. The characteristics, such as spectrum intensity and plasma excitation temperature, were measured using time-resolved spectroscopy. As a result, in order to obtain the stable intensity of calcium spectrum for the uranium spectrum, it was found out that the optimum observation delay time of spectrum is 4 microseconds or more after laser irradiation. (author)

  6. Antenatal calcium intake in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdy, Zaleha Abdullah; Basri, Hashimah; Md Isa, Zaleha; Ahmad, Shuhaila; Shamsuddin, Khadijah; Mohd Amin, Rahmah

    2014-04-01

    To determine the adequacy of antenatal calcium intake in Malaysia, and the influencing factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted among postnatal women who delivered in two tertiary hospitals. Data were collected from antenatal cards, hospital documents and diet recall on daily milk and calcium intake during pregnancy. SPSS version 19.0 was used for statistical analyses. A total of 150 women were studied. The total daily calcium intake was 834 ± 43 mg (mean ± standard error of the mean), but the calcium intake distribution curve was skewed to the right with a median intake of 725 mg daily. When calcium intake from milk and calcium supplements was excluded, the daily dietary calcium intake was only 478 ± 25 mg. Even with inclusion of milk and calcium supplements, more than a third (n=55 or 36.7%) of the women consumed less than 600 mg calcium in their daily diet. The adequacy of daily calcium intake was not influenced by maternal age, ethnicity, income or maternal job or educational status as well as parity. The daily dietary calcium intake of the Malaysian antenatal population is far from adequate without the addition of calcium supplements and milk. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2013 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  7. The Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, H.

    1983-01-01

    Three aspect of cellular calcium metabolism in animal cells was discussed including the importance of the plasma membrane in calcium homeostasis, experiments dealing with the actual mechanism of the calcium pump, and the function of the pump in relationship to the mitochondria and to the function of calmodulin in the intact cell.

  8. Targeted siRNA Screens Identify ER-to-Mitochondrial Calcium Exchange in Autophagy and Mitophagy Responses in RPE1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas D. B. MacVicar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an important stress response pathway responsible for the removal and recycling of damaged or redundant cytosolic constituents. Mitochondrial damage triggers selective mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy, mediated by a variety of response factors including the Pink1/Parkin system. Using human retinal pigment epithelial cells stably expressing autophagy and mitophagy reporters, we have conducted parallel screens of regulators of endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondrial morphology and function contributing to starvation-induced autophagy and damage-induced mitophagy. These screens identified the ER chaperone and Ca2+ flux modulator, sigma non-opioid intracellular receptor 1 (SIGMAR1, as a regulator of autophagosome expansion during starvation. Screens also identified phosphatidyl ethanolamine methyl transferase (PEMT and the IP3-receptors (IP3Rs as mediators of Parkin-induced mitophagy. Further experiments suggested that IP3R-mediated transfer of Ca2+ from the ER lumen to the mitochondrial matrix via the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (MCU primes mitochondria for mitophagy. Importantly, recruitment of Parkin to damaged mitochondria did not require IP3R-mediated ER-to-mitochondrial Ca2+ transfer, but mitochondrial clustering downstream of Parkin recruitment was impaired, suggesting involvement of regulators of mitochondrial dynamics and/or transport. Our data suggest that Ca2+ flux between ER and mitochondria at presumed ER/mitochondrial contact sites is needed both for starvation-induced autophagy and for Parkin-mediated mitophagy, further highlighting the importance of inter-organellar communication for effective cellular homeostasis.

  9. Advancing High Spatial and Spectral Resolution Remote Sensing for Observing Plant Community Response to Environmental Variability and Change in the Alaskan Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Zesati, Sergio A.

    The Arctic is being impacted by climate change more than any other region on Earth. Impacts to terrestrial ecosystems have the potential to manifest through feedbacks with other components of the Earth System. Of particular concern is the potential for the massive store of soil organic carbon to be released from arctic permafrost to the atmosphere where it could exacerbate greenhouse warming and impact global climate and biogeochemical cycles. Even though substantial gains to our understanding of the changing Arctic have been made, especially over the past decade, linking research results from plot to regional scales remains a challenge due to the lack of adequate low/mid-altitude sampling platforms, logistic constraints, and the lack of cross-scale validation of research methodologies. The prime motivation of this study is to advance observational capacities suitable for documenting multi-scale environmental change in arctic terrestrial landscapes through the development and testing of novel ground-based and low altitude remote sensing methods. Specifically this study addressed the following questions: • How well can low-cost kite aerial photography and advanced computer vision techniques model the microtopographic heterogeneity of changing tundra surfaces? • How does imagery from kite aerial photography and fixed time-lapse digital cameras (pheno-cams) compare in their capacity to monitor plot-level phenological dynamics of arctic vegetation communities? • Can the use of multi-scale digital imaging systems be scaled to improve measurements of ecosystem properties and processes at the landscape level? • How do results from ground-based and low altitude digital remote sensing of the spatiotemporal variability in ecosystem processes compare with those from satellite remote sensing platforms? Key findings from this study suggest that cost-effective alternative digital imaging and remote sensing methods are suitable for monitoring and quantifying plot to

  10. Does Increased Expression of the Plasma Membrane Calcium-ATPase Isoform 2 Confer Resistance to Apoptosis on Breast Cancer Cells?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    VanHouten, Joshua N

    2008-01-01

    The plasma membrane calcium ATPase isoform 2 (PMCA2) is highly expressed on the apical membrane of mammary epithelial cells during lactation, and is the predominant pump responsible for calcium transport into milk...

  11. Ginsenoside Rb1 Attenuates Agonist-Induced Contractile Response via Inhibition of Store-Operated Calcium Entry in Pulmonary Arteries of Normal and Pulmonary Hypertensive Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Xing Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulmonary hypertension (PH is characterized by sustained vasoconstriction, enhanced vasoreactivity and vascular remodeling, which leads to right heart failure and death. Despite several treatments are available, many forms of PH are still incurable. Ginsenoside Rb1, a principle active ingredient of Panax ginseng, exhibits multiple pharmacological effects on cardiovascular system, and suppresses monocrotaline (MCT-induced right heart hypertrophy. However, its effect on the pulmonary vascular functions related to PH is unknown. Methods: We examined the vasorelaxing effects of ginsenoside Rb1 on endothelin-1 (ET-1 induced contraction of pulmonary arteries (PAs and store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs from chronic hypoxia (CH and MCT-induced PH. Results: Ginsenoside Rb1 elicited concentration-dependent relaxation of ET-1-induced PA contraction. The vasorelaxing effect was unaffected by nifedipine, but abolished by the SOCE blocker Gd3+. Ginsenoside Rb1 suppressed cyclopiazonic acid (CPA-induced PA contraction, and CPA-activated cation entry and Ca2+ transient in PASMCs. ET-1 and CPA-induced contraction, and CPA-activated cation entry and Ca2+ transients were enhanced in PA and PASMCs of CH and MCT-treated rats; the enhanced responses were abolished by ginsenoside Rb1. Conclusion: Ginsenoside Rb1 attenuates ET-1-induced contractile response via inhibition of SOCE, and it can effectively antagonize the enhanced pulmonary vasoreactivity in PH.

  12. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamponi, Gerald Werner

    Voltage Gated Calcium Channels is the first comprehensive book in the calcium channel field, encompassing over thirty years of progress towards our understanding of calcium channel structure, function, regulation, physiology, pharmacology, and genetics. This book balances contributions from many of the leading authorities in the calcium channel field with fresh perspectives from risings stars in the area, taking into account the most recent literature and concepts. This is the only all-encompassing calcium channel book currently available, and is an essential resource for academic researchers at all levels in the areas neuroscience, biophysics, and cardiovascular sciences, as well as to researchers in the drug discovery area.

  13. Remote Network Access (RNA)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    .... Remote Network Access (RNA) includes or is associated with all communication devices/software, firewalls, intrusion detection systems and virus protection applications to ensure security of the OIG, DoD, Network from remote...

  14. L-Type Calcium Channels Modulation by Estradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Vela, Nelson E; Osorio, Daniel; Avila-Rodriguez, Marco; Gonzalez, Janneth; García-Segura, Luis Miguel; Echeverria, Valentina; Barreto, George E

    2017-09-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are key regulators of brain function, and their dysfunction has been associated with multiple conditions and neurodegenerative diseases because they couple membrane depolarization to the influx of calcium-and other processes such as gene expression-in excitable cells. L-type calcium channels, one of the three major classes and probably the best characterized of the voltage-gated calcium channels, act as an essential calcium binding proteins with a significant biological relevance. It is well known that estradiol can activate rapidly brain signaling pathways and modulatory/regulatory proteins through non-genomic (or non-transcriptional) mechanisms, which lead to an increase of intracellular calcium that activate multiple kinases and signaling cascades, in the same way as L-type calcium channels responses. In this context, estrogens-L-type calcium channels signaling raises intracellular calcium levels and activates the same signaling cascades in the brain probably through estrogen receptor-independent modulatory mechanisms. In this review, we discuss the available literature on this area, which seems to suggest that estradiol exerts dual effects/modulation on these channels in a concentration-dependent manner (as a potentiator of these channels in pM concentrations and as an inhibitor in nM concentrations). Indeed, estradiol may orchestrate multiple neurotrophic responses, which open a new avenue for the development of novel estrogen-based therapies to alleviate different neuropathologies. We also highlight that it is essential to determine through computational and/or experimental approaches the interaction between estradiol and L-type calcium channels to assist these developments, which is an interesting area of research that deserves a closer look in future biomedical research.

  15. The Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel 1 (AtVDAC1 Negatively Regulates Plant Cold Responses during Germination and Seedling Development in Arabidopsis and Interacts with Calcium Sensor CBL1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Yong Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC, a highly conserved major mitochondrial outer membrane protein, plays crucial roles in energy metabolism and metabolite transport. However, knowledge about the roles of the VDAC family in plants is limited. In this study, we investigated the expression pattern of VDAC1 in Arabidopsis and found that cold stress promoted the accumulation of VDAC1 transcripts in imbibed seeds and mature plants. Overexpression of VDAC1 reduced tolerance to cold stress in Arabidopsis. Phenotype analysis of VDAC1 T-DNA insertion mutant plants indicated that a vdac1 mutant line had faster germination kinetics under cold treatment and showed enhanced tolerance to freezing. The yeast two-hybrid system revealed that VDAC1 interacts with CBL1, a calcium sensor in plants. Like the vdac1, a cbl1 mutant also exhibited a higher seed germination rate. We conclude that both VDAC1 and CBL1 regulate cold stress responses during seed germination and plant development.

  16. Introduction to remote sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Cracknell, Arthur P

    2007-01-01

    Addressing the need for updated information in remote sensing, Introduction to Remote Sensing, Second Edition provides a full and authoritative introduction for scientists who need to know the scope, potential, and limitations in the field. The authors discuss the physical principles of common remote sensing systems and examine the processing, interpretation, and applications of data. This new edition features updated and expanded material, including greater coverage of applications from across earth, environmental, atmospheric, and oceanographic sciences. Illustrated with remotely sensed colo

  17. Remote detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nixon, K.V.; France, S.W.; Garcia, C.; Hastings, R.D.

    1981-05-01

    A newly designed remote detection system has been developed at Los Alamos that allows the collection of high-resolution gamma-ray spectra and neutron data from a remote location. The system consists of the remote unit and a command unit. The remote unit collects data in a potentially hostile environment while the operator controls the unit by either radio or wire link from a safe position. Both units are battery powered and are housed in metal carrying cases

  18. Polypepide synthesis in response to 20-hydroxyecdysone, with particular reference to calcium-binding proteins, in the epidermis of a larval insect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouellette, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Epidermal cells respond to 20-hydroxyecdysone (20HE) by altering their morphology, rate of proliferation and level of cell-to-cell communication. To study changes in polypeptide synthesis induced by 20HE, epidermal polypeptides from the midinstar larvae of the mealworm Tenebrio molitor were separated by one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. {sup 35}S-methionine-labelled polypeptides were extracted from cells incubated either in the absence or presence of 2{mu}g/ml 20HE for 14-16 h in vitro. Cells incubated with the hormone incorporated 28% more label into polypeptides. Over 250 polypeptides were detected in total cell lysates by this technique. Polypeptides that showed altered rates of synthesis in response to 20HE treatment were identified and characterized.

  19. Investigation of a calcium-responsive contrast agent in cellular model systems: feasibility for use as a smart molecular probe in functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelovski, Goran; Gottschalk, Sven; Milošević, Milena; Engelmann, Jörn; Hagberg, Gisela E; Kadjane, Pascal; Andjus, Pavle; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2014-05-21

    Responsive or smart contrast agents (SCAs) represent a promising direction for development of novel functional MRI (fMRI) methods for the eventual noninvasive assessment of brain function. In particular, SCAs that respond to Ca(2+) may allow tracking neuronal activity independent of brain vasculature, thus avoiding the characteristic limitations of current fMRI techniques. Here we report an in vitro proof-of-principle study with a Ca(2+)-sensitive, Gd(3+)-based SCA in an attempt to validate its potential use as a functional in vivo marker. First, we quantified its relaxometric response in a complex 3D cell culture model. Subsequently, we examined potential changes in the functionality of primary glial cells following administration of this SCA. Monitoring intracellular Ca(2+) showed that, despite a reduction in the Ca(2+) level, transport of Ca(2+) through the plasma membrane remained unaffected, while stimulation with ATP induced Ca(2+)-transients suggested normal cellular signaling in the presence of low millimolar SCA concentrations. SCAs merely lowered the intracellular Ca(2+) level. Finally, we estimated the longitudinal relaxation times (T1) for an idealized in vivo fMRI experiment with SCA, for extracellular Ca(2+) concentration level changes expected during intense neuronal activity which takes place upon repetitive stimulation. The values we obtained indicate changes in T1 of around 1-6%, sufficient to be robustly detectable using modern MRI methods in high field scanners. Our results encourage further attempts to develop even more potent SCAs and appropriate fMRI protocols. This would result in novel methods that allow monitoring of essential physiological processes at the cellular and molecular level.

  20. All or none cell responses of Ca2+-dependent K channels elicited by calcium or lead in human red cells can be explained by heterogeneity of agonist distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, J.; Garcia-Sancho, J.; Herreros, B.

    1988-01-01

    We have studied the all or none cell response of Ca2+-dependent K+ channels to added Ca in human red cells depleted of ATP by incubation with iodoacetate and inosine. A procedure was used which allows separation and differential analysis of responding and nonresponding cells. Responding (H for heavy) cells incubated in medium containing 5 mM K lose KCl and water and increase their density to the point of sinking on diethylphthalate (specific gravity = 1.12) on centrifugation. Nonresponding (L for light) cells do not lose KCl at all. There is no intermediate behavior. Increasing the Ca concentration in the medium increases the fraction of cells which become H. No differences in the sensitivity to Ca2+ of the individual K+ channels were detected in inside-out vesicles prepared either from H or from L cells. The Ca content of H cells was higher than that of L cells. Cells depleted of ATP by incubation with iodoacetate and inosine sustain pump-leak Ca fluxes of about 15 mumol/liter cells per hour. ATP seems to be resynthesized in these cells at the expense of cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate stores at a rate of about 150 mumol/liter cells per hour. Inhibition of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate phosphatase by tetrathionate increased 6-8 times the measured rate of uptake of external 45Ca. This was accompanied by an increase in the fraction of H cells. All or none cell responses of Ca2+-dependent K channels have also been evidenced in intact human red cells on addition of Pb. They have the same characteristics as those in responding and nonresponding cells. The detailed study of the kinetics of Pb-induced shrinkage of red cells suspended in medium containing 5 mM K showed that changes of Pb concentration changed not only the fraction of H cells but also the rate of shrinkage of responding cells. H cells generated by Pb treatment contained significantly more lead than L cells

  1. Fast calcium transients translate the distribution and conduction of neural activity in different regions of a single sensory neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purali, Nuhan

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, cytosolic calcium concentration changes were recorded in response to various forms of excitations, using the fluorescent calcium indicator dye OG-BAPTA1 together with the current or voltage clamp methods in stretch receptor neurons of crayfish. A single action potential evoked a rise in the resting calcium level in the axon and axonal hillock, whereas an impulse train or a large saturating current injection would be required to evoke an equivalent response in the dendrite region. Under voltage clamp conditions, amplitude differences between axon and dendrite responses vanished completely. The fast activation time and the modulation of the response by extracellular calcium concentration changes indicated that the evoked calcium transients might be mediated by calcium entry into the cytosol through a voltage-gated calcium channel. The decay of the responses was slow and sensitive to extracellular sodium and calcium concentrations as well as exposure to 1-10 mM NiCl 2 and 10-500 µM lanthanum. Thus, a sodium calcium exchanger and a calcium ATPase might be responsible for calcium extrusion from the cytosol. Present results indicate that the calcium indicator OG-BAPTA1 might be an efficient but indirect way of monitoring regional membrane potential differences in a single neuron.

  2. Models of calcium signalling

    CERN Document Server

    Dupont, Geneviève; Kirk, Vivien; Sneyd, James

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the ways in which mathematical, computational, and modelling methods can be used to help understand the dynamics of intracellular calcium. The concentration of free intracellular calcium is vital for controlling a wide range of cellular processes, and is thus of great physiological importance. However, because of the complex ways in which the calcium concentration varies, it is also of great mathematical interest.This book presents the general modelling theory as well as a large number of specific case examples, to show how mathematical modelling can interact with experimental approaches, in an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the study of an important physiological control mechanism. Geneviève Dupont is FNRS Research Director at the Unit of Theoretical Chronobiology of the Université Libre de Bruxelles;Martin Falcke is head of the Mathematical Cell Physiology group at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin;Vivien Kirk is an Associate Professor in the Depar...

  3. Gestational hypothyroidism-induced changes in L-type calcium channels of rat aorta smooth muscle and their impact on the responses to vasoconstrictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedaghat, Katayoun; Zahediasl, Saleh; Ghasemi, Asghar

    2015-02-01

    Thyroid hormones play an essential role in fetal growth and maternal hypo-thyroidism which leads to cardiovascular deficiency in their offspring. Considering this, we intended to investigate the impact of gestational hypothyroidism on offspring vascular contractibility and possible underlying mechanisms. Hypothyroidism was induced in female rats by administration of 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil in drinking water (0.02%) till delivery. The offspring aorta smooth muscle (without endothelium) contractile response to KCl (10-100 mM), KCl in the presence of nifedipine (10(-4)-10(-1) µM), phenylephrine (10(-9)-10(-6) M) and finally, phenylephrine and caffeine 100 mM in Ca(2+)-free Krebs were measured. KCl and phenylephrine-induced contractions were considerably lower in gestational hypothyroid (GH) than euthyroid offspring. GH responded to nifedipine with less sensitivity than control. The GH and control groups produced almost equal contraction in respond to phenylephrine and caffeine in Ca(2+)-free Krebs. This study suggests that in hypothyroid offspring L-type Ca(2+) channels are less functional, while intracellular Ca(2+) handling systems are less modified by low levels of maternal thyroid hormones.

  4. A salivary EF-hand calcium-binding protein of the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens functions as an effector for defense responses in rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Wenfeng; Yu, Haixin; Jian, Yukun; Zeng, Jiamei; Ji, Rui; Chen, Hongdan; Lou, Yonggen

    2017-01-01

    The brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) (Hemiptera: Delphacidae), a major pest of rice in Asia, is able to successfully puncture sieve tubes in rice with its piercing stylet and then to ingest phloem sap. How BPH manages to continuously feed on rice remains unclear. Here, we cloned the gene NlSEF1, which is highly expressed in the salivary glands of BPH. The NlSEF1 protein has EF-hand Ca2+-binding activity and can be secreted into rice plants when BPH feed. Infestation of rice by BPH nymphs whose NlSEF1 was knocked down elicited higher levels of Ca2+ and H2O2 but not jasmonic acid, jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile) and SA in rice than did infestation by control nymphs; Consistently, wounding plus the recombination protein NlSEF1 suppressed the production of H2O2 in rice. Bioassays revealed that NlSEF1-knockdown BPH nymphs had a higher mortality rate and lower feeding capacity on rice than control nymphs. These results indicate that the salivary protein in BPH, NlSEF1, functions as an effector and plays important roles in interactions between BPH and rice by mediating the plant’s defense responses. PMID:28098179

  5. Prediction and characterisation of a highly conserved, remote and cAMP responsive enhancer that regulates Msx1 gene expression in cardiac neural crest and outflow tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kerry Ann; Davidson, Scott; Liaros, Angela; Barrow, John; Lear, Marissa; Heine, Danielle; Hoppler, Stefan; MacKenzie, Alasdair

    2008-05-15

    Double knockouts of the Msx1 and Msx2 genes in the mouse result in severe cardiac outflow tract malformations similar to those frequently found in newborn infants. Despite the known role of the Msx genes in cardiac formation little is known of the regulatory systems (ligand receptor, signal transduction and protein-DNA interactions) that regulate the tissue-specific expression of the Msx genes in mammals during the formation of the outflow tract. In the present study we have used a combination of multi-species comparative genomics, mouse transgenic analysis and in-situ hybridisation to predict and validate the existence of a remote ultra-conserved enhancer that supports the expression of the Msx1 gene in migrating mouse cardiac neural crest and the outflow tract primordia. Furthermore, culturing of embryonic explants derived from transgenic lines with agonists of the PKC and PKA signal transduction systems demonstrates that this remote enhancer is influenced by PKA but not PKC dependent gene regulatory systems. These studies demonstrate the efficacy of combining comparative genomics and transgenic analyses and provide a platform for the study of the possible roles of Msx gene mis-regulation in the aetiology of congenital heart malformation.

  6. Saccadic distractor effects: the remote distractor effect (RDE) and saccadic inhibition (SI): A response to McIntosh and Buonocore (2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Robin; Benson, Valerie

    2015-02-04

    We (Walker & Benson, 2013) reported studies in which the spatial effects of distractors on the remote distractor effect (RDE) and saccadic inhibition (SI) were examined. Distractors remote from the target increased mean latency and the skew of the distractor-related distributions, without the presence of dips that are regarded as the hallmark of SI. We further showed that early onset distractors had similar effects although these would not be consistent with existing estimates of the duration of SI (of around 60-70 ms). McIntosh and Buonocore (2014) report a simulation showing that skewed latency distributions can arise from the putative SI mechanism and they also highlighted a number of methodological considerations regarding the RDE and SI as measures of saccadic distractor effects (SDEs). Here we evaluate these claims and note that the measures of SI obtained by subtracting latency distributions (specifically the decrease in saccade frequency--or dip duration) are no more diagnostic of a single inhibitory process, or more sensitive indicators of it, than is median latency. Furthermore the evidence of inhibitory influences of small distractors presented close to the target is incompatible with the explanations of both the RDE and SI. We conclude that saccadic distractor effects may be a more inclusive term to encompass the different characteristics of behavioral effects of underlying saccade target selection. © 2015 ARVO.

  7. Calcium signalling silencing in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiser, Maura

    2017-06-15

    Subcellular calcium signalling silencing is a novel and distinct cellular and molecular adaptive response to rapid cardiac activation. Calcium signalling silencing develops during short-term sustained rapid atrial activation as seen clinically during paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). It is the first 'anti-arrhythmic' adaptive response in the setting of AF and appears to counteract the maladaptive changes that lead to intracellular Ca 2+ signalling instability and Ca 2+ -based arrhythmogenicity. Calcium signalling silencing results in a failed propagation of the [Ca 2+ ] i signal to the myocyte centre both in patients with AF and in a rabbit model. This adaptive mechanism leads to a substantial reduction in the expression levels of calcium release channels (ryanodine receptors, RyR2) in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and the frequency of Ca 2+ sparks and arrhythmogenic Ca 2+ waves remains low. Less Ca 2+ release per [Ca 2+ ] i transient, increased fast Ca 2+ buffering strength, shortened action potentials and reduced L-type Ca 2+ current contribute to a substantial reduction of intracellular [Na + ]. These features of Ca 2+ signalling silencing are distinct and in contrast to the changes attributed to Ca 2+ -based arrhythmogenicity. Some features of Ca 2+ signalling silencing prevail in human AF suggesting that the Ca 2+ signalling 'phenotype' in AF is a sum of Ca 2+ stabilizing (Ca 2+ signalling silencing) and Ca 2+ destabilizing (arrhythmogenic unstable Ca 2+ signalling) factors. Calcium signalling silencing is a part of the mechanisms that contribute to the natural progression of AF and may limit the role of Ca 2+ -based arrhythmogenicity after the onset of AF. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  8. Mathematical investigation of IP3-dependent calcium dynamics in astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handy, Gregory; Taheri, Marsa; White, John A; Borisyuk, Alla

    2017-06-01

    We study evoked calcium dynamics in astrocytes, a major cell type in the mammalian brain. Experimental evidence has shown that such dynamics are highly variable between different trials, cells, and cell subcompartments. Here we present a qualitative analysis of a recent mathematical model of astrocyte calcium responses. We show how the major response types are generated in the model as a result of the underlying bifurcation structure. By varying key channel parameters, mimicking blockers used by experimentalists, we manipulate this underlying bifurcation structure and predict how the distributions of responses can change. We find that store-operated calcium channels, plasma membrane bound channels with little activity during calcium transients, have a surprisingly strong effect, underscoring the importance of considering these channels in both experiments and mathematical settings. Variation in the maximum flow in different calcium channels is also shown to determine the range of stable oscillations, as well as set the range of frequencies of the oscillations. Further, by conducting a randomized search through the parameter space and recording the resulting calcium responses, we create a database that can be used by experimentalists to help estimate the underlying channel distribution of their cells.

  9. Identification of the pigment responsible for the blue fluorescence band in the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of green plants, and the potential use of this band in remotely estimating rates of photosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chappelle, E.W.; McMurtrey, J.E. III; Kim, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    The laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of vegetation is being investigated in this laboratory for use as a technique for the remote detection of the effects of environmental stress upon vegetation, as well as for plant identification. The fluorescence band with a maximum at 440 nm, in conjunction with the chlorophyll bands with maxima at 685 and 740 nm, has been found to be a critical band in the development of algorithms for detecting stress, and identifying plant types. The identification of the plant constituent responsible for this band is vital to understanding the mechanism underlying its fluorescence changes in response to environmental and physiological changes. The identification was achieved as follows: The laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of pure plant pigments were determined. Fluorescence bands with maxima at 420 nm, 440 nm, 490 nm, and 525 nm were observed for vitamin K 1 , reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH), beta-carotene, and riboflavin, respectively. The LIF spectra of water extracts and acetone extracts of clover leaves were also measured. It was found that the blue fluorescence band was associated with the water extract. NADPH which is a water-soluble compound, and the water extract of clover had no fluorescence after oxidation by potassium ferricyanide, while the fluorescence of water insoluble vitamin K 1 was unchanged by the oxidizing agent. It was also found that the absorption maximum of NADPH was the same as the absorption maximum of the aqueous extract of clover. The above findings indicated that the compound responsible for the blue fluorescence at 440 nm is in the reduced state and is water-soluble. It was concluded that NADPH was responsible for the blue fluorescence at 440 nm. The strong linear relationship between the fluorescence at 440 nm and the rate of photosynthesis suggests the possible use of LIF measurements in the remote estimation of photosynthetic rates. (author)

  10. Determination of percent calcium carbonate in calcium chromate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, H.W.

    1979-01-01

    The precision, accuracy and reliability of the macro-combustion method is superior to the Knorr alkalimetric method, and it is faster. It also significantly reduces the calcium chromate waste accrual problem. The macro-combustion method has been adopted as the official method for determination of percent calcium carbonate in thermal battery grade anhydrous calcium chromate and percent calcium carbonate in quicklime used in the production of calcium chromate. The apparatus and procedure can be used to measure the percent carbonate in inorganic materials other than calcium chromate. With simple modifications in the basic apparatus and procedure, the percent carbon and hydrogen can be measured in many organic material, including polymers and polymeric formulations. 5 figures, 5 tables

  11. Calcium oxalate stone and gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marickar, Y M Fazil

    2009-12-01

    Gout is well known to be produced by increased uric acid level in blood. The objective of this paper is to assess the relationship between gout and calcium oxalate stone formation in the humans. 48 patients with combination of gout and calcium oxalate stone problem were included. The biochemical values of this group were compared with 38 randomly selected uric acid stone patients with gout, 43 stone patients with gout alone, 100 calcium oxalate stone patients without gout and 30 controls, making a total of 259 patients. Various biochemical parameters, namely serum calcium, phosphorus and uric acid and 24-h urine calcium, phosphorus, uric acid, oxalate, citrate and magnesium were analysed. ANOVA and Duncan's multiple-range tests were performed to assess statistical significance of the variations. The promoters of stone formation, namely serum calcium (P stone patients and gouty calcium oxalate stone patients compared to the non-gouty patients and controls. Urine oxalate (P stones patients. The inhibitor urine citrate (P stone gouty patients, followed by the gouty uric acid stone formers and gouty calcium oxalate stone patients. The high values of promoters, namely uric acid and calcium in the gouty stone patients indicate the tendency for urinary stone formation in the gouty stone patients. There is probably a correlation between gout and calcium oxalate urinary stone. We presume this mechanism is achieved through the uric acid metabolism. The findings point to the summation effect of metabolic changes in development of stone disease.

  12. Calcium and Nuclear Signaling in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan V. Maly

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there have been a number of developments in the fields of calcium and nuclear signaling that point to new avenues for a more effective diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. An example is the discovery of new classes of molecules involved in calcium-regulated nuclear import and nuclear calcium signaling, from the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR and myosin families. This review surveys the new state of the calcium and nuclear signaling fields with the aim of identifying the unifying themes that hold out promise in the context of the problems presented by prostate cancer. Genomic perturbations, kinase cascades, developmental pathways, and channels and transporters are covered, with an emphasis on nuclear transport and functions. Special attention is paid to the molecular mechanisms behind prostate cancer progression to the malignant forms and the unfavorable response to anti-androgen treatment. The survey leads to some new hypotheses that connect heretofore disparate results and may present a translational interest.

  13. Inotropic effect, binding properties, and calcium flux effects of the calcium channel agonist CGP 28392 in intact cultured embryonic chick ventricular cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent, S.; Kim, D.; Smith, T.W.; Marsh, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    CGP 28392 is a recently described dihydropyridine derivative with positive inotropic properties. To study the mechanism of action of this putative calcium channel agonist, we have related the effects of CGP 28392 on contraction (measured with an optical video system) and radioactive calcium uptake to ligand-binding studies in cultured, spontaneously beating chick embryo ventricular cells. CGP 28392 produced a concentration-dependent increase in amplitude and velocity of contraction (EC 50 = 2 x 10(-7) M; maximum contractile effect = 85% of the calcium 3.6 mM response). Nifedipine produced a shift to the right of the concentration-effect curve for CGP 28392 without decreasing the maximum contractile response, suggesting competitive antagonism (pA2 = 8.3). Computer analysis of displacement of [ 3 H]nitrendipine binding to intact heart cells by unlabeled CGP 28392 indicated a K /sub D/ = 2.2 +/- 0.95 x 10(-7) M, in good agreement with the EC 50 for the inotropic effect. CGP 28392 increased the rate of radioactive calcium influx (+39% at 10 seconds) without altering beating rate, while nifedipine decreased radioactive calcium influx and antagonized the CGP 28392-induced increase in calcium influx. Our results indicate that, in intact cultured myocytes, CGP 28392 acts as a calcium channel agonist and competes for the dihydropyridine-binding site of the slow calcium channel. In contrast to calcium channel blockers, CGP 28392 increases calcium influx and enhances the contractile state

  14. Visualisation of an nsPEF induced calcium wave using the genetically encoded calcium indicator GCaMP in U87 human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Lynn; Bardet, Sylvia M; Arnaud-Cormos, Delia; Leveque, Philippe; O'Connor, Rodney P

    2018-02-01

    Cytosolic, synthetic chemical calcium indicators are typically used to visualise the rapid increase in intracellular calcium ion concentration that follows nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) application. This study looks at the application of genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) to investigate the spatiotemporal nature of nsPEF-induced calcium signals using fluorescent live cell imaging. Calcium responses to 44kV/cm, 10ns pulses were observed in U87-MG cells expressing either a plasma membrane targeted GECI (GCaMP5-G), or one cytosolically expressed (GCaMP6-S), and compared to the response of cells loaded with cytosolic or plasma membrane targeted chemical calcium indicators. Application of 100 pulses, to cells containing plasma membrane targeted indicators, revealed a wave of calcium across the cell initiating at the cathode side. A similar spatial wave was not observed with cytosolic indicators with mobile calcium buffering properties. The speed of the wave was related to pulse application frequency and it was not propagated by calcium induced calcium release. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Neuronal calcium sensor synaptotagmin-9 is not involved in the regulation of glucose homeostasis or insulin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Wang, Xiaorui; Wang, Yue

    2010-01-01

    the identities of proteins that are responsible for sensing calcium changes and for transmitting the calcium signal to release machineries. Synaptotagmins are primarily expressed in brain and endocrine cells and exhibit diverse calcium binding properties. Synaptotagmin-1, -2 and -9 are calcium sensors for fast......BACKGROUND: Insulin secretion is a complex and highly regulated process. It is well established that cytoplasmic calcium is a key regulator of insulin secretion, but how elevated intracellular calcium triggers insulin granule exocytosis remains unclear, and we have only begun to define...... neurotransmitter release in respective brain regions, while synaptotagmin-7 is a positive regulator of calcium-dependent insulin release. Unlike the three neuronal calcium sensors, whose deletion abolished fast neurotransmitter release, synaptotagmin-7 deletion resulted in only partial loss of calcium...

  16. Remote Monitoring Transparency Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhoruchkin, V.K.; Shmelev, V.M.; Roumiantsev, A.N.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the Remote Monitoring Transparency Program is to evaluate and demonstrate the use of remote monitoring technologies to advance nonproliferation and transparency efforts that are currently being developed by Russia and the United States without compromising the national security to the participating parties. Under a lab-to-lab transparency contract between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Kurchatov Institute (KI RRC), the Kurchatov Institute will analyze technical and procedural aspects of the application of remote monitoring as a transparency measure to monitor inventories of direct- use HEU and plutonium (e.g., material recovered from dismantled nuclear weapons). A goal of this program is to assist a broad range of political and technical experts in learning more about remote monitoring technologies that could be used to implement nonproliferation, arms control, and other security and confidence building measures. Specifically, this program will: (1) begin integrating Russian technologies into remote monitoring systems; (2) develop remote monitoring procedures that will assist in the application of remote monitoring techniques to monitor inventories of HEU and Pu from dismantled nuclear weapons; and (3) conduct a workshop to review remote monitoring fundamentals, demonstrate an integrated US/Russian remote monitoring system, and discuss the impacts that remote monitoring will have on the national security of participating countries

  17. Cardiovascular Effects of Calcium Supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian R. Reid

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Calcium supplements reduce bone turnover and slow the rate of bone loss. However, few studies have demonstrated reduced fracture incidence with calcium supplements, and meta-analyses show only a 10% decrease in fractures, which is of borderline statistical and clinical significance. Trials in normal older women and in patients with renal impairment suggest that calcium supplements increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. To further assess their safety, we recently conducted a meta-analysis of trials of calcium supplements, and found a 27%–31% increase in risk of myocardial infarction, and a 12%–20% increase in risk of stroke. These findings are robust because they are based on pre-specified analyses of randomized, placebo-controlled trials and are consistent across the trials. Co-administration of vitamin D with calcium does not lessen these adverse effects. The increased cardiovascular risk with calcium supplements is consistent with epidemiological data relating higher circulating calcium concentrations to cardiovascular disease in normal populations. There are several possible pathophysiological mechanisms for these effects, including effects on vascular calcification, vascular cells, blood coagulation and calcium-sensing receptors. Thus, the non-skeletal risks of calcium supplements appear to outweigh any skeletal benefits, and are they appear to be unnecessary for the efficacy of other osteoporosis treatments.

  18. SR calcium handling and calcium after-transients in a rabbit model of heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baartscheer, Antonius; Schumacher, Cees A.; Belterman, Charly N. W.; Coronel, Ruben; Fiolet, Jan W. T.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: After-depolarization associated arrhythmias are frequently observed in heart failure and associated with spontaneous calcium release from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), calcium after-transients. We hypothesize that disturbed SR calcium handling underlies calcium after-transients in heart

  19. Savannah River Plant remote environmental monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    The SRP remote environmental monitoring system consists of separations facilities stack monitors, production reactor stack monitors, twelve site perimeter monitors, river and stream monitors, a geostationary operational environmental satellite (GOES) data link, reactor cooling lake thermal monitors, meteorological tower system, Weather Information and Display (WIND) system computer, and the VANTAGE data base management system. The remote environmental monitoring system when fully implemented will provide automatic monitoring of key stack releases and automatic inclusion of these source terms in the emergency response codes

  20. 21 CFR 573.240 - Calcium periodate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... with calcium hydroxide or calcium oxide to form a substance consisting of not less than 60 percent by... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium periodate. 573.240 Section 573.240 Food... Additive Listing § 573.240 Calcium periodate. The food additive calcium periodate may be safely used in...

  1. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and... Listing § 573.260 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used as an anticaking agent in animal feed, provided that the amount of calcium silicate does not...

  2. Calcium Occupancy of N-terminal Sites within Calmodulin Induces Inhibition of the Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boschek, Curt B; Jones, Terry E; Squier, Thomas C; Bigelow, Diana J

    2007-08-01

    R1 function upon the calcium-dependent activation of CaM. These results indicate that occupancy of the N-terminal domain calcium binding sites in CaM bound to the identified CaM-binding sequence K3619-N3643 is the conformational switch responsible for the CaM-dependent modulation of the RyR1 calcium release channel.

  3. Optical remote sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Prasad, Saurabh; Chanussot, Jocelyn

    2011-01-01

    Optical remote sensing relies on exploiting multispectral and hyper spectral imagery possessing high spatial and spectral resolutions respectively. These modalities, although useful for most remote sensing tasks, often present challenges that must be addressed for their effective exploitation. This book presents current state-of-the-art algorithms that address the following key challenges encountered in representation and analysis of such optical remotely sensed data: challenges in pre-processing images, storing and representing high dimensional data, fusing different sensor modalities, patter

  4. REMOTE SENSING IN OCEANOGRAPHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    remote sensing from satellites. Sensing of oceanographic variables from aircraft began with the photographing of waves and ice. Since then remote measurement of sea surface temperatures and wave heights have become routine. Sensors tested for oceanographic applications include multi-band color cameras, radar scatterometers, infrared spectrometers and scanners, passive microwave radiometers, and radar imagers. Remote sensing has found its greatest application in providing rapid coverage of large oceanographic areas for synoptic and analysis and

  5. Calcium-deficiency assessment and biomarker identification by an integrated urinary metabonomics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Calcium deficiency is a global public-health problem. Although the initial stage of calcium deficiency can lead to metabolic alterations or potential pathological changes, calcium deficiency is difficult to diagnose accurately. Moreover, the details of the molecular mechanism of calcium deficiency remain somewhat elusive. To accurately assess and provide appropriate nutritional intervention, we carried out a global analysis of metabolic alterations in response to calcium deficiency. Methods The metabolic alterations associated with calcium deficiency were first investigated in a rat model, using urinary metabonomics based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry and multivariate statistical analysis. Correlations between dietary calcium intake and the biomarkers identified from the rat model were further analyzed to confirm the potential application of these biomarkers in humans. Results Urinary metabolic-profiling analysis could preliminarily distinguish between calcium-deficient and non-deficient rats after a 2-week low-calcium diet. We established an integrated metabonomics strategy for identifying reliable biomarkers of calcium deficiency using a time-course analysis of discriminating metabolites in a low-calcium diet experiment, repeating the low-calcium diet experiment and performing a calcium-supplement experiment. In total, 27 biomarkers were identified, including glycine, oxoglutaric acid, pyrophosphoric acid, sebacic acid, pseudouridine, indoxyl sulfate, taurine, and phenylacetylglycine. The integrated urinary metabonomics analysis, which combined biomarkers with regular trends of change (types A, B, and C), could accurately assess calcium-deficient rats at different stages and clarify the dynamic pathophysiological changes and molecular mechanism of calcium deficiency in detail. Significant correlations between calcium intake and two biomarkers, pseudouridine (Pearson

  6. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may...

  7. The Effects of Dietary Calcium and/or Iron Deficiency upon Murine Intestinal Calcium Binding Protein Activity and Calcium Absorption

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, Catherine M.

    1980-01-01

    Iron deficiency has been shown to impair calcium absorption, leading to decreased bone mass. Vitamin D3-dependent calcium binding protein (CaBP) has been demonstrated to be necessary for the active transport of calcium in the intestine of numerous species. Iron deficiency might affect the activity of the calcium binding protein. Four experimental diets were formulated as follows: Diet 1, iron adequate, calcium adequate; Diet 2, iron deficient, calcium adequate; Diet 3, iron adequate, calci...

  8. Advanced Remote Sensing Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonecker, Terrence; Jones, John W.; Price, Susan D.; Hogan, Dianna

    2008-01-01

    'Remote sensing' is a generic term for monitoring techniques that collect information without being in physical contact with the object of study. Overhead imagery from aircraft and satellite sensors provides the most common form of remotely sensed data and records the interaction of electromagnetic energy (usually visible light) with matter, such as the Earth's surface. Remotely sensed data are fundamental to geographic science. The Eastern Geographic Science Center (EGSC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is currently conducting and promoting the research and development of three different aspects of remote sensing science: spectral analysis, automated orthorectification of historical imagery, and long wave infrared (LWIR) polarimetric imagery (PI).

  9. Remote Maintenance Monitoring System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Remote Maintenance and Monitoring System (RMMS) is a collection of subsystems that includes telecommunication components, hardware, and software, which serve to...

  10. Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory deploys rugged, cutting-edge electro-optical instrumentation for the collection of various event signatures, with expertise in...

  11. Remote Systems Design & Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Sharon A.; Baker, Carl P.; Valdez, Patrick LJ

    2009-08-28

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) to provide information and lessons learned relating to the design, development and deployment of remote systems, particularly remote arm/manipulator systems. This report reflects PNNL’s experience with remote systems and lays out the most important activities that need to be completed to successfully design, build, deploy and operate remote systems in radioactive and chemically contaminated environments. It also contains lessons learned from PNNL’s work experiences, and the work of others in the national laboratory complex.

  12. Remote docking apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dent, T.H.; Sumpman, W.C.; Wilhelm, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    The remote docking apparatus comprises a support plate with locking devices mounted thereon. The locking devices are capable of being inserted into tubular members for suspending the support plate therefrom. A vertical member is attached to the support plate with an attachment mechanism attached to the vertical member. A remote access manipulator is capable of being attached to the attachment mechanism so that the vertical member can position the remote access manipulator so that the remote access manipulator can be initially attached to the tubular members in a well defined manner

  13. Stress enhanced calcium kinetics in a neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Aayush; Bhandakkar, Tanmay K; Medhekar, Nikhil V

    2018-02-01

    Accurate modeling of the mechanobiological response of a Traumatic Brain Injury is beneficial toward its effective clinical examination, treatment and prevention. Here, we present a stress history-dependent non-spatial kinetic model to predict the microscale phenomena of secondary insults due to accumulation of excess calcium ions (Ca[Formula: see text]) induced by the macroscale primary injuries. The model is able to capture the experimentally observed increase and subsequent partial recovery of intracellular Ca[Formula: see text] concentration in response to various types of mechanical impulses. We further establish the accuracy of the model by comparing our predictions with key experimental observations.

  14. Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000490.htm Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones To use the sharing ... and maintain strong bones. How Much Calcium and Vitamin D do I Need? Amounts of calcium are ...

  15. Calcium Supplements: Do Men Need Them Too?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lifestyle Nutrition and healthy eating Should men take calcium supplements? Answers from Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L. ... Most healthy men don't need to take calcium supplements. Calcium is important for men for optimal ...

  16. Calcium transport in turtle bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabatini, S.; Kurtzman, N.A.

    1987-01-01

    Unidirectional 45 Ca fluxes were measured in the turtle bladder under open-circuit and short-circuit conditions. In the open-circuited state net calcium flux (J net Ca ) was secretory (serosa to mucosa). Ouabain reversed J net Ca to an absorptive flux. Amiloride reduced both fluxes such that J net Ca was not significantly different from zero. Removal of mucosal sodium caused net calcium absorption; removal of serosal sodium caused calcium secretion. When bladders were short circuited, J net Ca decreased to approximately one-third of control value but remained secretory. When ouabain was added under short-circuit conditions, J net Ca was similar in magnitude and direction to ouabain under open-circuited conditions (i.e., absorptive). Tissue 45 Ca content was ≅30-fold lower when the isotope was placed in the mucosal bath, suggesting that the apical membrane is the resistance barrier to calcium transport. The results obtained in this study are best explained by postulating a Ca 2+ -ATPase on the serosa of the turtle bladder epithelium and a sodium-calcium antiporter on the mucosa. In this model, the energy for calcium movement would be supplied, in large part, by the Na + -K + -ATPase. By increasing cell sodium, ouabain would decrease the activity of the mucosal sodium-calcium exchanger (or reverse it), uncovering active calcium transport across the serosa

  17. Calcium chromate process related investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillard, B.M.

    1979-01-01

    A pilot plant for production of calcium chromate has been scaled up to a small production facility at the General Electric Neutron Devices Department. In preparation for this scale-up, the process and final product were studied in order to evaluate problems not considered previously. The variables and processes studied included: (1) the determination of optimum drying temperature and time for product analysis; (2) the effect of the grade of lime used as the precipitating agent on the purity of the calcium chromate; (3) product purity when calcium chromate is precipitated by the addition of ammonium chromate to slaked lime; (4) the reagents best suited for cleaning calcium chromate spills; and (5) methods for determining hydroxide ion concentration in calcium chromate. The optimum drying time for the product before analysis is four hours at 600 0 C. Gases evolved at various temperatures during the drying process were carbon dioxide and water vapor. Technical grade lime produced calcium chromate of the highest purity. Both nitric and acetic acids were efficient dissolvers of calcium chromate spills. Direct titration of hydroxide ion with sulfuric acid gave an average recovery of 93% for samples spiked with calcium hydroxide. 1 figure, 17 tables

  18. Activation of a cGMP-sensitive calcium-dependent chloride channel may cause transition from calcium waves to whole-cell oscillations in smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jens Christian; Aalkjær, Christian; Nilsson, Holger

    2007-01-01

    approximately doubles. In this transition, the simulated results point to a key role for a recently discovered cGMP-sensitive calcium-dependent chloride channel. This channel depolarizes the membrane in response to calcium released from the SR. In turn, depolarization causes uniform opening of L-type calcium...... channels on the cell surface stimulating synchronized release of SR-calcium and inducing the shift from waves to whole-cell oscillations. The effect of the channel is therefore to couple the processes of the SR with those of the membrane. We hypothesize that the shift in oscillatory mode and the associated...

  19. The interplay between HIF-1 and calcium signalling in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi, Iman

    2018-04-01

    The interplay between hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and calcium in cancer has begun to be unravelled with recent findings demonstrating the relationships between the two in different cancer types. This is an area of significance considering the crucial roles of both HIF-1 and calcium signalling in cancer progression and metastasis. This review summarises the experimental evidence of the crosstalk between HIF-1 and specific calcium channels, pumps and regulators in the context of cancer. HIF-1 as a master regulator of hypoxic transcriptional responses, mediates transcription of several calcium modulators. On the other hand, specific calcium channels and pumps regulate HIF-1 activity through controlling its transcription, translation, stabilisation, or nuclear translocation. Identifying the interplay between HIF-1 and components of the calcium signal will give new insights into mechanisms underlying cellular responses to physiological and pathophysiological cues, and may provide novel and more efficient therapeutic strategies for the control of cancer progression. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cellular Architecture Regulates Collective Calcium Signaling and Cell Contractility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Sun

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A key feature of multicellular systems is the ability of cells to function collectively in response to external stimuli. However, the mechanisms of intercellular cell signaling and their functional implications in diverse vascular structures are poorly understood. Using a combination of computational modeling and plasma lithography micropatterning, we investigate the roles of structural arrangement of endothelial cells in collective calcium signaling and cell contractility. Under histamine stimulation, endothelial cells in self-assembled and microengineered networks, but not individual cells and monolayers, exhibit calcium oscillations. Micropatterning, pharmacological inhibition, and computational modeling reveal that the calcium oscillation depends on the number of neighboring cells coupled via gap junctional intercellular communication, providing a mechanistic basis of the architecture-dependent calcium signaling. Furthermore, the calcium oscillation attenuates the histamine-induced cytoskeletal reorganization and cell contraction, resulting in differential cell responses in an architecture-dependent manner. Taken together, our results suggest that endothelial cells can sense and respond to chemical stimuli according to the vascular architecture via collective calcium signaling.

  1. Calcium addition in straw gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risnes, H.; Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2003-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence of calcium addition in gasification. The inorganic¿organic element interaction as well as the detailed inorganic¿inorganic elements interaction has been studied. The effect of calcium addition as calcium sugar/molasses solutions to straw significantly...... affected the ash chemistry and the ash sintering tendency but much less the char reactivity. Thermo balance test are made and high-temperature X-ray diffraction measurements are performed, the experimental results indicate that with calcium addition major inorganic¿inorganic reactions take place very late...... in the char conversion process. Comprehensive global equilibrium calculations predicted important characteristics of the inorganic ash residue. Equilibrium calculations predict the formation of liquid salt if sufficient amounts of Ca are added and according to experiments as well as calculations calcium binds...

  2. Activation of a cGMP-sensitive calcium-dependent chloride channel may cause transition from calcium waves to whole-cell oscillations in smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jens Christian; Aalkjær, Christian; Nilsson, Holger

    2007-01-01

    waves sweeping through the cytoplasm when the SR is stimulated to release calcium. A rise in cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) leads to the experimentally observed transition from waves to whole-cell calcium oscillations. At the same time membrane potential starts to oscillate and the frequency...... approximately doubles. In this transition, the simulated results point to a key role for a recently discovered cGMP-sensitive calcium-dependent chloride channel. This channel depolarizes the membrane in response to calcium released from the SR. In turn, depolarization causes uniform opening of L-type calcium...... onset of oscillations in membrane potential within the individual cell may underlie sudden intercellular synchronization and the appearance of vasomotion. Key words: Vasomotion, Chloride channel, cGMP, Mathematical model, Calcium waves....

  3. Organization of cytoskeleton controls the changes in cytosolic calcium of cold-shocked Nicotiana plumbaginifolia protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazars, C; Thion, L; Thuleau, P; Graziana, A; Knight, M R; Moreau, M; Ranjeva, R

    1997-11-01

    Using Nicotiana plumbaginifolia constitutively expressing the recombinant bioluminescent calcium indicator, aequorin, it has been previously demonstrated that plant cells react to cold-shock by an immediate rise in cytosolic calcium. Such an opportune system has been exploited to address the regulatory pathway involved in the calcium response. For this purpose, we have used protoplasts derived from N. plumbaginifolia leaves that behave as the whole plant but with a better reproducibility. By both immunodetecting cytoskeletal components on membrane ghosts and measuring the relative change in cytosolic calcium, we demonstrate that the organization of the cytoskeleton has profound influences on the calcium response. The disruption of the microtubule meshwork by various active drugs, such as colchicin, oryzalin and vinblastin, leads to an important increase in the cytosolic calcium (up to 400 nM) in cold-shocked protoplasts over control. beta-Lumicolchicin, an inactive analogue of colchicin, is ineffective either on cytoplasmic calcium increase or on microtubule organization. A microfilament disrupting drug, cytochalasin D, exerts a slight stimulatory effect, whereas the simultaneous disruption of microtubule and microfilament meshworks results in a dramatic increase in the calcium response to cold-shock. The results described in the present paper illustrate the role of the intracellular organization and, more specifically, the role of cytoskeleton in controlling the intensity of calcium response to an extracellular stimulus.

  4. The use of flow cytometry to examine calcium signalling by TRPV1 in mixed cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assas, Bakri M; Abdulaal, Wesam H; Wakid, Majed H; Zakai, Haytham A; Miyan, J; Pennock, J L

    2017-06-15

    Flow cytometric analysis of calcium mobilisation has been in use for many years in the study of specific receptor engagement or isolated cell:cell communication. However, calcium mobilisation/signaling is key to many cell functions including apoptosis, mobility and immune responses. Here we combine multiplex surface staining of whole spleen with Indo-1 AM to visualise calcium mobilisation and examine calcium signaling in a mixed immune cell culture over time. We demonstrate responses to a TRPV1 agonist in distinct cell subtypes without the need for cell separation. Multi parameter staining alongside Indo-1 AM to demonstrate calcium mobilization allows the study of real time calcium signaling in a complex environment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Transcriptome wide identification and validation of calcium sensor gene family in the developing spikes of finger millet genotypes for elucidating its role in grain calcium accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma M Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In finger millet, calcium is one of the important and abundant mineral elements. The molecular mechanisms involved in calcium accumulation in plants remains poorly understood. Transcriptome sequencing of genetically diverse genotypes of finger millet differing in grain calcium content will help in understanding the trait. PRINCIPAL FINDING: In this study, the transcriptome sequencing of spike tissues of two genotypes of finger millet differing in their grain calcium content, were performed for the first time. Out of 109,218 contigs, 78 contigs in case of GP-1 (Low Ca genotype and out of 120,130 contigs 76 contigs in case of GP-45 (High Ca genotype, were identified as calcium sensor genes. Through in silico analysis all 82 unique calcium sensor genes were classified into eight calcium sensor gene family viz., CaM & CaMLs, CBLs, CIPKs, CRKs, PEPRKs, CDPKs, CaMKs and CCaMK. Out of 82 genes, 12 were found diverse from the rice orthologs. The differential expression analysis on the basis of FPKM value resulted in 24 genes highly expressed in GP-45 and 11 genes highly expressed in GP-1. Ten of the 35 differentially expressed genes could be assigned to three documented pathways involved mainly in stress responses. Furthermore, validation of selected calcium sensor responder genes was also performed by qPCR, in developing spikes of both genotypes grown on different concentration of exogenous calcium. CONCLUSION: Through de novo transcriptome data assembly and analysis, we reported the comprehensive identification and functional characterization of calcium sensor gene family. The calcium sensor gene family identified and characterized in this study will facilitate in understanding the molecular basis of calcium accumulation and development of calcium biofortified crops. Moreover, this study also supported that identification and characterization of gene family through Illumina paired-end sequencing is a potential tool for generating the

  6. Transcriptome wide identification and validation of calcium sensor gene family in the developing spikes of finger millet genotypes for elucidating its role in grain calcium accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Uma M; Chandra, Muktesh; Shankhdhar, Shailesh C; Kumar, Anil

    2014-01-01

    In finger millet, calcium is one of the important and abundant mineral elements. The molecular mechanisms involved in calcium accumulation in plants remains poorly understood. Transcriptome sequencing of genetically diverse genotypes of finger millet differing in grain calcium content will help in understanding the trait. In this study, the transcriptome sequencing of spike tissues of two genotypes of finger millet differing in their grain calcium content, were performed for the first time. Out of 109,218 contigs, 78 contigs in case of GP-1 (Low Ca genotype) and out of 120,130 contigs 76 contigs in case of GP-45 (High Ca genotype), were identified as calcium sensor genes. Through in silico analysis all 82 unique calcium sensor genes were classified into eight calcium sensor gene family viz., CaM & CaMLs, CBLs, CIPKs, CRKs, PEPRKs, CDPKs, CaMKs and CCaMK. Out of 82 genes, 12 were found diverse from the rice orthologs. The differential expression analysis on the basis of FPKM value resulted in 24 genes highly expressed in GP-45 and 11 genes highly expressed in GP-1. Ten of the 35 differentially expressed genes could be assigned to three documented pathways involved mainly in stress responses. Furthermore, validation of selected calcium sensor responder genes was also performed by qPCR, in developing spikes of both genotypes grown on different concentration of exogenous calcium. Through de novo transcriptome data assembly and analysis, we reported the comprehensive identification and functional characterization of calcium sensor gene family. The calcium sensor gene family identified and characterized in this study will facilitate in understanding the molecular basis of calcium accumulation and development of calcium biofortified crops. Moreover, this study also supported that identification and characterization of gene family through Illumina paired-end sequencing is a potential tool for generating the genomic information of gene family in non-model species.

  7. Transcriptome Wide Identification and Validation of Calcium Sensor Gene Family in the Developing Spikes of Finger Millet Genotypes for Elucidating Its Role in Grain Calcium Accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Uma M.; Chandra, Muktesh; Shankhdhar, Shailesh C.; Kumar, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Background In finger millet, calcium is one of the important and abundant mineral elements. The molecular mechanisms involved in calcium accumulation in plants remains poorly understood. Transcriptome sequencing of genetically diverse genotypes of finger millet differing in grain calcium content will help in understanding the trait. Principal Finding In this study, the transcriptome sequencing of spike tissues of two genotypes of finger millet differing in their grain calcium content, were performed for the first time. Out of 109,218 contigs, 78 contigs in case of GP-1 (Low Ca genotype) and out of 120,130 contigs 76 contigs in case of GP-45 (High Ca genotype), were identified as calcium sensor genes. Through in silico analysis all 82 unique calcium sensor genes were classified into eight calcium sensor gene family viz., CaM & CaMLs, CBLs, CIPKs, CRKs, PEPRKs, CDPKs, CaMKs and CCaMK. Out of 82 genes, 12 were found diverse from the rice orthologs. The differential expression analysis on the basis of FPKM value resulted in 24 genes highly expressed in GP-45 and 11 genes highly expressed in GP-1. Ten of the 35 differentially expressed genes could be assigned to three documented pathways involved mainly in stress responses. Furthermore, validation of selected calcium sensor responder genes was also performed by qPCR, in developing spikes of both genotypes grown on different concentration of exogenous calcium. Conclusion Through de novo transcriptome data assembly and analysis, we reported the comprehensive identification and functional characterization of calcium sensor gene family. The calcium sensor gene family identified and characterized in this study will facilitate in understanding the molecular basis of calcium accumulation and development of calcium biofortified crops. Moreover, this study also supported that identification and characterization of gene family through Illumina paired-end sequencing is a potential tool for generating the genomic information of

  8. Hyperspectral remote sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Eismann, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing is an emerging, multidisciplinary field with diverse applications that builds on the principles of material spectroscopy, radiative transfer, imaging spectrometry, and hyperspectral data processing. This book provides a holistic treatment that captures its multidisciplinary nature, emphasizing the physical principles of hyperspectral remote sensing.

  9. Remote actuated valve implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  10. Evolution of the Calcium Paradigm: The Relation between Vitamin D, Serum Calcium and Calcium Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borje E. Christopher Nordin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is the index disease for calcium deficiency, just as rickets/osteomalacia is the index disease for vitamin D deficiency, but there is considerable overlap between them. The common explanation for this overlap is that hypovitaminosis D causes malabsorption of calcium which then causes secondary hyperparathyroidism and is effectively the same thing as calcium deficiency. This paradigm is incorrect. Hypovitaminosis D causes secondary hyperparathyroidism at serum calcidiol levels lower than 60 nmol/L long before it causes malabsorption of calcium because serum calcitriol (which controls calcium absorption is maintained until serum calcidiol falls below 20 nmol/L. This secondary hyperparathyroidism, probably due to loss of a “calcaemic” action of vitamin D on bone first described in 1957, destroys bone and explains why vitamin D insufficiency is a risk factor for osteoporosis. Vitamin D thus plays a central role in the maintenance of the serum (ionised calcium, which is more important to the organism than the preservation of the skeleton. Bone is sacrificed when absorbed dietary calcium does not match excretion through the skin, kidneys and bowel which is why calcium deficiency causes osteoporosis in experimental animals and, by implication, in humans.

  11. Remote handling at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, D.L.; Lambert, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental area A at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) encompasses a large area. Presently there are four experimental target cells along the main proton beam line that have become highly radioactive, thus dictating that all maintenance be performed remotely. The Monitor remote handling system was developed to perform in situ maintenance at any location within area A. Due to the complexity of experimental systems and confined space, conventional remote handling methods based upon hot cell and/or hot bay concepts are not workable. Contrary to conventional remote handling which require special tooling for each specifically planned operation, the Monitor concept is aimed at providing a totally flexible system capable of remotely performing general mechanical and electrical maintenance operations using standard tools. The Monitor system is described

  12. Remote vehicle survey tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, G.A.; Burks, B.L.; Kress, R.L.; Wagner, D.G.; Ward, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Remote Vehicle Survey Tool (RVS7) is a color graphical display tool for viewing remotely acquired scientific data. The RVST displays the data in the form of a color two-dimensional world model map. The world model map allows movement of the remote vehicle to be tracked by the operator and the data from sensors to be graphically depicted in the interface. Linear and logarithmic meters, dual channel oscilloscopes, and directional compasses are used to display sensor information. The RVST is user-configurable by the use of ASCII text files. The operator can configure the RVST to work with any remote data acquisition system and teleoperated or autonomous vehicle. The modular design of the RVST and its ability to be quickly configured for varying system requirements make the RVST ideal for remote scientific data display in all environmental restoration and waste management programs

  13. Natural variations in calcium isotope composition as a monitor of bone mineral balance in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skulan, J.; Anbar, A.; Thomas, B.; Smith, S.

    2004-12-01

    The skeleton is the largest reservoir of calcium in the human body and is responsible for the short term control of blood levels of this element. Accurate measurement of changes in bone calcium balance is critical to understanding how calcium metabolism responds to physiological and environmental changes and, more specifically, to diagnosing and evaluating the effectiveness of treatments for osteoporosis and other serious calcium-related disorders. It is very difficult to measure bone calcium balance using current techniques, however, because these techniques rely either on separate estimates of bone resorption and formation that are not quantitatively comparable, or on complex and expensive studies of calcium kinetics using administered isotopic tracers. This difficulty is even more apparent and more severe for measurements of short-term changes in bone calcium balance that do not produce detectable changes in bone mineral density. Calcium isotopes may provide a novel means of addressing this problem. The foundation of this isotope application is the ca. 1.3 per mil fractionation of calcium during bone formation, favoring light calcium in the bone. This fractionation results in a steady-state isotopic offset between calcium in bone and calcium in soft tissues, blood and urine. Perturbations to this steady state due to changes in the net formation or resorption of bone should be reflected in changes in the isotopic composition of soft tissues and fluids. Here we present evidence that easily detectable shifts in the natural calcium isotope composition of human urine rapidly reflect changes in bone calcium balance. Urine from subjects in a 17-week bed rest study was analyzed for calcium isotopic composition. Bed rest promotes net resorption of bone, shifting calcium from bone to soft tissues, blood and urine. The calcium isotope composition of patients in this study shifted toward lighter values during bed rest, consistent with net resorption of isotopically

  14. Dietary calcium intake and the risk of colorectal cancer: a case control study

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Changwoo; Shin, Aesun; Lee, Jeonghee; Lee, Jeeyoo; Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Jeongseon

    2015-01-01

    Background High intake of dietary calcium has been thought to be a protective factor against colorectal cancer. To explore the dose-response relationship in the associations between dietary calcium intake and colorectal cancer risk by cancer location, we conducted a case-control study among Korean population, whose dietary calcium intake levels are relatively low. Methods The colorectal cancer cases and controls were recruited from the National Cancer Center in Korea between August 2010 and A...

  15. Hydrostatic Pressure–Induced Release of Stored Calcium in Cultured Rat Optic Nerve Head Astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Amritlal; Delamere, Nicholas A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Elevated intraocular pressure is associated with glaucomatous optic nerve damage. Other investigators have shown functional changes in optic nerve head astrocytes subjected to elevated hydrostatic pressure (HP) for 1 to 5 days. Recently, the authors reported ERK1/2, p90RSK and NHE1 phosphorylation after 2 hours. Here they examine calcium responses at the onset of HP to determine what precedes ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Methods. Cytoplasmic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) was measured in cultured rat optic nerve astrocytes loaded with fura-2. The cells were placed in a closed imaging chamber and subjected to an HP increase of 15 mm Hg. Protein phosphorylation was detected by Western blot analysis. Results. The increase of HP caused an immediate slow increase in [Ca2+]i. The response persisted in calcium-free solution and when nickel chloride (4 mM) was added to suppress channel-mediated calcium entry. Previous depletion of the ER calcium stores by cyclopiazonic acid abolished the HP-induced calcium level increase. The HP-induced increase persisted in cells exposed to xestospongin C, an inhibitor of IP3R-mediated calcium release. In contrast, ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonist ruthenium red (10 μM) or dantrolene (25 μM) inhibited the HP-induced calcium increase. The HP-induced calcium increase was abolished when ryanodine-sensitive calcium stores were pre-depleted with caffeine (3 mM). HP caused ERK1/2 phosphorylation. The magnitude of the ERK1/2 phosphorylation response was reduced by ruthenium red and dantrolene. Conclusions. Increasing HP causes calcium release from a ryanodine-sensitive cytoplasmic store and subsequent ERK1/2 activation. Calcium store release appears to be a required early step in the initial astrocyte response to an HP increase. PMID:20071675

  16. Physiological studies in heterozygous calcium sensing receptor (CaSR gene-ablated mice confirm that the CaSR regulates calcitonin release in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovacs Christopher S

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The calcium sensing receptor (CaSR regulates serum calcium by suppressing secretion of parathyroid hormone; it also regulates renal tubular calcium excretion. Inactivating mutations of CaSR raise serum calcium and reduce urine calcium excretion. Thyroid C-cells (which make calcitonin express CaSR and may, therefore, be regulated by it. Since calcium stimulates release of calcitonin, the higher blood calcium caused by inactivation of CaSR should increase serum calcitonin, unless CaSR mutations alter the responsiveness of calcitonin to calcium. To demonstrate regulatory effects of CaSR on calcitonin release, we studied calcitonin responsiveness to calcium in normal and CaSR heterozygous-ablated (Casr+/- mice. Casr+/- mice have hypercalcemia and hypocalciuria, and live normal life spans. Each mouse received either 500 μl of normal saline or one of two doses of elemental calcium (500 μmol/kg or 5 mmol/kg by intraperitoneal injection. Ionized calcium was measured at baseline and 10 minutes, and serum calcitonin was measured on the 10 minute sample. Results At baseline, Casr+/- mice had a higher blood calcium, and in response to the two doses of elemental calcium, had greater increments and peak levels of ionized calcium than their wild type littermates. Despite significantly higher ionized calcium levels, the calcitonin levels of Casr+/- mice were consistently lower than wild type at any ionized calcium level, indicating that the dose-response curve of calcitonin to increases in ionized calcium had been significantly blunted or shifted to the right in Casr+/- mice. Conclusions These results confirm that the CaSR is a physiological regulator of calcitonin; therefore, in response to increases in ionized calcium, the CaSR inhibits parathyroid hormone secretion and stimulates calcitonin secretion.

  17. Investigation of calcium-dependent activity and conformational dynamics of zebra fish 12-lipoxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Monica; Hasan, Mahmudul; Balagunaseelan, Navisraj; Fauland, Alexander; Wheelock, Craig; Rådmark, Olof; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes

    2017-08-01

    A 12-lipoxygenase in zebra fish (zf12-LOX) was found to be required for normal embryonic development and LOXs are of great interest for targeted drug designing. In this study, we investigate the structural-functional aspects of zf12-LOX in response to calcium. A soluble version of zf12-LOX was created by mutagenesis. Based on multiple sequence alignment, we mutated the putative calcium-responsive amino acids in N-PLAT domain of soluble zf12-LOX. Using a series of biophysical methods, we ascertained the oligomeric state, stability, structural integrity and conformational changes of zf12-LOX in response to calcium. We also compared the biophysical properties of soluble zf12-LOX with the mutant in the absence and presence of calcium. Here we provide a detailed characterization of soluble zf12-LOX and the mutant. Both proteins exist as compact monomers in solution, however the enzyme activity of soluble zf12-LOX is significantly increased in presence of calcium. We find that the stimulatory effect of calcium on zf12-LOX is related to a change in protein structure as observed by SAXS, adopting an open-state. In contrast, enzyme with a mutated calcium regulatory site has reduced activity-response to calcium and restricted large re-modeling, suggesting that it retains a closed-state in response to calcium. Taken together, our study suggests that Ca 2+ -dependent regulation is associated with different domain conformation(s) that might change the accessibility to substrate-binding site in response to calcium. The study can be broadly implicated in better understanding the mode(s) of action of LOXs, and the enzymes regulated by calcium in general. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Altered sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase 2a content: Targets for heart failure therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Li, Si Qi; Hu, Ping Ping; Tong, Xiao Yong

    2018-05-01

    Sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase is responsible for transporting cytosolic calcium into the sarcoplasmic reticulum and endoplasmic reticulum to maintain calcium homeostasis. Sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase is the dominant isoform expressed in cardiac tissue, which is regulated by endogenous protein inhibitors, post-translational modifications, hormones as well as microRNAs. Dysfunction of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase is associated with heart failure, which makes sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase a promising target for heart failure therapy. This review summarizes current approaches to ameliorate sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase function and focuses on phospholamban, an endogenous inhibitor of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase, pharmacological tools and gene therapies.

  19. Social-ecological innovation in remote mountain areas: Adaptive responses of forest-dependent communities to the challenges of a changing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnykovych, Mariana; Nijnik, Maria; Soloviy, Ihor; Nijnik, Albert; Sarkki, Simo; Bihun, Yurij

    2018-02-01

    To better understand how constantly changing human-environment interactions could be better organized to respond to current challenges, we examined the Ukrainian Carpathians as an example case of complex forest social-ecological systems (FSES). We did it by interviewing diverse and relevant local stakeholder (N=450). In particular, we strived to: i) outline how people and nature are linked and interact in coupled FSES; ii) examine the preferences of stakeholders on the forests and associated ecosystem services (ES); iii) map key drivers threatening well-being of FSES and iv) identify potential responses to address the challenges at a local scale. To answer these questions we followed a mixed method route by integrating qualitative (participatory) and quantitative data collection and analyses, with further application of a Driving Force-Pressure-State-Impact-Response (DPSIR) framework in combination with the ES approach in order to assess benefits, threats to these benefits, and responses regarding the studied FSES. We found that the key benefit from FSES is timber and non-wood forest products (like berries and mushrooms), but also various regulating services were ranked highly by respondents. To explore social-ecological innovation, with potential responses of forest-dependent communities to challenges they face, we employed a commonly used assumption that governance must fit to the particular characteristics of FSES in order to enable sustainability. For the particular case of the Ukrainian Carpathians, we identified and discussed the following five nonconformities or "misfits" threatening sustainability: 1) Spatial misfit in legislation; 2) Poor contextualization; 3) Trap of the single ES; 4) Participatory misfit; and 5) Robbing the commons. By conceptualizing those key threats, we proposed responses for sustainability. The findings contributed to an advanced understanding of complex FSES, their key challenges and potential solutions in order to secure well

  20. Calcium signaling properties of a thyrotroph cell line, mouse TαT1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomić, Melanija; Bargi-Souza, Paula; Leiva-Salcedo, Elias; Nunes, Maria Tereza; Stojilkovic, Stanko S

    2015-12-01

    TαT1 cells are mouse thyrotroph cell line frequently used for studies on thyroid-stimulating hormone beta subunit gene expression and other cellular functions. Here we have characterized calcium-signaling pathways in TαT1 cells, an issue not previously addressed in these cells and incompletely described in native thyrotrophs. TαT1 cells are excitable and fire action potentials spontaneously and in response to application of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), the native hypothalamic agonist for thyrotrophs. Spontaneous electrical activity is coupled to small amplitude fluctuations in intracellular calcium, whereas TRH stimulates both calcium mobilization from intracellular pools and calcium influx. Non-receptor-mediated depletion of intracellular pool also leads to a prominent facilitation of calcium influx. Both receptor and non-receptor stimulated calcium influx is substantially attenuated but not completely abolished by inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels, suggesting that depletion of intracellular calcium pool in these cells provides a signal for both voltage-independent and -dependent calcium influx, the latter by facilitating the pacemaking activity. These cells also express purinergic P2Y1 receptors and their activation by extracellular ATP mimics TRH action on calcium mobilization and influx. The thyroid hormone triiodothyronine prolongs duration of TRH-induced calcium spikes during 30-min exposure. These data indicate that TαT1 cells are capable of responding to natively feed-forward TRH signaling and intrapituitary ATP signaling with acute calcium mobilization and sustained calcium influx. Amplification of TRH-induced calcium signaling by triiodothyronine further suggests the existence of a pathway for positive feedback effects of thyroid hormones probably in a non-genomic manner. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Calcium and Calcium Supplements: Achieving the Right Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may have on heart attack risk. A similar controversy surrounds calcium and prostate cancer. Some studies have ... your agreement to the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy linked below. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy ...

  2. Why Calcium? How Calcium Became the Best Communicator*

    OpenAIRE

    Carafoli, Ernesto; Krebs, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carries messages to virtually all important functions of cells. Although it was already active in unicellular organisms, its role became universally important after the transition to multicellular life. In this Minireview, we explore how calcium ended up in this privileged position. Most likely its unique coordination chemistry was a decisive factor as it makes its binding by complex molecules particularly easy even in the presence of large excesses of other cations,...

  3. Isomorfic Substitutions of Calcium by Strontium in Calcium Hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, Hilbert

    1962-12-01

    By means of homogeneous precipitation it has been possible to synthesize crystalline solid solutions of calcium strontium hydroxyapatite from aqueous solutions. The lattice constants for the solid solutions were measured in the range Ca 9 Sr(PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 - CaSr 9 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 . The investigations show that the discrimination of strontium against calcium is considerably smaller than reported elsewhere (1). Strontium is preferentially built into the c-axis direction of the apatite lattice

  4. Influence of dietary calcium on bone calcium utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, M.; Roland, D.A. Sr.; Clark, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    In Experiment 1, 10 microCi 45 Ca/day were administered to 125 hens for 10 days. Hens were then allocated to five treatments with calcium levels ranging from .08 to 3.75% of the diet. In Experiment 2, hens with morning oviposition times were randomly allocated to 11 treatments that were periods of time postoviposition ranging from 6 hr to 24 hr, in 2-hr increments (Experiment 2). At the end of each 2-hr period, eggs from 25 hens were removed from the uterus. The 18-, 20-, and 22-hr treatments were replicated three times. In Experiment 3, hens were fed either ad libitum or feed was withheld the last 5 or 6 hr before oviposition. In Experiment 4, hens were fed 10 microCi of 45 Ca for 15 days to label skeletal calcium. Hens were divided into two groups and fed a .08 or 3.75% calcium diet for 2 days. On the second day, 25 hens fed the 3.75% calcium diet were intubated with 7 g of the same diet containing .5 g calcium at 1700, 2100, 0100, 0500, and 0700 hr. The measurements used were egg weight, shell weight, and 45 Ca content of the egg shell. Results indicated a significant linear or quadratic regression of dietary calcium levels on 45 Ca accumulation in eggshells and eggshell weight (Experiment 1). As the calcium level of the diet increased, eggshell weight increased and 45 Ca recovery decreased. Utilization of skeletal calcium for shell formation ranged from 28 to 96%. In Experiment 2, the rate of shell calcification was not constant throughout the calcification process but varied significantly

  5. TPX remote maintenance and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rennich, M.J.; Nelson, B.E.

    1994-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment machine design incorporates comprehensive planning for efficient and safe component maintenance. Three programmatic decisions have been made to insure the successful implementation of this objective. First, the tokamak incorporates radiation shielding to reduce activation of components and limit the dose rate to personnel working on the outside of the machine. This allows most of the ex-vessel equipment to be maintained through conventional ''hands-on'' procedures. Second, to the maximum extent possible, low activation materials will be used inside the shielding volume. This resulted in the selection of Titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) for the vacuum vessel and PFC structures. The third decision stipulated that the primary in-vessel components will be replaced or repaired via remote maintenance tools specifically provided for the task. The component designers have been given the responsibility of incorporating maintenance design and for proving the maintainability of the design concepts in full-scale mockup tests prior to the initiation of final fabrication. Remote maintenance of the TPX machine is facilitated by general purpose tools provided by a special purpose design team. Major tools will include an in-vessel transporter, a vessel transfer system and a large component transfer container. In addition, tools such as manipulators and remotely operable impact wrenches will be made available to the component designers by this group. Maintenance systems will also provide the necessary controls for this equipment

  6. Bcl-2 overexpression: effects on transmembrane calcium movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangaswami, Arun A.; Premack, Brett; Walleczek, Jan; Killoran, Pamela; Gardner, Phyllis; Knox, Susan J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: High levels of expression of the proto-oncogene bcl-2 and its 26 kD protein product Bcl-2 have been correlated with the inhibition of apoptosis and the increased resistance of tumor cells to cytotoxic drugs and ionizing radiation. Unfortunately, the specific mechanism of action of Bcl-2 remains poorly understood. In the studies described here, the role of intracellular calcium fluxes and plasma membrane calcium cycling in the induction of apoptosis, and the effect of Bcl-2 expression on the modulation of transmembrane calcium fluxes following treatment of cells with cytotoxic agents were studied. The relationship between intracellular calcium release, capacitive calcium entry, and the plasma membrane potential were also investigated. Materials and Methods: Human B-cell lymphoma (PW) and human promyelocytic leukemia (HL60) cell lines were transfected with Bcl-2 and a control vector. The Bcl-2 transfectants over expressed the Bcl-2 onco-protein and were more resistant to irradiation than the control cells. Cells were loaded with fluorescent indicators indo-1 and fura-2 AM to quantify the cytosolic calcium concentration and subsequent calcium responses to a variety of cytotoxic stimuli, including the microsomal ATPase inhibitor, thapsigargin, using fluorometric measurements. Comparisons of resting and stimulated cytosolic calcium concentrations were made between the parental, neomycin control, and bcl-2 transfected cells. In order to determine the actual calcium influx rate, cells were loaded with either indo-1 or fura-2 and then exposed to 0.1 mM extracellular manganese, which enters the cells through calcium influx channels and quenches the fluorescent signal in proportion to the calcium influx rate. In order to determine the role of the membrane potential in driving calcium influx, cells were treated with either 0.1 μM Valinomycin or isotonic potassium chloride to either hyper polarize or depolarize the resting membrane potential, and the

  7. The chemical and biological response of two remote mountain lakes in the Southern Central Alps (Italy) to twenty years of changing physical and chemical climate

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea LAMI; Pierluigi CAMMARANO; Michele ARMIRAGLIO; Pierisa PANZANI; Roberta BETTINETTI; Alessandra PUGNETTI; Anna M. NOCENTINI; Gabriele A. TARTARI; Simona MUSAZZI; Giuseppe MORABITO; Angela BOGGERO; Marina MANCA; Michela ROGORA; Rosario MOSELLO; Aldo MARCHETTO

    2004-01-01

    Two small high mountain lakes in the Alps were monitored in 1984-2003 to follow their response to changes in human impact, such as deposition of atmospheric pollutants, fish stocking and climate change. The results were compared to occasional samplings performed in the 1940s, and to the remains found in sediment cores. When monitoring started, the most acid-sensitive of them, Lake Paione Superiore, was acidified, with evident effects in its flora and fauna: benthic diatoms assemblage was shif...

  8. Vitamin D and intestinal calcium transport after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Anne L

    2017-10-01

    Bariatric surgery is a highly effective treatment for obesity, but it may have detrimental effects on the skeleton. Skeletal effects are multifactorial but mediated in part by nutrient malabsorption. While there is increasing interest in non-nutritional mechanisms such as changes in fat-derived and gut-derived hormones, nutritional factors are modifiable and thus represent potential opportunities to prevent and treat skeletal complications. This review begins with a discussion of normal intestinal calcium transport, including recent advances in our understanding of its regulation by vitamin D, and areas of continued uncertainty. Human and animal studies of vitamin D and intestinal calcium transport after bariatric surgery are then summarized. In humans, even with optimized 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and recommended calcium intake, fractional calcium absorption decreased dramatically after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). In rats, intestinal calcium absorption was lower after RYGB than after sham surgery, despite elevated 1,25-dihyroxyvitamin D levels and intestinal gene expression evidence of vitamin D responsiveness. Such studies have the potential to shed new light on the physiology of vitamin D and intestinal calcium transport. Moreover, understanding the effects of bariatric surgery on these processes may improve the clinical care of bariatric surgery patients. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Effect of dairy calcium or supplementary calcium intake on postprandial fat metabolism, appetite, and subsequent energy intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, J.K.; Nielsen, S.; Holst, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    postprandially. Results: Dairy calcium significantly diminished the postprandial lipid response. The baseline adjusted area under the curve for chylomicron triacylglycerol was approximate to 17% lower after the MC meal (P = 0.02) and approximate to 19% lower after the HC meal (P = 0.007) than after the LC meal...... and approximate to 15% lower after the MC meal (P = 0.0495) and approximate to 17% lower after the HC meal (P = 0.02) than after the Suppl meal. No consistent effects of calcium on appetite sensation, or on energy intake at the subsequent meal, or on the postprandial responses of cholecystokinin, glucagon...

  10. Calcium and vitamin D in post menopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Aggarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium and Vitamin D are widely used therapies for Osteoporosis. Vitamin D is not a vitamin in true sense since it is produced in response to the action of sunlight on skin. Vitamin D has multiple roles in the body, not all of them well-understood. Vitamin D supplementation must be considered a form of hormone replacement therapy. Therefore it raises all the questions about efficacy, dose, and side effects. The Efficacy of use of Calcium and Vitamin D in all post menopausal women in terms of the prevention of fracture is uncertain. The Annual worldwide sales of these supplements have been several billion dollars. The variation of the results from various studies of Calcium and Vitamin D supplementation in elderly women suggest that benefit of calcium plus vitamin D on bone mineral density or the risk of fracture is small and may vary from group to group and baseline Vitamin D status. Women taking supplemental vitamin D and calcium have a statistically increased incidence of renal stones, according to evidence from the Women′s Health Initiative. Studies have shown association between calcium use and increased risk for cardiovascular disease. In a recent review of evidence from 6 randomized trials evaluating the use of vitamin D and calcium to prevent fractures in postmenopausal women who are not living in a nursing home or other institution, the United States Preventive Task Force (USPTF found no evidence of a benefit from supplementation with 400 IU or less of vitamin D3 and 1000 mg or less of calcium. Also in a report from institute of Medicine Committee, there was insufficient evidence, particularly from randomized trials, that vitamin D treatment affected the risk of non skeletal outcomes like risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, infections, autoimmune disease, and other extra skeletal outcomes.

  11. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely...

  12. A Crash Course in Calcium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamponi, Gerald W

    2017-12-20

    Much progress has been made in understanding the molecular physiology and pharmacology of calcium channels. Recently, there have been tremendous advances in learning about calcium channel structure and function through crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy studies. Here, I will give an overview of our knowledge about calcium channels, and highlight two recent studies that give important insights into calcium channel structure.

  13. Calcium-sensing beyond neurotransmitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Han, Weiping

    2009-01-01

    Neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones are released through the regulated exocytosis of SVs (synaptic vesicles) and LDCVs (large dense-core vesicles), a process that is controlled by calcium. Synaptotagmins are a family of type 1 membrane proteins that share a common domain structure. Most....... Also, we discuss potential roles of synaptotagmins in non-traditional endocrine systems....... synaptotagmins are located in brain and endocrine cells, and some of these synaptotagmins bind to phospholipids and calcium at levels that trigger regulated exocytosis of SVs and LDCVs. This led to the proposed synaptotagmin-calcium-sensor paradigm, that is, members of the synaptotagmin family function...... as calcium sensors for the regulated exocytosis of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones. Here, we provide an overview of the synaptotagmin family, and review the recent mouse genetic studies aimed at understanding the functions of synaptotagmins in neurotransmission and endocrine-hormone secretion...

  14. Calcium phosphates for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Canillas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The history of calcium phosphates in the medicine field starts in 1769 when the first evidence of its existence in the bone tissue is discovered. Since then, the interest for calcium phosphates has increased among the scientific community. Their study has been developed in parallel with new advances in materials sciences, medicine or tissue engineering areas. Bone tissue engineering is the field where calcium phosphates have had a great importance. While the first bioceramics are selected according to bioinert, biocompatibility and mechanical properties with the aim to replace bone tissue damaged, calcium phosphates open the way to the bone tissue regeneration challenge. Nowadays, they are present in the majority of commercial products directed to repair or regenerate damaged bone tissue. Finally, in the last few decades, they have been suggested and studied as drug delivering devices and as vehicles of DNA and RNA for the future generation therapies.

  15. Functions of vitamin D / Calcium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Excitation-contraction coupling,. Cardiac functions. Hormonal secretion. Control of enzymatic reactions. Mitotic division. Maintenance of cell integrity. Ciliary motility. Notes: Calcium is a vital second messenger.

  16. Calcium signals in planetary embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2018-03-01

    The calcium-isotope composition of planetary bodies in the inner Solar System correlates with the masses of such objects. This finding could have implications for our understanding of how the Solar System formed.

  17. Calcium homeostasis in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Changhwan; Kang, Ji-Houn; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2017-09-30

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is becoming a lifestyle-related pandemic disease. Diabetic patients frequently develop electrolyte disorders, especially diabetic ketoacidosis or nonketotic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome. Such patients show characteristic potassium, magnesium, phosphate, and calcium depletion. In this review, we discuss a homeostatic mechanism that links calcium and DM. We also provide a synthesis of the evidence in favor or against this linking mechanism by presenting recent clinical indications, mainly from veterinary research. There are consistent results supporting the use of calcium and vitamin D supplementation to reduce the risk of DM. Clinical trials support a marginal reduction in circulating lipids, and some meta-analyses support an increase in insulin sensitivity, following vitamin D supplementation. This review provides an overview of the calcium and vitamin D disturbances occurring in DM and describes the underlying mechanisms. Such elucidation will help indicate potential pathophysiology-based precautionary and therapeutic approaches and contribute to lowering the incidence of DM.

  18. Calcium phosphates for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canillas, M.; Pena, P.; Aza, A.H. de; Rodriguez, M.A.

    2017-07-01

    The history of calcium phosphates in the medicine field starts in 1769 when the first evidence of its existence in the bone tissue is discovered. Since then, the interest for calcium phosphates has increased among the scientific community. Their study has been developed in parallel with new advances in materials sciences, medicine or tissue engineering areas. Bone tissue engineering is the field where calcium phosphates have had a great importance. While the first bioceramics are selected according to bioinert, biocompatibility and mechanical properties with the aim to replace bone tissue damaged, calcium phosphates open the way to the bone tissue regeneration challenge. Nowadays, they are present in the majority of commercial products directed to repair or regenerate damaged bone tissue. Finally, in the last few decades, they have been suggested and studied as drug delivering devices and as vehicles of DNA and RNA for the future generation therapies. (Author)

  19. Calcium signaling in liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspers, Lawrence D; Thomas, Andrew P

    2005-01-01

    In hepatocytes, hormones linked to the formation of the second messenger inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) evoke transient increases or spikes in cytosolic free calcium ([Ca2+]i), that increase in frequency with the agonist concentration. These oscillatory Ca2+ signals are thought to transmit the information encoded in the extracellular stimulus to down-stream Ca2+-sensitive metabolic processes. We have utilized both confocal and wide field fluorescence microscopy techniques to study the InsP3-dependent signaling pathway at the cellular and subcellular levels in the intact perfused liver. Typically InsP3-dependent [Ca2+]i spikes manifest as Ca2+ waves that propagate throughout the entire cytoplasm and nucleus, and in the intact liver these [Ca2+]i increases are conveyed through gap junctions to encompass entire lobular units. The translobular movement of Ca2+ provides a means to coordinate the function of metabolic zones of the lobule and thus, liver function. In this article, we describe the characteristics of agonist-evoked [Ca2+]i signals in the liver and discuss possible mechanisms to explain the propagation of intercellular Ca2+ waves in the intact organ.

  20. Effects of diphosphonate on kidney calcium content and duodenal absorption of 45calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulding, A.; Cameron, V.

    1978-01-01

    In rats the relationships between EHDP-induced changes in serum calcium concentration, kidney calcium content and duodenal transport of 45 calcium were studied. Body weights and kidney weights were similar in all groups. EHDP administration was associated with an increase in serum calcium concentration and kidney calcium content, and a decrease in duodenal 45 calcium transport. In the EHDP-treated rats, there was a significant negative correlation between kidney calcium concentration and duodenal 45 calcium transport but no correlation between either kidney calcium content and serum calcium concentration (r = 0.116) or between serum calcium concentration and duodenal 45 calcium transport (r = 0.02). Further experiments will be needed to determine whether the demonstrated increase in kidney calcium content induced by EHDP administration was the cause of, or was secondary to, inhibition of 1, 25(OH) 2 D 3 synthesis. (orig./AJ) [de

  1. Research of calcium oxide hydration in calcium nitrate solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Oliynyk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mineral fertilizers are one of the important factors of agriculture intensification and increasing of food products quantity. The volume of fertilizers production and its domestic consumption in Ukraine indicate that nitrogen fertilizer using only comes nearer to the required number of science-based. One of the most widespread artificial fertilizers is the calcium nitrate. Aim: The aim is to study and theoretically substantiate the processes occurring in the preparation of suspensions of calcium hydroxide Са(ОН2 in solution of calcium nitrate Ca(NО32. Materials and Methods: The technical calcium oxide (quicklime DSTU BV.2.7-90-99, solutions of calcium nitrate of 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40% Ca(NО32 concentrations were used in the work. The content of lime in the preparation of a suspension in the solution changed (in terms of calcium oxide CaO from 150 g/dm3 to the maximum possible. Each of these solutions saturated at 40°С in lime to maximum concentration. Suitable for use in these experiments and in the technology of calcium nitrate obtaining are considered the solutions (suspensions that within 12 hours did not lose their mobility (transportability. Results: The experimental results show that increasing of the concentration of calcium nitrate in solution within the range 15...40%, the amount of lime that you can put into the solution without loss of transportability decreases. Further increasing of lime quantity in solutions concentrations causes to its solidifying, loss of mobility (transportability. Calculations showed that in the presence of calcium nitrate the solubility of Са(ОН2 is reduced nearly by order that can lead to the formation of calcium oxide CaO the solid phase Са(ОН2 on the surface, which also can form hydrogen bonds with the components of the solution. As the probability of formation of hydrogen bonds in solutions is high, there is a possibility of formation of clusters.

  2. The role of uncoupling protein 3 regulating calcium ion uptake into mitochondria during sarcopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikawa, Takeshi; Choi, Inho; Haruna, Marie; Hirasaka, Katsuya; Maita Ohno, Ayako; Kondo Teshima, Shigetada

    Overloaded mitochondrial calcium concentration contributes to progression of mitochondrial dysfunction in aged muscle, leading to sarcopenia. Uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) is primarily expressed in the inner membrane of skeletal muscle mitochondria. Recently, it has been reported that UCP3 is associated with calcium uptake into mitochondria. However, the mechanisms by which UCP3 regulates mitochondrial calcium uptake are not well understood. Here we report that UCP3 interacts with HS-1 associated protein X-1 (Hax-1), an anti-apoptotic protein that is localized in mitochondria, which is involved in cellular responses to calcium ion. The hydrophilic sequences within the loop 2, matrix-localized hydrophilic domain of mouse UCP3 are necessary for binding to Hax-1 of the C-terminal domain in adjacent to mitochondrial innermembrane. Interestingly, these proteins interaction occur the calcium-dependent manner. Indeed, overexpression of UCP3 significantly enhanced calcium uptake into mitochondria on Hax-1 endogenously expressing C2C12 myoblasts. In addition, Hax-1 knock-down enhanced calcium uptake into mitochondria on both UCP3 and Hax-1 endogenously expressing C2C12 myotubes, but not myoblasts. Finally, the dissociation of UCP3 and Hax-1 enhances calcium uptake into mitochondria in aged muscle. These studies identify a novel UCP3-Hax-1 complex regulates the influx of calcium ion into mitochondria in muscle. Thus, the efficacy of UCP3-Hax-1 in mitochondrial calcium regulation may provide a novel therapeutic approach against mitochondrial dysfunction-related disease containing sarcopenia.

  3. Calcium Orthophosphate Cements and Concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Dorozhkin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In early 1980s, researchers discovered self-setting calcium orthophosphate cements, which are a bioactive and biodegradable grafting material in the form of a powder and a liquid. Both phases form after mixing a viscous paste that after being implanted, sets and hardens within the body as either a non-stoichiometric calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA or brushite, sometimes blended with unreacted particles and other phases. As both CDHA and brushite are remarkably biocompartible and bioresorbable (therefore, in vivo they can be replaced with newly forming bone, calcium orthophosphate cements represent a good correction technique for non-weight-bearing bone fractures or defects and appear to be very promising materials for bone grafting applications. Besides, these cements possess an excellent osteoconductivity, molding capabilities and easy manipulation. Furthermore, reinforced cement formulations are available, which in a certain sense might be described as calcium orthophosphate concretes. The concepts established by calcium orthophosphate cement pioneers in the early 1980s were used as a platform to initiate a new generation of bone substitute materials for commercialization. Since then, advances have been made in the composition, performance and manufacturing; several beneficial formulations have already been introduced as a result. Many other compositions are in experimental stages. In this review, an insight into calcium orthophosphate cements and concretes, as excellent biomaterials suitable for both dental and bone grafting application, has been provided.

  4. Remote Sensing Information Gateway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remote Sensing Information Gateway, a tool that allows scientists, researchers and decision makers to access a variety of multi-terabyte, environmental datasets and to subset the data and obtain only needed variables, greatly improving the download time.

  5. Remote handling equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, G.

    1984-01-01

    After a definition of intervention, problems encountered for working in an adverse environment are briefly analyzed for development of various remote handling equipments. Some examples of existing equipments are given [fr

  6. Hyperspectral remote sensing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eismann, Michael Theodore

    2012-01-01

    ..., and hyperspectral data processing. While there are many resources that suitably cover these areas individually and focus on specific aspects of the hyperspectral remote sensing field, this book provides a holistic treatment...

  7. The remote control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansweijer, P.P.M.

    1988-01-01

    The remote-control system is applied in order to control various signals in the car of the spectrometer at distance. The construction (hardware and software) as well as the operation of the system is described. (author). 20 figs

  8. Functional characterization of calcium sensing receptor polymorphisms and absence of association with indices of calcium homeostasis and bone mineral density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Brian; Curley, Alan J; Hannan, Fadil M; Christie, Paul T; Bowl, Michael R; Turner, Jeremy J O; Barber, Mathew; Gillham-Nasenya, Irina; Hampson, Geeta; Spector, Tim D; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2006-11-01

    Associations between calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) polymorphisms and serum calcium, PTH and bone mineral density (BMD) have been reported by six studies. However, three other studies have failed to detect such associations. We therefore further investigated three CaSR coding region polymorphisms (Ala986Ser, Arg990Gly and Gln1011Glu) for associations with indices of calcium homeostasis and BMD and for alterations in receptor function. One hundred and ten adult, Caucasian, female, dizygotic twin pairs were investigated for associations between the three CaSR polymorphisms and serum calcium, albumin, PTH, 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) (25OHD(3)), 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3)[1,25(OH)(2)D(3)], urinary calcium excretion and BMD. Each polymorphic CaSR was also transfected into HEK293 cells and functionally evaluated. There was a lack of association between each of these three CaSR polymorphisms and serum calcium corrected for albumin, PTH, 25OHD(3), 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), urinary calcium excretion or BMD at the hip, forearm and lumbar spine. These findings were supported by a lack of functional differences in the dose-response curves of the CaSR variants, with the EC(50) values (mean +/- SEM) of the wild-type (Ala986/Arg990/Gln1011), Ser986, Gly990 and Glu1011 CaSR variants being 2.74 +/- 0.29 mm, 3.09 +/- 0.34 mm (P > 0.4), 2.99 +/- 0.23 mm (P > 0.4) and 2.96 +/- 0.30 mm (P > 0.5), respectively. Our study, which was sufficiently powered to detect effects that would explain up to 5%, but not less than 1%, of the variance has revealed that the three CaSR polymorphisms of the coding region have no major influence on indices of calcium homeostasis in this female population, and that they do not alter receptor function.

  9. Accessing Remote Knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maskell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    young, single-site firms search for distant sources of complementary competences. The discussion is positioned within a comprehensive framework that allows a systematic investigation of the approaches available to firms engaged in globally extended learning. By utilizing the distinction between problem...... awareness (what remote knowledge is needed?) and source awareness (where does this knowledge reside?) the article explores the relative merits and inherent limitations of pipelines, listening posts, crowdsourcing and trade fairs to acquire knowledge and solutions from geographically and relationally remote...

  10. Remote maintenance development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zook, C.R.

    1979-01-01

    The concept of remote maintenance as it pertains to nuclear fuel fabrication facilities is quite unique. The future may require completely remote facilities where maintenance will be performed by hybrid manipulators/robots. These units will be capable of being preprogrammed for automatic operation or manually operated with the operator becoming a part of the closed loop control system. These robots will mesh television, computer control, and direct force feedback manual control in a usable new concept of robotics

  11. 21 CFR 184.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium lactate. 184.1207 Section 184.1207 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Calcium lactate (C6H10CaO6.xH2O, where x is any... calcium carbonate or calcium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals...

  12. The Acid Test: Calcium Signaling in the Skeletogenic Layer of Reef-Building Coral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florn, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    Since the Industrial Revolution, carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions have increased more than 40%. This increased atmospheric CO2 drives ocean acidification and has potentially serious consequences for all marine life, especially calcifying organisms. The specific goal of this study was to examine calcium homeostasis and signaling dynamics within the skeletogenic tissue layers (calicodermal cells) of two coral species (Pavona maldivensis and Porites rus) at three pH treatments corresponding to present-future ocean acidification levels. Confocal microscopy techniques were used to analyze in vivo calcium dynamics of the calicodermal cells in Pavona maldivensis and Porites rus. The results show biological variation between the two reef-building coral species and their response to ocean acidification. Pavona maldivensis showed a significant difference (p < 0.01) in the ionomycin-induced calcium response among the pH treatments, but not among the microcolonies. Porites rus did not show a significant difference (p < 0.01) in the ionomycin-induced calcium response among the pH treatments or the microcolonies. Upon comparing the calcium response curves, the ionomycin-induced calcium response exhibited by Pavona maldivensis is phenomenologically similar to a calcium response that is commonly found in vertebrates. This well-studied phenomenon in vertebrate biology is known as store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and is closely associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum (MAM) calcium stores. This study provides insight into the preliminary steps needed to understand in vivo calcium signaling in the calicodermis of reef-building coral and the associated consequences of ocean acidification.

  13. Adaptive Management Using Remote Sensing and Ecosystem Modeling in Response to Climate Variability and Invasive Aquatic Plants for the California Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Water Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David; Potter, Christopher; Zhang, Minghua; Madsen, John

    2017-01-01

    The California Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta is the hub for California's water supply and supports important ecosystem services, agriculture, and communities in Northern to Southern California. Expansion of invasive aquatic plants in the Delta coupled with impacts of changing climate and long-term drought is detrimental to the San Francisco Bay/California Delta complex. NASA Ames Research Center and the USDA-ARS partnered with the State of California to develop science-based, adaptive-management strategies for invasive aquatic plant in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Specific mapping tools developed utilizing satellite and airborne platforms provide regular assessments of population dynamics on a landscape scale and support both strategic planning and operational decision making for resource managers. San Joaquin and Sacramento River watersheds water quality input to the Delta is modeled using the Soil-Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and a modified SWAT tool has been customized to account for unique landscape and management of agricultural water supply and drainage within the Delta. Environmental response models for growth of invasive aquatic weeds are being parameterized and coupled with spatial distribution/biomass density mapping and water quality to study ecosystem response to climate and aquatic plant management practices. On the water validation and operational utilization of these tools by management agencies and how they are improving decision making, management effectiveness and efficiency will be discussed. The project combines science, operations, and economics related to integrated management scenarios for aquatic weeds to help land and water resource managers make science-informed decisions regarding management and outcomes.

  14. Adaptive Management Using Remote Sensing and Ecosystem Modeling in Response to Climate Variability and Invasive Aquatic Plants for the California Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Water Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, D.; Potter, C. S.; Zhang, M.; Madsen, J.

    2017-12-01

    The California Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta is the hub for California's water supply and supports important ecosystem services, agriculture, and communities in Northern and Southern California. Expansion of invasive aquatic plants in the Delta coupled with impacts of changing climate and long-term drought is detrimental to the San Francisco Bay/California Delta complex. NASA Ames Research Center and the USDA-ARS partnered with the State of California to develop science-based, adaptive-management strategies for invasive aquatic plant management in the California Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Specific mapping tools developed utilizing satellite and airborne platforms provide regular assessments of population dynamics on a landscape scale and support both strategic planning and operational decision making for resource managers. San Joaquin and Sacramento River watersheds water quality input to the Delta is modeled using the Soil-Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and a modified SWAT tool has been customized to account for unique landscape and management of agricultural water supply and drainage within the Delta. Environmental response models for growth of invasive aquatic weeds are being parameterized and coupled with spatial distribution/biomass density mapping and water quality to study ecosystem response to climate and aquatic plant management practices. On the water validation and operational utilization of these tools by management agencies and how they improve decision making, management effectiveness and efficiency will be discussed. The project combines science, operations, and economics related to integrated management scenarios for aquatic weeds to help land and water resource managers make science-informed decisions regarding management and outcomes.

  15. Allopregnanolone-induced rise in intracellular calcium in embryonic hippocampal neurons parallels their proliferative potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinton Roberta

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Factors that regulate intracellular calcium concentration are known to play a critical role in brain function and neural development, including neural plasticity and neurogenesis. We previously demonstrated that the neurosteroid allopregnanolone (APα; 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one promotes neural progenitor proliferation in vitro in cultures of rodent hippocampal and human cortical neural progenitors, and in vivo in triple transgenic Alzheimer's disease mice dentate gyrus. We also found that APα-induced proliferation of neural progenitors is abolished by a calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, indicating a calcium dependent mechanism for the proliferation. Methods In the present study, we investigated the effect of APα on the regulation of intracellular calcium concentration in E18 rat hippocampal neurons using ratiometric Fura2-AM imaging. Results Results indicate that APα rapidly increased intracellular calcium concentration in a dose-dependent and developmentally regulated manner, with an EC50 of 110 ± 15 nM and a maximal response occurring at three days in vitro. The stereoisomers 3β-hydroxy-5α-hydroxy-pregnan-20-one, and 3β-hydroxy-5β-hydroxy-pregnan-20-one, as well as progesterone, were without significant effect. APα-induced intracellular calcium concentration increase was not observed in calcium depleted medium and was blocked in the presence of the broad spectrum calcium channel blocker La3+, or the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine. Furthermore, the GABAA receptor blockers bicuculline and picrotoxin abolished APα-induced intracellular calcium concentration rise. Conclusion Collectively, these data indicate that APα promotes a rapid, dose-dependent, stereo-specific, and developmentally regulated increase of intracellular calcium concentration in rat embryonic hippocampal neurons via a mechanism that requires both the GABAA receptor and L-type calcium channel. These data suggest that AP

  16. Remote mechanical C line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuttall, K.R.; Gardner, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company is developing a desk-top simulation based training program on the operation of the Remote Mechanical C (RMC) Line process in the Plutonium Finishing Plant on the Hanford site, Richland, Washington. Simulations display aod contioually update current values of system parameters on computer graphics of RMC line equipment. Students are able to operate a variety of controllers to maintain proper system status. Programmed faults, selectable by the course instructor, can be used to test student responses to off-normal events. Prior to operation of the simulation, students are given computer-based tutorials on the function, processes, operation, and error conditions associated with individual components. By including the capability of operating each individual component - valves, heaters, agitators, etc. - the computer-based training (CBT) lessons become an interactive training manual. From one perspective RMC represents one step in the diffusion of the well-known and well-documented simulator training activities for nuclear reactor operators to other training programs, equally critical, perhaps, but less well scrutinized in the past. Because of the slowly responding nature of the actual process, RMC can retain many of the capabilities of practice and testing in a simulated work environment while avoiding the cost of a full scale simulator and the exposure and waste developed by practice runs of the RMC line. From another perspective RMC suggests training advances even beyond the most faithful simulators. For example, by integrating CBT lessons with the simulation, RMC permits students to focus in on specific processes occurring inside chosen components. In effect, the interactive training manual is available on-line with the simulation itself. Cost are also discussed

  17. Why Calcium? How Calcium Became the Best Communicator*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carafoli, Ernesto; Krebs, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carries messages to virtually all important functions of cells. Although it was already active in unicellular organisms, its role became universally important after the transition to multicellular life. In this Minireview, we explore how calcium ended up in this privileged position. Most likely its unique coordination chemistry was a decisive factor as it makes its binding by complex molecules particularly easy even in the presence of large excesses of other cations, e.g. magnesium. Its free concentration within cells can thus be maintained at the very low levels demanded by the signaling function. A large cadre of proteins has evolved to bind or transport calcium. They all contribute to buffer it within cells, but a number of them also decode its message for the benefit of the target. The most important of these “calcium sensors” are the EF-hand proteins. Calcium is an ambivalent messenger. Although essential to the correct functioning of cell processes, if not carefully controlled spatially and temporally within cells, it generates variously severe cell dysfunctions, and even cell death. PMID:27462077

  18. Why Calcium? How Calcium Became the Best Communicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carafoli, Ernesto; Krebs, Joachim

    2016-09-30

    Calcium carries messages to virtually all important functions of cells. Although it was already active in unicellular organisms, its role became universally important after the transition to multicellular life. In this Minireview, we explore how calcium ended up in this privileged position. Most likely its unique coordination chemistry was a decisive factor as it makes its binding by complex molecules particularly easy even in the presence of large excesses of other cations, e.g. magnesium. Its free concentration within cells can thus be maintained at the very low levels demanded by the signaling function. A large cadre of proteins has evolved to bind or transport calcium. They all contribute to buffer it within cells, but a number of them also decode its message for the benefit of the target. The most important of these "calcium sensors" are the EF-hand proteins. Calcium is an ambivalent messenger. Although essential to the correct functioning of cell processes, if not carefully controlled spatially and temporally within cells, it generates variously severe cell dysfunctions, and even cell death. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Application of the remote-sensing communication model to a time-sensitive wildfire remote-sensing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher D. Lippitt; Douglas A. Stow; Philip J. Riggan

    2016-01-01

    Remote sensing for hazard response requires a priori identification of sensor, transmission, processing, and distribution methods to permit the extraction of relevant information in timescales sufficient to allow managers to make a given time-sensitive decision. This study applies and demonstrates the utility of the Remote Sensing Communication...

  20. Testosterone increases urinary calcium excretion and inhibits expression of renal calcium transport proteins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hsu, Y.J.; Dimke, H.; Schoeber, J.P.H.; Hsu, S.C.; Lin, S.H.; Chu, P.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Although gender differences in the renal handling of calcium have been reported, the overall contribution of androgens to these differences remains uncertain. We determined here whether testosterone affects active renal calcium reabsorption by regulating calcium transport proteins. Male mice had

  1. Calcium: the molecular basis of calcium action in biology and medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pochet, Roland; Donato, Rosario

    2000-01-01

    ... of Calcium Calcium Signalling in Excitable Cells Ca2+ Release in Muscle Cells by N. Macrez and J. Mironneau Calcium Signalling in Neurons Exemplified by Rat Sympathetic Ganglion Cells by S.J. M...

  2. The chemical and biological response of two remote mountain lakes in the Southern Central Alps (Italy to twenty years of changing physical and chemical climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea LAMI

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Two small high mountain lakes in the Alps were monitored in 1984-2003 to follow their response to changes in human impact, such as deposition of atmospheric pollutants, fish stocking and climate change. The results were compared to occasional samplings performed in the 1940s, and to the remains found in sediment cores. When monitoring started, the most acid-sensitive of them, Lake Paione Superiore, was acidified, with evident effects in its flora and fauna: benthic diatoms assemblage was shifted towards acidophilous species, and zooplankton lost the dominant species, Arctodiaptomus alpinus. Palaeolimnological studies outlined that lake acidification paralleled the increasing input of long-range transported industrial pollutants, traced by spherical carbonaceous particles. On the contrary, the biota of Lake Paione Inferiore appeared to be mainly affected by fish stocking. In the last twenty years, decrease in acid load from the atmosphere led to an improvement in lake water quality, with an increase in both pH and alkalinity. First signs of biological recovery were identified, such as change in diatom flora and appearance of sensitive species among benthic insects. However, climate change and episodic deposition of Saharan dust were important driving factors controlling lake water chemistry. Further monitoring to assess the effects of climate change and of the increasing load of nitrogen and other pollutants is recommended.

  3. Mobile phone-based interactive voice response as a tool for improving access to healthcare in remote areas in Ghana - an evaluation of user experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkel, J; May, J; Krumkamp, R; Lamshöft, M; Kreuels, B; Owusu-Dabo, E; Mohammed, A; Bonacic Marinovic, A; Dako-Gyeke, P; Krämer, A; Fobil, J N

    2017-05-01

    To investigate and determine the factors that enhanced or constituted barriers to the acceptance of an mHealth system which was piloted in Asante-Akim North District of Ghana to support healthcare of children. Four semi-structured focus group discussions were conducted with a total of 37 mothers. Participants were selected from a study population of mothers who subscribed to a pilot mHealth system which used an interactive voice response (IVR) for its operations. Data were evaluated using qualitative content analysis methods. In addition, a short quantitative questionnaire assessed system's usability (SUS). Results revealed 10 categories of factors that facilitated user acceptance of the IVR system including quality-of-care experience, health education and empowerment of women. The eight categories of factors identified as barriers to user acceptance included the lack of human interaction, lack of update and training on the electronic advices provided and lack of social integration of the system into the community. The usability (SUS median: 79.3; range: 65-97.5) of the system was rated acceptable. The principles of the tested mHealth system could be of interest during infectious disease outbreaks, such as Ebola or Lassa fever, when there might be a special need for disease-specific health information within populations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Pawpaw leaves supplemented with three calcium sources and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The response of one hundred and thirty-two (132) grower African giant land snail (Archachatina marginata) with a weight range of 231.33-234.00 g and fed fresh pawpaw (Carica papaya) leaf-based diet supplemented with three mineral calcium sources was investigated in a humid tropical environment of Nigeria.

  5. A Bird's-eye View with X-ray Vision: Remote-sensing tools to Monitor Reach-scale Response to Dam Removal on the Elwha River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, A. C.

    2012-12-01

    Repeat digital surface models, orthoimagery and sidescan sonar data are being generated to monitor river response to the largest dam removal and controlled sediment release in history on the Elwha River, on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State. These products are generated using low-cost readily-available tools to collect data at a spatial and temporal scale that provides important insight into effects of base-level change, sediment release, and discrete hydrologic events on erosion of reservoir sediments, downstream sediment transport, and channel evolution above and below the dam sites. In combination, these products provide a view above and below the water surface to changes in sediment composition and morphology that other methods cannot capture at this spatial scale and both spatial and temporal resolution. Orthoimagery is developed from still images collected with a plane-mounted point-and-shoot camera using customized firmware from the open-source Canon Hack Development Kit (CHDK) with a total hardware cost of about $300 USD. Images are processed using structure-from-motion algorithms. Several software options are available. Sonar data are collected from a raft-mounted platform using a high-resolution 990 KHz Starfish sidescan sonar, with a water-resistant topside enclosure holding top-side electronics. A steerable pole-mount was developed for this application to allow the sidescan to to remain oriented in the direction of motion-over-ground.; Surface reconstruction from aerial images collected during Elwha dam removal project. ; bedforms near Elwha Sediment Treatment Plant from sediment released from Lake Aldwell, surveyed 12 July 2012.

  6. Stochastic Simulation of Cardiac Ventricular Myocyte Calcium Dynamics and Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Tuan, Hoang-Trong Minh; Williams, George S. B.; Chikando, Aristide C.; Sobie, Eric A.; Lederer, W. Jonathan; Jafri, M. Saleet

    2011-01-01

    A three dimensional model of calcium dynamics in the rat ventricular myocyte was developed to study the mechanism of calcium homeostasis and pathological calcium dynamics during calcium overload. The model contains 20,000 calcium release units (CRUs) each containing 49 ryanodine receptors. The model simulates calcium sparks with a realistic spontaneous calcium spark rate. It suggests that in addition to the calcium spark-based leak, there is an invisible calcium leak caused by the stochastic ...

  7. Lead in calcium supplements (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, S.; Khalid, N.

    2011-01-01

    Lead present in calcium supplements is of grave concern as some lead levels have been measured up to the extent of regulatory limit set by the United States. Calcium supplements inevitably get contaminated with lead as both are naturally occurring elements. Therefore, it is imperative to indicate its level in these supplements in order to create awareness among consumers. In this study, a sophisticated analytical technique, atomic absorption spectrometry was used to analyze Pb contents in 27 commonly consumed Ca supplements manufactured by different national and multinational companies. The daily intake of lead through these supplements was calculated. Only 10% of the calcium supplements analyzed met the criteria of acceptable Pb levels (1.5 mu g/daily dose) in supplements/consumer products set by the United States. It was also found that Pb intake was highest in chelated calcium supplements 28.5 mu g/daily dose, whereas lowest 0.47 mu g/daily dose through calcium supplements with vitamin D formulation. In order to validate our results from the study conducted, IAEA-certified reference material (animal bone, H-5) was analyzed for its Pb levels. The levels of Pb determined were quite in good agreement with the certified values. (author)

  8. Isomorfic Substitutions of Calcium by Strontium in Calcium Hydroxyapatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, Hilbert

    1962-12-15

    By means of homogeneous precipitation it has been possible to synthesize crystalline solid solutions of calcium strontium hydroxyapatite from aqueous solutions. The lattice constants for the solid solutions were measured in the range Ca{sub 9}Sr(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2} - CaSr{sub 9}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}. The investigations show that the discrimination of strontium against calcium is considerably smaller than reported elsewhere (1). Strontium is preferentially built into the c-axis direction of the apatite lattice.

  9. Short-range intercellular calcium signaling in bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye

    2005-01-01

    different mechanisms for this propagation. One mechanism involves the secretion of a nucleotide, possibly ATP, acting in an autocrine action to purinergic P2Y2 receptors on the neighboring cells, leading to intracellular IP3 generation and subsequent release of calcium from intracellular stores. The other...... to osteoclasts as well. We demonstrated that paracrine action of ATP was responsible for the wave propagation, but now the purinergic P2X7 receptor was involved. Thus, the studies demonstrate that calcium signals can be propagated not only among osteoblasts, but also between osteoblasts and osteoclasts...

  10. Influence of calcium on ceramide-1-phosphate monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana S. L. Oliveira

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P plays an important role in several biological processes, being identified as a key regulator of many protein functions. For instance, it acts as a mediator of inflammatory responses. The mediation of the inflammation process happens due to the interaction of C1P with the C2 domain of cPLA2α, an effector protein that needs the presence of submicromolar concentrations of calcium ions. The aim of this study was to determine the phase behaviour and structural properties of C1P in the presence and absence of millimolar quantities of calcium in a well-defined pH environment. For that purpose, we used monomolecular films of C1P at the soft air/liquid interface with calcium ions in the subphase. The pH was varied to change the protonation degree of the C1P head group. We used surface pressure versus molecular area isotherms coupled with other monolayer techniques as Brewster angle microscopy (BAM, infrared reflection–absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD. The isotherms indicate that C1P monolayers are in a condensed state in the presence of calcium ions, regardless of the pH. At higher pH without calcium ions, the monolayer is in a liquid-expanded state due to repulsion between the negatively charged phosphate groups of the C1P molecules. When divalent calcium ions are added, they are able to bridge the highly charged phosphate groups, enhancing the regular arrangement of the head groups. Similar solidification of the monolayer structure can be seen in the presence of a 150 times larger concentration of monovalent sodium ions. Therefore, calcium ions have clearly a strong affinity for the phosphomonoester of C1P.

  11. Quantifying the transient carbon dynamics of ecosystem scale carbon cycle responses to piñon pine mortality using a large-scale experimental manipulation, remote sensing and model-data fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvak, M. E.; Hilton, T. W.; Krofcheck, D. J.; Fox, A. M.; Robinson, E.; McDowell, N. G.; Rahn, T.; Sinsabaugh, R.

    2012-12-01

    The southwestern United States experienced an extended drought from 1999-2002 which led to widespread coniferous tree mortality throughout New Mexico, Arizona, Utah and Colorado. Piñon-juniper (PJ) woodlands, which occupy 24 million ha throughout the Southwest, proved to be extremely vulnerable to this drought, experiencing 40 to 95% mortality of piñon pine (Pinus edulis) and 2-25% mortality of juniper (Juniperus monosperma) in less than 3 years (Breshears et al., 2005). Understanding the response trajectories of these woodlands is crucial given that climate projections for the region suggest that episodic droughts, such as the one correlated with these recent conifer mortality, are likely to increase in frequency and severity and to expand northward. We are using a combination of eddy covariance, soil respiration, sap flow and biomass carbon pool measurements made at: (i) an undisturbed PJ woodland (control) in central New Mexico and at a manipulation site within 2 miles of the control where all piñon trees greater than 7 cm diameter at breast height within the 4 ha flux footprint were girdled (decreasing LAI by ~ 1/3) to quantify the response of ecosystem carbon and water dynamics in PJ woodlands to widespread piñon mortality. As expected, piñon mortality triggered an abrupt shift in carbon stocks from productive biomass to detritus, leading to a 25% decrease in gross primary production, and >50% decrease in net ecosystem production in the two years following mortality. Because litter and course woody debris are slow to decompose in these semiarid environments, ecosystem respiration initially decreased following mortality, and only increased two years post mortality following a large monsoon precipitation event. In the three years following mortality, reduced competition for water in these water limited ecosystems and increased light availability has triggered compensatory growth in understory vegetation observed in both remote sensing and ground

  12. Electrophysical properties of calcium vanadates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnenko, T.I.; Fotiev, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    Electrophysical properties of calcium vanadates are studied for the case of alteration of external parameters of the medium (PO 2 , T). It is lshown that structural transformations bring about changes in the nature of electrophysical properties of Ca 2 V 2 O 7 , Ca 3 (VO 4 ) 2 , this being the reason for charge redistribution in anion groupings. It is obvious, that the general conductivity of calcium methavanadate is mainly caused by ion transport. Ca(VO 3 ) 2 possesses amphoteric character of semiconducting properties: the type of conductivity changes from ''p'' to ''n'' with temperature increase. Polytherms of conductivity and sums of ion numbers of Ca 2 V 2 O 7 transition are given. It is established that calcium pyrovanadate has a mixed electron-ion conductivity

  13. Preparation of calcium phosphate paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Reusmaazran Yusof; Norzita Yaacob; Idris Besar; Che Seman Mahmood; Rusnah Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    Calcium phosphate paste were prepared by mixing between calcium sodium potassium phosphate, Ca 2 NaK (PO 4 ) 2 (CSPP) and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate, Ca(H 2 PO 4 ) 2 .H 2 O (MCPM). CSPP were obtained by reaction between calcium hydrogen phosphate (CaHPO 4 ), potassium carbonate (K 2 CO 3 ) and sodium carbonate (Na 2 CO 3 ) in solid state sintering process followed by quenching in air at 1000 degree Celsius. The paste was aging in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 0.5, 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 hrs, 3, 7 and 14 days. The morphological investigation indicated the formation of apatite crystal were first growth after 24 hours. The obvious growth of apatite crystal was shown at 3 days. The obvious growth of apatite crystal was shown in 7 and 14 days indicated the prediction of paste would have rapid reaction with bone after implantation. (author)

  14. Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to the reviews of his book, "The Good Life of Teaching: An Ethics of Professional Practice." He begins by highlighting some of the main concerns of his book. He then offers a brief response, doing his best to address the main criticisms of his argument and noting where the four reviewers (Charlene…

  15. Remote connector development study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parazin, R.J.

    1995-05-01

    Plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) connectors, the most common connectors used at the Hanford site, offer a certain level of flexibility in pipe routing, process system configuration, and remote equipment/instrument replacement. However, these desirable features have inherent shortcomings like leakage, high pressure drop through the right angle bends, and a limited range of available pipe diameters that can be connect by them. Costs for construction, maintenance, and operation of PUREX connectors seem to be very high. The PUREX connector designs include a 90 degree bend in each connector. This increases the pressure drop and erosion effects. Thus, each jumper requires at least two 90 degree bends. PUREX connectors have not been practically used beyond 100 (4 in.) inner diameter. This study represents the results of a survey on the use of remote pipe-connection systems in US and foreign plants. This study also describes the interdependence between connectors, remote handling equipment, and the necessary skills of the operators

  16. NET remote workstation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leinemann, K.

    1990-10-01

    The goal of this NET study was to define the functionality of a remote handling workstation and its hardware and software architecture. The remote handling workstation has to fulfill two basic functions: (1) to provide the man-machine interface (MMI), that means the interface to the control system of the maintenance equipment and to the working environment (telepresence) and (2) to provide high level (task level) supporting functions (software tools) during the maintenance work and in the preparation phase. Concerning the man-machine interface, an important module of the remote handling workstation besides the standard components of man-machine interfacing is a module for graphical scene presentation supplementing viewing by TV. The technique of integrated viewing is well known from JET BOOM and TARM control using the GBsim and KISMET software. For integration of equipment dependent MMI functions the remote handling workstation provides a special software module interface. Task level support of the operator is based on (1) spatial (geometric/kinematic) models, (2) remote handling procedure models, and (3) functional models of the equipment. These models and the related simulation modules are used for planning, programming, execution monitoring, and training. The workstation provides an intelligent handbook guiding the operator through planned procedures illustrated by animated graphical sequences. For unplanned situations decision aids are available. A central point of the architectural design was to guarantee a high flexibility with respect to hardware and software. Therefore the remote handling workstation is designed as an open system based on widely accepted standards allowing the stepwise integration of the various modules starting with the basic MMI and the spatial simulation as standard components. (orig./HP) [de

  17. Uptake of radiactive calcium by groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L. ) and efficiency of utilisation of applied calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loganathan, S; Krishnamoorthy, K K [Tamil Nadu Agricultural Univ., Coimbatore (India). Dept. of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry

    1977-04-01

    A pot experiment was conducted with groundnut applying labelled calcium as its sulphate and carbonate at two levels namely 75 and 150 kg Ca per ha with varying levels of P, K and Mg. Plant samples were taken at different stages of crop growth and analysed for the content of radioactive calcium. Calcium sulphate treatment has resulted in larger uptake of calcium compared to calcium carbonate. An application of 150 kg Ca per ha has caused significantly higher uptake by groundnut plant than 75 kg Ca per ha. The percentage of utilisation of added calcium ranged from 2.2 to 5.4 Recovery of calcium by plants was more in calcium sulphate treatment rather than in calcium carbonate. The plants showed a preference for absorbing applied calcium rather than native calcium.

  18. Uptake of radiactive calcium by groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) and efficiency of utilisation of applied calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loganathan, S.; Krishnamoorthy, K.K.

    1977-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted with groundnut applying labelled calcium as its sulphate and carbonate at two levels namely 75 and 150 kg Ca per ha with varying levels of P, K and Mg. Plant samples were taken at different stages of crop growth and analysed for the content of radioactive calcium. Calcium sulphate treatment has resulted in larger uptake of calcium compared to calcium carbonate. An application of 150 kg Ca per ha has caused significantly higher uptake by groundnut plant than 75 kg Ca per ha. The percentage of utilisation of added calcium ranged from 2.2 to 5.4 Recovery of calcium by plants was more in calcium sulphate treatment rather than in calcium carbonate. The plants showed a preference for absorbing applied calcium rather than native calcium

  19. The effect of habitat geology on calcium intake and calcium status of wild rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, R F; Balment, R J; Yalden, D W

    1991-12-01

    Calcium is essential for normal physiological function, reproduction and growth in mammals but its distribution in the natural environment is heterogeneous. Spatial variation in calcium soil content is especially marked in the Peak District, United Kingdom, where both calcium-rich limestone and calcium-poor gritstone rock types occur. Wood mice Apodemus sylvaticus (L) and bank voles Clethrionomys glareolus (Schreber 1780) from limestone areas had significantly higher calcium concentrations in stomach contents and in faeces compared with their counterparts from gritstone areas. Calcium status was assessed from serum calcium concentration, femur weight, ash content of the body, calcium concentration in the femur and body ash. There was no significant difference in serum calcium concentration, femur calcium concentration and body ash calcium concentration between animals from the limestone and the gritstone. However, on the limestone, bank voles, but not wood mice, had significantly heavier femora and a greater proportion of ash in the body compared with their gritstone counterparts.

  20. Remote Reactor Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Adam [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dazeley, Steve [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dobie, Doug [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marleau, Peter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brennan, Jim [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gerling, Mark [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sumner, Matthew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sweany, Melinda [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-21

    The overall goal of the WATCHMAN project is to experimentally demonstrate the potential of water Cerenkov antineutrino detectors as a tool for remote monitoring of nuclear reactors. In particular, the project seeks to field a large prototype gadolinium-doped, water-based antineutrino detector to demonstrate sensitivity to a power reactor at ~10 kilometer standoff using a kiloton scale detector. The technology under development, when fully realized at large scale, could provide remote near-real-time information about reactor existence and operational status for small operating nuclear reactors out to distances of many hundreds of kilometers.

  1. Remote sensing image fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Alparone, Luciano; Baronti, Stefano; Garzelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    A synthesis of more than ten years of experience, Remote Sensing Image Fusion covers methods specifically designed for remote sensing imagery. The authors supply a comprehensive classification system and rigorous mathematical description of advanced and state-of-the-art methods for pansharpening of multispectral images, fusion of hyperspectral and panchromatic images, and fusion of data from heterogeneous sensors such as optical and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images and integration of thermal and visible/near-infrared images. They also explore new trends of signal/image processing, such as

  2. Introduction to remote sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, James B

    2012-01-01

    A leading text for undergraduate- and graduate-level courses, this book introduces widely used forms of remote sensing imagery and their applications in plant sciences, hydrology, earth sciences, and land use analysis. The text provides comprehensive coverage of principal topics and serves as a framework for organizing the vast amount of remote sensing information available on the Web. Including case studies and review questions, the book's four sections and 21 chapters are carefully designed as independent units that instructors can select from as needed for their courses. Illustrations in

  3. Radar Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    This lecture was just a taste of radar remote sensing techniques and applications. Other important areas include Stereo radar grammetry. PolInSAR for volumetric structure mapping. Agricultural monitoring, soil moisture, ice-mapping, etc. The broad range of sensor types, frequencies of observation and availability of sensors have enabled radar sensors to make significant contributions in a wide area of earth and planetary remote sensing sciences. The range of applications, both qualitative and quantitative, continue to expand with each new generation of sensors.

  4. CBL-CIPK network for calcium signaling in higher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Sheng

    Plants sense their environment by signaling mechanisms involving calcium. Calcium signals are encoded by a complex set of parameters and decoded by a large number of proteins including the more recently discovered CBL-CIPK network. The calcium-binding CBL proteins specifi-cally interact with a family of protein kinases CIPKs and regulate the activity and subcellular localization of these kinases, leading to the modification of kinase substrates. This represents a paradigm shift as compared to a calcium signaling mechanism from yeast and animals. One example of CBL-CIPK signaling pathways is the low-potassium response of Arabidopsis roots. When grown in low-K medium, plants develop stronger K-uptake capacity adapting to the low-K condition. Recent studies show that the increased K-uptake is caused by activation of a specific K-channel by the CBL-CIPK network. A working model for this regulatory pathway will be discussed in the context of calcium coding and decoding processes.

  5. Neutrophils and the calcium-binding protein MRP-14 mediate carrageenan-induced antinociception in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana L. Pagano

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We have previously shown that the calcium-binding protein MRP-14 secreted by neutrophils mediates the antinociceptive response in an acute inflammatory model induced by the intraperitoneal injection of glycogen in mice.

  6. Cytosolic calcium rises and related events in ergosterol-treated Nicotiana cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatsa, Parul; Chiltz, Annick; Luini, Estelle; Vandelle, Elodie; Pugin, Alain; Roblin, Gabriel

    2011-07-01

    The typical fungal membrane component ergosterol was previously shown to trigger defence responses and protect plants against pathogens. Most of the elicitors mobilize the second messenger calcium, to trigger plant defences. We checked the involvement of calcium in response to ergosterol using Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi cells expressing apoaequorin in the cytosol. First, it was verified if ergosterol was efficient in these cells inducing modifications of proton fluxes and increased expression of defence-related genes. Then, it was shown that ergosterol induced a rapid and transient biphasic increase of free [Ca²⁺](cyt) which intensity depends on ergosterol concentration in the range 0.002-10 μM. Among sterols, this calcium mobilization was specific for ergosterol and, ergosterol-induced pH and [Ca²⁺](cyt) changes were specifically desensitized after two subsequent applications of ergosterol. Specific modulators allowed elucidating some events in the signalling pathway triggered by ergosterol. The action of BAPTA, LaCl₃, nifedipine, verapamil, neomycin, U73122 and ruthenium red suggested that the first phase was linked to calcium influx from external medium which subsequently triggered the second phase linked to calcium release from internal stores. The calcium influx and the [Ca²⁺](cyt) increase depended on upstream protein phosphorylation. The extracellular alkalinization and ROS production depended on calcium influx but, the ergosterol-induced MAPK activation was calcium-independent. ROS were not involved in cytosolic calcium rise as described in other models, indicating that ROS do not systematically participate in the amplification of calcium signalling. Interestingly, ergosterol-induced ROS production is not linked to cell death and ergosterol does not induce any calcium elevation in the nucleus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Improved remote HEPA filtration development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.E. III.

    1987-03-01

    This paper presents a summary of the prototype development and hot cell mock-up testing program undertaken to adapt a commercial remote HEPA filter housing for use in the Process Facility Modification Project (PFMP). This program was initiated in response to the project design criteria and documentation that required the air from the hot cell environment to be exhausted through three stages of HEPA filtration. Due to the anticipated quantity of radioactive contamination captured by the first stage of filters, it was determined that the first stage would need to be located in a remotely operated and maintained shielded cell adjoining the primary hot cell areas. Commercially available remote filtration equipment was evaluated and candidate unit was identified, which could be developed into a suitable filter housing. A candidate unit was obtained from Flanders Filters, Inc. and a series of hot cell mock-up tests were identified in the 305 facility at the Hanford site. The results of these tests, and further interaction with the vendor, led to a prototype remote filter housing which satisfied most PFMP criteria and proved to be significantly superior to existing commercial units for remote operation/maintenance

  8. Mechanically induced intracellular calcium waves in osteoblasts demonstrate calcium fingerprints in bone cell mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Lindsay M; Suzuki, Sakiko; Jacobs, Christopher R; Donahue, Henry J; Donahue, Seth W

    2007-11-01

    An early response to mechanical stimulation of bone cells in vitro is an increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca (2+)](i)). This study analyzed the [Ca (2+)](i) wave area, magnitude, duration, rise time, fall time, and time to onset in individual osteoblasts for two identical bouts of mechanical stimulation separated by a 30-min rest period. The area under the [Ca (2+)](i) wave increased in the second loading bout compared to the first. This suggests that rest periods may potentiate mechanically induced intracellular calcium signals. Furthermore, many of the [Ca (2+)](i) wave parameters were strongly, positively correlated between the two bouts of mechanical stimulation. For example, in individual primary osteoblasts, if a cell had a large [Ca (2+)](i) wave area in the first bout it was likely to have a large [Ca (2+)](i) wave area in the second bout (r (2) = 0.933). These findings support the idea that individual bone cells have "calcium fingerprints" (i.e., a unique [Ca (2+)](i) wave profile that is reproducible for repeated exposure to a given stimulus).

  9. Preservation and promotion of bone formation in the mandible as a response to a novel calcium-phosphate based biomaterial in mineral deficiency induced low bone mass male versus female rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Kritika; Naula, Diana P.; Mijares, Dindo Q.; Janal, Malvin N.; LeGeros, Raquel Z.; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Calcium and other trace mineral supplements have previously demonstrated to safely improve bone quality. We hypothesize that our novel calcium-phosphate based biomaterial (SBM) preserves and promotes mandibular bone formation in male and female rats on mineral deficient diet (MD). Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to receive one of three diets (n = 10): basic diet (BD), MD or mineral deficient diet with 2% SBM. Rats were sacrificed after 6 months. Micro-Computed Tomography (μCT) was used to evaluate bone volume and 3D-microarchitecture while microradiography (Faxitron) was used to measure bone mineral density from different sections of the mandible. Results showed that bone quality varied with region, gender and diet. MD reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and volume and increased porosity. SBM preserved BMD and bone mineral content (BMC) in the alveolar bone and condyle in both genders. In the alveolar crest and mandibular body, while preserving more bone in males, SBM also significantly supplemented female bone. Results indicate that mineral deficiency leads to low bone mass in skeletally immature rats, comparatively more in males. Furthermore, SBM administered as a dietary supplement was effective in preventing mandibular bone loss in all subjects. This study suggests that the SBM preparation has potential use in minimizing low peak bone mass induced by mineral deficiency and related bone loss irrespective of gender. PMID:26914814

  10. Magnetogenetics: Remote Control of Cellular Signaling with Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Jeremy P.

    Means for temporally regulating gene expression and cellular activity are invaluable for elucidating the underlying physiological processes and have therapeutic implications. Here we report the development of a system for remote regulation of gene expression by low frequency radiowaves (RF) or by a static magnetic field. We accomplished this by first adding iron oxide nanoparticles - either exogenously or as genetically encoded ferritin/ferric oxyhydroxide particle. These particles have been designed with affinity to the plasma membrane ion channel Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) by a conjugated antibody. Application of a magnetic field stimulates the particle to gate the ion channel and this, in turn, initiates calcium-dependent transgene expression. We first demonstrated in vitro that TRPV1 can be actuated to cause calcium flux into the cell by directly applying a localized magnetic field. In mice expressing these genetically encoded components, application of external magnetic field caused remote stimulation of insulin transgene expression and significantly lowered blood glucose. In addition, we are investigating mechanisms by which iron oxide nanoparticles can absorb RF, and transduce this energy to cause channel opening. This robust, repeatable method for remote cellular regulation in vivo may ultimately have applications in basic science, as well as in technology and therapeutics.

  11. Calcium electroporation in three cell lines; a comparison of bleomycin and calcium, calcium compounds, and pulsing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gissel, Hanne; Hojman, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    offers several advantages over standard treatment options: calcium is inexpensive and may readily be applied without special precautions, as is the case with cytostatic drugs. Therefore, details on the use of calcium electroporation are essential for carrying out clinical trials comparing calcium...

  12. Calcium fertilization increases the concentration of calcium in sapwood and calcium oxalate in foliage of red spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith; Walter C. Shortle; Jon H. Connolly; Rakesh Minocha; Jody Jellison

    2009-01-01

    Calcium cycling plays a key role in the health and productivity of red spruce forests in the northeastern US. A portion of the flowpath of calcium within forests includes translocation as Ca2+ in sapwood and accumulation as crystals of calcium oxalate in foliage. Concentrations of Ca in these tree tissues have been used as markers of...

  13. Synthesis and properties of Asante Calcium Red--a novel family of long excitation wavelength calcium indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyrc, Krzysztof L; Minta, Akwasi; Escamilla, P Rogelio; Chan, Patrick P L; Meshik, Xenia A; Goldberg, Mark P

    2013-10-01

    Although many synthetic calcium indicators are available, a search for compounds with improved characteristics continues. Here, we describe the synthesis and properties of Asante Calcium Red-1 (ACR-1) and its low affinity derivative (ACR-1-LA) created by linking BAPTA to seminaphthofluorescein. The indicators combine a visible light (450-540 nm) excitation with deep-red fluorescence (640 nm). Upon Ca2+ binding, the indicators raise their fluorescence with longer excitation wavelengths producing higher responses. Although the changes occur without any spectral shifts, it is possible to ratio Ca(2+)-dependent (640 nm) and quasi-independent (530 nm) emission when using visible (calcium indicators. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bone Health Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health Download PDFs English ... also helps keep your bones strong. Why are vitamin D and calcium important to bone health? Vitamin ...

  15. Complex formation ions calcium with macromolecules pectin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalikova, M.D.; Avloev, Kh.Kh.; Muhiddinov, Z.K.

    2005-01-01

    In clause the mechanism of sorption of ions of calcium by macromolecules of pectin is opened. Is shown, that the linkage of ions of calcium descends on acid bunches of pectin, and process carries cooperative character

  16. Atomic layer deposition of calcium oxide and calcium hafnium oxide films using calcium cyclopentadienyl precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukli, Kaupo; Ritala, Mikko; Sajavaara, Timo; Haenninen, Timo; Leskelae, Markku

    2006-01-01

    Calcium oxide and calcium hafnium oxide thin films were grown by atomic layer deposition on borosilicate glass and silicon substrates in the temperature range of 205-300 o C. The calcium oxide films were grown from novel calcium cyclopentadienyl precursor and water. Calcium oxide films possessed refractive index 1.75-1.80. Calcium oxide films grown without Al 2 O 3 capping layer occurred hygroscopic and converted to Ca(OH) 2 after exposure to air. As-deposited CaO films were (200)-oriented. CaO covered with Al 2 O 3 capping layers contained relatively low amounts of hydrogen and re-oriented into (111) direction upon annealing at 900 o C. In order to examine the application of CaO in high-permittivity dielectric layers, mixtures of Ca and Hf oxides were grown by alternate CaO and HfO 2 growth cycles at 230 and 300 o C. HfCl 4 was used as a hafnium precursor. When grown at 230 o C, the films were amorphous with equal amounts of Ca and Hf constituents (15 at.%). These films crystallized upon annealing at 750 o C, showing X-ray diffraction peaks characteristic of hafnium-rich phases such as Ca 2 Hf 7 O 16 or Ca 6 Hf 19 O 44 . At 300 o C, the relative Ca content remained below 8 at.%. The crystallized phase well matched with rhombohedral Ca 2 Hf 7 O 16 . The dielectric films grown on Si(100) substrates possessed effective permittivity values in the range of 12.8-14.2

  17. Kinetics of calcium sulfoaluminate formation from tricalcium aluminate, calcium sulfate and calcium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xuerun; Zhang, Yu; Shen, Xiaodong; Wang, Qianqian; Pan, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    The formation kinetics of tricalcium aluminate (C 3 A) and calcium sulfate yielding calcium sulfoaluminate (C 4 A 3 $) and the decomposition kinetics of calcium sulfoaluminate were investigated by sintering a mixture of synthetic C 3 A and gypsum. The quantitative analysis of the phase composition was performed by X-ray powder diffraction analysis using the Rietveld method. The results showed that the formation reaction 3Ca 3 Al 2 O 6 + CaSO 4 → Ca 4 Al 6 O 12 (SO 4 ) + 6CaO was the primary reaction 4 Al 6 O 12 (SO 4 ) + 10CaO → 6Ca 3 Al 2 O 6 + 2SO 2 ↑ + O 2 ↑ primarily occurred beyond 1350 °C with an activation energy of 792 ± 64 kJ/mol. The optimal formation region for C 4 A 3 $ was from 1150 °C to 1350 °C and from 6 h to 1 h, which could provide useful information on the formation of C 4 A 3 $ containing clinkers. The Jander diffusion model was feasible for the formation and decomposition of calcium sulfoaluminate. Ca 2+ and SO 4 2− were the diffusive species in both the formation and decomposition reactions. -- Highlights: •Formation and decomposition of calcium sulphoaluminate were studied. •Decomposition of calcium sulphoaluminate combined CaO and yielded C 3 A. •Activation energy for formation was 231 ± 42 kJ/mol. •Activation energy for decomposition was 792 ± 64 kJ/mol. •Both the formation and decomposition were controlled by diffusion

  18. Binding of [125I]iodipine to parathyroid cell membranes: Evidence of a dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.I.; Fitzpatrick, L.A.

    1990-01-01

    The parathyroid cell is unusual, in that an increase in extracellular calcium concentrations inhibits PTH release. Calcium channels are glycoproteins that span cell membranes and allow entry of extracellular calcium into cells. We have demonstrated that the calcium channel agonist (+)202-791, which opens calcium channels, inhibits PTH release and that the antagonist (-)202-791, which closes calcium channels, stimulates PTH release. To identify the calcium channels responsible for these effects, we used a radioligand that specifically binds to calcium channels. Bovine parathyroid cell membranes were prepared and incubated under reduced lighting with [125I] iodipine (SA, 2000 Ci/mmol), which recognizes 1,4-dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels. Bound ligand was separated from free ligand by rapid filtration through Whatman GF/B filters. Nonspecific binding was measured by the inclusion of nifedipine at 10 microM. Specific binding represented approximately 40% of the total binding. The optimal temperature for [125I] iodipine binding was 4 C, and binding reached equilibrium by 30 min. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) was approximately 550 pM, and the maximum number of binding sites was 780 fmol/mg protein. Both the calcium channel agonist (+)202-791 and antagonist (-)202-791 competitively inhibited [125I] iodipine binding, with 50% inhibition concentrations of 20 and 300 nM, respectively. These data indicate the presence of dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels on parathyroid cell membranes

  19. PresenceRemote

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokoler, Tomas; Svensson, Marcus Sanchez

    2008-01-01

    how these technologies can accommodate the specific challenges related to the everyday life of elderly people. In particular, using an example concept – the PresenceRemote – we will discuss how the stigma associated with being lonely, an inherent part of senior living, can be addressed by leaving room...

  20. A Remote WIRELESS Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kees Uiterwijk

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Continuing need for available distance learning facilities has led to the development of a remote lab facility focusing on wireless technology. In the field of engineering there is a student need of gaining experience in set-up, monitoring and maintenance of 802.11A/B/G based wireless LAN environments.

  1. Remote sensing: best practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Gareth [Sgurr Energy (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents remote sensing best practice in the wind industry. Remote sensing is a technique whereby measurements are obtained from the interaction of laser or acoustic pulses with the atmosphere. There is a vast diversity of tools and techniques available and they offer wide scope for reducing project uncertainty and risk but best practice must take into account versatility and flexibility. It should focus on the outcome in terms of results and data. However, traceability of accuracy requires comparison with conventional instruments. The framework for the Boulder protocol is given. Overviews of the guidelines for IEA SODAR and IEA LIDAR are also mentioned. The important elements of IEC 61400-12-1, an international standard for wind turbines, are given. Bankability is defined based on the Boulder protocol and a pie chart is presented that illustrates the uncertainty area covered by remote sensing. In conclusion it can be said that remote sensing is changing perceptions about how wind energy assessments can be made.

  2. Remote RF Battery Charging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, H.J.; Pop, V.; Op het Veld, J.H.G.; Vullers, R.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The design of a remote RF battery charger is discussed through the analysis and design of the subsystems of a rectenna (rectifying antenna): antenna, rectifying circuit and loaded DC-to-DC voltage (buck-boost) converter. Optimum system power generation performance is obtained by adopting a system

  3. Section summary: Remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belinda Arunarwati Margono

    2013-01-01

    Remote sensing is an important data source for monitoring the change of forest cover, in terms of both total removal of forest cover (deforestation), and change of canopy cover, structure and forest ecosystem services that result in forest degradation. In the context of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), forest degradation monitoring requires information...

  4. Remotely controlled spray gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, William C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A remotely controlled spray gun is described in which a nozzle and orifice plate are held in precise axial alignment by an alignment member, which in turn is held in alignment with the general outlet of the spray gun by insert. By this arrangement, the precise repeatability of spray patterns is insured.

  5. Calcium channel blockers and Alzheimer's disease★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yi; Deng, Yulin; Qing, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by two pathological hallmarks: amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. In addition, calcium homeostasis is disrupted in the course of human aging. Recent research shows that dense plaques can cause functional alteration of calcium signals in mice with Alzheimer's disease. Calcium channel blockers are effective therapeutics for treating Alzheimer's disease. This review provides an overview of the current research of calcium channel blockers involved in Alzheimer's disease therapy. PMID:25767489

  6. 21 CFR 184.1210 - Calcium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium oxide. 184.1210 Section 184.1210 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1210 Calcium oxide. (a) Calcium oxide (CaO, CAS Reg. No. 1305-78-8) is also known as lime, quick lime, burnt lime, or calx. It is produced from calcium carbonate, limestone, or...

  7. Oxalic acid decreases calcium absorption in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, C.M.; Martin, B.R.; Ebner, J.S.; Krueger, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    Calcium absorption from salts and foods intrinsically labeled with 45 Ca was determined in the rat model. Calcium bioavailability was nearly 10 times greater for low oxalate kale, CaCO 3 and CaCl 2 than from CaC 2 O 4 (calcium oxalate) and spinach (high in oxalates). Extrinsic and intrinsic labeling techniques gave a similar assessment of calcium bioavailability from kale but not from spinach

  8. Calcium and Nuclear Signaling in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan V. Maly; Wilma A. Hofmann

    2018-01-01

    Recently, there have been a number of developments in the fields of calcium and nuclear signaling that point to new avenues for a more effective diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. An example is the discovery of new classes of molecules involved in calcium-regulated nuclear import and nuclear calcium signaling, from the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and myosin families. This review surveys the new state of the calcium and nuclear signaling fields with the aim of identifying the un...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1195 - Calcium citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium citrate. 184.1195 Section 184.1195 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1195 Calcium citrate. (a) Calcium citrate (Ca3(C6H5O7)2·4H2O, CAS Reg. No. 813-0994-095) is the calcium salt of citric acid. It is prepared by neutralizing citric acid with...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium acetate. 184.1185 Section 184.1185 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1185 Calcium acetate. (a) Calcium acetate (Ca (C2H3O2)2, CAS Reg. No. 62-54-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid. It may be...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1229 - Calcium stearate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium stearate. 184.1229 Section 184.1229 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1229 Calcium stearate. (a) Calcium stearate (Ca(C17H35COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 1529-23-0) is the calcium salt of stearic acid derived from edible sources. It is prepared as...

  12. Calcium Balance in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill Gallant, Kathleen M; Spiegel, David M

    2017-06-01

    The kidneys play a critical role in the balance between the internal milieu and external environment. Kidney failure is known to disrupt a number of homeostatic mechanisms that control serum calcium and normal bone metabolism. However, our understanding of calcium balance throughout the stages of chronic kidney disease is limited and the concept of balance itself, especially with a cation as complex as calcium, is often misunderstood. Both negative and positive calcium balance have important implications in patients with chronic kidney disease, where negative balance may increase risk of osteoporosis and fracture and positive balance may increase risk of vascular calcification and cardiovascular events. Here, we examine the state of current knowledge about calcium balance in adults throughout the stages of chronic kidney disease and discuss recommendations for clinical strategies to maintain balance as well as future research needs in this area. Recent calcium balance studies in adult patients with chronic kidney disease show that neutral calcium balance is achieved with calcium intake near the recommended daily allowance. Increases in calcium through diet or supplements cause high positive calcium balance, which may put patients at risk for vascular calcification. However, heterogeneity in calcium balance exists among these patients. Given the available calcium balance data in this population, it appears clinically prudent to aim for recommended calcium intakes around 1000 mg/day to achieve neutral calcium balance and avoid adverse effects of either negative or positive calcium balance. Assessment of patients' dietary calcium intake could further equip clinicians to make individualized recommendations for meeting recommended intakes.

  13. 21 CFR 184.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium chloride. 184.1193 Section 184.1193 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Calcium chloride (CaCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10035-04-8) or anhydrous calcium chloride (CaCl2, CAS Reg. No. 10043-52-4) may be commercially...

  14. The Electronic Structure of Calcium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jan, J.-P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The electronic structure of calcium under pressure is re-examined by means of self-consistent energy band calculations based on the local density approximation and using the linear muffin-tin orbitals (LMTO) method with corrections to the atomic sphere approximation included. At zero pressure...

  15. Remote sensing for water quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giardino, Claudia

    2006-01-01

    The application of remote sensing to the study of lakes is begun in years 80 with the lunch of the satellites of second generation. Many experiences have indicated the contribution of remote sensing for the limnology [it

  16. The impact of calcium assay change on a local adjusted calcium equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Sarah L; Hill, Charlotte; Bailey, Lisa M; Davison, Andrew S; Milan, Anna M

    2016-03-01

    Deriving and validating local adjusted calcium equations is important for ensuring appropriate calcium status classification. We investigated the impact on our local adjusted calcium equation of a change in calcium method by the manufacturer from cresolphthalein complexone to NM-BAPTA. Calcium and albumin results from general practice requests were extracted from the Laboratory Information Management system for a three-month period. Results for which there was evidence of disturbance in calcium homeostasis were excluded leaving 13,482 sets of results for analysis. The adjusted calcium equation was derived following least squares regression analysis of total calcium on albumin and normalized to the mean calcium concentration of the data-set. The revised equation (NM-BAPTA calcium method) was compared with the previous equation (cresolphthalein complexone calcium method). The switch in calcium assay resulted in a small change in the adjusted calcium equation but was not considered to be clinically significant. The calcium reference interval differed from that proposed by Pathology Harmony in the UK. Local adjusted calcium equations should be re-assessed following changes in the calcium method. A locally derived reference interval may differ from the consensus harmonized reference interval. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Absorbability of calcium from calcium-bound phosphoryl oligosaccharides in comparison with that from various calcium compounds in the rat ligated jejunum loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To-o, Kenji; Kamasaka, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Takahisa; Kuriki, Takashi; Saeki, Shigeru; Nakabou, Yukihiro

    2003-08-01

    Calcium-bound phosphoryl oligosaccharides (POs-Ca) were prepared from potato starch. Their solubility and in situ absorbability as a calcium source were investigated by comparing with the soluble calcium compounds, calcium chloride and calcium lactate, or insoluble calcium compounds, calcium carbonate and dibasic calcium phosphate. The solubility of POs-Ca was as high as that of calcium chloride and about 3-fold higher than that of calcium lactate. An in situ experiment showed that the intestinal calcium absorption rate of POs-Ca was almost comparable with that of the soluble calcium compounds, and was significantly higher (pcalcium groups. Moreover, the total absorption rate of a 1:1 mixture of the calcium from POs-Ca and a whey mineral complex (WMC) was significantly higher (psoluble calcium source with relatively high absorption in the intestinal tract.

  18. 21 CFR 582.1210 - Calcium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium oxide. 582.1210 Section 582.1210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1210 Calcium oxide. (a) Product. Calcium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  19. 21 CFR 582.5210 - Calcium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium oxide. 582.5210 Section 582.5210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5210 Calcium oxide. (a) Product. Calcium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  20. Lactulose stimulates calcium absorption in postmenopausal women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, E.G.H.M. van den; Muijs, T.; Dokkum, W. van; Schaafsma, G.

    1999-01-01

    Animal studies have indicated that calcium absorption is increased by lactulose, a synthetic disaccharide. Therefore, the influence of lactulose on calcium absorption was measured in postmenopausal women who may benefit from the possible enhancing effect of lactulose on calcium absorption. Twelve

  1. 21 CFR 182.3225 - Calcium sorbate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium sorbate. 182.3225 Section 182.3225 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3225 Calcium sorbate. (a) Product. Calcium sorbate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as...

  2. 21 CFR 582.5230 - Calcium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium sulfate. 582.5230 Section 582.5230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5230 Calcium sulfate. (a) Product. Calcium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  3. 21 CFR 582.6185 - Calcium acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium acetate. 582.6185 Section 582.6185 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium acetate. (a) Product. Calcium acetate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  4. 21 CFR 582.5195 - Calcium citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium citrate. 582.5195 Section 582.5195 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5195 Calcium citrate. (a) Product. Calcium citrate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  5. 21 CFR 582.3225 - Calcium sorbate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium sorbate. 582.3225 Section 582.3225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3225 Calcium sorbate. (a) Product. Calcium sorbate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  6. 21 CFR 582.6195 - Calcium citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium citrate. 582.6195 Section 582.6195 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium citrate. (a) Product. Calcium citrate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  7. 21 CFR 582.6219 - Calcium phytate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phytate. 582.6219 Section 582.6219 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium phytate. (a) Product. Calcium phytate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  8. 21 CFR 582.1207 - Calcium lactate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium lactate. 582.1207 Section 582.1207 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1207 Calcium lactate. (a) Product. Calcium lactate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  9. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c) Limitations...

  10. 21 CFR 582.1195 - Calcium citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium citrate. 582.1195 Section 582.1195 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1195 Calcium citrate. (a) Product. Calcium citrate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  11. 21 CFR 582.7187 - Calcium alginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium alginate. 582.7187 Section 582.7187 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium alginate. (a) Product. Calcium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  12. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c) Limitations...

  13. Mechanism of store-operated calcium entry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Activation of receptors coupled to the phospholipase C/IP3 signalling pathway results in a rapid release of calcium from its intracellular stores, eventually leading to depletion of these stores. Calcium store depletion triggers an influx of extracellular calcium across the plasma membrane, a mechanism known as the ...

  14. 21 CFR 201.70 - Calcium labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium labeling. 201.70 Section 201.70 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.70 Calcium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the calcium content per...

  15. Preparation and properties of calcium zirconate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudek, M.; Bucko, M.; Rog, G.

    2001-01-01

    Dense samples of calcium zirconate were prepared. Electrical conductivity of the samples were measured in the temperature range 873 - 1273 K by both the d.c. four probe and the impedance spectroscopy methods. Calcium zirconate with small excess of calcium oxide appeared to be oxygen ion conductor. It was applied as an electrolyte in solid-state galvanic cells. (author)

  16. 21 CFR 582.6193 - Calcium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.6193 Section 582.6193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  17. 21 CFR 582.1193 - Calcium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium chloride. 582.1193 Section 582.1193 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1193 Calcium chloride. (a) Product. Calcium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  18. 7 CFR 58.434 - Calcium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calcium chloride. 58.434 Section 58.434 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.434 Calcium chloride. Calcium chloride, when used, shall meet the requirements of the Food...

  19. Remote Sensing and the Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosius, Craig A.; And Others

    This document is designed to help senior high school students study remote sensing technology and techniques in relation to the environmental sciences. It discusses the acquisition, analysis, and use of ecological remote data. Material is divided into three sections and an appendix. Section One is an overview of the basics of remote sensing.…

  20. Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry Reveals Calcium Binding Properties and Allosteric Regulation of Downstream Regulatory Element Antagonist Modulator (DREAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Li, Jing; Craig, Theodore A; Kumar, Rajiv; Gross, Michael L

    2017-07-18

    Downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM) is an EF-hand Ca 2+ -binding protein that also binds to a specific DNA sequence, downstream regulatory elements (DRE), and thereby regulates transcription in a calcium-dependent fashion. DREAM binds to DRE in the absence of Ca 2+ but detaches from DRE under Ca 2+ stimulation, allowing gene expression. The Ca 2+ binding properties of DREAM and the consequences of the binding on protein structure are key to understanding the function of DREAM. Here we describe the application of hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) and site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the Ca 2+ binding properties and the subsequent conformational changes of full-length DREAM. We demonstrate that all EF-hands undergo large conformation changes upon calcium binding even though the EF-1 hand is not capable of binding to Ca 2+ . Moreover, EF-2 is a lower-affinity site compared to EF-3 and -4 hands. Comparison of HDX profiles between wild-type DREAM and two EF-1 mutated constructs illustrates that the conformational changes in the EF-1 hand are induced by long-range structural interactions. HDX analyses also reveal a conformational change in an N-terminal leucine-charged residue-rich domain (LCD) remote from Ca 2+ -binding EF-hands. This LCD domain is responsible for the direct interaction between DREAM and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and regulates the recruitment of the co-activator, CREB-binding protein. These long-range interactions strongly suggest how conformational changes transmit the Ca 2+ signal to CREB-mediated gene transcription.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide homeostasis: activation of plant catalase by calcium/calmodulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Environmental stimuli such as UV, pathogen attack, and gravity can induce rapid changes in hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels, leading to a variety of physiological responses in plants. Catalase, which is involved in the degradation of H(2)O(2) into water and oxygen, is the major H(2)O(2)-scavenging enzyme in all aerobic organisms. A close interaction exists between intracellular H(2)O(2) and cytosolic calcium in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Studies indicate that an increase in cytosolic calcium boosts the generation of H(2)O(2). Here we report that calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, binds to and activates some plant catalases in the presence of calcium, but calcium/CaM does not have any effect on bacterial, fungal, bovine, or human catalase. These results document that calcium/CaM can down-regulate H(2)O(2) levels in plants by stimulating the catalytic activity of plant catalase. Furthermore, these results provide evidence indicating that calcium has dual functions in regulating H(2)O(2) homeostasis, which in turn influences redox signaling in response to environmental signals in plants.

  2. Energy and remote sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, R. A.; Smith, W. L.; Short, N. M.

    1978-01-01

    The nature of the U.S. energy problem is examined. Based upon the best available estimates, it appears that demand for OPEC oil will exceed OPEC productive capacity in the early to mid-eighties. The upward pressure on world oil prices resulting from this supply/demand gap could have serious international consequences, both financial and in terms of foreign policy implementation. National Energy Plan objectives in response to this situation are discussed. Major strategies for achieving these objectives include a conversion of industry and utilities from oil and gas to coal and other abundant fuels. Remote sensing from aircraft and spacecraft could make significant contributions to the solution of energy problems in a number of ways, related to exploration of energy-related resources, the efficiency and safety of exploitation procedures, power plant siting, environmental monitoring and assessment, and the transportation infrastructure.

  3. Inhibition of polar calcium movement and gravitropism in roots treated with auxin-transport inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. S.; Mulkey, T. J.; Evans, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Primary roots of maize (Zea mays L.) and pea (Pisum sativum L.) exhibit strong positive gravitropism. In both species, gravistimulation induces polar movement of calcium across the root tip from the upper side to the lower side. Roots of onion (Allium cepa L.) are not responsive to gravity and gravistimulation induces little or no polar movement of calcium across the root tip. Treatment of maize or pea roots with inhibitors of auxin transport (morphactin, naphthylphthalamic acid, 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid) prevents both gravitropism and gravity-induced polar movement of calcium across the root tip. The results indicate that calcium movement and auxin movement are closely linked in roots and that gravity-induced redistribution of calcium across the root cap may play an important role in the development of gravitropic curvature.

  4. Calcium-sensitive MRI contrast agents based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasijevic, Tatjana; Shusteff, Maxim; Fam, Peter; Jasanoff, Alan

    2006-10-03

    We describe a family of calcium indicators for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), formed by combining a powerful iron oxide nanoparticle-based contrast mechanism with the versatile calcium-sensing protein calmodulin and its targets. Calcium-dependent protein-protein interactions drive particle clustering and produce up to 5-fold changes in T2 relaxivity, an indication of the sensors' potency. A variant based on conjugates of wild-type calmodulin and the peptide M13 reports concentration changes near 1 microM Ca(2+), suitable for detection of elevated intracellular calcium levels. The midpoint and cooperativity of the response can be tuned by mutating the protein domains that actuate the sensor. Robust MRI signal changes are achieved even at nanomolar particle concentrations (calcium levels. When combined with technologies for cellular delivery of nanoparticulate agents, these sensors and their derivatives may be useful for functional molecular imaging of biological signaling networks in live, opaque specimens.

  5. Calcium Sensing by Recoverin: Effect of Protein Conformation on Ion Affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timr, Štěpán; Kadlec, Jan; Srb, Pavel; Ollila, O H Samuli; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2018-04-05

    The detailed functional mechanism of recoverin, which acts as a myristoyl switch at the rod outer-segment disk membrane, is elucidated by direct and replica-exchange molecular dynamics. In accord with NMR structural evidence and calcium binding assays, simulations point to the key role of enhanced calcium binding to the EF3 loop of the semiopen state of recoverin as compared to the closed state. This 2-4-order decrease in calcium dissociation constant stabilizes the semiopen state in response to the increase of cytosolic calcium concentration in the vicinity of recoverin. A second calcium ion then binds to the EF2 loop and, consequently, the structure of the protein changes from the semiopen to the open state. The latter has the myristoyl chain extruded to the cytosol, ready to act as a membrane anchor of recoverin.

  6. Mammary-Specific Ablation of the Calcium-Sensing Receptor During Lactation Alters Maternal Calcium Metabolism, Milk Calcium Transport, and Neonatal Calcium Accrual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamillapalli, Ramanaiah; VanHouten, Joshua; Dann, Pamela; Bikle, Daniel; Chang, Wenhan; Brown, Edward

    2013-01-01

    To meet the demands for milk calcium, the lactating mother adjusts systemic calcium and bone metabolism by increasing dietary calcium intake, increasing bone resorption, and reducing renal calcium excretion. As part of this adaptation, the lactating mammary gland secretes PTHrP into the maternal circulation to increase bone turnover and mobilize skeletal calcium stores. Previous data have suggested that, during lactation, the breast relies on the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) to coordinate PTHrP secretion and milk calcium transport with calcium availability. To test this idea genetically, we bred BLG-Cre mice with CaSR-floxed mice to ablate the CaSR specifically from mammary epithelial cells only at the onset of lactation (CaSR-cKO mice). Loss of the CaSR in the lactating mammary gland did not disrupt alveolar differentiation or milk production. However, it did increase the secretion of PTHrP into milk and decreased the transport of calcium from the circulation into milk. CaSR-cKO mice did not show accelerated bone resorption, but they did have a decrease in bone formation. Loss of the mammary gland CaSR resulted in hypercalcemia, decreased PTH secretion, and increased renal calcium excretion in lactating mothers. Finally, loss of the mammary gland CaSR resulted in decreased calcium accrual by suckling neonates, likely due to the combination of increased milk PTHrP and decreased milk calcium. These results demonstrate that the mammary gland CaSR coordinates maternal bone and calcium metabolism, calcium transport into milk, and neonatal calcium accrual during lactation. PMID:23782944

  7. Effect of anions or foods on absolute bioavailability of calcium from calcium salts in mice by pharmacokinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Zenei Taira, Zenei; Ueda,Yukari

    2013-01-01

    Yukari Ueda, Zenei TairaFaculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Tokushima, JapanAbstract: We studied the absolute bioavailability of calcium from calcium L-lactate in mice using pharmacokinetics, and reviewed the absolute bioavailability of calcium from three other calcium salts in mice previously studied: calcium chloride, calcium acetate, and calcium ascorbate. The results showed that calcium metabolism is linear between intravenous administration of 15 mg/kg and 30 ...

  8. Radioisotope 45Ca labeling four calcium chemical compounds and tracing calcium bioavailability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Hui; Zhen Rong; Niu Huisheng; Li Huaifen

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To build up a new method of the radioisotope 45 Ca labeling four calcium chemical compounds, observe and tracing bioavailability change of calcium labeled with radioisotope 45 Ca. Methods: The calcium gluconate (Ca-Glu), calcium citrate (Ca-Cit), calcium carbonate (Ca-Car) and calcium L-threonate (Ca-Thr)were labeled by radioisotope 45 Ca. Four calcium chemical compounds of 45 Ca labeling were used of calcium content 200 mg/kg in the rats and measure the absorption content and bioavailability of calcium in tissue of heart, lever spleen, stomach, kidney, brain, intestine, whole blood, urine, faeces. Results: 1) Radioisotope 45 Ca labeling calcium chemical compound has high radio intensity, more steady standard curve and recover rate. 2) The absorption of organic calcium chemical compounds is higher than the inorganic calcium chemical compound in the study of calcium bioavailability. Conclusion: The method of tracing with radioisotope 45 Ca labeling calcium chemical compounds has the characteristic of the sensitive, objective, accurate and steady in the study of calcium bioavailability

  9. Remote maintenance development for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Eisuke; Shibanuma, Kiyoshi

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the overall ITER remote maintenance design concept developed mainly for in-vessel components such as diverters and blankets, and outlines the ITER R and D program to develop remote handling equipment and radiation hard components. Reactor structures inside the ITER cryostat must be maintained remotely due to DT operation, making remote handling technology basic to reactor design. The overall maintenance scenario and design concepts have been developed, and maintenance design feasibility, including fabrication and testing of full-scale in-vessel remote maintenance handling equipment and tool, is being verified. (author)

  10. Remote maintenance development for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, Eisuke [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Shibanuma, Kiyoshi

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes the overall ITER remote maintenance design concept developed mainly for in-vessel components such as diverters and blankets, and outlines the ITER R and D program to develop remote handling equipment and radiation hard components. Reactor structures inside the ITER cryostat must be maintained remotely due to DT operation, making remote handling technology basic to reactor design. The overall maintenance scenario and design concepts have been developed, and maintenance design feasibility, including fabrication and testing of full-scale in-vessel remote maintenance handling equipment and tool, is being verified. (author)

  11. Proteinaceous and oligosaccharidic elicitors induce different calcium signatures in the nucleus of tobacco cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecourieux, David; Lamotte, Olivier; Bourque, Stéphane; Wendehenne, David; Mazars, Christian; Ranjeva, Raoul; Pugin, Alain

    2005-12-01

    We previously reported elevated cytosolic calcium levels in tobacco cells in response to elicitors [D. Lecourieux, C. Mazars, N. Pauly, R. Ranjeva, A. Pugin, Analysis and effects of cytosolic free calcium elevations in response to elicitors in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia cells, Plant Cell 14 (2002) 2627-2641]. These data suggested that in response to elicitors, Ca2+, as a second messenger, was involved in both systemic acquired resistance (RSA) and/or hypersensitive response (HR) depending on calcium signature. Here, we used transformed tobacco cells with apoaequorin expressed in the nucleus to monitor changes in free nuclear calcium concentrations ([Ca2+](nuc)) in response to elicitors. Two types of elicitors are compared: proteins leading to necrosis including four elicitins and harpin, and non-necrotic elicitors including flagellin (flg22) and two oligosaccharidic elicitors, namely the oligogalacturonides (OGs) and the beta-1,3-glucan laminarin. Our data indicate that the proteinaceous elicitors induced a pronounced and sustainable [Ca2+](nuc) elevation, relative to the small effects of oligosaccharidic elicitors. This [Ca2+](nuc) elevation, which seems insufficient to induce cell death, is unlikely to result directly from the diffusion of calcium from the cytosol. The [Ca2+](nuc) rise depends on free cytosolic calcium, IP3, and active oxygen species (AOS) but is independent of nitric oxide.

  12. Calcium regulation and Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepthi Rapaka

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the neuron induces transient fluctuations in [Ca2+]i. This transient rise in [Ca2+]i is dependent on calcium entry via calcium channels and release of calcium from intracellular stores, finally resulting in increase in calcium levels, which activates calcium regulatory proteins to restore the resting calcium levels by binding to the calcium-binding proteins, sequestration into the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria, and finally extrusion of calcium spike potential from the cell by adenosine triphosphate-driven Ca2+ pumps and the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. Improper regulation of calcium signaling, sequentially, likely contributes to synaptic dysfunction and excitotoxic and/or apoptotic death of the vulnerable neuronal populations. The cognitive decline associated with normal aging is not only due to neuronal loss, but is fairly the result of synaptic connectivity. Many evidences support that Ca2+ dyshomeostasis is implicated in normal brain aging. Thus the chief factor associated with Alzheimer’s disease was found to be increase in the levels of free intracellular calcium, demonstrating that the excessive levels might lead to cell death, which provides a key target for the calcium channel blockers might be used as the neuroprotective agents in Alzheimer’s disease.

  13. Remote monitoring demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, Susan; Olsen, John

    2006-01-01

    The recently upgraded remote monitoring system at the Joyo Experimental Reactor uses a DCM-14 camera module and GEMINI software. The final data is compatible both with the IAEA-approved GARS review software and the ALIS software that was used for this demonstration. Features of the remote monitoring upgrade emphasized compatibility with IAEA practice. This presentation gives particular attention to the selection process for meeting network security considerations at the O'arai site. The Joyo system is different from the NNCA's ACPF system, in that it emphasizes use of IAEA standard camera technology and data acquisition and transmission software. In the demonstration itself, a temporary virtual private network (VPN) between the meeting room and the server at Sandia in Albuquerque allowed attendees to observe data stored from routine transmissions from the Joyo Fresh Fuel Storage to Sandia. Image files from a fuel movement earlier in the month showed Joyo workers and IAEA inspectors carrying out a transfer. (author)

  14. RemoteLabs Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Crabeel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a first step towards the implementation of a framework for remote experimentation of electric machines – the RemoteLabs platform. This project was focused on the development of two main modules: the user Web-based and the electric machines interfaces. The Web application provides the user with a front-end and interacts with the back-end – the user and experiment persistent data. The electric machines interface is implemented as a distributed client server application where the clients, launched by the Web application, interact with the server modules located in platforms physically connected the electric machines drives. Users can register and authenticate, schedule, specify and run experiments and obtain results in the form of CSV, XML and PDF files. These functionalities were successfully tested with real data, but still without including the electric machines. This inclusion is part of another project scheduled to start soon.

  15. Recruiting in remote locations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ionel, C. [Enerflex Systems Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    This presentation provided details of Enerflex, a leading supplier of products and services to the oil and gas industry, and outlined their personnel hiring policies. Enerflex's core values include community involvement and divisional logo branding. The extensive training that is provided places an emphasis on employee empowerment. The company also places an emphasis on employee safety, diversity, and team building. Competitive salaries are offered along with generous equipment allowances and a flexible benefits program. Benefits include travel and overtime rates; health benefits; retirement savings; scholarship programs; career opportunities; and apprenticeship programs. External technical training is provided. An employee referral program has been developed, and the company's recruitment program also advertises in remote newspapers to develop career streams within remote communities. tabs., figs.

  16. Remote handling in ZEPHYR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andelfinger, C.; Lackner, E.; Ulrich, M.; Weber, G.; Schilling, H.B.

    1982-04-01

    A conceptual design of the ZEPHYR building is described. The listed radiation data show that remote handling devices will be necessary in most areas of the building. For difficult repair and maintenance works it is intended to transfer complete units from the experimental hall to a hot cell which provides better working conditions. The necessary crane systems and other transport means are summarized as well as suitable commercially available manipulators and observation devices. The conept of automatic devices for cutting and welding and other operations inside the vacuum vessel and the belonging position control system is sketched. Guidelines for the design of passive components are set up in order to facilitate remote operation. (orig.)

  17. Remote Ischemic Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusch, Gerd; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Przyklenk, Karin; Redington, Andrew; Yellon, Derek

    2014-01-01

    In remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) brief, reversible episodes of ischemia with reperfusion in one vascular bed, tissue or organ confer a global protective phenotype and render remote tissues and organs resistant to ischemia/reperfusion injury. The peripheral stimulus can be chemical, mechanical or electrical and involves activation of peripheral sensory nerves. The signal transfer to the heart or other organs is through neuronal and humoral communications. Protection can be transferred, even across species, with plasma-derived dialysate and involves nitric oxide, stromal derived factor-1α, microRNA-144, but also other, not yet identified factors. Intracardiac signal transduction involves: adenosine, bradykinin, cytokines, and chemokines, which activate specific receptors; intracellular kinases; and mitochondrial function. RIC by repeated brief inflation/deflation of a blood pressure cuff protects against endothelial dysfunction and myocardial injury in percutaneous coronary interventions, coronary artery bypass grafting and reperfused acute myocardial infarction. RIC is safe and effective, noninvasive, easily feasible and inexpensive. PMID:25593060

  18. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-11-27

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC.

  19. Detection of irradiation history for health foods. Calcium salt of organic acid and its basic ingredient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, Masayuki; Nakagawa, Seiko; Yunoki, Shunji; Ohyabu, Yoshimi

    2013-01-01

    Calcium carbonate and calcium salt of organic acid are well-known food additives used for the improvement of the shelf life and eating quality of health food. Calcium carbonate is a precursor in the synthesis of calcium salts of organic acid. Certain calcium carbonates made of natural limestone mined from very old stratum have silicate minerals exposed to a low level of natural radiation over a long period of time and food additives derived from calcium carbonates contained of such silicate minerals are possible to classify as irradiated foods by PSL and TL analysis in spite of non-irradiation. The study of calcium carbonates and calcium salts of organic acid obtained from different producers were allow to provided appropriate decisions by using the information of both the TL response (Glow1 peak temperature and TL ratio) and PSL ratio. ESR measurements of radicals in such food additives caused by gamma- irradiation were effective tool for correctly determining for irradiation history of those because the measurements were not affected by silicate minerals contained in those. (author)

  20. Calcium intake and 28-year cardiovascular and coronary heart disease mortality in Dutch civil servants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Vijver, L P; van der Waal, M A; Weterings, K G; Dekker, J M; Schouten, E G; Kok, F J

    1992-02-01

    Data obtained from a general health examination in 1953-1954 of 2605 middle-aged Dutch civil servants were analysed to investigate the relation between dietary calcium and cardiovascular (CVD) and coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality. Calcium intake was assessed at baseline by a 1-week food frequency recall. Multivariate adjusted odds ratios (OR) were calculated using the highest quintile of calcium intake as the reference. No statistically significant associations were observed for low calcium intake in 15 and 28 years of follow-up in both men and women. For men, multivariate adjusted OR for the lowest quintile of calcium intake were 1.3 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.8-1.9) and 0.9 (95% CI: 0.6-1.6) for 28-year CVD and CHD mortality, respectively. For women, corresponding OR were 1.1 (95% CI: 0.6-2.0) and 1.1 (95% CI: 0.5-2.5). Although an inverse association between calcium intake and CVD and CHD mortality, possibly mediated by blood pressure, might be hypothesized, no clear association was observed. Because dietary patterns in the 1950s were quite stable, and major calcium sources were addressed, misclassification of calcium intake may not be fully responsible for this finding.