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Sample records for release small amounts

  1. Method for optical 15N analysis of small amounts of nitrogen gas released from an automatic nitrogen analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arima, Yasuhiro

    1981-01-01

    A method of optical 15 N analysis is proposed for application to small amounts of nitrogen gas released from an automatic nitrogen analyzer (model ANA-1300, Carlo Erba, Milano) subjected to certain set modifications. The ANA-1300 was combined with a vacuum line attached by a molecular sieve 13X column. The nitrogen gas released from the ANA-1300 was introduced with a carrier gas of helium into the molecular sieve column which was pre-evacuated at 10 -4 Torr and cooled with outer liquid nitrogen. After removal of the helium by evacuation, the nitrogen gas fixed on the molecular sieve was released by warming the column, and then, it was sealed into pre-evacuated pyrex glass tubes at 4.5 - 5.0 Torr. In the preparation of discharge tubes, contamination of unlabelled nitrogen occurred from the carrier gas of standard grade helium, and the relative lowering of the 15 N value by it was estimated to be less than 1% when over 700 μg nitrogen was charged on the ANA-1300; when 200 μg nitrogen was charged, it was about 3.5%. However, the effect of the contamination could be corrected for by knowing the amount of contaminant nitrogen. In the analysis of plant materials by the proposed method, the coefficient of variation was less than 2%, and no significant difference was observed between results given by the present method and by the ordinary method in which samples were directly pyrolyzed in the discharge tubes by the Dumas method. The present method revealed about 1.5 μg of cross-contaminated nitrogen and was applicable to more than 200 μg of sample nitrogen. (author)

  2. Possible chaoticity for the time series of the amount of nuclear information released by the newsmedia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, T.

    1995-01-01

    The amount of information concerning nuclear problems was time analysed which has been released by three types of the newsmedia in Japan, the press, television and magazines during the past 20 years. The time series of the logarithmic value of the amount released by some of the newsmedia was found to be possibly chaotic, or at least to be non-stochastic. Such a characteristic of time series can be interpreted as a result of the exertion of a certain sort of selection process in the interior of the newsmedia in deciding an event as news to be released. (author)

  3. Neutron Damage in Steels Containing Small Amounts of Boron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, H P

    1961-05-15

    Certain low alloy steels contain small amounts (0.003 to 0.007 w/o) of boron which element contributes to the development of the air hardening properties of these steels. Such steels appear attractive for reactor pressure vessel construction but the question arises whether they will, due to the (n,{alpha}) reaction in boron, be more susceptible to neutron radiation damage than other steels which do not contain boron. We have attempted to estimate the importance of damage arising through boron fission relative to that caused by fast neutrons by assuming that the two sources of damage will be proportional to the numbers of displaced atoms produced in the two processes when no annealing or re combination of defects occurs. Within the approximations used we conclude that in a neutron spectrum which may be represented by an equivalent thermal flux {phi}{sub t} and an equivalent fast flux at 1 MeV of {phi}{sub f}, then D, the ratio of damage to boron fission to that caused by fast neutrons, is D = 4.5 x 10{sup -2} {phi}{sub t}/{phi}{sub f} (for 0. 003 w/o B). For the conditions at the inside of the reactor tank to R3 this would imply D = 1.2 x 10{sup -2} , i.e. if the R3 tank were built with a steel containing 0.003 w/o B then damage due to boron fission would be only {approx} 1 % of that caused by fast neutrons. Further problems with such steels as here discussed are the probability of embrittlement due to the introduction of boron fission fragments lithium and helium and the possibility of a radiation enhanced diffusion of boron which might lead to accentuated slow strain rate embrittlement. We argue that none of these problems should arise. It is concluded that a constructional steel containing 0.003 to 0.007 w/o B should not on this account be more susceptible to radiation damage than other non boron containing steels.

  4. Evaluation of release amount of radioactivity from Chernobyl accident and of resulting radiological consequence in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongxing

    1987-01-01

    Three kinds of methods are used to evaluate the release amount from Chernoby1 RBMK-1000 reactor accident, i.e. (1) estimation by comparison with Windscale accident; (2) estimation in terms of the stock in the core; and (3) estimation according to the available monitoring data form adjacent countries such as Poland and Finland. The results obtained are as follows: the release of I-131 was 0.1-1.5 EBq, which is approximately 4-50% of the stock in the core; the release amount of Ru-103 was comparable to that of Cs-137, both approximately 5-10% of that of I-131; the volatile nuclides such as Mo-99, Ru-103, Te-132, Cs-137 etc., were in the order of 0.4 EBq; involatile nuclides were 0.2 EBq; noble gases and other fission products 10 EBq; and the total amount released was about 20 EBq, which taken together 8% of the stock in the core. The radioactive cloud cluster passed through over the area of China in the beginning of May. It was estimated that the total amount of I-131 in air over China area was about 1.6 PB q , Cs-137 about 0.3 PB q , Ru-103 about 0.2 PB q ; the total fallout in the area of China was about 3 PB q for I-131, about 0.1 PB q for Cs-137, about 0.3 PB q for Ru-103. The resulting effective dose equavalent commitment to critical group individual was about 60 μSv, collective effective dose equavalent commitment received by the population of China was about 1 x 10 4 man.Sv

  5. Physical protection of small amounts of nuclear material or contaminated parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zipper, R.

    2002-01-01

    In July 2001 an incident was recognized where a worker occupied with decontamination of structures in a shut down reprocessing plant for spent fuel illegally removed a small amount of radioactive material from the facility site. The investigations exhibited that he brought this material to the apartment of his partner in life and she incorporated significantly α-activity in the form of plutonium. Immediately after the incident was discovered the supervisory authorities and the operating company of the facility took action to minimize the harms to third parties arising from the radioactive material released and to prevent a similar event to occur. As the overall inventory of radioactive material in the shut down facility at the time the theft occurred was below the limit where measures of physical protection are required by the German regulatory work discussions were raised on consequences to be drawn from this incident to close this obvious gap. The German Federal Ministry for Environment, Nature Protection and Reactor Safety (BMU) as the superior competent authority therefore ordered GRS to draft a set of fundamental requirements for future rules to make a repetition of the initiating incident unlikely. Further discussions of the authorities involved on supplementary rules and guidelines aiming to better protect small amounts of radioactive material from being illegally removed out of nuclear facilities and laboratories are based on these fundamentals defined by GRS but not yet finished. (orig.)

  6. Environmental contamination due to release of a large amount of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Hiroshi

    1988-01-01

    Tritium release incidents have occurred many times in the Savannah Rever Plant in the U.S. A tritium release incident also took place in the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The present article outlines the reports by the plant and laboratory on these incidents and makes some comments on environmental contamination that may results from release of a large amount of tritium from nuclear fusion facilities. Tritium is normally released in the form of a combination of chemical compounds such as HT, DT and T 2 and oxides such as HTO, DTO and T 2 O. The percentage of the oxides is given in the reports by the plant. Oxides, which can be absorbed through the skin, are considered to be nearly a thousand times more toxic than the other type of tritium compounds. The HT type compounds (HT, DT and T 2 ) can be oxidized by microorganisms in soil into oxides (HTO, DTO and T 2 O) and therefore, great care should also given to this type of compounds. After each accidental tritium release, the health physics group of the plant collected various environmental samples, including ground surface water, milk, leaves of plants, soil and human urine, in leeward areas. Results on the contamination of surface water, fish and underground water are outlined and discussed. (Nogami, K.)

  7. Sorption of small amounts of europium(III) on iron(III) hydroxide and oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.; Gessner, M.; Wolf, R.H.H.

    1979-01-01

    The sorption of small amounts of europium(III) on iron(III) hydroxide and oxide has been studied as a function of pH. The mechanism of sorption is discussed. Optimum conditions have been found for the preconcentration of small or trace amounts of europium(III) by iron(III) hydroxide and oxide. The influence of complexing agents (EDTA, oxalate, tartrate and 5-sulfosalicylic acid) on the sorption of small amounts of europium(III) on iron(III) oxide has also been studied. (author)

  8. Release measurement of great amount of waste. Conveyor belt versus wire mesh pallet systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokcic-Kostic, Marina; Schultheis, Roland; Langer, Felix [NUKEM Technologies Engineering Services GmbH, Alzenau (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Great amount of waste has to be measured for release during the decommissioning and rebuilding of nuclear facilities and installation. Since the enclosed storage or decontamination is very expensive it is advisable for economic reasons to separate contaminated material. The necessary measurement is however a time and cost intensive work which has carefully provided. There are two general methods to perform this task: one is a continuously running system on the basis of a conveyor belt system. The other approach is a discontinuously running system using wire mesh pallets. With the knowledge from existing installations this article will discuss the pro's and contra's and show the limits of the systems.

  9. Imaging of small amounts of pleural fluid. Part one - small pleural effusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocijancic, I.

    2005-01-01

    Background. Small pleural effusions are not readily identified on conventional radiographic views of the chest, but may be an important finding, sometimes leading, via thoracocentesis, to a definitive diagnosis of pleural carcinomatosis, infection or transudate. A small meniscus sign and a medial displacement of the costophrenic angle are the only subtle signs of small accumulations of fluid on posteroanterior chest X-rays. On lateral views the finding of a small meniscus sign in the posterior costophrenic angle is the sign of small pleural effusion. Conclusions. Lateral decubitus chest radiographs were used for many years for the diagnosis of small pleural effusions. In last decades ultrasonography of pleural space becomes a leading real-time method for demonstrating small pleural effusions. (author)

  10. Simplified assessment of segmental gastrointestinal transit time with orally small amount of barium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Weitang; Zhang, Zhiyong; Liu, Jinbo; Li, Zhen; Song, Junmin; Wu, Changcai [Department of Colorectal Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, Zhengzhou University, 450052 Zhengzhou (China); Wang, Guixian, E-mail: guixianwang@hotmail.com [Department of Colorectal Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, Zhengzhou University, 450052 Zhengzhou (China)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness and advantage of small amount of barium in the measurement of gastrointestinal transmission function in comparison with radio-opaque pallets. Methods: Protocal 1: 8 healthy volunteers (male 6, female 2) with average age 40 ± 6.1 were subjected to the examination of radio-opaque pellets and small amount of barium with the interval of 1 week. Protocol 2: 30 healthy volunteers in group 1 (male 8, female 22) with average age 42.5 ± 8.1 and 50 patients with chronic functional constipation in group 2 (male 11, female 39) with average age 45.7 ± 7.8 were subjected to the small amount of barium examination. The small amount of barium was made by 30 g barium dissolved in 200 ml breakfast. After taking breakfast which contains barium, objectives were followed with abdominal X-ray at 4, 8, 12, 24, 48, 72, 96 h until the barium was evacuated totally. Results: Small amount of barium presented actual chyme or stool transit. The transit time of radio-opaque pallets through the whole gastrointestinal tract was significantly shorter than that of barium (37 ± 8 h vs. 47 ± 10 h, P < 0.05) in healthy people. The transit times of barium in constipation patients were markedly prolonged in colon (61.1 ± 22 vs. 37.3 ± 11, P < 0.01) and rectum (10.8 ± 3.7 vs. 2.3 ± 0.8 h, P < 0.01) compared with unconstipated volunteers. Transit times in individual gastrointestinal segments were also recorded by using small amount of barium, which allowed identifying the subtypes of constipation. Conclusion: The small amount barium examination is a convenient and low cost method to provide the most useful and reliable information on the transmission function of different gastrointestinal segments and able to classify the subtypes of slow transit constipation.

  11. Simplified assessment of segmental gastrointestinal transit time with orally small amount of barium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Weitang; Zhang, Zhiyong; Liu, Jinbo; Li, Zhen; Song, Junmin; Wu, Changcai; Wang, Guixian

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness and advantage of small amount of barium in the measurement of gastrointestinal transmission function in comparison with radio-opaque pallets. Methods: Protocal 1: 8 healthy volunteers (male 6, female 2) with average age 40 ± 6.1 were subjected to the examination of radio-opaque pellets and small amount of barium with the interval of 1 week. Protocol 2: 30 healthy volunteers in group 1 (male 8, female 22) with average age 42.5 ± 8.1 and 50 patients with chronic functional constipation in group 2 (male 11, female 39) with average age 45.7 ± 7.8 were subjected to the small amount of barium examination. The small amount of barium was made by 30 g barium dissolved in 200 ml breakfast. After taking breakfast which contains barium, objectives were followed with abdominal X-ray at 4, 8, 12, 24, 48, 72, 96 h until the barium was evacuated totally. Results: Small amount of barium presented actual chyme or stool transit. The transit time of radio-opaque pallets through the whole gastrointestinal tract was significantly shorter than that of barium (37 ± 8 h vs. 47 ± 10 h, P < 0.05) in healthy people. The transit times of barium in constipation patients were markedly prolonged in colon (61.1 ± 22 vs. 37.3 ± 11, P < 0.01) and rectum (10.8 ± 3.7 vs. 2.3 ± 0.8 h, P < 0.01) compared with unconstipated volunteers. Transit times in individual gastrointestinal segments were also recorded by using small amount of barium, which allowed identifying the subtypes of constipation. Conclusion: The small amount barium examination is a convenient and low cost method to provide the most useful and reliable information on the transmission function of different gastrointestinal segments and able to classify the subtypes of slow transit constipation

  12. Diagnostic imaging of small amounts of pleural fluid: pleural effusion vs. physiologic pleural fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocijancic, Igor

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this article is to present an overview of our 10 years clinical research work and early clinical experience with small pleural effusions. Small amounts of pleural fluid are severely difficult to identify with imaging methods (chest x-rays and ultrasound). Nevertheless, it may be an important finding, sometimes leading to a definitive diagnosis of pleural carcinomatosis, infection or other pathologic condition. Chest x-rays were used for many years for the diagnosis of small pleural effusions. Lateral decubitus chest radiographs represented a gold standard for imaging of small amounts of plural fluid for more than 80 years. In the last two decades, ultrasonography of pleural space became a leading real-time method for demonstrating small pleural effusions. Furthermore, the advent of sonographic technology actually enables detection of physiologic pleural fluid in some otherwise healthy individuals. In conclusion, new definitions of the key terms in the field of diagnostic imaging of small amounts of pleural fluid seem to be justified. We suggest that the term pleural fluid should determine physiologic pleural space condition while the term pleural effusion should only be used in the cases of pleural involvement or pleural illness.

  13. Determination of small amounts of zinc in cadmium with iodonitrotetrazolium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Kamburova, M.

    1976-01-01

    An extraction photometric method for determining small amounts of zinc in metallic cadmium with iodonitrotetrazolium chloride was suggested. This method is specific under the stipulated conditions. The mean standard deviation is 1.43%x0.01% zinc can be determined in cadmium. (author)

  14. Effectiveness of small daily amounts of progressive resistance training for frequent neck/shoulder pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Saervoll, Charlotte A; Mortensen, Ole S

    2011-01-01

    Regular physical exercise is a cornerstone in rehabilitation programs, but adherence to comprehensive exercise remains low. This study determined the effectiveness of small daily amounts of progressive resistance training for relieving neck/shoulder pain in healthy adults with frequent symptoms...

  15. Learning the Structure of Bayesian Network from Small Amount of Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan COCU

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Many areas of artificial intelligence must handling with imperfection ofinformation. One of the ways to do this is using representation and reasoning withBayesian networks. Creation of a Bayesian network consists in two stages. First stage isto design the node structure and directed links between them. Choosing of a structurefor network can be done either through empirical developing by human experts orthrough machine learning algorithm. The second stage is completion of probabilitytables for each node. Using a machine learning method is useful, especially when wehave a big amount of leaning data. But in many fields the amount of data is small,incomplete and inconsistent. In this paper, we make a case study for choosing the bestlearning method for small amount of learning data. Means more experiments we dropconclusion of using existent methods for learning a network structure.

  16. Influence of ultrasonic energy on dispersion of aggregates and released amounts of organic matter and polyvalent cations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, M.; Kleber, M.; Berhe, A. A.

    2010-12-01

    Aggregates play important roles in soil carbon storage and stabilization. Identification of scale-dependent mechanisms of soil aggregate formation and stability is necessary to predict and eventually manage the flow of carbon through terrestrial ecosystems. Application of ultrasonic energy is a common tool to disperse soil aggregates. In this study, we used ultra sonic energy (100 to 2000 J cm-3) to determine the amount of polyvalent cations and organic matter involved in aggregation processes in three arable and three forest soils that varied in soil mineral composition. To determine the amount of organic matter and cations released after application of different amount of ultrasonic energy, we removed the coarse fraction (>250 µm). The remaining residue (solid residue freeze dried before we analyzed the amounts of water-extracted organic carbon (OC), Fe, Al, Ca, Mn, and Mg in the filtrates. The extracted OM and solid residues were further characterized by Fourier Transformed Infra Red spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy. Our results show a linear increase in amount of dissolved OC with increasing amounts of ultra sonic energy up to 1500 J cm-3 indicating maximum dispersion of soil aggregates at this energy level independent from soil type or land use. In contrast to Mn, and Mg, the amounts of dissolved Ca, Fe, and Al increase with increasing ultra sonic energy up to 1500 J cm-3. At 1500 J cm-3, the absolute amounts of OC, Ca, Fe, and Al released were specific for each soil type, likely indicating differences in type of OM-mineral interactions involved in micro-scaled aggregation processes. The amounts of dissolved Fe, and Al released after an application of 1500 J cm-3 are not related to oxalate- and dithionite- extractable, or total Al content indicating less disintegration of pedogenic oxides or clay minerals due to high levels of ultrasonic energy.

  17. Density measurements of small amounts of high-density solids by a floatation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akabori, Mitsuo; Shiba, Koreyuki

    1984-09-01

    A floatation method for determining the density of small amounts of high-density solids is described. The use of a float combined with an appropriate floatation liquid allows us to measure the density of high-density substances in small amounts. Using the sample of 0.1 g in weight, the floatation liquid of 3.0 g cm -3 in density and the float of 1.5 g cm -3 in apparent density, the sample densities of 5, 10 and 20 g cm -3 are determined to an accuracy better than +-0.002, +-0.01 and +-0.05 g cm -3 , respectively that correspond to about +-1 x 10 -5 cm 3 in volume. By means of appropriate degassing treatments, the densities of (Th,U)O 2 pellets of --0.1 g in weight and --9.55 g cm -3 in density were determined with an accuracy better than +-0.05 %. (author)

  18. Neural network CT image reconstruction method for small amount of projection data

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, X F; Takeda, T

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for two-dimensional image reconstruction by using a multi-layer neural network. Though a conventionally used object function of such a neural network is composed of a sum of squared errors of the output data, we define an object function composed of a sum of squared residuals of an integral equation. By employing an appropriate numerical line integral for this integral equation, we can construct a neural network which can be used for CT image reconstruction for cases with small amount of projection data. We applied this method to some model problems and obtained satisfactory results. This method is especially useful for analyses of laboratory experiments or field observations where only a small amount of projection data is available in comparison with the well-developed medical applications.

  19. Neural network CT image reconstruction method for small amount of projection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, X.F.; Fukuhara, M.; Takeda, T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for two-dimensional image reconstruction by using a multi-layer neural network. Though a conventionally used object function of such a neural network is composed of a sum of squared errors of the output data, we define an object function composed of a sum of squared residuals of an integral equation. By employing an appropriate numerical line integral for this integral equation, we can construct a neural network which can be used for CT image reconstruction for cases with small amount of projection data. We applied this method to some model problems and obtained satisfactory results. This method is especially useful for analyses of laboratory experiments or field observations where only a small amount of projection data is available in comparison with the well-developed medical applications

  20. An alkaline separation method for detection of small amount of DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Kazuo; Okada, Shigefumi

    1981-01-01

    An alkaline separation technique originally established by Ahnstroem is modified to detect small amount of DNA damage in X-irradiated mouse leukemic L5178Y cells. It is made quantitative by calibration with an alkaline sucrose gradient centrifugation. The present method would make it possible to study DNA damage and its repair within a dose range of X-rays where cell survival and mutation are usually investigated. It is also useful for detecting DNA damage caused by chemicals. (author)

  1. Enrichment and determination of small amounts of 90Sr/90Y in water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundschenk, H.

    1979-01-01

    Small amounts of 90 Sr/ 90 Y can be concentrated from large volumes of surface water (100 l) by precipitation of the phosphates, using bentonite as adsorber matrix. In the case of samples containing no or nearly no suspended matter (tap water, ground water, sea water), the daughter 90 Y can be extracted directly by using filter beds impregnated with HDEHP. The applicability of both techniques is demonstrated under realistic conditions. (orig.) 891 HP/orig. 892 MKO [de

  2. A simple biosynthetic pathway for large product generation from small substrate amounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Marko; Djordjevic, Magdalena

    2012-10-01

    A recently emerging discipline of synthetic biology has the aim of constructing new biosynthetic pathways with useful biological functions. A major application of these pathways is generating a large amount of the desired product. However, toxicity due to the possible presence of toxic precursors is one of the main problems for such production. We consider here the problem of generating a large amount of product from a potentially toxic substrate. To address this, we propose a simple biosynthetic pathway, which can be induced in order to produce a large number of the product molecules, by keeping the substrate amount at low levels. Surprisingly, we show that the large product generation crucially depends on fast non-specific degradation of the substrate molecules. We derive an optimal induction strategy, which allows as much as three orders of magnitude increase in the product amount through biologically realistic parameter values. We point to a recently discovered bacterial immune system (CRISPR/Cas in E. coli) as a putative example of the pathway analysed here. We also argue that the scheme proposed here can be used not only as a stand-alone pathway, but also as a strategy to produce a large amount of the desired molecules with small perturbations of endogenous biosynthetic pathways.

  3. A simple biosynthetic pathway for large product generation from small substrate amounts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djordjevic, Marko [Institute of Physiology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Biology, University of Belgrade (Serbia); Djordjevic, Magdalena [Institute of Physics Belgrade, University of Belgrade (Serbia)

    2012-10-01

    A recently emerging discipline of synthetic biology has the aim of constructing new biosynthetic pathways with useful biological functions. A major application of these pathways is generating a large amount of the desired product. However, toxicity due to the possible presence of toxic precursors is one of the main problems for such production. We consider here the problem of generating a large amount of product from a potentially toxic substrate. To address this, we propose a simple biosynthetic pathway, which can be induced in order to produce a large number of the product molecules, by keeping the substrate amount at low levels. Surprisingly, we show that the large product generation crucially depends on fast non-specific degradation of the substrate molecules. We derive an optimal induction strategy, which allows as much as three orders of magnitude increase in the product amount through biologically realistic parameter values. We point to a recently discovered bacterial immune system (CRISPR/Cas in E. coli) as a putative example of the pathway analysed here. We also argue that the scheme proposed here can be used not only as a stand-alone pathway, but also as a strategy to produce a large amount of the desired molecules with small perturbations of endogenous biosynthetic pathways. (paper)

  4. A simple biosynthetic pathway for large product generation from small substrate amounts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djordjevic, Marko; Djordjevic, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    A recently emerging discipline of synthetic biology has the aim of constructing new biosynthetic pathways with useful biological functions. A major application of these pathways is generating a large amount of the desired product. However, toxicity due to the possible presence of toxic precursors is one of the main problems for such production. We consider here the problem of generating a large amount of product from a potentially toxic substrate. To address this, we propose a simple biosynthetic pathway, which can be induced in order to produce a large number of the product molecules, by keeping the substrate amount at low levels. Surprisingly, we show that the large product generation crucially depends on fast non-specific degradation of the substrate molecules. We derive an optimal induction strategy, which allows as much as three orders of magnitude increase in the product amount through biologically realistic parameter values. We point to a recently discovered bacterial immune system (CRISPR/Cas in E. coli) as a putative example of the pathway analysed here. We also argue that the scheme proposed here can be used not only as a stand-alone pathway, but also as a strategy to produce a large amount of the desired molecules with small perturbations of endogenous biosynthetic pathways. (paper)

  5. Crustacean zooplankton release copious amounts of dissolved organic matter as taurine in the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Elisabeth L; Hansell, Dennis A; Varela, Marta M; Nieto-Cid, Mar; Herndl, Gerhard J; Sintes, Eva

    2017-11-01

    Taurine (Tau), an amino acid-like compound, is present in almost all marine metazoans including crustacean zooplankton. It plays an important physiological role in these organisms and is released into the ambient water throughout their life cycle. However, limited information is available on the release rates by marine organisms, the concentrations and turnover of Tau in the ocean. We determined dissolved free Tau concentrations throughout the water column and its release by abundant crustacean mesozooplankton at two open ocean sites (Gulf of Alaska and North Atlantic). At both locations, the concentrations of dissolved free Tau were in the low nM range (up to 15.7 nM) in epipelagic waters, declining sharply in the mesopelagic to about 0.2 nM and remaining fairly stable throughout the bathypelagic waters. Pacific amphipod-copepod assemblages exhibited lower dissolved free Tau release rates per unit biomass (0.8 ± 0.4 μmol g -1 C-biomass h -1 ) than Atlantic copepods (ranging between 1.3 ± 0.4 μmol g -1 C-biomass h -1 and 9.5 ± 2.1 μmol g -1 C-biomass h -1 ), in agreement with the well-documented inverse relationship between biomass-normalized excretion rates and body size. Our results indicate that crustacean zooplankton might contribute significantly to the dissolved organic matter flux in marine ecosystems via dissolved free Tau release. Based on the release rates and assuming steady state dissolved free Tau concentrations, turnover times of dissolved free Tau range from 0.05 d to 2.3 d in the upper water column and are therefore similar to those of dissolved free amino acids. This rapid turnover indicates that dissolved free Tau is efficiently consumed in oceanic waters, most likely by heterotrophic bacteria.

  6. Comparison of the Amount of Fluoride Release from Nanofilled Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Conventional and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumitha Upadhyay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate and compare the amount of fluoride release of conventional, resin modified and nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cements.Materials and Methods: Tablets of glass-ionomer cements were immersed in deionized water and incubated at 37◦C. After 1, 2, 7, 15 and 30 days, fluoride ion was measured under normal atmospheric conditions by fluoride ion selective electrode. Buffer (TISAB II was used to decomplex the fluoride ion and to provide a constant background ionic strength and to maintain the pH of water between 5.0 and 5.5 as the fluoride electrode is sensitive to changes in pH. Statistical evaluation was carried out by one way ANOVA (Analysis of Variance using SPSS 11.0. The significance level was set at p< 0.05.Results: The release of fluoride was highest on day 1 and there was a sudden fall on day 2 in all three groups. Initially fluoride release from conven-tional glass-ionomer cement was highest compared to the other two glass-ionomer cements, but the amount drastically reduced over the period. Although the amount of fluoride release was less than both the resin modified and nanofilled resin modified glass-ionomer cement, the release was sustained consistently for 30 daysConclusion: The cumulative fluoride release of nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cement was very less compared to the conventional and resin modified glass ionomer cements and Nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cement released less but steady fluoride as compared to other resin modified glass ionomer cements.

  7. Development of novel small molecules for imaging and drug release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanting

    Small organic molecules, including small molecule based fluorescent probes, small molecule based drugs or prodrugs, and smart multifunctional fluorescent drug delivery systems play important roles in biological research, drug discovery, and clinical practices. Despite the significant progress made in these fields, the development of novel and diverse small molecules is needed to meet various demands for research and clinical applications. My Ph.D study focuses on the development of novel functional molecules for recognition, imaging and drug release. In the first part, a turn-on fluorescent probe is developed for the detection of intracellular adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) levels based on multiplexing recognitions. Considering the unique and complicated structure of ATP molecules, a fluorescent probe has been implemented with improved sensitivity and selectivity due to two synergistic binding recognitions by incorporating of 2, 2'-dipicolylamine (Dpa)-Zn(II) for targeting of phospho anions and phenylboronic acid group for cis-diol moiety. The novel probe is able to detect intracellular ATP levels in SH-SY5Y cells. Meanwhile, the advantages of multiplexing recognition design concept have been demonstrated using two control molecules. In the second part, a prodrug system is developed to deliver multiple drugs within one small molecule entity. The prodrug is designed by using 1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl (NPE) as phototrigger, and biphenol biquaternary ammonium as the prodrug. With controlled photo activation, both DNA cross-linking agents mechlorethamine and o-quinone methide are delivered and released at the preferred site, leading to efficient DNA cross-links formation and cell death. The prodrug shows negligible cytotoxicity towards normal skin cells (Hekn cells) with and without UV activation, but displays potent activity towards cancer cells (HeLa cells) upon UV activation. The multiple drug release system may hold a great potential for practical application. In the

  8. Study on thermal stability and chemical structure of polyamide blended with small amount of Cu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Tsuyoshi; Ueno, Tomonaga; Kajiya, Takafumi; Ishikawa, Tomoyuki; Takeda, Kunihiko

    2007-01-01

    The thermal stability and the chemical structure of Polyamide 66 (PA66) blended with a small amount of copper have been studied. The thermal degradation of the blend with 35 ppm or more of copper was restrained and no strong influence of the concentration of copper was observed. The molecular weight of PA66 decreased by the thermal aging process but the amount of decrease of the blend was smaller than that of the non-blend. The water uptake of the blend increased. The chemical structure, which was observed by IR and NMR, changed slightly by blending with copper after aging at higher temperatures. Multiple items influenced the thermal stability of PA66 blended with a small amount of copper instead of just one. Namely, the main chain of PA66 is cut by heat and the degree of the cut is restrained by the copper. The diffusion time of copper atoms that disperse uniformly in the PA66 matrix is short enough to cover the individual amide groups and the effect enlarges the entire configuration of the PA66 chain to enhance the thermal stability. (author)

  9. Effect of increased exposure times on amount of residual monomer released from single-step self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunsoy, Mustafa; Botsali, Murat Selim; Tosun, Gonca; Yasar, Ahmet

    2015-10-16

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of increased exposure times on the amount of residual Bis-GMA, TEGDMA, HEMA and UDMA released from single-step self-etch adhesive systems. Two adhesive systems were used. The adhesives were applied to bovine dentin surface according to the manufacturer's instructions and were polymerized using an LED curing unit for 10, 20 and 40 seconds (n = 5). After polymerization, the specimens were stored in 75% ethanol-water solution (6 mL). Residual monomers (Bis-GMA, TEGDMA, UDMA and HEMA) that were eluted from the adhesives (after 10 minutes, 1 hour, 1 day, 7 days and 30 days) were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The data were analyzed using 1-way analysis of variance and Tukey HSD tests. Among the time periods, the highest amount of released residual monomers from adhesives was observed in the 10th minute. There were statistically significant differences regarding released Bis-GMA, UDMA, HEMA and TEGDMA between the adhesive systems (p<0.05). There were no significant differences among the 10, 20 and 40 second polymerization times according to their effect on residual monomer release from adhesives (p>0.05). Increasing the polymerization time did not have an effect on residual monomer release from single-step self-etch adhesives.

  10. Sequencing historical specimens: successful preparation of small specimens with low amounts of degraded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproul, John S; Maddison, David R

    2017-11-01

    Despite advances that allow DNA sequencing of old museum specimens, sequencing small-bodied, historical specimens can be challenging and unreliable as many contain only small amounts of fragmented DNA. Dependable methods to sequence such specimens are especially critical if the specimens are unique. We attempt to sequence small-bodied (3-6 mm) historical specimens (including nomenclatural types) of beetles that have been housed, dried, in museums for 58-159 years, and for which few or no suitable replacement specimens exist. To better understand ideal approaches of sample preparation and produce preparation guidelines, we compared different library preparation protocols using low amounts of input DNA (1-10 ng). We also explored low-cost optimizations designed to improve library preparation efficiency and sequencing success of historical specimens with minimal DNA, such as enzymatic repair of DNA. We report successful sample preparation and sequencing for all historical specimens despite our low-input DNA approach. We provide a list of guidelines related to DNA repair, bead handling, reducing adapter dimers and library amplification. We present these guidelines to facilitate more economical use of valuable DNA and enable more consistent results in projects that aim to sequence challenging, irreplaceable historical specimens. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Analytical developments in thermal ionization mass spectrometry for the isotopic analysis of very small amounts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mialle, S.

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of the French transmutation project of nuclear wastes, experiments consisted in the irradiation in a fast neutron reactor of few milligrams of isotopically enriched powders. Hence, the isotopic analysis of very small amount of irradiation products is one of the main issues. The aim of this study was to achieve analytical developments in thermal ionization mass spectrometry in order to accurately analyze these samples. Several axes were studied including the new total evaporation method, deposition techniques, electron multiplier potentialities and comparison between different isotope measurement techniques. Results showed that it was possible to drastically decrease the amounts needed for analysis, especially with Eu and Nd, while maintaining an uncertainty level in agreement with the project requirements. (author) [fr

  12. Preferences of dairy cows for three stall surface materials with small amounts of bedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norring, M; Manninen, E; de Passillé, A M; Rushen, J; Saloniemi, H

    2010-01-01

    Farmers' concerns about the economy, cost of labor, and hygiene have resulted in reduced use of organic bedding in stalls for dairy cows; however, the reduced use of organic bedding possibly impairs cow comfort. The effects of different stall surface materials were evaluated in an unheated building in which only a small amount of bedding was used. The lying time and preferences of 18 cows using 3 stall surface materials (concrete, soft rubber mat, and sand) were compared. All materials were lightly bedded with a small amount of straw, and the amount of straw added to each stall was measured. The cows only had access to stalls of one surface type while their lying time was observed. Lying times were longest on the rubber mats compared with other surfaces (rubber mat 768; concrete 727; sand 707+/-16 min/d). In a preference test, cows had access to 2 of the 3 types of stalls for 10 d and their stall preference was measured. Cows preferred stalls with rubber mats to stalls with a concrete floor (median 73 vs. 18 from a total of 160 observations per day; interquartile range was 27 and 12, respectively), but showed no preference for sand stalls compared with stalls with a concrete floor or with rubber mats. More straw was needed on sand stalls compared with concrete or mat (638+/-13 g/d on sand, 468+/-10 g/d on concrete, and 464+/-8 g/d on rubber mats). Lying times on bedded mats indicated that mats were comfortable for the cows. If availability or cost of bedding material requires limiting the amount of bedding used, rubber mats may help maintain cow comfort. Copyright 2010 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Imaging of small amounts of pleural fluid. Part two - physiologic pleural fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocijancic, I.

    2006-01-01

    Background. There are only a few articles reporting the possibility of radiographic and sonographic detection of physiologic pleural fluid in healthy individuals. In the last decade the advent of sonographic equipments enables the detection of small amounts of physiologic pleural fluid in about 20% of healthy individuals. In certain physiologic conditions (i.e. pregnancy) the physiologic pleural fluid could be detected more frequently by chest ultrasonography. Conclusions. A positive result, if detected, should not be taken as a sign of the occult thoracic disease. (author)

  14. Mary Poppins was right: Adding small amounts of sugar or salt reduces the bitterness of vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakke, Alyssa J; Stubbs, Cody A; McDowell, Elliott H; Moding, Kameron J; Johnson, Susan L; Hayes, John E

    2018-07-01

    Only a quarter of adults and 7% of children consume recommended amounts of vegetables each day. Often vegetables are not initially palatable due to bitterness, which may lead children and adults to refuse to taste or eat them. The objective of this research was to determine if very small amounts of sugar or salt (common household ingredients) could lead to significant reductions in bitterness intensity and increased hedonic ratings of green vegetable purees. For Experiment 1, three different green vegetable purees (broccoli, spinach, and kale) were prepared with different levels of sugar (0%, 0.6%, 1.2%, and 1.8%) or salt (0 and 0.2%). Samples were evaluated using standard descriptive analysis techniques with nine adults who completed more than 20 h of green vegetable specific training as a group. For Experiment 2, each vegetable puree was prepared with either 0% or 2% sugar, and bitterness was assessed via a forced choice task with 84 adults. For Experiment 3, each vegetable puree was prepared with 0%, 1%, or 2% sugar and rated for liking on standard 9 point hedonic scales by 99 adults. Experiments 1 and 2 showed that addition of small amounts of sugar and salt each reduced the bitterness (and increased sweetness and saltiness) from all three vegetables without altering other sensory properties (e.g. texture or aroma). Experiment 3 showed that adding sugar to vegetable purees increased hedonic ratings for adult consumers. We also found parents had mixed attitudes about the idea of adding sugar to foods intended for infants and toddlers. Further research on the effects of bitterness masking especially for specific populations (e.g., infants and young children or adults who have higher sensitivity to bitter taste) is warranted. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Amount and timing of permafrost carbon release in response to climate warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Kevin; Zhang, Tingjun; Barrett, Andrew P. (National Snow and Ice Data Center, Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences, Univ. of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder (United States)), e-mail: kevin.schaefer@nsidc.org; Bruhwiler, Lori (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder (United States))

    2011-04-15

    The thaw and release of carbon currently frozen in permafrost will increase atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations and amplify surface warming to initiate a positive permafrost carbon feedback (PCF) on climate.We use surface weather from three global climate models based on the moderate warming, A1B Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change emissions scenario and the SiBCASA land surface model to estimate the strength and timing of the PCF and associated uncertainty. By 2200, we predict a 29-59% decrease in permafrost area and a 53-97 cm increase in active layer thickness. By 2200, the PCF strength in terms of cumulative permafrost carbon flux to the atmosphere is 190 +- 64 Gt C. This estimate may be low because it does not account for amplified surface warming due to the PCF itself and excludes some discontinuous permafrost regions where SiBCASA did not simulate permafrost. We predict that the PCF will change the arctic from a carbon sink to a source after the mid-2020s and is strong enough to cancel 42-88% of the total global land sink. The thaw and decay of permafrost carbon is irreversible and accounting for the PCF will require larger reductions in fossil fuel emissions to reach a target atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration

  16. Determination of phosphorus in small amounts of protein samples by ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, J Sabine; Boulyga, Sergei F; Pickhardt, Carola; Becker, J; Buddrus, Stefan; Przybylski, Michael

    2003-02-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is used for phosphorus determination in protein samples. A small amount of solid protein sample (down to 1 micro g) or digest (1-10 micro L) protein solution was denatured in nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide by closed-microvessel microwave digestion. Phosphorus determination was performed with an optimized analytical method using a double-focusing sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-SFMS) and quadrupole-based ICP-MS (ICP-QMS). For quality control of phosphorus determination a certified reference material (CRM), single cell proteins (BCR 273) with a high phosphorus content of 26.8+/-0.4 mg g(-1), was analyzed. For studies on phosphorus determination in proteins while reducing the sample amount as low as possible the homogeneity of CRM BCR 273 was investigated. Relative standard deviation and measurement accuracy in ICP-QMS was within 2%, 3.5%, 11% and 12% when using CRM BCR 273 sample weights of 40 mg, 5 mg, 1 mg and 0.3 mg, respectively. The lowest possible sample weight for an accurate phosphorus analysis in protein samples by ICP-MS is discussed. The analytical method developed was applied for the analysis of homogeneous protein samples in very low amounts [1-100 micro g of solid protein sample, e.g. beta-casein or down to 1 micro L of protein or digest in solution (e.g., tau protein)]. A further reduction of the diluted protein solution volume was achieved by the application of flow injection in ICP-SFMS, which is discussed with reference to real protein digests after protein separation using 2D gel electrophoresis.The detection limits for phosphorus in biological samples were determined by ICP-SFMS down to the ng g(-1) level. The present work discusses the figure of merit for the determination of phosphorus in a small amount of protein sample with ICP-SFMS in comparison to ICP-QMS.

  17. 76 FR 64354 - Burden of Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act Fee Amounts on Small...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0529] Burden of Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act Fee Amounts on Small Business... amounts on small business, as set forth in the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). In particular...

  18. 76 FR 45818 - Burden of Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act Fee Amounts on Small...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0529] Burden of Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act Fee Amounts on Small Business... burden of fee amounts on small business, as set forth in the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA...

  19. Boiling point measurement of a small amount of brake fluid by thermocouple and its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogami, Kazunari

    2002-09-01

    This study describes a new method for measuring the boiling point of a small amount of brake fluid using a thermocouple and a pear shaped flask. The boiling point of brake fluid was directly measured with an accuracy that was within approximately 3 C of that determined by the Japanese Industrial Standards method, even though the sample volume was only a few milliliters. The method was applied to measure the boiling points of brake fluid samples from automobiles. It was clear that the boiling points of brake fluid from some automobiles dropped to approximately 140 C from about 230 C, and that one of the samples from the wheel cylinder was approximately 45 C lower than brake fluid from the reserve tank. It is essential to take samples from the wheel cylinder, as this is most easily subjected to heating.

  20. Ingesting a small amount of beer reduces arterial stiffness in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiwaki, Masato; Kora, Naoki; Matsumoto, Naoyuki

    2017-08-01

    Epidemiological studies reveal a J-shaped association between alcohol consumption and arterial stiffness, with arterial stiffening lower among mild-to-moderate drinkers than heavy drinkers or nondrinkers. This study aimed to examine the effects of ingesting a small amount of beer, corresponding to the amount consumed per day by a mild drinker, on arterial stiffness. Eleven men (20-22 years) participated, in random order and on different days, in four separate trials. The participants each drank 200 or 350 mL of alcohol-free beer (AFB200 and AFB350) or beer (B200 and B350), and were monitored for 90 min postingestion. There were no significant changes in arterial stiffness among trials that ingested AF200 or AF350. However, among trials ingesting B200 and B350, breath alcohol concentrations increased significantly, while indexes of arterial stiffness decreased significantly for approximately 60 min: carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (B200: -0.6 ± 0.2 m/sec; B350: -0.6 ± 0.2 m/sec); brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (B200: -53 ± 18 cm/sec; B350: -57 ± 19 cm/sec); and cardio-ankle vascular index (B200: -0.4 ± 0.1 unit; B350: -0.3 ± 0.1 unit). Furthermore, AFB showed no effect on arterial stiffness, regardless of whether or not it contained sugar, and no significant difference in antioxidant capacity was found between AFB and B. This is the first study to demonstrate that acute ingestion of relatively small amounts of beer reduces arterial stiffness (for approximately 60 min). Our data also suggest that the reduction in arterial stiffness induced by ingestion of beer is largely attributable to the effects of alcohol. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  1. Exemption from Regulatory Control of Goods Containing Small Amounts of Radioactive Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Small amounts of radioactive material may be added to various goods for functional reasons. Several such items are currently available for either professional or personal use. These include ionization chamber smoke detectors, thoriated-tungsten welding rods, luminous dials, electrical devices and electric discharge lamps. Some of these goods may be intended for particular types of market such as cinemas or other places to which the public may have access, but they are unlikely to be provided directly to members of the public. Other goods may be intended for wide scale use and therefore readily available on the market as consumer products through commercial outlets where personal and household products are normally purchased. Members of the public may be exposed to ionizing radiation as a consequence of activities such as transport, storage, use and disposal of such goods. The IAEA safety standards provide the basic requirements for regulatory control of such goods. The most relevant documents are the Governmental, Legal and Regulatory Framework for Safety and the International Basic Safety Standards (hereafter referred to as the BSS). These requirements include notification of a practice to the regulatory body and authorization of the practice by the regulatory body. Provision is made for the exemption of practices from these and other regulatory requirements based on general criteria given in the BSS or any exemption levels specified by the regulatory body on the basis of these criteria. The BSS, which are jointly sponsored by the IAEA and several other international organizations, apply to all facilities and all activities for peaceful purposes that give rise to exposure to radiation. In the interest of harmonization of approaches among Member States, some guidance on the application of the criteria for exemption has been provided in a number of Safety Guides, e.g. Regulatory Control of Radiation Sources, IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-G-1.5 (2004) and the

  2. Proposal of the concept of selection of accidents that release large amounts of radioactive substances in the high temperature engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Masato; Honda, Yuki; Takada, Shoji; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    In Position, construction and equipment of testing and research reactor to be subjected to the use standards for rules Article 53 (prevention of expansion of the accident to release a large amount of radioactive material) generation the frequency is a lower accident than design basis accident, when what is likely to release a large amount of radioactive material or radiation from the facility has occurred, and take the necessary measures in order to prevent the spread of the accident. There is provided a lower accident than frequency design basis accidents, for those that may release a large amount of radioactive material or radiation. (author)

  3. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2013-05-29

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and net generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of antifoam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and

  4. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-11-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and

  5. When gains loom larger than losses: reversed loss aversion for small amounts of money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harinck, Fieke; Van Dijk, Eric; Van Beest, Ilja; Mersmann, Paul

    2007-12-01

    Previous research has generally shown that people are loss averse; that is, they weigh losses more heavily than gains. In a series of three experiments, we found that for small outcomes, this pattern is reversed, and gains loom larger than losses. We explain this reversal on the basis of (a) the hedonic principle, which states that individuals are motivated to maximize pleasure and to minimize pain, and (b) the assumption that small losses are more easily discounted cognitively than large losses are.

  6. Improving the efficiency of use of small amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizer on smallholders maize in Central Malawi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamanga, B.C.G.; Waddington, S.R.; Almekinders, C.J.M.; Giller, K.E.

    2014-01-01

    Mineral fertiliser is a scarce input for smallholder maize farmers in Malawi. A recent provision of small amounts of subsidised fertilisers by government programmes to farmers throughout Malawi has increased fertiliser access and raised maize production, but fertiliser management and yield responses

  7. Tailorable Release of Small Molecules Utilizing Plant Viral Nanoparticles and Fibrous Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jing

    We have engineered Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV) derived plant viral nanoparticles (PVNs) within a fibrous matrix to optimize its application for delivery and controlled release of active ingredients. RCNMV's structure and unique response to divalent cation depletion and re-addition enables the infusion of small molecules into its viral capsid through a pore formation mechanism. While this PVN technology shows a potential use in nano-scale therapeutic drug delivery, its inherent molecular dynamics to environmental stimuli places a constraint on its application and functionality as a vehicle for tailorable release of loading cargo. In this study, we enhance the understanding of the PVN technology by elucidating its mechanism for loading and triggered release of doxorubicin (Dox), a chemotherapeutic drug for breast cancer. Of critical importance is the methodology for manipulation of Dox's loading capacity and its binding location on either the exterior or interior of the virion capsid. The ability to control the active ingredient binding location provides an additional approach of tunable release from the PVN delivery vehicle besides its inherent pH- and ion- responsive release of loading cargo. The efficacious and controlled release strategy for agricultural active ingredients, such as nematicides, is also a large social need right now. Crop infestation of plant parasite nematodes causes in excess of 157 billion in worldwide crop damage annually. If an effective control strategy for these pests could be developed, it is estimated that the current market for effective nematicides is between 700 million and $1 billion each year worldwide. In this study, we report on the utilization of PVN technology to encapsulate the biological nematicide, abamectin (Abm), within the PVN's interior capsid (PVNAbm). Creating PVNAbm addresses Abm's issues of soil immobility while rendering a controlled release strategy for its bioavailability to root knot nematodes (RKNs

  8. Small amounts of ammonium (NH4+) can increase growth of maize (Zea mays)

    KAUST Repository

    George, Jessey; Holtham, Luke; Sabermanesh, Kasra; Heuer, Sigrid; Tester, Mark A.; Plett, Darren; Garnett, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    is consistent across a wide range of soil types. The possible contribution of these small concentrations of NHequation image to the overall N budget of crop plants is often overlooked. In this study the importance of this for the growth and nitrogen budget

  9. Radiation-induced decomposition of small amounts of trichloroethylene in drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proksch, E.; Gehringer, P.; Szinovatz, W.; Eschweiler, H.

    1989-01-01

    Solutions of 10 ppm trichloroethylene in air-saturated drinking waters are decomposed by γ radiation with initial G-values, G 0 , around 3-5 molecules per 100 eV. At lower concentrations, the G 0 -values decrease with decreasing trichloroethylene concentration and with increasing amounts of inorganic (especially HCO 3 - ) and organic solutes. From the results, a semi-empirical formula is derived which allows an estimation of G 0 -values for the trichloroethylene decomposition in drinking waters of given composition. (author)

  10. Effect of nonabsorbed amounts of a fructose-sorbitol mixture on small intestinal transit in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan L; Linnet, Jan; Rumessen, Jüri J

    2006-01-01

    Although malabsorption of small amounts of fructose-sorbitol mixtures occurs frequently in healthy humans, insights into their effects on gastrointestinal motility are poor. The present study addresses the hypothesis that malabsorption of a fructose-sorbitol challenge changes the small intestinal...... transit rate. Eleven healthy volunteers participated in a double-blind crossover investigation. In random order, the subjects ingested 30 g glucose or a mixture of 25 g fructose and 5 g sorbitol as 10% solutions. As a radiolabeled marker, (99m)Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid was added to each test...... solution. Breath hydrogen and methane concentrations and gastrointestinal progress of the radiolabeled marker were followed for the next 6-hr period. Malabsorption of small amounts of the fructose-sorbitol mixture was evident in all subjects. The area under the gastric radioactivity-time curve after...

  11. Effect of nonabsorbed amounts of a fructose-sorbitol mixture on small intestinal transit in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan L; Linnet, Jan; Rumessen, Jüri J

    2006-01-01

    transit rate. Eleven healthy volunteers participated in a double-blind crossover investigation. In random order, the subjects ingested 30 g glucose or a mixture of 25 g fructose and 5 g sorbitol as 10% solutions. As a radiolabeled marker, (99m)Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid was added to each test......Although malabsorption of small amounts of fructose-sorbitol mixtures occurs frequently in healthy humans, insights into their effects on gastrointestinal motility are poor. The present study addresses the hypothesis that malabsorption of a fructose-sorbitol challenge changes the small intestinal...... solution. Breath hydrogen and methane concentrations and gastrointestinal progress of the radiolabeled marker were followed for the next 6-hr period. Malabsorption of small amounts of the fructose-sorbitol mixture was evident in all subjects. The area under the gastric radioactivity-time curve after...

  12. Radiographic evidence of small amounts of pleural effusion in infant stage individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troeger, J.; Kuntz, M.; Otte, J.; Fuchs, M.

    1980-01-01

    The pleural cavity of ten young pigs was punctured and filled with specific amounts of fluid. Subsequently chest films were obtained in ap and lateral erect and in cross-table lateral decubitus position. Only 2 cases of these pigs radiographed in the erect position (after injection of 80 and even 100 ml of fluid) gave clear evidence of pleural effusion. Indirect signs of pleural effusion (such as blunting of the costophrenic angles; unsharpness, flatting or elevation of the diaphragm as a sign subpulmonic effusion), however, were already noted with only 20 ml of pleural fluid. In contrast to these exams done in the erect position, the radiographs obtained in cross table lateral decubitus position showed as little as 5 ml of fluid. Therefore, the cross table lateral decubitus position is ideal for the work up of suspected pleural effusion. (orig.) [de

  13. How can we investigate the effects of small amounts of toxic substances?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    Today there is increasing concern about the possible toxic effects of tiny amounts of toxic substances in the environment of workplace. Because the incidence of effects at such levels of toxic material is likely to be very low their investigation becomes very difficult and will require new approaches to toxicological research. Only through the use of in vitro cell systems and the most modern theoretical and experimental methods in biochemistry, chemistry and molecular biolgoy can we hope to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the causation and expression of environmentally-induced diseases. Much of this research will be at the fundamental level but it must be so oriented that the information obtained is directly applicable to the realistic estimation of the risks to mankind and other living creatures from natural and man made toxicants. (orig.) [de

  14. Multielemental analysis in small amounts of environmental reference materials with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombovári, J; Becker, J S; Dietze, H J

    2000-07-01

    The lowest possible sample weight for performing multielemental trace element analysis on environmental and biological samples by ICP-MS has been investigated. The certified reference materials Bovine Liver NIST SRM 1577b, Human Hair NCS DC 73347 and Oriental Tobacco Leaves CTA-OTL-1 were applied at sample weights (1, 5, 20 and 50 mg aliquots, n = 10) which were significantly lower than those recommended with most recoveries in the range of 95-110%. Samples were digested in a mixture of nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide and hydrogen fluoride by closed-vessel microwave digestion. Multielemental analysis was performed with an optimized ICP-QMS method. Aqueous standard solutions were applied for external calibration with rhodium as the internal standard element. The detection limits varied between 0.02-0.38 microg/g for Li, Na, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Cd, Ba and Pb, and up to 1.92 microg/g for Mg, Al, Ca, Fe and Ni. Digested human plasma samples were spiked with multielemental solution (0.5-10 microg/L) to test the analytical method and the recoveries were 95-105% for most analytes. Our results show that in the case of homogeneous SRMs it is possible to use them in very low amounts (1-5 mg) for method development and quality control.

  15. Small amounts of ammonium (NH4+) can increase growth of maize (Zea mays)

    KAUST Repository

    George, Jessey

    2016-09-16

    Nitrate (NOequation image) and ammonium (NHequation image) are the predominant forms of nitrogen (N) available to plants in agricultural soils. Nitrate concentrations are generally ten times higher than those of NHequation image and this ratio is consistent across a wide range of soil types. The possible contribution of these small concentrations of NHequation image to the overall N budget of crop plants is often overlooked. In this study the importance of this for the growth and nitrogen budget of maize (Zea mays L.) was investigated, using agriculturally relevant concentrations of NHequation image. Maize inbred line B73 was grown hydroponically for 30 d at low (0.5 mM) and sufficient (2.5 mM) levels of NOequation image. Ammonium was added at 0.05 mM and 0.25 mM to both levels of NOequation image. At low NOequation image levels, addition of NHequation image was found to improve the growth of maize plants. This increased plant growth was accompanied by an increase in total N uptake, as well as total phosphorus, sulphur and other micronutrients in the shoot. Ammonium influx was higher than NOequation image influx for all the plants and decreased as the total N in the nutrient medium increased. This study shows that agriculturally relevant proportions of NHequation image supplied in addition to NOequation image can increase growth of maize.

  16. 14C-lactose breath tests during pelvic radiotherapy: the effect of the amount of small bowel irradiated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, R.G.; Stryker, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Thirty patients who were undergoing pelvic radiotherapy had 14 C-lactose breath tests performed in the first and fifth weeks of treatment. In Group I (21 patients), a significant portion of the small intestine was irradiated, and in Group II (9 patients), only a small portion of the small intestine was irradiated. In Group I, the average reductions in the excretion of ingested 14 C between the first- and fifth-week tests were 41.5% at 1/2 hour postingestion (p 0.05). The data suggest that lactose malabsorption is a factor in the etiology of the nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea experienced by patients who are undergoing pelvic radiotherapy, and that the amount of bowel included in the treatment volume significantly influences the degree of malabsorption

  17. Small-scale experimental study of vaporization flux of liquid nitrogen released on water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalaswami, Nirupama; Olewski, Tomasz; Véchot, Luc N; Mannan, M Sam

    2015-10-30

    A small-scale experimental study was conducted using liquid nitrogen to investigate the convective heat transfer behavior of cryogenic liquids released on water. The experiment was performed by spilling five different amounts of liquid nitrogen at different release rates and initial water temperatures. The vaporization mass fluxes of liquid nitrogen were determined directly from the mass loss measured during the experiment. A variation of initial vaporization fluxes and a subsequent shift in heat transfer mechanism were observed with changes in initial water temperature. The initial vaporization fluxes were directly dependent on the liquid nitrogen spill rate. The heat flux from water to liquid nitrogen determined from experimental data was validated with two theoretical correlations for convective boiling. It was also observed from validation with correlations that liquid nitrogen was found to be predominantly in the film boiling regime. The substantial results provide a suitable procedure for predicting the heat flux from water to cryogenic liquids that is required for source term modeling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, G. N.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2013-08-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are largely absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b) and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the

  19. Application of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for multielement analysis in small sample amounts of thyroid tissue from Chernobyl area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, J.S.; Dietze, H.J.; Boulyga, S.F.; Bazhanova, N.N.; Kanash, N.V.; Malenchenko, A.F.

    2000-01-01

    As a result of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1986, thyroid pathologies occurred among children in some regions of belarus. Besides the irradiation of children's thyroids by radioactive iodine and caesium nuclides, toxic elements from fallout are a direct risk to health. Inductively coupled plasma quadrupole-based mass spectrometry (Icp-Ms) and instrumental neutron activation analysis (IAA) were used for multielement determination in small amounts (I-10 mg) of human thyroid tissue samples. The accuracy of the applied analytical technique for small biological sample amounts was checked using NIST standard reference material oyster tissue (SRM 1566 b). Almost all essential elements as well as a number of toxic elements such as Cd, Pb, Hg, U etc. Were determined in a multitude of human thyroid tissues by quadrupole-based Icp-Ms using micro nebulization. In general, the thyroid tissue affected by pathology is characterized by higher calcium content. Some other elements, among them Sr, Zn, Fe, Mn, V, As, Cr, Ni, Pb, U, Ba, Sb, were also Accumulated in such tissue. The results obtained will be used as initial material for further specific studies of the role of particular elements in thyroid pathology development

  20. Small Business Administration (SBA) Loan Program Performance- Charge Off Rates as a Percent of Unpaid Principal Balance (UPB) Amount by Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Reflects charge off rates, as a percent of the UPB amounts, at the end of the fiscal year for the major loan programs and aggregate totals for the small direct and...

  1. A Method for Decreasing the Amount of the Drug Remaining on the Surfaces of the Mortar and Pestle after Grinding Small Amount of Tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Miki; Kitada, Rika; Kurita, Takuro; Tokumura, Tadakazu

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a method for grinding tablets with a mortar and pestle while reducing drug loss because grinding tablets is known to be associated with reductions in tablet weight and loss of the active drug. Seven kinds of tablets were subjected to grinding. The proportion (%) of the amount of the active drug in the powder remaining on the surfaces of the mortar and pestle relative to the total amount of the drug recovered (the recovery percent) was calculated. The recovery percent of the 7 kinds of tablets ranged from 17.2-35.9%, and the tablets' recovery percent decreased as the tablet weight increased. When the grinding was performed with 1 g of lactose monohydrate or 1 g of D-mannitol moistened with water, the recovery percent of the tablets decreased to 2.6-9.9% and 3.8-9.9%, respectively. The effects of the weight of lactose monohydrate on the recovery percent of Allegra ® 60 mg tablets were examined. It was found that at least 0.6 g of lactose monohydrate was required to have a sufficient effect on drug recovery. Therefore, additives that have stronger effects at lower amounts were sought. As a result, calcium monohydrogen phosphate was found to have the strongest effect on drug recovery. The addition of 0.4 g calcium monohydrogen phosphate resulted in the recovery percent of 5.1%, which was significantly lower than that of 15.0% observed after the addition of 0.4 g lactose monohydrate, and lower than the 6.8% of 1 g lactose monohydrate.

  2. 14C-lactose breath tests during pelvic radiotherapy: the effect of the amount of small bowel irradiated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, R.G.; Stryker, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Thirty patients who were undergoing pelvic radiotherapy had 14 C-lactose breath tests performed in the first and fifth weeks of treatment. In Group I (21 patients), a significant portion of the small intestine was irradiated, and in Group II (9 patients), only a small portion of the small intestine was irradiated. In Group I, the average reductions in the excretion of ingested 14 C between the first- and fifth-week tests were 41.5% at 1/2 hour postingestion (p less than 0.05), and 21.8% at 1 hour postingestion (p less than 0.05). In Group II, the percentage reductions were 11.8% and 3.7% at 1/2 and 1 hour, respectively (p greater than 0.05). The data suggest that lactose malabsorption is a factor in the etiology of the nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea experienced by patients who are undergoing pelvic radiotherapy, and that the amount of bowel included in the treatment volume significantly influences the degree of malabsorption

  3. The evaluation of failure stress and released amount of fission product gas of power ramped rod by fuel behaviour analysis code 'FEMAXI-III'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Fujita, Misao

    1984-01-01

    Pellet-Cladding Interaction(PCI) related in-pile failure of Zircaloy sheathed fuel rod is in general considered to be caused by combination of pellet-cladding mechanical interaction(PCMI) with fuel-cladding chemical interaction(FCCI). An understanding of a basic mechanism of PCI-related fuel failure is therefore necessary to get actual cladding hoop stress from mechanical interaction and released amounts of fission product(FP) gas of aggressive environmental agency from chemical interaction. This paper describes results of code analysis performed on fuel failure to cladding hoop stress and amounts of FP gas released under the condition associated with power ramping. Data from Halden(HBWR) and from Studsvik(R2) are used for code analysis. The fuel behaviour analysis code ''FEMAXI-III'' is used as an analytical tool. The followings are revealed from the study: (1) PCI-related fuel failure is dependent upon cladding hoop stress and released amounts of FP gas at power ramping. (2) Preliminary calculated threshold values of hoop stress and of released amounts of FP gas to PCI failure are respectively 330MPa, 10% under the Halden condition, 190MPa, 5% under the Inter ramp(BWR) condition, and 270MPa, 14% under the Over ramp(PWR) condition. The values of hoop stress calculated are almost in the similar range of those obtained from ex-reactor PCI simulated tests searched from references published. (3) The FEMAXI-III code verification is made in mechanical manner by using in-pile deformation data(diametral strain) obtained from power ramping test undertaken by JAERI. While, the code verification is made in thermal manner by using punctured FP gas data obtained from post irradiation examination performed on non-defected power ramped fuel rods. The calculations are resulted in good agreements to both, mechanical and thermal experimental data suggesting the validity of the code evaluation. (J.P.N.)

  4. Sedimentation separation and fluorescent X-ray analysis of very small amount of cobalt in pure iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kensaku

    1990-01-01

    As the simple method of separation and analysis of very small amount of cobalt up to 1 ppm in pure iron, the application of sedimentation separation and fluorescent X-ray analysis was examined. By adding citric acid to the sample solution, the masking of the main components was carried out, and cobalt was deposited with 2-nitroso 1-naphtol separated and concentrated on a membrane filter. The reagents and equipments used are shown. The operation of the fundamental quantitative determination was determined. The condition of measurement, the condition of sedimentation separation, the effect of coexisting elements, the rate of recovery of cobalt, the calibration curve, and the analysis of actual samples are reported. By separating and concentrating cobalt on a membrane filter, this method eliminates the obstruction of coexisting elements to the object element, which is the problem in fluorescent X-ray measurement, and has the merit of simple operation and wide range of quantitative determination. (K.I.)

  5. Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification Technique for Copy Number Analysis on Small Amounts of DNA Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karina; Andersen, Paal; Larsen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    The multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique is a sensitive technique for relative quantification of up to 50 different nucleic acid sequences in a single reaction, and the technique is routinely used for copy number analysis in various syndromes and diseases. The aim...... of the study was to exploit the potential of MLPA when the DNA material is limited. The DNA concentration required in standard MLPA analysis is not attainable from dried blood spot samples (DBSS) often used in neonatal screening programs. A novel design of MLPA probes has been developed to permit for MLPA...... analysis on small amounts of DNA. Six patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) were used in this study. DNA was extracted from both whole blood and DBSS and subjected to MLPA analysis using normal and modified probes. Results were analyzed using GeneMarker and manual Excel analysis. A total...

  6. Technical Note: Precise quantitative measurements of total dissolved inorganic carbon from small amounts of seawater using a gas chromatographic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hansen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Total dissolved inorganic carbon (CT is one of the most frequently measured parameters used to calculate the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in seawater. Its determination has become increasingly important because of the rising interest in the biological effects of ocean acidification. Coulometric and infrared detection methods are currently favored in order to precisely quantify CT. These methods however are not sufficiently validated for CT measurements of biological experiments manipulating seawater carbonate chemistry with an extended CT measurement range (~1250–2400 μmol kg–1 compared to natural open ocean seawater (~1950–2200 μmol kg−1. The requirement of total sample amounts between 0.1–1 L seawater in the coulometric- and infrared detection methods potentially exclude their use for experiments working with much smaller volumes. Additionally, precise CT analytics become difficult with high amounts of biomass (e.g., phytoplankton cultures or even impossible in the presence of planktonic calcifiers without sample pre-filtration. Filtration however, can alter CT concentration through gas exchange induced by high pressure. Addressing these problems, we present precise quantification of CT using a small, basic and inexpensive gas chromatograph as a CT analyzer. Our technique is able to provide a repeatability of ±3.1 μmol kg−1, given by the pooled standard deviation over a CT range typically applied in acidification experiments. 200 μL of sample is required to perform the actual CT measurement. The total sample amount needed is 12 mL. Moreover, we show that sample filtration is applicable with only minor alteration of the CT. The method is simple, reliable and with low cumulative material costs. Hence, it is potentially attractive for all researchers experimentally manipulating the seawater carbonate system.

  7. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE AMOUNT OF ASTIGMATISM FOLLOWING CONVENTIONAL EXTRACAPSULAR CATARACT EXTRACTION AND MANUAL SMALL INCISION CATARACT SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumari Bigyabati

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Cataract is the principal cause of avoidable blindness in India and throughout the world. Surgical removal of the cataractous lens remains the only effective treatment for management of cataract blindness. The success of cataract surgery is determined by best and earliest visual recovery. But the occurrence of postoperative astigmatism has become a major hurdle in achieving this goal. AIMS The study was designed to compare the amount of astigmatism following conventional extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE and manual small incision cataract surgery (SICS. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was carried out in 100 eyes of 75 patients aged between 50 and 80 years admitted for cataract surgery. Out of these, 50 eyes were operated by conventional extracapsular cataract extraction and 50 eyes by manual small incision cataract surgery. The patients were followed up at 2 nd , 4 th , 6 th and 8 th weeks. At each follow-up visual acuity, refraction and acceptance and keratometry were recorded and the findings analysed for astigmatism. RESULTS In the current study, the mean (SD astigmatism developed at the end of the 2 nd , 4 th and 6 th of follow-up was significantly lower in the SICS group as compared to the ECCE group (P<0.000. At the end of 8 weeks of follow-up, the mean (SD astigmatism of the SICS group was 0.64±0.56 D as compared to the mean (SD of the ECCE group of 1.39±86 D and the difference was found to be significant (p<0.014. CONCLUSION The current study concludes that manual small incision cataract surgery is a better technique to control postoperative astigmatism than conventional extracapsular cataract extraction.

  8. Applying a crop-tree release in small-sawtimber white oak stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey W Stringer; Gary W. Miller; Robert F. Wittwer; Robert F. Wittwer

    1988-01-01

    Small-sawtimber white oak crop trees in Kentucky were released by a crown-touching technique. In two cutting treatments, 20 and 34 crop trees were released per acre at a total cost of $35 and $42, respectively. Both treatments yielded commercial volumes of cut material. Total mean merchantable volume (> 5.0 inches d.b.h.) in cut trees was 693 cubic feet/acre, with...

  9. Critical assessment of the performance of electronic moisture analyzers for small amounts of environmental samples and biological reference materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krachler, M

    2001-12-01

    Two electronic moisture analyzers were critically evaluated with regard to their suitability for determining moisture in small amounts (environmental matrices such as leaves, needles, soil, peat, sediments, and sewage sludge, as well as various biological reference materials. To this end, several homogeneous bulk materials were prepared which were subsequently employed for the development and optimization of all analytical procedures. The key features of the moisture analyzers included a halogen or ceramic heater and an integrated balance with a resolution of 0.1 mg, which is an essential prerequisite for obtaining precise results. Oven drying of the bulk materials in a conventional oven at 105 degrees C until constant mass served as reference method. A heating temperature of 65degrees C was found to provide accurate and precise results for almost all matrices investigated. To further improve the accuracy and precision, other critical parameters such as handling of sample pans, standby temperature, and measurement delay were optimized. Because of its ponderous heating behavior, the performance of the ceramic radiator was inferior to that of the halogen heater, which produced moisture results comparable to those obtained by oven drying. The developed drying procedures were successfully applied to the fast moisture analysis (1.4-6.3 min) of certified biological reference materials of similar provenance to the investigated the bulk materials. Moisture results for 200 mg aliquots ranged from 1.4 to 7.8% and good agreement was obtained between the recommended drying procedure for the reference materials and the electronic moisture analyzers with absolute uncertainties amounting to 0.1% and 0.2-0.3%, respectively.

  10. Dissolution kinetics of small amounts of oxygen in tantalum alloy T-111 and internal oxide displacement reactions during annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecura, S.

    1976-01-01

    Oxygen was added to T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf, wt. %) at 820 and 990 C at an oxygen pressure of about 0.0003 torr. The technique employed permitted predetermined and reproducible doping of T-111 up to 3.0 at. % oxygen. Based on the temperature dependence of the doping reaction, it is concluded that the initial rates of oxygen pickup are probably controlled by solution of oxygen into the T-111 lattice. Although hafnium oxides are more stable than those of tantalum or tungsten, analyses of extracted residues indicate that the latter oxides predominate in the as-doped specimens, presumably because of the higher concentrations of tantalum and tungsten in the alloy. However, high-temperature annealing promotes gettering of dissolved oxygen and of other oxides to form hafnium oxides. Small amounts of tantalum and tungsten oxides were still present after high-temperature annealing. Tungsten oxide (WO3) volatilizes slightly from the surface of T-111 at 990 C. The vaporization of WO3 has no apparent affect on the doping reaction.

  11. A New Method of Thoracocentesis Using CT Guidance in Patients with a Small Amount of Pleural Fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshitomo, Shinohara; Kenichi, Sugizaki; Kanae, Yamamoto; Tatsuo, Kumazaki

    1999-01-01

    A new technique of CT-guided diagnostic thoracocentesis (CT-TC) for patients with a small amount of pleural fluid was performed in 52 patients. More than 10 ml of pleural fluid was obtained successfully without any complications in all cases; 14 patients were found to have malignant cells in the pleural fluid. The main points of the CT-TC procedure are as follows: (1) The patient is placed supine with two radiolucent blocks underneath the shoulders and hips in order to make space for inserting the needle from the back (below). (2) Serial CT images are obtained to determine the insertion route and to measure the depth of the fluid level below the skin. (3) The needle is bent at the appropriate angle and length and is advanced upward slowly from the skin entry point on the back. CT-TC can also be used therapeutically in debilitated patients who can not maintain a sitting position or when the pleural fluid needs to be drained completely

  12. Modeling of recovery mechanism of ozone zero phenomenaby adding small amount of nitrogen in atmospheric pressure oxygen dielectric barrier discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Haruaki; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu

    2013-09-01

    Ozone zero phenomena in an atmospheric pressure oxygen dielectric barrier discharges have been one of the major problems during a long time operation of ozone generators. But it is also known that the adding a small amount of nitrogen makes the recover from the ozone zero phenomena. To make clear the mechanism of recovery, authors have been simulated the discharges with using the results of Ref. 3. As a result, the recovery process can be seen and ozone density increased. It is found that the most important species would be nitrogen atoms. The reaction of nitrogen atoms and oxygen molecules makes oxygen atoms which is main precursor species of ozone. This generation of oxygen atoms is effective to increase ozone. The dependence of oxygen atom density (nO) and nitrogen atom density (nN) ratio was examined in this paper. In the condition of low nN/nO ratio case, generation of nitrogen oxide is low, and the quenching of ozone by the nitrogen oxide would be low. But in the high ratio condition, the quenching of ozone by nitrogen oxide would significant. This work was supported by KAKENHI(23560352).

  13. Effect of a small amount of sodium carbonate on konjac glucomannan-induced changes in wheat starch gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yun; Zhao, Dan; Winkworth-Smith, Charles G; Foster, Tim J; Nirasawa, Satoru; Tatsumi, Eizo; Cheng, Yongqiang

    2015-02-13

    Wheat starch gels were produced with konjac glucomannan (KGM) and low concentrations of Na2CO3 (0.1-0.2 wt% of starch) using a rapid viscosity analyzer (RVA). The gelling properties of wheat starch in varying ratios of KGM and Na2CO3 were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), rheometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). A small amount of Na2CO3 resulted in gels with increased elasticity whereas structural ordering during retrogradation was insignificantly affected. Comparison of CLSM images of composite gels revealed that Na2CO3 at 0.2 wt% of starch allowed the formation of fiber-like extensions around scattered swollen granules by KGM and amylose interaction, making swollen granules disperse within the micro phase, which was not typical in CLSM images of gels in the absence of Na2CO3. Dynamic storage modulus and dynamic power law exponent were substantially higher than those observed for the same concentration of KGM in the presence of Na2CO3, supporting the hypothesis that Na2CO3 could promote strong interchain associations between KGM and starch components. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Experiments to investigate the effects of small changes in fuel stoichiometry on fission gas release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, P S; Smith, R C [Windscale Lab., AEA Technology, Seascale, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    Fuel pin failure in-reactor leads to fission product and in the case of a PWR fuel debris release to the coolant. For economic reasons immediate shutdown and discharge of failed fuel needs to be avoided but this needs to be counter-balanced against the increasing dose to operators. PWR practice is to continue running wit failed rods, monitoring coolant activity, and only shutting down the reactor and discharging the fuel when circuit activity levels become unacceptable. The rate of fission product release under failed fuel conditions is of key importance and considerable effort has been directed towards establishing the dependency of release on temperature, heating rate, burn-up, and also the extent of fuel oxidation. As a precursor to a possible wider investigation of this area, a small programme was mounted during 1992/1993 to confirm whether small changes in the oxidation state of the fuel, for example those caused by minor cladding defects, would significantly effect fuel behaviour during postulated design basis faults. The objective of the programme was to determine the effects of small departures from stoichiometric fuel composition on fission gas release, and to compare the results with the current methodology for calculating releases under fault conditions. A total of eight experiments was performed. Two were intended as baseline tests to provide a reference with which to compare the effect of oxidation state influenced behaviour with that of thermal effects. It was found that small changes in stoichiometry of {sup {approx}}1 x 10{sup -6} had little or no effect on release but that changes of {sup {approx}} 1 x 10{sup -4} were observed to increase the diffusion coefficient, for {sup 85}Kr, by up to an order of magnitude and hence greatly increase the release rate. The stoichiometry of the sample used in these tests was, for convenience, adjusted using He/H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O atmospheres. (Abstract Truncated)

  15. Polylactic acid nano- and microchamber arrays for encapsulation of small hydrophilic molecules featuring drug release via high intensity focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Meiyu; Frueh, Johannes; Tao, Tianyi; Petrov, Arseniy V; Petrov, Vladimir V; Shesterikov, Evgeniy V; Tverdokhlebov, Sergei I; Sukhorukov, Gleb B

    2017-06-01

    Long term encapsulation combined with spatiotemporal release for a precisely defined quantity of small hydrophilic molecules on demand remains a challenge in various fields ranging from medical drug delivery, controlled release of catalysts to industrial anti-corrosion systems. Free-standing individually sealed polylactic acid (PLA) nano- and microchamber arrays were produced by one-step dip-coating a PDMS stamp into PLA solution for 5 s followed by drying under ambient conditions. The wall thickness of these hydrophobic nano-microchambers is tunable from 150 nm to 7 μm by varying the PLA solution concentration. Furthermore, small hydrophilic molecules were successfully in situ precipitated within individual microchambers in the course of solvent evaporation after sonicating the PLA@PDMS stamp to remove air-bubbles and to load the active substance containing solvent. The cargo capacity of single chambers was determined to be in the range of several picograms, while it amounts to several micrograms per cm 2 . Two different methods for sealing chambers were compared: microcontact printing versus dip-coating whereby microcontact printing onto a flat PLA sheet allows for entrapment of micro-air-bubbles enabling microchambers with both ultrasound responsiveness and reduced permeability. Cargo release triggered by external high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) stimuli is demonstrated by experiment and compared with numerical simulations.

  16. Modeling the effects of repeated systemic administrations of small activity amounts In radionuclide therapy with beta emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderon, Carlos; Gonzalez, Joaquin; Cepero, Janet; Colom, Camila; Rodriguez, Juan C.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Good results for radionuclide therapy treatments where repeated short time spaced systemic injection of small activity amounts are given have been reported. Bone marrow and kidneys are usually considered as dose-limiting organs in radionuclide therapy. The treatments in radionuclide therapy with repeated administration could be optimized if irradiation effects in those one might be estimated. Xeno-grafted mice is the often biological model used during the evaluation of candidates for radionuclide therapy. A mathematical model of tumor cell kinetics was combined with another one reported for marrow cell kinetics which allows the calculation of marrow cell survival and proliferation in response to different irradiation schemes. Radionuclide therapy treatment with repeated administrations with radiopharmaceuticals labeled with beta emitters were simulated. The effects on fast-growing and slow-growing tumors were evaluated, as well as radiosensitive and radioresistant tumors. For more realistic estimation of absorbed dose in mice organs the cross-irradiation due to high energy beta particles was included into the MIRD's formula. Tumor and kidneys responses to the irradiation were estimated on the linear-quadratic model framework which was adapted for a multi-exponential dose rate function describing radionuclide therapy treatments with repeated administrations. Published values for murine tumors kinetics, marrows cellular turnover rates and radiosensitivities were used during the calculations. Iso-effective schemes were also determined varying the interval between fractions and the number of administration. For a given tolerated level of thrombocytopenia and absorbed dose in kidneys an optimal regime of radionuclide therapy with repeated administration could be found. The mathematical model presented here allows the prediction of the nadir and duration of thrombocytopenia, the effects on kidneys and the tumor cell response to various treatment schemes

  17. Detection of IL28B SNP DNA from buccal epithelial cells, small amounts of serum, and dried blood spots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Halfon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: Point mutations in the coding region of the interleukin 28 gene (rs12979860 have recently been identified for predicting the outcome of treatment of hepatitis C virus infection. This polymorphism detection was based on whole blood DNA extraction. Alternatively, DNA for genetic diagnosis has been derived from buccal epithelial cells (BEC, dried blood spots (DBS, and genomic DNA from serum. The aim of the study was to investigate the reliability and accuracy of alternative routes of testing for single nucleotide polymorphism allele rs12979860CC. METHODS: Blood, plasma, and sera samples from 200 patients were extracted (400 µL. Buccal smears were tested using an FTA card. To simulate postal delay, we tested the influence of storage at ambient temperature on the different sources of DNA at five time points (baseline, 48 h, 6 days, 9 days, and 12 days. RESULTS: There was 100% concordance between blood, plasma, sera, and BEC, validating the use of DNA extracted from BEC collected on cytology brushes for genetic testing. Genetic variations in HPTR1 gene were detected using smear technique in blood smear (3620 copies as well as in buccal smears (5870 copies. These results are similar to those for whole blood diluted at 1/10. A minimum of 0.04 µL, 4 µL, and 40 µL was necessary to obtain exploitable results respectively for whole blood, sera, and plasma. No significant variation between each time point was observed for the different sources of DNA. IL28B SNPs analysis at these different time points showed the same results using the four sources of DNA. CONCLUSION: We demonstrated that genomic DNA extraction from buccal cells, small amounts of serum, and dried blood spots is an alternative to DNA extracted from peripheral blood cells and is helpful in retrospective and prospective studies for multiple genetic markers, specifically in hard-to-reach individuals.

  18. Enhancement effects of test injection with a small amount of MR contrast medium in the oral and maxillofacial region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagi, Yoshinobu; Asaumi, Jun-ichi; Konouchi, Hironobu; Hisatomi, Miki; Matsuzaki, Hidenobu; Murakami, Jun; Maki, Yuu; Unetsubo, Teruhisa; Kishi, Kanji

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To examine whether the signal intensity of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) is altered by test injection of 1 ml of contrast medium, and if so, whether this change affects the DCE-MRI analysis. Materials and methods: Six healthy volunteers were examined by DCE-MRI using a Magnevist syringe and/or an Omniscan syringe for the injection of contrast medium. Each scan was performed 10 times using steady-state free precession (3D-FISP), a sequence for DCE-MRI, before and after intravenous injection of 1 ml of the contrast medium. The internal pterygoid muscle, masseter muscle, tongue, parotid gland, submandibular gland, bone marrow of the mandible, subcutaneous adipose tissue, and common carotid artery were determined to be regions of interest (ROI), and the ROI internal average signal intensity was measured. The 10 data sets obtained before or after contrast medium administration for each ROI were evaluated using the paired t-test. Results: The test injection increased the signal intensities of six of eight ROIs, with all 20 experiments in the submandibular gland showing significant differences. There was no significant difference in the two ROIs corresponding to the carotid artery and subcutaneous adipose tissue of the cheek. Conclusions: The enhanced signal intensity in the tissue might have been caused by the small amount of contrast medium in the test injection. To eliminate this discrepancy caused by the test injection, a pre-contrast scan should be performed when the average signal intensity of an ROI is measured. We therefore believe that the data obtained before a test injection may be important in the analysis of DCE-MRI

  19. Determination of small amounts of nitric acid in the presence of large amounts of uranium (VI) and extraction of nitric acid into TBP solutions highly loaded with uranyl nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolarik, Z.; Schuler, R.

    1982-10-01

    A new method for the determination of small amounts of nitric acid in the presence of large amounts of uranium(VI) was elaborated. The method is based on the precipitation of uranium(VI) as iodate and subsequent alkalimetric titration of the acid in the supernatant. The extraction of nitric acid and uranium(VI) with 30% TBP in dodecane was studied at high loading of the organic phase with uranyl nitrate and at 25, 40 and 60 0 C. The results are compared with available published data on the extraction of nitric acid under similar conditions. (orig.) [de

  20. Composite microsphere-functionalized scaffold for the controlled release of small molecules in tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Pandolfi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current tissue engineering strategies focus on restoring damaged tissue architectures using biologically active scaffolds. The ideal scaffold would mimic the extracellular matrix of any tissue of interest, promoting cell proliferation and de novo extracellular matrix deposition. A plethora of techniques have been evaluated to engineer scaffolds for the controlled and targeted release of bioactive molecules to provide a functional structure for tissue growth and remodeling, as well as enhance recruitment and proliferation of autologous cells within the implant. Recently, novel approaches using small molecules, instead of growth factors, have been exploited to regulate tissue regeneration. The use of small synthetic molecules could be very advantageous because of their stability, tunability, and low cost. Herein, we propose a chitosan–gelatin scaffold functionalized with composite microspheres consisting of mesoporous silicon microparticles and poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid for the controlled release of sphingosine-1-phospate, a small molecule of interest. We characterized the platform with scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and confocal microscopy. Finally, the biocompatibility of this multiscale system was analyzed by culturing human mesenchymal stem cells onto the scaffold. The presented strategy establishes the basis of a versatile scaffold for the controlled release of small molecules and for culturing mesenchymal stem cells for regenerative medicine applications.

  1. Evaluation of library preparation methods for Illumina next generation sequencing of small amounts of DNA from foodborne parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Fernanda S; Wei-Pridgeon, Yuping; Arrowood, Michael J; Moss, Delynn; da Silva, Alexandre J; Talundzic, Eldin; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne

    2016-11-01

    Illumina library preparation methods for ultra-low input amounts were compared using genomic DNA from two foodborne parasites (Angiostrongylus cantonensis and Cyclospora cayetanensis) as examples. The Ovation Ultralow method resulted in libraries with the highest concentration and produced quality sequencing data, even when the input DNA was in the picogram range. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Nonheme-iron absorption from a phytate-rich meal is increased by the addition of small amounts of pork meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boech, S.B.; Hansen, M.; Bukhave, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    of small amounts of meat on nonheme-iron absorption from a meal presumed to have low iron bioavailability. Design: Forty-five healthy women with a mean (+/-SD) age of 24 +/- 3 y were randomly assigned to I of 3 groups, each of which was served (A) a basic meal (rice, tomato sauce, pea puree, and a wheat...

  3. Role of small amount of MgO and ZrO 2 on creep behaviour of high ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Small levels of various dopants have a significant effect on creep in polycrystalline alumina. While most previous studies have examined the effect of ionic size, the influence of valency of dopants on creep has not yet been completely characterized. The present detailed experimental study, utilizing magnesia and zirconia ...

  4. Small Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Pemberton (Steven)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractThe term “Open Data” often goes hand in hand with the term “Big Data”, where large data sets get released allowing for analysis, but the Cinderella of the Open Data ball is Small Data, small amounts of data, nonetheless possibly essential, that are too small to be put in some database or

  5. Load-release of small and macromolecules from elastomers with reversible gyroid mesoporosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Fengxiao; Schulte, Lars; Ndoni, Sokol

    2012-01-01

    . However, in the gel state in the presence of a good solvent the swollen matrix did show a nanoporous structure originated from the gyroid block copolymer precursor. Nanopores can be opened or closed depending on the presence or absence of a solvent. Macromolecules like PEG of different molecular weights......A collapsed elastomeric matrix of lightly cross-linked 1,2-polybutadiene (1,2-PB) was prepared from a self-assembled 1,2-polybutadiene-b- polydimethylsiloxane (1,2-PB-b-PDMS) of gyroid morphology after the removal of the PDMS block. No mesoporosity could be observed in the material in the dry state...... or small molecules like the surfactant SDS were loaded into the opened nanoporous matrix in the presence of a solvent and remained trapped. The loaded molecules could be released again in the presence of a solvent. The load and release of the molecules in deuterated form were monitored by in situ time...

  6. Radiobiology of Small Hive Beetle (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) and Prospects for Management Using Sterile Insect Releases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Danielle; Chun, Stacey; Follett, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Small hive beetle, Aethina tumida Murray (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae), is considered a serious threat to beekeeping in the Western Hemisphere, Australia, and Europe mainly due to larval feeding on honey, pollen, and brood of the European honeybee, Apis mellifera L. Control methods are limited for this pest. Studies were conducted to provide information on the radiobiology of small hive beetle and determine the potential for sterile insect releases as a control strategy. Adult males and females were equally sensitive to a radiation dose of 80 Gy and died within 5-7 d after treatment. In reciprocal crossing studies, irradiation of females only lowered reproduction to a greater extent than irradiation of males only. For matings between unirradiated males and irradiated females, mean reproduction was reduced by >99% at 45 and 60 Gy compared with controls, and no larvae were produced at 75 Gy. Irradiation of prereproductive adults of both sexes at 45 Gy under low oxygen (1-4%) caused a high level of sterility (>99%) while maintaining moderate survivorship for several weeks, and should suffice for sterile insect releases. Sterile insect technique holds potential for suppressing small hive beetle populations in newly invaded areas and limiting its spread. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  7. Sensitivity of effective rainfall amount to land use description using GIS tool. Case of a small mediterranean catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payraudeau, S.; Tournoud, M. G.; Cernesson, F.

    Distributed modelling in hydrology assess catchment subdivision to take into account physic characteristics. In this paper, we test the effect of land use aggregation scheme on catchment hydrological response. Evolution of intra-subcatchment land use is studied using statistic and entropy methods. The SCS-CN method is used to calculate effective rainfall which is here assimilated to hydrological response. Our purpose is to determine the existence of a critical threshold-area appropriate for the application of hydrological modelling. Land use aggregation effects on effective rainfall is assessed on small mediterranean catchment. The results show that land use aggregation and land use classification type have significant effects on hydrological modelling and in particular on effective rainfall modelling.

  8. A small amount of mini-charged dark matter could cool the baryons in the early Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Julian B; Loeb, Abraham

    2018-05-01

    The dynamics of our Universe is strongly influenced by pervasive-albeit elusive-dark matter, with a total mass about five times the mass of all the baryons 1,2 . Despite this, its origin and composition remain a mystery. All evidence for dark matter relies on its gravitational pull on baryons, and thus such evidence does not require any non-gravitational coupling between baryons and dark matter. Nonetheless, some small coupling would explain the comparable cosmic abundances of dark matter and baryons 3 , as well as solving structure-formation puzzles in the pure cold-dark-matter models 4 . A vast array of observations has been unable to find conclusive evidence for any non-gravitational interactions of baryons with dark matter 5-9 . Recent observations by the EDGES collaboration, however, suggest that during the cosmic dawn, roughly 200 million years after the Big Bang, the baryonic temperature was half of its expected value 10 . This observation is difficult to reconcile with the standard cosmological model but could be explained if baryons are cooled down by interactions with dark matter, as expected if their interaction rate grows steeply at low velocities 11 . Here we report that if a small fraction-less than one per cent-of the dark matter has a mini-charge, a million times smaller than the charge on the electron, and a mass in the range of 1-100 times the electron mass, then the data 10 from the EDGES experiment can be explained while remaining consistent with all other observations. We also show that the entirety of the dark matter cannot have a mini-charge.

  9. Selection of efficient options for processing and storage of radioactive waste in countries with small amounts of waste generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-09-01

    The report is intended to assist decision makers in countries using nuclear energy for non-power applications to organize their waste management practices. It describes methodologies, criteria and options for the selection of appropriate technologies for processing and storage of low and intermediate level radioactive waste from different nuclear applications. The report reviews both technical and non-technical factors important for decision making and planning, and for implementation of waste management activities at the country and facility levels. It makes practical recommendations for the selection of particular technologies for different scales of waste generation. These wastes may arise from production of radionuclides and their application in industry, agriculture, medicine, education and research. The report also considers waste generated at research reactors, research centers and research laboratories using radioisotopes, as well as waste from decommissioning of research reactors and small nuclear facilities such as hot cells, laboratories and irradiation facilities. Management of uranium mining and milling waste and management of spent fuel from research reactors are not considered in this report. Discussed in detail are: the basic legal, regulatory, administrative and technical requirements set up in a national waste management system and review of the factors and components affecting the selection of an appropriate national waste management system. the origins and characteristics of radioactive waste from different nuclear applications. the technical factors that might affect the selection of waste processing and storage technologies, the main waste management steps, information on available technologies, the basis for planning of waste processing and storage and the selection of a particular option for radioactive waste processing and storage in countries with a different scale of nuclear applications

  10. Selection of efficient options for processing and storage of radioactive waste in countries with small amounts of waste generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-09-01

    The report is intended to assist decision makers in countries using nuclear energy for non-power applications to organize their waste management practices. It describes methodologies, criteria and options for the selection of appropriate technologies for processing and storage of low and intermediate level radioactive waste from different nuclear applications. The report reviews both technical and non-technical factors important for decision making and planning, and for implementation of waste management activities at the country and facility levels. It makes practical recommendations for the selection of particular technologies for different scales of waste generation. These wastes may arise from production of radionuclides and their application in industry, agriculture, medicine, education and research. The report also considers waste generated at research reactors, research centers and research laboratories using radioisotopes, as well as waste from decommissioning of research reactors and small nuclear facilities such as hot cells, laboratories and irradiation facilities. Management of uranium mining and milling waste and management of spent fuel from research reactors are not considered in this report. Discussed in detail are: the basic legal, regulatory, administrative and technical requirements set up in a national waste management system and review of the factors and components affecting the selection of an appropriate national waste management system. the origins and characteristics of radioactive waste from different nuclear applications. the technical factors that might affect the selection of waste processing and storage technologies, the main waste management steps, information on available technologies, the basis for planning of waste processing and storage and the selection of a particular option for radioactive waste processing and storage in countries with a different scale of nuclear applications.

  11. Utilization of small-amount of radioactive isotope. Report of Technical Committee for Using Minor Radioactive Sources, Section of Physical Science and Industry, JRIAS. (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The report of this series is a summary of considerations made by the committee which was founded in January, 1991, for stimulating the utilization of small-amount radioactive isotopes. The present report (1) is composed of three chapters concerning the purpose above mentioned and achievement of the committee, and reasonable regulation for the sealed isotopes. For the purpose, analysis was made for the present states of small-amount radioisotope utilization and of legal regulation and proposals were done by the committee. In the past, the first (1/1, 1991-5/31, 1992) and second (6/1, 1992 5/31, 1994) terms of the committee investigated the present states of utilization and safety handling in Japan and foreign countries, methods for stimulation, education and re-evaluation of the past trials for technology of those sub-legal isotopes together with translation of IAEA SAFETY SERIES No. 104 into Japanese, which was published in the journal Radioisotopes vol.44 (1995), for reference of the present states in Japan and foreign countries. In the chapter of proposal for the reasonable regulation for the sealed isotopes, the present committee investigated the present states of utilization of the industrial instruments and daily necessities which are equipped with small-amount radioisotopes, their legal and safety problems involved and the basis of calculation of exemption level, and made proposals for reasonable regulation. (K.H.)

  12. Devising of the method for the determination of small and very small amounts of cadmium in biological materials by radiochemical version of neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dybczynski, R.; Samczynski, Z.

    1996-01-01

    The newly modified version of the method for the determination of cadmium in biological materials by radiochemical NAA based on selective post irradiation separation of Cd using ion exchange rasin Retardion 11A8 is presented. The conditions necessary for the selective retaining of Cd on the column exploiting both anionic and cationic ion exchange function of the resin have been discussed. Depending on the composition of the external solution, cadmium existing in the form of either anionic chloride complexes or cationic amine species is taken up by quaternary ammonium or carboxylate functional groups, respectively while accompanying elements are eluted. The elaborated method was further verified by determine Cd content in several certified biological reference materials using neutron activation analysis. The ion exchange separation procedure assures very high radiochemical purity of the cadmium fraction. Decontamination factors obtained for Mo, Sb, Na, Zn, Co, Sc amounted to 10 3 - 10 6 . Detection limit for Cd was 0.5 μg kg -1 . Analytical results show good agreement with the certified values. (author). 10 refs, 7 figs, 1 tab

  13. Research on the possibility of separation of the small amounts of calcium from strontium during crystallization of their nitrates in the system acetic acid-water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubicki, W.; Piskorek, M.

    1976-01-01

    Co-crystallization of the calcium nitrate and strontium nitrate from solutions of acetic acid at room temperature and boiling point were investigated. The process of crystallization was studied, using radioactive calcium isotope Ca 45 of 153 day semi-stability period. The presented investigations show that high effects of purifying strontium nitrate from small amounts of calcium can be obtained during crystallization of these nitrates from the system CH 3 COOH-H 2 O. This method was applied for obtaining strontium nitrate of high purity. (author)

  14. Small Data

    OpenAIRE

    Pemberton, Steven

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractThe term “Open Data” often goes hand in hand with the term “Big Data”, where large data sets get released allowing for analysis, but the Cinderella of the Open Data ball is Small Data, small amounts of data, nonetheless possibly essential, that are too small to be put in some database or online dataset to be put to use. RDFa is a technology that allows Cinderella to go to the ball.

  15. The statistical analysis of energy release in small-scale coronal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulyanov, Artyom; Kuzin, Sergey; Bogachev, Sergey

    We present the results of statistical analysis of impulsive flare-like brightenings, which numerously occur in the quiet regions of solar corona. For our study, we utilized high-cadence observations performed with two EUV-telescopes - TESIS/Coronas-Photon and AIA/SDO. In total, we processed 6 sequences of images, registered throughout the period between 2009 and 2013, covering the rising phase of the 24th solar cycle. Based on high-speed DEM estimation method, we developed a new technique to evaluate the main parameters of detected events (geometrical sizes, duration, temperature and thermal energy). We then obtained the statistical distributions of these parameters and examined their variations depending on the level of solar activity. The results imply that near the minimum of the solar cycle the energy release in quiet corona is mainly provided by small-scale events (nanoflares), whereas larger events (microflares) prevail on the peak of activity. Furthermore, we investigated the coronal conditions that had specified the formation and triggering of registered flares. By means of photospheric magnetograms obtained with MDI/SoHO and HMI/SDO instruments, we examined the topology of local magnetic fields at different stages: the pre-flare phase, the peak of intensity and the ending phase. To do so, we introduced a number of topological parameters including the total magnetic flux, the distance between magnetic sources and their mutual arrangement. The found correlation between the change of these parameters and the formation of flares may offer an important tool for application of flare forecasting.

  16. Towards the use of small amounts of activated charcoal along with well-type NaI(Tl) detector for indoor radon measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Azmi, D.

    2006-01-01

    The feasibility of using small quantities of activated charcoal and a 7.6 cm x 7.6 cm NaI(Tl) well-type detector was investigated for indoor radon measurements. Vials, filled with 10 g of charcoal, were exposed for different indoor radon concentration levels typical of Kuwait dwellings. After exposure, the vials were sealed and kept for 3 h to allow radon to come into radioactive equilibrium with its progenies and were then analysed by gamma-ray spectrometry using the well-type NaI(Tl) detector. The variation of radon absorption by the vials filled with charcoal with exposure time was also studied. A comparative study of the present technique with the standard technique of using 70 g charcoal canisters and flat NaI detector was also performed. After establishing the suitability of the technique, the charcoal vials were then used to investigate the effect of air-ventilation on the concentration levels of the indoor radon. Results show that there is a reduction in the radon concentration level (up to 25%) when the air-ventilation system was switched on. The paper presents the results of the study on the feasibility of combining small amounts of activated charcoal with a well-type NaI(Tl) detector in the measurement of indoor radon concentrations. (authors)

  17. Fabrication of transparent, tough, and conductive shape-memory polyurethane films by incorporating a small amount of high-quality graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yong Chae; Kim, Jin Hee; Hayashi, Takuya; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Endo, Morinobu; Terrones, Mauricio; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2012-04-23

    We report a mechanically strong, electrically and thermally conductive, and optically transparent shape-memory polyurethane composite which was fabricated by introducing a small amount (0.1 wt%) of high-quality graphene as a filler. Geometrically large (≈4.6 μm(2)), but highly crystallized few-layer graphenes, verified by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, were prepared by the sonication of expandable graphite in an organic solvent. Oxygen- containing functional groups at the edge plane of graphene were crucial for an effective stress transfer from the graphene to polyurethane. Homogeneously dispersed few-layered graphene enabled polyurethane to have a high shape recovery force of 1.8 MPa cm(-3). Graphene, which is intrinsically stretchable up to 10%, will enable high-performance composites to be fabricated at relatively low cost and we thus envisage that such composites may replace carbon nanotubes for various applications in the near future. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Complex formation reactions of uranyl(VI) with neutral N-donors in dimethyl sulfoxide. Influence of small amounts of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassol, A.; Di Bernardo, P.; Zanonato, P.; Portanova, R.; Tolazzi, M.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative information about the existence and thermodynamic stability of uranyl(VI) ion complexes based solely upon nitrogen coordination has been obtained in the solvent dimethyl sulfoxide. Calorimetric, potentiometric, and FT-IR investigations, under controlled anhydrous conditions, show that the uranyl(VI) ion can form both mono and bis chelates with the ethylenediamine ligand and only a mono chelate of rather low stability with propylenediamine. With the monodentate ligand n-butylamine only a very weak metal-ligand interaction has been detected. The stability constants and the enthalpy and entropy changes have been calculated for the identified coordinated species. All data refer to 25.0 degree C and a tetraethylammonium perchlorate medium of ionic strength 0.1 M. All the complexes are enthalpy stabilized whereas the entropy contributions oppose the complex formation. Calorimetric and FT-IR measurements carried out to investigate the effects of small amounts of water present show that a very low water concentration, comparable to that of the coordinating metal ion, can give rise to hydrolysis reactions that may compete with complex formation. This is due to the combined action of different factors that are discussed. 39 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  19. In vivo detection, localization and measurement of radionuclides in man: a detection system for the localization and measurement of small amounts of photon emitters. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurer, G.R.

    1985-01-01

    A new detector has been devised which, by providing a significant increase in geometric counting efficiency, allows a concurrent reduction in the amount of radioactivity needed to produce an image of the deposition site(s) of radionuclides in humans and/or experimental animals. Consisting of four wedgeshaped NaI(Tl) crystals in a unique geometrical arrangement, the crystals themselves function as the collimator generally employed in radionuclide imaging applications. The four crystals, when coupled, become a 4-crystal unit detector; joined so their active faces form the silhouette of a pyramid. The outside, vertically oriented, rectangular faces of each crystal are placed back-to-back with those of adjoining detectors. Thus, small or large arrays of the 4-crystal unit detectors may be assembled. In practice, the array of detectors will be moved in fixed, discrete steps over the source of radiation to be imaged. As a result of its shape, each count obtained from each crystal at each counting position is different, relative to its position above the source. The array of counts obtained in this manner is the raw spatial information. They are used in a system of linear, simultaneous equations which relate the position of the detectors to the counts obtained at each position. The solution of these equations - utilizing the predetermined point-source-response (PSR) function of the crystals - yields a two-dimensional image of the deposition site of the radioactivity. 18 figs

  20. Development of a high temperature high strength Al alloy by addition of small amounts of Sc and Mg to 2219 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondol, S. [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Alam, T.; Banerjee, R. [Advanced Materials and Manufacturing Processes Institute and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203-5017 (United States); Kumar, S. [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Chattopadhyay, K., E-mail: kamanio@materials.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2017-02-27

    The paper reports a significant improvement in tensile properties, in particular at 200 °C, of commercial 2219 Al alloy by addition of small amounts of Sc (0.8 wt%) and Mg (0.45 wt%), and employing copper mould suction casting followed by natural ageing and cold rolling. Microstructural examination and measurement of hardness were performed in order to explain the effects of Sc and Mg at each processing step. It is found that the remarkable improvement of room temperature strength occurs due to fine grain size, Al{sub 3}Sc and Al{sub 3}(Sc,Zr) dispersoids, GP zones on {100} and {111} planes, and work hardening. On exposure at 200 °C, the GP zones transform primarily to θ′ precipitates and a few Ω precipitates. Sc and Mg atoms segregate at the θ′/matrix interface, which suppress the coarsening of θ′ precipitates and make them stable at higher temperatures. Thus, the work reports extremely high 0.2% proof stress of 542 MPa at room temperature, 378 MPa at 200 °C and 495 MPa at room temperature after 200 h exposure at 200 °C accompanied by reasonable ductility. Theoretical yield strength is calculated on the basis of the observed microstructure and is found to be in good agreement with the experimentally obtained value.

  1. Development of a high temperature high strength Al alloy by addition of small amounts of Sc and Mg to 2219 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondol, S.; Alam, T.; Banerjee, R.; Kumar, S.; Chattopadhyay, K.

    2017-01-01

    The paper reports a significant improvement in tensile properties, in particular at 200 °C, of commercial 2219 Al alloy by addition of small amounts of Sc (0.8 wt%) and Mg (0.45 wt%), and employing copper mould suction casting followed by natural ageing and cold rolling. Microstructural examination and measurement of hardness were performed in order to explain the effects of Sc and Mg at each processing step. It is found that the remarkable improvement of room temperature strength occurs due to fine grain size, Al 3 Sc and Al 3 (Sc,Zr) dispersoids, GP zones on {100} and {111} planes, and work hardening. On exposure at 200 °C, the GP zones transform primarily to θ′ precipitates and a few Ω precipitates. Sc and Mg atoms segregate at the θ′/matrix interface, which suppress the coarsening of θ′ precipitates and make them stable at higher temperatures. Thus, the work reports extremely high 0.2% proof stress of 542 MPa at room temperature, 378 MPa at 200 °C and 495 MPa at room temperature after 200 h exposure at 200 °C accompanied by reasonable ductility. Theoretical yield strength is calculated on the basis of the observed microstructure and is found to be in good agreement with the experimentally obtained value.

  2. Comparison of some gamma detectors and environmental measurement of small Ar41 releases from a Triga reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baers, B.; Kautto, A.M.T.

    1977-11-01

    GM-detectors, liquid- and NaI(Tl)-scintillation detectors and semiconductor detectors were compared in order to measure small airborne Ar 41 activity concentrations. A 12,5 cm x 12,5 cm NaI(Tl)-scintillation detector was used to semiempirically estimate the radiation exposure arising from airborne Ar 41 release passing 5 meters (estimated) above the detector at a distance of 130 meters from a 250 kW Triga-reactor under downwind conditions. The height of the release point was 19 m. The exposure was found to be 0.45 μR/h at an Ar 41 release rate of 18 mCi/h (670 MBq/h) under downwind conditions and at a wind speed of 3 m/s. The mean annual exposure from 1300 hours reactor operation is of the order of 40...100 μR/y (+100%,-50%) at this test point and at a release rate of 2.5...6μCi/s. The maximum exposure at the ground level is at a distance of about 200 meters (approximately 10 x height of chimney) and it is of the order of 100 μR/y. At close distances from the point of release a line source model can be used for the approximate estimation of the exposure. (author)

  3. [Spectral characteristics of dissolved organic matter released during the metabolic process of small medusa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dong-Hui; Yi, Yue-Yuan; Zhao, Lei; Guo, Wei-Dong

    2012-06-01

    The metabolic processes of jellyfish can produce dissolved organic matter (DOM) which will influence the functioning of the aquatic ecosystems, yet the optical properties of DOM released by jellyfish are unknown. Here we report the absorption and fluorescence properties of DOM released by a medusa species Black fordia virginica during a 24 h incubation experiment. Compared with the control group, an obvious increase in the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), absorption coefficient (a280) and total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) was observed in incubation group. This clearly demonstrated the release of DOM, chromophoric DOM (CDOM) and dissolved nutrients by B. virginica which feed on enough of Artemia sp. before the experiment. The increase in spectral slope ratio (SR) and decrease in humification index (HIX) indicated that the released DOM was less-humified and had relatively lower molecular weight. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) decomposed the fluorescence matrices of DOM into three humic-like components (C1-C3) and one protein-like component (C4). The Fmax of two components (C2: 400 nm showed little changes. Thus, we suggested a zooplankton index (ZIX) to trace and characterize the DOM excreted by metabolic activity of zooplankton, which is calculated as the ratio of the sum of Fmax of all fluorescence components with the emission wavelength 400 nm.

  4. Effects of feeding unlimited amounts of milk replacer for the first 5 weeks of age on rumen and small intestinal growth and development in dairy calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäff, C T; Gruse, J; Maciej, J; Pfuhl, R; Zitnan, R; Rajsky, M; Hammon, H M

    2018-01-01

    The development of the gastrointestinal tract in newborn calves is essential for sufficient nutrient uptake. An intensive milk feeding during the neonatal period may impair the rumen development in calves. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of milk replacer (MR) feeding in unlimited amounts for the first 5 wk of age on the gastrointestinal growth and development in preruminant calves at wk 9 of age. Twenty-eight newborn Holstein and Holstein × Charolais crossbred calves (19 male and 9 female) were fed MR ad libitum (ADLIB) or in restricted amounts (6 L per day; RES) until wk 5 of age. Thereafter, the MR intake of ADLIB was gradually reduced at wk 6 and 7, and all calves received 6 L of MR per day until wk 9 of age. In wk 9, calves were slaughtered and carcass and organ weight as well as rumen papilla size in the atrium, ventral sac, and ventral blind sac, and villus size of the mucosa in the small intestine (duodenum; proximal, mid, and distal jejunum; and ileum) were determined. The expression of mRNA associated with the local insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system was measured in the rumen epithelium. Ad libitum MR feeding increased MR intake and growth in ADLIB without influencing concentrate intake compared with RES. Carcass weight in wk 9 was greater in ADLIB than in RES. The density of the rumen papillae in the atrium and ventral blind sac was greater in RES than in ADLIB calves, but surface area of the epithelium was not different between groups in the investigated regions of the rumen. The mRNA abundance of IGF1 in the atrium tended to be greater and the IGFR1 mRNA abundance in the ventral sac tended to be lower in the ADLIB than in the RES feeding group. The rumen pH and volatile fatty acid concentrations were not affected by MR feeding intensity. In mid-jejunum, villus circumference was greater in ADLIB than in RES calves. In the distal jejunum, villus surface area and the villus height/crypt depth ratio were greater and the villus

  5. Peptide imprinted receptors for the determination of the small cell lung cancer associated biomarker progastrin releasing peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qader, A. A.; Urraca, J.; Torsetnes, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    Peptide imprinted polymers were developed for detection of progastrin releasing peptide (ProGRP); a low abundant blood based biomarker for small cell lung cancer. The polymers targeted the proteotypic nona-peptide sequence NLLGLIEAK and were used for selective enrichment of the proteotypic peptide...... prior to LCMS based quantification. Peptide imprinted polymers with the best affinity characteristics were first identified from a 96-polymer combinatorial library. The effects of functional monomers, crosslinker, porogen, and template on adsorption capacity and selectivity for NLLGLIEAK were...

  6. Heat Release Rate of an Open Kitchen Fire of Small Residential Units in Tall Buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Chow, W.K.

    2014-01-01

    Many small units of area less than 30 m2 in residential buildings over 200 m tall are equipped with open kitchens in Asia, including Hong Kong. Fire safety provisions of these kitchens are determined by performance-based design (PBD). In most PBD projects, only the spread of smoke from the kitchen on fire to the outside was commonly studied. However, a fire load survey in Hong Kong indicated large quantities of combustibles are stored in residential units. Cooking oil was found to be ignited ...

  7. psRNATarget: a plant small RNA target analysis server (2017 release).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xinbin; Zhuang, Zhaohong; Zhao, Patrick Xuechun

    2018-04-30

    Plant regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs), which include most microRNAs (miRNAs) and a subset of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), such as the phased siRNAs (phasiRNAs), play important roles in regulating gene expression. Although generated from genetically distinct biogenesis pathways, these regulatory sRNAs share the same mechanisms for post-translational gene silencing and translational inhibition. psRNATarget was developed to identify plant sRNA targets by (i) analyzing complementary matching between the sRNA sequence and target mRNA sequence using a predefined scoring schema and (ii) by evaluating target site accessibility. This update enhances its analytical performance by developing a new scoring schema that is capable of discovering miRNA-mRNA interactions at higher 'recall rates' without significantly increasing total prediction output. The scoring procedure is customizable for the users to search both canonical and non-canonical targets. This update also enables transmitting and analyzing 'big' data empowered by (a) the implementation of multi-threading chunked file uploading, which can be paused and resumed, using HTML5 APIs and (b) the allocation of significantly more computing nodes to its back-end Linux cluster. The updated psRNATarget server has clear, compelling and user-friendly interfaces that enhance user experiences and present data clearly and concisely. The psRNATarget is freely available at http://plantgrn.noble.org/psRNATarget/.

  8. Influence of charge on encapsulation and release behavior of small molecules in self-assembled layer-by-layer microcapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandapalli, Praveen K; Labala, Suman; Vanamala, Deekshith; Koranglekar, Manali P; Sakimalla, Lakshmi A; Venuganti, Venkata Vamsi K

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of charge of model small molecules on their encapsulation and release behavior in layer-by-layer microcapsules (LbL-MC). Poly(styrene sulfonate) and poly(ethylene imine) were sequentially adsorbed on calcium carbonate sacrificial templates to prepare LbL-MC. Model molecules with varying charge, anionic - ascorbic acid, cationic - imatinib mesylate (IM) and neutral - 5-fluorouracil were encapsulated in LbL-MC. Free and encapsulated LbL-MC were characterized using zetasizer, FTIR spectroscope and differential scanning calorimeter. The influence of IM-loaded LbL-MC on cell viability was studied in B16F10 murine melanoma cells. Furthermore, biodistribution of IM-loaded LbL-MC with and without PEGylation was studied in BALB/c mice. Results showed spherical LbL-MC of 3.0 ± 0.4 μm diameter. Encapsulation efficiency of LbL-MC increased linearly (R(2 )= 0.89-0.99) with the increase in solute concentration. Increase in pH from 2 to 6 increased the encapsulation of charged molecules in LbL-MC. Charged molecules showed greater encapsulation efficiency in LbL-MC compared with neutral molecule. In vitro release kinetics showed Fickian and non-Fickian diffusion of small molecules, depending on the nature of molecular interactions with LbL-MC. At 50 μM concentration, free IM showed significantly (p < 0.05) more cytotoxicity compared with IM-loaded LbL-MC. Biodistribution studies showed that PEGylation of LbL-MC decreased the liver and spleen uptake of IM-encapsulated LbL-MC. In conclusion, LbL-MC can be developed as a potential carrier for small molecules depending on their physical and chemical properties.

  9. Small heat shock proteins can release light dependence of tobacco seed during germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hyun Jo; Park, Soo Min; Kim, Keun Pill; Suh, Mi Chung; Lee, Mi Ok; Lee, Seong-Kon; Xinli, Xia; Hong, Choo Bong

    2015-03-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) function as ATP-independent molecular chaperones, and although the production and function of sHSPs have often been described under heat stress, the expression and function of sHSPs in fundamental developmental processes, such as pollen and seed development, have also been confirmed. Seed germination involves the breaking of dormancy and the resumption of embryo growth that accompany global changes in transcription, translation, and metabolism. In many plants, germination is triggered simply by imbibition of water; however, different seeds require different conditions in addition to water. For small-seeded plants, like Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), light is an important regulator of seed germination. The facts that sHSPs accumulate during seed development, sHSPs interact with various client proteins, and seed germination accompanies synthesis and/or activation of diverse proteins led us to investigate the role of sHSPs in seed germination, especially in the context of light dependence. In this study, we have built transgenic tobacco plants that ectopically express sHSP, and the effect was germination of the seeds in the dark. Administering heat shock to the seeds also resulted in the alleviation of light dependence during seed germination. Subcellular localization of ectopically expressed sHSP was mainly observed in the cytoplasm, whereas heat shock-induced sHSPs were transported to the nucleus. We hypothesize that ectopically expressed sHSPs in the cytoplasm led the status of cytoplasmic proteins involved in seed germination to function during germination without additional stimulus and that heat shock can be another signal that induces seed germination. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Small Heat Shock Proteins Can Release Light Dependence of Tobacco Seed during Germination1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hyun Jo; Park, Soo Min; Kim, Keun Pill; Suh, Mi Chung; Lee, Mi Ok; Lee, Seong-Kon; Xinli, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) function as ATP-independent molecular chaperones, and although the production and function of sHSPs have often been described under heat stress, the expression and function of sHSPs in fundamental developmental processes, such as pollen and seed development, have also been confirmed. Seed germination involves the breaking of dormancy and the resumption of embryo growth that accompany global changes in transcription, translation, and metabolism. In many plants, germination is triggered simply by imbibition of water; however, different seeds require different conditions in addition to water. For small-seeded plants, like Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), light is an important regulator of seed germination. The facts that sHSPs accumulate during seed development, sHSPs interact with various client proteins, and seed germination accompanies synthesis and/or activation of diverse proteins led us to investigate the role of sHSPs in seed germination, especially in the context of light dependence. In this study, we have built transgenic tobacco plants that ectopically express sHSP, and the effect was germination of the seeds in the dark. Administering heat shock to the seeds also resulted in the alleviation of light dependence during seed germination. Subcellular localization of ectopically expressed sHSP was mainly observed in the cytoplasm, whereas heat shock-induced sHSPs were transported to the nucleus. We hypothesize that ectopically expressed sHSPs in the cytoplasm led the status of cytoplasmic proteins involved in seed germination to function during germination without additional stimulus and that heat shock can be another signal that induces seed germination. PMID:25604531

  11. Precise control of the frequency and amount of food provided for small laboratory animals by a new electronic metering technique, used to evaluate the cariogenic potential of chocolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenby, T H; Mistry, M

    1995-01-01

    A new electronic system was set up for accurately regulating the amount and frequency of food dispensed to laboratory rats so that investigations of the cariogenic potential of foods can be carried out under strictly controlled conditions according to the stipulations of the San Antonio Consensus Conference, 1985. The system was used to evaluate the cariogenicity of sucrose incorporated into plain and milk chocolate. The results suggested that 18.75% of sucrose in the diet had the same cariogenic potential no matter whether it was in the form of fine crystals or incorporated into plain chocolate, but mean caries scores were nearly 30% higher on a plain chocolate than on a milk chocolate regime.

  12. Release of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} from small wetland lakes in western Siberia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repo, M.E.; Huttunen, J.T.; Martikainen, P.J. [Univ. of Kuopio, Dept. of Env ironmental Science, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Naumov, A.V.; Chichulin, A.V. [I nst. of Soil Science and Agrochemistry, Russian Academy of Science, 630099 Novos ibirsk (Russian Federation); Lapshina, E.D. [Yugra State Univ., 628012, Khanty-Mansiysk (Russian Federation); Bleuten , W. [Utrecht Univ., Dept. of Physical Geography,3508 TC Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2007-11-15

    CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fluxes were measured from three small wetland lakes located in the middle taiga and forest tundra zones on West Siberian Lowlands (WSL), the world's largest wetland area. Fluxes were measured during summer 2005 using floating chambers and were validated against the thin boundary layer model based on the relationship between gas exchange and wind speed. All studied lakes were supersaturated with CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}, and acted on a seasonal basis as sources of these greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. Daily mean CO{sub 2} fluxes measured with chambers ranged from near the zero to 3.1 g CO{sub 2}/m{sup 2}/d and corresponding CH{sub 4} fluxes from 1.1 to 120 mg CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2}/d. CH{sub 4} ebullition (0.65-11 mg CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2}/d) was detected in two of the lakes. Total carbon evasion from the studied lakes during the active season was 23-66 g C/m{sup 2}, of which more than 90% was released as CO{sub 2}-C. The carbon loss per unit area from the studied lakes was of similar magnitude as previously reported values of net carbon uptake of Siberian peatlands. This emphasizes the importance of small water-bodies in the carbon balance of West Siberian landscape.

  13. A summary of processes relevant for the particle balance of a cold plasma blanket contaminated with a small amount of helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potters, J.H.H.M.; Goedheer, W.J.

    1982-04-01

    A summary is given of the atomic processes which are relevant for the ionization balance and for the transport in a plasma consisting of hydrogen with a small admixture of helium. Attention is paid mainly to processes in plasmas with temperatures below 100 eV and electron densities between 3x10 13 and 3x10 14 cm -3 conditions which prevail in a so-called cold plasma blanket. The species considered are electrons, protons, hydrogen atoms (ground state and excited), α-particles, He + -ions (ground state and excited), and helium atoms (ground state and excited). The discussed processes are charge exchange, ionization, recombination, (de-) excitation, and elastic scattering

  14. Magnetic Active Agent Release System (MAARS): evaluation of a new way for a reproducible, externally controlled drug release into the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzel, Christian T; Richert, Hendryk; Abert, Sandra; Merkel, Ute; Hippius, Marion; Stallmach, Andreas

    2012-08-10

    Human absorption studies are used to test new drug candidates for their bioavailability in different regions of the gastrointestinal tract. In order to replace invasive techniques (e.g. oral or rectal intubation) a variety of externally controlled capsule-based drug release systems has been developed. Most of these use ionizing radiation, internal batteries, heating elements or even chemicals for the localization and disintegration process of the capsule. This embodies potential harms for volunteers and patients. We report about a novel technique called "Magnetic Active Agent Release System" (MAARS), which uses purely magnetic effects for this purpose. In our trial thirteen healthy volunteers underwent a complete monitoring and release procedure of 250 mg acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) targeting the flexura duodenojejunalis and the mid-part of the jejunum. During all experiments MAARS initiated a sufficient drug release and was well tolerated. Beside this we also could show that the absorption of ASA is about two times faster in the more proximal region of the flexura duodenojejunalis with a tmax of 47±13 min compared to the more distal jejunum with tmax values of 100±10 min (p=0.031). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Pick-up, transport and release of a molecular cargo using a small-molecule robotic arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Salma; Lee, Alan T. L.; Leigh, David A.; Markevicius, Augustinas; Solà, Jordi

    2016-02-01

    Modern-day factory assembly lines often feature robots that pick up, reposition and connect components in a programmed manner. The idea of manipulating molecular fragments in a similar way has to date only been explored using biological building blocks (specifically DNA). Here, we report on a wholly artificial small-molecule robotic arm capable of selectively transporting a molecular cargo in either direction between two spatially distinct, chemically similar, sites on a molecular platform. The arm picks up/releases a 3-mercaptopropanehydrazide cargo by formation/breakage of a disulfide bond, while dynamic hydrazone chemistry controls the cargo binding to the platform. Transport is controlled by selectively inducing conformational and configurational changes within an embedded hydrazone rotary switch that steers the robotic arm. In a three-stage operation, 79-85% of 3-mercaptopropanehydrazide molecules are transported in either (chosen) direction between the two platform sites, without the cargo at any time fully dissociating from the machine nor exchanging with other molecules in the bulk.

  16. Early detection of response in small cell bronchogenic carcinoma by changes in serum concentrations of creatine kinase, neuron specific enolase, calcitonin, ACTH, serotonin and gastrin releasing peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, E; Hansen, M; Urdal, P

    1988-01-01

    Creatine kinase (CK-BB), neuron specific enolase (NSE), ACTH, calcitonin, serotonin and gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) were measured in serum or plasma before and immediately after initiation of treatment in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCC). Pretherapeutic elevated concentrations of CK...

  17. Overexpression of pro-gastrin releasing peptide promotes the cell proliferation and progression in small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Zhiyun; Lu, Renquan; Xie, Suhong; Jiang, Minglei; Liu, Kai; Xiao, Ran; Shen, Jiabin; Wang, Yanchun; Guo, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Pro-gastrin releasing peptide (ProGRP) plays the role of oncogene in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). In this study, we aim to explore the biological function of ProGRP in SCLC cells and its potential mechanism. Expression of ProGRP in SCLC tissues and cell lines were detected by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis, respectively. The transduced cell lines with ProGRP down-regulation were established using RNA interference technology. Cell viability, cologenic, apoptosis-associated assay and the biomarker levels determination for cell supernatant were performed in the transduced cells to elucidate the biological functions and mechanisms of ProGRP in SCLC cells. Our data showed that ProGRP protein was demonstrated a higher level in SCLC tissues and cells compared with the control, and its diagnostic efficiency was better than NSE, further, the higher levels of ProGRP were detected in the patients with extensive disease stage (P < 0.05), were also the unfavorable factor to the prognosis of SCLC patients. Additionally, the concentration of serum ProGRP is a useful biomarker in disease-monitoring of the patients with SCLC. Down-regulation of ProGRP significantly reduced SCLC cell growth, repressed colony formation, but increased cancer cell apoptosis. Additionally, repression of ProGRP also induced change in the cell cycle and output of NSE. Our data indicated that ProGRP serve as the useful biomarker in the management of SCLC and might be a potential therapeutic target. - Highlights: • ProGRP is overexpressed in the tissues and sera of the patients with SCLC. • Down-regulation of ProGRP inhibited cell proliferation. • Inhibition of ProGRP altered cell cycle distribution and triggers the apoptosis of lung cancer cells.

  18. Ectopic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH syndrome from metastatic small cell carcinoma: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahani Sadeka

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cushing's Syndrome (CS which is caused by isolated Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH production, rather than adrenocorticotropin (ACTH production, is extremely rare. Methods We describe the clinical presentation, course, laboratory values and pathologic findings of a patient with isolated ectopic CRH causing CS. We review the literature of the types of tumors associated with this unusual syndrome and the behavior of these tumors by endocrine testing. Results A 56 year old woman presented with clinical and laboratory features consistent with ACTH-dependent CS. Pituitary imaging was normal and cortisol did not suppress with a high dose dexamethasone test, consistent with a diagnosis of ectopic ACTH. CT imaging did not reveal any discrete lung lesions but there were mediastinal and abdominal lymphadenopathy and multiple liver lesions suspicious for metastatic disease. Laboratory testing was positive for elevated serum carcinoembryonic antigen and the neuroendocrine marker chromogranin A. Serum markers of carcinoid, medullary thyroid carcinoma, and pheochromocytoma were in the normal range. Because the primary tumor could not be identified by imaging, biopsy of the presumed metastatic liver lesions was performed. Immunohistochemistry was consistent with a neuroendocrine tumor, specifically small cell carcinoma. Immunostaining for ACTH was negative but was strongly positive for CRH and laboratory testing revealed a plasma CRH of 10 pg/ml (normal 0 to 10 pg/ml which should have been suppressed in the presence of high cortisol. Conclusions This case illustrates the importance of considering the ectopic production of CRH in the differential diagnosis for presentations of ACTH-dependent Cushing's Syndrome.

  19. From human monocytes to genome-wide binding sites--a protocol for small amounts of blood: monocyte isolation/ChIP-protocol/library amplification/genome wide computational data analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Weiterer

    Full Text Available Chromatin immunoprecipitation in combination with a genome-wide analysis via high-throughput sequencing is the state of the art method to gain genome-wide representation of histone modification or transcription factor binding profiles. However, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis in the context of human experimental samples is limited, especially in the case of blood cells. The typically extremely low yields of precipitated DNA are usually not compatible with library amplification for next generation sequencing. We developed a highly reproducible protocol to present a guideline from the first step of isolating monocytes from a blood sample to analyse the distribution of histone modifications in a genome-wide manner.The protocol describes the whole work flow from isolating monocytes from human blood samples followed by a high-sensitivity and small-scale chromatin immunoprecipitation assay with guidance for generating libraries compatible with next generation sequencing from small amounts of immunoprecipitated DNA.

  20. Small liquid sodium leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufresne, J.; Rochedereux, Y.; Antonakas, D.; Casselman, C.; Malet, J.C.

    1986-05-01

    Usually, pessimistic considerations inassessing the safety of secondary sodium loops in LMFBR reactor lead to assume guillotine rupture releasing a large amount of sodium estimate the consequences of large sodium fires. In order to reduce these consequences, one has to detect the smallest leak as soon as possible and to evaluate the future of an initial small leak. Analysis of the relationship between crack size and sodium outflow rate; Analysis of a sodium pipe with a small open crack

  1. Human HDAC isoform selectivity achieved via exploitation of the acetate release channel with structurally unique small molecule inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, Lewis; Dobler, Markus R.; Radetich, Branko; Zhu, Yanyi; Atadja, Peter W.; Claiborne, Tavina; Grob, Jonathan E.; McRiner, Andrew; Pancost, Margaret R.; Patnaik, Anup; Shao, Wenlin; Shultz, Michael; Tichkule, Ritesh; Tommasi, Ruben A.; Vash, Brian; Wang, Ping; Stams, Travis (Novartis)

    2013-11-20

    Herein we report the discovery of a family of novel yet simple, amino-acid derived class I HDAC inhibitors that demonstrate isoform selectivity via access to the internal acetate release channel. Isoform selectivity criteria is discussed on the basis of X-ray crystallography and molecular modeling of these novel inhibitors bound to HDAC8, potentially revealing insights into the mechanism of enzymatic function through novel structural features revealed at the atomic level.

  2. [Studies on high temperature oxidation of noble metal alloys for dental use. (III) On high temperature oxidation resistance of noble metal alloys by adding small amounts of alloying elements. (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, H

    1976-11-01

    The previous report pointed out the undesirable effects of high temperature oxidation on the casting. The influence of small separate additions of Zn, Mg, Si, Be and Al on the high temperature oxidation of the noble metal alloys was examined. These alloying elements were chosen because their oxide have a high electrical resistivity and they have much higher affinity for oxygen than Cu. The casting were oxidized at 700 degrees C for 1 hour in air. The results obtained were as follows: 1. The Cu oxides are not observed on the as-cast surface of noble metal alloys containing small amounts of Zn, Mg, Si, Be, and Al. The castings have gold- or silver-colored surface. 2. After heating of the unpolished and polished castings, the additions of Si, Be and Al are effective in preventing oxidation of Cu in the 18 carats gold alloys. Especially the golden surface is obtained by adding Be and Al. But there is no oxidation-resistance on the polished castings in the alloys containing Zn and Mg. 3. The zinc oxide film formed on the as-cast specimen is effective in preventing of oxidation Cu in 18 carats gold alloys. 4. It seems that the addition of Al is most available in dental application.

  3. Controlled long-term release of small peptide hormones using a new microporous polypropylene polymer: its application for vasopressin in the Brattleboro rat and potential perinatal use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruisbrink, J.; Boer, G.J.

    1984-01-01

    Based on drug release by microporous hollow fibers and the recent introduction of microporous polymers, a new technique was developed for controlled delivery of peptides. Small-diameter microporous polypropylene tubing, lumen-loaded with microgram quantities of vasopressin, and coated with collodion, releases vasopressin after in vitro immersion slowly (1-100 ng/d) and constantly for months. The mechanism of pseudo-zero-order delivery is based on high adsorption of vasopressin, keeping the void volume concentration of dissolved vasopressin constant, which is consequently a constant driving force of outward diffusion. The collodion coating prevents the entry of proteinaceous compounds which would result in rapid desorption of vasopressin. The present delivery module provides a lasting release for other peptides as well (lysine-vasopressin, oxytocin, alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone and, to a lesser extent, Met-enkephalin). The microporous polymer-collodion device is biocompatible and, loaded with vasopressin, successfully alleviates the diabetes insipidus of Brattleboro rats deficient for vasopressin. Subcutaneous implantation normalized diuresis for a period of 60 d and constant urine vasopressin excretion is observed. When the commercially available osmotic minipump is too large for implantation, the small size of the present controlled-delivery system allows peptide treatment of young and immature laboratory rats, even if located in utero

  4. Accelerating the dissolution of enteric coatings in the upper small intestine: evolution of a novel pH 5.6 bicarbonate buffer system to assess drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varum, Felipe J O; Merchant, Hamid A; Goyanes, Alvaro; Assi, Pardis; Zboranová, Veronika; Basit, Abdul W

    2014-07-01

    Despite rapid dissolution in compendial phosphate buffers, gastro resistant (enteric coated) products can take up to 2 h to disintegrate in the human small intestine, which clearly highlights the inadequacy of the in vitro test method to predict in vivo behaviour of these formulations. The aim of this study was to establish the utility of a novel pH 5.6 bicarbonate buffer, stabilized by an Auto pH™ System, as a better surrogate of the conditions of the proximal small intestine to investigate the dissolution behaviour of standard and accelerated release enteric double coating formulations. Prednisolone tablets were coated with 3 or 5 mg/cm(2) of partially neutralized EUDRAGIT(®) L 30 D-55, HP-55 or HPMC adjusted to pH 6 or 8. An outer layer of EUDRAGIT(®) L 30 D-55 was applied at 5mg/cm(2). For comparison purposes, a standard single layer of EUDRAGIT(®) L 30 D-55 was applied to the tablets. Dissolution was carried out using USP II apparatus in 0.1 M HCl for 2 h, followed by pH 5.6 bicarbonate buffer. EUDRAGIT(®) L 30 D-55 single-coated tablets showed a slow drug release with a lag time of 75 min in buffer, whereas release from the EUDRAGIT(®) L 30 D-55 double-coated tablets was accelerated. These in vitro lag times closely match the in vivo disintegration times for these coated tablets reported previously. Drug release was further accelerated from modified double coatings, particularly in the case of coatings with a thinner inner layer of HP-55 or HPMC (pH 8 and KH2PO4). This study confirms that the pH 5.6 bicarbonate buffer system offers significant advantages during the development of dosage forms designed to release the drug in the upper small intestine. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Small and similar amounts of micromotion in an anatomical stem and a customized cementless femoral stem in regular-shaped femurs. A 5-year follow-up randomized RSA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nysted, Mona; Foss, Olav A; Klaksvik, Jomar; Benum, Pål; Haugan, Kristin; Husby, Otto Schnell; Aamodt, Arild

    2014-04-01

    High primary stability is important for long-term survival of uncemented femoral stems. Different stem designs are currently in use. The ABG-I is a well-documented anatomical stem with a press-fit design. The Unique stem is designed for a tight customized fit to the cortical bone of the upper femur. This implant was initially developed for patients with abnormal anatomy, but the concept can also be used in patients with normal femoral anatomy. We present 5-year radiostereometric analysis (RSA) results from a randomized study comparing the ABG-I anatomical stem with the Unique femoral stem. 100 hips with regular upper femur anatomy were randomized to either the ABG-I stem or the Unique femoral stem. RSA measurements were performed postoperatively and after 3, 6, 12, 24, and 60 months. RSA measurements from 80 hips were available for analysis at the 5-year follow-up. Small amounts of movement were observed for both stems, with no statistically significant differences between the 2 types. No improvement in long-term stability was found from using a customized stem design. However, no patients with abnormal geometry of the upper femur were included in this study.

  6. Diameter-dependent release of a cisplatin pro-drug from small and large functionalized carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzi, Laura; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Russier, Julie; Li, Jian; Chin, Chee Fei; Ang, Wee Han; Pastorin, Giorgia; Risuleo, Gianfranco; Bianco, Alberto

    2015-03-01

    The use of platinum-based chemotherapeutic drugs in cancer therapy still suffers from severe disadvantages, such as lack of appropriate selectivity for tumor tissues and insurgence of multi-drug resistance. Moreover, drug efficacy can be attenuated by several mechanisms such as premature drug inactivation, reduced drug uptake inside cells and increased drug efflux once internalized. The use of functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as chemotherapeutic drug delivery systems is a promising strategy to overcome such limitations due to their ability to enhance cellular internalization of poorly permeable drugs and thus increase the drug bioavailability at the diseased site, compared to the free drug. Furthermore, the possibility to encapsulate agents in the nanotubes' inner cavity can protect the drug from early inactivation and their external functionalizable surface is useful for selective targeting. In this study, a hydrophobic platinum(iv) complex was encapsulated within the inner space of two different diameter functionalized multi-walled CNTs (Pt(iv)@CNTs). The behavior of the complexes, compared to the free drug, was investigated on both HeLa human cancer cells and RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. Both CNT samples efficiently induced cell death in HeLa cancer cells 72 hours after the end of exposure to CNTs. Although the larger diameter CNTs were more cytotoxic on HeLa cells compared to both the free drug and the smaller diameter nanotubes, the latter allowed a prolonged release of the encapsulated drug, thus increasing its anticancer efficacy. In contrast, both Pt(iv)@CNT constructs were poorly cytotoxic on macrophages and induced negligible cell activation and no pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Both CNT samples were efficiently internalized by the two types of cells, as demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy observations and flow cytometry analysis. Finally, the platinum levels found in the cells after Pt(iv)@CNT exposure demonstrate that they can

  7. Simulated food effects on drug release from ethylcellulose: PVA-PEG graft copolymer-coated pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschert, Susanne; Siepmann, Florence; Leclercq, Bruno; Carlin, Brian; Siepmann, Juergen

    2010-02-01

    Food effects might substantially alter drug release from oral controlled release dosage forms in vivo. The robustness of a novel type of controlled release film coating was investigated using various types of release media and two types of release apparatii. Importantly, none of the investigated conditions had a noteworthy impact on the release of freely water-soluble diltiazem HCl or slightly water-soluble theophylline from pellets coated with ethylcellulose containing small amounts of PVA-PEG graft copolymer. In particular, the presence of significant amounts of fats, carbohydrates, surfactants, bile salts, and calcium ions in the release medium did not alter drug release. Furthermore, changes in the pH and differences in the mechanical stress the dosage forms were exposed to did not affect drug release from the pellets. The investigated film coatings allowing for oral controlled drug delivery are highly robust in vitro and likely to be poorly sensitive to classical food effects in vivo.

  8. Analysis of drug effects on neurotransmitter release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowell, P.; Garner, A.

    1986-01-01

    The release of neurotransmitter is routinely studied in a superfusion system in which serial samples are collected and the effects of drugs or other treatments on the amount of material in the superfusate is determined. With frequent sampling interval, this procedure provides a mechanism for dynamically characterizing the release process itself. Using automated data collection in conjunction with polyexponential computer analysis, the equation which describes the release process in each experiment is determined. Analysis of the data during the nontreated phase of the experiment allows an internal control to be used for accurately assessing any changes in neurotransmitter release which may occur during a subsequent treatment phase. The use of internal controls greatly improves the signal to noise ratio and allows determinations of very low concentrations of drugs on small amounts of tissue to be made. In this presentation, the effects of 10 μM nicotine on 3 H-dopamine release in rat nucleus accumbens is described. The time course, potency and efficacy of the drug treatment is characterized using this system. Determinations of the exponential order of the release as well as the rate constants allow one to study the mechanism of the release process. A description of 3 H-dopamine release in normal as well as Ca ++ -free medium is presented

  9. Cesium accumulation by aquatic organisms at different trophic levels following an experimental release into a small reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinder, J.E., E-mail: jepinder@uga.ed [Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, P. O. Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (United States); Hinton, T.G., E-mail: thomas.hinton@irsn.f [Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, P. O. Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (United States); Taylor, B.E., E-mail: TaylorB@dnr.sc.go [Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, P. O. Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (United States); Whicker, F.W., E-mail: ward.whicker@colostate.ed [Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado, State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1618 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    The rates of accumulation and subsequent loss of stable cesium ({sup 133}Cs) by organisms at different trophic levels within plankton-based and periphyton-based food chains were measured following the addition of {sup 133}Cs into a small reservoir near Aiken, South Carolina, USA. An uptake parameter u (L kg{sup -1} d{sup -1} dry mass) and a loss rate parameter k (d{sup -1}) were estimated for each organism using time-series measurements of {sup 133}Cs concentrations in water and biota, and these parameters were used to estimate maximum concentrations, times to maximum concentrations, and concentration ratios (C{sub r}). The maximum {sup 133}Cs concentrations for plankton, periphyton, the insect larva Chaoborus punctipennis, which feeds on plankton, and the snail Helisoma trivolvis, which feeds on periphyton, occurred within the first 14 days following the addition, whereas the maximum concentrations for the fish species Lepomis macrochirus and Micropterus salmoides occurred after 170 days. The C{sub r} based on dry mass for plankton and C. punctipennis were 1220 L kg{sup -1} and 5570 L kg{sup -1}, respectively, and were less than the C{sub r} of 8630 L kg{sup -1} for periphyton and 47,700 L kg{sup -1} for H. trivolvis. Although the C{sub r} differed between plankton-based and periphyton-based food chains, they displayed similar levels of biomagnification. Biomagnification was also indicated for fish where the C{sub r} for the mostly nonpiscivorous L. macrochirus of 22,600 L kg{sup -1} was three times less than that for mostly piscivorous M. salmoides of 71,500 L kg{sup -1}. Although the C{sub r} for M. salmoides was greater than those for periphyton and H. trivolvis, the maximum {sup 133}Cs concentrations for periphyton and H. trivolvis were greater than that for M. salmoides. - Research highlights: {yields} A simple uptake and loss model described the Cs dynamics in all the various biota. {yields} Concentrations of Cs were greater in periphyton than in plankton

  10. Early detection of response in small cell bronchogenic carcinoma by changes in serum concentrations of creatine kinase, neuron specific enolase, calcitonin, ACTH, serotonin and gastrin releasing peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, E; Hansen, M; Urdal, P

    1988-01-01

    Creatine kinase (CK-BB), neuron specific enolase (NSE), ACTH, calcitonin, serotonin and gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) were measured in serum or plasma before and immediately after initiation of treatment in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCC). Pretherapeutic elevated concentrations of CK...... stage patients and 71% in limited stage patients. Frequent initial monitoring of the substances showed an increase in the concentrations of pretherapeutic elevated CK-BB and NSE on day 1 or 2 followed by a sharp decrease within 1 week. These changes were correlated to objective clinical response...... determined within 4-8 weeks. The results indicate that serum CK-BB and NSE are potential markers for SCC at the time of diagnosis and that changes in the concentrations during the first course of cytostatic therapy are promising as biochemical tests for early detection of response to chemotherapy....

  11. Hydrogen Sulfide Releasing 2-Mercaptoacrylic Acid-Based Derivative Possesses Cytoprotective Activity in a Small Intestine of Rats with Medication-Induced Enteropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Sklyarova

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Small intestinal injury is known to be one of the most commonly appearing pathologies, resulting in the use of medications such as: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, antitumor drugs and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors. The principal objective of this study is to evaluate the action of a novel mercaptoacrylic acid derivative able to release H2S on parameters of NO-synthase system and oxidative stress. Inducing enteropathy, three types of medications were used: indomethacin, an NSAID (35 mg/kg; methotrexate, an antitumor drug (10 mg/kg; and enalapril, an ACE inhibitor (2 mg/kg/day. 2-[(4-chlorophenyl-carbamoyl-methyl]-3-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyphenyl-acrylic acid (2C3DHTA was introduced based on the background of medication-induced enteropathy (10 mg/kg/day. The survey showed that malondialdehyde (MDA concentration, myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase, and NO-synthases (NOS were determined in the small intestinal mucosa. The increase in inducible NO-synthase (iNOS activity was due to indomethacin and methotrexate administration. Constitutive NO-synthase (cNOS activity was decreased by an ACE-inhibitor. The cytoprotective effect was demonstrated by 2C3DHTA, which returned iNOS activity to its control level and increased cNOS activity. The enterotoxic action of studied medication was accompanied by the development of oxidative stress manifested, activity of MPO was increased. MPO activity and manifestations of oxidative stress were decreased by 2C3DHTA. Effects of 2C3DHTA can be explained by the action of H2S, released from this compound in the gastrointestinal (GI system.

  12. Benefit from the association of small amounts of tannin-rich shrub foliage (Acacia cyanophylla Lindl.) with soya bean meal given as supplements to Barbarine sheep fed on oaten hay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Salem, H.; Makkar, H.P.S.; Nefzaoui, A.; Abidi, S.; Hassayoun, L.

    2005-01-01

    Two trials were conducted to test the hypotheses that (i) feeding small amount of a tanniniferous shrub foliage (Acacia cyanophylla Lindl., acacia) increases the proportion of rumen undegradable protein, and consequently benefits growth performance in Barbarine lamb; and (ii) such positive effect depends on the timing of feeding tannin source (i.e. acacia) relative to protein source (soya bean meal, SBM). Total (TT) and condensed tannin (CT) concentrations in air-dried acacia leaves used in this study averaged 29 g tannic acid and 48 g leucocyanidin equivalents per kg dry matter (DM), respectively. In trial 1, rumen fistulated ewes received oaten hay (hay) ad libitum and 200 g SBM (D1), D1 and 100 g acacia fed with the SBM (D2, mixed strategy) or as D2, but the SBM fed 1 h later than acacia when acacia was consumed completely (D3, sequential strategy). Hay intake, diet digestibility, rumen fermentation parameters (pH, ammonia nitrogen (NH 3 -N) and total volatile fatty acids) and in situ degradation of SBM nitrogen were similar between D1 and D2 (P > 0.05). However, the sequential strategy (D3) resulted in efficient use of N as reflected by the decrease of crude protein digestibility (CPD), plasma urea, NH 3 -N concentration and in situ degradation of SBM nitrogen. In trial 2, four groups each of six Barbarine lambs (initial LW 35.3 ± 3.7 kg) received for 90 days: hay ad libitum and 200 g SBM (D1), D1 and 20 g polyethylene glycol (PEG, MW 4000) mixed with SBM (D2), D1 and 100 g acacia with the SBM fed 1 h later when acacia was completely consumed (sequential strategy) (D3) or D3 and 20 g PEG fed with the SBM (D4). Polyethylene glycol was here used to deactivate tannins. Hay intake and DM, organic matter and neutral detergent fibre digestibility were similar among dietary treatment (P > 0.05). However, supplementing lambs with SBM and acacia without PEG (D3) resulted in a significant decrease (P 0.05). However, those supplemented with acacia without PEG (D3) had

  13. Benefit from the association of small amounts of tannin-rich shrub foliage (Acacia cyanophylla Lindl.) with soya bean meal given as supplements to Barbarine sheep fed on oaten hay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Salem, H. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique de Tunisie, Laboratoire des Productions Animales et Fourrageres, Ariana (Tunisia)]. E-mail: bensalem.hichem@iresa.agrinet.tn; Makkar, H.P.S. [Animal Production and Health Section, Joint FAO/IAEA Division, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Nefzaoui, A.; Abidi, S. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique de Tunisie, Laboratoire des Productions Animales et Fourrageres, Ariana (Tunisia); Hassayoun, L. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique de Tunisie, Laboratoire des Productions Animales et Fourrageres, Ariana (Tunisia); Ecole Superieure d' Agriculture de Mateur, Mateur (Tunisia)

    2005-08-19

    Two trials were conducted to test the hypotheses that (i) feeding small amount of a tanniniferous shrub foliage (Acacia cyanophylla Lindl., acacia) increases the proportion of rumen undegradable protein, and consequently benefits growth performance in Barbarine lamb; and (ii) such positive effect depends on the timing of feeding tannin source (i.e. acacia) relative to protein source (soya bean meal, SBM). Total (TT) and condensed tannin (CT) concentrations in air-dried acacia leaves used in this study averaged 29 g tannic acid and 48 g leucocyanidin equivalents per kg dry matter (DM), respectively. In trial 1, rumen fistulated ewes received oaten hay (hay) ad libitum and 200 g SBM (D1), D1 and 100 g acacia fed with the SBM (D2, mixed strategy) or as D2, but the SBM fed 1 h later than acacia when acacia was consumed completely (D3, sequential strategy). Hay intake, diet digestibility, rumen fermentation parameters (pH, ammonia nitrogen (NH{sub 3}-N) and total volatile fatty acids) and in situ degradation of SBM nitrogen were similar between D1 and D2 (P > 0.05). However, the sequential strategy (D3) resulted in efficient use of N as reflected by the decrease of crude protein digestibility (CPD), plasma urea, NH{sub 3}-N concentration and in situ degradation of SBM nitrogen. In trial 2, four groups each of six Barbarine lambs (initial LW 35.3 {+-} 3.7 kg) received for 90 days: hay ad libitum and 200 g SBM (D1), D1 and 20 g polyethylene glycol (PEG, MW 4000) mixed with SBM (D2), D1 and 100 g acacia with the SBM fed 1 h later when acacia was completely consumed (sequential strategy) (D3) or D3 and 20 g PEG fed with the SBM (D4). Polyethylene glycol was here used to deactivate tannins. Hay intake and DM, organic matter and neutral detergent fibre digestibility were similar among dietary treatment (P > 0.05). However, supplementing lambs with SBM and acacia without PEG (D3) resulted in a significant decrease (P < 0.001) of CPD (0.664 versus 0.597, respectively for D1 and

  14. Methane release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Swiss Gas Industry has carried out a systematic, technical estimate of methane release from the complete supply chain from production to consumption for the years 1992/1993. The result of this survey provided a conservative value, amounting to 0.9% of the Swiss domestic output. A continuation of the study taking into account new findings with regard to emission factors and the effect of the climate is now available, which provides a value of 0.8% for the target year of 1996. These results show that the renovation of the network has brought about lower losses in the local gas supplies, particularly for the grey cast iron pipelines. (author)

  15. Project EROS development of a new reactor concept with liquid fuel based on molten fluorides for reducing the amount and hazard of nuclear waste. Demonstration of promising P and T technology at small scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hron, Miloslav J.

    2005-01-01

    There have been new tendencies of significant decreasing of amount and potential danger of nuclear waste getting up in the world of nuclear power during the last decade. The development of a convenient for those purposes technology has been in fact a rehabilitation of the so called nuclear transmutation technologies well known since the beginning of the first nuclear era, however, having been evaluated in those times as technologically and therefore even economically demanding to a non-acceptable level. Therefore, an attempt to develop new modifications of those technologies under different conditions at the end of the first nuclear era has been supposed to be promising and acceptable for an efficient closing of nuclear fuel cycle. These new modified transmutation technologies should make it possible to return a fuel component contained in nuclear fuel burned up in conventional nuclear reactors back to nuclear fuel cycle and to turn a significant part of long-lived nuclear waste (heavy metals from the transuranium region) to useful energy without rests and by an irreversible way. This could be, besides other positive features, a way, which according to our contemporary knowledge could exclude or at least minimize a non-desirable misusing of those nuclear materials. A series of national projects started at the end of 80s and beginning of 90s of the last century. For all of them, at least two should be mentioned: The Japanese project OMEGA and the ADTT project of LANL, USA. There has been such a project, which follows namely the tendencies established by Charles Bowman in LANL, started also in the Czech Republic in the middle of 90s. The project, latter on called SPHINX (SPent Hot fuel Incinerator by Neutron fluX), has focused on the development of a burner for spent fuel from PWRs having been operated in this and some other central European countries. The principle feature of the adopted transmuter concept has been, since the very beginning of the project, the

  16. Fasting decreases apolipoprotein B mRNA editing and the secretion of small molecular weight apoB by rat hepatocytes: Evidence that the total amount of apoB secreted is regulated post-transcriptionally

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leighton, J.K.; Joyner, J.; Zamarripa, J.; Deines, M.; Davis, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Two different molecular weight forms of apoB are produced from a common initial transcript via editing of a Gln codon (CAA) to a stop codon (UAA), leading to a truncated translation product (apo BS) that consists of the amino terminal half of the larger form (apoBL). Previous studies have shown that fasting coordinately decreases lipogenesis and the secretion of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) lipids and apoBS. Secretion of the apoBL is unaffected by fasting. We studied whether editing of apoB RNA is repressed by fasting, thus accounting for the selective decreased secretion of apoBS. Column chromatography of [35S]methionine-labeled lipoproteins secreted by hepatocytes from fed rats showed that essentially all of apoBL is secreted in the VLDL fraction, whereas a significant amount (15%) of apoBS is secreted associated as lipoproteins eluting in the HDL fractions. Fasting decreased the relative amount of apoBS that eluted in the VLDL fractions and increased the amount secreted in the HDL fractions. Consistent with previous results, hepatocytes from fasted rats show a selective twofold decrease in apoBS secretion. Fasting did not affect the relative abundance of apoB RNA, determined by slot blot hybridization assays using two different 32P-labeled cDNA probes coding either for both molecular weight forms or for only the large molecular weight form. However, quantitative of the editing of apoB RNA showed that fasting caused a 60% decrease in the amount of apoB RNA possessing the stop codon. These data show that the editing of apoB RNA is sensitive to metabolic state (i.e., fasting) resulting in a selective decrease in the secretion of apoBS. However, since the total secretion of apoB was decreased by fasting, while apoB mRNA levels remained constant, additional (post-transcriptional) mechanisms play a role in regulating apoB secretion

  17. Gas Release Behavior of Cu-TiH2 Composite Powder and Its Application as a Blowing Agent to Fabricate Aluminum Foams with Low Porosity and Small Pore Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ying; Li, Yanxiang; Chen, Xiang; Liu, Zhiyong; Zhou, Xu; Wang, Ningzhen

    2018-03-01

    Compared to traditional pore structure with high porosity (≥ 80 pct) and large pore size (≥ 3 mm), aluminum foams with low porosity (60 to 70 pct) and small pore size (≤ 2 mm) possess higher compressive property and formability. In order to achieve the goal of reducing pore size, Cu-TiH2 composite powder prepared by ball milling preoxidized TiH2 with Cu powder was used as a blowing agent. Its gas release behavior was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. The results show that the ball milling treatment can advance the gas release process and slow the gas release rate at the same time. All these changes are favorable to the reduction of porosity and pore size. Such Cu-TiH2 composite powder provides an alternative way to fabricate aluminum foams with low porosity and small pore size.

  18. Gas Release Behavior of Cu-TiH2 Composite Powder and Its Application as a Blowing Agent to Fabricate Aluminum Foams with Low Porosity and Small Pore Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ying; Li, Yanxiang; Chen, Xiang; Liu, Zhiyong; Zhou, Xu; Wang, Ningzhen

    2018-06-01

    Compared to traditional pore structure with high porosity (≥ 80 pct) and large pore size (≥ 3 mm), aluminum foams with low porosity (60 to 70 pct) and small pore size (≤ 2 mm) possess higher compressive property and formability. In order to achieve the goal of reducing pore size, Cu-TiH2 composite powder prepared by ball milling preoxidized TiH2 with Cu powder was used as a blowing agent. Its gas release behavior was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. The results show that the ball milling treatment can advance the gas release process and slow the gas release rate at the same time. All these changes are favorable to the reduction of porosity and pore size. Such Cu-TiH2 composite powder provides an alternative way to fabricate aluminum foams with low porosity and small pore size.

  19. Overnight Levels of Luteinizing Hormone, Follicle-Stimulating Hormone and Growth Hormone before and during Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Analogue Treatment in Short Boys Born Small for Gestational Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kaay, Danielle C. M.; de Jong, Frank H.; Rose, Susan R.; Odink, Roelof J. H.; Bakker-van Waarde, Willie M.; Sulkers, Eric J.; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C. S.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate if 3 months of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue (GnRHa) treatment results in sufficient suppression of pubertal luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) profile patterns in short pubertal small for gestational age (SGA) boys. To compare growth hormone

  20. Development of a Methodology to Conduct Usability Evaluation for Hand Tools that May Reduce the Amount of Small Parts that are Dropped During Installation while Processing Space Flight Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Darcy

    2000-01-01

    Foreign object debris (FOD) is an important concern while processing space flight hardware. FOD can be defined as "The debris that is left in or around flight hardware, where it could cause damage to that flight hardware," (United Space Alliance, 2000). Just one small screw left unintentionally in the wrong place could delay a launch schedule while it is retrieved, increase the cost of processing, or cause a potentially fatal accident. At this time, there is not a single solution to help reduce the number of dropped parts such as screws, bolts, nuts, and washers during installation. Most of the effort is currently focused on training employees and on capturing the parts once they are dropped. Advances in ergonomics and hand tool design suggest that a solution may be possible, in the form of specialty hand tools, which secure the small parts while they are being handled. To assist in the development of these new advances, a test methodology was developed to conduct a usability evaluation of hand tools, while performing tasks with risk of creating FOD. The methodology also includes hardware in the form of a testing board and the small parts that can be installed onto the board during a test. The usability of new hand tools was determined based on efficiency and the number of dropped parts. To validate the methodology, participants were tested while performing a task that is representative of the type of work that may be done when processing space flight hardware. Test participants installed small parts using their hands and two commercially available tools. The participants were from three groups: (1) students, (2) engineers / managers and (3) technicians. The test was conducted to evaluate the differences in performance when using the three installation methods, as well as the difference in performance of the three participant groups.

  1. 13 CFR 120.930 - Amount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... percent of total Project cost plus 100 percent of eligible administrative costs. For good cause shown, SBA... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Amount. 120.930 Section 120.930 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Development Company Loan...

  2. In vivo detection, localization, and measurement of radionuclides in man: a detection system for the localization and measurement of small amounts of photon emitters. Progress report, September 1, 1978-May 15, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurer, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    The design, construction, and testing of a photon detection system which will yield, simultaneously, information proportional to both the magnitude and location of sources of radioactivity were undertaken. The operating principle of the detector system, active collimation, allows spatial resolution by utilizing the crystal elements themselves as the collimating device; hence a greater counting efficiency is attainable than with other currently available systems. The differences in characteristics of various crystals are utilized as the means of separating events occurring in each of five crystals. Mathematical processing of the counts from the individual crystals is then employed in conjunction with their geometric relationship to develop both positional data and to quantify the amount of radioactivity. By utilizing crystal detector elements in an active collimation configuration and incorporating them in an array which permits these crystals to be alternately advanced and retracted in a programmed, ordered manner, a high degree of spatial resolution is believed achievable without unduly compromising system sensitivity. Experiments were planned with a detector of optimized design to provide data on the ultimate performance that can be achieved with an N-element detector array. The experiments include development of the optimal crystal configuration, studies to ascertain the most efficient crystal shape, and the evolving of data processing techniques to translate detector response into precise source position information

  3. Integrated Control of Cabbage Pests Plutella xylostella (L) and Crocidolomia binotalis (Z) by Release of Irradiated Moths and the Parasitoid Diadegma semiclausums (H) under Field Cage and a Small Area Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singgih-Sutrisno

    2005-01-01

    The impact of the release of irradiated Diamondback moth (DBM) Plutella xylostella (L) with a dose of 200 Gy was studied in field cage experiments by releasing of irradiated and untreated DBM at a 9:1 ratio. Releasing male and female (F-1) of irradiated DBM caused a considerable level of sterility in the subsequent generations. The sterility level in those respective generations were 73.03% and 73.30%, while the release of the F-1 male only induced a level of sterility of about 55.40% and 56.44%. Inundative releases of irradiated males caused the level of sterility to reach about 44.78% and 68.01% in F-1 and F-2 respectively. The effect of the release of irradiated male Cabbage web worm (CWW) moths Crocidolomia binotalis (Z), and the release of both sexes on the population were studied under laboratory cage conditions. There was a significant difference between the effects of releasing irradiated male only and both sexes at a level of F ≤ 0.001, where the percentage of egg hatch were 22.78% and 24.75% respectively in the F-1 and F-2 generations. The effects of combining two tactics, inherited sterility and the release of parasitoid Diadegma semiclausums (H) for controlling DBMS were studied. The pupal viability in the F-1 generation was 32.5% as compared to the untreated DBMS. The impacts of respective single tactic the release of F-1 males and parasitoid D. semiclausums on the pupal viability were 57.5% and 81%. The effects of the release of sub sterile insects in a small area of about 1000 m 2 located at an isolated area in the forest in Malang, East Java was found that average number of moths caught per week from first to the fifth month at the release area was about 89.42% as compared to those at the control area. The highest level of parasitation of D, semiclausums was found in the second instar larvae of DBMS. Population growth of parasitoid D. semiclausums from the first generation to the eleventh generation increased till to the fifth generation larvae

  4. Carbon nanotube release from polymers into a food simulant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yining; Uysal Unalan, Ilke; Rubino, Maria; Auras, Rafael

    2017-10-01

    The release assessment of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was performed on two types of polymer-CNT nanocomposites: polypropylene (PP) and polyamide 6 (PA6) containing 3 wt% CNT. Nanocomposite films were prepared and then exposed to ethanol as a fatty-food simulant at 40 °C, and the amount of CNT release into ethanol was determined by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The CNTs released into ethanol were visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and verified by Raman spectroscopy. UV-Vis analysis showed a very small amount of CNT release from the nanocomposite films into ethanol over 60 d: maximum CNT concentrations in ethanol were 1.3 mg/L for the PP-CNT film and 1.2 mg/L for the PA6-CNT film. GFAAS results indicated that the amount of CNTs released into ethanol after 12 d was over 20-fold higher than the results obtained by UV-Vis. Overestimation of CNT release by GFAAS suggested aggregation and poor dispersion of CNTs in the solvent. This assumption was verified by TEM images exhibiting the embedded CNTs in the polymer flakes, which could be poorly dispersed in the solvent. In general, CNT release from the nanocomposite films was considered a surface phenomenon, as indicated by detachment of CNT-containing polymer flakes from the film surface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. In vivo-detection, localization and measurement of radionuclides in man: a detection system for the localization amd measurement of small amounts of photon emitters. Progress report, March 1, 1981-October 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurer, G. R.

    1981-11-01

    The design, construction, and testing of a photon detection system which will yield, simultaneously, information proportional to both the magnitude and location of sources of radioactivity are under investigation. The operating principle of the detector system, active collimation, allows spatial resolution by utilizing the crystal elements themselves as the collimating device; hence a greater counting efficiency is attainable. Two approaches have been tested thus far: in the first, the differences in characteristics of various crystals are utilized as the means of separating events occurring in each of five crystals viewed by a single phototube; in the second, smaller, single crystal/phototube elements are used in the array. Mathematical processing of the counts from the individual crystal elements is then employed in conjunction with their geometric relationship to develop both positional data and to quantify the amount of radioactivity. By utilizing crystal elements in an active collimation configuration and incorporating them in an array which permits these crystals to be alternately advanced and retracted in a programmed, ordered manner, a high degree of spatial resolution is achievable without compromising system sensitivity. The experiments include development of the optimal crystal configuration and the evolving of data processing techniques to translate detector response into precise source position information for localization or imaging purposes. Such a system could add another dimension in studies involving uptake, distribution, and retention of radionuclide labeled compounds because of its ability to actively track, in vivo, the distribution of these compounds. In addition, it should be possible to study, dynamically, the motion of organs, such as the heart or lungs, through which these compounds move. (ERB)

  6. Data for Figures in Rainfall-induced release of microbes from manure: model development, parameter estimation, and uncertainty evaluation on small plots

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — • Figure 1. Ratio of cumulative released cells to cells initially present in the manure at Week 0 as they vary by time, manure type and age, microbe, and Event...

  7. Carbon nanotube release from polymers into a food simulant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Yining; Uysal Unalan, Ilke; Rubino, Maria; Auras, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    The release assessment of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was performed on two types of polymer-CNT nanocomposites: polypropylene (PP) and polyamide 6 (PA6) containing 3 wt% CNT. Nanocomposite films were prepared and then exposed to ethanol as a fatty-food simulant at 40 °C, and the amount of CNT release into ethanol was determined by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The CNTs released into ethanol were visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and verified by Raman spectroscopy. UV-Vis analysis showed a very small amount of CNT release from the nanocomposite films into ethanol over 60 d: maximum CNT concentrations in ethanol were 1.3 mg/L for the PP-CNT film and 1.2 mg/L for the PA6-CNT film. GFAAS results indicated that the amount of CNTs released into ethanol after 12 d was over 20-fold higher than the results obtained by UV-Vis. Overestimation of CNT release by GFAAS suggested aggregation and poor dispersion of CNTs in the solvent. This assumption was verified by TEM images exhibiting the embedded CNTs in the polymer flakes, which could be poorly dispersed in the solvent. In general, CNT release from the nanocomposite films was considered a surface phenomenon, as indicated by detachment of CNT-containing polymer flakes from the film surface. - Highlights: • Release of CNT from polypropylene and polyamide nanocomposites were quantified and validated with TEM and Raman. • Spectroscopy and silane-labeled CNT were used for tracking the release of CNT. • The release behavior of CNT from nanocomposites was mostly generated from the polymer surfaces.

  8. The Effect in Vitro of Ionizing Irradiation and Small Rises in Temperature on the Uptake and Release of Labelled Lipids by the Human Erythrocyte Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max; Karle, H.; Stender, S.

    1978-01-01

    1. The effect of X-irradiation (50 000 rad) and an increase in temperature from 37 to 42° C on the synthesis, uptake and release of labelled lipids by erythrocytes was studied in plasma incubations in vitro. 2. Both irradiation and a rise in temperature resulted in an enhanced synthesis of [32P]phosphatidic...

  9. Testing of self-repairing composite airplane components by use of CAI and the release of the repair chemicals from carefully inserted small tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dry, Carolyn

    2007-04-01

    The research on self repair of airplane components, under an SBIR phase II with Wright Patterson Air Force Base, has investigated the attributes and best end use applications for such a technology. These attributes include issues related to manufacturability, cost, potential benefits such as weight reduction, and cost reduction. The goal of our research has been to develop self-repairing composites with unique strength for air vehicles. Our revolutionary approach involves the autonomous release of repair chemicals from within the composite matrix itself. The repair agents are contained in hollow, structural fibers that are embedded within the matrix. Under stress, the composite senses external environmental factors and reacts by releasing the repair agents from within the hollow vessels. This autonomous response occurs wherever and whenever cracking, debonding or other matrix damage transpires. Superior performance over the life of the composite is achieved through this self-repairing mechanism. The advantages to the military would be safely executed missions, fewer repairs and eventually lighter vehicles. In particular the research has addressed the issues by correlating the impact of the various factors, such as 1) delivery vessel placement, shape/size and effect on composite strength, chemicals released and their effect on the matrix, release trigger and efficacy and any impact on matrix properties 2) impact of composite processing methods that involve heat and pressure on the repair vessels. Our self repairing system can be processed at temperatures of 300-350F, repairs in less than 30 seconds and does not damage the composite by repair fiber insertion or chemical release. Scaling up and manufacture of components has revealed that anticipating potential problems allowed us to avoid those associated with processing temperatures and pressures. The presentation will focus on compression after impact testing and the placement of repair fibers/tubes into prepreg

  10. 75 FR 58285 - Short-Term, Small Amount Loans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... credit union service organization; and one philanthropic foundation. Commenters addressed a wide range of... national government and the States, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various...

  11. A method for dating small amounts of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabien Pointurier; Amelie Hubert; Gaelle Roger

    2013-01-01

    In this study we describe a method for uranium dating (i.e. determination of the date of the last chemical purification undergone by the material) by measurement of the 230 Th/ 234 U ratio, applicable to sub-microgram quantities. The chosen protocol (AG1x8 resin in hydrochloric acid medium) has been tested on separation microcolumns (100 μl). This 'microchemistry' technique considerably limits the risks of contamination by reagents or the environment. Thorium extraction efficiencies were greater than 90 % and reproducible. The quantities of 230 Th introduced by the chemical purification procedure were negligible. Using an ultra-sensitive inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurement technique, detection limits of the order of femtograms (10 -15 g) of 230 Th were obtained. The complete procedure, chemical separation and isotope measurement, was successfully tested and validated on a few micrograms of uranium. (author)

  12. 75 FR 24497 - Short-Term, Small Amount Loans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    ... reporting their members' payment histories with STS loans to the credit bureaus. Members who successfully... not include fees for unanticipated late payments, defaults, delinquencies, or similar occurrences. As...

  13. The Dynamics of Pheromone Gland Synthesis and Release: a Paradigm Shift for Understanding Sex Pheromone Quantity in Female Moths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Stephen P; Anderson, Karin G; Casas, Jérôme

    2018-05-10

    Moths are exemplars of chemical communication, especially with regard to specificity and the minute amounts they use. Yet, little is known about how females manage synthesis and storage of pheromone to maintain release rates attractive to conspecific males and why such small amounts are used. We developed, for the first time, a quantitative model, based on an extensive empirical data set, describing the dynamical relationship among synthesis, storage (titer) and release of pheromone over time in a moth (Heliothis virescens). The model is compartmental, with one major state variable (titer), one time-varying (synthesis), and two constant (catabolism and release) rates. The model was a good fit, suggesting it accounted for the major processes. Overall, we found the relatively small amounts of pheromone stored and released were largely a function of high catabolism rather than a low rate of synthesis. A paradigm shift may be necessary to understand the low amounts released by female moths, away from the small quantities synthesized to the (relatively) large amounts catabolized. Future research on pheromone quantity should focus on structural and physicochemical processes that limit storage and release rate quantities. To our knowledge, this is the first time that pheromone gland function has been modeled for any animal.

  14. Effect of wild-type Shigella species and attenuated Shigella vaccine candidates on small intestinal barrier function, antigen trafficking, and cytokine release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fiorentino

    Full Text Available Bacterial dysentery due to Shigella species is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The pathogenesis of Shigella is based on the bacteria's ability to invade and replicate within the colonic epithelium, resulting in severe intestinal inflammatory response and epithelial destruction. Although the mechanisms of pathogenesis of Shigella in the colon have been extensively studied, little is known on the effect of wild-type Shigella on the small intestine and the role of the host response in the development of the disease. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge no studies have described the effects of apically administered Shigella flexneri 2a and S. dysenteriae 1 vaccine strains on human small intestinal enterocytes. The aim of this study was to assess the coordinated functional and immunological human epithelial responses evoked by strains of Shigella and candidate vaccines on small intestinal enterocytes. To model the interactions of Shigella with the intestinal mucosa, we apically exposed monolayers of human intestinal Caco2 cells to increasing bacterial inocula. We monitored changes in paracellular permeability, examined the organization of tight-junctions and the pro-inflammatory response of epithelial cells. Shigella infection of Caco2 monolayers caused severe mucosal damage, apparent as a drastic increase in paracellular permeability and disruption of tight junctions at the cell-cell boundary. Secretion of pro-inflammatory IL-8 was independent of epithelial barrier dysfunction. Shigella vaccine strains elicited a pro-inflammatory response without affecting the intestinal barrier integrity. Our data show that wild-type Shigella infection causes a severe alteration of the barrier function of a small intestinal cell monolayer (a proxy for mucosa and might contribute (along with enterotoxins to the induction of watery diarrhea. Diarrhea may be a mechanism by which the host attempts to eliminate harmful bacteria and transport them

  15. Combined gelatin-chondroitin sulfate hydrogels for controlled release of cationic antibacterial proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, A. J.; Engbers, G. H. M.; Meyvis, T. K. L.; de Smedt, S. S. C.; Demeester, J.; Krijgsveld, J.; Zaat, S. A. J.; Dankert, J.; Feijen, J.

    2000-01-01

    Chemically cross-linked gelatin-chondroitin sulfate (ChS) hydrogels were prepared for the controlled release of small cationic proteins. The amount of chondroitin sulfate in the gelatin gels varied between 0 and 20 wt %. The chemical cross-link density, the degree of swelling, and the rheological

  16. Opening of small and intermediate calcium-activated potassium channels induces relaxation mainly mediated by nitric-oxide release in large arteries and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor in small arteries from rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stankevicius, Edgaras; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Kroigaard, Christel

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether calcium-activated potassium channels of small (SK(Ca) or K(Ca)2) and intermediate (IK(Ca) or K(Ca)3.1) conductance activated by 6,7-dichloro-1H-indole-2,3-dione 3-oxime (NS309) are involved in both nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-derived hyperpolar......This study was designed to investigate whether calcium-activated potassium channels of small (SK(Ca) or K(Ca)2) and intermediate (IK(Ca) or K(Ca)3.1) conductance activated by 6,7-dichloro-1H-indole-2,3-dione 3-oxime (NS309) are involved in both nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium...... in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and calcium concentrations were investigated in both HUVECs and mesenteric arterial endothelial cells. In both superior (∼1093 μm) and small mesenteric (∼300 μm) arteries, NS309 evoked endothelium- and concentration-dependent relaxations. In superior....... In small mesenteric arteries, NS309 relaxations were reduced slightly by ADMA, whereas apamin plus an IK(Ca) channel blocker almost abolished relaxation. Iberiotoxin did not change NS309 relaxation. HUVECs expressed mRNA for SK(Ca) and IK(Ca) channels, and NS309 induced increases in calcium, outward...

  17. Subtype-Selective Small Molecule Inhibitors Reveal a Fundamental Role for Nav1.7 in Nociceptor Electrogenesis, Axonal Conduction and Presynaptic Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estacion, Mark; Turner, Jamie; Mis, Malgorzata A.; Wilbrey, Anna; Payne, Elizabeth C.; Gutteridge, Alex; Cox, Peter J.; Doyle, Rachel; Printzenhoff, David; Lin, Zhixin; Marron, Brian E.; West, Christopher; Swain, Nigel A.; Storer, R. Ian; Stupple, Paul A.; Castle, Neil A.; Hounshell, James A.; Rivara, Mirko; Randall, Andrew; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D.; Krafte, Douglas; Waxman, Stephen G.; Patel, Manoj K.; Butt, Richard P.; Stevens, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    Human genetic studies show that the voltage gated sodium channel 1.7 (Nav1.7) is a key molecular determinant of pain sensation. However, defining the Nav1.7 contribution to nociceptive signalling has been hampered by a lack of selective inhibitors. Here we report two potent and selective arylsulfonamide Nav1.7 inhibitors; PF-05198007 and PF-05089771, which we have used to directly interrogate Nav1.7’s role in nociceptor physiology. We report that Nav1.7 is the predominant functional TTX-sensitive Nav in mouse and human nociceptors and contributes to the initiation and the upstroke phase of the nociceptor action potential. Moreover, we confirm a role for Nav1.7 in influencing synaptic transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord as well as peripheral neuropeptide release in the skin. These findings demonstrate multiple contributions of Nav1.7 to nociceptor signalling and shed new light on the relative functional contribution of this channel to peripheral and central noxious signal transmission. PMID:27050761

  18. A method for release and multiple strand amplification of small quantities of DNA from endospores of the fastidious bacterium Pasteuria penetrans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauchline, T H; Mohan, S; Davies, K G; Schaff, J E; Opperman, C H; Kerry, B R; Hirsch, P R

    2010-05-01

    To establish a reliable protocol to extract DNA from Pasteuria penetrans endospores for use as template in multiple strand amplification, thus providing sufficient material for genetic analyses. To develop a highly sensitive PCR-based diagnostic tool for P. penetrans. An optimized method to decontaminate endospores, release and purify DNA enabled multiple strand amplification. DNA purity was assessed by cloning and sequencing gyrB and 16S rRNA gene fragments obtained from PCR using generic primers. Samples indicated to be 100%P. penetrans by the gyrB assay were estimated at 46% using the 16S rRNA gene. No bias was detected on cloning and sequencing 12 housekeeping and sporulation gene fragments from amplified DNA. The detection limit by PCR with Pasteuria-specific 16S rRNA gene primers following multiple strand amplification of DNA extracted using the method was a single endospore. Generation of large quantities DNA will facilitate genomic sequencing of P. penetrans. Apparent differences in sample purity are explained by variations in 16S rRNA gene copy number in Eubacteria leading to exaggerated estimations of sample contamination. Detection of single endospores will facilitate investigations of P. penetrans molecular ecology. These methods will advance studies on P. penetrans and facilitate research on other obligate and fastidious micro-organisms where it is currently impractical to obtain DNA in sufficient quantity and quality.

  19. A High Throughput Screening Assay for Anti-Mycobacterial Small Molecules Based on Adenylate Kinase Release as a Reporter of Cell Lysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Forbes

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is well-established to be one of the most important bacterial pathogens for which new antimicrobial therapies are needed. Herein, we describe the development of a high throughput screening assay for the identification of molecules that are bactericidal against Mycobacteria. The assay utilizes the release of the intracellular enzyme adenylate kinase into the culture medium as a reporter of mycobacterial cell death. We demonstrate that the assay is selective for mycobactericidal molecules and detects anti-mycobacterial activity at concentrations below the minimum inhibitory concentration of many molecules. Thus, the AK assay is more sensitive than traditional growth assays. We have validated the AK assay in the HTS setting using the Mtb surrogate organism M. smegmatis and libraries of FDA approved drugs as well as a commercially available Diversity set. The screen of the FDA-approved library demonstrated that the AK assay is able to identify the vast majority of drugs with known mycobactericidal activity. Importantly, our screen of the Diversity set revealed that the increased sensitivity of the AK assay increases the ability of M. smegmatis-based screens to detect molecules with relatively poor activity against M. smegmatis but good to excellent activity against Mtb.

  20. Subtype-Selective Small Molecule Inhibitors Reveal a Fundamental Role for Nav1.7 in Nociceptor Electrogenesis, Axonal Conduction and Presynaptic Release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristos J Alexandrou

    Full Text Available Human genetic studies show that the voltage gated sodium channel 1.7 (Nav1.7 is a key molecular determinant of pain sensation. However, defining the Nav1.7 contribution to nociceptive signalling has been hampered by a lack of selective inhibitors. Here we report two potent and selective arylsulfonamide Nav1.7 inhibitors; PF-05198007 and PF-05089771, which we have used to directly interrogate Nav1.7's role in nociceptor physiology. We report that Nav1.7 is the predominant functional TTX-sensitive Nav in mouse and human nociceptors and contributes to the initiation and the upstroke phase of the nociceptor action potential. Moreover, we confirm a role for Nav1.7 in influencing synaptic transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord as well as peripheral neuropeptide release in the skin. These findings demonstrate multiple contributions of Nav1.7 to nociceptor signalling and shed new light on the relative functional contribution of this channel to peripheral and central noxious signal transmission.

  1. Release of fission products from irradiated aluminide fuel at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Toshikazu; Kanda, Keiji; Mishima, Kaichiro; Tamai, Tadaharu; Hayashi, Masatoshi; Snelgrove, James L.; Stahl, David; Matos, James E.; Travelli, Armando; Case, F. Neil; Posey, John C.

    1983-01-01

    Irradiated uranium aluminide fuel plates of 40% U-235 enrichment were heated for the determination of fission products released under flowing helium gas at temperatures up to and higher than the melting point of fuel cladding material. The release of fission products from the fuel plate at temperature below 500 deg. C was found negligible. The first rapid release of fission products was observed with the occurrence of blistering at 561±1 deg. C on the plates. The next release at 585. C might be caused by melting of the cladding material of 6061-Al alloy. The last release of fission product gases was occurred at the eutectic temperature of 640 deg. C of U-Al x . The released material was mostly xenon, but small amounts of iodine and cesium were observed. (author)

  2. Release of fission products from irradiated aluminide fuel at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, T.; Kanda, K.; Mishima, K.

    1982-01-01

    Irradiated uranium aluminide fuel plates of 40% U-235 enrichment were heated for the determination of fission products released under flowing helium gas at temperatures up to and higher than the melting point of fuel-cladding material. The release of fission products from the fuel plate at temperature below 500 0 C was found negligible. The firist rapid release of fission products was observed with the occurrence of blistering at 561 +- 1 0 C on the plates. The next release at 585 0 C might be caused by melting of the cladding material of 6061-Al alloy. The last release of fission product gases was occurred at the eutectic temperature of 640 0 C of U-Al/sub x/. The released material was mostly xenon, but small amounts of iodine and cesium were observed

  3. The 2017 Release Cloudy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferland, G. J.; Chatzikos, M.; Guzmán, F.; Lykins, M. L.; van Hoof, P. A. M.; Williams, R. J. R.; Abel, N. P.; Badnell, N. R.; Keenan, F. P.; Porter, R. L.; Stancil, P. C.

    2017-10-01

    We describe the 2017 release of the spectral synthesis code Cloudy, summarizing the many improvements to the scope and accuracy of the physics which have been made since the previous release. Exporting the atomic data into external data files has enabled many new large datasets to be incorporated into the code. The use of the complete datasets is not realistic for most calculations, so we describe the limited subset of data used by default, which predicts significantly more lines than the previous release of Cloudy. This version is nevertheless faster than the previous release, as a result of code optimizations. We give examples of the accuracy limits using small models, and the performance requirements of large complete models. We summarize several advances in the H- and He-like iso-electronic sequences and use our complete collisional-radiative models to establish the densities where the coronal and local thermodynamic equilibrium approximations work.

  4. Operational experience in mitigating flammable gas releases from Hanford Site Tank 241-SY-101

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentsch, J.W.; Babad, H.; Kirch, N.W.

    1995-01-01

    Flammable gases consisting of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, ammonia, and methane are periodically released from Hanford Site waste tank 241-SY-101 at concentrations above the flammable limit. A large mixer pump installed in the tank in 1993 has effectively mitigated this problem by continuously releasing small amounts of the flammable gases at the rate they are generated. Tank 241-SY-101 is also equipped with multiple high-sensitivity gas monitoring systems and level detection systems to measure the quantity of gas that is retained in and released from the waste

  5. Slow-release fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Golden, D. C.

    1992-10-01

    A synthetic apatite containing agronutrients and a method for making the apatite are disclosed. The apatite comprises crystalline calcium phosphate having agronutrients dispersed in the crystalline structure. The agronutrients can comprise potassium, magnesium, sulfur, iron, manganese, molybdenum, chlorine, boron, copper and zinc in amounts suited for plant growth. The apatite can optionally comprise a carbonate and/or silicon solubility control agent. The agronutrients are released slowly as the apatite dissolves.

  6. Slow-release fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Douglas W. (Inventor); Golden, Dadigamuwage C. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A synthetic apatite containing agronutrients and a method for making the apatite are disclosed. The apatite comprises crystalline calcium phosphate having agronutrients dispersed in the crystalline structure. The agronutrients can comprise potassium, magnesium, sulfur, iron, manganese, molybdenum, chlorine, boron, copper and zinc in amounts suited for plant growth. The apatite can optionally comprise a carbonate and/or silicon solubility control agent. The agronutrients are released slowly as the apatite dissolves.

  7. Experiments to Measure Hydrogen Release from Graphite Walls During Disruptions in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollmann, E.M.; Pablant, N.A.; Rudakov, D.L.; Boedo, J.A.; Brooks, N.H.; Jernigan, Thomas C.; Pigarov, A.Y.

    2009-01-01

    Spectroscopy and wall the bake-out measurements are performed in the DIII-D tokamak to estimate the amount of hydrogen stored in and released from the walls during disruptions. Both naturally occurring disruptions and disruptions induced by massive gas injection (MGI) are investigated. The measurements indicate that both types of disruptions cause a net release of order 10(21) hydrogen (or deuterium) atoms from the graphite walls. This is comparable to the pre-disruptions plasma particle inventory, so the released hydrogen is important for accurate modeling of disruptions. However, the amount of hydrogen released is small compared to the total saturated wall inventory of order 10(22)-10(23), So it appears that many disruptions are necessary to provide full pump-out of the vessel walls. (C) 2009 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Peptide secreted by human alveolar macrophages releases neutrophil granule contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacArthur, C.K.; Miller, E.J.; Cohen, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody was developed against an 8000-kDa enzyme-releasing peptide (ERP) released from human alveolar macrophages. ERP was isolated on an immunoaffinity column containing the antibody bound to staphylococcal protein A-Sepharose, and by autoradiography. Release of ERP from the macrophages is not changed by plastic adherence, phagocytosis, calcium ionophore, or phorbol esters. The peptide was not antigenically similar to interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor, or interleukin lα or 1β. The release of constituents from azurophilic and specific granules was the main identified biologic function of ERP. ERP was a more effective secretagogue in the untreated neutrophils and f-met-leu-phe was more effective in the cytochalasin B-treated neutrophils. Absorption of ERP from macrophage-conditioned medium removed a small amount of the chemotactic activity; however, the immunopurified peptide was not chemotactic or chemokinetic for neutrophils, and at high concentrations, it suppressed base line chemokinesis. Treatment of washed macrophages with trypsin released active ERP of approximately the same m.w. of spontaneously secreted ERP. These studies showed that human alveolar macrophages release a peptide which is a secretagogue for human neutrophils under conditions which may be encountered in the lungs during certain disease states. Proteolytic enzymes which are free in the lungs may release the peptide and lead to the secretion of neutrophil enzymes

  9. Determination of accident related release data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, W.; Nolte, O.; Lange, F.; Martens, R.

    2004-01-01

    For accident safety analyses, for the assessment of potential radiological consequences, for the review of current requirements of the Transport Regulations and for their possible further development as well as for the demonstration that radioactive materials such as LDM candidate material fulfil the regulatory requirements reliable release data following mechanical impact are required. This is definitely one of the demanding issues in the field of transport safety of radioactive materials. In this context special attention has to be paid to radioactive wastes immobilised in brittle materials, e.g. cement/concrete, glass, ceramics or other brittle materials such as fresh and spent fuel. In this presentation we report on a long-term experimental program aiming at improving the general physical understanding of the release process as well as the quantity and the quality of release data. By combining laboratory experiments using small scale test specimens with a few key scaling experiments with large scale test objects significant progress was achieved to meet this objective. The laboratory equipment enables the in-situ determination of the amount and aerodynamic size distribution of the airborne particles generated upon impact of the test specimen on a hard target. Impact energies cover the range experienced in transport accidents including aircraft accidents. The well defined experimental boundary conditions and the good reproducibility of the experimental procedure allowed for systematic studies to exactly measure the amount and aerodynamic size distribution of the airborne release and to quantify its dependence on relevant parameters such as energy input, material properties, and specimen geometry. The experimental program was performed within the scope of various national and international (e.g. EU-funded) projects. The small scale experiments with brittle materials revealed a pronounced universality of the airborne release in view of the material properties and

  10. Cetirizine release from cyclodextrin formulated compressed chewing gum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stojanov, Mladen; Larsen, Kim Lambertsen

    2012-01-01

    release patterns, but with variations in the total amount released. Chewing gum formulated with cetirizine alone, demonstrated a release of 75% after 8 min of chewing. The presence of CDs resulted in increased cetirizine release. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonstrated that parameters with the most...... the statistical analysis (ANOVA) demonstrated significance in the release (P

  11. Release to the environment and diffusion of radioiodine in the environment, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Toshifumi

    1979-01-01

    1. Radioactivity of iodine nuclides accumulated in nuclear facilities. Radioactive iodine nuclides which are produced in nuclear plants consist mainly of short lived 131 I- 135 I, while 129 I with long half life is being produced in a small amount. The radioactivity of iodine in a power reactor of 1,000 MWe which burns uranium fuel amounts to about 6 x 10 8 C sub(i). In the case of fuel which is handled in a reprocessing plant of spent fuel, almost all radioactive iodine remaining in the fuel is 129 I (half life: 1.7 x 10 7 years) because of cooling period of more than 6 months which is imposed by the plant. 2. Release of radioactive iodine during normal operating conditions. In an event of fuel failure in light water cooled reactors, a part of radioactive iodine is dissolved in water and very small amount is released as gaseous iodine to the environment through the ventillation system. The actual amount of radioactive iodine which was released from various types of nuclear reactors in the world between 1970 to 1974 is recorded as much lower than to the presently regulated value in all cases. 3. Behavior of radioactive iodine during postulated accident. The amount of radioactive iodine which will be released from reactor core to the containment vessel varies with conditions to be assumed. In the event of a severe accidental condition such as fuel melt down or oxidation, 25% of radioactive iodine in the fuel are assumed to be released. The iodine released to the containment vessel is mostly removed by planting out to the wall of the containment or washed out by core spray, while the remaining part in air is to be removed by a filter unit which is installed in the emergency gas treatment system. (author)

  12. Savannah River Site radioiodine atmospheric releases and offsite maximum doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marter, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    Radioisotopes of iodine have been released to the atmosphere from the Savannah River Site since 1955. The releases, mostly from the 200-F and 200-H Chemical Separations areas, consist of the isotopes, I-129 and 1-131. Small amounts of 1-131 and 1-133 have also been released from reactor facilities and the Savannah River Laboratory. This reference memorandum was issued to summarize our current knowledge of releases of radioiodines and resultant maximum offsite doses. This memorandum supplements the reference memorandum by providing more detailed supporting technical information. Doses reported in this memorandum from consumption of the milk containing the highest I-131 concentration following the 1961 1-131 release incident are about 1% higher than reported in the reference memorandum. This is the result of using unrounded 1-131 concentrations of I-131 in milk in this memo. It is emphasized here that this technical report does not constitute a dose reconstruction in the same sense as the dose reconstruction effort currently underway at Hanford. This report uses existing published data for radioiodine releases and existing transport and dosimetry models

  13. Decontamination for free release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, K A; Elder, G R [Bradtec Ltd., Bristol (United Kingdom)

    1997-02-01

    Many countries are seeking to treat radioactive waste in ways which meet the local regulatory requirements, but yet are cost effective when all contributing factors are assessed. In some countries there are increasing amounts of waste, arising from nuclear plant decommissioning, which are categorized as low level waste: however with suitable treatment a large part of such wastes might become beyond regulatory control and be able to be released as non-radioactive. The benefits and disadvantages of additional treatment before disposal need to be considered. Several processes falling within the overall description of decontamination for free release have been developed and applied, and these are outlined. In one instance the process seeks to take advantage of techniques and equipment used for decontaminating water reactor circuits intermittently through reactor life. (author). 9 refs, 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  14. Controlled drug release on amine functionalized spherical MCM-41

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szegedi, Agnes, E-mail: szegedi@chemres.hu [Institute of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1025 Budapest, Pusztaszeri ut 59-67 (Hungary); Popova, Margarita; Goshev, Ivan [Institute of Organic Chemistry with Centre of Phytochemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); Klebert, Szilvia [Institute of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1025 Budapest, Pusztaszeri ut 59-67 (Hungary); Mihaly, Judit [Institute of Molecular Pharmacology, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1025 Budapest, Pusztaszeri ut 59-67 (Hungary)

    2012-10-15

    MCM-41 silica with spherical morphology and small particle sizes (100 nm) was synthesized and modified by post-synthesis method with different amounts of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). A comparative study of the adsorption and release of a model drug, ibuprofen, was carried out. The modified and drug loaded mesoporous materials were characterized by XRD, TEM, N{sub 2} physisorption, elemental analysis, thermal analysis and FT-IR spectroscopy. A new method was developed for the quantitative determination of amino groups in surface modified mesoporous materials by the ninhydrin reaction. Good correlation was found between the amino content of the MCM-41 materials determined by the ninhydrin method and their ibuprofen adsorption capacity. Amino modification resulted in high degree of ibuprofen loading and slow release rate in comparison to the parent non-modified MCM-41. - Graphical abstract: Determination of surface amino groups by ninhidrin method. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spherical MCM-41 modified by different amounts of APTES was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ibuprofen (IBU) adsorption and release characteristics was tested. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ninhydrin reaction was used for the quantitative determination of amino groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stoichiometric amount of APTES is enough for totally covering the surface with amino groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Good correlation was found between the amino content and IBU adsorption capacity.

  15. Controlled drug release on amine functionalized spherical MCM-41

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szegedi, Agnes; Popova, Margarita; Goshev, Ivan; Klébert, Szilvia; Mihály, Judit

    2012-01-01

    MCM-41 silica with spherical morphology and small particle sizes (100 nm) was synthesized and modified by post-synthesis method with different amounts of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). A comparative study of the adsorption and release of a model drug, ibuprofen, was carried out. The modified and drug loaded mesoporous materials were characterized by XRD, TEM, N 2 physisorption, elemental analysis, thermal analysis and FT-IR spectroscopy. A new method was developed for the quantitative determination of amino groups in surface modified mesoporous materials by the ninhydrin reaction. Good correlation was found between the amino content of the MCM-41 materials determined by the ninhydrin method and their ibuprofen adsorption capacity. Amino modification resulted in high degree of ibuprofen loading and slow release rate in comparison to the parent non-modified MCM-41. - Graphical abstract: Determination of surface amino groups by ninhidrin method. Highlights: ► Spherical MCM-41 modified by different amounts of APTES was studied. ► Ibuprofen (IBU) adsorption and release characteristics was tested. ► The ninhydrin reaction was used for the quantitative determination of amino groups. ► Stoichiometric amount of APTES is enough for totally covering the surface with amino groups. ► Good correlation was found between the amino content and IBU adsorption capacity.

  16. COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.O. Bader

    1999-10-18

    The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be

  17. COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S.O. Bader

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be

  18. Analyse géochimique de la matiére organique extraite des roches sédimentaires. IV. Extraction des roches en faible quantités Geochemical Analysis of Organic Matter Extracted from Sedimentary Rocks Iv. Exraction from Small Amounts of Rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monin J. C.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available L'extraction en Soxhlet est inappllcable lorsque les échantillons de roche sont de trop petite taille. A l'occasion de la mise au point du protocole d'extraction correspondant, on examine l'influence d'un certain nombre de conditions opératoires sur le rendement d'extraction : température, durée nature et quantité du solvant, présence de lumière, présence d'air, procédé d'extraction. Pour les hydrocarbures, tant saturés qu'aromatiques, le facteur essentiel est l'agitation du milieu d'extraction ; la nature du solvant n'est pas critique, à condition de ne pas choisir un très mauvais solvant des hydrocarbures : l'extractibilité est en effet plus fonction du pouvoir désorbant vis-à-vis de la roche que du pouvoir solvant proprement dit. Pour les résines et asphalténes, l'interprétation des résultats est délicate, car la frontière n'est pas nette entre produits simplement dissous, produits de solvolyse et, produits de néoformation par interaction solvant-matière organique-matière minérale. II n'existe donc pas de protocole d'extraction recommandable dans l'absolu. Tout dépend des exigences analytiques et aussi pratiques du laboratoire; à l'Institut Français du Pétrole (IFP le protocole retenu est l'extraction en bécher avec agitation magnétique pendant 20 min dans le chroroforme à 50 °C (approximativement; on donne aussi le protocole d'évaporation du solvant et de récupération de l'extrait, qui doit être étudié soigneusement étant donné les faibles quantités mises en jeu. A Soxhlet extractor cannot be used with rock samples that are too small in size. With the development of on extraction procédure for such cases, this article examines the influence of various operating conditions on extraction yield, i. e. temperature, duration, nature and amount of solvent, presence of light, présence of air and extraction process. For both saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons, the essential factor is the stirring of the

  19. 13 CFR 143.52 - Collection of amounts due.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collection of amounts due. 143.52 Section 143.52 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE... Government. If not paid within a reasonable period after demand, the Federal agency may reduce the debt by...

  20. 46 CFR 308.403 - Insured amounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... total amount of war risk insurance obtainable from companies authorized to do an insurance business in a... MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Builder's Risk Insurance § 308.403 Insured amounts. (a) Prelaunching period. The amount insured during...

  1. 13 CFR 400.202 - Loan amount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Loan amount. 400.202 Section 400.202 Business Credit and Assistance EMERGENCY STEEL GUARANTEE LOAN BOARD EMERGENCY STEEL GUARANTEE LOAN PROGRAM Steel Guarantee Loans § 400.202 Loan amount. (a) The aggregate amount of loan principal guaranteed...

  2. 13 CFR 500.202 - Loan amount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Loan amount. 500.202 Section 500.202 Business Credit and Assistance EMERGENCY OIL AND GAS GUARANTEED LOAN BOARD EMERGENCY OIL AND GAS GUARANTEED LOAN PROGRAM Oil and Gas Guaranteed Loans § 500.202 Loan amount. The aggregate amount of loan...

  3. 45 CFR 32.8 - Amounts withheld.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) of this section, or (ii) An amount equal to 25% of the debtor's disposable pay less the amount(s... first pay day after the employer receives the order. However, if the first pay day is within 10 days after receipt of the order, the employer may begin deductions on the second pay day. (k) An employer may...

  4. 31 CFR 235.5 - Reclamation amounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reclamation amounts. 235.5 Section 235.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE... ON DESIGNATED DEPOSITARIES § 235.5 Reclamation amounts. Amounts received by way of reclamation on...

  5. SU-E-T-225: Correction Matrix for PinPoint Ionization Chamber for Dosimetric Measurements in the Newly Released Incise™ Multileaf Collimator Shaped Small Field for CyberKnife M6™ Machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y; Li, T; Heron, D; Huq, M [University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and UPMC CancerCenter, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: For small field dosimetry, such as measurements of output factors for cones or MLC-shaped irregular small fields, ion chambers often Result in an underestimation of the dose, due to both the volume averaging effect and the lack of lateral charged particle equilibrium. This work presents a mathematical model for correction matrix for a PTW PinPoint ionization chamber for dosimetric measurements made in the newly released Incise™ Multileaf collimator fields of the CyberKnife M6™ machine. Methods: A correction matrix for a PTW 0.015cc PinPoint ionization chamber was developed by modeling its 3D dose response in twelve cone-shaped circular fields created using the 5mm, 7.5mm, 10mm, 12.5mm, 15mm, 20mm, 25mm, 30mm, 35mm, 40mm, 50mm, 60mm cones in a CyberKnife M6™ machine. For each field size, hundreds of readings were recorded for every 2mm chamber shift in the horizontal plane. The contribution of each dose pixel to a measurement point depended on the radial distance and the angle to the chamber axis. These readings were then compared with the theoretical dose as obtained with Monte Carlo calculation. A penalized least-square optimization algorithm was developed to generate the correction matrix. After the parameter fitting, the mathematical model was validated for MLC-shaped irregular fields. Results: The optimization algorithm used for parameter fitting was stable and the resulted response factors were smooth in spatial domain. After correction with the mathematical model, the chamber reading matched with the calculation for all the tested fields to within 2%. Conclusion: A novel mathematical model has been developed for PinPoint chamber for dosimetric measurements in small MLC-shaped irregular fields. The correction matrix is dependent on detector, treatment unit and the geometry of setup. The model can be applied to non-standard composite fields and provides an access to IMRT point dose validation.

  6. SU-E-T-225: Correction Matrix for PinPoint Ionization Chamber for Dosimetric Measurements in the Newly Released Incise™ Multileaf Collimator Shaped Small Field for CyberKnife M6™ Machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y; Li, T; Heron, D; Huq, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: For small field dosimetry, such as measurements of output factors for cones or MLC-shaped irregular small fields, ion chambers often Result in an underestimation of the dose, due to both the volume averaging effect and the lack of lateral charged particle equilibrium. This work presents a mathematical model for correction matrix for a PTW PinPoint ionization chamber for dosimetric measurements made in the newly released Incise™ Multileaf collimator fields of the CyberKnife M6™ machine. Methods: A correction matrix for a PTW 0.015cc PinPoint ionization chamber was developed by modeling its 3D dose response in twelve cone-shaped circular fields created using the 5mm, 7.5mm, 10mm, 12.5mm, 15mm, 20mm, 25mm, 30mm, 35mm, 40mm, 50mm, 60mm cones in a CyberKnife M6™ machine. For each field size, hundreds of readings were recorded for every 2mm chamber shift in the horizontal plane. The contribution of each dose pixel to a measurement point depended on the radial distance and the angle to the chamber axis. These readings were then compared with the theoretical dose as obtained with Monte Carlo calculation. A penalized least-square optimization algorithm was developed to generate the correction matrix. After the parameter fitting, the mathematical model was validated for MLC-shaped irregular fields. Results: The optimization algorithm used for parameter fitting was stable and the resulted response factors were smooth in spatial domain. After correction with the mathematical model, the chamber reading matched with the calculation for all the tested fields to within 2%. Conclusion: A novel mathematical model has been developed for PinPoint chamber for dosimetric measurements in small MLC-shaped irregular fields. The correction matrix is dependent on detector, treatment unit and the geometry of setup. The model can be applied to non-standard composite fields and provides an access to IMRT point dose validation

  7. Sustained release of radioprotective agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shani, J.

    1980-11-01

    New pharmaceutical formulations for the sustained release into the G.I. tract of radioprotective agents have been developed by the authors. The experimental method initially consisted in the production of methylcellulose microcapsules. This method failed apparently because of the premature ''explosion'' of the microcapsules and the consequent premature release of massive amounts of the drug. A new method has been developed which consists in drying and pulverising cysteamine and cysteine preparations, mixing them in various proportions with stearic acid and ethylcellulose as carriers. The mixture is then compressed into cylindrical tablets at several pressure values and the leaching rate of the radioprotective agents is then measured by spectrophotometry. The relation between the concentration of the active drug and its rate of release, and the effect on the release rate of the pressure applied to the tablet during its formation were also investigated. Results indicating that the release rate was linearly related to the square root of ''t'' seem to be in agreement with what is predictable, according to Higuchi's equation, save for the very initial and terminal phases. A clear correlation was also established between the stearic acid/ethylcellulose ratios and the release of 20% cysteine, namely a marked decrease in the rate of cysteine release was observed with increasing concentrations of stearic acid. Finally, it was observed that a higher formation pressure results in quicker release of the drug

  8. An integrated device for magnetically-driven drug release and in situ quantitative measurements: Design, fabrication and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruvera, I.J. [Aragon Institute of Nanoscience (INA), University of Zaragoza, 50018 (Spain); Hernández, R.; Mijangos, C. [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Polímeros, CSIC, Juan Cierva 3, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Goya, G.F., E-mail: goya@unizar.es [Aragon Institute of Nanoscience (INA), University of Zaragoza, 50018 (Spain); Condensed Matter Physics Department, Science Faculty, University of Zaragoza, 50009 (Spain)

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a device capable of remote triggering and in situ quantification of therapeutic drugs, based on magnetically-responsive hydrogels of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) and alginate (PNiPAAm). The heating efficiency of these hydrogels measured by their specific power absorption (SPA) values showed that the values between 100 and 300 W/g of the material were high enough to reach the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the polymeric matrix within few minutes. The drug release through application of AC magnetic fields could be controlled by time-modulated field pulses in order to deliver the desired amount of drug. Using B12 vitamin as a concept drug, the device was calibrated to measure amounts of drug released as small as 25(2)×10{sup −9} g, demonstrating the potential of this device for very precise quantitative control of drug release. - Highlights: • A device for magnetically driven drug release was developed and constructed. • Thermally responsive PNiPAAm and Fe3O4 nanoparticles were usedas drug reservoir. • The device allowed repetitive, remote and precisely controlled drug release. • By in situ spectrometry we could detect released drug quantities as small as 25 ng. • Released drug was controlled through magnetic ac field parameters H, f and time.

  9. An integrated device for magnetically-driven drug release and in situ quantitative measurements: Design, fabrication and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruvera, I.J.; Hernández, R.; Mijangos, C.; Goya, G.F.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a device capable of remote triggering and in situ quantification of therapeutic drugs, based on magnetically-responsive hydrogels of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) and alginate (PNiPAAm). The heating efficiency of these hydrogels measured by their specific power absorption (SPA) values showed that the values between 100 and 300 W/g of the material were high enough to reach the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the polymeric matrix within few minutes. The drug release through application of AC magnetic fields could be controlled by time-modulated field pulses in order to deliver the desired amount of drug. Using B12 vitamin as a concept drug, the device was calibrated to measure amounts of drug released as small as 25(2)×10 −9 g, demonstrating the potential of this device for very precise quantitative control of drug release. - Highlights: • A device for magnetically driven drug release was developed and constructed. • Thermally responsive PNiPAAm and Fe3O4 nanoparticles were usedas drug reservoir. • The device allowed repetitive, remote and precisely controlled drug release. • By in situ spectrometry we could detect released drug quantities as small as 25 ng. • Released drug was controlled through magnetic ac field parameters H, f and time

  10. Heparin-based hydrogels with tunable sulfation & degradation for anti-inflammatory small molecule delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yifeng; Tellier, Liane E; Temenoff, Johnna S

    2016-08-16

    Sustained release of anti-inflammatory agents remains challenging for small molecule drugs due to their low molecular weight and hydrophobicity. Therefore, the goal of this study was to control the release of a small molecule anti-inflammatory agent, crystal violet (CV), from hydrogels fabricated with heparin, a highly sulfated glycosaminoglycan capable of binding positively-charged molecules such as CV. In this system, both electrostatic interactions between heparin and CV and hydrogel degradation were tuned simultaneously by varying the level of heparin sulfation and varying the amount of dithiothreitol within hydrogels, respectively. It was found that heparin sulfation significantly affected CV release, whereby more sulfated heparin hydrogels (Hep and Hep(-N)) released CV with near zero-order release kinetics (R-squared values between 0.96-0.99). Furthermore, CV was released more quickly from fast-degrading hydrogels than slow-degrading hydrogels, providing a method to tune total CV release between 5-15 days while maintaining linear release kinetics. In particular, N-desulfated heparin hydrogels exhibited efficient CV loading (∼90% of originally included CV), near zero-order CV release kinetics, and maintenance of CV bioactivity after release, making this hydrogel formulation a promising CV delivery vehicle for a wide range of inflammatory diseases.

  11. Radioactivity release vs probability for a steam generator tube rupture accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buslik, A.J.; Hall, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    A calculation of the probability of obtaining various radioactivity releases from a steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) is presented. The only radioactive isotopes considered are Iodine-131 and Xe-133. The particular accident path considered consists of a double-ended guillotine SGTR followed by loss of offsite power (LOSP). If there is no loss of offsite power, and no system fault other than the SGTR, it is judged that the consequences will be minimal, since the amount of iodine released through the condenser air ejector is expected to be quite small; this is a consequence of the fact that the concentration of iodine in the vapor released from the condenser air ejector is very small compared to that dissolved in the condensate water. In addition, in some plants the condenser air ejector flow is automatically diverted to containment or a high-activity alarm. The analysis presented here is for a typical Westinghouse PWR such as described in RESAR-3S

  12. Gastrin-releasing peptide in the porcine pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, J J; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1987-01-01

    to consist of one main form, namely the 27-amino acid peptide originally extracted from porcine stomach, and small amounts of a C-terminal fragment identical with the C-terminal 10-amino acid peptide. Gastrin-releasing peptide-like immunoreactivity released from the isolated perfused porcine pancreas during...... electrical vagal stimulation was shown by gel filtration to consist of the same two forms. By use of immunocytochemical techniques employing an antiserum directed against its N terminus, GRP was localized to varicose nerve fibers in close association with the exocrine tissue of the porcine pancreas...... in particular. Some fibers were found penetrating into pancreatic islets also. Immunoreactive nerve cell bodies as well as fibers were found within intrapancreatic ganglia. The potency of GRP in stimulating exocrine as well as endocrine secretion from the porcine pancreas, its presence in close contact...

  13. Airborne engineered nanomaterials in the workplace—a review of release and worker exposure during nanomaterial production and handling processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yaobo [Institute for Work and Health (IST), Universities of Lausanne and Geneva, Route de la Corniche 2, 1066, Epalinges (Switzerland); Kuhlbusch, Thomas A.J. [Institute of Energy and Environmental Technology (IUTA), Air Quality & Sustainable Nanotechnology Unit, Bliersheimer Straße 58-60, 47229 Duisburg (Germany); Centre for Nanointegration (CENIDE), University Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg (Germany); Van Tongeren, Martie; Jiménez, Araceli Sánchez [Centre for Human Exposure Science, Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM), Research Avenue North, Edinburgh EH14 4AP (United Kingdom); Tuinman, Ilse [TNO, Lange Kleiweg 137, Rijswijk (Netherlands); Chen, Rui [CAS Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety & CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of China, Beijing 100190 (China); Alvarez, Iñigo Larraza [ACCIONA Infrastructure, Materials Area, Innovation Division, C/Valportillo II 8, 28108, Alcobendas (Spain); Mikolajczyk, Urszula [Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland); Nickel, Carmen; Meyer, Jessica; Kaminski, Heinz [Institute of Energy and Environmental Technology (IUTA), Air Quality & Sustainable Nanotechnology Unit, Bliersheimer Straße 58-60, 47229 Duisburg (Germany); Wohlleben, Wendel [Dept. Material Physics, BASF SE, Advanced Materials Research, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Stahlmecke, Burkhard [Institute of Energy and Environmental Technology (IUTA), Air Quality & Sustainable Nanotechnology Unit, Bliersheimer Straße 58-60, 47229 Duisburg (Germany); Clavaguera, Simon [NanoSafety Platform, Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble, 38054 (France); and others

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Release characteristics can be grouped by the type of occupational activities. • Release levels may be linked to process energy. • A better data reporting practice will facilitate exposure assessment. • The results help prioritize industrial processes for human risk assessment. - Abstract: For exposure and risk assessment in occupational settings involving engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), it is important to understand the mechanisms of release and how they are influenced by the ENM, the matrix material, and process characteristics. This review summarizes studies providing ENM release information in occupational settings, during different industrial activities and using various nanomaterials. It also assesses the contextual information — such as the amounts of materials handled, protective measures, and measurement strategies — to understand which release scenarios can result in exposure. High-energy processes such as synthesis, spraying, and machining were associated with the release of large numbers of predominantly small-sized particles. Low-energy processes, including laboratory handling, cleaning, and industrial bagging activities, usually resulted in slight or moderate releases of relatively large agglomerates. The present analysis suggests that process-based release potential can be ranked, thus helping to prioritize release assessments, which is useful for tiered exposure assessment approaches and for guiding the implementation of workplace safety strategies. The contextual information provided in the literature was often insufficient to directly link release to exposure. The studies that did allow an analysis suggested that significant worker exposure might mainly occur when engineering safeguards and personal protection strategies were not carried out as recommended.

  14. Airborne engineered nanomaterials in the workplace—a review of release and worker exposure during nanomaterial production and handling processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Yaobo; Kuhlbusch, Thomas A.J.; Van Tongeren, Martie; Jiménez, Araceli Sánchez; Tuinman, Ilse; Chen, Rui; Alvarez, Iñigo Larraza; Mikolajczyk, Urszula; Nickel, Carmen; Meyer, Jessica; Kaminski, Heinz; Wohlleben, Wendel; Stahlmecke, Burkhard; Clavaguera, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Release characteristics can be grouped by the type of occupational activities. • Release levels may be linked to process energy. • A better data reporting practice will facilitate exposure assessment. • The results help prioritize industrial processes for human risk assessment. - Abstract: For exposure and risk assessment in occupational settings involving engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), it is important to understand the mechanisms of release and how they are influenced by the ENM, the matrix material, and process characteristics. This review summarizes studies providing ENM release information in occupational settings, during different industrial activities and using various nanomaterials. It also assesses the contextual information — such as the amounts of materials handled, protective measures, and measurement strategies — to understand which release scenarios can result in exposure. High-energy processes such as synthesis, spraying, and machining were associated with the release of large numbers of predominantly small-sized particles. Low-energy processes, including laboratory handling, cleaning, and industrial bagging activities, usually resulted in slight or moderate releases of relatively large agglomerates. The present analysis suggests that process-based release potential can be ranked, thus helping to prioritize release assessments, which is useful for tiered exposure assessment approaches and for guiding the implementation of workplace safety strategies. The contextual information provided in the literature was often insufficient to directly link release to exposure. The studies that did allow an analysis suggested that significant worker exposure might mainly occur when engineering safeguards and personal protection strategies were not carried out as recommended.

  15. 24 CFR 201.10 - Loan amounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Loan amounts. 201.10 Section 201.10... MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES TITLE I PROPERTY IMPROVEMENT AND MANUFACTURED HOME LOANS Loan and Note Provisions § 201.10 Loan amounts. (a) Property...

  16. Measuring method for amount of fissionable gas in spent fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashibe, Shinji.

    1992-01-01

    The method of the present invention separately measures the amount of both of a fission product (FP) gas accumulated in bubbles at the crystal grain boundary of spent fuel pellets and an FP gas accumulated in the crystal grains. That is, in a radial position of the spent fuel pellet, a microfine region is mechanically destroyed. The amount of the FP gas released by the destruction from the crystal grains is measured by using a mass analyzer. Then, when the destroyed pieces formed by the destruction are recovered and dissolved, FP gas accumulated in the crystal grains of the pellet is released. The amount released is measured by the mass analyzer. With such procedures, the amount of FP gas accumulated in the bubbles at the crystal grain boundary and in the crystal grains at the radial position of the spent fuel pellet can be measured discriminately. Accordingly, the integrity of the fuel pellet can be recognized appropriately. (I.S.)

  17. Technical measurement of small fission gas inventory in fuel rod with laser puncturing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Moon; Kim, Sung Ryul; Lee, Byoung Oon; Yang, Yong Sik; Baek, Sang Ryul; Song, Ung Sup

    2012-01-01

    The fission gas release cause degradation of fuel rod. It influences fuel temperature and internal pressure due to low thermal conductivity. Therefore, fission gas released to internal void of fuel rod must be measured with burnup. To measure amount of fission gas, fuel rod must be punctured by a steel needle in a closed chamber. Ideal gas law(PV=nRT) is applied to obtain atomic concentration(mole). Steel needle type is good for large amount of fission gas such as commercial spent fuel rod. But, some cases with small fuel rig in research reactor for R/D program are not available to use needle type because of large chamber volume. The laser puncturing technique was developed to solve measurement of small amount of fission gas. This system was very rare equipment in other countries. Fine pressure gage and strong vacuum system were installed, and the chamber volume was reduced at least. Fiber laser was used for easy operation

  18. 131I release from a HTGR during the LOFC accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, J.E.

    1975-03-01

    The time-dependent release of 131 I from both the core and the containment building of a high temperature gas-cooled (HTGR) reactor during the loss of forced coolant (LOFC) accident is studied. A simplified core release model is combined with a containment building release model so that the total amount of the isotope released to the environment can be calculated. The time-dependent release of 131 I from the core during the LOFC accident is primarily a function of the time-dependent core temperatures and the failed fuel release constants. The most important factor in calculating the amount of the isotope released to the environment is the total amount released into the containment building. (U.S.)

  19. Controlled Release from Zein Matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, Jacob; Belton, Peter; Venema, Paul; Linden, Van Der Erik; Vries, De Renko; Qi, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In earlier studies, the corn protein zein is found to be suitable as a sustained release agent, yet the range of drugs for which zein has been studied remains small. Here, zein is used as a sole excipient for drugs differing in hydrophobicity and isoelectric point: indomethacin,

  20. Fission product release from core-concrete mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, M.F.; Settle, J.; Leibowitz, L.; Johnson, C.E.; Ritzman, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this research is to measure the amount of strontium, barium, and lanthanum that is vaporized from core-concrete mixtures. The measurements are being done using a transpiration method. Mixtures of limestone-aggregated concrete, urania doped with a small amount of La, Sr, Ba, and Zr oxides, and stainless steel were vaporized at 2150 K from a zirconia crucible into flowing He-6% H 2 -0.06% H 2 O (a partial molar free energy of oxygen of -420 kJ). The amounts that were vaporized was determined by weight change and by chemical analyses on condensates. The major phases present in the mixture were inferred from electron probe microanalysis (EPM). They were: (1) urania containing calcia and zirconia, (2) calcium zirconate, (3) a calcium magnesium silicate, and (4) magnesia. About 10% of the zirconia crucible was dissolved by the concrete-urania mixture during the experiment, which accounts for the presence of zirconia-containing major phases. To circumvent the problem of zirconia dissolution, we repeated the experiments using mixtures of the limestone-aggregate concrete and the doped urania in molybdenum crucibles. These studies show that thermodynamic calculations of the release of refractory fission products will yield release fractions that are a factor of sixteen too high if the effects of zirconate formation are ignored

  1. Trace amount analysis using spark mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefani, Rene

    1975-01-01

    Characteristics of spark mass spectrometers (ion source, properties of the ion beam, ion optics, and performance) and their use in qualitative and quantitative analysis are described. This technique is very interesting for the semi-quantitative analysis of trace amounts, down to 10 -8 atoms. Examples of applications such as the analysis of high purity materials and non-conducting mineral samples, and determination of carbon and gas trace amounts are presented. (50 references) [fr

  2. Tailored sequential drug release from bilayered calcium sulfate composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orellana, Bryan R.; Puleo, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The current standard for treating infected bony defects, such as those caused by periodontal disease, requires multiple time-consuming steps and often multiple procedures to fight the infection and recover lost tissue. Releasing an antibiotic followed by an osteogenic agent from a synthetic bone graft substitute could allow for a streamlined treatment, reducing the need for multiple surgeries and thereby shortening recovery time. Tailorable bilayered calcium sulfate (CS) bone graft substitutes were developed with the ability to sequentially release multiple therapeutic agents. Bilayered composite samples having a shell and core geometry were fabricated with varying amounts (1 or 10 wt.%) of metronidazole-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particles embedded in the shell and simvastatin directly loaded into either the shell, core, or both. Microcomputed tomography showed the overall layered geometry as well as the uniform distribution of PLGA within the shells. Dissolution studies demonstrated that the amount of PLGA particles (i.e., 1 vs. 10 wt.%) had a small but significant effect on the erosion rate (3% vs. 3.4%/d). Mechanical testing determined that introducing a layered geometry had a significant effect on the compressive strength, with an average reduction of 35%, but properties were comparable to those of mandibular trabecular bone. Sustained release of simvastatin directly loaded into CS demonstrated that changing the shell to core volume ratio dictates the duration of drug release from each layer. When loaded together in the shell or in separate layers, sequential release of metronidazole and simvastatin was achieved. By introducing a tunable, layered geometry capable of releasing multiple drugs, CS-based bone graft substitutes could be tailored in order to help streamline the multiple steps needed to regenerate tissue in infected defects. - Highlights: • Bilayered CS composites were fabricated as potential bone graft substitutes. • The shell

  3. Tailored sequential drug release from bilayered calcium sulfate composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orellana, Bryan R.; Puleo, David A., E-mail: puleo@uky.edu

    2014-10-01

    The current standard for treating infected bony defects, such as those caused by periodontal disease, requires multiple time-consuming steps and often multiple procedures to fight the infection and recover lost tissue. Releasing an antibiotic followed by an osteogenic agent from a synthetic bone graft substitute could allow for a streamlined treatment, reducing the need for multiple surgeries and thereby shortening recovery time. Tailorable bilayered calcium sulfate (CS) bone graft substitutes were developed with the ability to sequentially release multiple therapeutic agents. Bilayered composite samples having a shell and core geometry were fabricated with varying amounts (1 or 10 wt.%) of metronidazole-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particles embedded in the shell and simvastatin directly loaded into either the shell, core, or both. Microcomputed tomography showed the overall layered geometry as well as the uniform distribution of PLGA within the shells. Dissolution studies demonstrated that the amount of PLGA particles (i.e., 1 vs. 10 wt.%) had a small but significant effect on the erosion rate (3% vs. 3.4%/d). Mechanical testing determined that introducing a layered geometry had a significant effect on the compressive strength, with an average reduction of 35%, but properties were comparable to those of mandibular trabecular bone. Sustained release of simvastatin directly loaded into CS demonstrated that changing the shell to core volume ratio dictates the duration of drug release from each layer. When loaded together in the shell or in separate layers, sequential release of metronidazole and simvastatin was achieved. By introducing a tunable, layered geometry capable of releasing multiple drugs, CS-based bone graft substitutes could be tailored in order to help streamline the multiple steps needed to regenerate tissue in infected defects. - Highlights: • Bilayered CS composites were fabricated as potential bone graft substitutes. • The shell

  4. Stimuli responsive nanomaterials for controlled release applications

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Song

    2012-01-01

    The controlled release of therapeutics has been one of the major challenges for scientists and engineers during the past three decades. Coupled with excellent biocompatibility profiles, various nanomaterials have showed great promise for biomedical applications. Stimuli-responsive nanomaterials guarantee the controlled release of cargo to a given location, at a specific time, and with an accurate amount. In this review, we have combined the major stimuli that are currently used to achieve the ultimate goal of controlled and targeted release by "smart" nanomaterials. The most heavily explored strategies include (1) pH, (2) enzymes, (3) redox, (4) magnetic, and (5) light-triggered release.

  5. Improved Oxidation Resistance of Zirconium Resulting from Addition of Small Amounts of Copper; Amelioration de la Resistance a l'Oxydation du Zirconium par de Faibles Additions de Cuivre; Povyshenie soprotivlyaemosti k okisleniyu tsirkoniya posle dobavlenij nebol'shikh kolichestv medi; Aumento de la Resistencia del Circonio a la Oxidacion por Agregado de Pequenas Cantidades de Cobre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loriers, H.; Darras, R.; Baque, P. [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay (France)

    1966-02-15

    The authors have tried to explain the process by which the addition of small amounts of copper improves the resistance of zirconium to oxidation by pressurized carbon dioxide between 600 and 700 Degree-Sign C. The resulting alloys, particularly that with 2.5% copper, seem to offer interesting possibilities as cladding or structural materials for the fuel elements of reactors of the heavy water-carbon dioxide type. The corrosion of zirconium by carbon dioxide amounts essentially to oxidation, in which two processes are involved: (1) the building up of a layer of monoclinic zirconia, through which oxygen diffuses by migration of the anionic vacancies: (2) the dissolution and diffusion of oxygen, which penetrates into the metal. The combination of gravimetric data and measurements of the thickness of the oxide layers permits evaluation of the two corresponding diffusion coefficients. This calculation has been extended, by analogy, to the case of binary zirconium-copper alloys with a concentration of copper less than or equal to 4% by weight. Comparison of the results obtained shows that the apparent diffusion coefficient of oxygen in the oxide layer that is formed decreases as the copper content of the alloy in question increases; as regards the apparent diffusion coefficient of the oxygen in the alloy, though this is only slightly modified at 600 Degree-Sign C, at 700 Degree-Sign C it too decreases when the copper content is increased to 2.5%. The improved oxidation resistance associated with slowing down of the diffusion processes results, in particular, in prolongation of parabolic-type kinetics whereas, in the case of non-alloyed zirconium or other alloys, cracking in the oxide layer rapidly leads to linear oxidation kinetics as a result of the phenomenon of peeling. (author) [French] Les auteurs ont cherche a interpreter l'amelioration apportee par de faibles additions de cuivre a la resistance a l'oxydation du zirconium par le gaz carbonique sous pression entre

  6. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Schulz

    2004-11-05

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  7. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M andO 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  8. Quantification of nanoparticle release from polymer nanocomposite coatings due to environmental stressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon Seok; Davis, Rick; Uddin, Nasir; Nyden, Marc; Rabb, Savelas A

    2016-01-01

    Certain engineered nanoparticles (ENP) reduce the flammability of components used in soft furnishings (mattresses and upholstered furniture). However, because of the ENP's small size and ability to interact with biological molecules, these fire retardant ENPs may pose a health and environmental risks, if they are released sometime during the life cycle of the soft furnishing. Quantifying the released amount of these ENPs under normal end-use circumstances provides a basis for assessing their potential health and environmental impact. In this article, we report on efforts to identify suitable methodologies for quantifying the release of carbon nanofibers, carbon nanotubes, and sodium montmorillonites from coatings applied to the surfaces of barrier fabric and polyurethane foam. The ENPs released in simulated chewing and mechanical stressing experiments were collected in aqueous solution and quantified using Ultraviolet-Visible and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy. The microstructures of the released ENPs were characterized using scanning electron microscopy. The reported methodology and results provide important milestones to estimate the impact and toxicity of the ENP release during the life cycle of the nanocomposites. To our knowledge, this is the first study of ENP release from the soft furnishing coating, something that can be important application area for fire safety.

  9. Small sample whole-genome amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Christine; Nguyen, Christine; Wheeler, Elizabeth; Sorensen, Karen; Arroyo, Erin; Vrankovich, Greg; Christian, Allen

    2005-11-01

    Many challenges arise when trying to amplify and analyze human samples collected in the field due to limitations in sample quantity, and contamination of the starting material. Tests such as DNA fingerprinting and mitochondrial typing require a certain sample size and are carried out in large volume reactions; in cases where insufficient sample is present whole genome amplification (WGA) can be used. WGA allows very small quantities of DNA to be amplified in a way that enables subsequent DNA-based tests to be performed. A limiting step to WGA is sample preparation. To minimize the necessary sample size, we have developed two modifications of WGA: the first allows for an increase in amplified product from small, nanoscale, purified samples with the use of carrier DNA while the second is a single-step method for cleaning and amplifying samples all in one column. Conventional DNA cleanup involves binding the DNA to silica, washing away impurities, and then releasing the DNA for subsequent testing. We have eliminated losses associated with incomplete sample release, thereby decreasing the required amount of starting template for DNA testing. Both techniques address the limitations of sample size by providing ample copies of genomic samples. Carrier DNA, included in our WGA reactions, can be used when amplifying samples with the standard purification method, or can be used in conjunction with our single-step DNA purification technique to potentially further decrease the amount of starting sample necessary for future forensic DNA-based assays.

  10. 29 CFR 4219.14 - Amount of liability for 20-year-limitation amounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... amount equal to the present value of all initial withdrawal liability payments for which the employer was not liable pursuant to section 4219(c)(1)(B) of ERISA. The present value of such payments shall be... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amount of liability for 20-year-limitation amounts. 4219.14...

  11. News/Press Releases

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — A press release, news release, media release, press statement is written communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing programs...

  12. Consequences of severe radioactive releases to Nordic Marine environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iosjpe, M.; Isaksson, M.; Joensen, H.P.

    - or minor – radioactive releases to Nordic marine environment. As a reference, the release amounts from a 3000 MWth reactor size were used. Based on source term analyses, the chosen release fractions in the study were: iodine 20% (of the total core inventory), caesium 10%, tellurium 10%, strontium 0...

  13. Fission product release from high gap-inventory LWR fuel under LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, R.A.; Collins, J.L.; Osborne, M.F.; Malinauskas, A.P.

    1980-01-01

    Fission product release tests were performed with light water reactor (LWR) fuel rod segments containing large amounts of cesium and iodine in the pellet-to-cladding gap space in order to check the validity of the previously published Source Term Model for this type of fuel. The model describes the release of fission product cesium and iodine from LWR fuel rods for controlled loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) transients in the temperature range 500 to 1200 0 C. The basis for the model was test data obtained with simulated fuel rods and commercial fuel irradiated to high burnup but containing relatively small amounts of cesium and iodine in the pellet-to-cladding gap space

  14. Riola release report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, E.C.

    1983-08-04

    Eleven hours after execution of the Riola Event (at 0826 PDT on 25 September 1980) in hole U2eq of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a release of radioactivity began. When the seepage stopped at about noon the following day, up to some 3200 Ci of activity had been dispersed by light variable winds. On 26 September, examination of the geophone records showed six hours of low-level, but fairly continuous, activity before the release. Electrical measurements indicated that most cables were still intact to a depth below the stemming platform. A survey of the ground zero area showed that the seepage came through cracks between the surface conductor and the pad, through cracks in the pad, and through a crack adjacent to the pad around the mousehole (a small hole adjacent to the emplacement hole). To preclude undue radiation exposure or injury from a surprise subsidence, safety measures were instituted. Tritium seepage was suffucient to postpone site activities until a box and pipeline were emplaced to contain and remove the gas. Radiation release modeling and calculations were generally consistent with observations. Plug-hole interaction calculations showed that the alluvium near the bottom of the plug may have been overstressed and that improvements in the design of the plug-medium interface can be made. Experimental studies verified that the surface appearance of the plug core was caused by erosion, but, assuming a normal strength for the plug material, that erosion alone could not account for the disappearance of such a large portion of the stemming platform. Samples from downhole plug experiments show that the plug may have been considerably weaker than had been indicted by quality assurance (QA) samples. 19 references, 32 figures, 10 tables.

  15. Riola release report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    Eleven hours after execution of the Riola Event (at 0826 PDT on 25 September 1980) in hole U2eq of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a release of radioactivity began. When the seepage stopped at about noon the following day, up to some 3200 Ci of activity had been dispersed by light variable winds. On 26 September, examination of the geophone records showed six hours of low-level, but fairly continuous, activity before the release. Electrical measurements indicated that most cables were still intact to a depth below the stemming platform. A survey of the ground zero area showed that the seepage came through cracks between the surface conductor and the pad, through cracks in the pad, and through a crack adjacent to the pad around the mousehole (a small hole adjacent to the emplacement hole). To preclude undue radiation exposure or injury from a surprise subsidence, safety measures were instituted. Tritium seepage was suffucient to postpone site activities until a box and pipeline were emplaced to contain and remove the gas. Radiation release modeling and calculations were generally consistent with observations. Plug-hole interaction calculations showed that the alluvium near the bottom of the plug may have been overstressed and that improvements in the design of the plug-medium interface can be made. Experimental studies verified that the surface appearance of the plug core was caused by erosion, but, assuming a normal strength for the plug material, that erosion alone could not account for the disappearance of such a large portion of the stemming platform. Samples from downhole plug experiments show that the plug may have been considerably weaker than had been indicted by quality assurance (QA) samples. 19 references, 32 figures, 10 tables

  16. Interaction between fed and gastric media (ensure Plus) and different hypromellose based caffeine controlled release tablets; comparison and mechanistic study of caffeine release in fed and fasted media versus water using USP dissolution apparatus 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franek, Frans; Holm, Per; Larsen, Frank

    2014-01-01

    , which decreases erosion rate in 100 mPa s viscosity tablets, swelling in 15,000 mPa s viscosity tablets and caffeine release from both tablets. This observed interaction between Ensure Plus® and the HPMC tablets may translate into decreased drug release rate in the fed stomach, which may decrease...... using factorial designed experiments. Furthermore, the mechanism of release in Ensure Plus®, a nutrition drink similar in composition to the FDA standard meal, was investigated by studying tablet swelling using texture analysis. Altering dip speed has negligible effect on release and erosion rates...... the amount of drug available for absorption in the small intestine and thus reduce systemic drug exposure and maximum plasma concentration....

  17. 33 CFR 135.203 - Amount required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amount required. 135.203 Section 135.203 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OFFSHORE OIL POLLUTION COMPENSATION FUND...

  18. Physician Fee Schedule National Payment Amount File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The significant size of the Physician Fee Schedule Payment Amount File-National requires that database programs (e.g., Access, dBase, FoxPro, etc.) be used to read...

  19. Total surface area change of Uranium dioxide fuel in function of burn-up and its impact on fission gas release during neutron irradiation for small, intermediate and high burn-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szuta, M.

    2011-01-01

    In the early published papers it was observed that the fractional fission gas release from the specimen have a tendency to increase with the total surface area of the specimen - a fairy linear relationship was indicated. Moreover it was observed that the increase of total surface area during irradiation occurs in the result of connection the closed porosity with the open porosity what in turn causes the increase of fission gas release. These observations let us surmise that the process of knock-out release is the most significant process of fission gas release since its quantity is proportional to the total surface area. Review of the experiments related to the increase of total surface area in function of burn-up is presented in the paper. For very high burn-up the process of grain sub-division (polygonization) occurs under condition that the temperature of irradiated fuel lies below the temperature of grain re-crystallization. Simultaneously with the process of polygonization, the increase in local porosity and the decrease in local density in function of burn-up occurs, which leads to the increase of total surface area. It is suggested that the same processes take place in the transformed fuel as in the original fuel, with the difference that the total surface area is so big that the whole fuel can be treated as that affected by the knock-out process. This leads to explanation of the experimental data that for very high burn-up (>120 MWd/kgU) the concentration of xenon is constant. An explanation of the grain subdivision process in function of burn-up in the 'athermal' rim region in terms of total surface area, initial grain size and knock-out release is undertaken. Correlation of the threshold burn-up, the local fission gas concentration, local total surface area, initial and local grain size and burn-up in the rim region is expected. (author)

  20. Intermediate temperature heat release in an HCCI engine fueled by ethanol/n-heptane mixtures: An experimental and modeling study

    KAUST Repository

    Vuilleumier, David

    2014-03-01

    This study examines intermediate temperature heat release (ITHR) in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines using blends of ethanol and n-heptane. Experiments were performed over the range of 0-50% n-heptane liquid volume fractions, at equivalence ratios 0.4 and 0.5, and intake pressures from 1.4bar to 2.2bar. ITHR was induced in the mixtures containing predominantly ethanol through the addition of small amounts of n-heptane. After a critical threshold, additional n-heptane content yielded low temperature heat release (LTHR). A method for quantifying the amount of heat released during ITHR was developed by examining the second derivative of heat release, and this method was then used to identify trends in the engine data. The combustion process inside the engine was modeled using a single-zone HCCI model, and good qualitative agreement of pre-ignition pressure rise and heat release rate was found between experimental and modeling results using a detailed n-heptane/ethanol chemical kinetic model. The simulation results were used to identify the dominant reaction pathways contributing to ITHR, as well as to verify the chemical basis behind the quantification of the amount of ITHR in the experimental analysis. The dominant reaction pathways contributing to ITHR were found to be H-atom abstraction from n-heptane by OH and the addition of fuel radicals to O2. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  1. Intermediate temperature heat release in an HCCI engine fueled by ethanol/n-heptane mixtures: An experimental and modeling study

    KAUST Repository

    Vuilleumier, David; Kozarac, Darko; Mehl, Marco; Saxena, Samveg; Pitz, William J.; Dibble, Robert W.; Chen, Jyhyuan; Sarathy, Mani

    2014-01-01

    This study examines intermediate temperature heat release (ITHR) in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines using blends of ethanol and n-heptane. Experiments were performed over the range of 0-50% n-heptane liquid volume fractions, at equivalence ratios 0.4 and 0.5, and intake pressures from 1.4bar to 2.2bar. ITHR was induced in the mixtures containing predominantly ethanol through the addition of small amounts of n-heptane. After a critical threshold, additional n-heptane content yielded low temperature heat release (LTHR). A method for quantifying the amount of heat released during ITHR was developed by examining the second derivative of heat release, and this method was then used to identify trends in the engine data. The combustion process inside the engine was modeled using a single-zone HCCI model, and good qualitative agreement of pre-ignition pressure rise and heat release rate was found between experimental and modeling results using a detailed n-heptane/ethanol chemical kinetic model. The simulation results were used to identify the dominant reaction pathways contributing to ITHR, as well as to verify the chemical basis behind the quantification of the amount of ITHR in the experimental analysis. The dominant reaction pathways contributing to ITHR were found to be H-atom abstraction from n-heptane by OH and the addition of fuel radicals to O2. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  2. Environmental Release Prevention and Control Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamatey, A.; Arnett, M.

    1997-01-01

    During the history of SRS, continual improvements in facilities, process, and operations, and changes in the site''s mission have reduced the amount of radioactive liquid releases. In the early years of SRS (1958 to 1965), the amount of tritium discharged to the Savannah River averaged approximately 61,000 curies a year. During the mid-1980''s (1983 to 1988), liquid releases of tritium averaged 27,000 curies a year. By 1996, liquid releases of tritium are projected to be just 3000 curies for the year. This large projected decrease is the result of the planned shut-down of all reactors and the anticipated significant decline in the amount of tritium migrating from the site seepage basins and the Solid Waste Disposal Facility

  3. Radiculography with reduced amounts of contrast medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signorini, E.; Caputo, N.; Chiurulla, C.; Ciorba, E.; Pelliccioli, G.P.; Cianciulli, E.

    1984-01-01

    Because of the frequency and seriousness of side effects observed after radiculography, due to, among the other things, the amount of contrast medium, the authors describe a method that gives diagnostically satisfactory results using a low dose of contrast and a tangent-beam technique. Among 106 patients undergoing radiculography with a tangent-beam technique and Iopamidol, only 4 developed mild side effects, namely headache in three cases and headache with nausea in one. (Author)

  4. Amount of trace elements in marine cephalopods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Taiji; Nakahara, Motokazu; Ishii, Toshiaki; Suzuki, Yuzuru; Suzuki, Hamaji.

    1979-01-01

    For the estimation of internal radiation to human beings, the amounts of Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Co and Cs in 5 species of marine cephalopods were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and neutron activation analysis, and then the concentration factors were calculated. The average amount and the concentration factor of the elements in the edible parts (mantle, arms and tentacles) of cephalopods are as follows: 0.14 mg, 2 x 10 2 for Mn, 1.8 mg, 2 x 10 2 for Fe, 2.0 mg, 7 x 10 2 for Cu, 12.2 mg, 1 x 10 3 for Zn, 5.3 μg, 6 x 10 1 for Co and 3.4 μg, 7 for Cs. The amounts of Fe, Co, Cu and Zn in the liver and the branchial heart were much higher than those in the edible parts, although those of Cs and Mn were almost the same. The Co content in the visceral organs of O. Vulgaris showed extremely high value, particularly in the branchial heart. (author)

  5. Synthesis and release of fatty acids by human trophoblast cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, R.A.; Haynes, E.B.

    1987-01-01

    In order to determine whether placental cells can synthesize and release fatty acids, trophoblast cells from term human placentas were established in monolayer culture. The cells continued to secrete placental lactogen and progesterone and maintained specific activities of critical enzymes of triacylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis for 24 to 72 hr in culture. Fatty acid was rapidly synthesized from [ 14 C]acetate and released by the cells. Palmitoleic, palmitic, and oleic acids were the major fatty acids synthesized from [ 14 C]acetate and released. Small amounts of lauric, myristic, and stearic acids were also identified. [ 14 C]acetate was also incorporated into cellular triacylglycerol, phospholipid, and cholesterol, but radiolabeled free fatty acid did not accumulate intracellularly. In a pulse-chase experiment, cellular glycerolipids were labeled with [1- 14 C]oleate; trophoblast cells then released 14 C-labeled fatty acid into the media as the cellular content of labeled phospholipid and triacylglycerol decreased without intracellular accumulation of free fatty acid. Twenty percent of the 14 C-label lost from cellular glycerolipid could not be recovered as a chloroform-extractable product, suggesting that some of the hydrolyzed fatty acid had been oxidized. These data indicate that cultured placenta trophoblast cells can release fatty acids that have either been synthesized de novo or that have been hydrolyzed from cellular glycerolipids. Trophoblast cells in monolayer culture should provide an excellent model for molecular studies of placental fatty acid metabolism and release

  6. A sorites paradox in the conventional definition of amount of substance

    OpenAIRE

    Nigel Wheatley

    2011-01-01

    The conventional definition of amount of substance _n_ is as a quantity proportional to number of entities _N_. This implies that n is discrete for small _N_ while _n_ is considered to be continuous at the macroscopic scale, leading to a sorites paradox. A practical criterion is proposed for distinguishing between amount of substance and number of entities, and the implications for the conventional definition of amount of substance are discussed.

  7. Optimization of sustained release aceclofenac microspheres using response surface methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshmukh, Rameshwar K.; Naik, Jitendra B., E-mail: jitunaik@gmail.com

    2015-03-01

    Polymeric microspheres containing aceclofenac were prepared by single emulsion (oil-in-water) solvent evaporation method using response surface methodology (RSM). Microspheres were prepared by changing formulation variables such as the amount of Eudragit® RS100 and the amount of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) by statistical experimental design in order to enhance the encapsulation efficiency (E.E.) of the microspheres. The resultant microspheres were evaluated for their size, morphology, E.E., and in vitro drug release. The amount of Eudragit® RS100 and the amount of PVA were found to be significant factors respectively for determining the E.E. of the microspheres. A linear mathematical model equation fitted to the data was used to predict the E.E. in the optimal region. Optimized formulation of microspheres was prepared using optimal process variables setting in order to evaluate the optimization capability of the models generated according to IV-optimal design. The microspheres showed high E.E. (74.14 ± 0.015% to 85.34 ± 0.011%) and suitably sustained drug release (minimum; 40% to 60%; maximum) over a period of 12 h. The optimized microspheres formulation showed E.E. of 84.87 ± 0.005 with small error value (1.39). The low magnitudes of error and the significant value of R{sup 2} in the present investigation prove the high prognostic ability of the design. The absence of interactions between drug and polymers was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD) revealed the dispersion of drug within microspheres formulation. The microspheres were found to be discrete, spherical with smooth surface. The results demonstrate that these microspheres could be promising delivery system to sustain the drug release and improve the E.E. thus prolong drug action and achieve the highest healing effect with minimal gastrointestinal side effects. - Highlights: • Aceclofenac microspheres

  8. Drug release kinetic analysis and prediction of release data via polymer molecular weight in sustained release diltiazem matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adibkia, K; Ghanbarzadeh, S; Mohammadi, G; Khiavi, H Z; Sabzevari, A; Barzegar-Jalali, M

    2014-03-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of HPMC (K4M and K100M) as well as tragacanth on the drug release rate of diltiazem (DLTZ) from matrix tablets prepared by direct compression method.Mechanism of drug transport through the matrices was studied by fitting the release data to the 10 kinetic models. 3 model independent parameters; i. e., mean dissolution time (MDT), mean release rate (MRR) and release rate efficacy (RE) as well as 5 time point approaches were established to compare the dissolution profiles. To find correlation between fraction of drug released and polymer's molecular weight, dissolution data were fitted into two proposed equations.All polymers could sustain drug release up to 10 h. The release data were fitted best to Peppas and Higuchi square root kinetic models considering squared correlation coefficient and mean percent error (MPE). RE and MRR were decreased when polymer to drug ratio was increased. Conversely, t60% was increased with raising polymer /drug ratio. The fractions of drug released from the formulations prepared with tragacanth were more than those formulated using the same amount of HPMC K4M and HPMC K100M.Preparation of DLTZ matrices applying HPMCK4M, HPMC K100M and tragacanth could effectively extend the drug release. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Predicting hydrocarbon release from soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poppendieck, D.; Loehr, R.C.

    2002-01-01

    'Full text:' The remediation of hazardous chemicals from soils can be a lengthy and costly process. As a result, recent regulatory initiatives have focused on risk-based corrective action (RBCA) approaches. Such approaches attempt to identify the amount of chemical that can be left at a site with contaminated soil and still be protective of human health and the environment. For hydrocarbons in soils to pose risk to human heath and the environment, the hydrocarbons must be released from the soil and accessible to microorganisms, earthworms, or other higher level organisms. The sorption of hydrocarbons to soil can reduce the availability of the hydrocarbon to receptors. Typically in soils and sediments, there is an initial fast release of a hydrocarbon from the soil to the aqueous phase followed by a slower release of the remaining hydrocarbon to the aqueous phase. The rate and extent of slow release can influence aqueous hydrocarbon concentrations and the fate and transport of hydrocarbons in the subsurface. Once the fast fraction of the chemical has been removed from the soil, the remaining fraction of a chemical may desorb at a rate that natural mechanisms can attenuate the released hydrocarbon. Hence, active remediation may be needed only until the fast fraction has been removed. However, the fast fraction is a soil and chemical specific parameter. This presentation will present a tier I type protocol that has been developed to quickly estimate the fraction of hydrocarbons that are readily released from the soil matrix to the aqueous phase. Previous research in our laboratory and elsewhere has used long-term desorption (four months) studies to determine the readily released fraction. This research shows that a single short-term (less than two weeks) batch extraction procedure provides a good estimate of the fast released fraction derived from long-term experiments. This procedure can be used as a tool to rapidly evaluate the release and bioavailability of

  10. Can gamma irradiation during radiotherapy influence the metal release process for biomedical CoCrMo and 316L alloys?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zheng; Edin, Jonathan; Karlsson, Anna Emelie; Petrovic, Katarina; Soroka, Inna L; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Hedberg, Yolanda

    2018-02-09

    The extent of metal release from implant materials that are irradiated during radiotherapy may be influenced by irradiation-formed radicals. The influence of gamma irradiation, with a total dose of relevance for radiotherapy (e.g., for cancer treatments) on the extent of metal release from biomedical stainless steel AISI 316L and a cobalt-chromium alloy (CoCrMo) was investigated in physiological relevant solutions (phosphate buffered saline with and without 10 g/L bovine serum albumin) at pH 7.3. Directly after irradiation, the released amounts of metals were significantly higher for irradiated CoCrMo as compared to nonirradiated CoCrMo, resulting in an increased surface passivation (enhanced passive conditions) that hindered further release. A similar effect was observed for 316L showing lower nickel release after 1 h of initially irradiated samples as compared to nonirradiated samples. However, the effect of irradiation (total dose of 16.5 Gy) on metal release and surface oxide composition and thickness was generally small. Most metals were released initially (within seconds) upon immersion from CoCrMo but not from 316L. Albumin induced an increased amount of released metals from AISI 316L but not from CoCrMo. Albumin was not found to aggregate to any greater extent either upon gamma irradiation or in the presence of trace metal ions, as determined using different light scattering techniques. Further studies should elucidate the effect of repeated friction and fractionated low irradiation doses on the short- and long term metal release process of biomedical materials. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2018. © 2018 The Authors Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Experiments to quantify airborne release from packages with dispersible radioactive materials under accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, R.; Lange, F. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Schwertnergasse 1, 50667 Koeln (Germany); Koch, W.; Nolte, O. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin (ITEM), Nikolai-Fuchs-Str.1, 30625 Hannover (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    For transport or handling accidents involving packages with radioactive materials and the assessment of potential radiological consequences, for the review of current requirements of the IAEA Transport Regulations, and for their possible further development reliable release data following mechanical impact are required. Within this context a research project was carried out which extends the basis for a well-founded examination of the contemporary system of requirements of 'Low Specific Activity' (LSA)-type materials and allows for its further development where appropriate. This project comprises a prior system-analytical examination and an experimental programme aiming at improving the general physical understanding of the release process as well as the quantity and the characteristics of airborne released material for non-fixed dispersible LSA-II material upon mechanical impact. Impaction experiments applying small, medium and real sized specimens of different dispersible materials revealed that the release behaviour of dispersible powders strongly depends upon material properties, e.g. particle size distribution and cohesion forces. The highest experimentally determined release fraction of respirable mass (AED < 10 {mu}m) amounted to about 2 % and was obtained for 2 kg of un-contained easily dispersible pulverized fly ash (PFA). For larger un-contained PFA specimen the release fraction decreases. However, packaging containing powdery material substantially reduces the airborne release fraction. The measured airborne release fractions for a 200 l drum with Type A certificate containing PFA were about a factor of 50 to 100 lower than for un-contained material. For a drop height of 9 m the airborne release fraction amounted to about 4 x 10{sup -5}. This value should be applicable for most of transport and handling accidents with mechanical impact. For a metal container of Type IP-2 or better which contains powder masses of 100 kg or more this release

  12. Metal release from simulated fixed orthodontic appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, C J; Shin, J S; Cha, J Y

    2001-10-01

    Most orthodontic appliances and archwires are stainless steel or nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloys that can release metal ions, with saliva as the medium. To measure metal released from the fixed orthodontic appliances currently in use, we fabricated simulated fixed orthodontic appliances that corresponded to half of the maxillary arch and soaked them in 50 mL of artificial saliva (pH 6.75 +/- 0.15, 37 degrees C) for 3 months. We used brackets, tubes, and bands made by Tomy (Tokyo, Japan). Four groups were established according to the appliance manufacturer and the type of metal in the .016 x .022-in archwires. Groups A and B were stainless steel archwires from Ormco (Glendora, Calif) and Dentaurum (Ispringen, Germany), respectively, and groups C and D were both NiTi archwires with Ormco's copper NiTi and Tomy's Bioforce sentalloy, respectively. Stainless steel archwires were heat treated in an electric furnace at 500 degrees C for 1 minute and quenched in water. We measured the amount of metal released from each group by immersion time. Our conclusions were as follows: (1) there was no increase in the amount of chromium released after 4 weeks in group A, 2 weeks in group B, 3 weeks in group C, and 8 weeks in group D; (2) there was no increase in the amount of nickel released after 2 weeks in group A, 3 days in group B, 7 days in group C, and 3 weeks in group D; and (3) there was no increase in the amount of iron released after 2 weeks in group A, 3 days in group B, and 1 day in groups C and D. In our 3-month-long investigation, we saw a decrease in metal released as immersion time increased.

  13. Toxics Release Inventory (TRI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a dataset compiled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It contains information on the release and waste...

  14. Polarographic determination of trace amounts of thorium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaofan Zhao; Xiaohua Cai; Peibiao Li; Handong Yang

    1986-07-01

    A sensitive linear-sweep polarographic method for the determination of thorium is described. It is based on the thorium complex with Xylidyl Blue I (XBI) in a medium containing ethylenediamine, 1, 10-phenanthroline, oxalic acid and ninhydrin, at pH 10.5-11.5. The complex has been proved to be Th(XBI)/sub 2/, with log ..beta..'=9.6. The method can be used to determine trace amounts of thorium over the range 3.5x10/sup -8/-3x10/sup -6/M. The detection limit is 1x10/sup -8/M. A solvent extraction procedure is necessary to eliminate interference from several cations. The method has been applied to determination of traces of thorium in minerals, with good results.

  15. Small scale studies of production of fissium aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindqvist, O.; Rydberg, J.

    1983-02-01

    A small scale study concerning the production and analysis of fission product aerosols formed at various temperatures as a function of the chemical composition of the fissium/corium mixture at the source is presented. CsOH, CsJ and Te are the main aerosol components to be expected. The thermodynamic characterization of occuring Te-iodides and other phases is of great importance for reactor core meltdown chemistry and for the evaluation of the aerosol transport tests. Elemental iodine seems not to be released in significant amounts in reducing atmosphere. Analysis data concerning elements, phases, themral analysis and gases are presented. (G.B.)

  16. Stimuli responsive nanomaterials for controlled release applications

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Song; Li, Wengang; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2012-01-01

    applications. Stimuli-responsive nanomaterials guarantee the controlled release of cargo to a given location, at a specific time, and with an accurate amount. In this review, we have combined the major stimuli that are currently used to achieve the ultimate

  17. Studies on renin release in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skøtt, O

    1989-01-01

    1) Measurements of renin secretion from single arterioles at time intervals down to 20 seconds showed that the renin secretion is episodic, the amount of renin released during each episode corresponding to the estimated content of one secretory granule. 2) A decrease in osmolality elicits episodi...

  18. DETERMINATION OF METAL IONS RELEASED BY STAINLESS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The amounts of cobalt, iron, manganese, nickel and chromium ions released from new and reused stainless steel arch bar used for maxillomandibular fixation was determined in Hank's solutions of different hydrogen and chloride ions concentrations, whole blood serum and phosphate buffered saline (PBS) in vitro, over a ...

  19. Tritium behavior intentionally released in the room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Hayashi, T.; Iwai, Y.; Yamanishi, T.; Willms, R. S.; Carlson, R. V.

    2008-01-01

    To construct a fusion reactor with high safety and acceptability, it is necessary to establish and to ensure tritium safe handling technology. Tritium should be well-controlled not to be released to the environment excessively and to prevent workers from excess exposure. It is especially important to grasp tritium behavior in the final confinement area, such as the room and/or building. In order to obtain data for actual tritium behavior in a room and/or building, a series of intentional Tritium Release Experiments (TREs) were planned and carried out within a radiologically controlled area (main cell) at Tritium System Test Assembly (TSTA) in Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) under US-JAPAN collaboration program. These experiments were carried out three times. In these experiments, influence of a difference in the tritium release point and the amount of hydrogen isotope for the initial tritium behavior in the room were suggested. Tritium was released into the main cell at TSTA/LANL. The released tritium reached a uniform concentration about 30 - 40 minutes in all the experiments. The influence of the release point and the amount of hydrogen isotope were not found to be important in these experiments. The experimental results for the initial tritium behavior in the room were also simulated well by the modified three-dimensional eddy flow analysis code FLOW-3D. (authors)

  20. Marine fouling release silicone/carbon nanotube nanocomposite coatings: on the importance of the nanotube dispersion state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigbeder, Alexandre; Mincheva, Rosica; Pettitt, Michala E; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A; Claes, Michael; Dubois, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    The present work reports on the influence of the dispersion quality of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in a silicone matrix on the marine fouling-release performance of the resulting nanocomposite coatings. A first set of coatings filled with different nanofiller contents was prepared by the dilution of a silicone/MWCNTs masterbatch within a hydrosilylation-curing polydimethylsiloxane resin. The fouling-release properties of the nanocomposite coatings were studied through laboratory assays with the marine alga (seaweed) Ulva, a common fouling species. As reported previously (see Ref. [19]), the addition of a small (0.05%) amount of carbon nanotubes substantially improves the fouling-release properties of the silicone matrix. This paper shows that this improvement is dependent on the amount of filler, with a maximum obtained with 0.1 wt% of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The method of dispersion of carbon nanotubes in the silicone matrix is also shown to significantly (p = 0.05) influence the fouling-release properties of the coatings. Dispersing 0.1% MWCNTs using the masterbatch approach yielded coatings with circa 40% improved fouling-release properties over those where MWCNTs were dispersed directly in the polymeric matrix. This improvement is directly related to the state of nanofiller dispersion within the cross-linked silicone coating.

  1. Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling of the February 2014 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasstrom, John [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Piggott, Tom [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Simpson, Matthew [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lobaugh, Megan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tai, Lydia [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pobanz, Brenda [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Yu, Kristen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-22

    This report presents the results of a simulation of the atmospheric dispersion and deposition of radioactivity released from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in New Mexico in February 2014. These simulations were made by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and supersede NARAC simulation results published in a previous WIPP report (WIPP, 2014). The results presented in this report use additional, more detailed data from WIPP on the specific radionuclides released, radioactivity release amounts and release times. Compared to the previous NARAC simulations, the new simulation results in this report are based on more detailed modeling of the winds, turbulence, and particle dry deposition. In addition, the initial plume rise from the exhaust vent was considered in the new simulations, but not in the previous NARAC simulations. The new model results show some small differences compared to previous results, but do not change the conclusions in the WIPP (2014) report. Presented are the data and assumptions used in these model simulations, as well as the model-predicted dose and deposition on and near the WIPP site. A comparison of predicted and measured radionuclide-specific air concentrations is also presented.

  2. Long-term culture of astrocytes attenuates the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Kawano

    Full Text Available The astrocyte is a major glial cell type of the brain, and plays key roles in the formation, maturation, stabilization and elimination of synapses. Thus, changes in astrocyte condition and age can influence information processing at synapses. However, whether and how aging astrocytes affect synaptic function and maturation have not yet been thoroughly investigated. Here, we show the effects of prolonged culture on the ability of astrocytes to induce synapse formation and to modify synaptic transmission, using cultured autaptic neurons. By 9 weeks in culture, astrocytes derived from the mouse cerebral cortex demonstrated increases in β-galactosidase activity and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP expression, both of which are characteristic of aging and glial activation in vitro. Autaptic hippocampal neurons plated on these aging astrocytes showed a smaller amount of evoked release of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, and a lower frequency of miniature release of glutamate, both of which were attributable to a reduction in the pool of readily releasable synaptic vesicles. Other features of synaptogenesis and synaptic transmission were retained, for example the ability to induce structural synapses, the presynaptic release probability, the fraction of functional presynaptic nerve terminals, and the ability to recruit functional AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptors to synapses. Thus the presence of aging astrocytes affects the efficiency of synaptic transmission. Given that the pool of readily releasable vesicles is also small at immature synapses, our results are consistent with astrocytic aging leading to retarded synapse maturation.

  3. Influence of additives and impurities in sweep gas and solid tritium release behaviour from lithium ceramics (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Satoru

    1991-01-01

    Tritium release from solid breeding material is affected by small amounts of additives or impurities in the sweep gas or solid itself. Addition of hydrogen or water vapor to the sweep gas is reported to enhance the surface reaction of tritium release. Doping to solid breeder with elements of different valence from lithium has a possibility to improve tritium diffusion in the solid. Surface reaction and migration behavior in bulk are believed to be also affected by impurities in the sweep gas and in the solid. In order to model tritium release behavior in the blanket of fusion reactor, the mechanism of interaction with these additives or impurities must be quantitatively formulated. However, the mechanism of these remains to be elucidated. In this paper effects of these additives and impurities on tritium migration are reviewed. The mechanism of surface reaction for He+H 2 sweep gas is also discussed. (orig.)

  4. 76 FR 59138 - Medicare Program; Medicare Appeals; Adjustment to the Amount in Controversy Threshold Amounts for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    ... Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) hearings and judicial review under the Medicare appeals process. The adjustment to the AIC threshold amounts will be effective for requests for ALJ hearings and judicial review filed on... $1,350 for judicial review. DATES: Effective Date: This notice is effective on January 1, 2012. FOR...

  5. 75 FR 58407 - Medicare Program; Medicare Appeals; Adjustment to the Amount in Controversy Threshold Amounts for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) hearings and judicial review under the Medicare appeals process. The adjustment to the AIC threshold amounts will be effective for requests for ALJ hearings and judicial review filed on... judicial review. DATES: Effective Date: This notice is effective on January 1, 2011. FOR FURTHER...

  6. 78 FR 59702 - Medicare Program; Medicare Appeals: Adjustment to the Amount in Controversy Threshold Amounts for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    ... Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) hearings and judicial review under the Medicare appeals process. The adjustment to the AIC threshold amounts will be effective for requests for ALJ hearings and judicial review filed on... ALJ hearings and $1,430 for judicial review. DATES: This notice is effective on January 1, 2014. FOR...

  7. 77 FR 59618 - Medicare Program; Medicare Appeals; Adjustment to the Amount in Controversy Threshold Amounts for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) hearings and judicial review under the Medicare appeals process. The adjustment to the AIC threshold amounts will be effective for requests for ALJ hearings and judicial review filed on... $1,400 for judicial review. Effective Date: This notice is effective on January 1, 2013. FOR FURTHER...

  8. Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis by TAK-385 (relugolix), a novel, investigational, orally active, small molecule gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist: studies in human GnRH receptor knock-in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Daisuke; Masaki, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Akira; Yoshimatsu, Mie; Akinaga, Yumiko; Asada, Mari; Sasada, Reiko; Takeyama, Michiyasu; Miwa, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Tatsuya; Kusaka, Masami

    2014-01-15

    TAK-385 (relugolix) is a novel, non-peptide, orally active gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist, which builds on previous work with non-peptide GnRH antagonist TAK-013. TAK-385 possesses higher affinity and more potent antagonistic activity for human and monkey GnRH receptors compared with TAK-013. Both TAK-385 and TAK-013 have low affinity for the rat GnRH receptor, making them difficult to evaluate in rodent models. Here we report the human GnRH receptor knock-in mouse as a humanized model to investigate pharmacological properties of these compounds on gonadal function. Twice-daily oral administration of TAK-013 (10mg/kg) for 4 weeks decreased the weights of testes and ventral prostate in male knock-in mice but not in male wild-type mice, demonstrating the validity of this model to evaluate antagonists for the human GnRH receptor. The same dose of TAK-385 also reduced the prostate weight to castrate levels in male knock-in mice. In female knock-in mice, twice-daily oral administration of TAK-385 (100mg/kg) induced constant diestrous phases within the first week, decreased the uterus weight to ovariectomized levels and downregulated GnRH receptor mRNA in the pituitary after 4 weeks. Gonadal function of TAK-385-treated knock-in mice began to recover after 5 days and almost completely recovered within 14 days after drug withdrawal in both sexes. Our findings demonstrate that TAK-385 acts as an antagonist for human GnRH receptor in vivo and daily oral administration potently, continuously and reversibly suppresses the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. TAK-385 may provide useful therapeutic interventions in hormone-dependent diseases including endometriosis, uterine fibroids and prostate cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Thermoresponsive latexes for fragrance encapsulation and release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popadyuk, N; Popadyuk, A; Kohut, A; Voronov, A

    2016-04-01

    To synthesize cross-linked latex particles protecting the encapsulated fragrance at ambient temperatures and facilitating the release of cargo at the temperature of the surface of the skin that varies in different regions of the body between 33.5 and 36.9°C. Poly(stearyl acrylate) (PSA), a polymer with long crystallizable alkyl side chains (undergoes order-disorder transitions at 45°C), was chosen as the main component of the polymer particles. As a result, new thermoresponsive polymer particles for fragrance encapsulation were synthesized and characterized, including assessing the performance of particles in triggered release by elevated temperature. To obtain network domains of various crystallinity, stearyl acrylate was copolymerized with dipropylene glycol acrylate caprylate (DGAC) (comonomer) in the presence of a dipropylene glycol diacrylate sebacate (cross-linker) using the miniemulsion process. Comonomers and a cross-linker were mixed directly in a fragrance during polymerization. Fragrance release was evaluated at 25, 31, 35 and 39°C to demonstrate a new material potential in personal/health care skin-related applications. Particles protect the fragrance from evaporation at 25°C. The fragrance release rate gradually increases at 31, 35 and 39°C. Two slopes were found on release plots. The first slope corresponds to a rapid fragrance release. The second slope indicates a subsequent reduction in the release rate. Crystalline-to-amorphous transition of PSA triggers the release of fragrances from cross-linked latex particles at elevated temperatures. The presence of the encapsulated fragrance, as well as the inclusion of amorphous fragments in the polymer network, reduces the particle crystallinity and enhances the release. Release profiles can be tuned by temperature and controlled by the amount of loaded fragrance and the ratio of comonomers in the feed mixture. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  10. Bubble development and fission gas release during rapid heating of 18 GWd/TeU UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Small samples (approximately 50 mg) of UO 2 irradiated to 18 GWd/TeU have been heated rapidly in an out-of-pile furnace. Ramp rates were in the range 10-80 deg. C.s -1 , peak temperatures varied from 1400 deg. C to 2500 deg. C and dwell times from one to fifteen min. The specimens were sealed in small capsules which were subsequently pierced to determine the total amount of fission gas ( 85 Kr) released during each test. Changes in the size and number of gas bubbles on grain boundaries were examined using SEM, TEM, replication and fractography techniques will be employed later. In this paper are reported the first series of gas release results and some metallography. The results are compared with related experiments and some qualitative conclusions are drawn regarding the mechanisms and kinetics of transient fission gas behaviour. (author)

  11. Research on the Characteristics and Mechanism of the Cumulative Release of Antimony from an Antimony Smelting Slag Stacking Area under Rainfall Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yingying; Deng, Renjian

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to study the characteristics and the mechanism of the cumulative release of antimony at an antimony smelting slag stacking area in southern China. A series of dynamic and static leaching experiments to simulate the effects of rainfall were carried out. The results showed that the release of antimony from smelting slag increased with a decrease in the solid-liquid ratio, and the maximum accumulated release was found to be 42.13 mg Sb/kg waste and 34.26 mg Sb/kg waste with a solid/liquid ratio of 1 : 20; the maximum amount of antimony was released within 149–420 μm size fraction with 7.09 mg/L of the cumulative leaching. Also, the antimony release was the greatest and most rapid at pH 7.0 with the minimum release found at pH 4.0. With an increase in rainfall duration, the antimony release increased. The influence of variation in rainfall intensity on the release of antimony from smelting slag was small. PMID:28804669

  12. The yearly amount and characteristics of deep-buried phreatic evaporation in hyper-arid areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Wang, W.; Zhan, H.; Qiu, F.; Wu, F.; Zhang, G.

    2015-12-01

    Water scarcity is the primary cause of land deterioration, so finding new available water resources is crucial to ecological restoration. We investigated a hyper-arid Gobi location in the Dunhuang Mogao Grottoes in this work wherein the burial depth of phreatic water is over 200 m. An air-conditioner was used in a closed greenhouse to condense and measure the yearly amount of phreatic evaporation (PE) from 2010 to 2015. The results show that the annual quantity of PE is 4.52 mm, and that the PE has sinusoidal characteristics. The average PE is 0.0183 mm d-1 from March to November. Accordingly, by monitoring the annual changes in soil-air temperature and humidity to a depth of 5.0 m, we analyzed the water migration mechanism in the heterothermozone (subsurface zone of variable temperature). The results show that, from March to November, the temperature and absolute humidity (AH) increase. This is due to the flow of solar heat entering the soil - the soil subsequently releases moisture and the soil is in a state of increasing AH so that evaporation occurs. From November to March, the temperature decreases. Now, the soil absorbs water vapor and AH is in a state of decline. Thus, it is temperature alternation in the heterothermozone - due to solar heat transfer - that provides the main driving power for PE. When it drives water vapor to move downwards in the heterothermozone, a small part is reversed upwards and evaporates. Solar radiation intensity dominates the annual sinusoidal PE characteristics.

  13. On the physicochemical states of heavy metals of very small amounts in river water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, Isao; Inoue, Yoriteru; Hashimoto, Noriaki.

    1976-01-01

    The physicochemical existence states of the heavy metals in river water were experimentally studied, with radioactive nuclides as tracers. The experimental samples taken from Kamo-river in the city of Kyoto were filtered through a membrane filter of 0.45 μm pore diameter. The radioactive nuclides of heavy metal tracers were added into the sample water, and pH was adjusted to the given value with hydrochloric solution on the acidic side and with sodium hydroxide solution on the alkaline side. After two days aging, the radioactivity ratios of the sediments on membrane filters to that of total passed samples were measured. The variation in the course of time of the concentrations of ionic tracers dialysed with cellulose tubes (24 angstrom pore diameter) was traced until the equilibrium condition was reached. The radioactivity of the supernatant of 20 ml of sample water added with 0.5 g of anion or cation exchange resin, and the concentrations of tracers in the upper layer of liquid in a centrifuge were measured. The existing conditions of elements such as zinc, cadmium, cobalt, strontium-yttrium were examined. In conclusion, the adsorption of all nuclides on the membrane filters increased with the increase of pH, but the significant difference was not recognized owing to the pore diameter (1.2 μm - 0.05 μm) excepting some experimental results. (Iwakiri, K.)

  14. A method to press powder at 6000 ton using small amount of explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilmi, Ahmad Humaizi; Azmi, Nor Azmaliana; Ismail, Ariffin

    2017-12-01

    Large die hydraulic press forces are one of the key instruments in making jumbo planes. The machine can produce aircraft components such as wing spars, landing gear supports and armor plates. Superpower nations such as USA, Russia, Germany, Japan, Korea and China have large die hydraulic press which can press 50,000 tons. In Malaysia, heavy-duty press is available from companies such as Proton that builds chassis for cars. However, that heavy-duty press is not able to produce better bulkhead for engines, fuselage, and wings of an aircraft. This paper presents the design of an apparatus that uses 50 grams of commercial grade explosives to produce 6000 tons of compaction. This is a first step towards producing larger scale apparatus that can produce 50,000-ton press. The design was done using AUTODYN blast simulation software. According to the results, the maximum load the apparatus can withstand was 6000 tons which was contributed by 50 grams of commercial explosive(Emulex). Explosive size larger than 50 grams will lead to catastrophic failure. Fabrication of the apparatus was completed. However, testing of the apparatus is not presented in this article.

  15. Influence of small amounts of additives on gas hold-up, bubble size, and interfacial area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cents, A. H. G.; Jansen, D. J. W.; Brilman, D. W. F.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2005-01-01

    The gas-liquid interfacial area, which is determined by the gas hold-up and the Sauter mean bubble diameter, determines the production rate in many industrial processes. The effect of additives on this interfacial area is, especially in multiphase systems (gas-liquid-solid, gas-liquid-liquid), often

  16. Rulings in Argentinean and Colombian courts decriminalize possession of small amounts of narcotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozac, David

    2009-12-01

    Two recent court decisions in South America have reflected a growing backlash in the region against the so-called, U.S.-led "war on drugs". In Argentina, the Supreme Court of Justice ruled unanimously on 25 August 2009 that the second paragraph of Article 14 of the country's drug control legislation, which punishes the possession of drugs for personal consumption, was unconstitutional. In Colombia, the Supreme Court of Justice ruled on 8 July 2009 that the possession of illegal drugs for personal use was not a criminal offence.

  17. Comparative analysis of experimental methods for quantification of small amounts of oil in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Ahkami, Mehrdad; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2016-01-01

    ) and the quantification of oil is then difficult. In this study, we compare four approaches to determine the volume of the collected oil fraction in core flooding effluents. The four methods are: Image analysis, UV/visible spectroscopy, liquid scintillation counting, and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR...... comparison to a pre-made standard curve. Image analysis, UV/visible spectroscopy, and liquid scintillation counting quantify only the oil fraction by comparing with a pre-made standard curve. The image analysis technique is reliable when more than 0.1 ml oil is present, whereas liquid scintillation counting...... performs well when less than 0.6 ml oil is present. Both UV/visible spectroscopy and NMR spectrometry produced high accuracy results in the entire studied range (0.006-1.1 ml). In terms of laboratory time, the liquid scintillation counting is the fastest and least user dependent, whereas the NMR...

  18. Fire-assay determination of small amounts of gold in mineral raw materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuligin, V.M.; Zdorova, Eh.P.; Popova, N.N.; Rakovskij, Eh.V.

    1976-01-01

    Gold is concentrated in 0.1-1.0 g of a lead alloy obtained in fire assay and cupellation and can be used for the analysis of a number of geological samples. The procedure makes it possible to determine gold with a limit of detection of 0.02 g/ton from a representative sample of 50-100 g. The use of lead acetate ensures the limit of detection of 0.002 g/ton, the relative standard deviation being greater than 0.01

  19. Determination of small amounts of aluminum in iron and steel by x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Minao; Sato, Shoki; Narita, Masanao

    1981-01-01

    The accuracy of X-ray fluorescence analysis for determining aluminum in steel is generally poor when the aluminum content is below 0.1%. In this study, it is confirmed that the existence of inhomogeneous acid-insoluble aluminum causes the poor accuracy of X-ray fluorescence analysis. The accuracy can be improved by adding granular ferro-zirconium to molten steel when sampling. By using this method, the accuracy of determining aluminum was 0.0024% for low alloy steels and 0.0022% for stainless steels as the standard deviation obtained for a series of differences between an analytical result and a standard value. Corrections for overlapping of the chromium spectrum, and for absorption and enhancement effects of co-existent elements are not necessary for the analysis of low alloy steels, whereas these corrections are necessary for the analysis of stainless steels. (author)

  20. Small amounts of functional ATP7A protein permit mild phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lisbeth Birk

    2015-01-01

    concentrations, ATP7A shifts to the post-Golgi compartments or to the plasma membrane to export copper out of the cell. Impaired copper-regulation trafficking has been observed for ATP7A mutants, but its impact on the clinical outcome is not clear. The major problem in patients with MD seems to be insufficient...... of missense mutations on structural models of the ATP7A protein suggests that affected conserved residues generally lead to a severe phenotype. The ATP7A protein traffics within the cells. At low copper levels, ATP7A locates to the Trans-Golgi Network (TGN) to load cuproenzymes with copper, whereas at higher...

  1. Adsorption of fluids in slitlike pores containing a small amount of mobile ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borówko, M; Bucior, K; Sokołowski, S; Staszewski, T

    2005-11-01

    We apply density functional theory to investigate changes in the phase behavior of a fluid caused by the presence of mobile ions inside the pore. The approach has been based on the fundamental measure density functional theory and on the theory of nonuniform electrolytes developed recently by O. Pizio, A. Patrykiejew, S. Sokołowski [J. Chem. Phys. 121 (2005) 11,957]. We have evaluated capillary condensation phase diagrams for pores of different widths and for different concentrations of confined ions. The calculations have demonstrated that the presence of ions leads to lowering the critical temperature and to an increase of the value of the chemical potential at the capillary condensation point.

  2. The Right Amount of Income Variability : Evidence from Small Retailers in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalton, Patricio; Nhung, Nguyen; Rüschenpöhler, Julius

    Recent in influential literature suggests that poverty by itself reduces cognitive capacity. We hypothesise that it is the income variability typically associated with poverty that impedes cognitive functioning of low-income people. To test this hypothesis, we experimentally induced thoughts about

  3. Large scientific releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pongratz, M.B.

    1981-01-01

    The motivation for active experiments in space is considered, taking into account the use of active techniques to obtain a better understanding of the natural space environment, the utilization of the advantages of space as a laboratory to study fundamental plasma physics, and the employment of active techniques to determine the magnitude, degree, and consequences of artificial modification of the space environment. It is pointed out that mass-injection experiments in space plasmas began about twenty years ago with the Project Firefly releases. Attention is given to mass-release techniques and diagnostics, operational aspects of mass release active experiments, the active observation of mass release experiments, active perturbation mass release experiments, simulating an artificial modification of the space environment, and active experiments to study fundamental plasma physics

  4. 24 CFR 891.525 - Amount and terms of financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amount and terms of financing. 891... Handicapped-Section 8 Assistance § 891.525 Amount and terms of financing. (a) The amount of financing approved... financing provided shall not exceed the lesser of: (1) The dollar amounts stated in paragraphs (b) through...

  5. 45 CFR 149.100 - Amount of reimbursement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Amount of reimbursement. 149.100 Section 149.100... REQUIREMENTS FOR THE EARLY RETIREE REINSURANCE PROGRAM Reinsurance Amounts § 149.100 Amount of reimbursement... reimbursement in the amount of 80 percent of the costs for health benefits (net of negotiated price concessions...

  6. A simple assessment scheme for severe accident consequences using release parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Kampanart, E-mail: kampanarts@tint.or.th [Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology, 16 Vibhavadi-Rangsit Rd., Latyao, Chatuchak, 10900 (Thailand); Okamoto, Koji [The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Nuclear accident consequence index can assess overall consequences of an accident. • Correlations between the index and release parameters are developed. • Relation between the index and release amount follows power function. • The exponent of the power function is the key to the relation. - Abstract: Nuclear accident consequence index (NACI) which can assess the overall consequences of a severe accident on people and the environment is developed based on findings from previous studies. It consists of three indices: radiation effect index, relocation index and decontamination index. Though the NACI can cover large range of consequences, its assessment requires extensive resources. The authors then attempt to simplify the assessment, by investigating the relations between the release parameters and the NACI, in order to use the release parameters for severe accident consequence assessment instead of the NACI. NACI and its components increase significantly when the release amount is increased, while the influences of the release period and the release starting time on the NACI are nearly negligible. Relations between the release amount and the NACI and its components follow simple power functions (y = ax{sup b}). The exponent of the power functions seems to be the key to the relations. The exponent of the relation between the release amount and the NACI was around 0.8–1.0 when the release amount is smaller than 100 TBq, and it increased to around 1.3–1.4 when the release amount is equal to or larger than 100 TBq.

  7. Presynaptic M1 muscarinic receptor modulates spontaneous release of acetylcholine from rat basal forearm slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, T.; Fujimoto, LK.; Oohata, H.; Kawashima, K.

    1988-01-01

    Spontaneous release of (ACh) from rat basal forebrain slices in the presence of cholinesterase inhibitor was directly determined using a specific radioimmunoassay for ACh. The release was calcium dependent. A consistent amount of ACh release was observed throughout the experiment. Atropine (10- 8 to 10- 5 M) and pirenzepine (10- 7 to 10- 5 M) enhanced spontaneous ACh release. These findings indicate the presence of an M 1 muscarenic autoreceptor that modulates spontaneous release of ACh in the rat forebrain

  8. Influence of Nanomaterial Compatibilization Strategies on Polyamide Nanocomposites Properties and Nanomaterial Release during the Use Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rosas, Elisabet; Vilar, Gemma; Janer, Gemma; González-Gálvez, David; Puntes, Victor; Jamier, Vincent; Aubouy, Laurent; Vázquez-Campos, Socorro

    2016-03-01

    The incorporation of small amounts of nanofillers in polymeric matrices has enabled new applications in several industrial sectors. The nanofiller dispersion can be improved by modifying the nanomaterial (NM) surface or predispersing the NMs to enhance compatibility. This study evaluates the effect of these compatibilization strategies on migration/release of the nanofiller and transformation of polyamide-6 (PA6), a thermoplastic polymer widely used in industry during simulated outdoors use. Two nanocomposites (NCs) containing SiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) with different surface properties and two multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) NCs obtained by different addition methods were produced and characterized, before and after accelerated wet aging conditions. Octyl-modified SiO2 NPs, though initially more aggregated than uncoated SiO2 NPs, reduced PA6 hydrolysis and, consequently, NM release. Although no clear differences in dispersion were observed between the two types of MWCNT NCs (masterbatch vs direct addition) after manufacture, the use of the MWCNT masterbatch reduced PA6 degradation during aging, preventing MWCNT accumulation on the surface and further release or potential exposure by direct contact. The amounts of NM released were lower for MWCNTs (36 and 108 mg/m(2)) than for SiO2 NPs (167 and 730 mg/m(2)), being lower in those samples where the NC was designed to improve the nanofiller-matrix interaction. Hence, this study shows that optimal compatibilization between NM and matrix can improve NC performance, reducing polymer degradation and exposure and/or release of the nanofiller.

  9. Safety consequences of the release of radiation induced stored energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prij, J.

    1994-08-01

    Due to the disposal of HLW in a salt formation gamma energy will be deposited in the rock salt. Most of this energy will be converted into heat, whilst a small part will create defects in the salt crystals. Energy is stored in the damaged crystals. Due to uncertainties in the models and differences in the disposal concepts the estimated values for the stored energy range from 10 to 1000 J/g in the most heavily damaged crystals close to the waste containers. The amount of radiation damage decays exponentially with increasing distance from the containers and at distances larger than 0.2 m the stored energy can be neglected. Given the uncertainties in the model predictions and in the possible release mechanism an instantaneous release of stored energy cannot be excluded completely. Therefore the thermo-mechanical consequences of a postulated instantaneous release of an extremely high amount of radiation induced stored energy have been estimated. These estimations are based on the quasi-static solutions for line and point sources. To account for the dynamic effects and the occurrence of fractures an amplification factor has been derived from mining experience with explosives. A validation of this amplification factor has been given using post experimental observations of two nuclear explosions in a salt formation. For some typical disposal concepts in rock salt the extent of the fractured zone has been estimated. It appeared that the radial extent of the fractured zone is limited to 5 m. Given the much larger distance between the individual boreholes and the distance between the boreholes and the boundary of the salt formation (more than 100 m), the probability of a release of radiation induced stored energy creating a pathway for the nuclides from the containers to the groundwater, is extremely low. The radiological consequences of a groundwater intrusion scenario induced by this very unprobable pathway are bounded by the 'standard' groundwater intrusion

  10. Conditioning the radioactive oils released from the Cernavoda NPP operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, I.; Deneanu, N.; Dulama, M.; Baboiescu, E.

    2001-01-01

    The radioactive oils released during the Cernavoda NPP operation are lubricating oils used in the primary circuit pumps, hydraulic oils used in the reactor charging machine, as well as, waste turbine oils. The primary cooling circuit is the main way of contamination. This waste contain variable amounts of tritium of activities up to 10 8 Bq/l and relatively small amounts of β/γ emitting radionuclides. The radioactive oils resulting of the heat transport system may contain as much as 1.8 TBq/l of tritium. At INR Pitesti, Department of Radioactive Waste Processing, studies were done concerning the radioactive oils conditioning in concrete. It was found that the minimal compression level required for disposal, of 50 MPa, was exceeded. As consequence, the conditioned waste fulfils the conditions of acceptance provided by the Radioactive Waste National Repository at Baita-Bihor. The main stages of the process are: - dosing the radioactive oil, water and NOFOX9 and NOFOX4 emulsion additives for the 220 l or 80 l barrel; - mixing these ingredients up to reaching the emulsion state; - dosing the cement and lime; - adding the enhancing silicate and shaking the mixture to get a homogeneous matrix; - closing the barrel; - conditioning the 80 l barrel within the 220 l container. The production capacity is of 5 to 8 barrels/shift

  11. Investigation of delayed fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cayet, Nicolas

    1996-05-01

    The study of the fission gas release process in the high burnup rig IFA-562 has revealed a particular fuel behaviour: a delay in the fission gas release process. It appeared that an important release of gas was measured by the pressure transducers once the power had decreased, whereas, during steady-state operation, the pressure did not increase very much. After examinations, the gap size has been concluded to be the main parameter involving this delay. However the burnup could have been a potential factor, its role is mainly to close the gap by swelling. The observations of low burnup rods have shown the same delayed fission gas release, the gap being small by design and closed essentially by thermal expansion. The study of the kinetics has demonstrated the time-independency of the phenomenon. Thus the proposed mechanism driving this delayed fission gas release would involve three consecutives stages. During steady-state, the gas is released into the interlinkage network of grain boundary bubbles and cracks. Due to the closed gap, the gas is trapped in some void volumes, unable to escape the pellet. During power reduction, the gap and some old/new cracks open, immediately providing a path for the gas to the pressure transducers and explaining this delay in the fission gas release. (author)

  12. Bioactive Glass Nanoparticles as a New Delivery System for Sustained 5-Fluorouracil Release: Characterization and Evaluation of Drug Release Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer M. El-Kady

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glass nanoparticles were synthesized and tested for the first time as a new delivery system for sustained 5-fluorouracil (5-FU release. They were characterized by TEM, DTA, TGA, and FT-IR. The porosity % and specific surface area of glass nanoparticles were 85.59% and 378.36 m2/g, respectively. The in vitro bioactivity evaluation confirmed that bioactive glass disks prepared from these nanoparticles could induce hydroxyapatite layer over their surfaces in simulated body fluid. The in vitro drug release experiment indicated that glass nanoparticles could serve as long-term local delivery vehicles for sustained 5-FU release. The release profile of 5-FU showed an initial fast release stage followed by a second stage of slower release. The initial burst release of 5-FU in the first day was about 23% (28.92 mg·L−1 of the total amount of loaded 5-FU, while the final cumulative percentage of the 5-FU released after 32 days was about 45.6% (57.31 mg·L−1 of the total amount of loaded 5-FU. The application of different mathematical models indicated that 5-FU was released by diffusion controlled mechanism and suggested that its release rate was dependent on glass particles dissolution, changes of surface area as well as diameter of glass particles, and concentration of loaded drug.

  13. Effect of Food Emulsifiers on Aroma Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Jia Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the influence of different emulsifiers or xanthan-emulsifier systems on the release of aroma compounds. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME and GC-MS were used to study the effects of varying concentrations of xanthan gum, sucrose fatty acid ester, Tween 80 and soybean lecithin on the release of seven aroma compounds. The effects of the emulsifier systems supplemented with xanthan gum on aroma release were also studied in the same way. The results showed varying degrees of influence of sucrose fatty acid ester, soybean lecithin, Tween 80 and xanthan gum on the release of aroma compounds. Compared with other aroma compounds, ethyl acetate was more likely to be conserved in the solution system, while the amount of limonene released was the highest among these seven aroma compounds. In conclusion, different emulsifiers and complexes showed different surface properties that tend to interact with different aroma molecules. The present studies showed that the composition and structure of emulsifiers and specific interactions between emulsifiers and aroma molecules have significant effects on aroma release.

  14. Tritium breeding and release-rate kinetics from neutron-irradiated lithium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quanci, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    The research encompasses the measurement of the tritium breeding and release-rate kinetics from lithium oxide, a ceramic tritium-breeding material. A thermal extraction apparatus which allows the accurate measurement of the total tritium inventory and release rate from lithium oxide samples under different temperatures, pressures and carrier-gas compositions with an uncertainty not exceeding 3% was developed. The goal of the Lithium Blanket Module program was to determine if advanced computer codes could accurately predict the tritium production in the lithium oxide blanket of a fusion power plant. A fusion blanket module prototype was built and irradiated with a deuterium-tritium fusion-neutron source. The tritium production throughout the module was modeled with the MCNP three dimensional Monte Carlo code and was compared to the assay of the tritium bred in the module. The MCNP code accurately predicted tritium-breeding trends but underestimated the overall tritium breeding by 30%. The release rate of tritium from small grain polycrystalline sintered lithium oxides with a helium carrier gas from 300 to 450 C was found to be controlled by the first order surface desorption of monotritiated water. When small amounts of hydrogen were added to the helium carrier gas, the first order rate constant increased from the isotopic exchange of hydrogen for tritium at the lithium oxide surface occurring in parallel with the first order desorption process. The isotopic-exchange first order rate constant temperature dependence and hydrogen partial pressure dependence were evaluated

  15. Tritium breeding and release-rate kinetics from neutron-irradiated lithium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quanci, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    The research encompasses the measurement of the tritium breeding and release-rate kinetics from lithium oxide, a ceramic tritium-breeding material. A thermal extraction apparatus which allows the accurate measurement of the total tritium inventory and release rate from lithium oxide samples under different temperatures, pressures and carrier-gas compositions with an uncertainty not exceeding 3% was developed. The goal of the Lithium Blanket Module program was to determine if advanced computer codes could accurately predict the tritium production in the lithium oxide blanket of a fusion power plant. A fusion blanket module prototype, was built and irradiated with a deuterium-tritium fusion-neutron source. The tritium production throughout the module was modeled with the MCNP three dimensional Monte Carlo code and was compared to the assay of the tritium bred in the module. The MCNP code accurately predicted tritium-breeding trends but underestimated the overall tritium breeding by 30%. The release rate of tritium from small grain polycrystalline sintered lithium oxide with a helium carrier gas from 300 to 450 C was found to be controlled by the first order surface desorption of mono-tritiated water. When small amounts of hydrogen were added to the helium carrier gas, the first order rate constant increased from the isotopic exchange of hydrogen for tritium at the lithium oxide surface occurring in parallel with the first order desorption process. The isotopic-exchange first order rate constant temperature dependence and hydrogen partial pressure dependence were evaluated. Large single crystals of lithium oxide were fabricated by the vacuum fusion technique. The release rate of tritium from the large single crystals was found to be controlled by diffusion, and the mixed diffusion-desorption controlled release regime

  16. EIA new releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This report is a compliation of news releases from the Energy Information Administration. The september-october report includes articles on energy conservation, energy consumption in commercial buildings, and a short term energy model for a personal computer

  17. Limited contribution of permafrost carbon to methane release from thawing peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Mark D. A.; Estop-Aragonés, Cristian; Fisher, James P.; Thierry, Aaron; Garnett, Mark H.; Charman, Dan J.; Murton, Julian B.; Phoenix, Gareth K.; Treharne, Rachael; Kokelj, Steve V.; Wolfe, Stephen A.; Lewkowicz, Antoni G.; Williams, Mathew; Hartley, Iain P.

    2017-07-01

    Models predict that thaw of permafrost soils at northern high latitudes will release tens of billions of tonnes of carbon (C) to the atmosphere by 2100 (refs ,,). The effect on the Earth’s climate depends strongly on the proportion of this C that is released as the more powerful greenhouse gas methane (CH4), rather than carbon dioxide (CO2) (refs ,); even if CH4 emissions represent just 2% of the C release, they would contribute approximately one-quarter of the climate forcing. In northern peatlands, thaw of ice-rich permafrost causes surface subsidence (thermokarst) and water-logging, exposing substantial stores (tens of kilograms of C per square meter, ref. ) of previously frozen organic matter to anaerobic conditions, and generating ideal conditions for permafrost-derived CH4 release. Here we show that, contrary to expectations, although substantial CH4 fluxes (>20 g CH4 m-2 yr-1) were recorded from thawing peatlands in northern Canada, only a small amount was derived from previously frozen C (effect of permafrost thaw on CH4 emissions from northern peatlands.

  18. Analysis of small leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, W.; Hofmann, K.

    1979-01-01

    Problems associated with 'small leaks' are described and requirements are derived for experimental facilities and computer codes. Based on these requirements, a valuation of the existing experimental facilities and codes is presented. Facilities for integral tests in relatively large scale (ex. LOFT) are suitable for small leak test in principle, however minor changes (instrumentation, secondary side) are necessary for the evaluation of certain phenomena. The 'advanced blowdown codes' are capable of describing most of the phenomena occurring during small leak events, however a substantial amount of code development and verification is still needed. In addition, the use of transient codes in small leak analysis is demonstrated. There are some areas (neutronics feedback, influence of control system) in which the use of transient codes is possible and advantageous. (orig.) 891 HP/orig. 892 BRE [de

  19. Sellafield (release of radioactivity)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, J; Goodlad, A; Morris, M

    1986-02-06

    A government statement is reported, about the release of plutonium nitrate at the Sellafield site of British Nuclear Fuels plc on 5 February 1986. Matters raised included: details of accident; personnel monitoring; whether radioactive material was released from the site; need for public acceptance of BNFL activities; whether plant should be closed; need to reduce level of radioactive effluent; number of incidents at the plant.

  20. [Preparation of hydrophilic matrix sustained release tablets of total lactones from Andrographis paniculata and study on its in vitro release mechanism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fang-Fang; Shi, Wei; Zhang, Hui; Guo, Qing-Ming; Wang Zhen-Zhong; Bi, Yu-An; Wang, Zhi-Min; Xiao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    In this study, hydrophilic matrix sustained release tablets of total lactones from Andrographis paniculata were prepared and the in vitro release behavior were also evaluated. The optimal prescription was achieved by studying the main factor of the type and amount of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) using single factor test and evaluating through cumulative release of three lactones. No burst drug release from the obtained matrix tablets was observed. Drug release sustained to 14 h. The release mechanism of three lactones from A. paniculata was accessed by zero-order, first-order, Higuchi and Peppas equation. The release behavior of total lactones from A. paniculata was better agreed with Higuchi model and the drug release from the tablets was controlled by degradation of the matrix. The preparation of hydrophilic matrix sustained release tablets of total lactones from A. paniculata with good performance of drug release was simple.

  1. 13 CFR 107.1150 - Maximum amount of Leverage for a Section 301(c) Licensee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... up-to-date business plan that reflects continuation of the Licensee's successful investment strategy... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum amount of Leverage for a Section 301(c) Licensee. 107.1150 Section 107.1150 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS...

  2. 12 CFR 347.120 - Computation of investment amounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computation of investment amounts. 347.120... GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.120 Computation of investment amounts. In computing the amount that may be invested in any foreign organization under §§ 347.117 through 347.119, any investments held...

  3. 29 CFR 4.142 - Contracts in an indefinite amount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... McNamara-O'Hara Service Contract Act Determining Amount of Contract § 4.142 Contracts in an indefinite amount. (a) Every contract subject to this Act which is indefinite in amount is required to contain the....), a case arising under the Walsh-Healey Public Contracts Act. Such a contract, which may be in the...

  4. 46 CFR 308.303 - Amounts insured under interim binder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 308.303 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE Second Seamen's War Risk Insurance § 308.303 Amounts insured under interim binder. The amounts insured are the amounts specified in the Second Seamen's War Risk Policy (1955) or as modified by shipping...

  5. Modeling metabolic response to changes of enzyme amount in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on the work of Hynne et al. (2001), in an in silico model of glycolysis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is established by introducing an enzyme amount multiple factor (.) into the kinetic equations. The model is aimed to predict the metabolic response to the change of enzyme amount. With the help of .α, the amounts of ...

  6. 7 CFR 1710.107 - Amount lent for acquisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Amount lent for acquisitions. 1710.107 Section 1710... GUARANTEES Loan Purposes and Basic Policies § 1710.107 Amount lent for acquisitions. The maximum amount that will be lent for an acquisition is limited to the value of the property, as determined by RUS. If the...

  7. Pore size is a critical parameter for obtaining sustained protein release from electrochemically synthesized mesoporous silicon microparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester L. Pastor

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous silicon has become a material of high interest for drug delivery due to its outstanding internal surface area and inherent biodegradability. We have previously reported the preparation of mesoporous silicon microparticles (MS-MPs synthesized by an advantageous electrochemical method, and showed that due to their inner structure they can adsorb proteins in amounts exceeding the mass of the carrier itself. Protein release from these MS-MPs showed low burst effect and fast delivery kinetics with complete release in a few hours. In this work, we explored if tailoring the size of the inner pores of the particles would retard the protein release process. To address this hypothesis, three new MS-MPs prototypes were prepared by electrochemical synthesis, and the resulting carriers were characterized for morphology, particle size, and pore structure. All MS-MP prototypes had 90 µm mean particle size, but depending on the current density applied for synthesis, pore size changed between 5 and 13 nm. The model protein α-chymotrypsinogen was loaded into MS-MPs by adsorption and solvent evaporation. In the subsequent release experiments, no burst release of the protein was detected for any prototype. However, prototypes with larger pores (>10 nm reached 100% release in 24–48 h, whereas prototypes with small mesopores (<6 nm still retained most of their cargo after 96 h. MS-MPs with ∼6 nm pores were loaded with the osteogenic factor BMP7, and sustained release of this protein for up to two weeks was achieved. In conclusion, our results confirm that tailoring pore size can modify protein release from MS-MPs, and that prototypes with potential therapeutic utility for regional delivery of osteogenic factors can be prepared by convenient techniques.

  8. 500 Cities: Local Data for Better Health, 2016 release

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This is the complete dataset for the 500 Cities project 2016 release. This dataset includes 2013, 2014 model-based small area estimates for 27 measures of chronic...

  9. 500 Cities: Local Data for Better Health, 2017 release

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This is the complete dataset for the 500 Cities project 2017 release. This dataset includes 2015, 2014 model-based small area estimates for 27 measures of chronic...

  10. Cooling-water amounts, temperature, and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koops, F.B.J.; Donze, M.; Hadderingh, R.H.

    1979-01-01

    The release of heat from power plants into a water can take place with relative small quantities of cooling water, highly warmed up accordingly, or with large quantities of cooling water slightly warmed up. The utilization of cooling water is bound to certain guidelines established by the authorities. With the intention to protect the environment, the admissable temperatures and warming-up have been strictly limited by the authorities. In the Netherlands, we have presently temporary cooling water guidelines which allow a max. temperature of the cooling water in the cooling cycle of 30 0 C and a maximum admissible temperature rise in the condenser between 7 0 C during summer and 15 0 C during winter. It has also been determined in these requirements how much cooling water at least has to be used to discharge a specified quantity of heat. Plankton, spawn and young fish are dragged with the cooling water. Harm to these organisms can be caused mechanically by pumps, sieves and the condenser or they can be harmed by the temperature rise in the condenser. Investigations showed that mechanical harm to spawn and young fish in the cooling water flow should not be ignored, and that detectable harm to plankton organisms takes place only at water temperatures above 32 0 C. The cooling water consumption can therefore be optimised as follows: The solution of a greater temperature increase and a slightly higher value for the temperature maximum can reduce the cooling water quantity. This reduction of the cooling water quantity reduces the destruction of the fish quantity, which gets into the cooling water system, especially during the summer. If the temperature rise and the temperature itself are not selected too high, the destruction of fish may be reduced without causing serious damage to the plankton. (orig.) [de

  11. Drug Release Studies from Caesalpinia pulcherrima Seed Polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevanandham, Somasundaram; Dhachinamoorthi, Duraiswamy; Bannoth Chandra Sekhar, Kothapalli

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the controlled release behavior of both water-soluble (acetaminophen, caffeine, theophylline and salicylic acid) and water insoluble (indomethacin) drugs derived from Caesalpinia pulcherrima seed Gum isolated from Caesalpinia pulcherrima kernel powder. It further investigates the effect of incorporating diluents such as microcrystalline cellulose and lactose on caffeine release. In addition the effect the gum's (polysaccharide) partial cross-linking had on release of acetaminophen was examined. Applying the exponential equation, the soluble drugs mechanism of release was found to be anomalous. The insoluble drugs showed a near case II or zero order release mechanism. The rate of release in descending order was caffeine, acetaminophen, theophylline, salicylic acid and indomethacin. An increase in the release kinetics of the drug was observed on blending with diluents. However, the rate of release varied with the type and amount of blend within the matrix. The mechanism of release due to effect of diluents was found to be anomalous. The rate of drug release decreased upon partial cross-linking and the mechanism of release was found to be of super case II.

  12. Preliminary analysis of public dose from CFETR gaseous tritium release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, Baojie [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Ni, Muyi, E-mail: muyi.ni@fds.org.cn [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Lian, Chao; Jiang, Jieqiong [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Present the amounts and limit dose of tritium release to the environment for CFETR. • Perform a preliminary simulation of radiation dose for gaseous tritium release. • Key parameters about soil types, wind speed, stability class, effective release height and age were sensitivity analyzed. • Tritium release amount is recalculated consistently with dose limit in Chinese regulation for CFETR. - Abstract: To demonstrate tritium self-sufficiency and other engineering issues, the scientific conception of Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) has been proposed in China parallel with ITER and before DEMO reactor. Tritium environmental safety for CFETR is an important issue and must be evaluated because of the huge amounts of tritium cycling in reactor. In this work, different tritium release scenarios of CFETR and dose limit regulations in China are introduced. And the public dose is preliminarily analyzed under normal and accidental events. Furthermore, after finishing the sensitivity analysis of key input parameters, the public dose is reevaluated based on extreme parameters. Finally, tritium release amount is recalculated consistently with the dose limit in Chinese regulation for CFETR, which would provide a reference for tritium system design of CFETR.

  13. Determination of micro amounts of vanadium by oxidative coupling of α-naphthol and p-phenylenediamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainberger, S.J.; Damasceno, R.N.

    1975-01-01

    A sensitive determination of vanadium is described. In the presence of the necessary amount of potassium chlorate and small amounts of vanadium, α-naphthol and p-phenylenediamine react to yield a dyestuff, which exhibits an absorption maximum at 345 nm. The Lambert-Beer law is followed at 0.008-0.12 μg vanadium per ml. The molar extinction amounts to 54 x 10 4 .mol -1 The removal of the interfering cations is described. (author)

  14. ATP Release Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiyuki Taruno

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine triphosphate (ATP has been well established as an important extracellular ligand of autocrine signaling, intercellular communication, and neurotransmission with numerous physiological and pathophysiological roles. In addition to the classical exocytosis, non-vesicular mechanisms of cellular ATP release have been demonstrated in many cell types. Although large and negatively charged ATP molecules cannot diffuse across the lipid bilayer of the plasma membrane, conductive ATP release from the cytosol into the extracellular space is possible through ATP-permeable channels. Such channels must possess two minimum qualifications for ATP permeation: anion permeability and a large ion-conducting pore. Currently, five groups of channels are acknowledged as ATP-release channels: connexin hemichannels, pannexin 1, calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1, volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs, also known as volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying (VSOR anion channels, and maxi-anion channels (MACs. Recently, major breakthroughs have been made in the field by molecular identification of CALHM1 as the action potential-dependent ATP-release channel in taste bud cells, LRRC8s as components of VRACs, and SLCO2A1 as a core subunit of MACs. Here, the function and physiological roles of these five groups of ATP-release channels are summarized, along with a discussion on the future implications of understanding these channels.

  15. 13 CFR 123.19 - May I request an increase in the amount of an economic injury loan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... amount of an economic injury loan? 123.19 Section 123.19 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DISASTER LOAN PROGRAM Overview § 123.19 May I request an increase in the amount of an economic... increase is essential for your business to continue and is based on events occurring after SBA approved...

  16. Estimation of erosion amount by geochemical characteristic in the Horonobe area, northern Hokkaido

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kazuharu; Niizato, Tadafumi; Yasue, Ken-ichi; Ishii, Eiichi

    2005-08-01

    This article presents the results of the estimated amount of erosion and uplifting based on mineralogy and organic geochemical characters of the Neogene siliceous rock (Wakkanai and Koetoi Formations) in Horonobe. As a result of the transformational change of silica minerals, it was clarified that the erosion amount was about 0.66 [m ky -1 ] or more at the large uplift site, and about 0.21 [m ky -1 ] or more at the small uplift site at Hokushin region, Horonobe area. In this case of the correlation with the palaeo-geothermal temperature and the sterane/sterene ratio, the ratio is effective measure to estimate the burial depth and erosion amount. We think that the estimation of the amount of erosion and uplifting became possible in high resolution by the organic geochemical character. (author)

  17. Nuclear trafficking latest statistics released

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Countries reported 121 incidents to the IAEA in 2004 of illicit trafficking and other unauthorized activities involving nuclear and other radioactive materials, newly released statistics from the Agency's Illicit Trafficking Database (ITDB) show. The ITDB report also shows that one incident was reported since 2003 that involved fissile material - highly enriched uranium (HEU) or plutonium - that is needed to make a nuclear weapon. It occurred in June 2003 when an individual was arrested in possession of 170 grams of HEU, attempting to illegally transport it across the border. During the two-year period 2003-2004, the number of incidents reported by States substantially increased compared with previous years. 'Improved reporting may in part account for it,' the report said. 'The majority of the incidents reported in 2003-2004 showed no evidence of criminal activity.' The Past Twelve Years: 1993 - 2004 Nuclear Weapons Grade Material. Since the database started in 1993, there have been eighteen confirmed incidents involving trafficking in HEU and plutonium. A few of these incidents involved seizures of kilogram quantities of weapons-usable nuclear material but most involved very small quantities. In some of the cases the seized material was allegedly a sample of larger quantities available for illegal sale or at risk of theft. More than two dozens incidents involved trace amounts of plutonium sources. Table can be viewed: Incidents involving HEU and Pu confirmed to the ITDB (1993-2004). Nuclear Materials. In the past twelve years, 220 incidents involved nuclear materials. The majority of confirmed cases with nuclear materials involved low-grade nuclear materials, mostly in the form of reactor fuel pellets, and natural uranium, depleted uranium and thorium. While the quantities of these materials have been rather small to be significant for nuclear proliferation or use in a terrorist nuclear explosive device, these cases are indicative of gaps in the control

  18. RAVEN Beta Release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabiti, Cristian; Alfonsi, Andrea; Cogliati, Joshua Joseph; Mandelli, Diego; Kinoshita, Robert Arthur; Wang, Congjian; Maljovec, Daniel Patrick; Talbot, Paul William

    2016-01-01

    This documents the release of the Risk Analysis Virtual Environment (RAVEN) code. A description of the RAVEN code is provided, and discussion of the release process for the M2LW-16IN0704045 milestone. The RAVEN code is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. RAVEN is capable of investigating the system response as well as the input space using Monte Carlo, Grid, or Latin Hyper Cube sampling schemes, but its strength is focused toward system feature discovery, such as limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, using dynamic supervised learning techniques. RAVEN has now increased in maturity enough for the Beta 1.0 release.

  19. RAVEN Beta Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cogliati, Joshua Joseph [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinoshita, Robert Arthur [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wang, Congjian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Maljovec, Daniel Patrick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Talbot, Paul William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This documents the release of the Risk Analysis Virtual Environment (RAVEN) code. A description of the RAVEN code is provided, and discussion of the release process for the M2LW-16IN0704045 milestone. The RAVEN code is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. RAVEN is capable of investigating the system response as well as the input space using Monte Carlo, Grid, or Latin Hyper Cube sampling schemes, but its strength is focused toward system feature discovery, such as limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, using dynamic supervised learning techniques. RAVEN has now increased in maturity enough for the Beta 1.0 release.

  20. Gas Release as a Deformation Signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Stephen J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Radiogenic noble gases are contained in crustal rock at inter and intra granular sites. The gas composition depends on lithology, geologic history, fluid phases, and the aging effect by decay of U, Th, and K. The isotopic signature of noble gases found in rocks is vastly different than that of the atmosphere which is contributed by a variety of sources. When rock is subjected to stress conditions exceeding about half its yield strength, micro-cracks begin to form. As rock deformation progresses a fracture network evolves, releasing trapped noble gases and changing the transport properties to gas migration. Thus, changes in gas emanation and noble gas composition from rocks could be used to infer changes in stress-state and deformation. The purpose of this study has been to evaluate the effect of deformation/strain rate upon noble gas release. Four triaxial experiments were attempted for a strain rate range of %7E10-8 /s (180,000s) to %7E 10-4/s (500s); the three fully successful experiments (at the faster strain rates) imply the following: (1) helium is measurably released for all strain rates during deformation, this release is in amounts 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than that present in the air, and (2) helium gas release increases with decreasing strain rate.

  1. Catalytic combustion in small wood burning appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oravainen, H. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    There is over a million hand fired small heating appliances in Finland where about 5,4 million cubic meters of wood fuel is used. Combustion in such heating appliances is a batch-type process. In early stages of combustion when volatiles are burned, the formation of carbon monoxide (CO) and other combustible gases are difficult to avoid when using fuels that have high volatile matter content. Harmful emissions are formed mostly after each fuel adding but also during char burnout period. When the CO-content in flue gases is, say over 0.5 %, also other harmful emissions will be formed. Methane (CH{sub 4}) and other hydrocarbons are released and the amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)-compounds can be remarkable. Some PAH-compounds are very carcinogenic. It has been estimated that in Finland even more than 90 % of hydrocarbon and PAH emissions are due to small scale wood combustion. Emissions from transportation is excluded from these figures. That is why wood combustion has a net effect on greenhouse gas phenomena. For example carbon monoxide emissions from small scale wood combustion are two fold compared to that of energy production in power plants. Methane emission is of the same order as emission from transportation and seven fold compared with those of energy production. Emissions from small heating appliances can be reduced by developing the combustion techniques, but also by using other means, for example catalytic converters. In certain stages of the batch combustion, temperature is not high enough, gas mixing is not good enough and residence time is too short for complete combustion. When placed to a suitable place inside a heating appliance, a catalytic converter can oxidize unburned gases in the flue gas into compounds that are not harmful to the environment. (3 refs.)

  2. Catalytic combustion in small wood burning appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oravainen, H [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    There is over a million hand fired small heating appliances in Finland where about 5,4 million cubic meters of wood fuel is used. Combustion in such heating appliances is a batch-type process. In early stages of combustion when volatiles are burned, the formation of carbon monoxide (CO) and other combustible gases are difficult to avoid when using fuels that have high volatile matter content. Harmful emissions are formed mostly after each fuel adding but also during char burnout period. When the CO-content in flue gases is, say over 0.5 %, also other harmful emissions will be formed. Methane (CH{sub 4}) and other hydrocarbons are released and the amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)-compounds can be remarkable. Some PAH-compounds are very carcinogenic. It has been estimated that in Finland even more than 90 % of hydrocarbon and PAH emissions are due to small scale wood combustion. Emissions from transportation is excluded from these figures. That is why wood combustion has a net effect on greenhouse gas phenomena. For example carbon monoxide emissions from small scale wood combustion are two fold compared to that of energy production in power plants. Methane emission is of the same order as emission from transportation and seven fold compared with those of energy production. Emissions from small heating appliances can be reduced by developing the combustion techniques, but also by using other means, for example catalytic converters. In certain stages of the batch combustion, temperature is not high enough, gas mixing is not good enough and residence time is too short for complete combustion. When placed to a suitable place inside a heating appliance, a catalytic converter can oxidize unburned gases in the flue gas into compounds that are not harmful to the environment. (3 refs.)

  3. Retro-Nasal Aroma Release Is Correlated with Variations in the In-Mouth Air Cavity Volume after Empty Deglutition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishellany-Dutour, Anne; Woda, Alain; Labouré, Hélène; Bourdiol, Pierre; Lachaze, Pauline; Guichard, Elisabeth; Feron, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesized that interindividual differences in motor activities during chewing and/or swallowing were determining factors for the transfer of volatile aroma from the in-mouth air cavity (IMAC) toward the olfactory mucosa. In our first experiment, we looked for changes in IMAC volume after saliva deglutition in 12 healthy subjects. The mean IMAC volume was measured after empty deglutition using an acoustic pharyngometer device. Based on the time course of the IMAC volume after swallowing, we discerned two groups of subjects. The first group displayed a small, constant IMAC volume (2.26 mL ±0.62) that corresponded to a high tongue position. The second group displayed a progressive increase in IMAC (from 6.82 mL ±2.37 to 22.82 mL ±3.04) that corresponded to a progressive lowering of the tongue to its resting position. In our second experiment, we investigated the relationship between IMAC volume changes after deglutition and the level of aroma release at the nostril. For this purpose, the release of menthone was measured at the nostril level in 25 subjects who consumed similar amounts of a mint tablet. The subjects were separated into two groups corresponding to two levels of menthone release: high (H) and low (L). The mean volume of IMAC was measured during and after empty deglutition. Group H displayed a small, constant amplitude of IMAC volume change after deglutition, while Group L displayed a progressive increase in IMAC. It is likely that Group H continuously released the aroma through the veloglossal isthmus as the mint was consumed, while Group L trapped the aroma in the oral cavity and then released it into the nasal cavity upon swallowing. These results show that the in vivo aroma release profile in humans depends closely on the different motor patterns at work during empty deglutition. PMID:22815986

  4. Retro-nasal aroma release is correlated with variations in the in-mouth air cavity volume after empty deglutition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Mishellany-Dutour

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that interindividual differences in motor activities during chewing and/or swallowing were determining factors for the transfer of volatile aroma from the in-mouth air cavity (IMAC toward the olfactory mucosa. In our first experiment, we looked for changes in IMAC volume after saliva deglutition in 12 healthy subjects. The mean IMAC volume was measured after empty deglutition using an acoustic pharyngometer device. Based on the time course of the IMAC volume after swallowing, we discerned two groups of subjects. The first group displayed a small, constant IMAC volume (2.26 mL ±0.62 that corresponded to a high tongue position. The second group displayed a progressive increase in IMAC (from 6.82 mL ±2.37 to 22.82 mL ±3.04 that corresponded to a progressive lowering of the tongue to its resting position. In our second experiment, we investigated the relationship between IMAC volume changes after deglutition and the level of aroma release at the nostril. For this purpose, the release of menthone was measured at the nostril level in 25 subjects who consumed similar amounts of a mint tablet. The subjects were separated into two groups corresponding to two levels of menthone release: high (H and low (L. The mean volume of IMAC was measured during and after empty deglutition. Group H displayed a small, constant amplitude of IMAC volume change after deglutition, while Group L displayed a progressive increase in IMAC. It is likely that Group H continuously released the aroma through the veloglossal isthmus as the mint was consumed, while Group L trapped the aroma in the oral cavity and then released it into the nasal cavity upon swallowing. These results show that the in vivo aroma release profile in humans depends closely on the different motor patterns at work during empty deglutition.

  5. Small Business and the Risk Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    This factsheet helps small businesses comply with the regulation requiring companies that use regulated substances, hazardous chemical such as ammonia and chlorine, to develop a risk management plan, to help prevent accidental toxic or flammable releases.

  6. Hydraulic release oil tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mims, M.G.; Mueller, M.D.; Ehlinger, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a hydraulic release tool. It comprises a setting assembly; a coupling member for coupling to drill string or petroleum production components, the coupling member being a plurality of sockets for receiving the dogs in the extended position and attaching the coupling member the setting assembly; whereby the setting assembly couples to the coupling member by engagement of the dogs in the sockets of releases from and disengages the coupling member in movement of the piston from its setting to its reposition in response to a pressure in the body in exceeding the predetermined pressure; and a relief port from outside the body into its bore and means to prevent communication between the relief port and the bore of the body axially of the piston when the piston is in the setting position and to establish such communication upon movement of the piston from the setting position to the release position and reduce the pressure in the body bore axially of the piston, whereby the reduction of the pressure signals that the tool has released the coupling member

  7. APASS Data Release 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henden, Arne A.; Levine, Stephen; Terrell, Dirk; Welch, Douglas L.; Munari, Ulisse; Kloppenborg, Brian K.

    2018-06-01

    The AAVSO Photometric All-Sky Survey (APASS) has been underway since 2010. This survey covers the entire sky from 7.5 knowledge of the optical train distortions. With these changes, DR10 includes many more stars than prior releases. We describe the survey, its remaining limitations, and prospects for the future, including a very-bright-star extension.

  8. Release the Prisoners Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hecke, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the mathematical approach of the optimal strategy to win the "Release the prisoners" game and the integration of this analysis in a math class. Outline lesson plans at three different levels are given, where simulations are suggested as well as theoretical findings about the probability distribution function and its mean…

  9. Small hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, K.; Tung, T.

    1995-01-01

    A small hydro plant in Canada is defined as any project between 1 MW and 15 MW but the international standard is 10 MW. The global market for small hydro development was considered good. There are some 1000 to 2000 MW of generating capacity being added each year. In Canada, growth potential is considered small, primarily in remote areas, but significant growth is anticipated in Eastern Europe, Africa and Asia. Canada with its expertise in engineering, manufacturing and development is considered to have a good chance to take advantage of these growing markets

  10. Nuclear operator. Liability amounts and financial security limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-07-01

    This paper gives, for numerous countries involved (or would be involved) in nuclear activities, financial information on the liability amount imposed on the operator, the amounts provided from public funds beyond the Operator's Liability Amount, to be made available by the State in whose territory the nuclear installation of the liable operator is situated, and the public funds contributed jointly by all the States parties to the BSC or CSC according to a pre-determined formula

  11. Minimizing lead release levels in secondary smelters slags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shenkler, E.S.; Graham, S.; Ghosh, R.; Greenhut, V.A.

    1991-01-01

    Five lead-containing slags and four mattes were analyzed to reveal microstructure, semi-quantitative microchemistry, and phases present. To determine if the slags could be incorporated as a glass so that lead release levels could be stabilized, glass batches were formulated based on slag compositions. Leaching tests showed that all materials that were fritted in a glass batch had lower lead release levels than non-adjusted materials, and all could satisfy EPA test requirements. The mole ratio of glass modifiers to glass formers played an important role in the extent of lead release. Small additions of phosphate to a batch had a significant effect on lowering lead release levels

  12. Radionuclide releases from natural analogues of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, D.B.; Fabryka-Martin, J.; Dixon, P.; Aguilar, R.; Rokop, D.; Cramer, J.

    1993-01-01

    Measures of 99 Tc, 129 I, 239 Pu and U concentrations in rock samples from uranium deposits at Cigar Lake and Koongarra have been used to study processes of radionuclide release from uranium minerals. Rates of release have been immeasurably slow at Cigar Lake. At Koongarra release rates appear to have been faster, producing small deficiencies of 99 Tc, and larger ones of 129 I. The inferred differences in radionuclide release rates are consistent with expected differences in uranium mineral degradation rates produced by the differing hydrogeochemical environments at the two sites

  13. Influence of the amount of collector on ion flotation of niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushakova, L.I.; Berezyuk, V.G.; Kasimov, A.M.

    1983-01-01

    Flotation methods based on chemical interaction of the metal ion to be extracted (colligend) with an oppositely charged surfactant ion (collector) are now attracting attention increasingly in purification of wastewaters. Extraction of small amounts of metals by flotation from industrial wastes provides solutions of problems associated with prevention of pollution of natural water supplies by toxic pollutants, and also with concentration of valuable elements for subsequent utilization. Niobium is one such metal, extraction of which from aqueous solutions is of considerable interest. The results of an experimental study of the influence of the amount of flotation reagent on ion flotation of niobates are discussed in this paper

  14. Microstructural effects in drug release by solid and cellular polymeric dosage forms: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaesi, Aron H; Saka, Nannaji

    2017-11-01

    In recent studies, we have introduced melt-processed polymeric cellular dosage forms to achieve both immediate drug release and predictable manufacture. Dosage forms ranging from minimally-porous solids to highly porous, open-cell and thin-walled structures were prepared, and the drug release characteristics investigated as the volume fraction of cells and the excipient molecular weight were varied. In the present study, both minimally-porous solid and cellular dosage forms consisting of various weight fractions of Acetaminophen drug and polyethylene glycol (PEG) excipient are prepared and analyzed. Microstructures of the solid forms and the cell walls range from single-phase solid solutions of the excipient and a small amount of drug molecules to two-phase composites of the excipient and tightly packed drug particles. Results of dissolution experiments show that the minimally-porous solid forms disintegrate and release drug by slow surface erosion. The erosion rate decreases as the drug weight fraction is increased. By contrast, the open-cell structures disintegrate rapidly by viscous exfoliation, and the disintegration time is independent of drug weight fraction. Drug release models suggest that the solid forms erode by convective mass transfer of the faster-eroding excipient if the drug volume fraction is small. At larger drug volume fractions, however, the slower-eroding drug particles hinder access of the free-flowing fluid to the excipient, thus slowing down erosion of the composite. Conversely, the disintegration rate of the cellular forms is limited by diffusion of the dissolution fluid into the excipient phase of the thin cell walls. Because the wall thickness is of the order of the drug particle size, and the particles are enveloped by the excipient during melt-processing, the drug particles cannot hinder diffusion through the excipient across the walls. Thus the disintegration time of the cellular forms is mostly unaffected by the volume fraction of drug

  15. CT and angiographic analysis of posterior communicating artery aneurysms: What factors influence the amount of subarachnoid blood?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Min; Jung, Kun Sik; Rho, Myung Ho; Choi, Pil Youb; Sung, Young Soon; Kwon, Jae Soo; Lee, Sang Wook

    1998-01-01

    To determine how clinical and angiographic factors relate to the amount of subarachnoid blood detected by computerized tomography in patients with a ruptured aneurysm. Between January 1996 and December 1997, 22 patients with a posterior communicating artery aneurysm were retrospectively evaluated. Oval(three of four cases), funnel(both cases), and daughter-sac (four of five cases) types of aneurysmal sac were found among the 13 patients with a large amount of subarachnoid blood;eight of these had a past history of hyertension or diabetes. Seven of eleven cases of cylindricaltype aneurysmal sac were found among the 9 patients with a small amount of sularachnoid blood;eight of these had no past history of hypertension or diabetes. The average S/N ratio (ratio of maximum sac length to neck diameter) of patients with a small amount of blood was higher than that of patients with a large amount of blood(2.72 vs 2.07). Although many factors influence the amount of subarachnoid blood in an aneurysmal rupture, we found that a large amount of blood was frequently present in the oval, funnel and daughter sac types of aneurysm, when S/N ratio was low, and when an underlying disease such as hypertension or diabetes was present. Conversely, a small amount of blood was present in the cylindrical type, when S/N ratio was high, and where there was no underlying disease.=20

  16. Source term estimation and the isotopic ratio of radioactive material released from the WIPP repository in New Mexico, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, P.

    2016-01-01

    After almost 15 years of operations, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) had one of its waste drums breach underground as a result of a runaway chemical reaction in the waste it contained. This incident occurred on February 14, 2014. Moderate levels of radioactivity were released into the underground air. A small portion of the contaminated underground air also escaped to the surface through the ventilation system and was detected approximately 1 km away from the facility. According to the source term estimation, the actual amount of radioactivity released from the WIPP site was less than 1.5 mCi. The highest activity detected on the surface was 115.2 μBq/m 3 for 241 Am and 10.2 μBq/m 3 for 239+240 Pu at a sampling station located 91 m away from the underground air exhaust point and 81.4 μBq/m 3 of 241 Am and 5.8 μBq/m 3 of 239+240 Pu at a monitoring station located approximately 1 km northwest of the WIPP facility. The dominant radionuclides released were americium and plutonium, in a ratio that matches the content of the breached drum. Air monitoring across the WIPP site intensified following the first reports of radiation detection underground to determine the extent of impact to WIPP personnel, the public, and the environment. In this paper, the early stage monitoring data collected by an independent monitoring program conducted by the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring & Research Center (CEMRC) and an oversight monitoring program conducted by the WIPP's management and operating contractor, the Nuclear Waste Partnership (NWP) LLC were utilized to estimate the actual amount of radioactivity released from the WIPP underground. The Am and Pu isotope ratios were measured and used to support the hypothesis that the release came from one drum identified as having breached that represents a specific waste stream with this radionuclide ratio in its inventory. This failed drum underwent a heat and gas producing reaction that overpowered its vent and

  17. Controlled release system for ametryn using polymer microspheres: Preparation, characterization and release kinetics in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grillo, Renato; Pereira, Anderson do Espirito Santo; Ferreira Silva de Melo, Nathalie; Porto, Raquel Martins; Feitosa, Leandro Oliveira; Tonello, Paulo Sergio; Dias Filho, Newton L.; Rosa, Andre Henrique; Lima, Renata; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a modified release system for the herbicide ametryn by encapsulating the active substance in biodegradable polymer microparticles produced using the polymers poly(hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) or poly(hydroxybutyrate-valerate) (PHBV), in order to both improve the herbicidal action and reduce environmental toxicity. PHB or PHBV microparticles containing ametryn were prepared and the efficiencies of herbicide association and loading were evaluated, presenting similar values of approximately 40%. The microparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which showed that the average sizes of the PHB and PHBV microparticles were 5.92 ± 0.74 μm and 5.63 ± 0.68 μm, respectively. The ametryn release profile was modified when it was encapsulated in the microparticles, with slower and more sustained release compared to the release profile of pure ametryn. When ametryn was associated with the PHB and PHBV microparticles, the amount of herbicide released in the same period of time was significantly reduced, declining to 75% and 87%, respectively. For both types of microparticle (PHB and PHBV) the release of ametryn was by diffusion processes due to anomalous transport (governed by diffusion and relaxation of the polymer chains), which did not follow Fick's laws of diffusion. The results presented in this paper are promising, in view of the successful encapsulation of ametryn in PHB or PHBV polymer microparticles, and indications that this system may help reduce the impacts caused by the herbicide, making it an environmentally safer alternative.

  18. On–off switch-controlled doxorubicin release from thermo- and pH-responsive coated bimagnetic nanocarriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammad, Mohaned; Nica, Valentin; Hempelmann, Rolf, E-mail: r.hempelmann@mx.uni-saarland.de [Saarland University, Department of Physical Chemistry (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    A switch-controlled drug release system is designed by coating of core/shell bimagnetic nanoparticles with a pH- and thermo-responsive polymer shell, which can be used as hyperthermic agent, drug carrier, and for controlled release. Doxorubicin is loaded onto the surface of the last coating layer, and a high loading efficiency of 90.5 % is obtained. The nanocarriers are characterized by FTIR, dynamic light scattering, Zeta potential, TEM, In vitro hyperthermia, and vibrating sample magnetometry. The core/shell magnetic nanoparticles (Zn{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}@Zn{sub 0.4}Mn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) exhibit a superparamagnetic behavior with a saturation magnetization around 45.6 emu/g and a high specific absorption rate of up to 360 W/g. The in vitro drug release experiments confirm that only a small amount of doxorubicin is released at body temperature and physiological pH, whereas a high drug release is obtained at acidic tumor pH under hyperthermia conditions (43 °C). The functionalized core/shell bimagnetic nanocarriers facilitate controllable release of doxorubicin as an effect of induced thermo- and pH-responsiveness of the polymer when are subjected to a high-frequency alternating magnetic field at acidic pH; thereby the drug release rate is controlled using on–off cycles of the applied field.Graphical Abstract.

  19. Heat release rate from the combustion of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solbrig, C.W.

    1995-01-01

    Fuel treatment is planned at the Argonne National Laboratory on EBR-II spent fuel. The electrochemical treatment process is carried out in a cell with an argon atmosphere to prevent any reaction. The amount of fuel processed at any time is limited by the amount of energy which could be released by metal combustion if air is inadvertently allowed into the cell since the heat release would increase the cell pressure. The cell pressure is required to be below atmospheric even if combustion occurs to ensure no cell gas/aerosol is released to the environment. Metal fires can release large amounts of heat. In certain configurations such as fine particulate, metal can be pyrophoric at room temperature. When the metal is a nuclear fuel, it is important to be able to predict the reaction/heat release rate if the metal is inadvertently exposed to air. A realistic combustion model is needed to predict heat release rates for the many different flow and transport configurations which exist in the various fuel processing steps. A model for the combustion of uranium is developed here which compares satisfactorily to experimental data

  20. Influence of environmental factors on mercury release in hydroelectric reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, K.; Therien, N.

    1991-04-01

    Due to increased mercury concentrations in fish in hydro-electric reservoirs after flooding, a study was carried out to evaluate the release and transformation of mercury due to vegetation and soil flooded as a result of reservoir creation. Samples of vegetation and soils were immersed in water and concentrations of total mercury, methylmercury and nutrients were followed. The effects of anoxia, pH and temperature on release and transformation were examined. An existing dynamic model of decomposition of flooded materials in reservoirs was modified to include mercury release and transformation, and was calibrated to the experimental data. Amounts of mercury released by the different substrates was of the same order of magnitude. Tree species contributed to the greatest amounts of methylmercury per unit biomass, but the biomass used for these was twigs and foliage. Soil released significant amounts of mercury, but methylation was very low. The model was able to fit well for all substrates except lichen. The model can be adapted to proposed reservoirs to predict nutrient and mecury release and transformation. 175 refs., 38 figs., 38 tabs.

  1. 5 CFR 870.704 - Amount of Option A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Amount of Option A. 870.704 Section 870... of Option A. (a) The amount of Option A coverage an annuitant or compensationer can continue is $10,000. (b) An annuitant's or compensationer's Option A coverage reduces by 2 percent of the original...

  2. 24 CFR 232.565 - Maximum loan amount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES MORTGAGE INSURANCE FOR NURSING HOMES, INTERMEDIATE CARE FACILITIES, BOARD AND CARE HOMES, AND ASSISTED... Fire Safety Equipment Eligible Security Instruments § 232.565 Maximum loan amount. The principal amount...

  3. 39 CFR 601.111 - Interest on claim amounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... that date is later, until the date of payment. Simple interest will be paid at the rate established by... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interest on claim amounts. 601.111 Section 601.111... PROPERTY RIGHTS OTHER THAN PATENTS PURCHASING OF PROPERTY AND SERVICES § 601.111 Interest on claim amounts...

  4. 22 CFR 226.73 - Collection of amounts due.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Collection of amounts due. 226.73 Section 226.73 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION OF ASSISTANCE AWARDS TO U.S. NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS After-the-Award Requirements § 226.73 Collection of amounts due. (a...

  5. Potentiometric determination of milligram amounts of uranium by semiautomatic titrator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryzhinskij, M.V.; Stepanov, A.V.; Preobrazhenskaya, L.D.; Solntseva, L.F.; Gromova, E.A.

    1978-01-01

    A semiautomatic titrator is described which allows gravimetriotentiometricc-p titrat mg amounts of substances. Milligram amounts of uranium (absolute contents and oxygen/uranium ratio) in U 3 O 8 were determined as an example of the titrator action. The relative standard deviation was less than 0.001

  6. 12 CFR 209.4 - Amounts and payments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... CANCELLATION OF FEDERAL RESERVE BANK CAPITAL STOCK (REGULATION I) § 209.4 Amounts and payments. (a) Amount of... lesser of 15 percent or 100 shares of its Reserve Bank capital stock, it shall file with the appropriate Reserve Bank an application for issue or cancellation of Reserve Bank capital stock in order to adjust its...

  7. 45 CFR 1225.11 - Amount of attorney fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Amount of attorney fees. 1225.11 Section 1225.11... § 1225.11 Amount of attorney fees. (a) When a decision of the agency provides for an award of attorney's fees or costs, the complainant's attorney shall submit a verified statement of costs and attorney's...

  8. 46 CFR 282.20 - Amount of subsidy payable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Rates. Daily ODS rates shall be used to quantify the amount of ODS payable. The daily ODS rate... items is the daily amount of ODS payable for approved vessel operating days, excluding reduced crew... the daily wage ODS rate to conform to the complement remaining on the vessel. The man-day reduction...

  9. 29 CFR 530.302 - Amounts of civil money penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amounts of civil money penalties. 530.302 Section 530.302... EMPLOYMENT OF HOMEWORKERS IN CERTAIN INDUSTRIES Civil Money Penalties § 530.302 Amounts of civil money penalties. (a) A civil money penalty, not to exceed $500 per affected homeworker for any one violation, may...

  10. 42 CFR 438.704 - Amounts of civil money penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Amounts of civil money penalties. 438.704 Section... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Sanctions § 438.704 Amounts of civil money penalties. (a) General rule. The limit on, or the maximum civil money penalty the State may impose varies...

  11. 20 CFR 362.12 - Computation of amount of reimbursement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Computation of amount of reimbursement. 362.12 Section 362.12 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION, POLICY AND... the cost of repair is the amount payable. (b) Depreciation in value of an item of personal property is...

  12. 28 CFR 70.73 - Collection of amounts due.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Collection of amounts due. 70.73 Section 70.73 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS... OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS After-the-Award Requirements § 70.73 Collection of amounts due. (a) Any...

  13. Preparation and Evaluation of Oxaliplatin Thermosensitive Liposomes with Rapid Release and High Stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunying Zeng

    Full Text Available Oxaliplatin (OXP was reported to show low anti-tumor activity when used alone and to display side effects; this low activity was attributed to high partitioning to erythrocytes and low accumulation in tumors. Thermosensitive liposomes (TSL were considered able to specifically deliver drugs to heated tumors and to resolve the OXP distribution problem. Regretfully, TSL encapsulating doxorubicin did not demonstrate significant improvement in progression-free survival. Drug release below 41°C and significant leakage were considered major reasons for the failure. The purpose of this study was to acquire OXP TSL with rapid release at the triggered temperature and high stability at body temperature and at storage temperatures. A small quantity of poloxamer 188 was introduced into the TSL formulation to stabilize the encapsulated drug. It was shown that the addition of poloxamer 188 had no influence on the TSL characteristics. More than 90% of OXP was released within 10 min at 42°C, and less than 15% was released within 60 min at temperatures below 39°C. TSL were stable at 37°C for 96 h and at 4°C for 6 months. The anti-tumor activity of TSL at the dose of 2.5 mg/kg was certified to be equal to those of OXP injection and non-thermosensitive liposomes (NTSL at the dose of 5 mg/kg, and significant improvement of tumor inhibition was observed in TSL compared with injection and NTSL at the same dose. It was also shown from the histological transmutation of tumors that TSL had stronger anti-tumor activity. Therefore, it could be concluded that TSL composed of a proper amount of poloxamer had rapid release and high stability, and OXP TSL would be anticipated to exert prominent anti-tumor activity in the clinic.

  14. Release of nitrogen precursors from coal and biomass residues in a bubbling fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Abelha; I. Gulyurtlu; I. Cabrita [Instituto Nacional de Engenharia, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2008-01-15

    This work was undertaken with the aim of quantifying the relative amounts of NH{sub 3} and HCN released from different residues during their devolatilization under fluidized bed conditions. The results were compared with data collected for bituminous coals of different origin. The relation between amounts of HCN and NH{sub 3} released and the levels of NOX and N{sub 2}O formed during cocombustion was also addressed. The partitioning of nitrogen between volatiles and char was also quantified. The pyrolysis studies were undertaken in a small fluidized bed reactor of 80 mm of ID and 500 mm high using an inert atmosphere (N{sub 2}). The HCN and NH{sub 3} were quantified by bubbling the pyrolysis gases in absorbing solutions which were subsequently analyzed with selective electrodes. The combustion studies were carried out on a pilot installation. The fluidized bed combustor is square in cross section with each side being 300 mm long. There is secondary air supply to the freeboard at different heights to deal with high volatile fuels as almost all waste materials are. The temperatures in the bed and in the freeboard and that of the flue gases leaving the reactor were continuously monitored. The results obtained suggest that, while coal releases nitrogen mostly as HCN, residues like RDF and sewage sludge give out fuel-N in greater quantities as NH{sub 3}. Residues at fluidized bed combustion (FBC) temperatures release more than 80% of the fuel-N with the volatiles. The NH{sub 3} evolved during pyrolysis acted as a reducing agent on NOX emissions. The presence of calcium significantly reduces the emission of N{sub 2}O probably by interfering with HCN chemistry. With high amounts of residues in the fuel mixture, the relative importance of char on the nitrogen chemistry substantially decreases. By using cocombustion, it is possible to reduce fuel-N conversion to NOX and N{sub 2}O, by tuning the amounts of coal and residue in the mixture. 29 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Sullivan, T.J.

    1983-02-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) project is a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored real-time emergency response service available for use by both federal and state agencies in case of a potential or actual atmospheric release of nuclear material. The project, initiated in 1972, is currently evolving from the research and development phase to full operation. Plans are underway to expand the existing capability to continuous operation by 1984 and to establish a National ARAC Center (NARAC) by 1988. This report describes the ARAC system, its utilization during the past two years, and plans for its expansion during the next five to six years. An integral part of this expansion is due to a very important and crucial effort sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency to extend the ARAC service to approximately 45 Department of Defense (DOD) sites throughout the continental US over the next three years

  16. Border cell release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mravec, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    Plant border cells are specialised cells derived from the root cap with roles in the biomechanics of root growth and in forming a barrier against pathogens. The mechanism of highly localised cell separation which is essential for their release to the environment is little understood. Here I present...... in situ analysis of Brachypodium distachyon, a model organism for grasses which possess type II primary cell walls poor in pectin content. Results suggest similarity in spatial dynamics of pectic homogalacturonan during dicot and monocot border cell release. Integration of observations from different...... species leads to the hypothesis that this process most likely does not involve degradation of cell wall material but rather employs unique cell wall structural and compositional means enabling both the rigidity of the root cap as well as detachability of given cells on its surface....

  17. Energy released in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, M.F.

    1969-05-01

    The effective energy released in and following the fission of U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 by thermal neutrons, and of U-238 by fission spectrum neutrons, is discussed. The recommended values are: U-235 ... 192.9 ± 0.5 MeV/fission; U-238 ... 193.9 ± 0.8 MeV/fission; Pu-239 ... 198.5 ± 0.8 MeV/fission; Pu-241 ... 200.3 ± 0.8 MeV/fission. These values include all contributions except from antineutrinos and very long-lived fission products. The detailed contributions are discussed, and inconsistencies in the experimental data are pointed out. In Appendix A, the contribution to the total useful energy release in a reactor from reactions other than fission are discussed briefly, and in Appendix B there is a discussion of the variations in effective energy from fission with incident neutron energy. (author)

  18. Helium release from radioisotope heat sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, D.E.; Early, J.W.; Starzynski, J.S.; Land, C.C.

    1984-05-01

    Diffusion of helium in /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ fuel was characterized as a function of the heating rate and the fuel microstructure. The samples were thermally ramped in an induction furnace and the helium release rates measured with an automated mass spectrometer. The diffusion constants and activation energies were obtained from the data using a simple diffusion model. The release rates of helium were correlated with the fuel microstructure by metallographic examination of fuel samples. The release mechanism consists of four regimes, which are dependent upon the temperature. Initially, the release is controlled by movement of point defects combined with trapping along grain boundaries. This regime is followed by a process dominated by formation and growth of helium bubbles along grain boundaries. The third regime involves volume diffusion controlled by movement of oxygen vacancies. Finally, the release at the highest temperatures follows the diffusion rate of intragranular bubbles. The tendency for helium to be trapped within the grain boundaries diminishes with small grain sizes, slow thermal pulses, and older fuel.

  19. Helium release from radioisotope heat sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, D.E.; Early, J.W.; Starzynski, J.S.; Land, C.C.

    1984-05-01

    Diffusion of helium in 238 PuO 2 fuel was characterized as a function of the heating rate and the fuel microstructure. The samples were thermally ramped in an induction furnace and the helium release rates measured with an automated mass spectrometer. The diffusion constants and activation energies were obtained from the data using a simple diffusion model. The release rates of helium were correlated with the fuel microstructure by metallographic examination of fuel samples. The release mechanism consists of four regimes, which are dependent upon the temperature. Initially, the release is controlled by movement of point defects combined with trapping along grain boundaries. This regime is followed by a process dominated by formation and growth of helium bubbles along grain boundaries. The third regime involves volume diffusion controlled by movement of oxygen vacancies. Finally, the release at the highest temperatures follows the diffusion rate of intragranular bubbles. The tendency for helium to be trapped within the grain boundaries diminishes with small grain sizes, slow thermal pulses, and older fuel

  20. Released air during vapor and air cavitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jablonská, Jana, E-mail: jana.jablonska@vsb.cz; Kozubková, Milada, E-mail: milada.kozubkova@vsb.cz [VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Hydromechanics and Hydraulic Equipment, 17. listopadu 15, 708 33 Ostrava-Poruba (Czech Republic)

    2016-06-30

    Cavitation today is a very important problem that is solved by means of experimental and mathematical methods. The article deals with the generation of cavitation in convergent divergent nozzle of rectangular cross section. Measurement of pressure, flow rate, temperature, amount of dissolved air in the liquid and visualization of cavitation area using high-speed camera was performed for different flow rates. The measurement results were generalized by dimensionless analysis, which allows easy detection of cavitation in the nozzle. For numerical simulation the multiphase mathematical model of cavitation consisting of water and vapor was created. During verification the disagreement with the measurements for higher flow rates was proved, therefore the model was extended to multiphase mathematical model (water, vapor and air), due to release of dissolved air. For the mathematical modeling the multiphase turbulence RNG k-ε model for low Reynolds number flow with vapor and air cavitation was used. Subsequently the sizes of the cavitation area were verified. In article the inlet pressure and loss coefficient depending on the amount of air added to the mathematical model are evaluated. On the basis of the approach it may be create a methodology to estimate the amount of released air added at the inlet to the modeled area.

  1. EIA new releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration. It contains news releases on items of interest to the petroleum, coal, nuclear, electric and alternate fuels industries ranging from economic outlooks to environmental concerns. There is also a listing of reports by industry and an energy education resource listing containing sources for free or low-cost energy-related educational materials for educators and primary and secondary students

  2. Atmospheric release advisory capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, T.J.

    1981-01-01

    The ARAC system (Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability) is described. The system is a collection of people, computers, computer models, topographic data and meteorological input data that together permits a calculation of, in a quasi-predictive sense, where effluent from an accident will migrate through the atmosphere, where it will be deposited on the ground, and what instantaneous and integrated dose an exposed individual would receive

  3. An experimental test of the habitat-amount hypothesis for saproxylic beetles in a forested region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibold, Sebastian; Bässler, Claus; Brandl, Roland; Fahrig, Lenore; Förster, Bernhard; Heurich, Marco; Hothorn, Torsten; Scheipl, Fabian; Thorn, Simon; Müller, Jörg

    2017-06-01

    The habitat-amount hypothesis challenges traditional concepts that explain species richness within habitats, such as the habitat-patch hypothesis, where species number is a function of patch size and patch isolation. It posits that effects of patch size and patch isolation are driven by effects of sample area, and thus that the number of species at a site is basically a function of the total habitat amount surrounding this site. We tested the habitat-amount hypothesis for saproxylic beetles and their habitat of dead wood by using an experiment comprising 190 plots with manipulated patch sizes situated in a forested region with a high variation in habitat amount (i.e., density of dead trees in the surrounding landscape). Although dead wood is a spatio-temporally dynamic habitat, saproxylic insects have life cycles shorter than the time needed for habitat turnover and they closely track their resource. Patch size was manipulated by adding various amounts of downed dead wood to the plots (~800 m³ in total); dead trees in the surrounding landscape (~240 km 2 ) were identified using airborne laser scanning (light detection and ranging). Over 3 yr, 477 saproxylic species (101,416 individuals) were recorded. Considering 20-1,000 m radii around the patches, local landscapes were identified as having a radius of 40-120 m. Both patch size and habitat amount in the local landscapes independently affected species numbers without a significant interaction effect, hence refuting the island effect. Species accumulation curves relative to cumulative patch size were not consistent with either the habitat-patch hypothesis or the habitat-amount hypothesis: several small dead-wood patches held more species than a single large patch with an amount of dead wood equal to the sum of that of the small patches. Our results indicate that conservation of saproxylic beetles in forested regions should primarily focus on increasing the overall amount of dead wood without considering its

  4. Highly Controlled Diffusion Drug Release from Ureasil-Poly(ethylene oxide)-Na+-Montmorillonite Hybrid Hydrogel Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, Celso R N; Molina, Eduardo F; Pulcinelli, Sandra H; Santilli, Celso V

    2018-06-06

    In this work, we report the effects of incorporation of variable amounts (1-20 wt %) of sodium montmorillonite (MMT) into a siloxane-poly(ethylene oxide) hybrid hydrogel prepared by the sol-gel route. The aim was to control the nanostructural features of the nanocomposite, improve the release profile of the sodium diclofenac (SDCF) drug, and optimize the swelling behavior of the hydrophilic matrix. The nanoscopic characteristics of the siloxane-cross-linked poly(ethylene oxide) network, the semicrystallinity of the hybrid, and the intercalated or exfoliated structure of the clay were investigated by X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering, and differential scanning calorimetry. The correlation between the nanoscopic features of nanocomposites containing different amounts of MMT and the swelling behavior revealed the key role of exfoliated silicate in controlling the water uptake by means of a flow barrier effect. The release of the drug from the nanocomposite displayed a stepped pattern kinetically controlled by the diffusion of SDCF molecules through the mass transport barrier created by the exfoliated silicate. The sustained SDCF release provided by the hybrid hydrogel nanocomposite could be useful for the prolonged treatment of painful conditions, such as arthritis, sprains and strains, gout, migraine, and pain after surgical procedures.

  5. Contact: Releasing the news

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinotti, Roberto

    The problem of mass behavior after man's future contacts with other intelligences in the universe is not only a challenge for social scientists and political leaders all over the world, but also a cultural time bomb as well. In fact, since the impact of CETI (Contact with Extraterrestrial Intelligence) on human civilization, with its different cultures, might cause a serious socio-anthropological shock, a common and predetermined worldwide strategy is necessary in releasing the news after the contact, in order to keep possible manifestations of fear, panic and hysteria under control. An analysis of past studies in this field and of parallel historical situations as analogs suggests a definite "authority crisis" in the public as a direct consequence of an unexpected release of the news, involving a devastating "chain reaction" process (from both the psychological and sociological viewpoints) of anomie and maybe the collapse of today's society. The only way to prevent all this is to prepare the world's public opinion concerning contact before releasing the news, and to develop a long-term strategy through the combined efforts of scientists, political leaders, intelligence agencies and the mass media, in order to create the cultural conditions in which a confrontation with ETI won't affect mankind in a traumatic way. Definite roles and tasks in this multi-level model are suggested.

  6. Fluoride and sodium trimetaphosphate (TMP release from fluoride varnishes supplemented with TMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Mauricio MANARELLI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study assessed fluoride (F and sodium trimetaphosphate (TMP release into artificial saliva from varnishes containing 0%, 2.5%, and 5% NaF, supplemented or not with 5% TMP. The varnishes were applied on polyester sheets (n = 8/group, and F and TMP released into artificial saliva were measured for up to 24 hours. The amount of F and TMP released were directly related to NaF and TMP concentrations in the varnishes. The highest F release was seen for 5% NaF and 5% NaF + 5% TMP, whereas 5% TMP released the highest amount of TMP. However, the simultaneous addition of NaF and TMP to varnishes significantly reduced the amount of F and TMP released from the products.

  7. Noble Gas Release Signal as a Precursor to Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, S. J.; Lee, H.; Gardner, W. P.

    2017-12-01

    We present empirical results of rock strain, microfracturing, acoustic emissions, and noble gas release from laboratory triaxial experiments for a granite, basalt, shale and bedded rock salt. Noble gases are released and measured real-time during deformation using mass spectrometry. The gas release represents a precursive signal to macrofracture. Gas release is associated with increased acoustic emissions indicating that microfracturing is required to release gas and create pathways for the gas to be sensed. The gas released depends on initial gas content, pore structure and its evolution during deformation, the deformation amount, matrix permeability, deformation style and the stress/strain history. Gases are released from inter and intracrystalline sites; release rate increases as strain and microfracturing increases. The gas composition depends on lithology, geologic history and age, fluids present, and radioisotope concentrations that affect radiogenic noble gas isotope (e.g. 4He,40Ar) production. Noble gas emission and its relationship to crustal processes such as seismicity and volcanism, tectonic velocities, qualitative estimates of deep permeability, age dating of groundwater, and a signature of nuclear weapon detonation. Our result show that mechanical deformation of crustal materials is an important process controlling gas release from rocks and minerals, and should be considered in techniques which utilize gas release and/or accumulation. We propose using noble gas release to signal rock deformation in boreholes, mines and waste repositories. We postulate each rock exhibits a gas release signature which is microstructure, stress, strain, and/or permanent deformation dependent. Calibration of such relationships, for example relating gas release per rock unit volume to strain may be used to quantify rock deformation and develop predictive models.Sandia National Laboratories is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and

  8. Improved antimicrobial property and controlled drug release kinetics of silver sulfadiazine loaded ordered mesoporous silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Jangra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the loading of silver sulfadiazine into ordered mesoporous silica material by post-impregnation method and its effect on the in vitro release kinetics and antimicrobial property of the drug. The formulated SBA-15 silica material with rope-like morphology and SBA-15-silver sulfadiazine (SBA-AgSD were characterized by UV–visible spectrophotometer, small and wide-angle powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD, field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM. Thermo-gravimetric analysis of SBA-AgSD revealed a high loading amount of 52.87%. Nitrogen adsorption–desorption analysis confirmed the drug entrapment into host material by revealing a reduced surface area (214 m2/g and pore diameter (6.7 nm of the SBA-AgSD. The controlled release of silver sulfadiazine drug from the mesoporous silica to simulated gastric, intestinal and body fluids was evaluated. The Korsmeyer–Peppas model fits the drug release data with the non-Fickian diffusion model and zero order kinetics of SBA-AgSD. The antibacterial performance of the SBA-AgSD was evaluated with respect to Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The controlled drug delivery of the SBA-AgSD revealed improved antibacterial activity, thus endorsing its applicability in effective wound dressing.

  9. NEAMS Software Licensing, Release, and Distribution: Implications for FY2013 Work Package Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernholdt, David E.

    2012-01-01

    The vision of the NEAMS program is to bring truly predictive modeling and simulation (M and S) capabilities to the nuclear engineering community in order to enable a new approach to the analysis of nuclear systems. NEAMS anticipates issuing in FY 2018 a full release of its computational 'Fermi Toolkit' aimed at advanced reactor and fuel cycles. The NEAMS toolkit involves extensive software development activities, some of which have already been underway for several years, however, the Advanced Modeling and Simulation Office (AMSO), which sponsors the NEAMS program, has not yet issued any official guidance regarding software licensing, release, and distribution policies. This motivated an FY12 task in the Capability Transfer work package to develop and recommend an appropriate set of policies. The current preliminary report is intended to provide awareness of issues with implications for work package planning for FY13. We anticipate a small amount of effort associated with putting into place formal licenses and contributor agreements for NEAMS software which doesn't already have them. We do not anticipate any additional effort or costs associated with software release procedures or schedules beyond those dictated by the quality expectations for the software. The largest potential costs we anticipate would be associated with the setup and maintenance of shared code repositories for development and early access to NEAMS software products. We also anticipate an opportunity, with modest associated costs, to work with the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) to clarify export control assessment policies for software under development.

  10. IL-10 release by bovine epithelial cells cultured with Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Chaves Vilela

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus are parasitic protists of the human and bovine urogenital tracts, respectively. Several studies have described the cytotoxic effects of trichomonads on urogenital tract epithelial cells. However, little is known about the host cell response against trichomonads. The aim of this study was to determine whether T. foetus and T. vaginalis stimulated the release of the cytokine interleukin (IL-10 from cultured bovine epithelial cells. To characterise the inflammatory response induced by these parasites, primary cultures of bovine oviduct epithelial cells were exposed to either T. vaginalis or T. foetus. Within 12 h after parasite challenge, supernatants were collected and cytokine production was analysed. Large amounts of IL-10 were detected in the supernatants of cultures that had been stimulated with T. foetus. Interestingly, T. vaginalis induced only a small increase in the release of IL-10 upon exposure to the same bovine cells. Thus, the inflammatory response of the host cell is species-specific. Only T. foetus and not T. vaginalis induced the release of IL-10 by bovine oviduct epithelial cells.

  11. Radioactivity: ''small users, big problems''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonnell, C.

    1993-01-01

    In the United Kingdom there are at least one thousand small users of radioactivity in industry, in medicine, in higher education establishments and even schools. These users of small amounts of radioactivity, covering a wide variety of forms and applications, have difficulty in disposing of their wastes. Disposal provisions for users outside the nuclear industry, the practical problems they encounter and the future developments likely are discussed. (UK)

  12. Protecting privacy in data release

    CERN Document Server

    Livraga, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive approach to protecting sensitive information when large data collections are released by their owners. It addresses three key requirements of data privacy: the protection of data explicitly released, the protection of information not explicitly released but potentially vulnerable due to a release of other data, and the enforcement of owner-defined access restrictions to the released data. It is also the first book with a complete examination of how to enforce dynamic read and write access authorizations on released data, applicable to the emerging data outsou

  13. Triggered Release from Polymer Capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esser-Kahn, Aaron P. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry; Odom, Susan A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry; Sottos, Nancy R. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; White, Scott R. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Aerospace Engineering; Moore, Jeffrey S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry

    2011-07-06

    Stimuli-responsive capsules are of interest in drug delivery, fragrance release, food preservation, and self-healing materials. Many methods are used to trigger the release of encapsulated contents. Here we highlight mechanisms for the controlled release of encapsulated cargo that utilize chemical reactions occurring in solid polymeric shell walls. Triggering mechanisms responsible for covalent bond cleavage that result in the release of capsule contents include chemical, biological, light, thermal, magnetic, and electrical stimuli. We present methods for encapsulation and release, triggering methods, and mechanisms and conclude with our opinions on interesting obstacles for chemically induced activation with relevance for controlled release.

  14. REGIONAL DIFFERENCES IN THE AMOUNTS OF SINGLE AREA PAYMENT SCHEME IN AGRICULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Teszbir

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the causes of regional variation in the direct payments. The publication data has been used from ARiMR, publications which spans the time included the amount of subsidies paid throughout the post-accession period. Both at national and regional level, the total amount of payments increased from year to year, average 10%, which was connected to the principle phasing in. The amount of aid received by individual regions and individual farms varied widely, which had a direct relationship with the agrarian structure and the average total area of farms in these areas. The bigger number of small farms, as well as the smaller average total surface area of a single voivodeship, the lower sum of the payments.

  15. Determination of nanogram amounts of iodide by electrochemical isotope dilution analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabrielsson, A.-B.; Beronius, P.

    1976-01-01

    A known quantity of iodide in ethanol as solvent was labelled with 131 I-and subsequently diluted with a predetermined amount of inactive iodide. Specific activities before and after the isotope dilution were established by anodically depositing small fractions of the halide in each sample on rotating silver micro electrodes and determining the activities of the electrodeposits. The lowest concentration of iodide used in any analysis was 1.10 -5 M. Further deposition studies revealed that iodide can be deposited with 1 100% current efficiency on the rotating silver micro electrode for concentration down to 2.4.10 -6 M. Electrodeposition studies for still lower concentrations have not yet been undertaken. These results suggest that amounts of iodide ion down to about 10 ng, and possibly still smaller quantitites, might be determined with the method developed. Amounts from 42 ng to 1 μg can be determined with an error of 2.5%. (T.G.)

  16. Metal release from coffee machines and electric kettles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Frederic D; Hackethal, Christin; Schmidt, Roman; Kappenstein, Oliver; Pfaff, Karla; Luch, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The release of elemental ions from 8 coffee machines and 11 electric kettles into food simulants was investigated. Three different types of coffee machines were tested: portafilter espresso machines, pod machines and capsule machines. All machines were tested subsequently on 3 days before and on 3 days after decalcification. Decalcification of the machines was performed with agents according to procedures as specified in the respective manufacturer's manuals. The electric kettles showed only a low release of the elements analysed. For the coffee machines decreasing concentrations of elements were found from the first to the last sample taken in the course of 1 day. Metal release on consecutive days showed a decreasing trend as well. After decalcification a large increase in the amounts of elements released was encountered. In addition, the different machine types investigated clearly differed in their extent of element release. By far the highest leaching, both quantitatively and qualitatively, was found for the portafilter machines. With these products releases of Pb, Ni, Mn, Cr and Zn were in the range and beyond the release limits as proposed by the Council of Europe. Therefore, a careful rinsing routine, especially after decalcification, is recommended for these machines. The comparably lower extent of release of one particular portafilter machine demonstrates that metal release at levels above the threshold that triggers health concerns are technically avoidable.

  17. 26 CFR 1.465-20 - Treatment of amounts borrowed from certain persons and amounts protected against loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... not increase the taxpayer's amount at risk because they are borrowed from a person who has an interest in the activity other than that of a creditor or from a person who is related to a person (other than the taxpayer) who has an interest in the activity other than that of a creditor; and (2) Amounts...

  18. Influence of social norms and palatability on amount consumed and food choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliner, Patricia; Mann, Nikki

    2004-04-01

    In two parallel studies, we examined the effect of social influence and palatability on amount consumed and on food choice. In Experiment 1, which looked at amount consumed, participants were provided with either palatable or unpalatable food; they were also given information about how much previous participants had eaten (large or small amounts) or were given no information. In the case of palatable food, participants ate more when led to believe that prior participants had eaten a great deal than when led to believe that prior participants had eaten small amounts or when provided with no information. This social-influence effect was not present when participants received unpalatable food. In Experiment 2, which looked at food choice, some participants learned that prior participants had chosen the palatable food, others learned that prior participants had chosen the unpalatable food, while still others received no information about prior participants' choices. The social-influence manipulation had no effect on participants' food choices; nearly all of them chose the palatable food. The results were discussed in the context of Churchfield's (1995) distinction between judgments about matters of fact and judgments about preferences. The results were also used to illustrate the importance of palatability as a determinant of eating behavior.

  19. Small radioisotope powered batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myatt, J.

    1975-06-01

    Various methods of converting the large amounts of energy stored in radioisotopes are described. These are based on:- (a) the Seebeck effect; (b) thermionic emission of electrons from a hot body; (c) the Stirling Cycle; and (d) radiovoltaic charge separation in 'p-n' junctions. Small generators in the range 0 to 100 W(e) developed using these effects are described and typical applications for each of these systems are given. These include data collection and transmission from remote sites, implantable medical devices, lighthouses, radio beacons, and space power supplies. (author)

  20. Diclofenac sodium sustained release hot melt extruded lipid matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vithani, K; Cuppok, Y; Mostafa, S; Slipper, I J; Snowden, M J; Douroumis, D

    2014-08-01

    Sustained release diclofenac sodium (Df-Na) solid lipid matrices with Compritol® 888 ATO were developed in this study. The drug/lipid powders were processed via cold and hot melt extrusion at various drug loadings. The influence of the processing temperatures, drug loading and the addition of excipients on the obtained dissolution rates was investigated. The physicochemical characterization of the extruded batches showed the existence of crystalline drug in the extrudates with a small amount being solubilized in the lipid matrix. The drug content and uniformity on the tablet surface were also investigated by using energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The dissolution rates were found to depend on the actual Df-Na loading and the nature of the added excipients, while the effect of the processing temperatures was negligible. The dissolution mechanism of all extruded formulations followed Peppas-Korsemeyer law, based on the estimated determination coefficients and the dissolution constant rates, indicating drug diffusion from the lipid matrices.

  1. Allegheny County Toxics Release Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) data provides information about toxic substances released into the environment or managed through recycling, energy recovery, and...

  2. Release of tritium from fuel and collection for storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, L.L.; Trevorrow, L.E.

    1976-04-01

    Recent work is reviewed on the technology that has been suggested as applicable to collection and storage of tritium in anticipation of the necessity of that course of action. Collection technology and procedures must be adapted to the tritium-bearing effluent and to the facility from which it emerges. Therefore, this discussion of tritium collection technology includes some information on the processes from which release is expected to occur, the amounts, the nature of the effluent media, and the form in which tritium appears. Recent work on collection and storage concepts has explored, both by experimentation and by feasibility analyses, the operations generally aimed at producing recycle, collection, or storage of tritium from these streams. Storage concepts aimed specifically at tritium involve plans to store volumes ranging from that of the entire effluent stream to only that of a small volume of a concentrate. Decisions between storage of unconcentrated streams and storage of concentrates are expected to be made largely by weighing the cost of storage space against the cost of concentration. The storage of tritium concentrate requires the selection of a form of tritium possessing physical and chemical properties appropriate for the expected storage conditions. This selection of an appropriate storage form has occupied a major portion of recent work concerned with tritium storage concepts. In summary, within the context of present regulations and expected amounts of waste tritium; this waste can be disposed of by dilution and dispersal to the environment. In the future, however, more restrictive regulations might be introduced that could be satisfied only by some collection and storage operations. Technology for this practice is not now available, and the present discussion reviews recent activities devoted to its development

  3. Effect of interfacial composition and crumbliness on aroma release in soy protein/sugar beet pectin mixed emulsion gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jun-Jie; Guo, Jian; Wang, Jin-Mei; Yang, Xiao-Quan

    2016-10-01

    In this study, soy protein isolate/sugar beet pectin (SPI/SBP) emulsion gels were prepared through an enzymatic gelation process. The effects of emulsifier (SBP, SPI or SPI/SBP complex) and emulsification process on the microstructure, texture, breakdown properties and aroma release behavior of resulting emulsion gels were investigated. Oil emulsification by SBP/SPI complex resulted in a higher amount of emulsifier absorbing on the oil-water interface than by SBP and SPI alone, indicating that a more compact interfacial network was formed. Flocculation of oil droplets was observed and corresponding emulsion gels exhibited lower fracture force and strain when the oil was emulsified by SPI and SBP/SPI complex. Moreover, emulsion gels with small droplets produced a greater quantity of small fragments after mastication. However, microstructure did not have a significant effect on breakdown properties of emulsion gels. Headspace gas chromatography analysis showed that the release rate of ethyl butyrate before and after mastication was significantly lower in emulsion gel with more compact network, but the release of aroma compounds with higher hydrophobicity did not show a significant influence of the microstructure and texture of emulsion gel. This finding provides a useful application for designing semi-solid foods with desirable flavor perception. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. USING OF THE COVER AMOUNTS METHOD FOR OPTIMIZATION OF INCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Volkov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of cover amounts (marginal income gives possibility to determine profitableness of each kind of the production and their real contribution into the result of work of enterprise.

  5. Nuclear liability amounts on the rise for nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasquez-Maignan, Ximena; Schwartz, Julia; Kuzeyli, Kaan

    2015-01-01

    The NEA Table on Nuclear Operator Liability Amounts and Financial Security Limits (NEA 'Liability Table'), which covers 71 countries, aims to provide one of the most comprehensive listings of nuclear liability amounts and financial security limits. The current and revised Paris and Brussels Supplementary Conventions ('Paris-Brussels regime'), the original and revised Vienna Conventions ('Vienna regime') and the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage, newly entered into force in April 2015, provide for the minimum amounts to be transposed in the national legislation of states parties to the conventions, and have served as guidelines for non-convention states. This article examine in more detail increases in the liability amounts provided for under these conventions, as well as examples of non-convention states (China, India and Korea)

  6. Amount of Future Forest Edge at a 2 Hectare Scale

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Forests provide economic and ecological value. High amounts of forest edge indicates a highly fragmented forest, which generally diminishes those economic and...

  7. 41 CFR 105-56.019 - Offset amount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Administration 56-SALARY OFFSET FOR INDEBTEDNESS OF FEDERAL EMPLOYEES TO THE UNITED STATES Centralized Salary... referred for offset under this subpart is $100. (b) The amount offset from a salary payment under this... resolved to the satisfaction of GSA. ...

  8. Amount of Forest Edge at a 65 Hectare Scale

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Forests provide economic and ecological value. High amounts of forest edge indicates a highly fragmented forest, which generally diminishes those economic and...

  9. Amount of Future Forest Edge at a 65 Hectare scale

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Forests provide economic and ecological value. High amounts of forest edge indicates a highly fragmented forest, which generally diminishes those economic and...

  10. Amount of Forest Edge at a 2 Hectare Scale

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Forests provide economic and ecological value. High amounts of forest edge indicates a highly fragmented forest, which generally diminishes those economic and...

  11. 24 CFR 17.48 - Computation of amount of award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... be no allowance for replacement cost or for appreciation in the value of the property. Subject to... repairs does not exceed the amount allowable under paragraph (a)(1) of this section. (b) Depreciation in...

  12. Evaluation of the amount of apically extruded debris during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-04-06

    Apr 6, 2015 ... Objective: To evaluate the amount of apically extruded debris during retreatment (with or without solvent) of root canals filled by two ... These filling materials can be used with several obturation .... The tip of the master cone.

  13. 24 CFR 206.105 - Amount of MIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES HOME EQUITY CONVERSION MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Mortgage Insurance Premiums § 206.105 Amount of...

  14. Sugar amount analysis in food from Lithuanian food market

    OpenAIRE

    Gudauskaitė, Milda

    2015-01-01

    When taking too much simple sugar, especially sucrose, harmful health effects occur: more tooth decay occurs, the excess sugar coverts into fat, digestive system gets irritated, increase of weight, possibility in increasing of developing cancer cells, pancreatic and other misbalances in the endocrine organs. Thesis goal: to perform sugar amount analysis in Lithuanian food market Analysis methodology. Assessing the amount of sugar (g/100g) there was analyzed 147 major food la...

  15. Polymeric nanoparticles containing diazepam: preparation, optimization, characterization, in-vitro drug release and release kinetic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohrey, Sarvesh; Chourasiya, Vibha; Pandey, Archna

    2016-03-01

    Nanoparticles formulated from biodegradable polymers like poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) are being extensively investigated as drug delivery systems due to their two important properties such as biocompatibility and controlled drug release characteristics. The aim of this work to formulated diazepam loaded PLGA nanoparticles by using emulsion solvent evaporation technique. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is used as stabilizing agent. Diazepam is a benzodiazepine derivative drug, and widely used as an anticonvulsant in the treatment of various types of epilepsy, insomnia and anxiety. This work investigates the effects of some preparation variables on the size and shape of nanoparticles prepared by emulsion solvent evaporation method. These nanoparticles were characterized by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Zeta potential study was also performed to understand the surface charge of nanoparticles. The drug release from drug loaded nanoparticles was studied by dialysis bag method and the in vitro drug release data was also studied by various kinetic models. The results show that sonication time, polymer content, surfactant concentration, ratio of organic to aqueous phase volume, and the amount of drug have an important effect on the size of nanoparticles. Hopefully we produced spherical shape Diazepam loaded PLGA nanoparticles with a size range under 250 nm with zeta potential -23.3 mV. The in vitro drug release analysis shows sustained release of drug from nanoparticles and follow Korsmeyer-Peppas model.

  16. A fission gas release model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denis, A; Piotrkowski, R [Argentine Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1997-08-01

    The hypothesis contained in the model developed in this work are as follows. The UO{sub 2} is considered as a collection of spherical grains. Nuclear reactions produce fission gases, mainly Xe and Kr, within the grains. Due to the very low solubility of these gases in UO{sub 2}, intragranular bubbles are formed, of a few nanometers is size. The bubbles are assumed to be immobile and to act as traps which capture gas atoms. Free atoms diffuse towards the grain boundaries, where they give origin to intergranular, lenticular bubbles, of the order of microns. The gas atoms in bubbles, either inter or intragranular, can re-enter the matrix through the mechanism of resolution induced by fission fragment impact. The amount of gas stored in intergranular bubbles grows up to a saturation value. Once saturation is reached, intergranular bubbles inter-connect and the gas in excess is released through different channels to the external surface of the fuel. The resolution of intergranular bubbles particularly affects the region of the grain adjacent to the grain boundary. During grain growth, the grain boundary traps the gas atoms, either free or in intragranular bubbles, contained in the swept volume. The grain boundary is considered as a perfect sink, i.e. the gas concentration is zero at that surface of the grain. Due to the spherical symmetry of the problem, the concentration gradient is null at the centre of the grain. The diffusion equation was solved using the implicit finite difference method. The initial solution was analytically obtained by the Laplace transform. The calculations were performed at different constant temperatures and were compared with experimental results. They show the asymptotic growth of the grain radius as a function of burnup, the gas distribution within the grain at every instant, the growth of the gas content at the grain boundary up to the saturation value and the fraction of gas released by the fuel element referred to the total gas generated

  17. Dexamethasone-induced haptoglobin release by calf liver parenchymal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, H; Katoh, N; Miyamoto, T; Uchida, E; Yuasa, A; Takahashi, K

    1994-08-01

    Parenchymal cells were isolated from the liver of male calves, and monolayer cultures formed were treated with glucocorticoids to examine whether haptoglobin, appearance of which is associated with hepatic lipidosis (fatty liver) in cattle, is induced by steroid hormones. Without addition of dexamethasone, only trace amounts of haptoglobin were detected in culture medium. With addition of dexamethasone (10(-12) to 10(-4) M), considerable amounts of haptoglobin were released into the medium. Maximal release was observed at concentrations of 10(-8) to 10(-6) M dexamethasone. Haptoglobin release was similarly induced by cortisol, although the effect was less potent than that of dexamethasone. Actinomycin D (a known protein synthesis inhibitor) dose-dependently reduced amounts of haptoglobin released in response to 10(-8) M dexamethasone. Dexamethasone also induced annexin I, which is known to be synthesized in response to glucocorticoids. Dexamethasone treatment resulted in reduced protein kinase C activity in the cell cytosol, which has been shown to be an early event in dexamethasone-treated cells. Other than glucocorticoids, estradiol induced haptoglobin release, whereas progesterone was less effective. The association of haptoglobin with hepatic lipidosis can be reasonably explained by the fact that haptoglobin production by the liver is induced by glucocorticoids and estradiol, and these steroid hormones are triggers for development of hepatic lipidosis in cattle.

  18. The market for equity release products: Lessons from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Home Equity Release Products (ERPs) are innovative fi nancial instruments that enable elderly, retired people to use their unencumbered houses as a source of income/funding while they continue to reside in them, thereby seeking to address the constraints of the life cycle hypothesis. The loan and outstanding amounts ...

  19. Differential antibiotic-induced endotoxin release in severe melioidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simpson, A. J.; Opal, S. M.; Angus, B. J.; Prins, J. M.; Palardy, J. E.; Parejo, N. A.; Chaowagul, W.; White, N. J.

    2000-01-01

    Severe melioidosis is a life-threatening, systemic bacterial infection caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei. A prospective, randomized treatment trial was conducted in northeast Thailand to compare ceftazidime (a penicillin-binding protein [PBP]-3-specific agent that causes release of large amounts

  20. Cobalt release from inexpensive jewellery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Menné, Torkil

    2010-01-01

    . Conclusions: This study showed that only a minority of inexpensive jewellery purchased in Denmark released cobalt when analysed with the cobalt spot test. As fashion trends fluctuate and we found cobalt release from dark appearing jewellery, cobalt release from consumer items should be monitored in the future......Objectives: The aim was to study 354 consumer items using the cobalt spot test. Cobalt release was assessed to obtain a risk estimate of cobalt allergy and dermatitis in consumers who would wear the jewellery. Methods: The cobalt spot test was used to assess cobalt release from all items...

  1. Improved recovery of trace amounts of gold (III), palladium (II) and platinum (IV) from large amounts of associated base metals using anion-exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubara, I. [Lab. of Chemistry, Tokyo Women' s Medical Univ. (Japan); Takeda, Y.; Ishida, K. [Lab. of Chemistry, Nippon Medical School, Kawasaki-shi, Kanagawa-ken (Japan)

    2000-02-01

    The adsorption and desorption behaviors of gold (III), palladium (II) and platinum (IV) were surveyed in column chromatographic systems consisting of one of the conventional anion-exchange resins of large ion-exchange capacity and dilute thiourea solutions. The noble metals were strongly adsorbed on the anion-exchange resins from dilute hydrochloric acid, while most base metals did not show any marked adsorbability. These facts made it possible to separate the noble metals from a large quantity of base metals such as Ag (I), Al (III), Co (II), Cu (II), Fe (III), Mn (II), Ni (II), Pb (II), and Zn (II). Although it used to be very difficult to desorb the noble metals from the resins used, the difficulty was easily overcome by use of dilute thiourea solutions as an eluant. In the present study, as little as 1.00 {mu}g of the respective noble metals was quantitatively separated and recovered from as much as ca. 10 mg of a number of metals on a small column by elution with a small amount of dilute thiourea solution. The present systems should be applicable to the separation, concentration and recovery of traces of the noble metals from a number of base metals coexisting in a more extended range of amounts and ratios. (orig.)

  2. Manufacturing Amorphous Solid Dispersions with a Tailored Amount of Crystallized API for Biopharmaceutical Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theil, Frank; Milsmann, Johanna; Anantharaman, Sankaran; van Lishaut, Holger

    2018-05-07

    The preparation of an amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) by dissolving a poorly water-soluble active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in a polymer matrix can improve the bioavailability by orders of magnitude. Crystallization of the API in the ASD, though, is an inherent threat for bioavailability. Commonly, the impact of crystalline API on the drug release of the dosage form is studied with samples containing spiked crystallinity. These spiked samples possess implicit differences compared to native crystalline samples, regarding size and spatial distribution of the crystals as well as their molecular environment. In this study, we demonstrate that it is possible to grow defined amounts of crystalline API in solid dosage forms, which enables us to study the biopharmaceutical impact of actual crystallization. For this purpose, we studied the crystal growth in fenofibrate tablets over time under an elevated moisture using transmission Raman spectroscopy (TRS). As a nondestructive method to assess API crystallinity in ASD formulations, TRS enables the monitoring of crystal growth in individual dosage forms. Once the kinetic trace of the crystal growth for a certain environmental condition is determined, this method can be used to produce samples with defined amounts of crystallized API. To investigate the biopharmaceutical impact of crystallized API, non-QC dissolution methods were used, designed to identify differences between the various amounts of crystalline materials present. The drug release in the samples manufactured in this fashion was compared to that of samples with spiked crystallinity. In this study, we present for the first time a method for targeted crystallization of amorphous tablets to simulate crystallized ASDs. This methodology is a valuable tool to generate model systems for biopharmaceutical studies on the impact of crystallinity on the bioavailability.

  3. Ultrasound stimulated release of gallic acid from chitin hydrogel matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Huixin; Kobayashi, Takaomi

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) stimulated drug release was examined in this study using a chitin hydrogel matrix loaded with gallic acid (GA), a drug used for wound healing and anticancer. Using phase inversion, GA-chitin hydrogels were prepared from chitin-dimethylacetamide (DMAc)/lithium chloride (LiCl) solution in the presence of GA, with 24 h exposure of the solution to water vapor. The GA release from the GA-chitin hydrogel was examined under different US powers of 0–30 W at 43 kHz. The effects of GA loading amounts in the hydrogels (0.54, 0.43, and 0.25 mg/cm 3 ) and chitin concentrations (0.1, 0.5, and 1 wt%) on the release behaviors were recorded under 43 kHz US exposure at 30 W. Results show that US accelerated the release efficiencies for all samples. Furthermore, the release efficiency increased concomitantly with increasing US power, GA loading amount, and decrease of the chitin concentration. The highest release rate of 0.74 μg/mL·min was obtained from 0.54 mg/cm 3 of GA-loaded hydrogel fabricated from a 0.1 wt% chitin mixture solution under 43 kHz US exposure at 30 W: nine times higher than that of the sample without US exposure. The hydrogel viscoelasticity demonstrated that the US irradiation rigidified the material. FT-IR showed that US can break the hydrogen bonds in the GA-chitin hydrogels. - Highlights: • Ultrasound (US) stimulated Gallic acid (GA) release from chitin hydrogel was studied. • The release efficiency of GA from chitin hydrogel increased nine times when irradiated by 43 kHz US compared with the sample without US. • Generalized 2D correlation and deconvolution study of FT-IR showed that US could promote the GA release by breaking hydrogen bonds.

  4. Ultrasound stimulated release of gallic acid from chitin hydrogel matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Huixin; Kobayashi, Takaomi, E-mail: takaomi@nagaokaut.ac.jp

    2017-06-01

    Ultrasound (US) stimulated drug release was examined in this study using a chitin hydrogel matrix loaded with gallic acid (GA), a drug used for wound healing and anticancer. Using phase inversion, GA-chitin hydrogels were prepared from chitin-dimethylacetamide (DMAc)/lithium chloride (LiCl) solution in the presence of GA, with 24 h exposure of the solution to water vapor. The GA release from the GA-chitin hydrogel was examined under different US powers of 0–30 W at 43 kHz. The effects of GA loading amounts in the hydrogels (0.54, 0.43, and 0.25 mg/cm{sup 3}) and chitin concentrations (0.1, 0.5, and 1 wt%) on the release behaviors were recorded under 43 kHz US exposure at 30 W. Results show that US accelerated the release efficiencies for all samples. Furthermore, the release efficiency increased concomitantly with increasing US power, GA loading amount, and decrease of the chitin concentration. The highest release rate of 0.74 μg/mL·min was obtained from 0.54 mg/cm{sup 3} of GA-loaded hydrogel fabricated from a 0.1 wt% chitin mixture solution under 43 kHz US exposure at 30 W: nine times higher than that of the sample without US exposure. The hydrogel viscoelasticity demonstrated that the US irradiation rigidified the material. FT-IR showed that US can break the hydrogen bonds in the GA-chitin hydrogels. - Highlights: • Ultrasound (US) stimulated Gallic acid (GA) release from chitin hydrogel was studied. • The release efficiency of GA from chitin hydrogel increased nine times when irradiated by 43 kHz US compared with the sample without US. • Generalized 2D correlation and deconvolution study of FT-IR showed that US could promote the GA release by breaking hydrogen bonds.

  5. Computational modeling and analysis of iron release from macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka A Potdar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A major process of iron homeostasis in whole-body iron metabolism is the release of iron from the macrophages of the reticuloendothelial system. Macrophages recognize and phagocytose senescent or damaged erythrocytes. Then, they process the heme iron, which is returned to the circulation for reutilization by red blood cell precursors during erythropoiesis. The amount of iron released, compared to the amount shunted for storage as ferritin, is greater during iron deficiency. A currently accepted model of iron release assumes a passive-gradient with free diffusion of intracellular labile iron (Fe2+ through ferroportin (FPN, the transporter on the plasma membrane. Outside the cell, a multi-copper ferroxidase, ceruloplasmin (Cp, oxidizes ferrous to ferric ion. Apo-transferrin (Tf, the primary carrier of soluble iron in the plasma, binds ferric ion to form mono-ferric and di-ferric transferrin. According to the passive-gradient model, the removal of ferrous ion from the site of release sustains the gradient that maintains the iron release. Subcellular localization of FPN, however, indicates that the role of FPN may be more complex. By experiments and mathematical modeling, we have investigated the detailed mechanism of iron release from macrophages focusing on the roles of the Cp, FPN and apo-Tf. The passive-gradient model is quantitatively analyzed using a mathematical model for the first time. A comparison of experimental data with model simulations shows that the passive-gradient model cannot explain macrophage iron release. However, a facilitated-transport model associated with FPN can explain the iron release mechanism. According to the facilitated-transport model, intracellular FPN carries labile iron to the macrophage membrane. Extracellular Cp accelerates the oxidation of ferrous ion bound to FPN. Apo-Tf in the extracellular environment binds to the oxidized ferrous ion, completing the release process. Facilitated-transport model can

  6. Statistical Optimization of Sustained Release Venlafaxine HCI Wax Matrix Tablet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalekar, M R; Madgulkar, A R; Sheladiya, D D; Kshirsagar, S J; Wable, N D; Desale, S S

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to prepare a sustained release drug delivery system of venlafaxine hydrochloride by using a wax matrix system. The effects of bees wax and carnauba wax on drug release profile was investigated. A 3(2) full factorial design was applied to systemically optimize the drug release profile. Amounts of carnauba wax (X(1)) and bees wax (X(2)) were selected as independent variables and release after 12 h and time required for 50% (t(50)) drug release were selected as dependent variables. A mathematical model was generated for each response parameter. Both waxes retarded release after 12 h and increases the t(50) but bees wax showed significant influence. The drug release pattern for all the formulation combinations was found to be approaching Peppas kinetic model. Suitable combination of two waxes provided fairly good regulated release profile. The response surfaces and contour plots for each response parameter are presented for further interpretation of the results. The optimum formulations were chosen and their predicted results found to be in close agreement with experimental findings.

  7. Consumption of energy and release of entropy into the biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutscher, G.

    2014-01-01

    The short-term threat on humanity is not the shortage of energy but rather the contamination of the environment. The concept of entropy is useful to assess the impact of humane activities on the environment. During most of earth history the increase of entropy was more than compensated by the energy brought by the sun. Today the intensive use of fossil fuels has reversed the trend: the biosphere entropy increases as CO 2 piles up in the atmosphere. The release of entropy is linked to the amount of energy we consume and to the efficiency of the process we use to produce it. Nuclear power plants release entropy as low-temperature heat but this amount of entropy is far less than the entropy released by fossil-fuel power plants under the form of CO 2 . (A.C.)

  8. Uptake and release of glucose by the human kidney. Postabsorptive rates and responses to epinephrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumvoll, M; Chintalapudi, U; Perriello, G; Welle, S; Gutierrez, O; Gerich, J

    1995-11-01

    Despite ample evidence that the kidney can both produce and use appreciable amounts of glucose, the human kidney is generally regarded as playing a minor role in glucose homeostasis. This view is based on measurements of arteriorenal vein glucose concentrations indicating little or no net release of glucose. However, inferences from net balance measurements do not take into consideration the simultaneous release and uptake of glucose by the kidney. Therefore, to assess the contribution of release and uptake of glucose by the human kidney to overall entry and removal of plasma glucose, we used a combination of balance and isotope techniques to measure renal glucose net balance, fractional extraction, uptake and release as well as overall plasma glucose appearance and disposal in 10 normal volunteers under basal postabsorptive conditions and during a 3-h epinephrine infusion. In the basal postabsorptive state, there was small but significant net output of glucose by the kidney (66 +/- 22 mumol.min-1, P = 0.016). However, since renal glucose fractional extraction averaged 2.9 +/- 0.3%, there was considerable renal glucose uptake (2.3 +/- 0.2 mumol.kg-1.min-1) which accounted for 20.2 +/- 1.7% of systemic glucose disposal (11.4 +/- 0.5 mumol.kg-1.min-1). Renal glucose release (3.2 +/- 0.2 mumol.kg-1.min-1) accounted for 27.8 +/- 2.1% of systemic glucose appearance (11.4 +/- 0.5 mumol.kg-1.min-1). Epinephrine infusion, which increased plasma epinephrine to levels observed during hypoglycemia (3722 +/- 453 pmol/liter) increased renal glucose release nearly twofold (5.2 +/- 0.5 vs 2.8 +/- 0.1 mol.kg-1.min-1, P = 0.01) so that at the end of the infusion, renal glucose release accounted for 40.3 +/- 5.5% of systemic glucose appearance and essentially all of the increase in systemic glucose appearance. These observations suggest an important role for the human kidney in glucose homeostasis.

  9. How restrained eaters perceive the amount they eat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, A

    1996-09-01

    The cognitive model of binge eating states that it is the awareness of a broken diet that disinhibits the restrained eater. It is, according to that model, the perception of having overeaten that triggers disinhibited eating. However, although the perception of the amount eaten plays a central role in cognitive restraint theory, it has never directly been tested how restrained subjects perceive the amount of food they eat. In the present studies, participants were given ad libitum access to large amounts of palatable food and both their perception of the amount eaten and their estimated caloric intake were compared with the amount they actually ate. The restrained participants in these studies ate more than the unrestrained participants. In the first and second studies, the restrained participants consumed 571 and 372 'forbidden' calories respectively, without having the feeling that they had eaten very much, let alone too much. Moreover in both studies, the restrained eaters underestimated their caloric intake, whereas unrestrained eaters estimated their caloric intake quite well. The potential implications of the present findings for the cognitive restraint model are discussed.

  10. Amounts of mercury in soil of some golf course sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLean, A J; Stone, B; Cordukes, W E

    1973-01-01

    Mercurial compounds are widely used for controlling diseases of turfgrass of golf courses, but the fungicides are usually confined to the greens. Composite soil samples were obtained from three golf courses in the Ottawa and Ontario region of Canada. Samples from the turf and surface layer of soil were analyzed and high amounts of mercury were found. The soil of No.I course was a sand; No.II was a sandy loam in the surface and a loam below; and No. III was a loam in the surface layer and a clay loam below. The pH of the surface layer was 6.4 in No. I, 7.5 in No. II, and 6.0 in No. III. The amounts of Hg in the turf were high near the green but they decreased with distance. Fairway III contained the highest amounts of Hg and there was evidence of it leaching to a depth of 90 cm at the edge of the green. The particularly high amounts of Hg in no III were in accord with the liberal use of mercurial fungicides on this course in the period 1912-64. The leaching of Hg depends on amounts of organic matter and the clay in the soil.

  11. Predicting red wolf release success in the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Frank T.; Crawford, Barron A.; Clark, Joseph D.

    2000-01-01

    Although the red wolf (Canis rufus) was once found throughout the southeastern United States, indiscriminate killing and habitat destruction reduced its range to a small section of coastal Texas and Louisiana. Wolves trapped from 1973 to 1980 were taken to establish a captive breeding program that was used to repatriate 2 mainland and 3 island red wolf populations. We collected data from 320 red wolf releases in these areas and classified each as a success or failure based on survival and reproductive criteria, and whether recaptures were necessary to resolve conflicts with humans. We evaluated the relations between release success and conditions at the release sites, characteristics of released wolves, and release procedures. Although <44% of the variation in release success was explained, model performance based on jackknife tests indicated a 72-80% correct prediction rate for the 4 operational models we developed. The models indicated that success was associated with human influences on the landscape and the level of wolf habituation to humans prior to release. We applied the models to 31 prospective areas for wolf repatriation and calculated an index of release success for each area. Decision-makers can use these models to objectively rank prospective release areas and compare strengths and weaknesses of each.

  12. The release of silver nanoparticles from commercial toothbrushes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackevica, Aiga; Olsson, Mikael Emil; Hansen, Steffen Foss

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Ag and Ag nanoparticle release was measured from two types of toothbrushes. • Maximum release for entire intended product use period was 10 ng Ag per toothbrush. • Released Ag nanoparticles had median sizes from 42 to 47 nm. • Up to 2.8% of total Ag released was detected in nanoparticulate form. - Abstract: The use of silver nanoparticles (NPs) in commercial products has become increasingly common in the past decade, mostly due to their antimicrobial properties. Using Ag NP-containing articles may lead to particle release, which raises concern of human and environmental safety. The published literature addressing particle release is scarce, especially when it comes to quantifying exposure to NPs specifically. In this study, we have experimentally investigated the release of total Ag and Ag NP from commercially available toothbrushes i.e. biodegradable toothbrushes for adults and toothbrushes for children. Toothbrushes were immersed and abraded in tap water for 24 h corresponding to more than the whole intended usage time of a toothbrush. The total amount of released Ag was quantified by inductively coupled plasma—mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis, and the Ag NPs were characterized by single particle ICP-MS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The median size of the released Ag NPs ranged from 42 to 47 nm, and the maximum total Ag release was 10.2 ng per toothbrush. The adult toothbrushes were generally releasing more total Ag and NPs than children toothbrushes. In conclusion, our results indicate that the use of Ag NP-impregnated toothbrushes can cause consumer as well as environmental exposure to Ag NPs.

  13. The release of silver nanoparticles from commercial toothbrushes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackevica, Aiga, E-mail: aima@env.dtu.dk; Olsson, Mikael Emil; Hansen, Steffen Foss

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Ag and Ag nanoparticle release was measured from two types of toothbrushes. • Maximum release for entire intended product use period was 10 ng Ag per toothbrush. • Released Ag nanoparticles had median sizes from 42 to 47 nm. • Up to 2.8% of total Ag released was detected in nanoparticulate form. - Abstract: The use of silver nanoparticles (NPs) in commercial products has become increasingly common in the past decade, mostly due to their antimicrobial properties. Using Ag NP-containing articles may lead to particle release, which raises concern of human and environmental safety. The published literature addressing particle release is scarce, especially when it comes to quantifying exposure to NPs specifically. In this study, we have experimentally investigated the release of total Ag and Ag NP from commercially available toothbrushes i.e. biodegradable toothbrushes for adults and toothbrushes for children. Toothbrushes were immersed and abraded in tap water for 24 h corresponding to more than the whole intended usage time of a toothbrush. The total amount of released Ag was quantified by inductively coupled plasma—mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis, and the Ag NPs were characterized by single particle ICP-MS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The median size of the released Ag NPs ranged from 42 to 47 nm, and the maximum total Ag release was 10.2 ng per toothbrush. The adult toothbrushes were generally releasing more total Ag and NPs than children toothbrushes. In conclusion, our results indicate that the use of Ag NP-impregnated toothbrushes can cause consumer as well as environmental exposure to Ag NPs.

  14. Profile of Fluoride Release from a Nanohybrid Composite Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Assed Bezerra Silva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the amount and profile of fluoride release from a fluoride-containing nanohybrid composite resin (Tetric® N-Ceram by direct potentiometry. Thirty specimens (5 mm diameter x 3 mm high; n=10/material were made of Tetric® N-Ceram, Vitremer® resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC (positive control or Filtek® Z350 nanofill composite resin (negative control. The specimens were stored individually in plastic tubes containing 1 mL of artificial saliva at 37°C, which was daily renewed during 15 days. At each renewal of saliva, the amount of fluoride ions released in the solution was measured using a fluoride ion-selective electrode with ion analyzer, and the values obtained in mV were converted to ppm (µg/mL. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc test at a significance level of 5%. The results showed that the resins Tetric® N-Ceram and Filtek® Z350 did not release significant amounts of fluoride during the whole period of evaluation (p>0.05. Only Vitremer® released significant amounts of fluoride ions during the 15 days of the experiment, with greater release in first 2 days (p0.05. In conclusion, the nanohybrid composite resin Tetric® N-Ceram did not present in vitro fluoride-releasing capacity throughout the 15 days of study.

  15. Increasing the amount of payment to research subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, DB

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses some ethical issues that can arise when researchers decide to increase the amount of payment offered to research subjects to boost enrollment. Would increasing the amount of payment be unfair to subjects who have already consented to participate in the study? This article considers how five different models of payment—the free market model, the wage payment model, the reimbursement model, the appreciation model, and the fair benefits model—would approach this issue. The article also considers several practical problems related to changing the amount of payment, including determining whether there is enough money in the budget to offer additional payments to subjects who have already enrolled, ascertaining how difficult it will be to re-contact subjects, and developing a plan of action for responding to subjects who find out they are receiving less money and demand an explanation. PMID:18757614

  16. Methods for determining the release of radioactive material into the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farges, L.; Daw, H.T.

    1976-01-01

    The current policy on the discharge of radioactive effluents calls for the containment of radioactive wastes in most instances. The resulting doses to individuals and populations have been shown by many surveys to be very small (UNSCEAR Report, 1972). Nevertheless, small amounts of radioactive releases are made to the environment during normal operation of nuclear facilities. Whenever discharge of radioactive effluents to the environment is permitted, careful consideration is made of all the relevant factors which might lead to exposure of man. However, with the expansion of nuclear power programmes, more sophistication is required in setting discharge limits to the environment, taking into consideration future sources as well as present sources. The IAEA's recommendations conform to the dose limitation system set out by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The system implies that the individual dose limits should never be exceeded. Furthermore, the ICRP guidelines require that doses be kept as low as reasonably possible, taking social and economic considerations into account. This second objective, usually called optimization, implies the use of differential cost-benefit analysis. At present, decisions are still made by other procedures, for example, by applying safety factors to release limits derived only from the dose limits. However, the ICRP system of dose limitation, including optimization, appears to be a more rational approach to the establishment of release limits. Thus, it is necessary to provide basic material on concepts which are intended for use and decision making by national authorities, and the Agency plans to publish a series of complementary documents on the application of these concepts to various specific cases. (author)

  17. Safe handling of kilogram amounts of fuel-grade plutonium and of gram amounts of plutonium-238, americium-241 and curium-244

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louwrier, K.P.; Richter, K.

    1976-01-01

    During the past 10 years about 600 glove-boxes have been installed at the Institute for Transuranium Elements at Karlsruhe. About 80% of these glove-boxes have been designed and equipped for handling 100-g to 1-kg amounts of 239 Pu containing 8-12% 240 Pu (low-exposure plutonium). A small proportion of the glove-boxes is equipped with additional shielding in the form of lead sheet or lead glass for work with recycled plutonium. In these glove-boxes gram-amounts of 241 Am have also been handled for preparation of Al-Am targets using tongs and additional shielding inside the glove-boxes themselves. Water- and lead-shielded glove-boxes equipped with telemanipulators have been installed for routine work with gram-amounts of 241 Am, 243 Am and 244 Cm. A prediction of the expected radiation dose for the personnel is difficult and only valid for a preparation procedure with well-defined preparation steps, owing to the fact that gamma dose-rates depend strongly upon proximity and source seize. Gamma radiation dose measurements during non-routine work for 241 Am target preparation showed that handling of gram amounts leads to a rather high irradiation dose for the personnel, despite lead or steel glove-box shielding and shielding within the glove-boxes. A direct glove-hand to americium contact must be avoided. For all glove-handling of materials with gamma radiation an irradiation control of the forearms of the personnel by, for example, thermoluminescence dosimeters is necessary. Routine handling of americium and curium should be executed with master-slave equipment behind neutron and gamma shielding. (author)

  18. Unusual amount of (-)-mesquitol from the heartwood of Prosopis juliflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirmah, Peter; Dumarçay, Stéphane; Masson, Eric; Gérardin, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    A large amount of flavonoid has been extracted and isolated from the heartwood of Prosopis juliflora, an exogenous wood species of Kenya. Structural and physicochemical elucidation based on FTIR, (1)H and (13)C NMR, GC-MS and HPLC analysis clearly demonstrated the presence of (-)-mesquitol as the sole compound without any noticeable impurities. The product was able to slow down oxidation of methyl linoleate induced by AIBN. The important amount and high purity of (-)-mesquitol present in the acetonic extract of P. juliflora could therefore be of valuable interest as a potential source of antioxidants from a renewable origin.

  19. The release of nickel from orthodontic NiTi wires is increased by dynamic mechanical loading but not constrained by surface nitridation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitsch, T; Klocke, A; Kahl-Nieke, B; Prymak, O; Epple, M

    2007-09-01

    The influence of dynamic mechanical loading and of surface nitridation on the nickel release from superelastic nickel-titanium orthodontic wires was investigated under ultrapure conditions. Commercially available superelastic NiTi arch wires (size 0.018 x 0.025'') without surface modification (Neo Sentalloy) and with nitrogen ion implantation surface treatment (Neo Sentalloy Ionguard) were analyzed. Mechanical loading of wire segments with a force similar to the physiological situation was performed with a frequency of 5 Hz in ultrapure water and saline solution, respectively. The release of nickel was monitored by atomic absorption spectroscopy for up to 36 days. The mechanically loaded wires released significantly more nickel ( approximately 45 ng cm(-2) d(-1)) than did nonloaded wires (<1 ng cm(-2) d(-1)). There was no statistically significant effect of the testing solution (water or NaCl) or of the surface nitridation. The total amount of released nickel was small in all cases, but may nevertheless account for the occasional clinical observations of adverse reactions during application of NiTi-based orthodontic appliances. The surface nitridation did not constrain the release of nickel from NiTi under continuous mechanical stress.

  20. Thermo-sensitive nanoparticles for triggered release of siRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zheng; Cheng, Qiang; Jiang, Qian; Deng, Liandong; Liang, Zicai; Dong, Anjie

    2015-01-01

    Efficient delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) is crucially required for cancer gene therapy. Herein, a thermo-sensitive copolymer with a simple structure, poly (ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate-b-poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (mPEG-b-PNIPAM) was developed. A novel kind of thermo-sensitive nanoparticles (DENPs) was constructed for the cold-shock triggered release of siRNA by double emulsion-solvent evaporation method using mPEG-b-PNIPAM and a cationic lipid, 3β [N-(N', N'-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl] cholesterol [DC-Chol]. DENPs were observed by transmission electron microscopy and dynamical light scattering before and after 'cold shock' treatment. The encapsulation efficiency (EE) of siRNA in DENPs, which was measured by fluorescence spectrophotometer was 96.8% while it was significantly reduced to be 23.2% when DC-Chol was absent. DENPs/siRNA NPs exhibited a thermo-sensitive siRNA release character that the cumulatively released amount of siRNA from cold shock was approximately 2.2 folds higher after 7 days. In vitro luciferase silencing experiments indicated that DENPs showed potent gene silencing efficacy in HeLa-Luc cells (HeLa cells steadily expressed luciferase), which was further enhanced by a cold shock. Furthermore, MTT assay showed that cell viability with DENPs/siRNA up to 200 nM remained above 80%. We also observed that most of siRNA was accumulated in kidney mediated by DENPs instead of liver and spleen in vivo experiments. Thus, DENPs as a cold shock responsive quick release model for siRNA or hydrophilic macromolecules delivery provide a new way to nanocarrier design and clinic therapy.

  1. The influence of source term release parameters on health effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jong Tae; Ha, Jae Joo

    1998-08-01

    In this study, the influence of source term release parameters on the health effects was examined. This is very useful in identifying the relative importance of release parameters and can be an important factor in developing a strategy for reducing offsite risks. The release parameters investigated in this study are release height, heat content, fuel burnup, release time, release duration, and warning time. The health effects affected by the change of release parameters are early fatalities, cancer fatalities, early injuries, cancer injuries, early fatality risk, population weighted early fatality risk, population weighted cancer fatality risk, effective whole body population dose, population exceeding an early acute red bone marrow dose of 1.5 Sv, and distance at which early fatalities are expected to occur. As release height increases, the values of early health effects such as early fatalities and injuries decrease. However, the release height dose not have significant influences on late health effects. The values of both early and late health effects decrease as heat content increases. The increase fuel burnup, i.e., the increase of core inventories increases the late health effects, however, has small influence on the early health effects. But, the number of early injuries increases as the fuel burnup increases. The effects of release time increase shows very similar influence on both the early and late health effects. As the release time increases to 2 hours, the values of health effects increase and then decrease rapidly. As release duration increases, the values of late health effects increase slightly, however, the values of early health effects decrease. As warning time increases to 2 hours, the values of late health effects decrease and then shows no variation. The number of early injuries decreases rapidly as the warning time increases to 2 hours. However, the number of early fatalities and the early fatality risk increase as the warning time increases

  2. Type and amount of organic amendments affect enhanced biogenic methane production from coal and microbial community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Katherine J.; Lu, Shipeng; Barnhart, Elliott P.; Parker, Albert E.; Fields, Matthew W.; Gerlach, Robin

    2018-01-01

    Slow rates of coal-to-methane conversion limit biogenic methane production from coalbeds. This study demonstrates that rates of coal-to-methane conversion can be increased by the addition of small amounts of organic amendments. Algae, cyanobacteria, yeast cells, and granulated yeast extract were tested at two concentrations (0.1 and 0.5 g/L), and similar increases in total methane produced and methane production rates were observed for all amendments at a given concentration. In 0.1 g/L amended systems, the amount of carbon converted to methane minus the amount produced in coal only systems exceeded the amount of carbon added in the form of amendment, suggesting enhanced coal-to-methane conversion through amendment addition. The amount of methane produced in the 0.5 g/L amended systems did not exceed the amount of carbon added. While the archaeal communities did not vary significantly, the bacterial populations appeared to be strongly influenced by the presence of coal when 0.1 g/L of amendment was added; at an amendment concentration of 0.5 g/L the bacterial community composition appeared to be affected most strongly by the amendment type. Overall, the results suggest that small amounts of amendment are not only sufficient but possibly advantageous if faster in situcoal-to-methane production is to be promoted.

  3. Determination of fungal spore release from wet building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildesø, J.; Wurtz, H.; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2003-01-01

    The release and transport of fungal spores from water-damaged building materials is a key factor for understanding the exposure to particles of fungal origin as a possible cause of adverse health effects associated to growth of fungi indoors. In this study, the release of spores from nine species...... of typical indoor fungi has been measured under controlled conditions. The fungi were cultivated for a period of 4-6 weeks on sterilized wet wallpapered gypsum boards at a relative humidity (RH) of approximately 97%. A specially designed small chamber (P-FLEC) was placed on the gypsum board. The release...

  4. Small talk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Przybylski

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The poem Small talk conjures up a communicative situation in which the main character, a newcomer from Poland, answers conventional questions related to their country. Bearing in mind the fact that this poem is set during a military dictatorship, superficial interest in his homeland may trigger a feeling of impatience. This is at least the impression formed if we adopt the perspective defined within the romantic tradition, and when taking into account the conventional poetry of martial law in Poland. Nevertheless, Barańczak retains an ironic distance towards such communicative situations and, as a consequence, does not create poetry that meets most readersʼ expectations. His poetic imperative for verbal art to be the expression of mistrust remains valid.

  5. Small Composers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holgersen, Sven-Erik; Bruun, Peter; Tjagvad, Mette

    2018-01-01

    the study: What expectations do the class teacher and the professional musicians have to the creative practice, i.e. to the collaboration and to the musical outcome? To which extent do the collaborating partners share a common understanding of the aim, content and method of the workshop? How do the roles......The present chapter discusses roles and responsibilities of the collaborating partners in a creative music workshop called Small Composers. The aim is to be attentive to a number of potential alterations implicated by the collaborating partners’ different backgrounds. The following questions guided...... and responsibilities of the collaborating partners become visible through the practice? How do the professional identities of the teacher and the musicians become visible and what are the implications for the workshop as a musical community of practice?...

  6. High loading efficiency and sustained release of siRNA encapsulated in PLGA nanoparticles: quality by design optimization and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cun, Dongmei; Jensen, Ditte Krohn; Maltesen, Morten Jonas; Bunker, Matthew; Whiteside, Paul; Scurr, David; Foged, Camilla; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2011-01-01

    Poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide acid) (PLGA) is an attractive polymer for delivery of biopharmaceuticals owing to its biocompatibility, biodegradability and outstanding controlled release characteristics. The purpose of this study was to understand and define optimal parameters for preparation of small interfering RNA (siRNA)-loaded PLGA nanoparticles by the double emulsion solvent evaporation method and characterize their properties. The experiments were performed according to a 2(5-1) fractional factorial design based on five independent variables: The volume ratio between the inner water phase and the oil phase, the PLGA concentration, the sonication time, the siRNA load and the amount of acetylated bovine serum albumin (Ac-BSA) in the inner water phase added to stabilize the primary emulsion. The effects on the siRNA encapsulation efficiency and the particle size were investigated. The most important factors for obtaining an encapsulation efficiency as high as 70% were the PLGA concentration and the volume ratio whereas the size was mainly affected by the PLGA concentration. The viscosity of the oil phase was increased at high PLGA concentration, which explains the improved encapsulation by stabilization of the primary emulsion and reduction of siRNA leakage to the outer water phase. Addition of Ac-BSA increased the encapsulation efficiency at low PLGA concentrations. The PLGA matrix protected siRNA against nuclease degradation, provided a burst release of surface-localized siRNA followed by a triphasic sustained release for two months. These results enable careful understanding and definition of optimal process parameters for preparation of PLGA nanoparticles encapsulating high amounts of siRNA with immediate and long-term sustained release properties. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. 29 CFR 4.141 - General criteria for measuring amount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Government for such work under his contract or may even agree to pay the Government in return for the right... formal advertising, in arriving at the aggregate amount involved, there must be included all property and... single advertisement for bids if the procurement were being effected by formal advertising. Therefore, if...

  8. 42 CFR 402.105 - Amount of penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... insurance benefit plans (§ 402.1(c)(21)). (b) $1,000. CMS or OIG may impose a penalty of not more than $1... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Amount of penalty. 402.105 Section 402.105 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL...

  9. 20 CFR 404.338 - Widow's and widower's benefits amounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... benefit may change as explained in § 404.304. (c) Your monthly benefit will be reduced if the insured person chooses to receive old-age benefits before reaching full retirement age. If so, your benefit will... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Widow's and widower's benefits amounts. 404...

  10. 26 CFR 1.617-2 - Limitation on amount deductible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 1.617-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.617-2 Limitation on amount deductible. (a... 1967, 1968, 1969, and 1970 A had exploration costs of $80,000 all with respect to coal deposits located...

  11. 26 CFR 1.615-4 - Limitation of amount deductible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 1.615-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.615-4 Limitation of amount deductible. (a) Taxable... lease with respect to certain coal lands. A has deducted exploration expenditures under section 615 for...

  12. 42 CFR 493.649 - Methodology for determining fee amount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... fringe benefit costs to support the required number of State inspectors, management and direct support... full time equivalent employee. Included in this cost are salary and fringe benefit costs, necessary... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Methodology for determining fee amount. 493.649...

  13. 42 CFR 422.382 - Minimum net worth amount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... that CMS considers appropriate to reduce, control or eliminate start-up administrative costs. (b) After... section. (c) Calculation of the minimum net worth amount—(1) Cash requirement. (i) At the time of application, the organization must maintain at least $750,000 of the minimum net worth amount in cash or cash...

  14. 7 CFR 3550.63 - Maximum loan amount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... self-help housing will be calculated by adding the total of the market value of the lot (including... amount. Total secured indebtedness must not exceed the area loan limit or market value limitations... appraisal, tax monitoring fee, and the charge to establish an escrow account for taxes and insurance will...

  15. 41 CFR 105-56.029 - Offset amount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Administration 56-SALARY OFFSET FOR INDEBTEDNESS OF FEDERAL EMPLOYEES TO THE UNITED STATES Centralized Salary... salary offset under this subpart is $100. (b) The amount offset from a salary payment under this subpart... otherwise resolved to the satisfaction of the creditor agency. ...

  16. 20 CFR 615.6 - Extended Benefits; weekly amount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Extended Benefits; weekly amount. 615.6 Section 615.6 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EXTENDED... compensation payable during such benefit year. (2) If the method in paragraph (a)(1)(iii) of this section is...

  17. 46 CFR 308.300 - Insured amount-application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE Second Seamen's War Risk Insurance § 308.300 Insured amount—application. An applicant for Second Seamen's war risk insurance shall not state the amount of insurance desired, which shall be as provided in...

  18. 34 CFR 682.506 - Limitations on maximum loan amounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... loan is intended less— (i) The student's estimated financial assistance; and (ii) The student's.... (b) The Secretary does not guarantee a Federal Consolidation loan in an amount greater than that required to discharge loans eligible for consolidation under § 682.100(a)(4). (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1075...

  19. 7 CFR 3565.204 - Maximum loan amount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... project. The lender shall recommend to the Agency an adjustment in the loan amount if appropriate as a result of this review. (2) Where the project financing combines a guaranteed loan with Low-Income Housing Tax Credits or other Federal assistance, the project must conform to the policies regarding necessary...

  20. 9 CFR 89.1 - Amount of feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Amount of feed. 89.1 Section 89.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS STATEMENT OF POLICY UNDER THE...

  1. 29 CFR 530.303 - Considerations in determining amounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Considerations in determining amounts. 530.303 Section 530... REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT OF HOMEWORKERS IN CERTAIN INDUSTRIES Civil Money Penalties § 530.303 Considerations in... representations; and (5) Exercise of due care. (b) An employer's financial inability to meet obligations under the...

  2. 76 FR 71554 - Civil Penalties; Notice of Adjusted Maximum Amounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-18

    ... Substances Act (FHSA), and the Flammable Fabrics Act (FFA). The Improvement Act added civil penalty authority... penalty amounts authorized under the Consumer Product Safety Act, the Federal Hazardous Substances Act, and the Flammable Fabrics Act. On August 14, 2009, the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008...

  3. 78 FR 4057 - Inflation Adjustment of Civil Money Penalty Amounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-18

    ...] RIN 2501-AD59 Inflation Adjustment of Civil Money Penalty Amounts AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, HUD. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This final rule amends HUD's civil money penalty and civil penalty... outdated cross-reference in its civil money penalty regulations. DATES: Effective Date: February 19, 2013...

  4. AMOUNT TO EXPROPRIATION? AN ANALYSIS OF THE Agri SA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Examiner

    then make an order for the payment against the defendant to the state of any amount .... The second point of criticism is found in a decision of the Australian High Court, .... system when it comes to distinguishing between deprivation and ...

  5. 47 CFR 54.403 - Lifeline support amount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... local exchange carrier serving the area in which the qualifying low-income consumer receives service, as... a qualifying low-income consumer's intrastate rate, if the carrier has received the non-federal... SERVICE Universal Service Support for Low-Income Consumers § 54.403 Lifeline support amount. (a) The...

  6. 26 CFR 1.1441-2 - Amounts subject to withholding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., it shall apply only to obligations issued after December 31, 2000. (4) Securities lending... issue discount) described in section 871(i)(2)(A) or 881(d)); (3) Amounts described in § 1.1441-1(b)(4)(iv) (dealing with interest or original issue discount on certain short-term obligations described in...

  7. Released radioactivity reducing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takeaki.

    1992-01-01

    Upon occurrence of a reactor accident, penetration portions of a reactor container, as a main leakage source from a reactor container, are surrounded by a plurality of gas-tight chambers, the outside of which is surrounded by highly gas-tightly buildings. Branched pipelines of an emergency gas processing system are introduced to each of the gas-tight chambers and they are joined and in communication with an emergency gas processing device. With such a constitution, radioactive materials are prevented from leaking directly from the buildings. Further, pipeline openings of the emergency gas processing facility are disposed in the plurality highly gas-tight penetration chambers. If the radioactive materials are leaked from the reactor to elevate the pressure in the penetration chambers, the radioactive materials are introduced to a filter device in the emergency gas processing facility by way of the branched pipelines, filtered and then released to the atmosphere. Accordingly, the reliability and safety of the system can be improved. (T.M.)

  8. Containment and release management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehner, J.R.; Pratt, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    Reducing the risk from potentially severe accidents by appropriate accident management strategies is receiving increased attention from the international reactor safety community. Considerable uncertainty still surrounds some of the physical phenomena likely to occur during a severe accident. The USNRC, in developing its research plan for accident management, wants to ensure that both the developers and implementers of accident management strategies are aware of the uncertainty associated with the plant operators' ability to correctly diagnose an accident, as well as the uncertainties associated with various preventive and mitigative strategies. The use of a particular accident management strategy can have both positive and negative effects on the status of a plant and these effects must be carefully weighed before a particular course of action is chosen and implemented. By using examples of severe accident scenarios, initial insights are presented here regarding the indications plant operators may have to alert them to particular accident states. Insights are also offered on the various management actions operators and plant technical staff might pursue for particular accident situations and the pros and cons associated with such actions. The examples given are taken for the most part from the containment and release phase of accident management, since this is the current focus of the effort in the accident management area at Brookhaven National Laboratory. 2 refs

  9. Released radioactivity reducing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Yumi.

    1995-01-01

    A water scrubber is disposed in a scrubber tank and a stainless steel fiber filter is disposed above the water scrubber. The upper end of the scrubber tank is connected by way of a second bent tube to a capturing vessel incorporating a moisture removing layer and an activated carbon filter. The exit of the capturing vessel is connected to a stack. Upon occurrence of an accident of a BWR-type power plant, gases containing radioactive materials released from a reactor container are discharged into the water scrubber from a first bent tube through a venturi tube nozzle, and water soluble and aerosol-like radioactive materials are captured in the water. Aerosol and splashes of water droplets which can not be captured thoroughly by the water scrubber are captured by the stainless steel fiber filter. Gases passing through the scrubber tank are introduced to a capturing vessel through a second bent tube, and organic iodine is captured by the activated carbon filter. (I.N.)

  10. Cell-swelling-induced taurine release from isolated perfused rat liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H. S.; Meijer, A. J.; Gustafson, L. A.; Jörning, G. G.; Leegwater, A. C.; Maas, M. A.; Chamuleau, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Astrocytes and lymphocytes are able to release significant amounts of taurine during periods of hypotonicity to reduce the increase in cell volume. To investigate this mechanism in the liver, we studied the release of free amino acids from isolated perfused rat liver during hypotonicity. The

  11. Equilibrium and kinetic models for colloid release under transient solution chemistry conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    We present continuum models to describe colloid release in the subsurface during transient physicochemical conditions. Our modeling approach relates the amount of colloid release to changes in the fraction of the solid surface area that contributes to retention. Equilibrium, kinetic, equilibrium and...

  12. Radionuclide releases to the atmosphere from Hanford Operations, 1944--1972. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeb, C.M.

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of radionuclide emissions since 1944 from the Hanford Site. The first step in determining dose is to estimate the amount and timing of radionuclide releases to air and water. This report provides the air release information.

  13. Investigation of chloride-release of nuclear grade resin in PWR primary system coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Xiaoning; Li Yunde; Li Jinghong; Lin Fangliang

    1997-01-01

    A new preparation technique is developed for making the low-chloride nuclear-grade resin by commercial resin. The chloride remained in nuclear grade resin may release to PWR primary coolant. The amount of released chloride is depended on the concentration of boron, lithium, other anion impurities, and remained chloride concentration in resin

  14. An advanced model for spreading and evaporation of accidentally released hazardous liquids on land

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trijssenaar-Buhre, I.J.M.; Sterkenburg, R.P.; Wijnant-Timmerman, S.I.

    2009-01-01

    Pool evaporation modelling is an important element in consequence assessment of accidentally released hazardous liquids. The evaporation rate determines the amount of toxic or flammable gas released into the atmosphere and is an important factor for the size of a pool fire. In this paper a

  15. An advanced model for spreading and evaporation of accidentally released hazardous liquids on land

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trijssenaar-Buhre, I.J.M.; Wijnant-Timmerman, S.L.

    2008-01-01

    Pool evaporation modelling is an important element in consequence assessment of accidentally released hazardous liquids. The evaporation rate determines the amount of toxic or flammable gas released into the atmosphere and is an important factor for the size of a pool fire. In this paper a

  16. Underground water stress release models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Dang, Shenjun; Lü, Shaochuan

    2011-08-01

    The accumulation of tectonic stress may cause earthquakes at some epochs. However, in most cases, it leads to crustal deformations. Underground water level is a sensitive indication of the crustal deformations. We incorporate the information of the underground water level into the stress release models (SRM), and obtain the underground water stress release model (USRM). We apply USRM to the earthquakes occurred at Tangshan region. The analysis shows that the underground water stress release model outperforms both Poisson model and stress release model. Monte Carlo simulation shows that the simulated seismicity by USRM is very close to the real seismicity.

  17. Comparison of metal release from various metallic biomaterials in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Yoshimitsu; Gotoh, Emiko

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the metal release of each base and alloying elements in vitro, SUS316L stainless steel, Co-Cr-Mo casting alloy, commercially pure Ti grade 2, and Ti-6Al-4V, V-free Ti-6Al-7Nb and Ti-15Zr-4Nb-4Ta alloys were immersed in various solutions, namely, alpha-medium, PBS(-), calf serum, 0.9% NaCl, artificial saliva, 1.2 mass% L-cysteine, 1 mass% lactic acid and 0.01 mass% HCl for 7d. The difference in the quantity of Co released from the Co-Cr-Mo casting alloy was relatively small in all the solutions. The quantities of Ti released into alpha-medium, PBS(-), calf serum, 0.9% NaCl and artificial saliva were much lower than those released into 1.2% L-cysteine, 1% lactic acid and 0.01% HCl. The quantity of Fe released from SUS316L stainless steel decreased linearly with increasing pH. On the other hand, the quantity of Ti released from Ti materials increased with decreasing pH, and it markedly attenuated at pHs of approximately 4 and higher. The quantity of Ni released from stainless steel gradually decreased with increasing pH. The quantities of Al released from the Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-7Nb alloys gradually decreased with increasing pH. A small V release was observed in calf serum, PBS(-), artificial saliva, 1% lactic acid, 1.2% l-cysteine and 0.01% HCl. The quantity of Ti released from the Ti-15Zr-4Nb-4Ta alloy was smaller than those released from the Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-7Nb alloys in all the solutions. In particular, it was approximately 30% or smaller in 1% lactic acid, 1.2% L-cysteine and 0.01% HCl. The quantity of (Zr + Nb + Ta) released was also considerably lower than that of (Al + Nb) or (Al + V) released. Therefore, the Ti-15Zr-4Nb-4Ta alloy with its low metal release in vitro is considered advantageous for long-term implants. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Flash release an alternative for releasing complex MEMS devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deladi, S.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2004-01-01

    A novel time-saving and cost-effective release technique has been developed and is described. The physical nature of the process is explained in combination with experimental observations. The results of the flash release process are compared with those of freeze-drying and supercritical CO2

  19. Stimuli-Responsive Materials for Controlled Release Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Song

    2015-04-01

    The controlled release of therapeutics has been one of the major challenges for scientists and engineers during the past three decades. To address this outstanding problem, the design and fabrication of stimuli-responsive materials are pursued to guarantee the controlled release of cargo at a specific time and with an accurate amount. Upon applying different stimuli such as light, magnetic field, heat, pH change, enzymes or redox, functional materials change their physicochemical properties through physical transformation or chemical reactions, allowing the release of payload agents on demand. This dissertation studied three stimuli-responsive membrane systems for controlled release from films of macro sizes to microcapsules of nano sizes. The first membrane system is a polymeric composite film which can decrease and sustain diffusion upon light irradiation. The photo-response of membranes is based on the photoreaction of cinnamic derivatives. The second one is composite membrane which can improve diffusion upon heating. The thermo-response of membranes comes from the volume phase transition ability of hydrogels. The third one is microcapsule which can release encapsulated agents upon light irradiation. The photo-response of capsules results from the photoreaction of nitrobenzyl derivatives. The study on these membrane systems reveals that stimuli-responsive release can be achieved by utilizing different functional materials on either macro or micro level. Based on the abundant family of smart materials, designing and fabricating stimuli-responsive systems shall lead to various advanced release processes on demand for biomedical applications.

  20. Toxic chemical considerations for tank farm releases. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Keuren, J.C.

    1995-11-01

    This document provides a method of determining the toxicological consequences of accidental releases from Hanford Tank Farms. A determination was made of the most restrictive toxic chemicals that are expected to be present in the tanks. Concentrations were estimated based on the maximum sample data for each analyte in all the tanks in the composite. Composite evaluated were liquids and solids from single shell tanks, double shell tanks, flammable gas watch list tanks, as well as all solids, all liquids, head space gases, and 241-C-106 solids. A sum of fractions of the health effects was computed for each composite for unit releases based emergency response planning guidelines (ERPGs). Where ERPGs were not available for chemical compounds of interest, surrogate guidelines were established. The calculation method in this report can be applied to actual release scenarios by multiplying the sum of fractions by the release rate for continuous releases, or the release amount for puff releases. Risk guidelines are met if the product is less than for equal to one.

  1. Toxic chemical considerations for tank farm releases. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Keuren, J.C.

    1995-11-01

    This document provides a method of determining the toxicological consequences of accidental releases from Hanford Tank Farms. A determination was made of the most restrictive toxic chemicals that are expected to be present in the tanks. Concentrations were estimated based on the maximum sample data for each analyte in all the tanks in the composite. Composite evaluated were liquids and solids from single shell tanks, double shell tanks, flammable gas watch list tanks, as well as all solids, all liquids, head space gases, and 241-C-106 solids. A sum of fractions of the health effects was computed for each composite for unit releases based emergency response planning guidelines (ERPGs). Where ERPGs were not available for chemical compounds of interest, surrogate guidelines were established. The calculation method in this report can be applied to actual release scenarios by multiplying the sum of fractions by the release rate for continuous releases, or the release amount for puff releases. Risk guidelines are met if the product is less than for equal to one

  2. Comparing fixed-amount and progressive-amount DRO Schedules for tic suppression in youth with chronic tic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capriotti, Matthew R; Turkel, Jennifer E; Johnson, Rachel A; Espil, Flint M; Woods, Douglas W

    2017-01-01

    Chronic tic disorders (CTDs) involve motor and/or vocal tics that often cause substantial distress and impairment. Differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO) schedules of reinforcement produce robust, but incomplete, reductions in tic frequency in youth with CTDs; however, a more robust reduction may be needed to affect durable clinical change. Standard, fixed-amount DRO schedules have not commonly yielded such reductions, so we evaluated a novel, progressive-amount DRO schedule, based on its ability to facilitate sustained abstinence from functionally similar behaviors. Five youth with CTDs were exposed to periods of baseline, fixed-amount DRO (DRO-F), and progressive-amount DRO (DRO-P). Both DRO schedules produced decreases in tic rate and increases in intertic interval duration, but no systematic differences were seen between the two schedules on any dimension of tic occurrence. The DRO-F schedule was generally preferred to the DRO-P schedule. Possible procedural improvements and other future directions are discussed. © 2016 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  3. Environmental and health impacts of February 14, 2014 radiation release from the nation's only deep geologic nuclear waste repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, P; Lemons, B G; Ballard, S; Hardy, R

    2015-08-01

    The environmental impact of the February 14, 2014 radiation release from the nation's only deep geologic nuclear waste repository, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was assessed using monitoring data from an independent monitoring program conducted by the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring & Research Center (CEMRC). After almost 15 years of safe and efficient operations, the WIPP had one of its waste drums rupture underground resulting in the release of moderate levels of radioactivity into the underground air. A small amount of radioactivity also escaped to the surface through the ventilation system and was detected above ground. It was the first unambiguous release from the WIPP repository. The dominant radionuclides released were americium and plutonium, in a ratio that matches the content of the breached drum. The accelerated air monitoring campaign, which began following the accident, indicates that releases were low and localized, and no radiation-related health effects among local workers or the public would be expected. The highest activity detected was 115.2 μBq/m(3) for (241)Am and 10.2 μBq/m(3) for (239+240)Pu at a sampling station located 91 m away from the underground air exhaust point and 81.4 μBq/m(3) of (241)Am and 5.8 μBq/m(3) of (239+240)Pu at a monitoring station located approximately one kilometer northwest of the WIPP facility. CEMRC's recent monitoring data show that the concentration levels of these radionuclides have returned to normal background levels and in many instances, are not even detectable, demonstrating no long-term environmental impacts of the recent radiation release event at the WIPP. This article presents an evaluation of almost one year of environmental monitoring data that informed the public that the levels of radiation that got out to the environment were very low and did not, and will not harm anyone or have any long-term environmental consequence. In terms of radiological risk at or in the vicinity of the

  4. Quantifying Ca2+ release and inactivation of Ca2+ release in fast- and slow-twitch muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, C J

    2012-12-01

    The aims of this study were to quantify the Ca(2+) release underlying twitch contractions of mammalian fast- and slow-twitch muscle and to comprehensively describe the transient inactivation of Ca(2+) release following a stimulus. Experiments were performed using bundles of fibres from mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles. Ca(2+) release was quantified from the amount of ATP used to remove Ca(2+) from the myoplasm following stimulation. ATP turnover by crossbridges was blocked pharmacologically (N-benzyl-p-toluenesulphonamide for EDL, blebbistatin for soleus) and muscle heat production was used as an index of Ca(2+) pump ATP turnover. At 20°C, Ca(2+) release in response to a single stimulus was 34 and 84 μmol (kg muscle)(-1) for soleus and EDL, respectively, and increased with temperature (30°C: soleus, 61 μmol kg(-1); EDL, 168 μmol kg(-1)). Delivery of another stimulus within 100 ms of the first produced a smaller Ca(2+) release. The maximum magnitude of the decrease in Ca(2+) release was greater in EDL than soleus. Ca(2+) release recovered with an exponential time course which was faster in EDL (mean time constant at 20°C, 32.1 ms) than soleus (65.6 ms) and faster at 30°C than at 20°C. The amounts of Ca(2+) released and crossbridge cycles performed are consistent with a scheme in which Ca(2+) binding to troponin-C allowed an average of ∼1.7 crossbridge cycles in the two muscles.

  5. Effect of increasing amounts of straw on pigs’ explorative behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Margit Bak; Herskin, Mette S.; Forkman, Björn

    2015-01-01

    According to European legislation, pigs must have permanent access to sufficient quantity of materialto enable manipulation activities. However, few studies have quantified how much straw is needed tofulfil the requirements of growing pigs. We investigated the effect of increasing amount of straw...... on pigs’manipulation of the straw, and hypothesised that after a certain point increasing straw amount will nolonger increase oral manipulation further. From 30 to 80 kg live weight, pigs were housed in 90 groups of18 pigs in pens (5.48 m × 2.48 m) with partly slatted concrete floor and daily provided...... with the percentage ofpigs manipulating straw simultaneously. This was recorded in three 1-h intervals (1 h before and 1 h afterstraw allocation in the morning, as well as from 17 to 18 h in the afternoon). With increasing quantity ofstraw provided, we found a curvilinear (P increase in the time spent in oral...

  6. Another way of managing large amounts of data

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Jeff Hammerbacher is Vice President of Products and Chief Scientist at Cloudera, a US software company that provides solutions for managing and analysing very large data sets. His invited talk on 21 August was a good opportunity to exchange views with the CERN experts who face similar problems. Although still relatively young, Jeff has considerable experience in developing tools for storing and processing large amounts of data. Before Cloudera Jeff conceived, built and led the Data team at Facebook. He has also worked as a quantitative analyst on Wall Street. Jeff holds a Bachelor’s Degree in mathematics from Harvard University. At CERN, handling large amounts of data is the job of the Grid; Hadoop, the software Cloudera is developing, is intended for the same scope but has different technical features and implementations. "The Grid software products are designed for many organisations to collaborate on large-scale data analysis across many data centres. In contrast, Had...

  7. Hindered disulfide bonds to regulate release rate of model drug from mesoporous silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadrah, Peter; Maver, Uroš; Jemec, Anita; Tišler, Tatjana; Bele, Marjan; Dražić, Goran; Benčina, Mojca; Pintar, Albin; Planinšek, Odon; Gaberšček, Miran

    2013-05-01

    With the advancement of drug delivery systems based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), a simple and efficient method regulating the drug release kinetics is needed. We developed redox-responsive release systems with three levels of hindrance around the disulfide bond. A model drug (rhodamine B dye) was loaded into MSNs' mesoporous voids. The pore opening was capped with β-cyclodextrin in order to prevent leakage of drug. Indeed, in absence of a reducing agent the systems exhibited little leakage, while the addition of dithiothreitol cleaved the disulfide bonds and enabled the release of cargo. The release rate and the amount of released dye were tuned by the level of hindrance around disulfide bonds, with the increased hindrance causing a decrease in the release rate as well as in the amount of released drug. Thus, we demonstrated the ability of the present mesoporous systems to intrinsically control the release rate and the amount of the released cargo by only minor structural variations. Furthermore, an in vivo experiment on zebrafish confirmed that the present model delivery system is nonteratogenic.

  8. Small-Scale Experiments.10-gallon drum experiment summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, David M.

    2015-02-05

    A series of sub-scale (10-gallon) drum experiments were conducted to characterize the reactivity, heat generation, and gas generation of mixtures of chemicals believed to be present in the drum (68660) known to have breached in association with the radiation release event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) on February 14, 2014, at a scale expected to be large enough to replicate the environment in that drum but small enough to be practical, safe, and cost effective. These tests were not intended to replicate all the properties of drum 68660 or the event that led to its breach, or to validate a particular hypothesis of the release event. They were intended to observe, in a controlled environment and with suitable diagnostics, the behavior of simple mixtures of chemicals in order to determine if they could support reactivity that could result in ignition or if some other ingredient or event would be necessary. There is a significant amount of uncertainty into the exact composition of the barrel; a limited sub-set of known components was identified, reviewed with Technical Assessment Team (TAT) members, and used in these tests. This set of experiments was intended to provide a framework to postulate realistic, data-supported hypotheses for processes that occur in a “68660-like” configuration, not definitively prove what actually occurred in 68660.

  9. Geotail Video News Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The Geotail mission, part of the International Solar Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) program, measures global energy flow and transformation in the magnetotail to increase understanding of fundamental magnetospheric processes. The satellite was launched on July 24, 1992 onboard a Delta II rocket. This video shows with animation the solar wind, and its effect on the Earth. The narrator explains that the Geotail spacecraft was designed and built by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), the Japanese Space Agency. The mission objectives are reviewed by one of the scientist in a live view. The video also shows an animation of the orbit, while the narrator explains the orbit and the reason for the small launch window.

  10. Amount of substance and the proposed redefinition of the mole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, M. J. T.; Mills, I. M.

    2009-06-01

    There has been considerable discussion about the merits of redefining four of the base units of the SI, including the mole. In this paper, the options for implementing a new definition for the mole based on a fixed value for the Avogadro constant are discussed. They are placed in the context of the macroscopic nature of the quantity amount of substance and the opportunity to introduce a system for molar and atomic masses with unchanged values and consistent relative uncertainties.

  11. Infected Atopic Dermatitis Lesions Contain Pharmacologic Amounts of Lipoteichoic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Jeffrey B.; Kozman, Amal; Mousdicas, Nico; Saha, Chandan; Landis, Megan; Al-Hassani, Mohammed; Yao, Weiguo; Yao, Yongxue; Hyatt, Ann-Marie; Sheehan, Michael P.; Haggstrom, Anita N.; Kaplan, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Bacterial infection with Staphylococcus aureus is a known trigger for worsening of atopic dermatitis (AD); the exact mechanisms by which bacterial infection worsens dermatitis are unknown. Objective We sought to characterize the amounts of the biologically active bacterial lipoprotein lipoteichoic acid (LTA) in infected AD lesions. Methods Eighty-nine children with clinically impetiginized lesions of AD were enrolled in this study. A lesion was graded clinically using the Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI), and then wash fluid obtained from the lesion for quantitative bacterial culture, and measurement of LTA and cytokines. The staphylococcal isolate was tested for antibiotic susceptibilities. The patients were treated with a regimen that included topical corticosteroids and systemic antibiotics and the lesion was re-analyzed after two weeks. Results S. aureus was identified in 79 of 89 children enrolled in the study. The bacterial CFU correlated with the EASI lesional score (p = 0.04). LTA levels up to 9.8 μg/ml were measured in the wash fluid samples and the amounts correlated with the lesional EASI scores (p = 0.01) and S. aureus CFU (p < 0.001). Approximately 30% of clinically impetiginized AD lesions contained greater than 1 μg/ml LTA, amounts that exert effects on various cell types in vitro. Moreover, injection of skin tissue ex vivo with amounts of LTA found in AD lesions resulted in epidermal cytokine gene expression. Conclusions Pharmacologic levels of LTA are found in many infected atopic dermatitis lesions. Clinical Implications These findings suggest that staphylococcal LTA could be an important mediator of the increased skin inflammation associated with infected AD. Capsule Summary These studies demonstrate high levels of staphylococcal LTA are found on impetiginized AD lesions. Moreover, subjects harboring MRSA exhibited greater total body involvement of AD. PMID:19962742

  12. Forest amount affects soybean productivity in Brazilian agricultural frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattis, L.; Brando, P. M.; Marques, E. Q.; Queiroz, N.; Silverio, D. V.; Macedo, M.; Coe, M. T.

    2017-12-01

    Over the past three decades, large tracts of tropical forests have been converted to crop and pasturelands across southern Amazonia, largely to meet the increasing worldwide demand for protein. As the world's population continue to grow and consume more protein per capita, forest conversion to grow more crops could be a potential solution to meet such demand. However, widespread deforestation is expected to negatively affect crop productivity via multiple pathways (e.g., thermal regulation, rainfall, local moisture, pest control, among others). To quantify how deforestation affects crop productivity, we modeled the relationship between forest amount and enhanced vegetation index (EVI—a proxy for crop productivity) during the soybean planting season across southern Amazonia. Our hypothesis that forest amount causes increased crop productivity received strong support. We found that the maximum MODIS-based EVI in soybean fields increased as a function of forest amount across three spatial-scales, 0.5 km, 1 km, 2 km, 5 km, 10 km, 15 km and 20 km. However, the strength of this relationship varied across years and with precipitation, but only at the local scale (e.g., 500 meters and 1 km radius). Our results highlight the importance of considering forests to design sustainable landscapes.

  13. Controlled Release Formulations of Auxinic Herbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Witold J.; Siłowiecki, Andrzej.; Romanowska, Iwona; Glazek, Mariola; Bajor, Justyna; Cieciwa, Katarzyna; Rychter, Piotr

    2013-04-01

    Controlled release formulations are applied extensively for the release of active ingredients such as plant protection agents and fertilizers in response to growing concern for ecological problems associated with increased use of plant protection chemicals required for intensive agricultural practices [1]. We synthesized oligomeric mixtures of (R,S)-3-hydroxy butyric acid chemically bonded with 2,4-D, Dicamba and MCPA herbicides (HBA) respectively, and determined their molecular structure and molecular weight dispersion by the size exclusion chromatography, proton magnetic resonance spectrometry and electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry. Further we carried out bioassays of herbicidal effectiveness of the HBA herbicides vs. series of dicotyledonous weeds and crop injury tests [2, 3, 4]. Field bioassays were accomplished according to the EPPO standards [5]. Groups of representative weeds (the development stages in the BCCH scale: 10 - 30) were selected as targets. Statistical variabilities were assessed by the Fisher LSD test for plants treated with the studied herbicides in form of HBA oligomers, the reference herbicides in form of dimethyl ammonium salts (DMA), and untreated plants. No statistically significant differences in the crop injuries caused by the HBA vs. the DMA reference formulation were observed. The effectiveness of the HBA herbicides was lower through the initial period (ca. 2 weeks) relative to the DMA salts, but a significant increase in the effectiveness of the HBA systems followed during the remaining fraction of each assay. After 6 weeks all observed efficiencies approached 100%. The death of weeds treated with the HBA herbicides was delayed when compared with the DMA reference herbicides. The delayed uptake observed for the HBA oligomers relative to the DMA salts was due to controlled release phenomena. In case of the DMA salts the total amount of active ingredients was available at the target site. By contrast, the amount of an active

  14. The influence of "host release factor" on carbon release by zooxanthellae isolated from fed and starved Aiptasia pallida (Verrill).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, S K; Cook, C B

    2001-06-01

    Symbiotic dinoflagellates (zooxanthellae) typically respond to extracts of host tissue with enhanced release of short-term photosynthetic products. We examined this "host release factor" (HRF) response using freshly isolated zooxanthellae of differing nutritional status. The nutritional status was manipulated by either feeding or starving the sea anemone Aiptasia pallida (Verrill). The release of fixed carbon from isolated zooxanthellae was measured using 14C in 30 min experiments. Zooxanthellae in filtered seawater alone released approximately 5% of photosynthate irrespective of host feeding history. When we used a 10-kDa ultrafiltrate of A. pallida host tissue as a source of HRF, approximately 14% of photosynthate was released to the medium. This increased to over 25% for zooxanthellae from anemones starved for 29 days or more. The cell-specific photosynthetic rate declined with starvation in these filtrate experiments, but the decline was offset by the increased percentage release. Indeed, the total amount of released photosynthate remained unchanged, or even increased, as zooxanthellae became more nutrient deficient. Similar trends were also observed when zooxanthellae from A. pallida were incubated in a 3-kDa ultrafiltrate of the coral Montastraea annularis, suggesting that HRF in the different filtrates operated in a similar manner. Our results support the suggestion that HRF diverts surplus carbon away from storage compounds to translocated compounds such as glycerol.

  15. Press Oil Final Release Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, Jeffrey Jay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ruedig, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-11

    There are forty-eight 55 gallon barrels filled with hydraulic oil that are candidates for release and recycle. This oil needs to be characterized prior to release. Principles of sampling as provided in MARSAME/MARSSIM approaches were used as guidance for sampling.

  16. Workload Control with Continuous Release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phan, B. S. Nguyen; Land, M. J.; Gaalman, G. J. C.

    2009-01-01

    Workload Control (WLC) is a production planning and control concept which is suitable for the needs of make-to-order job shops. Release decisions based on the workload norms form the core of the concept. This paper develops continuous time WLC release variants and investigates their due date

  17. Plasmonic Titania Photo catalysts Active under UV and Visible-Light Irradiation: Influence of Gold Amount, Size, and Shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalska, E.; Rau, S.; Kowalska, E.; Kowalska, E.; Ohtani, B.

    2012-01-01

    Plasmonic titania photo catalysts were prepared by titania modification with gold by photo deposition. It was found that for smaller amount of deposited gold (≤ 0.1 wt%), anatase presence and large surface area were beneficial for efficient hydrogen evolution during methanol dehydrogenation. After testing twelve amounts of deposited gold on large rutile titania, the existence of three optima for 0.5, 2 and >6 wt% of gold was found during acetic acid degradation. Under visible light irradiation, in the case of small gold NPs deposited on fine anatase titania, the dependence of photo activity on gold amount was parabolic, and large gold amount (2 wt%), observable as an intensively coloured powder, caused photo activity decrease. While for large gold NPs deposited on large rutile titania, the dependence represented cascade increase, due to change of size and shape of deposited gold with its amount increase. It has been thought that spherical/hemispherical shape of gold NPs, in comparison with rod-like ones, is beneficial for higher level of photo activity under visible light irradiation. For all tested systems and regardless of deposited amount of gold, each rutile Au/TiO 2 photo catalyst of large gold and titania NPs exhibited much higher photo activity than anatase Au/TiO 2 of small gold and titania NPs

  18. Toxic releases from power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, E.S.

    1999-01-01

    Beginning in 1998, electric power plants burning coal or oil must estimate and report their annual releases of toxic chemicals listed in the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) published by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This paper identifies the toxic chemicals of greatest significance for the electric utility sector and develops quantitative estimates of the toxic releases reportable to the TRI for a representative coal-fired power plant. Key factors affecting the magnitude and types of toxic releases for individual power plants also are discussed. A national projection suggests that the magnitude of electric utility industry releases will surpass those of the manufacturing industries which current report to the TRI. Risk communication activities at the community level will be essential to interpret and provide context for the new TRI results

  19. Airborne Nanoparticle Release and Toxicological Risk from Metal-Oxide-Coated Textiles: Toward a Multiscale Safe-by-Design Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantecca, Paride; Kasemets, Kaja; Deokar, Archana; Perelshtein, Ilana; Gedanken, Aharon; Bahk, Yeon Kyoung; Kianfar, Baharh; Wang, Jing

    2017-08-15

    Nano metal oxides have been proposed as alternatives to silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs) for antibacterial coatings. Here, cotton and polyester-cotton fabrics were sonochemically coated with zinc oxide (ZnO) and copper oxide (CuO) NPs. By varying the reaction solvent (water or ethanol), NPs with different sizes and shapes were synthesized. The cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory effects of studied NPs were investigated in vitro in human alveolar epithelial A549 and macrophage-like THP1 cells. To understand the potential respiratory impact of the NPs, the coated textiles were subjected to the abrasion tests, and the released airborne particles were measured. A very small amount of the studied metal oxides NPs was released from abrasion of the textiles coated by the ethanol-based sonochemical process. The release from the water-based coating was comparably higher. Lung and immune cells viability decreased after 24 h of exposure only at the highest studied NPs concentration (100 μg/mL). Different from the ZnO NPs, both formulations of CuO NPs induced IL-8 release in the lung epithelial cells already at subtoxic concentrations (1-10 μg/mL) but not in immune cells. All of the studied NPs did not induce IL-6 release by the lung and immune cells. Calculations revealed that the exposures of the NPs to human lung due to the abrasion of the textiles were lower or comparable to the minimum doses in the cell viability tests (0.1 μg/mL), at which acute cytotoxicity was not observed. The results alleviate the concerns regarding the potential risk of these metal oxide NPs in their applications for the textile coating and provide insight for the safe-by-design approach.

  20. Ketoprofen-loaded Eudragit RSPO microspheres: an influence of sodium carbonate on in vitro drug release and surface topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Sachin S; Hase, Dinesh P; Bankar, Manish M; Patil, Arun T; Gaikwad, Naresh J

    2009-05-01

    Eudragit RSPO microspheres containing ketoprofen as model drug, prepared by solvent evaporation technique using acetone-liquid paraffin (heavy) solvent system were examined. Depending upon polymer concentration in the internal phase, microspheres of particle mean diameter (122.8, 213.6 and 309.5 μm) were obtained. The influence of surface washing of microspheres with n-hexane, i.e. untreated microspheres (UM) on the drug content, drug release and surface topology of microspheres were compared to those of microspheres washed with sodium carbonate, i.e. treated microspheres (TM) in order to make the non-encapsulated surface drug soluble. The significant reduction in encapsulation efficiency (p < 0.001) and drug content (p < 0.001) after treatment, in combination with the small crystalline peaks observed during XRD testing and lack of melting endotherm observed in DSC testing, suggests that the washing process actually removes a significant amount of drug (p < 0.001) from the surface and encapsulated near to the surface of the microsphere polymer matrix. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination revealed that the removal of surface drug did not affect the size of microspheres but the topology of treated smallest microspheres was modified. The ketoprofen release profiles were examined in phosphate buffer pH 7.4, using USPXXIII paddle type dissolution apparatus. In general both UM and TM result in biphasic release patterns, but the initial burst effect (first release phase) of TM was lower than that of UM. The second release phase did not change for the bigger size but increased for the smallest microspheres, probably owing to the modification of matrix porosity.

  1. Stretch-induced Ca2+ independent ATP release in hippocampal astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yingfei; Teng, Sasa; Zheng, Lianghong; Sun, Suhua; Li, Jie; Guo, Ning; Li, Mingli; Wang, Li; Zhu, Feipeng; Wang, Changhe; Rao, Zhiren; Zhou, Zhuan

    2018-02-28

    Similar to neurons, astrocytes actively participate in synaptic transmission via releasing gliotransmitters. The Ca 2+ -dependent release of gliotransmitters includes glutamate and ATP. Following an 'on-cell-like' mechanical stimulus to a single astrocyte, Ca 2+ independent single, large, non-quantal, ATP release occurs. Astrocytic ATP release is inhibited by either selective antagonist treatment or genetic knockdown of P2X7 receptor channels. Our work suggests that ATP can be released from astrocytes via two independent pathways in hippocampal astrocytes; in addition to the known Ca 2+ -dependent vesicular release, larger non-quantal ATP release depends on P2X7 channels following mechanical stretch. Astrocytic ATP release is essential for brain functions such as synaptic long-term potentiation for learning and memory. However, whether and how ATP is released via exocytosis remains hotly debated. All previous studies of non-vesicular ATP release have used indirect assays. By contrast, two recent studies report vesicular ATP release using more direct assays. In the present study, using patch clamped 'ATP-sniffer cells', we re-investigated astrocytic ATP release at single-vesicle resolution in hippocampal astrocytes. Following an 'on-cell-like' mechanical stimulus of a single astrocyte, a Ca 2+ independent single large non-quantal ATP release occurred, in contrast to the Ca 2+ -dependent multiple small quantal ATP release in a chromaffin cell. The mechanical stimulation-induced ATP release from an astrocyte was inhibited by either exposure to a selective antagonist or genetic knockdown of P2X7 receptor channels. Functional P2X7 channels were expressed in astrocytes in hippocampal brain slices. Thus, in addition to small quantal ATP release, larger non-quantal ATP release depends on P2X7 channels in astrocytes. © 2018 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2018 The Physiological Society.

  2. A radiolabel release microassay for phagocytic killing of Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bistoni, F.; Baccarini, M.; Blasi, E.; Marconi, P.; Puccetti, P.

    1982-01-01

    The chromium-51 release technique for quantifying intracellular killing of radiolabelled Candida albicans particles was exploited in a microassay in which murine and human phagocytes acted as effectors under peculiarly simple conditions. At appropriate effector: target ratios and with a 4 h incubation, up to 50% specific chromium release could be detected in the supernatant with no need for opsonization or lysis of phagocytes. This simple microassay permits easy-to-perform, simultaneous testing of a variety of different phagocytes even if only available in limited amounts, and provides an objective measurement of intracellular killing of Candida albicans. (Auth.)

  3. Subtype-specific suppression of Shiga toxin 2 released from Escherichia coli upon exposure to protein synthesis inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Malene Gantzhorn; Hansen, Claus; Riise, Erik

    2008-01-01

    Shiga toxins (Stx) are important virulence factors in the pathogenesis of severe disease including hemolytic-uremic syndrome, caused by Stx-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). STEC strains increase the release of Stx in vitro following the addition of fluoroquinolones, whereas protein synthesis...... inhibitors previously have been reported to suppress the release of Stx. The amount of Stx released from wild-type STEC strains incubated with protein synthesis inhibitors was examined by a Vero cell cytotoxicity assay. The amounts released were compared to the Stx type (Stx1 or Stx2) and additionally...... to the individual subtypes and toxin variants of Stx2. In general, Stx2 release was suppressed significantly upon exposure to protein synthesis inhibitors at MICs, which was not observed in the case of Stx1. Also, the average amount of different Stx2 toxin variants released was suppressed to various levels ranging...

  4. Small reservoir effects on headwater water quality in the rural-urban fringe, Georgia Piedmont, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.. Amber R. Ignatius, Geographer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Small reservoirs are prevalent landscape features that affect the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of headwater streams. Tens of thousands of small reservoirs, often less than a hectare in size, were constructed over the past century within the United States. While remote-sensing and geographic-mapping technologies assist in identifying and quantifying these features, their localized influence on water quality is uncertain. We report a year-long physicochemical study of nine small reservoirs (0.15–2.17 ha within the Oconee and Broad River Watersheds in the Georgia Piedmont. Study sites were selected along an urban-rural gradient with differing amounts of agricultural, forested, and developed land covers. Sites were sampled monthly for discharge and inflow/outflow water quality parameters (temperature, specific conductance, pH, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, alkalinity, total phosphorus, total nitrogen, nitrate, ammonium. While the proportion of developed land cover within watersheds had positive correlations with reservoir specific conductivity values, agricultural and forested land covers showed correlations (positive and negative, respectively with reservoir alkalinity, total nitrogen, nitrate, and specific conductivity. The majority of outflow temperatures were warmer than inflows for all land uses throughout the year, especially in the summer. Outflows had lower nitrate concentrations, but higher ammonium. The type of outflow structure was also influential; top-release dams showed higher dissolved oxygen and pH than bottom-release dams. Water quality effects were still evident 250 m below the dam, albeit reduced.

  5. Aerosols released in accidents in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballinger, M.Y.; Owczarski, P.C.; Hashimoto, K.; Nishio, G.; Jordan, S.; Lindner, W.

    1987-01-01

    For analyzing the thermodynamic and radiological consequences of solvent fire accidents in reprocessing plants, intensive investigations on burning contaminated condensible liquids were performed at Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). In small- and large-scale tests, KfK studied the behavior of kerosene, tributyl phosphate, HNO 3 mixture fires in open air and closed containments. The particle release from uranium-contaminated pool fires was investigated. Different filter devices were tested. For analyzing fires, PNL has developed the FIRIN computer code and has generated small-scale fire data in support of that code. The results of the experiments in which contaminated combustible liquids were burned demonstrate the use of the FIRIN code in simulating a solvent fire in a nuclear reprocessing plant. To demonstrate the safety evaluation of a postulated solvent fire in an extraction process of a reprocessing pant, JAERI conducted large-scale fire tests. Behavior of solvent fires in a cell and the integrity of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters due to smoke plugging were investigated. To evaluate confinement of radioactive materials released from the solvent fire, the ventilation systems with HEPA filters were tested under postulated fire conditions

  6. The Milky Way Project: A Census of Small Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidsson, Kim; Wolf-Chase, G. A.; Way Project, Milky

    2013-01-01

    The first data release (DR1) from the Milky Way Project (MWP) contains 1362 visually identified small bubbles drawn by users. These small infrared bubbles typically have diameters MSX6C point source catalog; >90% of all small bubbles are MSX point sources.

  7. Chemical form of tritium released from solid breeder materials and the influences of it on a bred tritium recovery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukubo, Y.; Nishikawa, M.; Nishida, Y.; Kinjyo, T.; Tanifuji, Takaaki; Kawamura, Yoshinori; Enoeda, Mikio

    2004-01-01

    The ratio of HTO in total tritium was measured at release of the bred tritium to the purge gas with hydrogen using the thermal release after irradiation method, where neutron irradiation was performed at JRR-3 reactor in JAERI or KUR reactor in Kyoto University. It is experimentally confirmed in this study that not a small portion of bred tritium is released to the purge gas in the form of HTO form ceramic breeder materials even when hydrogen is added to the purge gas. The chemical composition is to be decided by the competitive reaction at the grain surface of a ceramic breeder material where desorption reaction, isotope exchange reaction 1, isotope exchange reaction 2 and water formation reaction are considered to take part. Observation in this study implies that it is necessary to have a bred tritium recovery system applicable for both HT and HTO form to recover whole bred tritium. The chemical composition also decides the amount of tritium transferable to the cooling water of the electricity generation system through the structural material in the blanket system. Permeation behavior of tritium through some structural materials at various conditions are also discussed. (author)

  8. Release potential of single-wall carbon nanotubes produced by super-growth method during manufacturing and handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Isamu; Sakurai, Hiromu; Mizuno, Kohei; Gamo, Masashi

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the release potential of single-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) produced by the super-growth method during their manufacturing and handling processes at a research facility. We generally sampled air at points both outside and inside of protective enclosures such as a glove box and fume hood. Sampling the air outside of the enclosures was intended to evaluate the actual exposure of workers to CNTs, while sampling the air inside the enclosures was performed to quantify the release of CNTs to the air in order to estimate the potential exposure of workers without protection. The results revealed that airborne CNTs were generated when (1) CNTs were separated from the substrates using a spatula and placed in a container in a glove box; (2) an air gun was used to clean the air filters (containing dust that included CNTs) of a vacuum cleaner; (3) a vacuum cleaner was used to collect CNTs (emission with exhaust air from the cleaner); (4) the container of CNTs was opened; and (5) CNTs in the bin of the cleaner were transferred to a container. In these processes, airborne CNTs were only found inside the enclosures, except for a small amount of CNTs released from the glove box when it was opened. Electron microscopic observations of aerosol particles found CNT clusters, which were fragments of CNT forests, with sizes ranging from submicrometers to tens of micrometers.

  9. Automated assay for screening the enzymatic release of reducing sugars from micronized biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asther Marcel

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To reduce the production cost of bioethanol obtained from fermentation of the sugars provided by degradation of lignocellulosic biomass (i.e., second generation bioethanol, it is necessary to screen for new enzymes endowed with more efficient biomass degrading properties. This demands the set-up of high-throughput screening methods. Several methods have been devised all using microplates in the industrial SBS format. Although this size reduction and standardization has greatly improved the screening process, the published methods comprise one or more manual steps that seriously decrease throughput. Therefore, we worked to devise a screening method devoid of any manual steps. Results We describe a fully automated assay for measuring the amount of reducing sugars released by biomass-degrading enzymes from wheat-straw and spruce. The method comprises two independent and automated steps. The first step is the making of "substrate plates". It consists of filling 96-well microplates with slurry suspensions of micronized substrate which are then stored frozen until use. The second step is an enzymatic activity assay. After thawing, the substrate plates are supplemented by the robot with cell-wall degrading enzymes where necessary, and the whole process from addition of enzymes to quantification of released sugars is autonomously performed by the robot. We describe how critical parameters (amount of substrate, amount of enzyme, incubation duration and temperature were selected to fit with our specific use. The ability of this automated small-scale assay to discriminate among different enzymatic activities was validated using a set of commercial enzymes. Conclusions Using an automatic microplate sealer solved three main problems generally encountered during the set-up of methods for measuring the sugar-releasing activity of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes: throughput, automation, and evaporation losses. In its present set-up, the

  10. Amount and composition of rain failing at Rothamsted

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, E J; Richards, E H

    1919-01-01

    The monthly fluctuations in the ammoniacal concentration varies with rainfall, i.e., highest in spring; lowest in winter. The nitric nitrogen concentration fluctuated year by year and month by month in the same way as the ammoniacal nitrogen and the rainfall until 1910, since when there has been no simple relationship. The close relationship between the amounts of ammoniacal and nitric nitrogen suggests either a common origin or the production of nitric compounds from ammonia. Chlorine fluctuations closely follow the rainfall also. Since 1888, when the experiments began, to 1916, when they terminated, there has been a rise in the amounts of nitric nitrogen and of chlorine in the rain. In the case of chlorine a parallel series of determinations made at Cirencester over the same period shows a similar rise. There is no rise of ammonia but on the contrary a tendency to drop; the sum of ammoniacal and nitric nitrogen shows little change over the period. This seems to suggest that a former source of ammonia is now turning out nitric acid. It is possible that modern gas burners and grates tend to the formation of nitric oxides rather than of ammonia. Rain contains on an average 10 parts of dissolved oxygen per million, the amount being higher in winter than in summer: 66.4 lb per acre per annum was brought down during the two years over which the determinations extended. The marked difference in composition between summer and winter rainfall suggests that these may differ in their origin. The winter rain resembles Atlantic rain in its high chlorine and low ammonia and nitrate content; the summer rain is characterized by low chlorine but high ammonia and nitrate content, suggesting that it arises by evaporation of water from the soil and condensation at higher altitudes than in the case of winter rain.

  11. DEFERRED TAXES GENERATED BY THE CAPITALIZED INTERESTS IN THE AMOUNT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PALIU – POPA LUCIA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available According to the General Framework for preparing and presenting the financial statements elaborated by IASB, the utility of information is provided by attributes (qualitative features, such as: intelligibility, relevance, credibility and comparability. For being credible, the financial information shall be erroneous, shall not be biased or deforming the patrimony, and one of the elements representing and defining the information credibility is the prudency. Thus, the prudential accounting treatments affect, on the one hand, the accounting information relevance and credibility, and on the other hand, equally, both the producers as well as the users of the financial information, due to the economic consequences which are generated. From this perspective and considering that the implied economic agents are not neutral in terms of their option concerning the neutral accounting practices, prudent or aggressive, we opined that it is useful to conduct a study aiming the relevance of the accounting information related to the deferred taxes generated by the capitalized interests in the amount of the fix assets, recognizing the value of these taxes having as result the compliance with the principle of prudency within the accountancy. In this context, compared to the dominant accounting systems, respectively the continental system and the Anglo- Saxon system, within which the accounting information is characterized as legal, respectively addressed to the external users, especially to the investors, the conducted study aimed the following directions: the main differences between the provisions of the national, European, Anglo-Saxon accounting regulations and those of the international referential related to the prudency; the occurrence and evolution of the deferred taxes generated by the capitalized interests in the amount of the fix assets; informational benefits of the accounting prudency concerning the reflection of the deferred taxes established by the

  12. Estimation of cobalt release from feed water heater tubes of BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, S.; Kitamura, M.; Ozawa, Y.

    1983-01-01

    To evaluate the release source of cobalt from heater tubes of the feed water line, release rate measurements were carried out by detecting 60 Co released from irradiated stainless steel in contact with neutral water at an oxygen concentration of 20 ppb. The dependences of cobalt release rate on temperature, flow velocity and exposure time were studied after 670 hours of release experiments, and an empirical equation (which is presented) was obtained in the temperature range from 150 to 240 deg C. A decrease in the cobalt release rate above 250 deg C was considered due to the formation of a protective oxide layer. From these data, the amount of cobalt released from individual feed water heaters was evaluated. It was demonstrated that low cobalt containing stainless steel was economically applied only in the higher temperature region of the heater (20% of the total surface) to reduce cobalt feed rate into the reactor (to approx. 1/2). (author)

  13. The effect of loading solution and dissolution media on release of Diclofenac from ion exchange resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Atyabi F

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Drugs can be loaded on ion exchange resins in order to control their release. Loading of diclofenac sodium on the resin beads not only sustain its release but also reduce its gastrointestinal mucosal injury. In this study the effect of loading solution and concentration of diclofenac in loading solution on total amount of drug loaded on the resin beads (Amberlite IRA-900 and the release characteristic of drug in different media were examined. Results showed that diclofenac resin complex did not release their drug content in simulated gastric fluid but released it in simulated intestinal fluid independent of exposure time in acidic conditions. The effect of a number of parameters such as ionic strength and pH on the release characteristic of drug - resin complexes were also examined. Results showed that although ionic strength is an important factor, drug release is more affected by the pH of the media. NO ABSTRACT

  14. Optimum amount of an insurance sum in life insurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janez Balkovec

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Personal insurance represents one of the sources of personal social security as a category of personal property. How to get a proper life insurance is a frequently asked question. When insuring material objects (car, house..., the problem is usually not in the amount of the taken insurance. With life insurance (abstract goods, problems as such occur. In this paper, we wish to present a model that, according to the financial situation and the anticipated future, makes it possible to calculate the optimum insurance sum in life insurance.

  15. PIXE investigation of in-vitro release of chloramphenicol across polyvinyl alcohol/ acrylamide hydrogel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rihawi, M.; Al-Zeer, A.; Allaf, A.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogels based on polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and different amounts of acrylamide monomer (AAm) were prepared by thermal crosslinking process in solid state. The PVA/AAm hydrogels were investigated for drug delivery system applications. Chloramphenicol was adopted as a model drug to study its release behaviour across the prepared hydrogels. Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analytical technique was utilized to study the drug release behaviour across the hydrogels. A comparison study between PIXE and UV measurements was performed. FTIR measurements were carried out to perform the molecular characterization. The releasing behaviour of the drug across the hydrogels demonstrates a decrease and a subsequent increase in the drug release rate, as the AAm amount increases. The FTIR characterization of the prepared hydrogels has shown a competitive behaviour between the crosslinking of PVA with AAm monomer or oligomerized AAm, depending on the amount of AAm added to prepare the PVA/AAm hydrogels. (author)

  16. Chlorine release from biomass. Part 6; Kloravgaang fraan biobraenslen. Del 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zintl, Frank; Stroemberg, Birgitta [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2000-04-01

    Chlorine release from model compounds and different biomass fuels has been studied during thermal treatment in an electric oven in inert atmosphere (N{sub 2}) and with addition of 10% O{sub 2}. The amount of chlorine in all investigated materials has been kept to 2% with addition of KCl solution in methanol. The amount of chlorine was analysed before and after treatment in the decided atmosphere and to the temperature chosen. The influence from different functional groups on the chlorine release at low temperatures has been studied in pyrolysis experiments of simple model compounds with different structures. A good correlation between the chlorine release and the functional groups in the model substances was achieved. Results from the experiments shows that the early chlorine release, is most likely to occur in all biofuels, since all biomass fuels contains biological material with significant amounts of functional groups which can interact with fuel chlorine ( inorganic chlorine)

  17. Thermal release behavior of helium from copper irradiated by He+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, T.; Tokura, S.; Yamanaka, S.; Miyake, M.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal release behavior of helium from copper irradiated by 20 keV He + ions with a dose of 2x10 15 to 3x10 17 ions/cm 2 has been studied. The shape of the thermal release curves and thew number of helium release peaks strongly depend on the irradiation dose. Results from SEM surface observastion after post-irradiation heating suggested that helium release caused various surface damages such as blistering, flaking, and hole formation. Helium release resulting in small holes was analyzed and helium bubble growth mechanisms are discussed. (orig.)

  18. Interleukin-6 release from the human brain during prolonged exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars; Nielsen, Bodil; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2002-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-6 is a pleiotropic cytokine, which has a variety of physiological roles including functions within the central nervous system. Circulating IL-6 increases markedly during exercise, partly due to the release of IL-6 from the contracting skeletal muscles, and exercise-induced IL-6 m...... influence of hyperthermia. In conclusion, IL-6 is released from the brain during prolonged exercise in humans and it appears that the duration of the exercise rather than the increase in body temperature dictates the cerebral IL-6 response....... in the brain at rest or after 15 min of exercise, but a small release of IL-6 was observed after 60 min of exercise in the first bout (0.06 +/- 0.03 ng min(-1)). This release of IL-6 from the brain was five-fold greater at the end of the second bout (0.30 +/- 0.08 ng min(-1); P

  19. Savannah River release: test of the new ARAC capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerson, M.H.

    1977-01-01

    Working jointly from opposite sides of the nation Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) and the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) quickly assessed the consequences of an early-morning tritium release in May 1974 from the Savannah River Plant, in South Carolina. Measurements confirmed the accuracy of the LLL predictions. Due to the small quantity involved and to the release location (well within the plant confines), the release was not dangerous to the public. The emergency provided a dramatic test of procedures and capabilities of the new Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) center at Livermore, which was not yet operational, demonstrating the capacity for quick response, and the feasibility of real-time data acquisition and transmittal across the continent

  20. Release plan for Big Pete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, T.A.

    1996-11-01

    This release plan is to provide instructions for the Radiological Control Technician (RCT) to conduct surveys for the unconditional release of ''Big Pete,'' which was used in the removal of ''Spacers'' from the N-Reactor. Prior to performing surveys on the rear end portion of ''Big Pete,'' it shall be cleaned (i.e., free of oil, grease, caked soil, heavy dust). If no contamination is found, the vehicle may be released with the permission of the area RCT Supervisor. If contamination is found by any of the surveys, contact the cognizant Radiological Engineer for decontamination instructions

  1. Influence of increasing amount of recycled concrete powder on mechanical properties of cement paste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topič, Jaroslav; Prošek, Zdeněk; Plachý, Tomáš

    2017-09-01

    This paper deals with using fine recycled concrete powder in cement composites as micro-filler and partial cement replacement. Binder properties of recycled concrete powder are given by exposed non-hydrated cement grains, which can hydrate again and in small amount replace cement or improve some mechanical properties. Concrete powder used in the experiments was obtained from old railway sleepers. Infrastructure offer more sources of old concrete and they can be recycled directly on building site and used again. Experimental part of this paper focuses on influence of increasing amount of concrete powder on mechanical properties of cement paste. Bulk density, shrinkage, dynamic Young’s modulus, compression and flexural strength are observed during research. This will help to determine limiting amount of concrete powder when decrease of mechanical properties outweighs the benefits of cement replacement. The shrinkage, dynamic Young’s modulus and flexural strength of samples with 20 to 30 wt. % of concrete powder are comparable with reference cement paste or even better. Negative effect of concrete powder mainly influenced the compression strength. Only a 10 % cement replacement reduced compression strength by about 25 % and further decrease was almost linear.

  2. Expert system shell to reason on large amounts of data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffrida, Gionanni

    1994-01-01

    The current data base management systems (DBMS's) do not provide a sophisticated environment to develop rule based expert systems applications. Some of the new DBMS's come with some sort of rule mechanism; these are active and deductive database systems. However, both of these are not featured enough to support full implementation based on rules. On the other hand, current expert system shells do not provide any link with external databases. That is, all the data are kept in the system working memory. Such working memory is maintained in main memory. For some applications the reduced size of the available working memory could represent a constraint for the development. Typically these are applications which require reasoning on huge amounts of data. All these data do not fit into the computer main memory. Moreover, in some cases these data can be already available in some database systems and continuously updated while the expert system is running. This paper proposes an architecture which employs knowledge discovering techniques to reduce the amount of data to be stored in the main memory; in this architecture a standard DBMS is coupled with a rule-based language. The data are stored into the DBMS. An interface between the two systems is responsible for inducing knowledge from the set of relations. Such induced knowledge is then transferred to the rule-based language working memory.

  3. Milk intake in kits: not only the total amount matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Arnau Bonachera

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to identify milk intake variation patterns in kits throughout lactation, to evaluate their permanent maternal component and their relationships with the performance of kits before and after weaning. To achieve this goal, we used 73 rabbit does, controlled between the 1st and the 4th lactation, which kindled 229 litters with a total of 2225 kits. The daily milk intake records per young rabbit were analysed using a principal component analysis (PCA. We found that 72.3% of the variability was explained by the first 3 principal components (PCs. PC1 explained 46.4% of the total variability, was associated with the total amount of milk intake during lactation and presented a repeatability of 0.27 (P0.05. This component was little related to performance traits. Therefore, it seems that milk plays 2 different roles at the beginning of feed intake; the most important would affect development of the kits and thus is related with high intake. The second one, for a given total amount of milk intake during lactation, would create a kind of competition between milk and feed intake at the end of lactation. The effects of both components still persist during the growing period and seem to be moderately affected by the mother.

  4. Chemical Characteristics of C-14 Released from YGN-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidoo Kang; Kyungrok Park; Kyoungdoek Kim; Jonghyun Ha [Nuclear Environment Technology Institute Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. P.O.Box 149, Yusung Daejeon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: C-14 is resulting from the activation reaction of oxygen, nitrogen and carbon in the fuel and coolant of PWR. The amount of Carbon-14 released from PWR is small and not easy to detect, it is not used as a main monitored nuclide released in PWR in general. Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company (KHNP) had monitored Carbon-14 at five main ventilation lines of Yonggwang-4 from 2003 for 2 years. In order to monitor C-14, KHNP devised C-14 sampling instrument which can collect CO{sub 2} and hydrocarbons separately. It is composed of three main components, that is, primary CO{sub 2} sampler, a hydrocarbon oxidation assembly and a secondary CO{sub 2} sampler. The primary CO{sub 2} sampler has one water bubbler and two NaOH bubblers. To analyze C-14 in NaOH, CO{sub 3} ion was precipitated as CaCO{sub 3} or BaCO{sub 3} using CaCl{sub 2} and BaCl{sub 2} and performed mass analysis. But it was difficult due to over-precipitation by OH ion. This problem was solved by pH control using buffer solution NH{sub 4}Cl and adding some heat to the solution. The collecting efficiency was calculated to 92% and the test result was verified by C-14 tracer (NaHCO{sub 3}). According to the analysis results, the total activity is estimated to be 0.147 TBq/GWe.Yr. This activity would be about 67% of world's PWR average: 0.22 TBq/Gwe (UNSCEAR 2000) The area of highest concentration is the Fuel Building (RMS 035, which reaches 98% of total activity) followed by the Reactor Building, the Radwaste Building and the Auxiliary Building. The ventilation time of the Reactor Building is 3.3 hours per month, and 720 hours for the others (continuous) In the point of chemical form, the results show CO{sub 2} is dominant chemical form in fuel building, while methane compound is dominant in other areas. (authors)

  5. Breeding blanket development. Tritium release from breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Nagao, Yoshiharu

    2006-01-01

    Engineering data on neutron irradiation performance of tritium breeders are needed to design the breeding blanket of fusion reactor. In this study, tritium release experiments of the breeders were carried out to examine the effects of various parameters (such as sweep gas flow rate, hydrogen content in sweep gas, irradiation temperature and thermal neutron flux) on tritium generation and release behavior. Lithium titanate (Li 2 TiO 3 ) is considered as a candidate tritium breeder in the blanket design of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). As for the shape of the breeder material, a small spherical form is preferred to reduce the thermal stress induced in the breeder. Li 2 TiO 3 pebbles of about 170g in total weight and with 0.3 and 2 mm in diameter were manufactured by a wet process, and an assembly packed with the binary Li 2 TiO 3 pebbles was irradiated in Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). The tritium was generated in the Li 2 TiO 3 pebble bed and released from the pebble bed, and was swept downstream using the sweep gas for on-line analysis of tritium content. Concentration of total tritium and gaseous tritium (HT or T 2 gas) released from the Li 2 TiO 3 pebble bed were measured by ionization chambers, and the ratio of (gaseous tritium)/(total tritium) was evaluated. The sweep gas flow rate was changed from 100 to 900cm 3 /min, and hydrogen content in the sweep gas was changed from 100 to 10000 ppm. Furthermore, thermal neutron flux was changed using a window made of hafnium (Hf) neutron absorber. The irradiation temperature at an outer region of the Li 2 TiO 3 pebble bed was held between 200 and 400degC. The main results of this experiment are summarized as follows. 1) When the temperature at the outside edge of the Li 2 TiO 3 pebble bed exceeded 100degC, the tritium release from the Li 2 TiO 3 pebble bed started. The ratio of the tritium release rate and the tritium generation rate (normalized tritium release rate: R/G) reached

  6. Comparison Analysis among Large Amount of SNS Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toriumi, Fujio; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Suwa, Hirohiko; Okada, Isamu; Izumi, Kiyoshi; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro

    In recent years, application of Social Networking Services (SNS) and Blogs are growing as new communication tools on the Internet. Several large-scale SNS sites are prospering; meanwhile, many sites with relatively small scale are offering services. Such small-scale SNSs realize small-group isolated type of communication while neither mixi nor MySpace can do that. However, the studies on SNS are almost about particular large-scale SNSs and cannot analyze whether their results apply for general features or for special characteristics on the SNSs. From the point of view of comparison analysis on SNS, comparison with just several types of those cannot reach a statistically significant level. We analyze many SNS sites with the aim of classifying them by using some approaches. Our paper classifies 50,000 sites for small-scale SNSs and gives their features from the points of network structure, patterns of communication, and growth rate of SNS. The result of analysis for network structure shows that many SNS sites have small-world attribute with short path lengths and high coefficients of their cluster. Distribution of degrees of the SNS sites is close to power law. This result indicates the small-scale SNS sites raise the percentage of users with many friends than mixi. According to the analysis of their coefficients of assortativity, those SNS sites have negative values of assortativity, and that means users with high degree tend to connect users with small degree. Next, we analyze the patterns of user communication. A friend network of SNS is explicit while users' communication behaviors are defined as an implicit network. What kind of relationships do these networks have? To address this question, we obtain some characteristics of users' communication structure and activation patterns of users on the SNS sites. By using new indexes, friend aggregation rate and friend coverage rate, we show that SNS sites with high value of friend coverage rate activate diary postings

  7. Release fraction of PWR after severe accidents. Vol. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, M.; El-Messeiry, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Fission fragments and gases are emitted after accidents as a result of core meltdown and core concrete interactions. These aerosols are transported and fill the reactor containment. With increasing the pressure above pressure design bases, a failure of containment may occur and subsequently these aerosols will release into the external environment leading to a source term of radioactivity that affects the safety of workers and public. The amount of aerosol which escapes to the environment can be described by the release fraction which is defined as the total accumulated aerosol which initially enters the containment. The factors that affect the release fraction is studied, and the aerosol dynamics equation is used to model the release of aerosol to the outside atmosphere. These factors are containment pressure, failure time,break area, the size of aerosol particle. It found that early failure time and higher pressure increase the release fraction, also the release faction is affected by the area and the aerosol particle size. 7 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Effects of compost age on the release of nutrients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal B. Al-Bataina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Composted organic materials are applied to help restore disturbed soils, speed revegetation, and control erosion; these changes are generally beneficial for stormwater quality. Ensuring that nutrient release from compost is adequate for plant needs without degrading stormwater quality is important since composts release nitrogen at variable rates (1–3% of total N/yr and the leaching process can extend for many years. The aim of this work was to understand the effect of compost age on the extent and rates of nitrogen release by conducting detailed rainfall simulation studies of one compost type at three different ages. Models describing temporal changes in nitrogen release to runoff during a single storm and across multiple storms were developed and applied to the runoff data. Nitrogen content (% and bulk density of compost increased with the increase in compost age and total nitrogen release decreased with increasing compost age. The three rain simulations (storms performed on each of the three compost ages show that nitrogen release declined each day of the repeated daily storms. A first-order kinetic model was used to estimate the amount of nitrogen remaining on compost after several storms.

  9. Sustained release of fungicide metalaxyl by mesoporous silica nanospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanyika, Harrison, E-mail: hwanyika@gmail.com [Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Department of Chemistry (Kenya)

    2013-08-15

    The use of nanomaterials for the controlled delivery of pesticides is nascent technology that has the potential to increase the efficiency of food production and decrease pollution. In this work, the prospect of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) for storage and controlled release of metalaxyl fungicide has been investigated. Mesoporous silica nanospheres with average particle diameters of 162 nm and average pore sizes of 3.2 nm were prepared by a sol-gel process. Metalaxyl molecules were loaded into MSN pores from an aqueous solution by a rotary evaporation method. The loaded amount of metalaxyl as evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis was about 14 wt%. Release of the fungicide entrapped in the MSN matrix revealed sustained release behavior. About 76 % of the free metalaxyl was released in soil within a period of 30 days while only 11.5 and 47 % of the metalaxyl contained in the MSN carrier was released in soil and water, respectively, within the same period. The study showed that MSN can be used to successfully store metalaxyl molecules in its mesoporous framework and significantly delay their release in soil.

  10. Release fraction of PWR after severe accidents. Vol. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aziz, M; El-Messeiry, A M [National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Fission fragments and gases are emitted after accidents as a result of core meltdown and core concrete interactions. These aerosols are transported and fill the reactor containment. With increasing the pressure above pressure design bases, a failure of containment may occur and subsequently these aerosols will release into the external environment leading to a source term of radioactivity that affects the safety of workers and public. The amount of aerosol which escapes to the environment can be described by the release fraction which is defined as the total accumulated aerosol which initially enters the containment. The factors that affect the release fraction is studied, and the aerosol dynamics equation is used to model the release of aerosol to the outside atmosphere. These factors are containment pressure, failure time,break area, the size of aerosol particle. It found that early failure time and higher pressure increase the release fraction, also the release faction is affected by the area and the aerosol particle size. 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Sustained release of fungicide metalaxyl by mesoporous silica nanospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanyika, Harrison

    2013-01-01

    The use of nanomaterials for the controlled delivery of pesticides is nascent technology that has the potential to increase the efficiency of food production and decrease pollution. In this work, the prospect of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) for storage and controlled release of metalaxyl fungicide has been investigated. Mesoporous silica nanospheres with average particle diameters of 162 nm and average pore sizes of 3.2 nm were prepared by a sol–gel process. Metalaxyl molecules were loaded into MSN pores from an aqueous solution by a rotary evaporation method. The loaded amount of metalaxyl as evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis was about 14 wt%. Release of the fungicide entrapped in the MSN matrix revealed sustained release behavior. About 76 % of the free metalaxyl was released in soil within a period of 30 days while only 11.5 and 47 % of the metalaxyl contained in the MSN carrier was released in soil and water, respectively, within the same period. The study showed that MSN can be used to successfully store metalaxyl molecules in its mesoporous framework and significantly delay their release in soil

  12. Tritium release experiments with CATS and numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munakata, Kenzo; Wajima, Takaaki; Hara, Keisuke; Wada, Kohei; Takeishi, Toshiharu; Shinozaki, Yohei; Mochizuki, Kazuhiro; Katekari, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Iwai, Yasunori; Hayashi, Takumi; Yamanishi, Toshihiko

    2010-01-01

    In D-T fusion power plants, large amounts of tritium would be handled. Tritium is the radioisotope of protium, and is easily taken into the human body, and thus the behavior of tritium accidentally released in fusion power plants should be studied for the safety design and radioprotection of workers. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the behavior of tritium released into large rooms with objectives, since complex flow fields should exist in such rooms and they could influence the ventilation of the air containing released tritium. Thus, tritium release experiments were conducted using Caisson Assembly for Tritium Safety Study (CATS) in TPL/JAEA. Some data were taken for tritium behavior in the ventilated area and response of tritium monitors. In the experiments, approximately 17 GBq of tritium was released into Caisson with the total volume of 12 m 3 , and the room was ventilated at the rate of 12 m 3 /h after release of tritium. It was found that placement of an objective in the vessel substantially affects decontamination efficiency. With regard to an experimental result, numerical calculation was performed and the experimental result and the result of numerical calculation were compared, which indicates that experimental results are qualitatively reproduced by numerical calculation. However, further R and D needs to be carried out for quantitative reproduction of the experimental results.

  13. Tritium release experiments with CATS and numerical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munakata, Kenzo, E-mail: kenzo@gipc.akita-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering and Resource Sciences, Akita University, Tegata-gakuen-cho 1-1, Akita 010-8502 (Japan); Wajima, Takaaki; Hara, Keisuke; Wada, Kohei [Faculty of Engineering and Resource Sciences, Akita University, Tegata-gakuen-cho 1-1, Akita 010-8502 (Japan); Takeishi, Toshiharu; Shinozaki, Yohei; Mochizuki, Kazuhiro; Katekari, Kenichi [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, Hakozaki 6-10-1, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Iwai, Yasunori; Hayashi, Takumi; Yamanishi, Toshihiko [Tritium Technology Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    In D-T fusion power plants, large amounts of tritium would be handled. Tritium is the radioisotope of protium, and is easily taken into the human body, and thus the behavior of tritium accidentally released in fusion power plants should be studied for the safety design and radioprotection of workers. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the behavior of tritium released into large rooms with objectives, since complex flow fields should exist in such rooms and they could influence the ventilation of the air containing released tritium. Thus, tritium release experiments were conducted using Caisson Assembly for Tritium Safety Study (CATS) in TPL/JAEA. Some data were taken for tritium behavior in the ventilated area and response of tritium monitors. In the experiments, approximately 17 GBq of tritium was released into Caisson with the total volume of 12 m{sup 3}, and the room was ventilated at the rate of 12 m{sup 3}/h after release of tritium. It was found that placement of an objective in the vessel substantially affects decontamination efficiency. With regard to an experimental result, numerical calculation was performed and the experimental result and the result of numerical calculation were compared, which indicates that experimental results are qualitatively reproduced by numerical calculation. However, further R and D needs to be carried out for quantitative reproduction of the experimental results.

  14. Observation of electrostatically released DNA from gold electrodes with controlled threshold voltages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeishi, Shunsaku; Rant, Ulrich; Fujiwara, Tsuyoshi; Buchholz, Karin; Usuki, Tatsuya; Arinaga, Kenji; Takemoto, Kazuya; Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Tornow, Marc; Fujita, Shozo; Abstreiter, Gerhard; Yokoyama, Naoki

    2004-03-22

    DNA oligo-nucleotides, localized at Au metal electrodes in aqueous solution, are found to be released when applying a negative bias voltage to the electrode. The release was confirmed by monitoring the intensity of the fluorescence of cyanine dyes (Cy3) linked to the 5' end of the DNA. The threshold voltage of the release changes depending on the kind of linker added to the DNA 3'-terminal. The amount of released DNA depends on the duration of the voltage pulse. Using this technique, we can retain DNA at Au electrodes or Au needles, and release the desired amount of DNA at a precise location in a target. The results suggest that DNA injection into living cells is possible with this method. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics

  15. Radioisotopic composition of yellowcake: an estimation of stack release rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momeni, M.H.; Kisieleski, W.E.; Rayno, D.R.; Sabau, C.S.

    1979-12-01

    Uranium concentrate (yellowcake) composites from four mills (Anaconda, Kerr-McGee, Highland, and Uravan) were analyzed for U-238, U-235, U-234, Th-230, Ra-226, and Pb-210. The ratio of specific activities of U-238 to U-234 in the composites suggested that secular radioactive equilibrium exists in the ore. The average activity ratios in the yellowcake were determined to be 2.7 x 10 -3 (Th-230/U-238), 5 x 10 -4 (Ra-226/U-238) and 2 x 10 -4 (Pb-210/U-238). Based on earlier EPA measurements of the release rates from the stacks, the amount of yellowcake released was determined to be 0.1% of the amount processed

  16. Sulfur Release during Alternative fuels Combustion in Cement Rotary Kilns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortada Mut, Maria del Mar

    fuel with the bed material, heating up of a particle, 5 iv devolatilization, char combustion, the reactions between CaSO 4 and the different reducing agents, and the oxidation of the volatiles gases in the free board. The main reducing agents are CO, CH 4 and H 2 , which are introduced under the bed...... are of high importance for SO 2 release because it is shown that introducing the same total amount of gas, the highest reducing agent concentration fo r a short period released a higher total SO 2 amount compared to the lowest concentration during a long period. A mathematical reaction based model...... but the effect of sulfur content in the bed cannot be predicted. Further development regarding particle motion according to the rotational speed may be needed. Furthermore, a model for predicting the tendency of build-ups for a kiln system is developed based on the prediction of SO 3 and Cl concentrations...

  17. Birth control - slow release methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contraception - slow-release hormonal methods; Progestin implants; Progestin injections; Skin patch; Vaginal ring ... might want to consider a different birth control method. SKIN PATCH The skin patch is placed on ...

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF SUSTAINED RELEASE TABLETS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-12-31

    Dec 31, 2013 ... The SR dosage forms that release drugs pH independently in .... were determined; Post compression parameters such as weight variation test, hardness, ... Based on the ICH guidelines 12, the stability studies were carried out ...

  19. Augmented surgical amounts for intermittent exotropia to prevent recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Arda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose was to evaluate the results of bilateral lateral rectus (BLR recession which is based on augmented surgical amounts of classical surgical table of Parks′ for basic and pseudo-divergence excess type intermittent exotropia [X(T]. Materials and Methods: Patients with X(T operated by the same surgeon and followed-up for at least 6 months were included. Patients with prior surgery, neurobehavioral and musculoskeletal conditions, strabismus different from that mentioned above X(T were excluded. All the patients received BLR only. The amount of the recession was increased by the amount needed to correct 5 prism diopters (PD more X(T than what was measured. After the operation, 1 st week, 2 nd and 6 months measurements were recorded. The patients were grouped according to their 1 st week (3-7 days postoperative examination as: >10 PD esotropia (Group 1, ≤10 PD esotropia (Group 2, exotropia (Group 3, and orthotropic (Group 4, respectively. Final surgical outcomes were classified as "good" (≤10 PD exotropia and ≤5 PD esotropia, "recurrence" (>10 PD exotropia and "overcorrected" (>5 esotropia. Results: Thirty-seven patients were included. The mean age was 6.78 ± 2.87 years (range: 2-12 years. Mean preoperative deviation was 29.72 ± 8.07 PD (range: 15-45 PD at distance and 20.94 ± 11.65 PD (range: 10-45 PD at near (P < 0.0001. There were 21 (56.8% patients in Group 1, 9 (24.3% patients in Group 2, 1 (2.7% patient in Group 3 and 6 (16.2% patients in Group 4. Initial esotropia was achieved in 30 (30/37 of the patients. Twenty-eight of them had good results at the end of the 6 months. Overall "motor surgical" success rate was found to be 89.2% (33/37 patients, with 1 (2.7% overcorrection and 3 (8.1% recurrences at the end of the 6 months. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that early overcorrection of 10-20 PD after X(T surgery can achieve acceptable motor outcomes in the first 6 months postoperative period.

  20. Small Business Development Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs) provide assistance to small businesses and aspiring entrepreneurs throughout the United States and its territories. SBDCs...