WorldWideScience

Sample records for release include direct

  1. Sustained Release of a Watermgoluble tiring from Directly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sustained Release of a Watermgoluble tiring from Directly Compressed Okra Gum Matrix. Tablets. Val). Mill, MA. Gilllllbll'ifl'l' AND KT. ... in near noromorder release of aspirin from the matrix tablets. The results indicate that okra gum is .... porous structure including alteration of the shape and size distribution of the pores.

  2. Sustained Release of a Water-Soluble Drug from Directly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Okra gum was evaluated as a controlled-release agent in modified release matrices in comparison with sodium carboxymethylcellulose (NaCMC) using aspirin as the model drug. Tablets were produced by direct compression and the in vitro drug release was assessed under conditions similar to those in the gastrointestinal ...

  3. Gliclazide directly inhibits arginine-induced glucagon release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cejvan, Kenan; Coy, David H; Holst, Jens Juul

    2002-01-01

    Arginine-stimulated insulin and somatostatin release is enhanced by the sulfonylurea gliclazide. In contrast, gliclazide inhibits the glucagon response. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether this inhibition of glucagon release was mediated by a direct suppressive effect of glicl......Arginine-stimulated insulin and somatostatin release is enhanced by the sulfonylurea gliclazide. In contrast, gliclazide inhibits the glucagon response. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether this inhibition of glucagon release was mediated by a direct suppressive effect....... In islet perifusions with DC-41-33, arginine-induced glucagon release was inhibited by 66%. We therefore concluded that gliclazide inhibits glucagon release by a direct action on the pancreatic A cell....

  4. Transient fission gas release during direct electrical heating experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.R.; Emerson, J.E.; Savoie, F.E.

    1983-12-01

    The gas release behavior of irradiated EBR-II fuel was observed to be dependent on several factors: the presence of cladding, the retained gas content, and the energy absorbed. Fuel that retained in excess of 16 to 17 μmoles/g of fission gas underwent spallation as the cladding melted and released 22 to 45% of its retained gas, while fuel with retained gas levels below approx. 15 to 16 μmoles/g released less than approx. 9% of its gas as the cladding melted. During subsequent direct electrical heating ramps, fuel that did not spall released an additional quantity of gas (up to 4 μmoles/g), depending on the energy absorbed

  5. Modeling of in-vessel fission product release including fuel morphology effects for severe accident analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, K.Y.

    1989-10-01

    A new in-vessel fission product release model has been developed and implemented to perform best-estimate calculations of realistic source terms including fuel morphology effects. The proposed bulk mass transfer correlation determines the product of fission product release and equiaxed grain size as a function of the inverse fuel temperature. The model accounts for the fuel-cladding interaction over the temperature range between 770 K and 3000 K in the steam environment. A separate driver has been developed for the in-vessel thermal hydraulic and fission product behavior models that were developed by the Department of Energy for the Modular Accident Analysis Package (MAAP). Calculational results of these models have been compared to the results of the Power Burst Facility Severe Fuel Damage tests. The code predictions utilizing the mass transfer correlation agreed with the experimentally determined fractional release rates during the course of the heatup, power hold, and cooldown phases of the high temperature transients. Compared to such conventional literature correlations as the steam oxidation model and the NUREG-0956 correlation, the mass transfer correlation resulted in lower and less rapid releases in closer agreement with the on-line and grab sample data from the Severe Fuel Damage tests. The proposed mass transfer correlation can be applied for best-estimate calculations of fission products release from the UO 2 fuel in both nominal and severe accident conditions. 15 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Accurate SHAPE-directed RNA secondary structure modeling, including pseudoknots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdin, Christine E; Bellaousov, Stanislav; Huggins, Wayne; Leonard, Christopher W; Mathews, David H; Weeks, Kevin M

    2013-04-02

    A pseudoknot forms in an RNA when nucleotides in a loop pair with a region outside the helices that close the loop. Pseudoknots occur relatively rarely in RNA but are highly overrepresented in functionally critical motifs in large catalytic RNAs, in riboswitches, and in regulatory elements of viruses. Pseudoknots are usually excluded from RNA structure prediction algorithms. When included, these pairings are difficult to model accurately, especially in large RNAs, because allowing this structure dramatically increases the number of possible incorrect folds and because it is difficult to search the fold space for an optimal structure. We have developed a concise secondary structure modeling approach that combines SHAPE (selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension) experimental chemical probing information and a simple, but robust, energy model for the entropic cost of single pseudoknot formation. Structures are predicted with iterative refinement, using a dynamic programming algorithm. This melded experimental and thermodynamic energy function predicted the secondary structures and the pseudoknots for a set of 21 challenging RNAs of known structure ranging in size from 34 to 530 nt. On average, 93% of known base pairs were predicted, and all pseudoknots in well-folded RNAs were identified.

  7. A new wall function boundary condition including heat release effect for supersonic combustion flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Zhen-Xun; Jiang, Chong-Wen; Lee, Chun-Hian

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new wall function including heat release effect is theoretically derived. • The new wall function is a unified form holding for flows with/without combustion. • The new wall function shows good results for a supersonic combustion case. - Abstract: A new wall function boundary condition considering combustion heat release effect (denoted as CWFBC) is proposed, for efficient predictions of skin friction and heat transfer in supersonic combustion flows. Based on a standard flow model including boundary-layer combustion, the Shvab–Zeldovich coupling parameters are introduced to derive a new velocity law-of-the-wall including the influence of combustion. For the temperature law-of-the-wall, it is proposed to use the enthalpy–velocity relation, instead of the Crocco–Busemann equation, to eliminate explicit influence of chemical reactions. The obtained velocity and temperature law-of-the-walls constitute the CWFBC, which is a unified form simultaneously holding for single-species, multi-species mixing and multi-species reactive flows. The subsequent numerical simulations using this CWFBC on an experimental case indicate that the CWFBC could accurately reflect the influences on the skin friction and heat transfer by the chemical reactions and heat release, and show large improvements compared to previous WFBC. Moreover, the CWFBC can give accurate skin friction and heat flux for a coarse mesh with y"+ up to 200 for the experimental case, except for slightly larger discrepancy of the wall heat flux around ignition position.

  8. Direct releases to the surface and associated complementary cumulative distribution functions in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: direct brine release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoelzel, D.M.; O'Brien, D.G.; Garner, J.W.; Helton, J.C.; Johnson, J.D.; Smith, L.N.

    2000-01-01

    The following topics related to the treatment of direct brine releases to the surface environment in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are presented: (i) mathematical description of models; (ii) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results arising from subjective (i.e. epistemic) uncertainty for individual releases; (iii) construction of complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) arising from stochastic (i.e. aleatory) uncertainty; and (iv) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results for CCDFs. The presented analyses indicate that direct brine releases do not constitute a serious threat to the effectiveness of the WIPP as a disposal facility for transuranic waste. Even when the effects of uncertain analysis inputs are taken into account, the CCDFs for direct brine releases fall substantially to the left of the boundary line specified in the US Environmental Protection Agency's standard for the geologic disposal of radioactive waste (40 CFR 191, 40 CFR 194)

  9. Direct effect of nicotine on mesolimbic dopamine release in rat nucleus accumbens shell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijn, J.; Folgering, J. H. A.; van der Hart, M. C. G.; Rollema, H.; Cremers, T. I. F. H.; Westerink, B. H. C.

    2011-01-01

    Nicotine stimulates dopamine (DA) cell firing via a local action at somatodendritic sites in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), increasing DA release in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). Additionally, nicotine may also modulate DA release via a direct effect in the NAcc. This study examined the

  10. Preparation and its drug release property of radiation-polymerized poly(methyl methacrylate) capsule including potassium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Masaru; Kumakura, Minoru; Kaetsu, Isao

    1979-01-01

    Porous flat circular capsules including KCl as a drug were prepared by radiation-induced polymerization of methyl methacrylate at room temperature in the presence of polyethylene glycol No. 600. The porous structure can be controlled by the methyl methacrylate-polyethylene glycol No. 600 composition. The amount of drug released was linearly related to the square root of time. The magnitude of drug release increased roughly in proportional to the water content of capsule, which can be related to porosity in the capsule. (author)

  11. Direct fragmentation of quarkonia including Fermi motion using light-cone wave function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobary, M.A. Gomshi [Razi University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kermanshah (Iran); A.E.O.I., Center for Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, Tehran (Iran); Javadi, B. [Razi University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kermanshah (Iran)

    2005-07-01

    We investigate the effect of Fermi motion on the direct fragmentation of the J/{psi} and {upsilon} states employing a light-cone wave function. Consistent with such a wave function we set up the kinematics of a heavy quark fragmenting into quarkonia such that the Fermi motion of the constituents splits into a longitudinal as well as a transverse direction and thus calculate the fragmentation functions for these states. In the framework of our investigation, we estimate that the fragmentation probabilities of J/{psi} and {upsilon} may increase at least up to 14 percent when including this degree of freedom. (orig.)

  12. Effectiveness of a personalized ventilation system in reducing personal exposure against directly released simulated cough droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantelic, J.; Tham, K. W.; Licina, Dusan

    2015-01-01

    manikin at distances between 1 and 4m. Cough droplet concentration was measured with an aerosol spectrometer in the breathing zone of a thermal manikin. Particle image velocimetry was used to characterize the velocity field in the breathing zone. Desktop personalized ventilation substantially reduced......The inhalation intake fraction was used as an indicator to compare effects of desktop personalized ventilation and mixing ventilation on personal exposure to directly released simulated cough droplets. A cough machine was used to simulate cough release from the front, back, and side of a thermal...

  13. Pipe elbow stiffness coefficients including shear and bend flexibility factors for use in direct stiffness codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, R.F.

    1977-01-01

    Historically, developments of computer codes used for piping analysis were based upon the flexibility method of structural analysis. Because of the specialized techniques employed in this method, the codes handled systems composed of only piping elements. Over the past ten years, the direct stiffness method has gained great popularity because of its systematic solution procedure regardless of the type of structural elements composing the system. A great advantage is realized with a direct stiffness code that combines piping elements along with other structural elements such as beams, plates, and shells, in a single model. One common problem, however, has been the lack of an accurate pipe elbow element that would adequately represent the effects of transverse shear and bend flexibility factors. The purpose of the present paper is to present a systematic derivation of the required 12x12 stiffness matrix and load vectors for a three dimensional pipe elbow element which includes the effects of transverse shear and pipe bend flexibility according to the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III. The results are presented analytically and as FORTRAN subroutines to be directly incorporated into existing direct stiffness codes. (Auth.)

  14. Modeling of the Direct Current Generator Including the Magnetic Saturation and Temperature Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso J. Mercado-Samur

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the inclusion of temperature effect on the field resistance on the direct current generator model DC1A, which is valid to stability studies is proposed. First, the linear generator model is presented, after the effect of magnetic saturation and the change in the resistance value due to temperature produced by the field current are included. The comparison of experimental results and model simulations to validate the model is used. A direct current generator model which is a better representation of the generator is obtained. Visual comparison between simulations and experimental results shows the success of the proposed model, because it presents the lowest error of the compared models. The accuracy of the proposed model is observed via Modified Normalized Sum of Squared Errors index equal to 3.8979%.

  15. Direct-phase-variable model of a synchronous reluctance motor including all slot and winding harmonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obe, Emeka S.; Binder, A.

    2011-01-01

    A detailed model in direct-phase variables of a synchronous reluctance motor operating at mains voltage and frequency is presented. The model includes the stator and rotor slot openings, the actual winding layout and the reluctance rotor geometry. Hence, all mmf and permeance harmonics are taken into account. It is seen that non-negligible harmonics introduced by slots are present in the inductances computed by the winding function procedure. These harmonics are usually ignored in d-q models. The machine performance is simulated in the stator reference frame to depict the difference between this new direct-phase model including all harmonics and the conventional rotor reference frame d-q model. Saturation is included by using a polynomial fitting the variation of d-axis inductance with stator current obtained by finite-element software FEMAG DC (registered) . The detailed phase-variable model can yield torque pulsations comparable to those obtained from finite elements while the d-q model cannot.

  16. Prediction and Validation of Heat Release Direct Injection Diesel Engine Using Multi-Zone Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anang Nugroho, Bagus; Sugiarto, Bambang; Prawoto; Shalahuddin, Lukman

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study is to develop simulation model which capable to predict heat release of diesel combustion accurately in efficient computation time. A multi-zone packet model has been applied to solve the combustion phenomena inside diesel cylinder. The model formulations are presented first and then the numerical results are validated on a single cylinder direct injection diesel engine at various engine speed and timing injections. The model were found to be promising to fulfill the objective above.

  17. Direct and indirect effects of paliperidone extended-release tablets on negative symptoms of schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Bossie, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    Ibrahim Turkoz, Cynthia A Bossie, Bryan Dirks, Carla M CanusoOrtho-McNeil Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Titusville, NJ, USAAbstract: Direct and indirect effects of the new psychotropic paliperidone extended-release (paliperidone ER) tablets on negative symptom improvement in schizophrenia were investigated using path analysis. A post hoc analysis of pooled data from three 6-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of paliperidone ER in patients experiencing acute exacerbation was con...

  18. Effectiveness of a personalized ventilation system in reducing personal exposure against directly released simulated cough droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelic, J; Tham, K W; Licina, D

    2015-12-01

    The inhalation intake fraction was used as an indicator to compare effects of desktop personalized ventilation and mixing ventilation on personal exposure to directly released simulated cough droplets. A cough machine was used to simulate cough release from the front, back, and side of a thermal manikin at distances between 1 and 4 m. Cough droplet concentration was measured with an aerosol spectrometer in the breathing zone of a thermal manikin. Particle image velocimetry was used to characterize the velocity field in the breathing zone. Desktop personalized ventilation substantially reduced the inhalation intake fraction compared to mixing ventilation for all investigated distances and orientations of the cough release. The results point out that the orientation between the cough source and the breathing zone of the exposed occupant is an important factor that substantially influences exposure. Exposure to cough droplets was reduced with increasing distance between cough source and exposed occupant. The results from this study show that an advanced air distribution system such as personalized ventilation reduces exposure to cough-released droplets better than commonly applied overhead mixing ventilation. This work can inform HVAC engineers about different aspects of air distribution systems’ performance and can serve as an aid in making critical design decisions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The comparison between limited open carpal tunnel release using direct vision and tunneling technique and standard open carpal tunnel release: a randomized controlled trial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppaphol, Sorasak; Worathanarat, Patarawan; Kawinwongkovit, Viroj; Pittayawutwinit, Preecha

    2012-04-01

    To compare the operative outcome of carpal tunnel release between limited open carpal tunnel release using direct vision and tunneling technique (group A) with standard open carpal tunnel release (group B). Twenty-eight patients were enrolled in the present study. A single blind randomized control trial study was conducted to compare the postoperative results between group A and B. The study parameters were Levine's symptom severity and functional score, grip and pinch strength, and average two-point discrimination. The postoperative results between two groups were comparable with no statistical significance. Only grip strength at three months follow up was significantly greater in group A than in group B. The limited open carpal tunnel release in the present study is effective comparable to the standard open carpal tunnel release. The others advantage of this technique are better cosmesis and improvement in grip strength at the three months postoperative period.

  20. The Direct and Indirect Effects of Paliperidone Extended-release on Depressive Symptoms in Schizoaffective Disorder: A Path Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkoz, Ibrahim; Fu, Dong-Jing; Bossie, Cynthia A; Alphs, Larry

    2015-01-01

    This analysis evaluates improvement in symptoms of depression in patients with schizoaffective disorder administered oral paliperidone extended-release by accounting for the magnitude of direct and indirect (changes in negative and positive symptoms and worsening of extrapyramidal symptoms) treatment effects on depressive symptoms. Data for this post hoc analysis were drawn from two six-week, randomized, placebo-controlled studies of paliperidone extended-release versus placebo in adult subjects with schizoaffective disorder (N=614; NCT00412373, NCT00397033). Subjects with baseline 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression scores of 16 or greater were included. Structural equation models (path analyses) were used to separate total effects into direct and indirect effects on depressive symptoms. Change from baseline in 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score at the Week 6 end point was the dependent variable; changes in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale positive and negative factors and Simpson-Angus Scale (to evaluate extrapyramidal symptoms) scores were independent variables. At baseline, 332 of 614 (54.1%) subjects had a 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score of 16 or greater. Path analysis determined that up to 26.4 percent of the paliperidone extended-release versus placebo effect on depressive symptoms may be attributed to a direct treatment effect, and 45.8 percent and 28.4 percent were mediated indirectly through improvements on positive and negative symptoms, respectively. No effects were identified as mediated through extrapyramidal symptoms changes (-0.7%). RESULTS of this analysis suggest that paliperidone's effect on depressive symptoms in subjects with schizoaffective disorder participating in two six-week, randomized, placebo-controlled studies is mediated through indirect effects (e.g., positive and negative symptom changes) and a direct treatment effect.

  1. MODARIA WG5: Towards a practical guidance for including uncertainties in the results of dose assessment of routine releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora, Juan C. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas - CIEMAT (Spain); Telleria, Diego [International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA (Austria); Al Neaimi, Ahmed [Emirates Nuclear Energy Corporation - ENEC (United Arab Emirates); Blixt Buhr, Anna Ma [Vattenfall AB (Sweden); Bonchuk, Iurii [Radiation Protection Institute - RPI (Ukraine); Chouhan, Sohan [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited - AECL (Canada); Chyly, Pavol [SE-VYZ (Slovakia); Curti, Adriana R. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear - ARN (Argentina); Da Costa, Dejanira [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria - IRD (Brazil); Duran, Juraj [VUJE Inc (Slovakia); Galeriu, Dan [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN-HH (Romania); Haegg, Ann- Christin; Lager, Charlotte [Swedish Radiation Safety Authority - SSM (Sweden); Heling, Rudie [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group - NRG (Netherlands); Ivanis, Goran; Shen, Jige [Ecometrix Incorporated (Canada); Iosjpe, Mikhail [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority - NRPA (Norway); Krajewski, Pawel M. [Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection - CLOR (Poland); Marang, Laura; Vermorel, Fabien [Electricite de France - EdF (France); Mourlon, Christophe [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire - IRSN (France); Perez, Fabricio F. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre - SCK (Belgium); Woodruffe, Andrew [Federal Authority for Nuclear Regulation - FANR (United Arab Emirates); Zorko, Benjamin [Jozef Stefan Institute (Slovenia)

    2014-07-01

    MODARIA (Modelling and Data for Radiological Impact Assessments) project was launched in 2012 with the aim of improving the capabilities in radiation dose assessment by means of acquisition of improved data for model testing, model testing and comparison, reaching consensus on modelling philosophies, approaches and parameter values, development of improved methods and exchange of information. The project focuses on areas where uncertainties remain in the predictive capability of environmental models, emphasizing in reducing associated uncertainties or developing new approaches to strengthen the evaluation of the radiological impact. Within MODARIA, four main areas were defined, one of them devoted to Uncertainty and Variability. In this area four working groups were included, Working Group 5 dealing with the 'uncertainty and variability analysis for assessments of radiological impacts arising from routine discharges of radionuclides'. Whether doses are estimated by using measurement data, by applying models, or through a combination of measurements and calculations, the variability and uncertainty contribute to a distribution of possible values. The degree of variability and uncertainty is represented by the shape and extent of that distribution. The main objective of WG5 is to explore how to consider uncertainties and variabilities in the results of assessment of doses in planned situations for controlling the impact of routine releases from radioactive and nuclear installations to the environment. The final aim is to produce guidance for the calculation of uncertainties in these exposure situations and for the presentation of such results to the different stakeholders. To achieve that objective the main tasks identified were: to find tools and methods for uncertainty and variability analysis applicable to dose assessments in routine radioactive discharges, to define scenarios where information on uncertainty and variability of parameters is available

  2. Development of New Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone-Modified Dendrimer Platforms with Direct Antiproliferative and Gonadotropin Releasing Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varamini, Pegah; Rafiee, Amirreza; Giddam, Ashwini Kumar; Mansfeld, Friederike M; Steyn, Frederik; Toth, Istvan

    2017-10-26

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists (e.g., triptorelin) are used for androgen suppression therapy. They possess improved stability as compared to the natural GnRH, yet they suffer from a poor pharmacokinetic profile. To address this, we used a GnRH peptide-modified dendrimer platform with and without lipidation strategy. Dendrimers were synthesized on a polylysine core and bore either native GnRH (1, 2, and 5) or lipid-modified GnRH (3 and 4). Compound 3, which bore a lipidic moiety in a branched tetramer structure, showed approximately 10-fold higher permeability and metabolic stability and 39 times higher antitumor activity against hormone-resistant prostate cancer cells (DU145) relative to triptorelin. In gonadotropin-release experiments, dendrimer 3 was shown to be the most potent construct. Dendrimer 3 showed similar luteinizing hormone (LH)-release activity to triptorelin in mice. Our findings indicate that dendrimer 3 is a promising analog with higher potency for the treatment of hormone-resistant prostate cancer than the currently available GnRH agonists.

  3. Outcomes of Direct Facial-to-Hypoglossal Neurorrhaphy with Parotid Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Joel; Rihani, Jordan; Lin, Karen; Miller, Phillip J; Roland, J Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Lesions of the temporal bone and cerebellopontine angle and their management can result in facial nerve paralysis. When the nerve deficit is not amenable to primary end-to-end repair or interpositional grafting, nerve transposition can be used to accomplish the goals of restoring facial tone, symmetry, and voluntary movement. The most widely used nerve transposition is the hypoglossal-facial nerve anastamosis, of which there are several technical variations. Previously we described a technique of single end-to-side anastamosis using intratemporal facial nerve mobilization and parotid release. This study further characterizes the results of this technique with a larger patient cohort and longer-term follow-up. The design of this study is a retrospective chart review and the setting is an academic tertiary care referral center. Twenty-one patients with facial nerve paralysis from proximal nerve injury at the cerebellopontine angle underwent facial-hypoglossal neurorraphy with parotid release. Outcomes were assessed using the Repaired Facial Nerve Recovery Scale, questionnaires, and patient photographs. Of the 21 patients, 18 were successfully reinnervated to a score of a B or C on the recovery scale, which equates to good oral and ocular sphincter closure with minimal mass movement. The mean duration of paralysis between injury and repair was 12.1 months (range 0 to 36 months) with a mean follow-up of 55 months. There were no cases of hemiglossal atrophy, paralysis, or subjective dysfunction. Direct facial-hypoglossal neurorrhaphy with parotid release achieved a functional reinnervation and good clinical outcome in the majority of patients, with minimal lingual morbidity. This technique is a viable option for facial reanimation and should be strongly considered as a surgical option for the paralyzed face.

  4. Analysis of Silicones Released from Household Items and Baby Articles by Direct Analysis in Real Time-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jürgen H.

    2015-03-01

    Direct analysis in real time-mass spectrometry (DART-MS) enables screening of articles of daily use made of polydimethylsiloxanes (PDMS), commonly known as silicone rubber, to assess their tendency to release low molecular weight silicone oligomers. DART-MS analyses were performed on a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. Flexible silicone baking molds, a watch band, and a dough scraper, as baby articles different brands of pacifiers, nipples, and a teething ring have been examined. While somewhat arbitrarily chosen, the set can be regarded as representative of household items, baby articles, and other objects made of silicone rubber. For comparison, two brands of silicone septa and as blanks a glass slide and a latex pacifier were included. Differences between the objects were mainly observed in terms of molecular weight distribution and occasional release of other compounds in addition to PDMS. Other than that, all objects made of silicone rubber released significant amounts of PDMS during DART analysis. To provide a coarse quantification, a calibration based on silicone oil was established, which delivered PDMS losses from 20 μg to >100 μg during the 16-s period per measurement. Also, the extraction of baking molds in rapeseed oil demonstrated a PDMS release at the level of 1 μg mg-1. These findings indicate a potential health hazard from frequent or long-term use of such items. This work does not intend to blame certain brands of such articles. Nonetheless, a higher level of awareness of this source of daily silicone intake is suggested.

  5. Direct encapsulation of water-soluble drug into silica microcapsules for sustained release applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jiexin; Wang Zhihui; Chen Jianfeng; Yun, Jimmy

    2008-01-01

    Direct encapsulation of water-soluble drug into silica microcapsules was facilely achieved by a sol-gel process of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) in W/O emulsion with hydrochloric acid (HCl) aqueous solution containing Tween 80 and drug as well as cyclohexane solution containing Span 80. Two water-soluble drugs of gentamicin sulphate (GS) and salbutamol sulphate (SS) were chosen as model drugs. The characterization of drug encapsulated silica microcapsules by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), FTIR, thermogravimetry (TG) and N 2 adsorption-desorption analyses indicated that drug was successfully entrapped into silica microcapsules. The as-prepared silica microcapsules were uniform spherical particles with hollow structure, good dispersion and a size of 5-10 μm, and had a specific surface area of about 306 m 2 /g. UV-vis and thermogravimetry (TG) analyses were performed to determine the amount of drug encapsulated in the microcapsules. The BJH pore size distribution (PSD) of silica microcapsules before and after removing drug was examined. In vitro release behavior of drug in simulated body fluid (SBF) revealed that such system exhibited excellent sustained release properties

  6. pH-dependent release of trace elements including platinum group elements (PGEs) from gasoline and diesel catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucha, Veronika; Mihaljevic, Martin; Ettler, Vojtech; Strnad, Ladislav

    2014-05-01

    The release of trace metals and platinum group elements (PGEs) from automobile exhaust catalysts represents a remarkable source of higly dispersed environmental contamination. Especially, PGEs have shown increasing research interest due to their possible bioaccessibility. In our research, we focused on leaching behaviour of trace metals from gasoline and diesel automobile catalysts. While catalysts for gasoline engines contain a mixture of Pt-Pd-Rh or Pd-Rh, catalysts for diesel engines are composed only of Pt. We used dust from two crushed gasoline and two crushed diesel catalysts (new and aged). The dust of gasoline catalysts contains significant concentrations of Pt (700 mg.kg-1), Pd (11 000 mg.kg-1) and Rh (700 mg.kg-1). And the dust of diesel catalysts are composed of Pt (3 900 mg.kg-1) and they contains negligible amounts of Pd dan Rh (leaching of trace metals from dust we used pH-stat leaching test according to the European standard CEN/TS 14997. The concentrations of cations: PGEs (Pt, Pd a Rh), K, Na, Ca, Mg, Al, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, La and Ce were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), and anions: F-, Cl-, SO42- and NO3- by high-performance liquid chromatography. Although the dusts from catalysts were relatively stable to acid/base influence, the leaching of trace metals from catalysts showed a dependence on pH. Generally, the highest concentrations were released under acidic conditions. The leaching of PGEs was higher for Pt in diesel catalysts and for Pd and Rh in gasoline catalysts. The highest concentrations of Zn and Pb were observed in old catalysts. The rare earth metals were released more from gasoline catalysts. Catalysts particles represent health risk especially with respect to their PGEs contents.

  7. A new force field including charge directionality for TMAO in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usui, Kota; Nagata, Yuki; Hunger, Johannes; Bonn, Mischa; Sulpizi, Marialore

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new force field for trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), which is designed to reproduce the long-lived and highly directional hydrogen bond between the TMAO oxygen (O TMAO ) atom and surrounding water molecules. Based on the data obtained by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, we introduce three dummy sites around O TMAO to mimic the O TMAO lone pairs and we migrate the negative charge on the O TMAO to the dummy sites. The force field model developed here improves both structural and dynamical properties of aqueous TMAO solutions. Moreover, it reproduces the experimentally observed dependence of viscosity upon increasing TMAO concentration quantitatively. The simple procedure of the force field construction makes it easy to implement in molecular dynamics simulation packages and makes it compatible with the existing biomolecular force fields. This paves the path for further investigation of protein-TMAO interaction in aqueous solutions.

  8. A new force field including charge directionality for TMAO in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usui, Kota; Nagata, Yuki, E-mail: sulpizi@uni-mainz.de, E-mail: nagata@mpip-mainz.mpg.de; Hunger, Johannes; Bonn, Mischa [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Sulpizi, Marialore, E-mail: sulpizi@uni-mainz.de, E-mail: nagata@mpip-mainz.mpg.de [Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Staudingerweg 7, 55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2016-08-14

    We propose a new force field for trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), which is designed to reproduce the long-lived and highly directional hydrogen bond between the TMAO oxygen (O{sub TMAO}) atom and surrounding water molecules. Based on the data obtained by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, we introduce three dummy sites around O{sub TMAO} to mimic the O{sub TMAO} lone pairs and we migrate the negative charge on the O{sub TMAO} to the dummy sites. The force field model developed here improves both structural and dynamical properties of aqueous TMAO solutions. Moreover, it reproduces the experimentally observed dependence of viscosity upon increasing TMAO concentration quantitatively. The simple procedure of the force field construction makes it easy to implement in molecular dynamics simulation packages and makes it compatible with the existing biomolecular force fields. This paves the path for further investigation of protein-TMAO interaction in aqueous solutions.

  9. Design of generic coal conversion facilities: Process release---Direct coal liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    The direct liquefaction portion of the PETC generic direct coal liquefaction process development unit (PDU) is being designed to provide maximum operating flexibility. The PDU design will permit catalytic and non-catalytic liquefaction concepts to be investigated at their proof-of-the-concept stages before any larger scale operations are attempted. The principal variations from concept to concept are reactor configurations and types. These include thermal reactor, ebullating bed reactor, slurry phase reactor and fixed bed reactor, as well as different types of catalyst. All of these operating modes are necessary to define and identify the optimum process conditions and configurations for determining improved economical liquefaction technology.

  10. Hyaluronate nanoparticles included in polymer films for the prolonged release of vitamin E for the management of skin wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Gabriela Garrastazu; Detoni, Cassia Britto; Balducci, Anna Giulia; Rondelli, Valeria; Colombo, Paolo; Guterres, Silvia Stanisçuaski; Sonvico, Fabio

    2016-02-15

    Lecithin and hyaluronic acid were used for the preparation of polysaccharide decorated nanoparticles loaded with vitamin E using the cationic lipid dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODMA). Nanoparticles showed mean particle size in the range 130-350 nm and narrow size distribution. Vitamin E encapsulation efficiency was higher than 99%. These nanoparticles were incorporated in polymeric films containing Aloe vera extract, hyaluronic acid, sodium alginate, polyethyleneoxide (PEO) and polyvinylalcohol (PVA) as an innovative treatment in skin wounds. Films were thin, flexible, resistant and suitable for application on burn wounds. Additionally, in vitro occlusion study highlighted the dependence of the occlusive effect on the presence of nanoparticles. The results obtained show that the bioadhesive films containing vitamin E acetate and Aloe vera could be an innovative therapeutic system for the treatment of skin wounds, such as burns. The controlled release of the vitamin along with a reduction in water loss through damaged skin provided by the nanoparticle-loaded polymer film are considered important features for an improvement in wound healing and skin regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Direct observation of the release of alkali vapor species in biofuel combustion and gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, R.J.; Milne, T.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The largest present use of biomass for energy is in combustion for steam and electrical power. Biofuels have an acknowledged advantage over coal as a solid fuel because of their low sulfur and ash content. However, some forms of biomass have substantial quantities of alkali metals and chlorine. In addition, evidence indicates that the alkali in biomass is largely atomically dispersed, resulting in its facile mobilization into the gas-phase. Gaseous alkali compounds aggravate problems of slagging, fouling, and corrosion on heat transfer surfaces in present-day boilers. These problems can be particularly severe when mixed and variable agricultural residues are burned. Furthermore, the next generation of biomass-to-power systems will likely involve combined cycle gas turbines, where alkali tolerances are especially restrictive. In this paper, we report on laboratory studies in which biofuels are combusted under simulated turbine or boiler-firing conditions. Gaseous alkali, sulfur, nitrogen, and halogen-containing species are measured by direct extraction from the hot gases through molecular-beam mass spectrometry (MBMS). The experimental apparatus will be described and its capability illustrated with results of time-resolved evolution of species like K, KCl, KOH, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from small samples of biomass in combustion environments. The nature and release of such species will be explicated by referring to thermodynamic equilibrium predictions and the form of alkali in solid, gaseous, and liquid biofuels.

  12. Dormancy release and flowering time in Ziziphus jujuba Mill., a "direct flowering" fruit tree, has a facultative requirement for chilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Michal; Ransbotyn, Vanessa; Raveh, Eran; Barak, Simon; Tel-Zur, Noemi; Zaccai, Michele

    2016-03-15

    In deciduous fruit trees, the effect of chilling on flowering has mostly been investigated in the "indirect flowering" group, characterized by a period of rest between flower bud formation and blooming. In the present study, we explored the effects of chilling and chilling deprivation on the flowering of Ziziphus jujuba, a temperate deciduous fruit tree belonging to the "direct flowering" group, in which flower bud differentiation, blooming and fruit development occur after dormancy release, during a single growing season. Dormancy release, vegetative growth and flowering time in Z. jujuba cv. Ben-Li were assessed following several treatments of chilling. Chilling treatments quantitatively decreased the timing of vegetative bud dormancy release, thereby accelerating flowering, but had no effect on the time from dormancy release to flowering. Trees grown at a constant temperature of 25°C, without chilling, broke dormancy and flowered, indicating the facultative character of chilling in this species. We measured the expression of Z. jujuba LFY and AP1 homologues (ZjLFY and ZjAP1). Chilling decreased ZjLFY expression in dormant vegetative buds but had no effect on ZjAP1expression, which reached peak expression before dormancy release and at anthesis. In conclusion, chilling is not obligatory for dormancy release of Z. jujuba cv. Ben-Li vegetative buds. However, the exposure to chilling during dormancy does accelerate vegetative bud dormancy release and flowering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Heat release effects on mixing scales of non-premixed turbulent wall-jets: A direct numerical simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouransari, Zeinab; Vervisch, Luc; Johansson, Arne V.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A non-premixed turbulent flame close to a solid surface is studied using DNS. ► Heat release effects delay transition and enlarge fluctuation of density and pressure. ► The fine-scale structures damped and surface wrinkling diminished due to heat-release. ► Using semilocal scaling improves the collapse of turbulence statistic in inner region. ► There are regions of the flame where considerable (up to 10%) premixed burning occurs. -- Abstract: The present study concerns the role of heat release effects on characteristics mixing scales of turbulence in reacting wall-jet flows. Direct numerical simulations of exothermic reacting turbulent wall-jets are performed and compared to the isothermal reacting case. An evaluation of the heat-release effects on the structure of turbulence is given by examining the mixture fraction surface characteristics, diagnosing vortices and exploring the dissipation rate of the fuel and passive scalar concentrations, and moreover by illustration of probability density functions of reacting species and scatter plots of the local temperature against the mixture fraction. Primarily, heat release effects delay the transition, enlarge the fluctuation intensities of density and pressure and also enhance the fluctuation level of the species concentrations. However, it has a damping effect on all velocity fluctuation intensities and the Reynolds shear stress. A key result is that the fine-scale structures of turbulence are damped, the surface wrinkling is diminished and the vortices become larger due to heat-release effects. Taking into account the varying density by using semi-local scaling improves the collapse of the turbulence statistics in the inner region, but does not eliminate heat release induced differences in the outer region. Examining the two-dimensional premultiplied spanwise spectra of the streamwise velocity fluctuations indicates a shifting in the positions of the outer peaks, associated with large

  14. Isotopic and molecular fractionation in combustion; three routes to molecular marker validation, including direct molecular 'dating' (GC/AMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, L. A.; Klouda, G. A.; Benner, B. A.; Garrity, K.; Eglinton, T. I.

    The identification of unique isotopic, elemental, and molecular markers for sources of combustion aerosol has growing practical importance because of the potential effects of fine particle aerosol on health, visibility and global climate. It is urgent, therefore, that substantial efforts be directed toward the validation of assumptions involving the use of such tracers for source apportionment. We describe here three independent routes toward carbonaceous aerosol molecular marker identification and validation: (1) tracer regression and multivariate statistical techniques applied to field measurements of mixed source, carbonaceous aerosols; (2) a new development in aerosol 14C metrology: direct, pure compound accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) by off-line GC/AMS ('molecular dating'); and (3) direct observation of isotopic and molecular source emissions during controlled laboratory combustion of specific fuels. Findings from the combined studies include: independent support for benzo( ghi)perylene as a motor vehicle tracer from the first (statistical) and second (direct 'dating') studies; a new indication, from the third (controlled combustion) study, of a relation between 13C isotopic fractionation and PAH molecular fractionation, also linked with fuel and stage of combustion; and quantitative data showing the influence of both fuel type and combustion conditions on the yields of such species as elemental carbon and PAH, reinforcing the importance of exercising caution when applying presumed conservative elemental or organic tracers to fossil or biomass burning field data as in the first study.

  15. Development of a two-dimensional simulation code (koad) including atomic processes for beam direct energy conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Yoshikawa, K.; Hattori, Y.

    1987-01-01

    A two-dimensional simulation code for the beam direct energy conversion called KVAD (Kyoto University Advanced DART) including various loss mechanisms has been developed, and shown excellent agreement with the authors' experiments using the He + beams. The beam direct energy converter (BDC) is the device to recover the kinetic energy of unneutralized ions in the neutral beam injection (NBI) system directly into electricity. The BDC is very important and essential not only to the improvements of NBI system efficiency, but also to the relaxation of high heat flux problems on the beam dump with increase of injection energies. So far no simulation code could have successfully predicted BDC experimental results. The KUAD code applies, an optimized algorithm for vector processing, the finite element method (FEM) for potential calculation, and a semi-automatic method for spatial segmentations. Since particle trajectories in the KVAD code are analytically solved, very high speed tracings of the particle could be achieved by introducing an adjacent element matrix to identify the neighboring triangle elements and electrodes. Ion space charges are also analytically calculated by the Cloud in Cell (CIC) method, as well as electron space charges. Power losses due to atomic processes can be also evaluated in the KUAD code

  16. Direct effect of gonadal and contraceptive steroids on insulin release from mouse pancreatic islets in organ culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    1984-01-01

    Sex steroids are supposed to contribute to the normal glucose homeostasis and to the altered glucose and insulin metabolism in pregnancy and during contraception. In the present study isolated mouse pancreatic islets were maintained in tissue culture medium RPMI 1640 supplemented with 0.5% newborn...... calf serum and 100 ng/ml of one of the following steroids: oestradiol, progesterone, testosterone, megestrol acetate, medroxyprogesterone, chlormadinone acetate, norethynodrel, norethindrone acetate, and ethynyloestradiol. Release of insulin to the culture medium was measured during a 2 week culture...... in the presence of oestradiol, progesterone, or testosterone were subjected to 30 min stimulation with 5.5, 11, 22 mmol/l glucose, only the progesterone-treated islets released more insulin in response to glucose than the control islets. It is concluded that progesterone and its derivatives have a direct effect...

  17. [Therapeutic effects of venlafaxine extended release for patients with depressive and anxiety disorders in the German outpatient setting - results of 2 observational studies including 8500 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghelescu, I-G; Dierkes, W; Volz, H-P; Loeschmann, P-A; Schmitt, A B

    2009-11-01

    The therapeutic effects of venlafaxine extended release have been investigated by two prospective observational studies including 8506 patients in the outpatient setting of office based general practitioners and specialists. The efficacy has been documented by the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scale and by the Hamilton depression (HAMD-21) scale. The tolerability has been assessed by the documentation of adverse events. About (2/3) of the patients were treated because of depression and about (1/3) mainly because of anxiety disorder. The patients of specialists did receive higher dosages and were more severely affected. The response rate on the CGI scale was 87.4 for the patients of general practitioners and 74.2 % for the patients of specialists. The results of the HAMD-21 scale, which has been used by specialists, showed a response rate of 71.8 and a remission rate of 56.3 %. These positive effects could be demonstrated even for the more severely and chronically affected patients. The incidence of adverse events was low in both studies and comparable to the tolerability profile of randomized studies. Importantly, the good tolerability profile was similar even for patients with concomitant cardiovascular disease. In conclusion, these results confirm the efficacy and good tolerability of venlafaxine extended release in the outpatient setting in Germany. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  18. Carbon Footprint of Inbound Tourism to Iceland: A Consumption-Based Life-Cycle Assessment including Direct and Indirect Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Sharp

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The greenhouse gas (GHG emissions caused by tourism have been studied from several perspectives, but few studies exist that include all direct and indirect emissions, particularly those from aviation. In this study, an input/output-based hybrid life-cycle assessment (LCA method is developed to assess the consumption-based carbon footprint of the average tourist including direct and indirect emissions. The total inbound tourism-related GHG emissions are also calculated within a certain region. As a demonstration of the method, the full carbon footprint of an average tourist is assessed as well as the total GHG emissions induced by tourism to Iceland over the period of 2010–2015, with the presented approach applicable in other contexts as well. Iceland provides an interesting case due to three features: (1 the tourism sector in Iceland is the fastest-growing industry in the country with an annual growth rate of over 20% over the past five years; (2 almost all tourists arrive by air; and (3 the country has an almost emissions-free energy industry and an import-dominated economy, which emphasise the role of the indirect emissions. According to the assessment, the carbon footprint for the average tourist is 1.35 tons of CO2-eq, but ranges from 1.1 to 3.2 tons of CO2-eq depending on the distance travelled by air. Furthermore, this footprint is increasing due to the rise in average flight distances travelled to reach the country. The total GHG emissions caused by tourism in Iceland have tripled from approximately 600,000 tons of CO2-eq in 2010 to 1,800,000 tons in 2015. Aviation accounts for 50%–82% of this impact (depending on the flight distance underlining the importance of air travel, especially as tourism-related aviation is forecasted to grow significantly in the near future. From a method perspective, the carbon footprinting application presented in the study would seem to provide an efficient way to study both the direct and indirect

  19. 3-dimensional magnetotelluric inversion including topography using deformed hexahedral edge finite elements and direct solvers parallelized on symmetric multiprocessor computers - Part II: direct data-space inverse solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordy, M.; Wannamaker, P.; Maris, V.; Cherkaev, E.; Hill, G.

    2016-01-01

    Following the creation described in Part I of a deformable edge finite-element simulator for 3-D magnetotelluric (MT) responses using direct solvers, in Part II we develop an algorithm named HexMT for 3-D regularized inversion of MT data including topography. Direct solvers parallelized on large-RAM, symmetric multiprocessor (SMP) workstations are used also for the Gauss-Newton model update. By exploiting the data-space approach, the computational cost of the model update becomes much less in both time and computer memory than the cost of the forward simulation. In order to regularize using the second norm of the gradient, we factor the matrix related to the regularization term and apply its inverse to the Jacobian, which is done using the MKL PARDISO library. For dense matrix multiplication and factorization related to the model update, we use the PLASMA library which shows very good scalability across processor cores. A synthetic test inversion using a simple hill model shows that including topography can be important; in this case depression of the electric field by the hill can cause false conductors at depth or mask the presence of resistive structure. With a simple model of two buried bricks, a uniform spatial weighting for the norm of model smoothing recovered more accurate locations for the tomographic images compared to weightings which were a function of parameter Jacobians. We implement joint inversion for static distortion matrices tested using the Dublin secret model 2, for which we are able to reduce nRMS to ˜1.1 while avoiding oscillatory convergence. Finally we test the code on field data by inverting full impedance and tipper MT responses collected around Mount St Helens in the Cascade volcanic chain. Among several prominent structures, the north-south trending, eruption-controlling shear zone is clearly imaged in the inversion.

  20. Performance and efficiency evaluation and heat release study of a direct-injection stratified-charge rotary engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, H. L.; Addy, H. E.; Bond, T. H.; Lee, C. M.; Chun, K. S.

    1987-01-01

    A computer simulation which models engine performance of the Direct Injection Stratified Charge (DISC) rotary engines was used to study the effect of variations in engine design and operating parameters on engine performance and efficiency of an Outboard Marine Corporation (OMC) experimental rotary combustion engine. Engine pressure data were used in a heat release analysis to study the effects of heat transfer, leakage, and crevice flows. Predicted engine data were compared with experimental test data over a range of engine speeds and loads. An examination of methods to improve the performance of the rotary engine using advanced heat engine concepts such as faster combustion, reduced leakage, and turbocharging is also presented.

  1. Modelling the effect of injection pressure on heat release parameters and nitrogen oxides in direct injection diesel engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yüksek Levent

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation and modelling the effect of injection pressure on heat release parameters and engine-out nitrogen oxides are the main aim of this study. A zero-dimensional and multi-zone cylinder model was developed for estimation of the effect of injection pressure rise on performance parameters of diesel engine. Double-Wiebe rate of heat release global model was used to describe fuel combustion. extended Zeldovich mechanism and partial equilibrium approach were used for modelling the formation of nitrogen oxides. Single cylinder, high pressure direct injection, electronically controlled, research engine bench was used for model calibration. 1000 and 1200 bars of fuel injection pressure were investigated while injection advance, injected fuel quantity and engine speed kept constant. The ignition delay of injected fuel reduced 0.4 crank angle with 1200 bars of injection pressure and similar effect observed in premixed combustion phase duration which reduced 0.2 crank angle. Rate of heat release of premixed combustion phase increased 1.75 % with 1200 bar injection pressure. Multi-zone cylinder model showed good agreement with experimental in-cylinder pressure data. Also it was seen that the NOx formation model greatly predicted the engine-out NOx emissions for both of the operation modes.

  2. Determination of the average number of electrons released during the oxidation of ethanol in a direct ethanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majidi, Pasha; Pickup, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    The energy efficiency of a direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) is directly proportional to the average number of electrons released per ethanol molecule (n-value) at the anode. An approach to measuring n-values in DEFC hardware is presented, validated for the oxidation of methanol, and shown to provide n-values for ethanol oxidation that are consistent with trends and estimates from full product analysis. The method is based on quantitative oxidation of fuel that crosses through the membrane to avoid the errors that would otherwise result from crossover. It will be useful for rapid screening of catalysts, and allows performances (polarization curves) and n-values to be determined simultaneously under well controlled transport conditions.

  3. Dynamics of rapid dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens during goal-directed behaviors for cocaine versus natural rewards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Courtney M; Wightman, R Mark; Carelli, Regina M

    2014-11-01

    Electrophysiological studies show that distinct subsets of nucleus accumbens (NAc) neurons differentially encode information about goal-directed behaviors for intravenous cocaine versus natural (food/water) rewards. Further, NAc rapid dopamine signaling occurs on a timescale similar to phasic cell firing during cocaine and natural reward-seeking behaviors. However, it is not known whether dopamine signaling is reinforcer specific (i.e., is released during responding for only one type of reinforcer) within discrete NAc locations, similar to neural firing dynamics. Here, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) was used to measure rapid dopamine release during multiple schedules involving sucrose reward and cocaine self-administration (n = 8 rats) and, in a separate group of rats (n = 6), during a sucrose/food multiple schedule. During the sucrose/cocaine multiple schedule, dopamine increased within seconds of operant responding for both reinforcers. Although dopamine release was not reinforcer specific, more subtle differences were observed in peak dopamine concentration [DA] across reinforcer conditions. Specifically, peak [DA] was higher during the first phase of the multiple schedule, regardless of reinforcer type. Further, the time to reach peak [DA] was delayed during cocaine-responding compared to sucrose. During the sucrose/food multiple schedule, increases in dopamine release were also observed relative to operant responding for both natural rewards. However, peak [DA] was higher relative to responding for sucrose than food, regardless of reinforcer order. Overall, the results reveal the dynamics of rapid dopamine signaling in discrete locations in the NAc across reward conditions, and provide novel insight into the functional role of this system in reward-seeking behaviors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The management of metastatic radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer requires an integrated approach including both directed and systemic therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooray, Shamil D; Topliss, Duncan J

    2017-01-01

    A 58-year-old man with metastatic radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) presented with left thigh and right flank numbness. He had known progressive and widespread bony metastases, for which he received palliative radiotherapy, and multiple bilateral asymptomatic pulmonary metastases. CT scan and MRI of the spine revealed metastases at right T10-L1 vertebrae with extension into the central canal and epidural disease at T10 and T11 causing cord displacement and canal stenosis but retention of spinal cord signal. Spinal surgery was followed by palliative radiotherapy resulting in symptom resolution. Two months later, sorafenib received approval for use in Australia and was commenced and up-titrated with symptomatic management of mild adverse effects. Follow-up CT scan three months after commencement of sorafenib revealed regression of pulmonary metastases but no evident change in most bone metastases except for an advancing lesion eroding into the right acetabulum. The patient underwent a right total hip replacement, intra-lesional curettage and cementing. After six months of sorafenib therapy, CT scanning showed enlarging liver lesions with marked elevation of serum thyroglobulin. Lenvatinib was commenced and sorafenib was ceased. He now has stable disease with a falling thyroglobulin more than 5 years after metastatic radioiodine-refractory DTC was diagnosed. In DTC, 5% of distant metastases become radioiodine-refractory, resulting in a median overall survival of 2.5-3.5 years. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy has recently been demonstrated to increase progression-free survival in these patients but poses some unique management issues and is best used as part of an integrated approach with directed therapy. Directed therapies may have greater potential to control localised disease and related symptoms when compared to systemic therapies.Consider TKI therapy in progressive disease where benefits outweigh risks.Active surveillance and

  5. Direct conversion from tramadol to tapentadol prolonged release for moderate to severe, chronic malignant tumour-related pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, H G; Koch, E D; Kosturski, H; Steup, A; Karcher, K; Dogan, C; Etropolski, M; Eerdekens, M

    2016-10-01

    A recent randomized-withdrawal, active- and placebo-controlled, double-blind phase 3 study showed that tapentadol prolonged release (PR) was effective and well tolerated for managing moderate to severe, chronic malignant tumour-related pain in patients who were opioid naive or dissatisfied with current treatment (Pain Physician, 2014, 17, 329-343). This post hoc, subgroup analysis evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of tapentadol PR in patients who previously received and were dissatisfied with tramadol for any reason and who had a pain intensity ≥5 (11-point numerical rating scale) before converting directly to tapentadol PR. In the original study, eligible patients had been randomized (2:1) and titrated to their optimal dose of tapentadol PR (100-250 mg bid) or morphine sulphate-controlled release (40-100 mg bid) over 2 weeks. The present report focuses on results during the titration period for a subgroup of patients randomized to tapentadol PR after having been on tramadol treatment prior to randomization in the study (n = 129). Results for this subgroup are compared with results for all 338 patients who received tapentadol PR during titration (overall tapentadol PR group). Responder rates (responders: completed titration, mean pain intensity pain could safely switch from prior treatment with the weak centrally acting analgesic tramadol directly to the strong centrally acting analgesic tapentadol PR, for an improved analgesic therapy for severe pain. WHAT DOES THIS STUDY ADD?: Results of this post hoc analysis show that patients who had received prior tramadol therapy could switch directly to tapentadol PR, with the majority (˜70%) experiencing improved efficacy. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Pain published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  6. Direct measurement of human plasma corticotropin-releasing hormone by two-site immunoradiometric assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linton, E.A.; McLean, C.; Nieuwenhuyzen Kruseman, A.C.; Tilders, F.J.; Van der Veen, E.A.; Lowry, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    A ''two-site'' immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) which allows the direct estimation of human CRH (hCRH) in plasma is described. Using this IRMA, basal levels of CRH in normal subjects ranged from 2-28 pg/mL [mean, 15 +/- 7 (+/- SD) pg/mL; n = 58]. Values in men and women were similar. Plasma CRH values within this range were also found in patients with Cushing's syndrome, Addison's disease, and Nelson's syndrome, with no correlation between plasma CRH and ACTH levels in these patients. Elevated plasma CRH levels were found in pregnant women near term [1462 +/- 752 (+/- SD) pg/mL; n = 55], and the dilution curve of this CRH-like immunoreactivity paralleled the IRMA standard curve. After its immunoadsorption from maternal plasma, this CRH-like material eluted on reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography with a retention time identical to that of synthetic CRH and had equipotent bioactivity with the synthetic peptide in the perfused anterior pituitary cell bioassay. Circulating CRH was not detected in Wistar rats, even after adrenalectomy and subsequent ether stress. Synthetic hCRH was degraded by fresh human plasma relatively slowly; 65% of added CRH remained after 1 h of incubation at 37 C. Degradation was inhibited by heat treatment (54 C; 1 h), cold treatment (4 C; 4 h), or freezing and thawing. Loss of synthetic rat CRH occurred more rapidly when fresh rat plasma was used; only 20% of added CRH remained under the same conditions. The inability to measure CRH in peripheral rat plasma may be due to the presence of active CRH-degrading enzymes which fragment the CRH molecule into forms not recognized by the CRH IRMA

  7. Uranium potential of southwestern New Mexico (southern Hidalgo County), including observations on crystallization history of lavas and ash tuffs and the release of uranium from them. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, A.W.; Salter, T.L.; Zetterlund, D.

    1980-08-01

    Geological environments present in southwestern New Mexico include thick sequences of sedimentary rock including limestone, conglomerates, sandstone, and shale: igneous intrusions with associated metal deposits; caldera centers, margins, and outflow facies; and basins with marginal faults and thick late Cenozoic sedimentary fillings. Predominant rock types are Paleozoic carbonates, Mesozoic terrigeneous rocks and carbonates, and Cenozoic volcanic rocks and basin-filling terrigeneous rocks. Consideration of information available in Preliminary Reconnaissance Reports and in Hydrogeochemical and Stream Reconnaissance Reports together with 347 new whole rock chemical analyses points to three areas of anomalous uranium abundance in Hidalgo County, New Mexico. The area has experienced three major periods of igneous activity in Phanerozoic time: one associated with the Laramide cycle of the Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary, mid-Tertiary cycle of silicic volcanism with abundant calderas, and a late Tertiary cycle of mafic volcanism. Silicic volcanic rocks are the most common exposed rock type in the area, and the most enriched in uranium (range, 0.4 to 19 ppM). The most likely source for any uranium ore-forming solutions lies with this cycle of volcanism. Solutions might have been introduced during volcanism or formed later by groundwater leaching of cooled volcanic rocks. Results indicate that groundwater leaching of cooled volcanic rocks was not an effective means of mobilizing uranium in the area. Study of several rhyolite lava flows indicates that they were emplaced in supercooled condition and may have crystallized completely at temperatures well below their liquids, or they may have warmed as crystallization released latent heat. Statistical comparison of the uranium concentration revealed no differences between vitrophyres and associated felsites.

  8. Uranium potential of southwestern New Mexico (southern Hidalgo County), including observations on crystallization history of lavas and ash tuffs and the release of uranium from them. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, A.W.; Salter, T.L.; Zetterlund, D.

    1980-08-01

    Geological environments present in southwestern New Mexico include thick sequences of sedimentary rock including limestone, conglomerates, sandstone, and shale: igneous intrusions with associated metal deposits; caldera centers, margins, and outflow facies; and basins with marginal faults and thick late Cenozoic sedimentary fillings. Predominant rock types are Paleozoic carbonates, Mesozoic terrigeneous rocks and carbonates, and Cenozoic volcanic rocks and basin-filling terrigeneous rocks. Consideration of information available in Preliminary Reconnaissance Reports and in Hydrogeochemical and Stream Reconnaissance Reports together with 347 new whole rock chemical analyses points to three areas of anomalous uranium abundance in Hidalgo County, New Mexico. The area has experienced three major periods of igneous activity in Phanerozoic time: one associated with the Laramide cycle of the Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary, mid-Tertiary cycle of silicic volcanism with abundant calderas, and a late Tertiary cycle of mafic volcanism. Silicic volcanic rocks are the most common exposed rock type in the area, and the most enriched in uranium (range, 0.4 to 19 ppM). The most likely source for any uranium ore-forming solutions lies with this cycle of volcanism. Solutions might have been introduced during volcanism or formed later by groundwater leaching of cooled volcanic rocks. Results indicate that groundwater leaching of cooled volcanic rocks was not an effective means of mobilizing uranium in the area. Study of several rhyolite lava flows indicates that they were emplaced in supercooled condition and may have crystallized completely at temperatures well below their liquids, or they may have warmed as crystallization released latent heat. Statistical comparison of the uranium concentration revealed no differences between vitrophyres and associated felsites

  9. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Rock Springs NTMS Quadrangle, Wyoming, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, T.L.

    1981-01-01

    This report contains data collected by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) during a regional geochemical survey for uranium in the Rock Springs National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) quadrangle, southwestern Wyoming, as part of the nationwide hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR). Totals of 397 water and 1794 sediment samples were collected from 1830 locations in the Rock Springs quadrangle of southern Wyoming during the summer of 1976. The average uranium concentration of all water samples is 6.57 ppb and the average sediment uranium concentration is 3.64 ppM. Elemental concentration, field measurement, weather, geologic, and geographic data for each sample location are listed for waters and for sediments in the appendices. Uranium/thorium ratios for sediment samples are also included. A sample location overlay (Plate I) at 1:250 000 scale for use in conjunction with the Rock Springs NTMS quadrangle sheet (US Geological Survey, 1954) is provided. All elemental analyses were performed at the LASL. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than 40 ppB uranium were reanalyzed by delayed-neutron counting. Sediments were analyzed for uranium and thorium as well as Al, Sb, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Ca, Ce, Cs, Cl, Cr, Co, Cu, Dy, Eu, Au, Hf, Fe, La, Pb, Li, Lu, Mg, Mn, Ni, Nb, K, Rb, Sm, Sc, Ag, Na, Sr, Ta, Tb, Sn, T, W, V, Yb, and Zn. All sediments were analyzed for uranium by delayed-neutron counting. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron-activation analysis for 30 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 12 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. These analytical methods are described briefly in the appendix. This report is simply a data release and is intended to make the data available to the DOE and to the public as quickly as possible

  10. Chase the direct impact of rainfall into groundwater in Mt. Fuji from multiple analyses including microbial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kenji; Sugiyama, Ayumi; Nagaosa, Kazuyo; Tsujimura, Maki

    2016-04-01

    A huge amount of groundwater is stored in subsurface environment of Mt. Fuji, the largest volcanic mountain in Japan. Based on the concept of piston flow transport of groundwater an apparent residence time was estimated to ca. 30 years by 36Cl/Cl ratio (Tosaki et al., 2011). However, this number represents an averaged value of the residence time of groundwater which had been mixed before it flushes out. We chased signatures of direct impact of rainfall into groundwater to elucidate the routes of groundwater, employing three different tracers; stable isotopic analysis (delta 18O), chemical analysis (concentration of silica) and microbial DNA analysis. Though chemical analysis of groundwater shows an averaged value of the examined water which was blended by various water with different sources and routes in subsurface environment, microbial DNA analysis may suggest the place where they originated, which may give information of the source and transport routes of the water examined. Throughout the in situ observation of four rainfall events showed that stable oxygen isotopic ratio of spring water and shallow groundwater obtained from 726m a.s.l. where the average recharge height of rainfall was between 1500 and 1800 m became higher than the values before a torrential rainfall, and the concentration of silica decreased after this event when rainfall exceeded 300 mm in precipitation of an event. In addition, the density of Prokaryotes in spring water apparently increased. Those changes did not appear when rainfall did not exceed 100 mm per event. Thus, findings shown above indicated a direct impact of rainfall into shallow groundwater, which appeared within a few weeks of torrential rainfall in the studied geological setting. In addition, increase in the density of Archaea observed at deep groundwater after the torrential rainfall suggested an enlargement of the strength of piston flow transport through the penetration of rainfall into deep groundwater. This finding was

  11. A simple method to evaluate the fission gas release at fuel grain boundary including the grain growth both at constant and at transient power histories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraschiv, M.; Paraschiv, A.

    1991-01-01

    A method to rewrite Fick's second law for a region with a moving boundary when the moving law in time of this boundary is known, has been proposed. This method was applied to Booth's sphere model for radioactive and stable fission product diffusion from the oxide fuel grain in order to take into account the grain growth. The solution of this new equation was presented in the mathematical formulation for power histories from ANS 5.4 model for the stable species. It is very simple to apply and very accurate. The results obtained with this solution for constant and transient temperatures show that the fission gas release (FGR) at grain boundary is strongly dependent on kinetics of grain growth. The utilization of two semiempirical grain growth laws, from published information, shows that the fuel microstructural properties need to be multicitly considered in the fission gas release for every manufacturer of fuel. (orig.)

  12. Calculation on spectrum of direct DNA damage induced by low-energy electrons including dissociative electron attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Tan, Zhenyu; Zhang, Liming; Champion, Christophe

    2017-03-01

    In this work, direct DNA damage induced by low-energy electrons (sub-keV) is simulated using a Monte Carlo method. The characteristics of the present simulation are to consider the new mechanism of DNA damage due to dissociative electron attachment (DEA) and to allow determining damage to specific bases (i.e., adenine, thymine, guanine, or cytosine). The electron track structure in liquid water is generated, based on the dielectric response model for describing electron inelastic scattering and on a free-parameter theoretical model and the NIST database for calculating electron elastic scattering. Ionization cross sections of DNA bases are used to generate base radicals, and available DEA cross sections of DNA components are applied for determining DNA-strand breaks and base damage induced by sub-ionization electrons. The electron elastic scattering from DNA components is simulated using cross sections from different theoretical calculations. The resulting yields of various strand breaks and base damage in cellular environment are given. Especially, the contributions of sub-ionization electrons to various strand breaks and base damage are quantitatively presented, and the correlation between complex clustered DNA damage and the corresponding damaged bases is explored. This work shows that the contribution of sub-ionization electrons to strand breaks is substantial, up to about 40-70%, and this contribution is mainly focused on single-strand break. In addition, the base damage induced by sub-ionization electrons contributes to about 20-40% of the total base damage, and there is an evident correlation between single-strand break and damaged base pair A-T.

  13. Tracking the direct impact of rainfall on groundwater at Mt. Fuji by multiple analyses including microbial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Ayumi; Masuda, Suguru; Nagaosa, Kazuyo; Tsujimura, Maki; Kato, Kenji

    2018-02-01

    A total of 2 to 3 million tons of spring water flushes out from the foot of Mt. Fuji, the largest volcanic mountain in Japan. Based on the concept of piston flow transport, residence time of stored groundwater at Mt. Fuji was estimated at ˜ 15-30 years by the 36Cl / Cl ratio (Tosaki et al., 2011). This range, however, represents the average residence time of groundwater that was mixed before it flushed out. To elucidate the route of groundwater in a given system, we determined signatures of direct impacts of rainfall on groundwater, using microbial, stable isotopic (δ18O), and chemical analyses (concentration of silica). Chemical analysis of the groundwater gave an average value of the water, which was already mixed with waters from various sources and routes in the subsurface environment. The microbial analysis suggested locations of water origin and paths. In situ observation during four rainfall events revealed that the stable oxygen isotopic signature obtained from spring water (at 726 m a.s.l., site SP-0 m) and shallow groundwater (at 150 m a.s.l., site GW-42 m), where the average recharge height from rainfall was 1700-1800 m, became greater than values observed prior to a torrential rain producing more than 300 mm of precipitation. The concentration of silica decreased after this event. In addition, the abundance of Bacteria in spring water increased, suggesting the influence of heavy rain. Such changes did not appear when rainfall was less than 100 mm per event. The above findings indicate a rapid flow of rain through the shallow part of the aquifer, which appeared within a few weeks of torrential rain extracting abundant microbes from soil in the studied geologic setting. Interestingly, we found that after the torrential rain, the abundance of Archaea increased in the deep groundwater at site GW-550 m, ˜ 12 km downstream of SP-0 m. However, chemical parameters did not show any change after the event. This suggests that strengthened piston flow caused by

  14. Tracking the direct impact of rainfall on groundwater at Mt. Fuji by multiple analyses including microbial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sugiyama

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A total of 2 to 3 million tons of spring water flushes out from the foot of Mt. Fuji, the largest volcanic mountain in Japan. Based on the concept of piston flow transport, residence time of stored groundwater at Mt. Fuji was estimated at  ∼  15–30 years by the 36Cl ∕ Cl ratio (Tosaki et al., 2011. This range, however, represents the average residence time of groundwater that was mixed before it flushed out. To elucidate the route of groundwater in a given system, we determined signatures of direct impacts of rainfall on groundwater, using microbial, stable isotopic (δ18O, and chemical analyses (concentration of silica. Chemical analysis of the groundwater gave an average value of the water, which was already mixed with waters from various sources and routes in the subsurface environment. The microbial analysis suggested locations of water origin and paths. In situ observation during four rainfall events revealed that the stable oxygen isotopic signature obtained from spring water (at 726 m a.s.l., site SP-0 m and shallow groundwater (at 150 m a.s.l., site GW-42 m, where the average recharge height from rainfall was 1700–1800 m, became greater than values observed prior to a torrential rain producing more than 300 mm of precipitation. The concentration of silica decreased after this event. In addition, the abundance of Bacteria in spring water increased, suggesting the influence of heavy rain. Such changes did not appear when rainfall was less than 100 mm per event. The above findings indicate a rapid flow of rain through the shallow part of the aquifer, which appeared within a few weeks of torrential rain extracting abundant microbes from soil in the studied geologic setting. Interestingly, we found that after the torrential rain, the abundance of Archaea increased in the deep groundwater at site GW-550 m,  ∼  12 km downstream of SP-0 m. However, chemical parameters did not show any change

  15. Fostering cooperation in power asymmetrical water systems by the use of direct release rules and index-based insurance schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denaro, Simona; Castelletti, Andrea; Giuliani, Matteo; Characklis, Gregory W.

    2018-05-01

    In river basin systems, power asymmetry is often responsible of inefficient and unbalanced water allocations. Climate change and anthropogenic pressure will possibly exacerbate such disparities as the dominant party controls an increasingly limited shared resource. In this context, the deployment of cooperation mechanisms giving greater consideration to a balanced distribution of the benefits, while improving system-wide efficiency, may be desirable. This often implies the intervention of a third party (e.g., the river basin water authority) imposing normative constraints (e.g., a minimum release) on the party in the dominant position. However, this imposition will be more acceptable to the dominant party if coupled with some form of compensation. For a public agency, compensation may be burdensome, especially when the allowance is triggered by natural events whose timing and magnitude are highly uncertain. In this context, index-based insurance contracts may represent a viable alternative and reduce the cost of achieving socially desirable outcomes. In this paper, we develop a hybrid cooperation mechanism composed of i) a direct normative constraint imposed by a regulator, and ii) an indirect financial tool, an index-based insurance contract, to be used as a compensation measure. The approach is developed for the Lake Como multi-purpose water system, Italy: a complex Alpine river basin, supporting several hydropower reservoirs and finally flowing into a regulated lake which supplies water to several downstream uses, mostly irrigated agriculture. The system is characterized by a manifest geographic power asymmetry: the upstream hydropower companies are free to release their stored water in time irrespective of the timing of the downstream demands. This situation can lead to financial losses by the downstream users and undesirable social outcomes. Results suggest that financial instruments may offer a reliable and relatively inexpensive alternative to other forms of

  16. Temperature-dependent release of volatile organic compounds of eucalypts by direct analysis in real time (DART) mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleknia, Simin D; Vail, Teresa M; Cody, Robert B; Sparkman, David O; Bell, Tina L; Adams, Mark A

    2009-08-01

    A method is described for the rapid identification of biogenic, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by plants, including the analysis of the temperature dependence of those emissions. Direct analysis in real time (DART) enabled ionization of VOCs from stem and leaf of several eucalyptus species including E. cinerea, E. citriodora, E. nicholii and E. sideroxylon. Plant tissues were placed directly in the gap between the DART ionization source skimmer and the capillary inlet of the time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. Temperature-dependent emission of VOCs was achieved by adjusting the temperature of the helium gas into the DART ionization source at 50, 100, 200 and 300 degrees C, which enabled direct evaporation of compounds, up to the onset of pyrolysis of plant fibres (i.e. cellulose and lignin). Accurate mass measurements facilitated by TOF mass spectrometry provided elemental compositions for the VOCs. A wide range of compounds was detected from simple organic compounds (i.e. methanol and acetone) to a series of monoterpenes (i.e. pinene, camphene, cymene, eucalyptol) common to many plant species, as well as several less abundant sesquiterpenes and flavonoids (i.e. naringenin, spathulenol, eucalyptin) with antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. The leaf and stem tissues for all four eucalypt species showed similar compounds. The relative abundances of methanol and ethanol were greater in stem wood than in leaf tissue suggesting that DART could be used to investigate the tissue-specific transport and emissions of VOCs. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Direct releases to the surface and associated complementary cumulative distribution functions in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: cuttings, cavings and spallings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglund, J.W.; Garner, J.W.; Helton, J.C.; Johnson, J.D.; Smith, L.N.

    2000-01-01

    The following topics related to the treatment of cuttings, cavings and spallings releases to the surface environment in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are presented: (i) mathematical description of models; (ii) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results arising from subjective (i.e. epistemic) uncertainty for individual releases; (iii) construction of complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) arising from stochastic (i.e. aleatory) uncertainty; and (iv) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results for CCDFs. The presented results indicate that direct releases due to cuttings, cavings and spallings do not constitute a serious threat to the effectiveness of the WIPP as a disposal facility for transuranic waste. Even when the effects of uncertain analysis inputs are taken into account, the CCDFs for cuttings, cavings and spallings releases fall substantially to the left of the boundary line specified in the US Environmental Protection Agency's standard for the geologic disposal of radioactive waste (40 CFR 191, 40 CFR 194)

  18. Direct releases to the surface and associated complementary cumulative distribution functions in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Cuttings, cavings and spallings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglund, J.W.; Garner, J.W.; Helton, Jon Craig; Johnson, J.D.; Smith, L.N.; Anderson, R.P.

    2000-01-01

    The following topics related to the treatment of cuttings, cavings and spallings releases to the surface environment in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are presented: (1) mathematical description of models. (2) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results arising from subjective (i.e., epistemic) uncertainty for individual releases, (3) construction of complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) arising from stochastic (i.e., aleatory) uncertainty, and (4) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results for CCDFs. The presented results indicate that direct releases due to cuttings, cavings and spallings do not constitute a serious threat to the effectiveness of the WIPP as a disposal facility for transuranic waste. Even when the effects of uncertain analysis inputs are taken into account, the CCDFs for cuttings, cavings and spallings releases fall substantially to the left of the boundary line specified in the US Environmental Protection Agency standard for the geologic disposal of radioactive waste (40 CFR 191, 40 CFR 194)

  19. Emergency planning and the Control of Major Accident Hazards (COMAH/Seveso II) Directive: An approach to determine the public safety zone for toxic cloud releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Mahony, Mary T.; Doolan, Donal; O'Sullivan, Alice; Hession, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The EU Control of Major Accidents Hazards Directive (Seveso II) requires an external emergency plan for each top tier site. This paper sets out a method to build the protection of public health into emergency planning for Seveso sites in the EU. The method involves the review of Seveso site details prescribed under the directive. The site safety report sets out the potential accident scenarios. The safety report's worst-case scenario, and chemical involved, is used as the basis for the external emergency plan. A decision was needed on the appropriate threshold value to use as the level of concern to protect public health. The definitions of the regulatory standards (air quality standards and occupational standards) in use were studied, how they are derived and for what purpose. The 10 min acute exposure guideline level (AEGL) for a chemical is recommended as the threshold value to inform decisions taken to protect public health from toxic cloud releases. The area delimited by AEGL 1 defines the population who may be concerned about being exposed. They need information based on comprehensive risk assessment. The area delimited by AEGL 2 defines the population for long-term surveillance when indicated and may include first responders. The area delimited by AEGL 3 defines the population who may present acutely to the medical services. It ensures that the emergency responders site themselves safely. A standard methodology facilitates discussions with plant operators and concerned public. Examples show how the methodology can be adapted to suit explosive risk and response to fire

  20. Co-formation and co-release of genotoxic PAHs, alkyl-PAHs and soot nanoparticles from gasoline direct injection vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Maria; Haag, Regula; Honegger, Peter; Zeyer, Kerstin; Mohn, Joachim; Comte, Pierre; Czerwinski, Jan; Heeb, Norbert V.

    2018-04-01

    Gasoline direct injection (GDI) vehicles quickly replace traditional port-fuel injection (PFI) vehicles in Europe reaching about 50 million vehicles on roads in 2020. GDI vehicles release large numbers of soot nanoparticles similar to conventional diesel vehicles without particle filters. These exhausts will increasingly affect air quality in European cities. We hypothesized that such particles are released together with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) formed under the same combustion conditions. Emission data of a fleet of 7 GDI vehicles (1.2-1.8 L) including Euro-3,-4,-5 and -6 technologies revealed substantial particle emissions on average of 2.5 × 1012 particles km-1 in the cold worldwide harmonized light vehicle test cycle (cWLTC), the future European legislative driving cycle. Particle emissions increased 2-3 orders of magnitude during acceleration like CO, indicating that transient driving produces fuel-rich conditions with intense particle formation. For comparison, an Euro-5 diesel vehicle (1.6 L) equipped with a particle filter released 3.9 × 1010 particles km-1 (cWLTC), clearly within the Euro-5/6 limit value of 6.0 × 1011 particles km-1 and 64-fold below the GDI fleet average. PAH and alkyl-PAH emissions of the GDI vehicles also exceeded those of the diesel vehicle. Mean GDI emissions of 2-, 3-, 4-, 5- and 6-ring PAHs in the cWLTC were 240, 44, 5.8, 0.5 and 0.4 μg km-1, those of the diesel vehicle were only 8.8, 7.1, 8.6, 0.02 and 0.02 μg km-1, respectively. Thus mean PAH emissions of the GDI fleet were 2 orders of magnitude higher than the bench mark diesel vehicle. A comparison of the toxicity equivalent concentrations (TEQ) in the cWLTC of the GDI fleet and the diesel vehicle revealed that GDI vehicles released 200-1700 ng TEQ m-3 genotoxic PAHs, being 6-40 times higher than the diesel vehicle with 45 ng TEQ km-1. The co-release of genotoxic PAHs adsorbed on numerous soot nanoparticles is critical due to the Trojan horse effect

  1. A novel co-processed directly compressible release-retarding polymer: In vitro, solid state and in vivo evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Kumar Choudhari

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Directly compressible (DC co-processed excipient capable of providing nearly zero order release with improved functionality was developed without any chemical modification by employed various techniques such as physical mixing, high shear mixer granulation and spray drying. Co-processed excipient was developed by using release retarding polymer Eudragit RSPO, separately, in combination with different concentration of hydroxyl propyl methyl cellulose 100 cps (Methocel K100 LV, HPMC, ethyl cellulose (Ethocel N50, EC and hydroxyl propyl cellulose (Klucel EF, HPC. All co-processed excipients were evaluated for their flow properties in terms of angle of repose, bulk density, tapped density, compressibility index and Hausner's ratio. Out of eighteen combinations, the nine co-processed excipients exhibited promising flow properties were found suitable for direct compression and formulated as tablets. Metoprolol succinate, a BCS Class I drug, was selected as a model drug and the formulation was developed employing direct compression approach. The developed tablets were evaluated for physical parameters like uniformity of weight, thickness, hardness, friability and assay. In vitro dissolution study confirms that formulation prepared using co-processed excipient showed sustained drug release. The optimized tablet formulation was characterized by DSC, FTIR and PXRD which confirms the absence of any chemical change during co-processing. The optimized formulation was kept for stability study for six months as per ICH guidelines and found to be stable. In vivo pharmacokinetic study of optimized formulation in rats showed similar pharmacokinetic behaviour as was observed with the marketed brand. Study revealed that co-processed excipient has advantage over polymers with single property and can be utilised for sustained release formulation. Keywords: Co-processed excipient, Metoprolol succinate, Extended-release, Direct compression, Zero-order release

  2. News/Press Releases

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — A press release, news release, media release, press statement is written communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing programs...

  3. Direct monitoring of dopamine and 5-HT release in substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rice, M E; Richards, C D; Nedergaard, S

    1994-01-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry with carbon fibre microelectrodes was used to detect endogenous dopamine (DA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release from three distinct regions of guinea-pig mid-brain in vitro: rostral and caudal substantia nigra (SN) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Previous...... these regions with in situ electrodes and demonstrates the utility of fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to investigate the mechanisms and possible non-classical functions of somato-dendritic DA release....

  4. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 536: Area 3 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0 / June 2003), Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-06-27

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 536: Area 3 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 536 consists of a single Corrective Action Site (CAS): 03-44-02, Steam Jenny Discharge. The CAU 536 site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of possible contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for CAS 03-44-02. The additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of this field investigation are to be used to support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3-2004.

  5. Predominant cerebral cytokine release syndrome in CD19-directed chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxian Hu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chimeric antigen receptor-modified (CAR T cells targeting CD19 (CART19 have shown therapeutical activities in CD19+ malignancies. However, the etiological nature of neurologic complications remains a conundrum. In our study, the evidence of blood-brain barrier (BBB-penetrating CAR T cells as a culprit was revealed. A patient with acute lymphocytic leukemia developed sustained pyrexia with tremors about 6 h after CART19 infusion, followed by a grade 2 cytokine release syndrome (CRS and neurological symptoms in the next 3 days. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance showed signs of intracranial edema. Lumbar puncture on day 5 showed an over 400-mmH2O cerebrospinal pressure. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF contained 20 WBCs/μL with predominant CD3+ T cells. qPCR analysis for CAR constructs showed 3,032,265 copies/μg DNA in CSF and 988,747 copies/μg DNA in blood. Cytokine levels including IFN-γ and IL-6 in CSF were extremely higher than those in the serum. Methyprednisone was administrated and the symptoms relieved gradually. The predominance of CART19 in CSF and the huge discrepancies in cytokine distributions indicated the development of a cerebral CRS, presumably featured as CSF cytokines largely in situ produced by BBB-penetrating CAR T cells. For the first time, we reported the development of cerebral CRS triggered by BBB-penetrating CAR T cells. Trial registration: ChiCTR-OCC-15007008 .

  6. Applying the model of Goal-Directed Behavior, including descriptive norms, to physical activity intentions: A contribution to improving the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    The theory of planned behavior (TPB) has received its fair share of criticism lately, including calls for it to retire. We contributed to improving the theory by testing extensions such as the model of goal-directed behavior (MGDB, which adds desire and anticipated positive and negative emotions) ap...

  7. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Lewistown NTMS Quadrangle, Montana, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannon, S.S. Jr.

    1980-08-01

    Totals of 758 water and 1170 sediment samples were collected from 1649 locations in the Levistown quadrangle. Water samples were collected at streams, springs, wells, ponds, and marshes; sediment samples were obtained from streams, springs, and ponds. Histograms and statistical data for uranium concentrations in water and sediment samples and thorium concentrations in sediment samples are given. All samples were collected at the nominal reconnaissance density of one sample location per 10 km 2 . Elemental concentration, field measurement, weather, geologic, and geographic data for each sample location are listed for waters and for sediments. Uranium to thorium (U/Th) ratios for sediment samples are included. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than 40 ppB U were reanalyzed by delayed-neutron counting. Sediments were analyzed for U and Th as well as Al, Sb, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Ca, Ce, Cs, Cl, Cr, Co, Cu, Dy, Eu, Au, Hf, Fe, La, Pb, Li, Lu, Mg, Mn, Ni, Nb, K, Rb, Sa, Sc, Ag, Na, Sr, Ta, Tb, Sn, Ti, W, V, Yb, and Zn. All sediments were analyzed for U by delayed neutron counting. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron activation analysis for 31 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 9 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. Analytical results are reported as parts per million. Descriptions of procedures used for analysis of water and sediments samples as well as analytical precisions and detection limits are given

  8. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Elk City NTMS Quadrangle, Idaho/Montana, including concentrations of forty-five additional elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broxton, D.E.; Beyth, M.

    1980-07-01

    Totals of 1580 water and 1720 sediment samples were collected from 1754 locations in the quadrangle. Elemental concentration, field measurement, weather, geologic, and geographic data for each sample location are listed for waters in Appendix I-A and for sediments in Appendix I-B. Uranium/thorium ratios for sediment samples are also included in Appendix I-B. All elemental analyses were performed at the LASL. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than 40 parts per billion (ppB) uranium were reanalyzed by delayed-neutron counting (DNC). A supplemental report containing the multielement analyses of water samples will be open filed in the near future. Sediments were analyzed for uranium and thorium as well as aluminum, antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, calcium, cerium, cesium, chlorine, chromium, cobalt, copper, dysprosium, europium, gold, hafnium, iron, lanthanum, lead, lithium, lutetium, magnesium, manganese, nickel, niobium, potassium, rubidium, samarium, selenium, scandium, silver, sodium, strontium, tantalum, terbium, tin, titanium, tungsten, vanadium, ytterbium, zinc, and zirconium. Basic statistics for 40 of these elements are presented. All sediments were analyzed for uranium by delayed-neutron counting. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron-activation analysis for 30 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 12 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. Analytical results for sediments are reported as parts per million.

  9. Shear bond strengths of tooth coating materials including the experimental materials contained various amounts of multi-ion releasing fillers and their effects for preventing dentin demineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arita, Shoko; Suzuki, Masaya; Kazama-Koide, Miku; Shinkai, Koichi

    2017-10-01

    We examined shear bond strengths (SBSs) of various tooth-coating-materials including the experimental materials to dentin and demineralization resistance of a fractured adhesive surface after the SBS testing. Three resin-type tooth-coating-materials (BC, PRG Barrier Coat; HC, Hybrid Coat II; and SF, Shield force plus) and two glass-ionomer-type tooth-coating-materials (CV, Clinpro XT Varnish; and FJ, Fuji VII) were selected. The experimental PRG Barrier Coat containing 0, 17, and 33 wt% S-PRG filler (BC0, BC17, and BC33, respectively) were developed. Each tooth-coating-material was applied to flattened dentin surfaces of extracted human teeth for SBS testing. After storing in water for 32 days with 4000 thermal cycling, the specimens were subjected to the SBS test. Specimens after SBS testing were subjected to a pH cycling test, and then, demineralization depths were measured using a polarized-light microscope. ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test were used for statistical analysis. The SBS value of FJ and CV was significantly lower than those of other materials except for BC (p coating-materials demonstrated significantly higher SBS for dentin than the glass-ionomer-type tooth-coating-materials; however, they were inferior to the glass ionomer-type tooth-coating-materials in regards to the acid resistance of the fractured adhesion surface.

  10. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Socorro NRMS Quadrangle, New Mexico, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planner, H.N.; Fuka, M.A.; Hanks, D.E.; Hansel, J.M.; Minor, M.M.; Montoya, J.D.; Sandoval, W.F.

    1980-10-01

    Results for uranium in water samples and uranium and 42 additional elements in sediment samples are given. A total of 650 water samples was collected from wells (525), springs (99), streams (25), and one pond. Uranium concentrations for all water samples range from below the detection limit to 157.20 parts per billion (ppB). Mean concentrations in springs and well waters are 4.91 ppB and 5.04 ppB, respectively, compared to a value of 2.78 ppB in stream waters. Of the 1384 sediment samples collected, 1246 are from dry stream beds. The remaining 138 samples are from springs (68), ponds (50), and flowing streams (20). Uranium concentrations in sediments range from 0.84 to 13.40 parts per million (ppM) with the exception of a single 445.10-ppM concentration. The mean uranium content of all sediments is 3.12 ppM. Field data, recorded at the collection site, are reported with the elemental concentrations for each water and sediment sample listed in Appendixes I-A and I-B. These data include a scintillometer determination of the equivalent uranium, pH and conductivity measurements, and geographic and weather information. Appendix II explains the codes used in Appendix I and describes the standard field and analytical procedures used by the LASL in the HSSR program

  11. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Leadville NTMS Quadrangle, Colorado, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planner, H.N.

    1980-10-01

    A total of 1797 locations was sampled over a 19 330-km 2 area, providing an average density of one sample location per 11 km 2 . This report contains results for uranium in water samples and uranium and 42 additional elements in sediment samples. A total of 1279 water samples was collected from streams (1125) and springs (154). Uranium concentrations for all water samples range from below the detection limit of 0.02 ppB to 37.56 ppB. Mean concentrations in streams and springs are 1.05 ppB and 1.19 ppB, respectively. A total of 1784 sediment samples was collected from streams (1590), springs (193), and one pond. Uranium concentrations in sediments range from 1.27 to 223.80 ppM. Statistical mean uranium concentrations for wet stream (8.55 ppM) and spring (7.51 ppM) sediments are found to be greater than their dry counterparts (5.13 ppM and 4.96 ppM, respectively). Field data, recorded at the collection site, are reported with the elemental concentrations for each water and sediment sample listed. These data include a scintillometer determination of the equivalent uranium, pH and conductivity measurements, and geographic and weather information

  12. Detailed uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the eastern portion of the Montrose NTMS Quadrangle, Colorado, including concentrations of forty-five additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maassen, L.W.

    1981-01-01

    In September and October 1979, the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) conducted a detailed geochemical survey for uranium primarily in the Sawatch Range in the eastern part of the Montrose National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) quadrangle, Colorado, as part of the National Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR). Totals of 1034 water and 2087 sediment samples were collected from streams and springs from 2088 locations within a 5420-km 2 area. Statistical data for uranium concentrations in water and sediment samples are presented. Elemental concentration, field measurement, weather, geologic, and geographic data for each sample location are listed for waters and for sediments in appendices. Uranium/thorium ratios for sediment samples are also included. This report contains uranium analyses for water samples and multielement analyses for sediment samples. Sediments were analyzed for uranium and thorium as well as Al, Sb, As, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Ca, Ce, Cs, Cl, Cr, Co, Cu, Dy, Eu, Au, Hf, Fe, La, Pb, Li, Lu, Mg, Mn, Ni, Nb, K, Rb, Sm, Sc, Se, Ag, Na, Sr, Ta, Tb, Sn, Ti, W, V, Yb, Zn, and Zr. All elemental analyses were performed at the LASL. Water samples were analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. Sediments were analyzed for uranium by delayed neutron counting. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron activation analysis for 31 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 12 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. Descriptions of procedures as analytical precisions and detection limits are given in the appendix

  13. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Butte NTMS Quadrangle, Montana, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broxton, D.E.; George, W.E.; Montoya, J.V.; Martell, C.J.; Hensley, W.K.; Hanks, D.

    1980-05-01

    This report contains data collected during a geochemical survey for uranium in the Butte National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) quadrangle of west-central Montana. Histograms and statistical data for uranium concentrations in water and sediment samples and thorium concentrations in sediment samples are given. Elemental concentration, field measurement, weather, geologic, and geographic data for each sample location are listed for waters and for sediments. Uranium/thorium ratios for sediment samples are also included. This report contains uranium analyses for water samples and multielement analyses for sediment samples. A supplemental report containing the results of multielement analyses of water samples will be open filed in the near future. Sediments were analyzed for uranium and thorium as well as aluminum, antimony, barium, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, calcium, cerium, cesium, chlorine, chromium, cobalt, copper, dysprosium, europium, gold, hafnium, iron, lanthanum, lead, lithium, lutetium, magnesium, manganese, nickel, niobium, potassium, rubidium, samarium, scandium, silver, sodium, strontium, tantalum, terbium, tin, titanium, tungsten, vanadium, ytterbium, and zinc. All elemental analyses were performed at the LASL. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than 40 ppB uranium were reanalyzed by delayed-neutron counting (DNC). All sediments were analyzed for uranium by DNC. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron activation analysis for 31 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 9 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. Analytical results for sediments are reported as parts per million. Descriptions of procedures used for analysis of water and sediment samples as well as analytical precisions and detection limits are given

  14. A new low threshold bi-directional wind vane and its potential impact on unplanned atmospheric release prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    At the Savannah River Site, the Environmental Transport Group (ETG) maintains and develops a comprehensive meteorological monitoring program which employs bi-directional wind vanes (bivanes) for the measurement of horizontal and vertical wind direction and turbulence. Wind data collected near and below instrument starting thresholds under stable nighttime conditions with these bivanes can result in artificially large standard deviations of horizontal wind direction (σA). In one hypothetical case, downwind concentrations could be underestimated by a factor of 40 by using artificially high σA data in a Gaussian dispersion model. In an effort to improve low wind speed measurements of wind direction, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Met One Instruments and the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) has been created to improve the dynamic performance of the Met One Model 1585 Bi-Directional Wind Vane

  15. EspC, an Autotransporter Protein Secreted by Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, Causes Apoptosis and Necrosis through Caspase and Calpain Activation, Including Direct Procaspase-3 Cleavage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Serapio-Palacios

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC has the ability to antagonize host apoptosis during infection through promotion and inhibition of effectors injected by the type III secretion system (T3SS, but the total number of these effectors and the overall functional relationships between these effectors during infection are poorly understood. EspC produced by EPEC cleaves fodrin, paxillin, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK, which are also cleaved by caspases and calpains during apoptosis. Here we show the role of EspC in cell death induced by EPEC. EspC is involved in EPEC-mediated cell death and induces both apoptosis and necrosis in epithelial cells. EspC induces apoptosis through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway by provoking (i a decrease in the expression levels of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2, (ii translocation of the proapoptotic protein Bax from cytosol to mitochondria, (iii cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytoplasm, (iv loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, (v caspase-9 activation, (vi cleavage of procaspase-3 and (vii an increase in caspase-3 activity, (viii PARP proteolysis, and (ix nuclear fragmentation and an increase in the sub-G1 population. Interestingly, EspC-induced apoptosis was triggered through a dual mechanism involving both independent and dependent functions of its EspC serine protease motif, the direct cleavage of procaspase-3 being dependent on this motif. This is the first report showing a shortcut for induction of apoptosis by the catalytic activity of an EPEC protein. Furthermore, this atypical intrinsic apoptosis appeared to induce necrosis through the activation of calpain and through the increase of intracellular calcium induced by EspC. Our data indicate that EspC plays a relevant role in cell death induced by EPEC.

  16. Different Effects of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Glioblastoma Stem Cells by Direct Cell Interaction or Via Released Soluble Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Bajetto

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM, the most common primary brain tumor in adults, is an aggressive, fast-growing and highly vascularized tumor, characterized by extensive invasiveness and local recurrence. In GBM and other malignancies, cancer stem cells (CSCs are believed to drive invasive tumor growth and recurrence, being responsible for radio- and chemo-therapy resistance. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent progenitors that exhibit tropism for tumor microenvironment mediated by cytokines, chemokines and growth factors. Initial studies proposed that MSCs might exert inhibitory effects on tumor development, although, to date, contrasting evidence has been provided. Different studies reported either MSC anti-tumor activity or their support to tumor growth. Here, we examined the effects of umbilical cord (UC-MSCs on in vitro GBM-derived CSC growth, by direct cell-to-cell interaction or indirect modulation, via the release of soluble factors. We demonstrate that UC-MSCs and CSCs exhibit reciprocal tropism when co-cultured as 3D spheroids and their direct cell interaction reduces the proliferation of both cell types. Contrasting effects were obtained by UC-MSC released factors: CSCs, cultured in the presence of conditioned medium (CM collected from UC-MSCs, increased proliferation rate through transient ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation/activation. Analysis of the profile of the cytokines released by UC-MSCs in the CM revealed a strong production of molecules involved in inflammation, angiogenesis, cell migration and proliferation, such as IL-8, GRO, ENA-78 and IL-6. Since CXC chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2, a receptor shared by several of these ligands, is expressed in GBM CSCs, we evaluated its involvement in CSC proliferation induced by UC-MSC-CM. Using the CXCR2 antagonist SB225002, we observed a partial but statistically significant inhibition of CSC proliferation and migration induced by the UC-MSC-released cytokines. Conversely, CXCR2 blockade did not

  17. Different Effects of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Glioblastoma Stem Cells by Direct Cell Interaction or Via Released Soluble Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajetto, Adriana; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Corsaro, Alessandro; Barbieri, Federica; Daga, Antonio; Bosio, Alessia; Gatti, Monica; Pisaturo, Valerio; Sirito, Rodolfo; Florio, Tullio

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM), the most common primary brain tumor in adults, is an aggressive, fast-growing and highly vascularized tumor, characterized by extensive invasiveness and local recurrence. In GBM and other malignancies, cancer stem cells (CSCs) are believed to drive invasive tumor growth and recurrence, being responsible for radio- and chemo-therapy resistance. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent progenitors that exhibit tropism for tumor microenvironment mediated by cytokines, chemokines and growth factors. Initial studies proposed that MSCs might exert inhibitory effects on tumor development, although, to date, contrasting evidence has been provided. Different studies reported either MSC anti-tumor activity or their support to tumor growth. Here, we examined the effects of umbilical cord (UC)-MSCs on in vitro GBM-derived CSC growth, by direct cell-to-cell interaction or indirect modulation, via the release of soluble factors. We demonstrate that UC-MSCs and CSCs exhibit reciprocal tropism when co-cultured as 3D spheroids and their direct cell interaction reduces the proliferation of both cell types. Contrasting effects were obtained by UC-MSC released factors: CSCs, cultured in the presence of conditioned medium (CM) collected from UC-MSCs, increased proliferation rate through transient ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation/activation. Analysis of the profile of the cytokines released by UC-MSCs in the CM revealed a strong production of molecules involved in inflammation, angiogenesis, cell migration and proliferation, such as IL-8, GRO, ENA-78 and IL-6. Since CXC chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2), a receptor shared by several of these ligands, is expressed in GBM CSCs, we evaluated its involvement in CSC proliferation induced by UC-MSC-CM. Using the CXCR2 antagonist SB225002, we observed a partial but statistically significant inhibition of CSC proliferation and migration induced by the UC-MSC-released cytokines. Conversely, CXCR2 blockade did not reduce the

  18. Neural Correlates of Auditory Perceptual Awareness and Release from Informational Masking Recorded Directly from Human Cortex: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R Dykstra

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In complex acoustic environments, even salient supra-threshold sounds sometimes go unperceived, a phenomenon known as informational masking. The neural basis of informational masking (and its release has not been well characterized, particularly outside auditory cortex. We combined electrocorticography in a neurosurgical patient undergoing invasive epilepsy monitoring with trial-by-trial perceptual reports of isochronous target-tone streams embedded in random multi-tone maskers. Awareness of such masker-embedded target streams was associated with a focal negativity between 100 and 200 ms and high-gamma activity between 50 and 250 ms (both in auditory cortex on the posterolateral superior temporal gyrus as well as a broad P3b-like potential (between ~300 and 600 ms with generators in ventrolateral frontal and lateral temporal cortex. Unperceived target tones elicited drastically reduced versions of such responses, if at all. While it remains unclear whether these responses reflect conscious perception, itself, as opposed to pre- or post-perceptual processing, the results suggest that conscious perception of target sounds in complex listening environments may engage diverse neural mechanisms in distributed brain areas.

  19. Supplemental Release Limits for the Directed Reuse of Lead in Shielding Products by the Department of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    The DOE National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle (NMR) proposes to define and implement a complex-wide directed reuse strategy for surplus radiologically impacted lead (Pb) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's commitment to the safe and cost-effective recycle or reuse of excess materials and equipment across the DOE complex. NMR will, under this proposal, act on behalf of the DOE Office of Environmental Management, Office of Technical Program Integration (specifically EM-22), as the Department's clearinghouse for DOE surplus lead and lead products by developing and maintaining a cost-effective commercially-based contaminated lead recycle program. It is NMR's intention, through this directed reuse strategy, to mitigate the adverse environmental and economic consequences of managing surplus lead as a waste within the complex. This approach would promote the safe and cost-effective reuse of DOE's scrap and surplus lead in support of the Department's goals of resource utilization, energy conservation, pollution prevention and waste minimization. This report discusses recommendations for supplemental radiological limits for the directed reuse of contaminated lead and lead products by the DOE within the nuclear industry. The limits were selected--with slight modification--from the recently published American National Standards Institute and Health Physics Society standard N13.12 titled Surface and Volume Radioactivity Standards for Clearance (ANSI/HPS 1999) and are being submitted for formal approval by the DOE. Health and measurement implications from the adoption and use of the limits for directed reuse scenarios are discussed within this report

  20. Supplemental Release Limits for the Directed Reuse of Lead in Shielding Products by the Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, R.L.

    2001-08-22

    The DOE National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle (NMR) proposes to define and implement a complex-wide directed reuse strategy for surplus radiologically impacted lead (Pb) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's commitment to the safe and cost-effective recycle or reuse of excess materials and equipment across the DOE complex. NMR will, under this proposal, act on behalf of the DOE Office of Environmental Management, Office of Technical Program Integration (specifically EM-22), as the Department's clearinghouse for DOE surplus lead and lead products by developing and maintaining a cost-effective commercially-based contaminated lead recycle program. It is NMR's intention, through this directed reuse strategy, to mitigate the adverse environmental and economic consequences of managing surplus lead as a waste within the complex. This approach would promote the safe and cost-effective reuse of DOE's scrap and surplus lead in support of the Department's goals of resource utilization, energy conservation, pollution prevention and waste minimization. This report discusses recommendations for supplemental radiological limits for the directed reuse of contaminated lead and lead products by the DOE within the nuclear industry. The limits were selected--with slight modification--from the recently published American National Standards Institute and Health Physics Society standard N13.12 titled Surface and Volume Radioactivity Standards for Clearance (ANSI/HPS 1999) and are being submitted for formal approval by the DOE. Health and measurement implications from the adoption and use of the limits for directed reuse scenarios are discussed within this report.

  1. Mechanisms of strand break formation in DNA due to the direct effect of ionizing radiation: the dependency of free base release on the length of alternating CG oligodeoxynucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kiran K; Razskazovskiy, Yuriy; Purkayastha, Shubhadeep; Bernhard, William A

    2009-06-11

    The question of how NA base sequence influences the yield of DNA strand breaks produced by the direct effect of ionizing radiation was investigated in a series of oligodeoxynucleotides of the form (d(CG)(n))(2) and (d(GC)(n))(2). The yields of free base release from X-irradiated DNA films containing 2.5 waters/nucleotide were measured by HPLC as a function of oligomer length. For (d(CG)(n))(2), the ratio of the Gua yield to Cyt yield, R, was relatively constant at 2.4-2.5 for n = 2-4 and it decreased to 1.2 as n increased from 5 to 10. When Gua was moved to the 5' end, for example going from d(CG)(5) to d(GC)(5), R dropped from 1.9 +/- 0.1 to 1.1 +/- 0.1. These effects are poorly described if the chemistry at the oligomer ends is assumed to be independent of the remainder of the oligomer. A mathematical model incorporating charge transfer through the base stack was derived to explain these effects. In addition, EPR was used to measure the yield of trapped-deoxyribose radicals at 4 K following X-irradiation at 4 K. The yield of free base release was substantially greater, by 50-100 nmol/J, than the yield of trapped-deoxyribose radicals. Therefore, a large fraction of free base release stems from a nonradical intermediate. For this intermediate, a deoxyribose carbocation formed by two one-electron oxidations is proposed. This reaction pathway requires that the hole (electron loss site) transfers through the base stack and, upon encountering a deoxyribose hole, oxidizes that site to form a deoxyribose carbocation. This reaction mechanism provides a consistent way of explaining both the absence of trapped radical intermediates and the unusual dependence of free base release on oligomer length.

  2. New Gastrin Releasing Peptide Receptor-Directed [99mTc]Demobesin 1 Mimics: Synthesis and Comparative Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nock, Berthold A; Charalambidis, David; Sallegger, Werner; Waser, Beatrice; Mansi, Rosalba; Nicolas, Guillaume P; Ketani, Eleni; Nikolopoulou, Anastasia; Fani, Melpomeni; Reubi, Jean-Claude; Maina, Theodosia

    2018-04-12

    We have previously reported on the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) antagonist [ 99m Tc]1, ([ 99m Tc]demobesin 1, 99m Tc-[N 4 '-diglycolate-dPhe 6 ,Leu-NHEt 13 ]BBN(6-13)). [ 99m Tc]1 has shown superior biological profile compared to analogous agonist-based 99m Tc-radioligands. We herein present a small library of [ 99m Tc]1 mimics generated after structural modifications in (a) the linker ([ 99m Tc]2, [ 99m Tc]3, [ 99m Tc]4), (b) the peptide chain ([ 99m Tc]5, [ 99m Tc]6), and (c) the C-terminus ([ 99m Tc]7 or [ 99m Tc]8). The effects of above modifications on the biological properties of analogs were studied in PC-3 cells and tumor-bearing SCID mice. All analogs showed subnanomolar affinity for the human GRPR, while most receptor-affine 4 and 8 behaved as potent GRPR antagonists in a functional internalization assay. In mice bearing PC-3 tumors, [ 99m Tc]1-[ 99m Tc]6 exhibited GRPR-specific tumor uptake, rapidly clearing from normal tissues. [ 99m Tc]4 displayed the highest tumor uptake (28.8 ± 4.1%ID/g at 1 h pi), which remained high even after 24 h pi (16.3 ± 1.8%ID/g), well surpassing that of [ 99m Tc]1 (5.4 ± 0.7%ID/g at 24 h pi).

  3. A STUDY OF CHINESE YUAN (RMB APPRECIATION ACCOMPANYING WITH OTHERS FACTORS INCLUDING FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT (FDI AND THEIR EFFECT ON CHINA ECONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-fu (Brian LAI

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Chinese Yuan (RMB has been on the trend of appreciation over the last decade, and such a trend will likely be continuing for some years over the next decade. According to some scholars in their published literatures, the appreciation of RMB, the influx of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI has been ongoing accompanying the sustained growing economy in mainland China over the past decade. It is believed that the China economy has an implication from some significant factors including appreciation of RMB, interest rate of RMB, inflation and continuous increase of FDI for the next several years. The present study aims to provide an emphasis on investigation into effect on China economy as a result of appreciation of RMB and FDI together with some other factors, and to provide an outlook on the economy in China for the coming decades. First, a review was carried on relevant background information and development history of RMB and FDI. There are many reasons and factors behind leading to the sustained growth in the economy in China in the last decade and such effects were in coverage in the literature review. An overview of the development of RMB exchange mechanism, and other variables including (1 RMB exchange rate, (2 China interest rate, (3 Foreign Direct Investment (FDI, (4 Trade Balance of China, (5 Annual Inflation rate in China, (6 Energy Consumption in China, (7 Foreign Exchange Reserve in China, (8 China wages, (9 China External Debt and (10 China Consumer Price Index, which may have effect on the growth of the economy in China is covered in the literature review conducted in Chapter 2.

  4. Direct and Systemic Administration of a CNS-Permeant Tamoxifen Analog Reduces Amphetamine-Induced Dopamine Release and Reinforcing Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Colleen; Zestos, Alexander G; Altshuler, Rachel; Sorenson, Roderick J; Guptaroy, Bipasha; Showalter, Hollis D; Kennedy, Robert T; Jutkiewicz, Emily; Gnegy, Margaret E

    2017-09-01

    Amphetamines (AMPHs) are globally abused. With no effective treatment for AMPH addiction to date, there is urgent need for the identification of druggable targets that mediate the reinforcing action of this stimulant class. AMPH-stimulated dopamine efflux is modulated by protein kinase C (PKC) activation. Inhibition of PKC reduces AMPH-stimulated dopamine efflux and locomotor activity. The only known CNS-permeant PKC inhibitor is the selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen. In this study, we demonstrate that a tamoxifen analog, 6c, which more potently inhibits PKC than tamoxifen but lacks affinity for the estrogen receptor, reduces AMPH-stimulated increases in extracellular dopamine and reinforcement-related behavior. In rat striatal synaptosomes, 6c was almost fivefold more potent at inhibiting AMPH-stimulated dopamine efflux than [ 3 H]dopamine uptake through the dopamine transporter (DAT). The compound did not compete with [ 3 H]WIN 35,428 binding or affect surface DAT levels. Using microdialysis, direct accumbal administration of 1 μM 6c reduced dopamine overflow in freely moving rats. Using LC-MS, we demonstrate that 6c is CNS-permeant. Systemic treatment of rats with 6 mg/kg 6c either simultaneously or 18 h prior to systemic AMPH administration reduced both AMPH-stimulated dopamine overflow and AMPH-induced locomotor effects. Finally, 18 h pretreatment of rats with 6 mg/kg 6c s.c. reduces AMPH-self administration but not food self-administration. These results demonstrate the utility of tamoxifen analogs in reducing AMPH effects on dopamine and reinforcement-related behaviors and suggest a new avenue of development for therapeutics to reduce AMPH abuse.

  5. Biomedical HIV Prevention Including Pre-exposure Prophylaxis and Opiate Agonist Therapy for Women Who Inject Drugs: State of Research and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Kimberly; Tsui, Judith; Maher, Lisa; Choopanya, Kachit; Vanichseni, Suphak; Mock, Philip A; Celum, Connie; Martin, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Women who inject drugs (WWID) are at higher risk of HIV compared with their male counterparts as a result of multiple factors, including biological, behavioral, and sociostructural factors, yet comparatively little effort has been invested in testing and delivering prevention methods that directly target this group. In this article, we discuss the need for expanded prevention interventions for WWID, focusing on 2 safe, effective, and approved, yet underutilized biomedical prevention methods: opiate agonist therapy (OAT) and oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Although both interventions are well researched, they have not been well examined in the context of gender. We discuss the drivers of women injectors' higher HIV risk, review the effectiveness of OAT and PrEP interventions among women, and explain why these new HIV prevention tools should be prioritized for WWID. There is substantial potential for impact of OAT and PrEP programs for WWID in the context of broader gender-responsive HIV prevention initiatives. Although awaiting efficacy data on other biomedical approaches in the HIV prevention research "pipeline," we propose that the scale-up and implementation of these proven, safe, and effective interventions are needed now.

  6. Graphene oxide directed in-situ synthesis of Prussian blue for non-enzymatic sensing of hydrogen peroxide released from macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Weiwei; Zhu, Qionghua; Gao, Fei; Gao, Feng [College of Chemistry and Environment, Fujian Province Key Laboratory of Morden Analytical Science and Separation Technology, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Huang, Jiafu; Pan, Yutian [College of Biological Science and Technology, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Wang, Qingxiang, E-mail: axiang236@126.com [College of Chemistry and Environment, Fujian Province Key Laboratory of Morden Analytical Science and Separation Technology, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China)

    2017-03-01

    A novel electrochemical non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) sensor has been developed based on Prussian blue (PB) and electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO). The GO was covalently modified on glassy carbon electrode (GCE), and utilized as a directing platform for in-situ synthesis of electroactive PB. Then the GO was electrochemically treated to reduction form to improve the effective surface area and electroactivity of the sensing interface. The fabrication process was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results showed that the rich oxygen containing groups play a crucial role for the successful synthesis of PB, and the obtained PB layer on the covalently immobilized GO has good stability. Electrochemical sensing assay showed that the modified electrode had tremendous electrocatalytic property for the reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The steady-state current response increased linearly with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations from 5 μM to 1 mM with a fast response time (less than 3 s). The detection limit was estimated to be 0.8 μM. When the sensor was applied for determination of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} released from living cells of macrophages, satisfactory results were achieved. - Highlights: • Covalent method was applied for immobilization of GO on glassy carbon electrode. • GO directed in-situ synthesis of electroactive PB. • PB-ERGO composite shows high electrocatalytic activity toward H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. • The modified biosensor is capable of detecting H{sub 2}O{sub 2} released from living macrophages.

  7. A comparison of stresses in molar teeth restored with inlays and direct restorations, including polymerization shrinkage of composite resin and tooth loading during mastication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejak, Beata; Młotkowski, Andrzej

    2015-03-01

    Polymerization shrinkage of composites is one of the main causes of leakage around dental restorations. Despite the large numbers of studies there is no consensus, what kind of teeth reconstruction--direct or indirect composite restorations are the most beneficial and the most durable. The aim was to compare equivalent stresses and contact adhesive stresses in molar teeth with class II MOD cavities, which were restored with inlays and direct restorations (taking into account polymerization shrinkage of composite resin) during simulated mastication. The study was conducted using the finite elements method with the application of contact elements. Three 3D models of first molars were created: model A was an intact tooth; model B--a tooth with a composite inlay, and model C--a tooth with a direct composite restoration. Polymerization linear shrinkage 0.7% of a direct composite restoration and resin luting cement was simulated (load 1). A computer simulation of mastication was performed (load 2). In these 2 situations, equivalent stresses according to the modified von Mises criterion (mvM) in the materials of mandibular first molar models with different restorations were calculated and compared. Contact stresses in the luting cement-tooth tissue adhesive interface around the restorations were also assessed and analyzed. Equivalent stresses in a tooth with a direct composite restoration (the entire volume of which was affected by polymerization shrinkage) were many times higher than in the tooth restored with a composite inlay (where shrinkage was present only in a thin layer of the luting cement). In dentin and enamel the stress values were 8-14 times higher, and were 13 times higher in the direct restoration than in the inlay. Likewise, contact stresses in the adhesive bond around the direct restoration were 6.5-7.7 times higher compared to an extraorally cured restoration. In the masticatory simulation, shear contact stresses in the adhesive bond around the direct

  8. Three-dimensional magnetotelluric inversion including topography using deformed hexahedral edge finite elements, direct solvers and data space Gauss-Newton, parallelized on SMP computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordy, M. A.; Wannamaker, P. E.; Maris, V.; Cherkaev, E.; Hill, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed an algorithm for 3D simulation and inversion of magnetotelluric (MT) responses using deformable hexahedral finite elements that permits incorporation of topography. Direct solvers parallelized on symmetric multiprocessor (SMP), single-chassis workstations with large RAM are used for the forward solution, parameter jacobians, and model update. The forward simulator, jacobians calculations, as well as synthetic and real data inversion are presented. We use first-order edge elements to represent the secondary electric field (E), yielding accuracy O(h) for E and its curl (magnetic field). For very low frequency or small material admittivity, the E-field requires divergence correction. Using Hodge decomposition, correction may be applied after the forward solution is calculated. It allows accurate E-field solutions in dielectric air. The system matrix factorization is computed using the MUMPS library, which shows moderately good scalability through 12 processor cores but limited gains beyond that. The factored matrix is used to calculate the forward response as well as the jacobians of field and MT responses using the reciprocity theorem. Comparison with other codes demonstrates accuracy of our forward calculations. We consider a popular conductive/resistive double brick structure and several topographic models. In particular, the ability of finite elements to represent smooth topographic slopes permits accurate simulation of refraction of electromagnetic waves normal to the slopes at high frequencies. Run time tests indicate that for meshes as large as 150x150x60 elements, MT forward response and jacobians can be calculated in ~2.5 hours per frequency. For inversion, we implemented data space Gauss-Newton method, which offers reduction in memory requirement and a significant speedup of the parameter step versus model space approach. For dense matrix operations we use tiling approach of PLASMA library, which shows very good scalability. In synthetic

  9. Direct projection from the suprachiasmatic nucleus to hypophysiotrophic corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactive cells in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus demonstrated...

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrang, N.; Larsen, P.J.; Mikkelsen, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    Suprachiasmatic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, circadian rhythms, phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin, corticotropin-releasing factor, dual immunocytochemistry......Suprachiasmatic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, circadian rhythms, phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin, corticotropin-releasing factor, dual immunocytochemistry...

  10. Comparative study of in vitro release and mucoadhesivity of gastric-compacts composed of multiple unit system/bilayered discs using direct compression of metformin hydrochloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Jelvehgari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Metformin is an oral anti-diabetic drug in the biguanide class. The goal of this study was to develop gastric-retentive MH discs in order to prolong the retention of drug in gastric mucosa.Methods:Two groups of metformin hydrochloride (MH mucoadhesive gastroretentive discs were prepared: (a bilayered discs prepared by direct compression of powders containing polymers as Carbopol 934P (CP, mucoadhesive polymer and ethylcellulose (EC, rotardant polymer, (b multiple unit system (microparticle discs prepared by the emulsification, solvent evaporation, and compression technique from microparticles using polymers CP and EC. Gastric-mucoadhesive compacts were evaluated by investigating their release pattern, swelling capacity, mucoadhesion property, surface pH, and in vitro gastro-retentive time. Discs formulation was subjected to disintegration and dissolution tests by placing in 0.1 M hydrochloric acid for 8 h. Results: The production yield showed F2 microparticles of 98.80%, mean particle size of 933.25 µm and loading efficiency of 98.44%. The results showed that prepared microparticle discs had slower release than bilayered discs (p>0.05. The bilayered discs exhibited very good percentage of mucoadhesion. The results also showed a significant higher retention of mucoadhesive bilayered discs in upper gastrointestinal tract (F´1, 1:2 ratio of CP:EC. Histopathological studies revealed no gastric mucosal damage.Conclusion: Mucoadhesive multiple unit system/bilayered discs interact with mucus of gastrointestinal tract and are considered to be localized or trapped at the adhesive site by retaining a dosage form at the site of action as well as improving in the intimacy of contact with underlying absorptive membrane to achieve a better therapeutic performance of anti-diabetic drug.

  11. Combination of interferon-alpha and 5-fluorouracil inhibits endothelial cell growth directly and by regulation of angiogenic factors released by tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Hiroshi; Tanemura, Masahiro; Umeshita, Koji; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Nagano, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Noda, Takehiro; Murakami, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Shogo; Marubashi, Shigeru; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Takeda, Yutaka

    2009-01-01

    The combination therapy of interferon (IFN)-alpha and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) improved the prognosis of the patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To determine the molecular mechanisms of the anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic effects, we examined the direct anti-proliferative effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and indirect effects by regulating secretion of angiogenic factors from HCC cells. The direct effects on HUVEC were examined by TUNEL, Annexin-V assays and cell cycles analysis. For analysis of the indirect effects, the apoptosis induced by the conditioned medium from HCC cell treated by IFN-alpha/5-FU and expression of angiogenic factors was examined. IFN-alpha and 5-FU alone had anti-proliferative properties on HUVEC and their combination significantly inhibited the growth (compared with control, 5-FU or IFN alone). TUNEL and Annexin-V assays showed no apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis revealed that IFN-alpha and 5-FU delayed cell cycle progression in HUVEC with S-phase accumulation. The conditioned medium from HuH-7 cells after treatment with IFN/5-FU significantly inhibited HUVEC growth and induced apoptosis, and contained high levels of angiopoietin (Ang)-1 and low levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and Ang-2. Knockdown of Ang-1 in HuH-7 cells abrogated the anti-proliferative effects on HUVEC while knockdown of Ang-2 partially rescue the cells. These results suggested that IFN-alpha and 5-FU had direct growth inhibitory effects on endothelial cells, as well as anti-angiogenic effects through regulation of angiogenic factors released from HCC cells. Modulation of VEGF and Angs secretion by IFN-alpha and 5-FU may contribute to their anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor effects on HCC

  12. Serial assessment of the physiological status of leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) during direct capture events in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean: comparison of post-capture and pre-release data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innis, Charles J; Merigo, Constance; Cavin, Julie M; Hunt, Kathleen; Dodge, Kara L; Lutcavage, Molly

    2014-01-01

    The physiological status of seven leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) was assessed at two time points during ecological research capture events in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. Data were collected as soon as possible after securing each turtle onboard the capture vessel and again immediately prior to release. Measured parameters included sea surface temperature, body temperature, morphometric data, sex, heart rate, respiratory rate and various haematological and blood biochemical variables. Results indicated generally stable physiological status in comparison to previously published studies of this species. However, blood pH and blood potassium concentrations increased significantly between the two time points (P = 0.0018 and P = 0.0452, respectively). Turtles were affected by a mild initial acidosis (mean [SD] temperature-corrected pH = 7.29 [0.07]), and blood pH increased prior to release (mean [SD] = 7.39 [0.07]). Initial blood potassium concentrations were considered normal (mean [SD] = 4.2 [0.9] mmol/l), but turtles experienced a mild to moderate increase in blood potassium concentrations during the event (mean [SD] pre-release potassium = 5.9 [1.7] mmol/l, maximum = 8.5 mmol/l). While these data support the general safety of direct capture for study of this species, the observed changes in blood potassium concentrations are of potential concern due to possible adverse effects of hyperkalaemia on cardiac function. The results of this study highlight the importance of physiological monitoring during scientific capture events. The results are also likely to be relevant to unintentional leatherback capture events (e.g. fisheries interactions), when interactions may be more prolonged or extreme.

  13. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Red Creek quartzite special study area, Vernal NTMS Quadrangle, Utah/Colorado, including concentrations of forty-six additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goff, S.; George, W.E.; Apel, C.T.; Hansel, J.M.; Fuka, M.A.; Bunker, M.E.; Hanks, D.

    1981-04-01

    Totals of 22 water and 140 sediment samples were collected from 148 locations in the study area. The study area, in the north-central portion of the Vernal NTMS quadrangle, is covered by four 7-1/2' topographic maps: Dutch John, Goslin Mountain, and Clav Basin, Utah; and Willow Creek Butte, Utah/Colorado. Additional HSSR data are available for the entire Vernal quadrangle (Purson, 1980). All field and analytical data are presented in Appendix I. Figure 1 is an index and sample location map that can be used in conjunction with the 1:250,000-scale topographic map of the Vernal quadrangle (USGS, 1954). Standarized field, analytical, and data base management procedures were followed in all phases of the study. These procedures are described briefly in Appendix II-A and in reports by Sharp (1977), Hues et al (1977), Sharp and Aamodt (1978), Cheadle (1977), and Kosiewicz (1979). The data presented in Appendix I are available on magnetic tape from GJOIS Project, Union Carbide Corporation (UCC-ND), Computer Applications Department, 4500 North Building, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box X, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830. Because this is simply a data release, intended to make the data available to the DOE and the public as quickly as possible, no discussion of the geology of the region, uranium occurrences, or data evaluation is included

  14. Study of direct Cp violation in B decay into vector mesons including rho zero-omega mixing in the framework of the LHCb experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimbault, C.

    2004-02-01

    ρ 0 - ω mixing effect on direct CP violation in B decay into vector mesons is one of the main studies of this work. The first part is dedicated to the calculation of the decay amplitudes of the channels B → Vρ 0 (ω) which have been represented by a model. We have used the helicity formalism. In such a way branching ratios and asymmetries depending on form factor models and other parameters are predicted. Direct CP violation appears at several levels: in branching ratios, in angular distributions and in differential asymmetry as a function of ρ 0 - ω mass. The dominance of the longitudinal polarization in the studied channels is confirmed by Babar and Belle experimental results. We calculated too the strong phase and the ratio of Penguin to Tree amplitudes for each channel. In a second part, was developed an analysis of the channel B 0 → K *0 ρ 0 (ω) in the framework of LHCb experiment. It will start in 2007 and is dedicated to b flavor study and CP violation. The realistic analysis which has been performed shows that this channel is not appropriate to observe ρ 0 - ω mixing effect on asymmetry in LHCb, while the ρ + ρ 0 (ω) channel, for which we have predicted a branching ratio value confirmed by Babar and Belle, is much more promising. (author)

  15. Rabbit IgG directed to a synthetic C-terminal peptide of the major grass pollen allergen Lol p I inhibits human basophil histamine release induced by natural Lol p I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ree, R.; Aalberse, R. C.

    1995-01-01

    The potential role of allergen-specific IgG antibodies as 'blocking' antibodies in allergen-induced human basophil histamine release was investigated. This was studied in a model with the major grass pollen allergen Lol p I and polyclonal rabbit antisera directed against this allergen and against a

  16. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-07-16

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 322 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 01-25-01, AST Release (Area 1); 03-25-03, Mud Plant AST Diesel Release (Area 3); 03-20-05, Injection Wells (Area 3). Corrective Action Unit 322 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. The investigation of three CASs in CAU 322 will determine if hazardous and/or radioactive constituents are present at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  17. The gastric acid secretagogue gastrin-releasing peptide and the inhibitor oxyntomodulin do not exert their effect directly on the parietal cell in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier; Holst, J J

    1988-01-01

    in vitro by measuring [14C]-aminopyrine accumulation, a reliable index of H+ generation, in isolated rat parietal cells. However, neither gastrin-releasing peptide nor oxyntomodulin influenced basal acid secretion or histamine-stimulated gastric acid secretion. Electron-microscopic studies of unstimulated...... and histamine-stimulated parietal cells confirmed that the cells retained the normal morphology of intracellular organelles and that the cells responded to physiological stimulation by marked expansion of the intracellular canaliculi....

  18. Formulation and in-vitro evaluation of directly compressed controlled release matrices of Losartan Potassium using Ethocel Grade 100 as rate retarding agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Kamran Ahmad; Khan, Gul Majid; Zeeshan Danish, Muhammad; Akhlaq; Khan, Haroon; Rehman, Fazal; Mehsud, Saifullah

    2015-12-30

    Current study was aimed to develop 200mg controlled release matrix tablets of Losartan Potassium using Ethocel 100 Premium and Ethocel 100 FP Premium as rate controlling polymer. In-vitro studies were performed according to USP Method-I in phosphate buffer (PH 6.8) using pharma test dissolution apparatus. The temperature of the dissolution medium was kept constant at 37±0.5°C at 100rpm. Flow properties, physical quality control tests, effect of polymer size and drug-to-polymers ratios were studied using different kinetics models such as 1st-order, zero-order, Hixon Crowell model, Highuchi model and Power law. Difference factor f1 and similarity factor f2 were applied for dissolution profiles against Cardaktin® tablets used as a reference formulation. The matrices with polymer ethocel 100 FP Premiums have prolonged the drug release rate as compared to polymer ethocel 100 Premiums. The n values matrices with polymer ethocel grade 100 ranged from 0.603 to 0.857 indicating that the drug release occurred by anomalous non fickian diffusion kinetics while then value of reference Cardaktin® tablet was measured as 0.125 indicating that these tablets do not follow power law. The dissolution profiles of test formulations were different than that of reference Cardaktin®. This suggests the polymer Ethocel grade 100 can be proficiently incorporated in fabrication and development of once a day controlled release matrix tablets. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Radiological effluents released from US continental tests, 1961 through 1992. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoengold, C.R.; DeMarre, M.E.; Kirkwood, E.M.

    1996-08-01

    This report documents all continental tests from September 15, 1961, through September 23, 1992, from which radioactive effluents were released. The report includes both updated information previously published in the publicly available May, 1990 report, DOE/NV-317, ''Radiological Effluents Released from Announced US Continental Tests 1961 through 1988'', and effluent release information on formerly unannounced tests. General information provided for each test includes the date, time, location, type of test, sponsoring laboratory and/or agency or other sponsor, depth of burial, purpose, yield or yield range, extent of release (onsite only or offsite), and category of release (detonation-time versus post-test operations). Where a test with simultaneous detonations is listed, location, depth of burial and yield information are given for each detonation if applicable, as well as the specific source of the release. A summary of each release incident by type of release is included. For a detonation-time release, the effluent curies are expressed at R+12 hours. For a controlled releases from tunnel-tests, the effluent curies are expressed at both time of release and at R+12 hours. All other types are listed at the time of the release. In addition, a qualitative statement of the isotopes in the effluent is included for detonation-time and controlled releases and a quantitative listing is included for all other types. Offsite release information includes the cloud direction, the maximum activity detected in the air offsite, the maximum gamma exposure rate detected offsite, the maximum iodine level detected offsite, and the maximum distance radiation was detected offsite. A release summary incudes whatever other pertinent information is available for each release incident. This document includes effluent release information for 433 tests, some of which have simultaneous detonations. However, only 52 of these are designated as having offsite releases

  20. Radiological effluents released from US continental tests, 1961 through 1992. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoengold, C.R.; DeMarre, M.E.; Kirkwood, E.M.

    1996-08-01

    This report documents all continental tests from September 15, 1961, through September 23, 1992, from which radioactive effluents were released. The report includes both updated information previously published in the publicly available May, 1990 report, DOE/NV-317, ``Radiological Effluents Released from Announced US Continental Tests 1961 through 1988``, and effluent release information on formerly unannounced tests. General information provided for each test includes the date, time, location, type of test, sponsoring laboratory and/or agency or other sponsor, depth of burial, purpose, yield or yield range, extent of release (onsite only or offsite), and category of release (detonation-time versus post-test operations). Where a test with simultaneous detonations is listed, location, depth of burial and yield information are given for each detonation if applicable, as well as the specific source of the release. A summary of each release incident by type of release is included. For a detonation-time release, the effluent curies are expressed at R+12 hours. For a controlled releases from tunnel-tests, the effluent curies are expressed at both time of release and at R+12 hours. All other types are listed at the time of the release. In addition, a qualitative statement of the isotopes in the effluent is included for detonation-time and controlled releases and a quantitative listing is included for all other types. Offsite release information includes the cloud direction, the maximum activity detected in the air offsite, the maximum gamma exposure rate detected offsite, the maximum iodine level detected offsite, and the maximum distance radiation was detected offsite. A release summary incudes whatever other pertinent information is available for each release incident. This document includes effluent release information for 433 tests, some of which have simultaneous detonations. However, only 52 of these are designated as having offsite releases.

  1. Rabbit IgG directed to a synthetic C-terminal peptide of the major grass pollen allergen Lol p I inhibits human basophil histamine release induced by natural Lol p I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ree, R; Aalberse, R C

    1995-03-01

    The potential role of allergen-specific IgG antibodies as 'blocking' antibodies in allergen-induced human basophil histamine release was investigated. This was studied in a model with the major grass pollen allergen Lol p I and polyclonal rabbit antisera directed against this allergen and against a synthetic peptide of its C terminus. When allergen and antibodies were allowed to preincubate, Lol p I induced histamine release was inhibited up to 85% by the antiserum against Lol p I. By omitting preincubation, and thereby more closely mimicking an in vivo situation, up to 55% inhibition was realized. This indicates that allergen-specific IgG can act as 'blocking' antibody without preincubation. Immunization of rabbits with a synthetic C-terminal peptide of Lol p I resulted in antibodies reactive with natural Lol p I. Despite their 100-fold lower avidity for Lol p I (as compared with antinatural Lol p I), these antibodies had the capacity to inhibit Lol p I induced histamine release for > 90% (up to 50% without preincubation). This indicates that it is possible to block histamine release induced by a major allergen with low-avidity IgG antibodies directed against a minor proportion of the allergen (25 amino acids). IgE antibodies from the donors studied were unreactive with this synthetic peptide, indicating that for blocking activity identical epitope specificity of IgE and IgG is not essential. This opens interesting perspectives for application of synthetic peptides in immunotherapy, distinct from their effects on T cell reactivity.

  2. EIA new releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This report is a compliation of news releases from the Energy Information Administration. The september-october report includes articles on energy conservation, energy consumption in commercial buildings, and a short term energy model for a personal computer

  3. Thermoresponsive latexes for fragrance encapsulation and release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popadyuk, N; Popadyuk, A; Kohut, A; Voronov, A

    2016-04-01

    To synthesize cross-linked latex particles protecting the encapsulated fragrance at ambient temperatures and facilitating the release of cargo at the temperature of the surface of the skin that varies in different regions of the body between 33.5 and 36.9°C. Poly(stearyl acrylate) (PSA), a polymer with long crystallizable alkyl side chains (undergoes order-disorder transitions at 45°C), was chosen as the main component of the polymer particles. As a result, new thermoresponsive polymer particles for fragrance encapsulation were synthesized and characterized, including assessing the performance of particles in triggered release by elevated temperature. To obtain network domains of various crystallinity, stearyl acrylate was copolymerized with dipropylene glycol acrylate caprylate (DGAC) (comonomer) in the presence of a dipropylene glycol diacrylate sebacate (cross-linker) using the miniemulsion process. Comonomers and a cross-linker were mixed directly in a fragrance during polymerization. Fragrance release was evaluated at 25, 31, 35 and 39°C to demonstrate a new material potential in personal/health care skin-related applications. Particles protect the fragrance from evaporation at 25°C. The fragrance release rate gradually increases at 31, 35 and 39°C. Two slopes were found on release plots. The first slope corresponds to a rapid fragrance release. The second slope indicates a subsequent reduction in the release rate. Crystalline-to-amorphous transition of PSA triggers the release of fragrances from cross-linked latex particles at elevated temperatures. The presence of the encapsulated fragrance, as well as the inclusion of amorphous fragments in the polymer network, reduces the particle crystallinity and enhances the release. Release profiles can be tuned by temperature and controlled by the amount of loaded fragrance and the ratio of comonomers in the feed mixture. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  4. A European network of experts with direct responsibility for monitoring and dosimetry after a deliberate release of radioactive material or a deliberate radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahola, Tua; Muikku, Maarit; Pellow, Peter G.D.; Etherington, George; Hodgson, Alan; Youngman, Mike J.; Le Guen, Bernard; Berard, Philippe; Lopez, Maria A.

    2008-01-01

    In the event of an accidental or deliberate release of radionuclides to the environment, individual monitoring and dose assessment may be needed for large numbers of people. The consequences of such incidents are not limited by national boundaries. However, within the European Union (EU), there has not been any coordinated strategy for individual monitoring and dose assessment. CONRAD (CO-ordination Action for Radiation Dosimetry) is an EC 6 th Framework Programme Co-ordination Action sponsored by EURADOS (the European Radiation Dosimetry Group, http://www.eurados.org). The objective of Task 5.4 of Work Package 5 of the CONRAD project, coordinated by HPA (UK) and STUK (Finland), is the development of a network of people and organisations with responsibilities for emergency monitoring of emergency services personnel and members of the public. The network (named EUREMON) aims to promote sharing of information between countries on plans and arrangements for individual monitoring. It currently has 51 individual members from 22 EU countries, 8 non-EU countries and two international organisations. After it was established, the network was used in a survey of plans and arrangements for emergency personal monitoring in EU countries. Information is also being compiled on portable and transportable monitoring facilities and equipment in the EU. (author)

  5. Identity work and direct quotations in the press releases and on the websites of a Danish TV documentary on transnational adoption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    2005-01-01

    This article concerns identity construction through timescales and by different actors, with direct quotations as the phenomenon in focus. The Danish public broadcasting channel, DR, produced a documentary about transnational adoption during 2002-2003. DR followed five prospective adoptive couples......’ quotations from the documentary, apparently culled to stir media or viewer interest in the episodes. The quotations were used as examples of ‘authentic’ suffering, and they constructed the prospective adoptive parents as economically and morally normal citizens. However, a closer look at the texts reveals...... that one couple was treated differently vis-à-vis direct quotations. This difference reflects DR’s bias towards the official decision makers in a contested case....

  6. Triggered Release from Polymer Capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esser-Kahn, Aaron P. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry; Odom, Susan A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry; Sottos, Nancy R. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; White, Scott R. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Aerospace Engineering; Moore, Jeffrey S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry

    2011-07-06

    Stimuli-responsive capsules are of interest in drug delivery, fragrance release, food preservation, and self-healing materials. Many methods are used to trigger the release of encapsulated contents. Here we highlight mechanisms for the controlled release of encapsulated cargo that utilize chemical reactions occurring in solid polymeric shell walls. Triggering mechanisms responsible for covalent bond cleavage that result in the release of capsule contents include chemical, biological, light, thermal, magnetic, and electrical stimuli. We present methods for encapsulation and release, triggering methods, and mechanisms and conclude with our opinions on interesting obstacles for chemically induced activation with relevance for controlled release.

  7. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data listing release for the Three Forks Basin, Spanish Peaks, and Boulder River areas for the Bozeman NTMS quadrangle, Montana, including concentrations of forty-six additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolivar, S.L.; George, W.E.; Gallimore, D.L.; Apel, C.T.; Gansel, J.M.; Hensley, W.K.; Van Haaften, I.J.; Pirtle, J.

    1980-08-01

    Totals of 531 water and 1275 sediment samples were collected from 1275 stream and spring locations. Elemental concentration, field measurement, weather, geologic, and geographic data for each sample location are listed for waters and for sediments. Uranium/thorium ratios for sediment samples are also included. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than 40 ppB uranium were reanalyzed by delayed-neutron counting (DNC). All sediments were analyzed for uranium by DNC. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron activation analysis for 31 elements (Al, Sb, Ba, Ca, Ce, Cs, Cl, Cr, Co, Dy, Eu, Au, Hf, Fe, La, Lu, Mg, Mn, K, Rb, Sn, Sc, Na, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th, Ti, V, Yb, and Zn), by x-ray fluorescence for 13 elements (As, Bi, Cd, Cu, Pb, Mo, Ni, Nb, Se, Ag, Sn, W, and Zr), and by arc-source emission spectrography for Li and Be. Analytical results for sediments are reported as parts per million

  8. Sellafield (release of radioactivity)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, J; Goodlad, A; Morris, M

    1986-02-06

    A government statement is reported, about the release of plutonium nitrate at the Sellafield site of British Nuclear Fuels plc on 5 February 1986. Matters raised included: details of accident; personnel monitoring; whether radioactive material was released from the site; need for public acceptance of BNFL activities; whether plant should be closed; need to reduce level of radioactive effluent; number of incidents at the plant.

  9. APASS Data Release 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henden, Arne A.; Levine, Stephen; Terrell, Dirk; Welch, Douglas L.; Munari, Ulisse; Kloppenborg, Brian K.

    2018-06-01

    The AAVSO Photometric All-Sky Survey (APASS) has been underway since 2010. This survey covers the entire sky from 7.5 knowledge of the optical train distortions. With these changes, DR10 includes many more stars than prior releases. We describe the survey, its remaining limitations, and prospects for the future, including a very-bright-star extension.

  10. Regulation of hormone release by cultured cells from a thyrotropin-growth hormone-secreting pituitary tumor. Direct inhibiting effects of 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine and dexamethasone on thyrotropin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberts, S W; Oosterom, R; Verleun, T; Krenning, E P; Assies, H

    1984-08-01

    The regulation of TSH and GH secretion was investigated in cultured tumor cells prepared from a mixed TSH/GH secreting pituitary tumor. The tumor tissue had been removed transsphenoidally from a patient with hyperthyroidism and inappropriately high serum TSH levels and acromegaly. TSH and GH secretion by cultured cells were stimulated in a parallel way by TRH (300 nM) and LHRH (50 nM), but were unaffected by bromocriptine (10 nM). Exposure of the tumor cells to dexamethasone (0.1 microM) or T3 (50 nM) had differential effects on hormone secretion. GH secretion was greatly stimulated by dexamethasone, but unaffected by T3. TSH secretion was inhibited both by T3 and by dexamethasone. So, T3 and glucocorticoids inhibit TSH release by the human pituitary tumor cells studied at least partly by means of a direct effect.

  11. Methane release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Swiss Gas Industry has carried out a systematic, technical estimate of methane release from the complete supply chain from production to consumption for the years 1992/1993. The result of this survey provided a conservative value, amounting to 0.9% of the Swiss domestic output. A continuation of the study taking into account new findings with regard to emission factors and the effect of the climate is now available, which provides a value of 0.8% for the target year of 1996. These results show that the renovation of the network has brought about lower losses in the local gas supplies, particularly for the grey cast iron pipelines. (author)

  12. Screw-released roller brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A screw-released roller brake including an input drive assembly, an output drive assembly, a plurality of locking sprags, a mechanical tripper nut for unlocking the sprags, and a casing therefor. The sprags consist of three dimensional (3-D) sprag members having pairs of contact surface regions which engage respective pairs of contact surface regions included in angular grooves or slots formed in the casing and the output drive assembly. The sprags operate to lock the output drive assembly to the casing to prevent rotation thereof in an idle mode of operation. In a drive mode of operation, the tripper is either self actuated or motor driven and is translated linearly up and down against a spline and at the limit of its travel rotates the sprags which unlock while coupling the input drive assembly to the output drive assembly so as to impart a turning motion thereto in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction.

  13. EPICS release 3.11.6 specific documentation -- Release notes for EPICS 3.11.6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    These notes cover the following: (1) directions for switching to production APS release R3.11.6; (2) unbundling of channel access clients; (3) access security; (4) channel access additions; synchronous time support; and (5) description of major differences between R3.11.3 and R3.11.6 Also included is a list of new and/or updated documentation for the program

  14. Stretch-induced Ca2+ independent ATP release in hippocampal astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yingfei; Teng, Sasa; Zheng, Lianghong; Sun, Suhua; Li, Jie; Guo, Ning; Li, Mingli; Wang, Li; Zhu, Feipeng; Wang, Changhe; Rao, Zhiren; Zhou, Zhuan

    2018-02-28

    Similar to neurons, astrocytes actively participate in synaptic transmission via releasing gliotransmitters. The Ca 2+ -dependent release of gliotransmitters includes glutamate and ATP. Following an 'on-cell-like' mechanical stimulus to a single astrocyte, Ca 2+ independent single, large, non-quantal, ATP release occurs. Astrocytic ATP release is inhibited by either selective antagonist treatment or genetic knockdown of P2X7 receptor channels. Our work suggests that ATP can be released from astrocytes via two independent pathways in hippocampal astrocytes; in addition to the known Ca 2+ -dependent vesicular release, larger non-quantal ATP release depends on P2X7 channels following mechanical stretch. Astrocytic ATP release is essential for brain functions such as synaptic long-term potentiation for learning and memory. However, whether and how ATP is released via exocytosis remains hotly debated. All previous studies of non-vesicular ATP release have used indirect assays. By contrast, two recent studies report vesicular ATP release using more direct assays. In the present study, using patch clamped 'ATP-sniffer cells', we re-investigated astrocytic ATP release at single-vesicle resolution in hippocampal astrocytes. Following an 'on-cell-like' mechanical stimulus of a single astrocyte, a Ca 2+ independent single large non-quantal ATP release occurred, in contrast to the Ca 2+ -dependent multiple small quantal ATP release in a chromaffin cell. The mechanical stimulation-induced ATP release from an astrocyte was inhibited by either exposure to a selective antagonist or genetic knockdown of P2X7 receptor channels. Functional P2X7 channels were expressed in astrocytes in hippocampal brain slices. Thus, in addition to small quantal ATP release, larger non-quantal ATP release depends on P2X7 channels in astrocytes. © 2018 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2018 The Physiological Society.

  15. Multiple transcription factors directly regulate Hox gene lin-39 expression in ventral hypodermal cells of the C. elegans embryo and larva, including the hypodermal fate regulators LIN-26 and ELT-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wan-Ju; Reece-Hoyes, John S; Walhout, Albertha J M; Eisenmann, David M

    2014-05-13

    Hox genes encode master regulators of regional fate specification during early metazoan development. Much is known about the initiation and regulation of Hox gene expression in Drosophila and vertebrates, but less is known in the non-arthropod invertebrate model system, C. elegans. The C. elegans Hox gene lin-39 is required for correct fate specification in the midbody region, including the Vulval Precursor Cells (VPCs). To better understand lin-39 regulation and function, we aimed to identify transcription factors necessary for lin-39 expression in the VPCs, and in particular sought factors that initiate lin-39 expression in the embryo. We used the yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) method to screen for factors that bound to 13 fragments from the lin-39 region: twelve fragments contained sequences conserved between C. elegans and two other nematode species, while one fragment was known to drive reporter gene expression in the early embryo in cells that generate the VPCs. Sixteen transcription factors that bind to eight lin-39 genomic fragments were identified in yeast, and we characterized several factors by verifying their physical interactions in vitro, and showing that reduction of their function leads to alterations in lin-39 levels and lin-39::GFP reporter expression in vivo. Three factors, the orphan nuclear hormone receptor NHR-43, the hypodermal fate regulator LIN-26, and the GATA factor ELT-6 positively regulate lin-39 expression in the embryonic precursors to the VPCs. In particular, ELT-6 interacts with an enhancer that drives GFP expression in the early embryo, and the ELT-6 site we identified is necessary for proper embryonic expression. These three factors, along with the factors ZTF-17, BED-3 and TBX-9, also positively regulate lin-39 expression in the larval VPCs. These results significantly expand the number of factors known to directly bind and regulate lin-39 expression, identify the first factors required for lin-39 expression in the embryo, and hint at a

  16. THE EFFECT OF INTRASTRIATAL APPLICATION OF DIRECTLY AND INDIRECTLY ACTING DOPAMINE AGONISTS AND ANTAGONISTS ON THE INVIVO RELEASE OF ACETYLCHOLINE MEASURED BY BRAIN MICRODIALYSIS - THE IMPORTANCE OF THE POSTSURGERY INTERVAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBOER, P; DAMSMA, G; SCHRAM, Q; STOOF, JC; ZAAGSMA, J; WESTERINK, BHC

    The effect of intrastriatal application of D-1, D-2 and indirect dopaminergic drugs on the release of striatal acetylcholine as a function of the post-implantation intervals was studied using in vivo microdialysis. The dopamine D-2 agonists LY 171555 and (-)N0437 inhibited the release of striatal

  17. Impact of Industrial Releases on Inshas Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Messiry, A.M.; Aly, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    Two Egyptian research reactors are located within the nuclear research center at Inshas area, 30 km north east of Cairo. This area are crowded by different industrial plants. The releases from them has a hazardous and economical effects on the research center workers and the surrounding inhabitancy. In the present work we study these effects. A meteorological regional specific data is considered all over the year, including a wind rose characterization. The study considered both normal operating conditions and an accidental releases. The results shows that there are a considerable risk due to normal releases in some areas downwind direction of the major releases, and a highly risk in areas subjected to major exposure. Regional maps of emission distribution, economical damage , pollutant concentration are obtained. The study helps to identify solutions to problems of atmospheric protection. It can be used as a decision support for the environmental, economic, and innovation planning at the national levels taking into consideration the national pollution standards and variety of existing emission sources

  18. COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.O. Bader

    1999-10-18

    The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be

  19. COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S.O. Bader

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be

  20. Contact: Releasing the news

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinotti, Roberto

    The problem of mass behavior after man's future contacts with other intelligences in the universe is not only a challenge for social scientists and political leaders all over the world, but also a cultural time bomb as well. In fact, since the impact of CETI (Contact with Extraterrestrial Intelligence) on human civilization, with its different cultures, might cause a serious socio-anthropological shock, a common and predetermined worldwide strategy is necessary in releasing the news after the contact, in order to keep possible manifestations of fear, panic and hysteria under control. An analysis of past studies in this field and of parallel historical situations as analogs suggests a definite "authority crisis" in the public as a direct consequence of an unexpected release of the news, involving a devastating "chain reaction" process (from both the psychological and sociological viewpoints) of anomie and maybe the collapse of today's society. The only way to prevent all this is to prepare the world's public opinion concerning contact before releasing the news, and to develop a long-term strategy through the combined efforts of scientists, political leaders, intelligence agencies and the mass media, in order to create the cultural conditions in which a confrontation with ETI won't affect mankind in a traumatic way. Definite roles and tasks in this multi-level model are suggested.

  1. Work plan: transient release from LMFBR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kress, T.S.; Parker, G.W.; Fontana, M.H.

    1975-09-01

    The proposed LMFBR Transient Release Program at ORNL is designed to investigate, by means of ex-reactor experiments and analytical modeling, the release and transport of fuel, fission products, and transuranic elements from fast reactor cores in the event of certain hypothetical accidents. It is desired to experimentally produce energy depositions that are characteristic of severe hypothetical reactor transients by the application of direct electrical current to mixed-oxide fuels under sodium. The experimental program includes tests with and without sodium, investigations of alternative methods of generating fuel and sodium aerosols, the use of UO 2 as a fuel simulant, additions of tracers as fission product simulants, effects of radiation, and under-water and under-sodium efforts to study the behavior of the vapor bubble itself. Analytical modeling will accompany all phases of the program, and the data will be correlated with models developed. 21 references. (auth)

  2. Energy released in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, M.F.

    1969-05-01

    The effective energy released in and following the fission of U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 by thermal neutrons, and of U-238 by fission spectrum neutrons, is discussed. The recommended values are: U-235 ... 192.9 ± 0.5 MeV/fission; U-238 ... 193.9 ± 0.8 MeV/fission; Pu-239 ... 198.5 ± 0.8 MeV/fission; Pu-241 ... 200.3 ± 0.8 MeV/fission. These values include all contributions except from antineutrinos and very long-lived fission products. The detailed contributions are discussed, and inconsistencies in the experimental data are pointed out. In Appendix A, the contribution to the total useful energy release in a reactor from reactions other than fission are discussed briefly, and in Appendix B there is a discussion of the variations in effective energy from fission with incident neutron energy. (author)

  3. A Study to Determine the Feasibility of Including the Direct Experiences of Microteaching and Team Teaching, and Interaction Analysis Training in the Pre-Service Training of Foreign Language Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, David Edwin

    This study examines potentially significant factors in the training of foreign language teachers. Remarks on microteaching and interaction analysis precede a review and analysis of related literature. Included in this section are the Stanford University Summer Intern Program, Amidon's model of microteaching and interaction analysis, and…

  4. Excessive nickel release from mobile phones--a persistent cause of nickel allergy and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter; Johansen, Jeanne D; Zachariae, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Despite the political intention to limit nickel allergy and dermatitis in Europeans, nickel allergy remains frequent. There are several explanations for the persistence of nickel allergy and dermatitis, including the increasing use of mobile phones. Before regulation of nickel release from mobile...... phones, we showed that eight (19.5%) of 41 mobile phones marketed in Denmark between 2003 and 2007 released nickel in concentrations that may result in nickel allergy and dermatitis. In 2009, the EU Nickel Directive was revised to include nickel-releasing mobile phones....

  5. Excessive nickel release from mobile phones--a persistent cause of nickel allergy and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter; Johansen, Jeanne D; Zachariae, Claus

    2011-01-01

    phones, we showed that eight (19.5%) of 41 mobile phones marketed in Denmark between 2003 and 2007 released nickel in concentrations that may result in nickel allergy and dermatitis. In 2009, the EU Nickel Directive was revised to include nickel-releasing mobile phones.......Despite the political intention to limit nickel allergy and dermatitis in Europeans, nickel allergy remains frequent. There are several explanations for the persistence of nickel allergy and dermatitis, including the increasing use of mobile phones. Before regulation of nickel release from mobile...

  6. Direct Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beramendi, Virginia; Ellis, Andrew; Kaufman, Bruno

    While many books on direct democracy have a regional or national approach, or simply focus on one of the many mechanisms associated with direct democracy, this Handbook delves into a global comparison of direct democracy mechanisms, including referendums, citizens' initiatives, agenda initiatives...... learned. In addition, the uniquely comprehensive world survey outlines direct democracy provisions in 214 countries and territories and indicates which, if any, of these provisions are used by each country or territory at both the national and sub-national levels. Furthermore, the world survey includes...

  7. Percutaneous carpal tunnel release compared with mini-open release using ultrasonographic guidance for both techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamichi, Ken-ichi; Tachibana, Shintaro; Yamamoto, Seizo; Ida, Masayoshi

    2010-03-01

    To compare the outcomes of percutaneous carpal tunnel release (PCTR) and mini-open carpal tunnel release (mini-OCTR) using ultrasonographic guidance for both techniques. We included 74 hands of 65 women with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (age, 52-71 y; mean, 58 y). Thirty-five hands of 29 women had the PCTR (release with a device consisting of an angled blade, guide, and holder, along a line midway between the median nerve and ulnar artery (safe line) under ultrasonography (incision, 4 mm), and 39 hands of 36 women had the mini-OCTR (release along the safe line, distally under direct vision (incision, 1-1.5 cm) and proximally under ultrasonography, using a device consisting of a basket punch and outer tube. Assessments at 3, 6, 13, 26, 52, and 104 weeks showed no significant differences in neurologic recovery between the groups (p > .05). The PCTR group had significantly less pain, greater grip and key-pinch strengths, and better satisfaction scores at 3 and 6 weeks (p < .05), and less scar sensitivity at 3, 6, and 13 weeks (p < .05). There were no complications. The PCTR provides the same neurologic recovery as does the mini-OCTR. The former leads to less postoperative morbidity and earlier functional return and achievement of satisfaction. Therapeutic III. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. New seismograph includes filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-02

    The new Nimbus ES-1210 multichannel signal enhancement seismograph from EG and G geometrics has recently been redesigned to include multimode signal fillers on each amplifier. The ES-1210F is a shallow exploration seismograph for near subsurface exploration such as in depth-to-bedrock, geological hazard location, mineral exploration, and landslide investigations.

  9. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Schulz

    2004-11-05

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  10. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M andO 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  11. Analytic device including nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Fratalocchi, Andrea; Totero Gongora, Juan Sebastian; Coluccio, Maria Laura; Candeloro, Patrizio; Cuda, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    A device for detecting an analyte in a sample comprising: an array including a plurality of pixels, each pixel including a nanochain comprising: a first nanostructure, a second nanostructure, and a third nanostructure, wherein size of the first nanostructure is larger than that of the second nanostructure, and size of the second nanostructure is larger than that of the third nanostructure, and wherein the first nanostructure, the second nanostructure, and the third nanostructure are positioned on a substrate such that when the nanochain is excited by an energy, an optical field between the second nanostructure and the third nanostructure is stronger than an optical field between the first nanostructure and the second nanostructure, wherein the array is configured to receive a sample; and a detector arranged to collect spectral data from a plurality of pixels of the array.

  12. Methodology for assessing the radiological consequences of radioactive releases from the BPX Facility at PPPL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Lyon, R.E.; Rope, S.K.

    1991-04-01

    This report contains information to support the Environmental Assessment for the Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX) Project proposed for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The assumptions and methodology used to assess the impact to members of the public from operational and accidental releases of radioactive material from the proposed BPX during the operational period of the project are described. A description of the tracer release tests conducted at PPPL by NOAA is included; dispersion values from these tests are used in the dose calculations. Radiological releases, doses, and resulting health risks are calculated and summarized. The computer code AIRDOS- EPA, which is part of the computer code system CAP-88, is used to calculate the individual and population doses for routine releases; FUSCRAC3 is used to calculate doses resulting from off-normal releases where direct application of the NOAA tracer test data is not practical. Where applicable, doses are compared to regulatory limits and guideline values. 48 refs., 16 tabs

  13. Saskatchewan resources. [including uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    The production of chemicals and minerals for the chemical industry in Saskatchewan are featured, with some discussion of resource taxation. The commodities mentioned include potash, fatty amines, uranium, heavy oil, sodium sulfate, chlorine, sodium hydroxide, sodium chlorate and bentonite. Following the successful outcome of the Cluff Lake inquiry, the uranium industry is booming. Some developments and production figures for Gulf Minerals, Amok, Cenex and Eldorado are mentioned.

  14. Excessive nickel release from mobile phones--a persistent cause of nickel allergy and dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Peter; Johansen, Jeanne D; Zachariae, Claus; Menné, Torkil; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2011-12-01

    Despite the political intention to limit nickel allergy and dermatitis in Europeans, nickel allergy remains frequent. There are several explanations for the persistence of nickel allergy and dermatitis, including the increasing use of mobile phones. Before regulation of nickel release from mobile phones, we showed that eight (19.5%) of 41 mobile phones marketed in Denmark between 2003 and 2007 released nickel in concentrations that may result in nickel allergy and dermatitis. In 2009, the EU Nickel Directive was revised to include nickel-releasing mobile phones. To investigate the proportion of mobile phones sold in Denmark that release nickel after regulation. Metallic parts from 50 randomly selected mobile phones currently for sale in Denmark were tested for nickel release by use of the dimethylglyoxime (DMG)-nickel spot test. Nine (18%) phones showed at least one positive DMG test reaction and two phones had more than one DMG test-positive spot. Apparently, the proportion of mobile phones with significant nickel release remains unchanged, despite the 2009 revision of the EU Nickel Directive. We encourage manufacturers to measure nickel release from metallic components used in the assembly of mobile phones to ensure safe products. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Toxics Release Inventory (TRI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a dataset compiled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It contains information on the release and waste...

  16. Launch Lock Assemblies Including Axial Gap Amplification Devices and Spacecraft Isolation Systems Including the Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Tim Daniel (Inventor); Hindle, Timothy (Inventor); Young, Ken (Inventor); Davis, Torey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments of a launch lock assembly are provided, as are embodiments of a spacecraft isolation system including one or more launch lock assemblies. In one embodiment, the launch lock assembly includes first and second mount pieces, a releasable clamp device, and an axial gap amplification device. The releasable clamp device normally maintains the first and second mount pieces in clamped engagement; and, when actuated, releases the first and second mount pieces from clamped engagement to allow relative axial motion there between. The axial gap amplification device normally residing in a blocking position wherein the gap amplification device obstructs relative axial motion between the first and second mount pieces. The axial gap amplification device moves into a non-blocking position when the first and second mount pieces are released from clamped engagement to increase the range of axial motion between the first and second mount pieces.

  17. Controlled Release from Recombinant Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant polymers provide a high degree of molecular definition for correlating structure with function in controlled release. The wide array of amino acids available as building blocks for these materials lend many advantages including biorecognition, biodegradability, potential biocompatibility, and control over mechanical properties among other attributes. Genetic engineering and DNA manipulation techniques enable the optimization of structure for precise control over spatial and temporal release. Unlike the majority of chemical synthetic strategies used, recombinant DNA technology has allowed for the production of monodisperse polymers with specifically defined sequences. Several classes of recombinant polymers have been used for controlled drug delivery. These include, but are not limited to, elastin-like, silk-like, and silk-elastinlike proteins, as well as emerging cationic polymers for gene delivery. In this article, progress and prospects of recombinant polymers used in controlled release will be reviewed. PMID:24956486

  18. Being Included and Excluded

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korzenevica, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Following the civil war of 1996–2006, there was a dramatic increase in the labor mobility of young men and the inclusion of young women in formal education, which led to the transformation of the political landscape of rural Nepal. Mobility and schooling represent a level of prestige that rural...... politics. It analyzes how formal education and mobility either challenge or reinforce traditional gendered norms which dictate a lowly position for young married women in the household and their absence from community politics. The article concludes that women are simultaneously excluded and included from...... community politics. On the one hand, their mobility and decision-making powers decrease with the increase in the labor mobility of men and their newly gained education is politically devalued when compared to the informal education that men gain through mobility, but on the other hand, schooling strengthens...

  19. GEWEX SRB Shortwave Release 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, S. J.; Stackhouse, P. W., Jr.; Mikovitz, J. C.; Zhang, T.

    2017-12-01

    The NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) project produces shortwave and longwave surface and top of atmosphere radiative fluxes for the 1983-near present time period. Spatial resolution is 1 degree. The new Release 4 uses the newly processed ISCCP HXS product as its primary input for cloud and radiance data. The ninefold increase in pixel number compared to the previous ISCCP DX allows finer gradations in cloud fraction in each grid box. It will also allow higher spatial resolutions (0.5 degree) in future releases. In addition to the input data improvements, several important algorithm improvements have been made since Release 3. These include recalculated atmospheric transmissivities and reflectivities yielding a less transmissive atmosphere. The calculations also include variable aerosol composition, allowing for the use of a detailed aerosol history from the Max Planck Institut Aerosol Climatology (MAC). Ocean albedo and snow/ice albedo are also improved from Release 3. Total solar irradiance is now variable, averaging 1361 Wm-2. Water vapor is taken from ISCCP's nnHIRS product. Results from GSW Release 4 are presented and analyzed. Early comparison to surface measurements show improved agreement.

  20. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  1. Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project : Final Siting Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, James M.

    1992-04-01

    This report presents the results of site analysis for the Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of satellite and release facilities for the Umatilla Basin hatchery program. The Umatilla Basin hatchery program consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in the Umatilla River as defined in the Umatilla master plan approved in 1989 by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult salmon broodstock holding and spawning facilities, facilities for recovery, acclimation, and/or extended rearing of salmon juveniles, and development of river sites for release of hatchery salmon and steelhead. The historic and current distribution of fall chinook, summer chinook, and coho salmon and steelhead trout was summarized for the Umatilla River basin. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Twenty seven sites were evaluated for the potential and development of facilities. Engineering and environmental attributes of the sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

  2. Dose estimation models for environmental tritium released from fusion facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Mikio

    1993-01-01

    Various mathematical models are being developed to predict the behavior of HT released to the natural environment and their consequent impact. This report outlines models and the major findings of HT field release studies in France and Canada. The models are constructed to incorporate the key processes thought to be responsible for the formation of atmospheric HTO from a release of HT. It has been established from the experiments that HT oxidized in surface soil is incorporated almost entirely into soil water as HTO. This tritium may be reemitted to the atmosphere in the form of HTO through exchange of soil and atmospheric moisture as well as through the bulk water mass flux from the soil the atmosphere due to evaporation and transpiration. The direct conversion of HT to HTO in air and direct uptake of HT by vegetation are expected to be negligible for the time and space scales of interest in considering short duration releases. HTO emitted to the atmosphere is can further exchange with soil and vegetation water. Validation of these models against experimental data is conducted to demonstrate their credibility. It may be concluded that further laboratory and field works are needed in order to develop a sufficiently good understanding of the dependence of the key processes on environmental factors (including diurnal cycling and seasonality) to allow the rates of the processes to be predicted from a knowledge of environmental conditions. (author)

  3. A perspective on direct conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, W. B.

    1963-10-15

    As flowing energy, electricity is sought for its versatility. Its generation from some other flow or release of energy without mechanical power, or even sometimes heat, as intermediary is called direct conversion. The objective is high electrical output for minimum total cost and not always high conversion efficiency. The wide range of techniques embracing cryogenics and hot plasma derives from the special requirements of source, environment and application. Sources include solar and other radiation, nuclear fission and fusion, chemical energy and heat. Environments and applications range from space vehicles to submarines and from giant power networks to isolated buoys and pocket devices. (author)

  4. A perspective on direct conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, W.B.

    1963-10-01

    As flowing energy, electricity is sought for its versatility. Its generation from some other flow or release of energy without mechanical power, or even sometimes heat, as intermediary is called direct conversion. The objective is high electrical output for minimum total cost and not always high conversion efficiency. The wide range of techniques embracing cryogenics and hot plasma derives from the special requirements of source, environment and application. Sources include solar and other radiation, nuclear fission and fusion, chemical energy and heat. Environments and applications range from space vehicles to submarines and from giant power networks to isolated buoys and pocket devices. (author)

  5. Containment response and radiological release for a TMLB' accident sequence in a large dry containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasser, R.D.; Bieniarz, P.P.; Tills, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis has been performed for the Bellefonte Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Unit 1 to determine the containment loading and the radiological releases into the environment from a station blackout accident. A number of issues have been addressed in this analysis, which include the effects of direct heating on containment loading and the effects of fission product heating and natural convection on releases from the primary system. The results indicate that direct heating, which involves more than about 50% of the core, may fail the Bellefonte containment, but natural convection in the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) may lead to overheating and failure of the primary system piping before core slump, thus, eliminating or mitigating direct heating. Releases from the primary system are significantly increased before vessel breach, due to natural circulation, and after vessel breach, due to reevolution of retained fission products by fission product heating of RCS structures. (orig.)

  6. Drug release kinetic analysis and prediction of release data via polymer molecular weight in sustained release diltiazem matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adibkia, K; Ghanbarzadeh, S; Mohammadi, G; Khiavi, H Z; Sabzevari, A; Barzegar-Jalali, M

    2014-03-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of HPMC (K4M and K100M) as well as tragacanth on the drug release rate of diltiazem (DLTZ) from matrix tablets prepared by direct compression method.Mechanism of drug transport through the matrices was studied by fitting the release data to the 10 kinetic models. 3 model independent parameters; i. e., mean dissolution time (MDT), mean release rate (MRR) and release rate efficacy (RE) as well as 5 time point approaches were established to compare the dissolution profiles. To find correlation between fraction of drug released and polymer's molecular weight, dissolution data were fitted into two proposed equations.All polymers could sustain drug release up to 10 h. The release data were fitted best to Peppas and Higuchi square root kinetic models considering squared correlation coefficient and mean percent error (MPE). RE and MRR were decreased when polymer to drug ratio was increased. Conversely, t60% was increased with raising polymer /drug ratio. The fractions of drug released from the formulations prepared with tragacanth were more than those formulated using the same amount of HPMC K4M and HPMC K100M.Preparation of DLTZ matrices applying HPMCK4M, HPMC K100M and tragacanth could effectively extend the drug release. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Environmental releases for calendar year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greager, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents data on radioactive and nonradioactive materials released into the environment during calendar year 1996 from facilities and activities managed by the Fluor Daniel Hanford, Incorporated (formerly the Westinghouse Hanford Company) and Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated. Fluor Daniel Hanford, Incorporated provides effluent monitoring services for Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated, which includes release reporting. Both summary and detailed presentations of the environmental releases are provided. When appropriate, comparisons to data from previous years are made

  8. Environmental releases for calendar year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greager, E.M.

    1997-07-31

    This report presents data on radioactive and nonradioactive materials released into the environment during calendar year 1996 from facilities and activities managed by the Fluor Daniel Hanford, Incorporated (formerly the Westinghouse Hanford Company) and Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated. Fluor Daniel Hanford, Incorporated provides effluent monitoring services for Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated, which includes release reporting. Both summary and detailed presentations of the environmental releases are provided. When appropriate, comparisons to data from previous years are made.

  9. Released radioactivity reducing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takeaki.

    1992-01-01

    Upon occurrence of a reactor accident, penetration portions of a reactor container, as a main leakage source from a reactor container, are surrounded by a plurality of gas-tight chambers, the outside of which is surrounded by highly gas-tightly buildings. Branched pipelines of an emergency gas processing system are introduced to each of the gas-tight chambers and they are joined and in communication with an emergency gas processing device. With such a constitution, radioactive materials are prevented from leaking directly from the buildings. Further, pipeline openings of the emergency gas processing facility are disposed in the plurality highly gas-tight penetration chambers. If the radioactive materials are leaked from the reactor to elevate the pressure in the penetration chambers, the radioactive materials are introduced to a filter device in the emergency gas processing facility by way of the branched pipelines, filtered and then released to the atmosphere. Accordingly, the reliability and safety of the system can be improved. (T.M.)

  10. Study of direct Cp violation in B decay into vector mesons including rho zero-omega mixing in the framework of the LHCb experiment; Etude de la violation directe de CP dans la desintegration du meson B en mesons vecteurs incluant le melange {rho}{sup 0} - {omega} dans le cadre de l'experience LHCb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimbault, C

    2004-02-01

    {rho}{sub 0} - {omega} mixing effect on direct CP violation in B decay into vector mesons is one of the main studies of this work. The first part is dedicated to the calculation of the decay amplitudes of the channels B {yields} V{rho}{sup 0}({omega}) which have been represented by a model. We have used the helicity formalism. In such a way branching ratios and asymmetries depending on form factor models and other parameters are predicted. Direct CP violation appears at several levels: in branching ratios, in angular distributions and in differential asymmetry as a function of {rho}{sup 0} - {omega} mass. The dominance of the longitudinal polarization in the studied channels is confirmed by Babar and Belle experimental results. We calculated too the strong phase and the ratio of Penguin to Tree amplitudes for each channel. In a second part, was developed an analysis of the channel B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup *0}{rho}{sup 0}({omega}) in the framework of LHCb experiment. It will start in 2007 and is dedicated to b flavor study and CP violation. The realistic analysis which has been performed shows that this channel is not appropriate to observe {rho}{sup 0} - {omega} mixing effect on asymmetry in LHCb, while the {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup 0}({omega}) channel, for which we have predicted a branching ratio value confirmed by Babar and Belle, is much more promising. (author)

  11. Airborne engineered nanomaterials in the workplace—a review of release and worker exposure during nanomaterial production and handling processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yaobo [Institute for Work and Health (IST), Universities of Lausanne and Geneva, Route de la Corniche 2, 1066, Epalinges (Switzerland); Kuhlbusch, Thomas A.J. [Institute of Energy and Environmental Technology (IUTA), Air Quality & Sustainable Nanotechnology Unit, Bliersheimer Straße 58-60, 47229 Duisburg (Germany); Centre for Nanointegration (CENIDE), University Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg (Germany); Van Tongeren, Martie; Jiménez, Araceli Sánchez [Centre for Human Exposure Science, Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM), Research Avenue North, Edinburgh EH14 4AP (United Kingdom); Tuinman, Ilse [TNO, Lange Kleiweg 137, Rijswijk (Netherlands); Chen, Rui [CAS Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety & CAS Center for Excellence in Nanoscience, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of China, Beijing 100190 (China); Alvarez, Iñigo Larraza [ACCIONA Infrastructure, Materials Area, Innovation Division, C/Valportillo II 8, 28108, Alcobendas (Spain); Mikolajczyk, Urszula [Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland); Nickel, Carmen; Meyer, Jessica; Kaminski, Heinz [Institute of Energy and Environmental Technology (IUTA), Air Quality & Sustainable Nanotechnology Unit, Bliersheimer Straße 58-60, 47229 Duisburg (Germany); Wohlleben, Wendel [Dept. Material Physics, BASF SE, Advanced Materials Research, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Stahlmecke, Burkhard [Institute of Energy and Environmental Technology (IUTA), Air Quality & Sustainable Nanotechnology Unit, Bliersheimer Straße 58-60, 47229 Duisburg (Germany); Clavaguera, Simon [NanoSafety Platform, Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble, 38054 (France); and others

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Release characteristics can be grouped by the type of occupational activities. • Release levels may be linked to process energy. • A better data reporting practice will facilitate exposure assessment. • The results help prioritize industrial processes for human risk assessment. - Abstract: For exposure and risk assessment in occupational settings involving engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), it is important to understand the mechanisms of release and how they are influenced by the ENM, the matrix material, and process characteristics. This review summarizes studies providing ENM release information in occupational settings, during different industrial activities and using various nanomaterials. It also assesses the contextual information — such as the amounts of materials handled, protective measures, and measurement strategies — to understand which release scenarios can result in exposure. High-energy processes such as synthesis, spraying, and machining were associated with the release of large numbers of predominantly small-sized particles. Low-energy processes, including laboratory handling, cleaning, and industrial bagging activities, usually resulted in slight or moderate releases of relatively large agglomerates. The present analysis suggests that process-based release potential can be ranked, thus helping to prioritize release assessments, which is useful for tiered exposure assessment approaches and for guiding the implementation of workplace safety strategies. The contextual information provided in the literature was often insufficient to directly link release to exposure. The studies that did allow an analysis suggested that significant worker exposure might mainly occur when engineering safeguards and personal protection strategies were not carried out as recommended.

  12. Airborne engineered nanomaterials in the workplace—a review of release and worker exposure during nanomaterial production and handling processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Yaobo; Kuhlbusch, Thomas A.J.; Van Tongeren, Martie; Jiménez, Araceli Sánchez; Tuinman, Ilse; Chen, Rui; Alvarez, Iñigo Larraza; Mikolajczyk, Urszula; Nickel, Carmen; Meyer, Jessica; Kaminski, Heinz; Wohlleben, Wendel; Stahlmecke, Burkhard; Clavaguera, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Release characteristics can be grouped by the type of occupational activities. • Release levels may be linked to process energy. • A better data reporting practice will facilitate exposure assessment. • The results help prioritize industrial processes for human risk assessment. - Abstract: For exposure and risk assessment in occupational settings involving engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), it is important to understand the mechanisms of release and how they are influenced by the ENM, the matrix material, and process characteristics. This review summarizes studies providing ENM release information in occupational settings, during different industrial activities and using various nanomaterials. It also assesses the contextual information — such as the amounts of materials handled, protective measures, and measurement strategies — to understand which release scenarios can result in exposure. High-energy processes such as synthesis, spraying, and machining were associated with the release of large numbers of predominantly small-sized particles. Low-energy processes, including laboratory handling, cleaning, and industrial bagging activities, usually resulted in slight or moderate releases of relatively large agglomerates. The present analysis suggests that process-based release potential can be ranked, thus helping to prioritize release assessments, which is useful for tiered exposure assessment approaches and for guiding the implementation of workplace safety strategies. The contextual information provided in the literature was often insufficient to directly link release to exposure. The studies that did allow an analysis suggested that significant worker exposure might mainly occur when engineering safeguards and personal protection strategies were not carried out as recommended.

  13. Stimuli responsive nanomaterials for controlled release applications

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Song

    2012-01-01

    The controlled release of therapeutics has been one of the major challenges for scientists and engineers during the past three decades. Coupled with excellent biocompatibility profiles, various nanomaterials have showed great promise for biomedical applications. Stimuli-responsive nanomaterials guarantee the controlled release of cargo to a given location, at a specific time, and with an accurate amount. In this review, we have combined the major stimuli that are currently used to achieve the ultimate goal of controlled and targeted release by "smart" nanomaterials. The most heavily explored strategies include (1) pH, (2) enzymes, (3) redox, (4) magnetic, and (5) light-triggered release.

  14. Direct Heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienau, P J

    1990-01-01

    Potential resources and applications of earth heat in the form of geothermal energy are large. United States direct uses amount to 2,100 MWt thermal and worldwide 8,850 MWt above a reference temperature of 35 degrees Celsius. Space and district heating are the major direct uses of geothermal energy. Equipment employed in direct use projects is of standard manufacture and includes downhole and circulation pumps, transmission and distribution pipelines, heat exchangers and convectors, heat pumps and chillers. Direct uses of earth heat discussed are space and district heating, greenhouse heating and fish farming, process and industrial applications. The economic feasibility of direct use projects is governed by site specific factors such as location of user and resource, resource quality, system load factor and load density, as well as financing. Examples are presented of district heating in Klamath Falls, and Elko. Further developments of direct uses of geothermal energy will depend on matching user needs to the resource, and improving load factors and load density.

  15. Extended release formulations for local anaesthetic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiniger, C F; Golovanevski, L; Domb, A J; Ickowicz, D

    2012-08-01

    Systemic toxicity through overdose of local anaesthetic agents is a real concern. By encapsulating local anaesthetics in biodegradable carriers to produce a system for prolonged release, their duration of action can be extended. This encapsulation should also improve the safety profile of the local anaesthetic as it is released at a slower rate. Work with naturally occurring local anaestheticss has also shown promise in the area of reducing systemic and neurotoxicity. Extended duration local anaesthetic formulations in current development or clinical use include liposomes, hydrophobic based polymer particles such as Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres, pasty injectable and solid polymers like Poly(sebacic-co-ricinoleic acid) P(SA:RA) and their combination with synthetic and natural local anaesthetic. Their duration of action, rationale and limitations are reviewed. Direct comparison of the different agents is limited by their chemical properties, the drug doses encapsulated and the details of in vivo models described. Anaesthesia © 2012 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  16. Nanostructured Diclofenac Sodium Releasing Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkola, L.; Vapalahti, K.; Harlin, A.; Seppälä, J.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    Various techniques have been developed to produce second generation biomaterials for tissue repair. These include extrusion, molding, salt leaching, spinning etc, but success in regenerating tissues has been limited. It is important to develop porous material, yet with a fibrous structure for it to be biomimetic. To mimic biological tissues, the extra-cellular matrix usually contains fibers in nano scale. To produce nanostructures, self-assembly or electrospinning can be used. Adding a drug release function to such a material may advance applications further for use in controlled tissue repair. This turns the resulting device into a multifunctional porous, fibrous structure to support cells and drug releasing properties in order to control tissue reactions. A bioabsorbable poly(ɛ-caprolactone-co-D,L lactide) 95/5 (PCL) was made into diluted solution using a solvent, to which was added 2w-% of diclofenac sodium (DS). Nano-fibers were made by electrospinning onto substrate. Microstructure of the resulting nanomat was studied using SEM and drug release profiles with UV/VIS spectroscopy. Thickness of the electrospun nanomat was about 2 mm. SEM analysis showed that polymeric nano-fibers containing drug particles form a highly interconnected porous nano structure. Average diameter of the nano-fibers was 130 nm. There was a high burst peak in drug release, which decreased to low levels after one day. The used polymer has slow a degradation rate and though the nanomat was highly porous with a large surface area, drug release rate is slow. It is feasible to develop a nano-fibrous porous structure of bioabsorbable polymer, which is loaded with test drug. Drug release is targeted at improving the properties of biomaterial for use in controlled tissue repair and regeneration.

  17. Large scientific releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pongratz, M.B.

    1981-01-01

    The motivation for active experiments in space is considered, taking into account the use of active techniques to obtain a better understanding of the natural space environment, the utilization of the advantages of space as a laboratory to study fundamental plasma physics, and the employment of active techniques to determine the magnitude, degree, and consequences of artificial modification of the space environment. It is pointed out that mass-injection experiments in space plasmas began about twenty years ago with the Project Firefly releases. Attention is given to mass-release techniques and diagnostics, operational aspects of mass release active experiments, the active observation of mass release experiments, active perturbation mass release experiments, simulating an artificial modification of the space environment, and active experiments to study fundamental plasma physics

  18. 19 CFR 12.114 - Release or refusal of delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Release or refusal of delivery. 12.114 Section 12... delivery. If the completed Notice of Arrival directs the port director to release the shipment of... directs the port director to refuse delivery of the shipment, the shipment shall be refused delivery and...

  19. Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry for Extracting Spectra of N-Glycans Directly from Incubation Mixtures Following Glycan Release: Application to Glycans from Engineered Glycoforms of Intact, Folded HIV gp120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, David J.; Sobott, Frank; Crispin, Max; Wrobel, Antoni; Bonomelli, Camille; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Scarff, Charlotte A.; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Scrivens, James H.

    2011-03-01

    The analysis of glycosylation from native biological sources is often frustrated by the low abundances of available material. Here, ion mobility combined with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry have been used to extract the spectra of N-glycans released with PNGase F from a serial titration of recombinantly expressed envelope glycoprotein, gp120, from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Analysis was also performed on gp120 expressed in the α-mannosidase inhibitor, and in a matched mammalian cell line deficient in GlcNAc transferase I. Without ion mobility separation, ESI spectra frequently contained no observable ions from the glycans whereas ions from other compounds such as detergents and residual buffer salts were abundant. After ion mobility separation on a Waters T-wave ion mobility mass spectrometer, the N-glycans fell into a unique region of the ion mobility/ m/z plot allowing their profiles to be extracted with good signal:noise ratios. This method allowed N-glycan profiles to be extracted from crude incubation mixtures with no clean-up even in the presence of surfactants such as NP40. Furthermore, this technique allowed clear profiles to be obtained from sub-microgram amounts of glycoprotein. Glycan profiles were similar to those generated by MALDI-TOF MS although they were more susceptible to double charging and fragmentation. Structural analysis could be accomplished by MS/MS experiments in either positive or negative ion mode but negative ion mode gave the most informative spectra and provided a reliable approach to the analysis of glycans from small amounts of glycoprotein.

  20. SRTM Data Release for Africa, Colored Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This color shaded relief image shows the extent of digital elevation data for Africa recently released by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). This release includes data for all of the continent, plus the island of Madagascar and the Arabian Peninsula. SRTM flew on board the Space Shuttle Endeavour in February 2000 and used an interferometric radar system to map the topography of Earth's landmass between latitudes 56 degrees south and 60 degrees north. The data were processed into geographic 'tiles,' each of which represents one by one degree of latitude and longitude. A degree of latitude measures 111 kilometers (69 miles) north-south, and a degree of longitude measures 111 kilometers or less east-west, decreasing away from the equator. The data are being released to the public on a continent-by-continent basis. This Africa segment includes 3256 tiles, almost a quarter of the total data set. Previous releases covered North America, South America and Eurasia. Forthcoming releases will include Australia plus an 'Islands' release for those islands not included in the continental releases. Together these data releases constitute the world's first high-resolution, near-global elevation model. The resolution of the publicly released data is three arcseconds (1/1,200 of a degree of latitude and longitude), which is about 90 meters (295 feet). Coverage in the current data release extends from 35 degrees north latitude at the southern edge of the Mediterranean to the very tip of South Africa, encompassing a great diversity of landforms. The northern part of the continent consists of a system of basins and plateaus, with several volcanic uplands whose uplift has been matched by subsidence in the large surrounding basins. Many of these basins have been infilled with sand and gravel, creating the vast Saharan lands. The Atlas Mountains in the northwest were created by convergence of the African and Eurasian tectonic plates. The geography of the central latitudes of

  1. Modelling vesicular release at hippocampal synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhita Nadkarni

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We study local calcium dynamics leading to a vesicle fusion in a stochastic, and spatially explicit, biophysical model of the CA3-CA1 presynaptic bouton. The kinetic model for vesicle release has two calcium sensors, a sensor for fast synchronous release that lasts a few tens of milliseconds and a separate sensor for slow asynchronous release that lasts a few hundred milliseconds. A wide range of data can be accounted for consistently only when a refractory period lasting a few milliseconds between releases is included. The inclusion of a second sensor for asynchronous release with a slow unbinding site, and thereby a long memory, affects short-term plasticity by facilitating release. Our simulations also reveal a third time scale of vesicle release that is correlated with the stimulus and is distinct from the fast and the slow releases. In these detailed Monte Carlo simulations all three time scales of vesicle release are insensitive to the spatial details of the synaptic ultrastructure. Furthermore, our simulations allow us to identify features of synaptic transmission that are universal and those that are modulated by structure.

  2. Electrochemical cell structure including an ionomeric barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Timothy N.; Hibbs, Michael

    2017-06-20

    An apparatus includes an electrochemical half-cell comprising: an electrolyte, an anode; and an ionomeric barrier positioned between the electrolyte and the anode. The anode may comprise a multi-electron vanadium phosphorous alloy, such as VP.sub.x, wherein x is 1-5. The electrochemical half-cell is configured to oxidize the vanadium and phosphorous alloy to release electrons. A method of mitigating corrosion in an electrochemical cell includes disposing an ionomeric barrier in a path of electrolyte or ion flow to an anode and mitigating anion accumulation on the surface of the anode.

  3. Regulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons by glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Alison V.; Moenter, Suzanne M.

    2011-01-01

    Reproduction is influenced by energy balance, but the physiological pathways mediating their relationship have not been fully elucidated. As the central regulators of fertility, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons integrate numerous physiological signals, including metabolic cues. Circulating glucose levels regulate GnRH release and may in part mediate the effects of negative energy balance on fertility. Existing evidence suggests that neural pathways originating in the hindbrain, as well as in the hypothalamic feeding nuclei, transmit information concerning glucose availability to GnRH neurons. Here we review recent evidence suggesting that GnRH neurons may directly sense changes in glucose availability by a mechanism involving adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). These findings expand our understanding of how metabolic signaling in the brain regulates reproduction. PMID:21855365

  4. Safety barriers on oil and gas platforms. Means to prevent hydrocarbon releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sklet, Snorre

    2005-12-15

    The main objective of the PhD project has been to develop concepts and methods that can be used to define, illustrate, analyse, and improve safety barriers in the operational phase of offshore oil and gas production platforms. The main contributions of this thesis are; Clarification of the term safety barrier with respect to definitions, classification, and relevant attributes for analysis of barrier performance Development and discussion of a representative set of hydrocarbon release scenarios Development and testing of a new method, BORA-Release, for qualitative and quantitative risk analysis of hydrocarbon releases Safety barriers are defined as physical and/or non-physical means planned to prevent, control, or mitigate undesired events or accidents. The means may range from a single technical unit or human actions, to a complex socio-technical system. It is useful to distinguish between barrier functions and barrier systems. Barrier functions describe the purpose of safety barriers or what the safety barriers shall do in order to prevent, control, or mitigate undesired events or accidents. Barrier systems describe how a barrier function is realized or executed. If the barrier system is functioning, the barrier function is performed. If a barrier function is performed successfully, it should have a direct and significant effect on the occurrence and/or consequences of an undesired event or accident. It is recommended to address the following attributes to characterize the performance of safety barriers; a) functionality/effectiveness, b) reliability/ availability, c) response time, d) robustness, and e) triggering event or condition. For some types of barriers, not all the attributes are relevant or necessary in order to describe the barrier performance. The presented hydrocarbon release scenarios include initiating events, barrier functions introduced to prevent hydrocarbon releases, and barrier systems realizing the barrier functions. Both technical and human

  5. The 2017 Release Cloudy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferland, G. J.; Chatzikos, M.; Guzmán, F.; Lykins, M. L.; van Hoof, P. A. M.; Williams, R. J. R.; Abel, N. P.; Badnell, N. R.; Keenan, F. P.; Porter, R. L.; Stancil, P. C.

    2017-10-01

    We describe the 2017 release of the spectral synthesis code Cloudy, summarizing the many improvements to the scope and accuracy of the physics which have been made since the previous release. Exporting the atomic data into external data files has enabled many new large datasets to be incorporated into the code. The use of the complete datasets is not realistic for most calculations, so we describe the limited subset of data used by default, which predicts significantly more lines than the previous release of Cloudy. This version is nevertheless faster than the previous release, as a result of code optimizations. We give examples of the accuracy limits using small models, and the performance requirements of large complete models. We summarize several advances in the H- and He-like iso-electronic sequences and use our complete collisional-radiative models to establish the densities where the coronal and local thermodynamic equilibrium approximations work.

  6. Differences between the release of radiolabelled and endogenous dopamine from superfused rat brain slices: effects of depolarizing stimuli, amphetamine and synthesis inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herdon, H.; Strupish, J.; Nahorski, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    Direct comparisons between radiolabelled and endogenous dopamine (DA) release from superfused rat brain slices have been made. Striatal slices were prelabelled with [ 3 H]dopamine ([ 3 H]DA), then superfused at 0.5 ml/min and the released catecholamines analyzed by HPLC with electrochemical detection and radioactivity present in superfusate fractions also counted. The studies indicate that labelled and endogenous amine release do not always occur in parallel, and that major causes of discrepancy between them may include the presence of a large newly-synthesized component in endogenous release and the uneven distribution of labelled amine within endogenous releasable pools. The results also suggest that the prelabelling process itself may alter the pools contributing to subsequent endogenous release. (Auth.)

  7. Fuel morphology effects on fission product release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osetek, D.J.; Hartwell, J.K.; Cronenberg, A.W.

    1986-01-01

    Results are presented of fission product release behavior observed during four severe fuel damage tests on bundles of UO 2 fuel rods. Transient temperatures up to fuel melting were obtained in the tests that included both rapid and slow cooldown, low and high (36 GWd/t) burnup fuel and the addition of Ag-In-Cd control rods. Release fractions of major fission product species and release rates of noble gas species are reported. Significant differences in release behavior are discussed between heatup and cooldown periods, low and high burnup fuel and long- and short-lived fission products. Explanations for the observed differences are offered that relate fuel morphology changes to the releases

  8. Controlled drug release for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambhia, Kunal J; Ma, Peter X

    2015-12-10

    Tissue engineering is often referred to as a three-pronged discipline, with each prong corresponding to 1) a 3D material matrix (scaffold), 2) drugs that act on molecular signaling, and 3) regenerative living cells. Herein we focus on reviewing advances in controlled release of drugs from tissue engineering platforms. This review addresses advances in hydrogels and porous scaffolds that are synthesized from natural materials and synthetic polymers for the purposes of controlled release in tissue engineering. We pay special attention to efforts to reduce the burst release effect and to provide sustained and long-term release. Finally, novel approaches to controlled release are described, including devices that allow for pulsatile and sequential delivery. In addition to recent advances, limitations of current approaches and areas of further research are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Using random event simulation to evaluate the effectiveness of indoor sheltering during a sour gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.

    2003-01-01

    In the event of sour gas releases to the atmosphere, there is a strong bias toward evacuation rather than sheltering-in-place. This paper described the critical factors in decision-making for shelter-in-place versus evacuation. These include: delay time expected before release begins; size of potential release, explosion or fire; expected duration; direction to safety for evacuation; the air tightness of the building; and, the number of people in the emergency response zone. A shelter-in-place decision chart developed by the Canadian Association of Fire Chiefs was presented. It shows the usual bias toward evacuation as the default position. It also shows the greatest drawbacks of sheltering-in-place. The main factor in maintaining the effectiveness of the building shelter is the rate of air infiltration into the building. Other issues to consider include: reactive versus passive chemicals in the release; light versus heavy gas releases; building type (houses, high-rise apartments, office buildings, or warehouses); tightness of building construction; whether to turn the house heating and air conditioning on or off during shelter; daytime versus nighttime conditions; and, cost factors. Equations for calculating indoor and outdoor toxic exposure to decide on shelter versus evacuation were also presented. It was concluded that the absence of peak concentrations dramatically reduce the risk of fatality to people sheltering indoors. Keeping people indoors is the best way to assure their safety for the first hour following a toxic release. 8 refs., 6 figs

  10. ATP Release Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiyuki Taruno

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine triphosphate (ATP has been well established as an important extracellular ligand of autocrine signaling, intercellular communication, and neurotransmission with numerous physiological and pathophysiological roles. In addition to the classical exocytosis, non-vesicular mechanisms of cellular ATP release have been demonstrated in many cell types. Although large and negatively charged ATP molecules cannot diffuse across the lipid bilayer of the plasma membrane, conductive ATP release from the cytosol into the extracellular space is possible through ATP-permeable channels. Such channels must possess two minimum qualifications for ATP permeation: anion permeability and a large ion-conducting pore. Currently, five groups of channels are acknowledged as ATP-release channels: connexin hemichannels, pannexin 1, calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1, volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs, also known as volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying (VSOR anion channels, and maxi-anion channels (MACs. Recently, major breakthroughs have been made in the field by molecular identification of CALHM1 as the action potential-dependent ATP-release channel in taste bud cells, LRRC8s as components of VRACs, and SLCO2A1 as a core subunit of MACs. Here, the function and physiological roles of these five groups of ATP-release channels are summarized, along with a discussion on the future implications of understanding these channels.

  11. EPICS release 3.11 specific documentation -- EPICS release notes for 3.11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    EPICS release 3.11 is now ready for user testing. A person who wants to set up a simplified application environment to boot an IOC and create databases using R3.11 should follow the directions in Appendix B, page 27, of the EPICS Source/Release Control Manual, Sept. 20, 1993. The R3.11 EPICS path at ANL/APS is /net/phebos/epics/R3.11 so the command to get the new release is /net/phebos/epics/R3.11/Unix/share/bin/getrel /net/phebos/epics/R3.11. An existing R3.8 short form report can be copied to this new directory and used to create a database. ANL/APS is currently testing an Application Developers Source/Release control system. It is not yet ready for general distribution. Attached are the EPICS R3.11 release notes

  12. RAVEN Beta Release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabiti, Cristian; Alfonsi, Andrea; Cogliati, Joshua Joseph; Mandelli, Diego; Kinoshita, Robert Arthur; Wang, Congjian; Maljovec, Daniel Patrick; Talbot, Paul William

    2016-01-01

    This documents the release of the Risk Analysis Virtual Environment (RAVEN) code. A description of the RAVEN code is provided, and discussion of the release process for the M2LW-16IN0704045 milestone. The RAVEN code is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. RAVEN is capable of investigating the system response as well as the input space using Monte Carlo, Grid, or Latin Hyper Cube sampling schemes, but its strength is focused toward system feature discovery, such as limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, using dynamic supervised learning techniques. RAVEN has now increased in maturity enough for the Beta 1.0 release.

  13. RAVEN Beta Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cogliati, Joshua Joseph [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinoshita, Robert Arthur [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wang, Congjian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Maljovec, Daniel Patrick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Talbot, Paul William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This documents the release of the Risk Analysis Virtual Environment (RAVEN) code. A description of the RAVEN code is provided, and discussion of the release process for the M2LW-16IN0704045 milestone. The RAVEN code is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. RAVEN is capable of investigating the system response as well as the input space using Monte Carlo, Grid, or Latin Hyper Cube sampling schemes, but its strength is focused toward system feature discovery, such as limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, using dynamic supervised learning techniques. RAVEN has now increased in maturity enough for the Beta 1.0 release.

  14. Heat release rate of wood-plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. M. Stark; R. H. White; C. M. Clemons

    1997-01-01

    Wood-plastic composites are becoming more important as a material that fulfills recycling needs. In this study, fire performance tests were conducted on several compositions of wood and plastic materials using the Ohio State University rate of heat release apparatus. Test results included five-minute average heat release rate in kW/m2 (HRR avg) and maximum heat release...

  15. Guidance for Evaluating the Safety of Experimental Releases of Mosquitoes, Emphasizing Mark-Release-Recapture Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Mark Q; Charlwood, J Derek; Harrington, Laura C; Lounibos, L Philip; Reisen, William K; Tabachnick, Walter J

    2018-01-01

    Experimental releases of mosquitoes are performed to understand characteristics of populations related to the biology, ability to transmit pathogens, and ultimately their control. In this article, we discuss considerations related to the safety of experimental releases of living mosquitoes, applying principles of good practice in vector biology that protect human health and comfort. We describe specific factors of experimental releases of mosquitoes that we believe are critical to inform institutional biosafety committees and similar review boards to which proposals to conduct mosquito release experiments have been submitted. In this study, "experimental releases" means those that do not significantly increase vector capacity or nuisance biting relative to the unperturbed natural baseline. This document specifically does not address releases of mosquitoes for ongoing control programs or trials of new control methods for which broader assessments of risk are required. It also does not address releases of transgenic or exotic (non-native) mosquito species, both of which require particular regulatory approval. Experimental releases may include females and males and evaluation must consider their effects based on the number released, their genotype and phenotype, the environment into which they are released, and postrelease collection activities. We consider whether increases of disease transmission and nuisance biting might result from proposed experimental releases against the backdrop of natural population size variation. We recommend that experimental releases be conducted in a manner that can be reasonably argued to have insignificant negative effects. Reviewers of proposals for experimental releases should expect applicants to provide such an argument based on evidence from similar studies and their planned activities. This document provides guidance for creating and evaluating such proposals.

  16. Lithium ceramics: sol-gel preparation and tritium release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renoult, O.

    1994-04-01

    Ceramics based on lithium aluminate (LiA1O 2 ), lithium zirconate (Li 2 ZrO 3 ) and lithium titanate (Li 2 TiO 3 ) are candidates as tritium breeder blanket materials for forthcoming nuclear fusion reactors. Lithium silico-aluminate Li 4+x A1 4-3x Si 2x O 8 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0,25) powders were synthetized from alkoxyde-hydroxyde sol-gel route. By direct sintering at 850-1100 deg C (without prior calcination), ceramics with controlled stoichiometry and homogenous microstructure were obtained. We have also prepared, using a comparable method, Li 2 Zr 1-x Ti x O 3 (x = 0, x = 0,1 et x = 1) materials. All these ceramics, with different microstructures and compositions, have been tested in out-of-reactor experiments. Concerning lithium aluminate microporous ceramics, the silicon substitution leads to a significant improvement of the tritrium release. Classical models taking into account independent surface mechanisms are not able to describe correctly the observed tritium release kinetics. We show, using a simple model, that the release kinetics is in fact limited by an intergranular diffusion followed by a desorption. The delay in tritium release, which occurs when the ceramic compacity increases, is explained in terms of an enhancement of the ionic T + diffusion path length. The energy required for desorption includes a leading term independent of hydrogen contained in the sweep gas. This term is attributed to the limiting recombination step of T + in molecular species HTO. For similar microstructures, the facility of tritium release for the different studied materials is explained by three properties: the crystal structure of the ceramic, the acidity of oxides and finally the presence of electronic non-stoichiometric defects. (author). 89 refs., 50 figs., 2 tabs., 1 annexe

  17. Endoscopic cubital tunnel release using the Hoffmann technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Reimer; Lubahn, John

    2013-06-01

    Endoscopic cubital tunnel release was originally described in 1989 by Tsai, and his technique has been modified by other surgeons including Mirza and Cobb. In 2006, Hoffmann and Siemionow described an endoscopic technique quite different from Tsai's original description. Instead of working from the "inside out," Hoffmann's technique is performed through an incision similar to that which would be used for an in situ release of the ulnar nerve. The main difference being that the nerve can be explored and decompressed 10 cm proximal and distal to the arcuate ligament as the surgeon looks down on the nerve and the surrounding tissues while viewing the anatomy through a camera attached to a soft tissue endoscope that is inserted in the wound. The arcuate (Osborne's) ligament is released under direct vision much like a standard in situ decompression. Using a blunt dissection instrument, a workspace is created proximally and distally to the cubital tunnel. Next an illuminated speculum is introduced, the nerve is directly visualized between 4 and 5 cm proximal and distal to the cubital tunnel, and potential compressive forearm fasciae or fibrous bands are released. Finally, a 15-cm, 30° soft tissue endoscope is introduced into the incision, and viewing the internal anatomy on a video monitor, the decompression continues using longer scissors. Any potential bleeding is controlled with a long bayonet bipolar cautery. The authors discuss indications, contraindications, and the surgical technique. Postoperative management and associated complications are also discussed. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tichler, J.; Norden, K.; Congemi, J.

    1991-05-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1988 have been compiled and reported. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1988 release data are summarized in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized. 16 tabs

  19. Expansion of ARAC for chemical releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskett, R.L.; Blair, M.D.; Foster, C.S.; Taylor, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    In 1996 the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) completed an effort to expand its national emergency response modeling system for chemical releases. Key components of the new capability include the integration of (1) an extensive chemical property database, (2) source modeling for tanks and evaporating pools, (3) denser-than-air dispersion, (4) public exposure guidelines, and (5) an interactive graphical user interface (GUI). Recent use and the future of the new capability are also discussed

  20. Hydraulic release oil tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mims, M.G.; Mueller, M.D.; Ehlinger, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a hydraulic release tool. It comprises a setting assembly; a coupling member for coupling to drill string or petroleum production components, the coupling member being a plurality of sockets for receiving the dogs in the extended position and attaching the coupling member the setting assembly; whereby the setting assembly couples to the coupling member by engagement of the dogs in the sockets of releases from and disengages the coupling member in movement of the piston from its setting to its reposition in response to a pressure in the body in exceeding the predetermined pressure; and a relief port from outside the body into its bore and means to prevent communication between the relief port and the bore of the body axially of the piston when the piston is in the setting position and to establish such communication upon movement of the piston from the setting position to the release position and reduce the pressure in the body bore axially of the piston, whereby the reduction of the pressure signals that the tool has released the coupling member

  1. Release the Prisoners Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hecke, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the mathematical approach of the optimal strategy to win the "Release the prisoners" game and the integration of this analysis in a math class. Outline lesson plans at three different levels are given, where simulations are suggested as well as theoretical findings about the probability distribution function and its mean…

  2. Direct Reaction of Amides with Nitric Oxide To Form Diazeniumdiolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We report the apparently unprecedented direct reaction of nitric oxide (NO) with amides to generate ions of structure R(C=O)NH–N(O)=NO–, with examples including R = Me (1a) or 3-pyridyl (1b). The sodium salts of both released NO in pH 7.4 buffer, with 37 °C half-lives of 1–3 min. As NO-releasing drug candidates, diazeniumdiolated amides would have the advantage of generating only 1 equiv of base on hydrolyzing exhaustively to NO, in contrast to their amine counterparts, which generate 2 equiv of base. PMID:25210948

  3. Tritium release from neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Werle, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reactortechnik

    1998-01-01

    One of the most important open issues related to beryllium for fusion applications refers to the kinetics of the tritium release as a function of neutron fluence and temperature. The EXOTIC-7 as well as the `Beryllium` experiments carried out in the HFR reactor in Petten are considered as the most detailed and significant tests for investigating the beryllium response under neutron irradiation. This paper reviews the present status of beryllium post-irradiation examinations performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe with samples from the above mentioned irradiation experiments, trying to elucidate the tritium release controlling processes. In agreement with previous studies it has been found that release starts at about 500-550degC and achieves a maximum at about 700-750degC. The observed release at about 500-550degC is probably due to tritium escaping from chemical traps, while the maximum release at about 700-750degC is due to tritium escaping from physical traps. The consequences of a direct contact between beryllium and ceramics during irradiation, causing tritium implanting in a surface layer of beryllium up to a depth of about 40 mm and leading to an additional inventory which is usually several times larger than the neutron-produced one, are also presented and the effects on the tritium release are discussed. (author)

  4. Pressure releasing device for reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Mika.

    1994-01-01

    In the present invention, dose rate to public caused by radioactive rare gases can be decreased. That is, a reactor container contains a reactor pressure vessel incorporating a reactor core. There are disposed a pressure releasing system for releasing the pressure in the reactor pressure vessel to the outside, and a burning device for burning gases released from the pressure releasing system. An exhaustion pipe is disposed to the pressure releasing system. A burning device is disposed to the exhaustion pipe. It is effective to dispose a ventilation port at a portion of the exhaustion pipe upstream of the burning device. In addition, the burning device may preferably be disposed in a multi-stage in the axial direction of the exhaustion pipe. With such procedures, hydrogen in gases discharged along with the release of the pressure in the container is burned. Buoyancy is caused to the exhaustion gases by heat energy upon burning. Since the exhaustion gases can reach a higher level by the buoyancy, the dose rate due to the rare gases can be reduced. (I.S.)

  5. Renal epithelial cells can release ATP by vesicular fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randi G Bjaelde

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Renal epithelial cells have the ability to release nucleotides as paracrine factors. In the intercalated cells of the collecting duct, ATP is released by connexin30 (cx30, which is selectively expressed in this cell type. However, ATP is released by virtually all renal epithelia and the aim of the present study was to identify possible alternative nucleotide release pathways in a renal epithelial cell model. We used MDCK (type1 cells to screen for various potential ATP release pathways. In these cells, inhibition of the vesicular H+-ATPases (bafilomycin reduced both the spontaneous and hypotonically (80%-induced nucleotide release. Interference with vesicular fusion using N-ethylamide markedly reduced the spontaneous nucleotide release, as did interference with trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus (brefeldin A1 and vesicular transport (nocodazole. These findings were substantiated using a siRNA directed against SNAP-23, which significantly reduced spontaneous ATP release. Inhibition of pannexin and connexins did not affect the spontaneous ATP release in this cell type, which consists of ∼90% principal cells. TIRF-microscopy of either fluorescently-labeled ATP (MANT-ATP or quinacrine-loaded vesicles, revealed that spontaneous release of single vesicles could be promoted by either hypoosmolality (50% or ionomycin. This vesicular release decreased the overall cellular fluorescence by 5.8% and 7.6% respectively. In summary, this study supports the notion that spontaneous and induced ATP release can occur via exocytosis in renal epithelial cells.

  6. Sulphur release from alternative fuel firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortada Mut, Maria del Mar; Nørskov, Linda Kaare; Glarborg, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The cement industry has long been dependent on the use of fossil fuels, although a recent trend in replacing fossil fuels with alternative fuels has arisen. 1, 2 However, when unconverted or partly converted alternative fuels are admitted directly in the rotary kiln inlet, the volatiles released...... from the fuels may react with sulphates present in the hot meal to form SO 2 . Here Maria del Mar Cortada Mut and associates describe pilot and industrial scale experiments focusing on the factors that affect SO 2 release in the cement kiln inlet....

  7. Direct drilling related releases from the WIPP repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglund, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    Two processes are identified that can influence the quantity of wastes brought to the ground surface when a waste disposal room of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is inadvertently penetrated by an exploratory borehole. The first mechanism is that due to the erosion of the borehole wall adjacent to the waste caused by the flowing drilling fluid. The second concerns the borehole spall caused by the flow of waste-generated gas to the borehole. Available literature concerning both processes and a quantitative model for erosion are presented. Calculations are shown that confirm the importance of gas-induced spall but no definitive model is developed. It is concluded that constitutive data for decomposed waste must be developed and additional experiments performed to assess the full significance of this latter mechanism

  8. Decontamination for free release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, K A; Elder, G R [Bradtec Ltd., Bristol (United Kingdom)

    1997-02-01

    Many countries are seeking to treat radioactive waste in ways which meet the local regulatory requirements, but yet are cost effective when all contributing factors are assessed. In some countries there are increasing amounts of waste, arising from nuclear plant decommissioning, which are categorized as low level waste: however with suitable treatment a large part of such wastes might become beyond regulatory control and be able to be released as non-radioactive. The benefits and disadvantages of additional treatment before disposal need to be considered. Several processes falling within the overall description of decontamination for free release have been developed and applied, and these are outlined. In one instance the process seeks to take advantage of techniques and equipment used for decontaminating water reactor circuits intermittently through reactor life. (author). 9 refs, 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  9. Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Sullivan, T.J.

    1983-02-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) project is a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored real-time emergency response service available for use by both federal and state agencies in case of a potential or actual atmospheric release of nuclear material. The project, initiated in 1972, is currently evolving from the research and development phase to full operation. Plans are underway to expand the existing capability to continuous operation by 1984 and to establish a National ARAC Center (NARAC) by 1988. This report describes the ARAC system, its utilization during the past two years, and plans for its expansion during the next five to six years. An integral part of this expansion is due to a very important and crucial effort sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency to extend the ARAC service to approximately 45 Department of Defense (DOD) sites throughout the continental US over the next three years

  10. Border cell release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mravec, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    Plant border cells are specialised cells derived from the root cap with roles in the biomechanics of root growth and in forming a barrier against pathogens. The mechanism of highly localised cell separation which is essential for their release to the environment is little understood. Here I present...... in situ analysis of Brachypodium distachyon, a model organism for grasses which possess type II primary cell walls poor in pectin content. Results suggest similarity in spatial dynamics of pectic homogalacturonan during dicot and monocot border cell release. Integration of observations from different...... species leads to the hypothesis that this process most likely does not involve degradation of cell wall material but rather employs unique cell wall structural and compositional means enabling both the rigidity of the root cap as well as detachability of given cells on its surface....

  11. Acetylcholine release and inhibitory interneuron activity in hippocampal CA1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rory McQuiston

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine release in the central nervous system (CNS has an important role in attention, recall and memory formation. One region influenced by acetylcholine is the hippocampus, which receives inputs from the medial septum and diagonal band of Broca complex (MS/DBB. Release of acetylcholine from the MS/DBB can directly affect several elements of the hippocampus including glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons, presynaptic terminals, postsynaptic receptors and astrocytes. A significant portion of acetylcholine’s effect likely results from the modulation of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons, which have crucial roles in controlling excitatory inputs, synaptic integration, rhythmic coordination of principal neurons and outputs in the hippocampus. Acetylcholine affects interneuron function in large part by altering their membrane potential via muscarinic and nicotinic receptor activation. This minireview describes recent data from mouse hippocampus that investigated changes in CA1 interneuron membrane potentials following acetylcholine release. The interneuron subtypes affected, the receptor subtypes activated, and the potential outcome on hippocampal CA1 network function is discussed.

  12. Slow-release fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Golden, D. C.

    1992-10-01

    A synthetic apatite containing agronutrients and a method for making the apatite are disclosed. The apatite comprises crystalline calcium phosphate having agronutrients dispersed in the crystalline structure. The agronutrients can comprise potassium, magnesium, sulfur, iron, manganese, molybdenum, chlorine, boron, copper and zinc in amounts suited for plant growth. The apatite can optionally comprise a carbonate and/or silicon solubility control agent. The agronutrients are released slowly as the apatite dissolves.

  13. EIA new releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration. It contains news releases on items of interest to the petroleum, coal, nuclear, electric and alternate fuels industries ranging from economic outlooks to environmental concerns. There is also a listing of reports by industry and an energy education resource listing containing sources for free or low-cost energy-related educational materials for educators and primary and secondary students

  14. Atmospheric release advisory capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, T.J.

    1981-01-01

    The ARAC system (Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability) is described. The system is a collection of people, computers, computer models, topographic data and meteorological input data that together permits a calculation of, in a quasi-predictive sense, where effluent from an accident will migrate through the atmosphere, where it will be deposited on the ground, and what instantaneous and integrated dose an exposed individual would receive

  15. Slow-release fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Douglas W. (Inventor); Golden, Dadigamuwage C. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A synthetic apatite containing agronutrients and a method for making the apatite are disclosed. The apatite comprises crystalline calcium phosphate having agronutrients dispersed in the crystalline structure. The agronutrients can comprise potassium, magnesium, sulfur, iron, manganese, molybdenum, chlorine, boron, copper and zinc in amounts suited for plant growth. The apatite can optionally comprise a carbonate and/or silicon solubility control agent. The agronutrients are released slowly as the apatite dissolves.

  16. Investigating the in vitro drug release kinetics from controlled release diclofenac potassium-ethocel matrix tablets and the influence of co-excipients on drug release patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shefaat Ullah; Shah, Kifayat Ullah; Rehman, Asimur; Khan, Gul Majid

    2011-04-01

    The objective of the study was to formulate and evaluate controlled release polymeric tablets of Diclofenac Potassium for the release rate, release patterns and the mechanism involved in the release process of the drug. Formulations with different types and grades of Ethyl Cellulose Ether derivatives in several drug-to-polymer ratios (D:P) were compressed into tablets using the direct compression method. In vitro drug release studies were performed in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) as dissolution medium by using USP Method-1 (Rotating Basket Method). Similarity factor f2 and dissimilarity factor f1 were applied for checking the similarities and dissimilarities of the release profiles of different formulations. For the determination of the release mechanism and drug release kinetics various mathematical/kinetic models were employed. It was found that all of the Ethocel polymers could significantly slow down the drug release rate with Ethocel FP polymers being the most efficient, especially at D:P ratios of 10:03 which lead towards the achievement of zero or near zero order release kinetics.

  17. Investigators find hundreds of intentional nuclear releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobsenz, G.

    1994-01-01

    Investigators with the federal Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments have said that the category of intentional releases is now known to be larger, in variety and quantity, than the 13 releases identified prior to the committee's formation in January 1994 by President Clinton. The committee is now aware of hundreds of additional intentional releases. In addition to the intentional releases, the committee said it had compiled documents on 400 biomedical experiments involving radiation prior to 1975, and had at least fragmentary evidence of more than 1,000 more. The committee also discovered a top secret 1953 Defense Department policy statement on human experimentation that was based on the World War II-era Nuremberg Code. The committee said it was looking into how or whether the policy was implemented. The committee is expected to issue a final report, including recommendations on possible compensation for victims by April 1995

  18. Radionuclide release calculations for SAR-08

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, Gavin; Miller, Alex; Smith, Graham; Jackson, Duncan

    2008-04-01

    Following a review by the Swedish regulatory authorities of the post-closure safety assessment of the SFR 1 disposal facility for low and intermediate waste (L/ILW), SAFE, the SKB has prepared an updated assessment called SAR-08. This report describes the radionuclide release calculations that have been undertaken as part of SAR-08. The information, assumptions and data used in the calculations are reported and the results are presented. The calculations address issues raised in the regulatory review, but also take account of new information including revised inventory data. The scenarios considered include the main case of expected behaviour of the system, with variants; low probability releases, and so-called residual scenarios. Apart from these scenario uncertainties, data uncertainties have been examined using a probabilistic approach. Calculations have been made using the AMBER software. This allows all the component features of the assessment model to be included in one place. AMBER has been previously used to reproduce results the corresponding calculations in the SAFE assessment. It is also used in demonstration of the IAEA's near surface disposal assessment methodology ISAM and has been subject to very substantial verification tests and has been used in verifying other assessment codes. Results are presented as a function of time for the release of radionuclides from the near field, and then from the far field into the biosphere. Radiological impacts of the releases are reported elsewhere. Consideration is given to each radionuclide and to each component part of the repository. The releases from the entire repository are also presented. The peak releases rates are, for most scenarios, due to organic C-14. Other radionuclides which contribute to peak release rates include inorganic C-14, Ni-59 and Ni-63. (author)

  19. Radionuclide release calculations for SAR-08

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, Gavin; Miller, Alex; Smith, Graham; Jackson, Duncan (Enviros Consulting Ltd, Wolverhampton (United Kingdom))

    2008-04-15

    Following a review by the Swedish regulatory authorities of the post-closure safety assessment of the SFR 1 disposal facility for low and intermediate waste (L/ILW), SAFE, the SKB has prepared an updated assessment called SAR-08. This report describes the radionuclide release calculations that have been undertaken as part of SAR-08. The information, assumptions and data used in the calculations are reported and the results are presented. The calculations address issues raised in the regulatory review, but also take account of new information including revised inventory data. The scenarios considered include the main case of expected behaviour of the system, with variants; low probability releases, and so-called residual scenarios. Apart from these scenario uncertainties, data uncertainties have been examined using a probabilistic approach. Calculations have been made using the AMBER software. This allows all the component features of the assessment model to be included in one place. AMBER has been previously used to reproduce results the corresponding calculations in the SAFE assessment. It is also used in demonstration of the IAEA's near surface disposal assessment methodology ISAM and has been subject to very substantial verification tests and has been used in verifying other assessment codes. Results are presented as a function of time for the release of radionuclides from the near field, and then from the far field into the biosphere. Radiological impacts of the releases are reported elsewhere. Consideration is given to each radionuclide and to each component part of the repository. The releases from the entire repository are also presented. The peak releases rates are, for most scenarios, due to organic C-14. Other radionuclides which contribute to peak release rates include inorganic C-14, Ni-59 and Ni-63. (author)

  20. Growth hormone-releasing peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghigo, E; Arvat, E; Muccioli, G; Camanni, F

    1997-05-01

    decreases thereafter. By the sixth decade of life, the activity of GHRPs is reduced but it is still marked and higher than that of GHRH. The GH-releasing activity of GHRPs is synergistic with that of GHRH, is not affected by opioid receptor antagonists, such as naloxone, and is only blunted by inhibitory influences, including neurotransmitters, glucose, free fatty acids, gluco corticoids, recombinant human GH and even exogenous somatostatin, which are known to almost abolish the effect of GHRH. GHRPs maintain their GH-releasing effect in somatotrope hypersecretory states such as in acromegaly, anorexia nervosa and hyperthyroidism. On the other hand, their good GH-releasing activity has been shown in some but not in other somatotrope hyposecretory states. In fact, reduced GH responses after GHRP administration have been reported in idiopathic GH deficiency as well as in idiopathic short stature, in obesity and in hypothyroidism, while in patients with pituitary stalk disconnection or Cushing's syndrome the somatotrope responsiveness to GHRPs is almost absent. In short children an increase in height velocity has also been reported during chronic GHRP treatment. Thus, based on their marked GH-releasing effect even after oral administration, GHRPs offer their own clinical usefulness for treatment of some GH hyposecretory states.

  1. Accidental hazardous material releases with human impacts in the United States: exploration of geographical distribution and temporal trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengul, Hatice; Santella, Nicholas; Steinberg, Laura J; Chermak, Christina

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the circumstances and geographic and temporal distributions of hazardous material releases and resulting human impacts in the United States. Releases with fatalities, injuries, and evacuations were identified from reports to the National Response Center between 1990 and 2008, correcting for data quality issues identified in previous studies. From more than 550,000 reports, 861 deaths, 16,348 injuries and 741,427 evacuations were identified. Injuries from releases of chemicals at fixed facilities and natural gas from pipelines have decreased whereas evacuations from petroleum releases at fixed facilities have increased. Results confirm recent advances in chemical and pipeline safety and suggest directions for further improvement including targeted training and inspections and adoption of inherently safer design principles.

  2. Release of silver nanoparticles from outdoor facades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaegi, Ralf; Sinnet, Brian; Zuleeg, Steffen; Hagendorfer, Harald; Mueller, Elisabeth; Vonbank, Roger; Boller, Markus; Burkhardt, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In this study we investigate the release of metallic silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) from paints used for outdoor applications. A facade panel mounted on a model house was exposed to ambient weather conditions over a period of one year. The runoff volume of individual rain events was determined and the silver and titanium concentrations of 36 out of 65 runoff events were measured. Selected samples were prepared for electron microscopic analysis. A strong leaching of the Ag-NP was observed during the initial runoff events with a maximum concentration of 145 μ Ag/l. After a period of one year, more than 30% of the Ag-NP were released to the environment. Particles were mostly 2 S. - We provide direct evidence for the release of silver nanoparticles from exterior paints to the aquatic environment.

  3. Presynaptic M1 muscarinic receptor modulates spontaneous release of acetylcholine from rat basal forearm slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, T.; Fujimoto, LK.; Oohata, H.; Kawashima, K.

    1988-01-01

    Spontaneous release of (ACh) from rat basal forebrain slices in the presence of cholinesterase inhibitor was directly determined using a specific radioimmunoassay for ACh. The release was calcium dependent. A consistent amount of ACh release was observed throughout the experiment. Atropine (10- 8 to 10- 5 M) and pirenzepine (10- 7 to 10- 5 M) enhanced spontaneous ACh release. These findings indicate the presence of an M 1 muscarenic autoreceptor that modulates spontaneous release of ACh in the rat forebrain

  4. Protecting privacy in data release

    CERN Document Server

    Livraga, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive approach to protecting sensitive information when large data collections are released by their owners. It addresses three key requirements of data privacy: the protection of data explicitly released, the protection of information not explicitly released but potentially vulnerable due to a release of other data, and the enforcement of owner-defined access restrictions to the released data. It is also the first book with a complete examination of how to enforce dynamic read and write access authorizations on released data, applicable to the emerging data outsou

  5. Nitric oxide donors enhance the frequency dependence of dopamine release in nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Henrike; Threlfell, Sarah; Cragg, Stephanie J

    2011-08-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is critically involved in normal as well as maladaptive motivated behaviors including drug addiction. Whether the striatal neuromodulator nitric oxide (NO) influences DA release in NAc is unknown. We investigated whether exogenous NO modulates DA transmission in NAc core and how this interaction varies depending on the frequency of presynaptic activation. We detected DA with cyclic voltammetry at carbon-fiber microelectrodes in mouse NAc in slices following stimuli spanning a full range of DA neuron firing frequencies (1-100 Hz). NO donors 3-morpholinosydnonimine hydrochloride (SIN-1) or z-1-[N-(3-ammoniopropyl)-N-(n-propyl)amino]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (PAPA/NONOate) enhanced DA release with increasing stimulus frequency. This NO-mediated enhancement of frequency sensitivity of DA release was not prevented by inhibition of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), DA transporters, or large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels, and did not require glutamatergic or GABAergic input. However, experiments to identify whether frequency-dependent NO effects were mediated via changes in powerful acetylcholine-DA interactions revealed multiple components to NO modulation of DA release. In the presence of a nicotinic receptor antagonist (dihydro-β-erythroidine), NO donors increased DA release in a frequency-independent manner. These data suggest that NO in the NAc can modulate DA release through multiple GC-independent neuronal mechanisms whose net outcome varies depending on the activity in DA neurons and accumbal cholinergic interneurons. In the presence of accumbal acetylcholine, NO promotes the sensitivity of DA release to presynaptic activation, but with reduced acetylcholine input, NO will promote DA release in an activity-independent manner through a direct action on dopaminergic terminals.

  6. Visualization of oxytocin release that mediates paired pulse facilitation in hypothalamic pathways to brainstem autonomic neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón A Piñol

    Full Text Available Recent work has shown that oxytocin is involved in more than lactation and uterine contraction. The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN contains neuroendocrine neurons that control the release of hormones, including vasopressin and oxytocin. Other populations of PVN neurons do not release hormones, but rather project to and release neurotransmitters onto other neurons in the CNS involved in fluid retention, thermoregulation, sexual behavior and responses to stress. Activation of oxytocin receptors can be cardioprotective and reduces the adverse cardiovascular consequences of anxiety and stress, yet how oxytocin can affect heart rate and cardiac function is unknown. While anatomical work has shown the presence of peptides, including oxytocin, in the projections from the PVN to parasympathetic nuclei, electrophysiological studies to date have only demonstrated release of glutamate and activation of fast ligand gated receptors in these pathways. In this study, using rats, we directly show, using sniffer CHO cells that express oxytocin receptors and the Ca2+ indicator R-GECO, that optogenetic activation of channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2 expressing PVN fibers in the brainstem activates oxytocin receptors in the dorsomotor nucleus of the vagus (DMNV. We also demonstrate that while a single photoactivation of PVN terminals only activates glutamatergic receptors in brainstem cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs, neurons that dominate the neural control of heart rate, both the paired pulse facilitation, and sustained enhancement of glutamate release in this pathway is mediated by activation of oxytocin receptors. Our results provide direct evidence that a pathway from the PVN likely releases oxytocin and enhances short-term plasticity of this critical autonomic connection.

  7. Visualization of Oxytocin Release that Mediates Paired Pulse Facilitation in Hypothalamic Pathways to Brainstem Autonomic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñol, Ramón A.; Jameson, Heather; Popratiloff, Anastas; Lee, Norman H.; Mendelowitz, David

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has shown that oxytocin is involved in more than lactation and uterine contraction. The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) contains neuroendocrine neurons that control the release of hormones, including vasopressin and oxytocin. Other populations of PVN neurons do not release hormones, but rather project to and release neurotransmitters onto other neurons in the CNS involved in fluid retention, thermoregulation, sexual behavior and responses to stress. Activation of oxytocin receptors can be cardioprotective and reduces the adverse cardiovascular consequences of anxiety and stress, yet how oxytocin can affect heart rate and cardiac function is unknown. While anatomical work has shown the presence of peptides, including oxytocin, in the projections from the PVN to parasympathetic nuclei, electrophysiological studies to date have only demonstrated release of glutamate and activation of fast ligand gated receptors in these pathways. In this study, using rats, we directly show, using sniffer CHO cells that express oxytocin receptors and the Ca2+ indicator R-GECO, that optogenetic activation of channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) expressing PVN fibers in the brainstem activates oxytocin receptors in the dorsomotor nucleus of the vagus (DMNV). We also demonstrate that while a single photoactivation of PVN terminals only activates glutamatergic receptors in brainstem cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs), neurons that dominate the neural control of heart rate, both the paired pulse facilitation, and sustained enhancement of glutamate release in this pathway is mediated by activation of oxytocin receptors. Our results provide direct evidence that a pathway from the PVN likely releases oxytocin and enhances short-term plasticity of this critical autonomic connection. PMID:25379676

  8. Oxaliplatin loaded PLAGA microspheres: design of specific release profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarce, F; Cruaud, O; Deuschel, C; Bayssas, M; Griffon-Etienne, G; Benoit, J

    2002-08-21

    Oxaliplatin loaded PLAGA microspheres have been prepared by solvent extraction process. Parameters affecting the release kinetics in vitro have been studied in order to design specific release profiles suitable for direct intra-tumoral injection. By varying the nature and the relative proportions of different polymers we managed to prepare microspheres with good encapsulation efficiency (75-90%) and four different release profiles: zero order kinetics (type II) and the classical sigmoïd release profile with three different sizes of plateau and burst. These results, if correlated with in vivo activity, are promising to enhance effectiveness of local tumor treatment.

  9. Models for environmental impact assessments of releases of radioactive substances from CERN facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Vojtyla, P

    2005-01-01

    The document describes generic models for environmental impact assessments of releases of radioactive substances from CERN facilities. Except for few models developed in the Safety Commission, the models are based on the 1997 Swiss directive HSK-R-41 and on the 2001 IAEA Safety Report No. 19. The writing style is descriptive, facilitating the practical implementation of the models at CERN. There are four scenarios assumed for airborne releases: (1) short-term releases for release limit calculations, (2) actual short-term releases, (3) short-term releases during incidents/accidents, and (4) chronic long-term releases during the normal operation of a facility. For water releases, two scenarios are considered: (1) a release into a river, and (2) a release into a water treatment plant. The document shall be understood as a reference for specific environmental studies involving radioactive releases and as a recommendation of the Safety Commission.

  10. Local control of striatal dopamine release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger eCachope

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The mesolimbic and nigrostriatal dopamine (DA systems play a key role in the physiology of reward seeking, motivation and motor control. Importantly, they are also involved in the pathophysiology of Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease, schizophrenia and addiction. Control of DA release in the striatum is tightly linked to firing of DA neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA and the substantia nigra (SN. However, local influences in the striatum affect release by exerting their action directly on axon terminals. For example, endogenous glutamatergic and cholinergic activity is sufficient to trigger striatal DA release independently of cell body firing. Recent developments involving genetic manipulation, pharmacological selectivity or selective stimulation have allowed for better characterization of these phenomena. Such termino-terminal forms of control of DA release transform considerably our understanding of the mesolimbic and nigrostriatal systems, and have strong implications as potential mechanisms to modify impaired control of DA release in the diseased brain. Here, we review these and related mechanisms and their implications in the physiology of ascending DA systems.

  11. Riola release report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, E.C.

    1983-08-04

    Eleven hours after execution of the Riola Event (at 0826 PDT on 25 September 1980) in hole U2eq of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a release of radioactivity began. When the seepage stopped at about noon the following day, up to some 3200 Ci of activity had been dispersed by light variable winds. On 26 September, examination of the geophone records showed six hours of low-level, but fairly continuous, activity before the release. Electrical measurements indicated that most cables were still intact to a depth below the stemming platform. A survey of the ground zero area showed that the seepage came through cracks between the surface conductor and the pad, through cracks in the pad, and through a crack adjacent to the pad around the mousehole (a small hole adjacent to the emplacement hole). To preclude undue radiation exposure or injury from a surprise subsidence, safety measures were instituted. Tritium seepage was suffucient to postpone site activities until a box and pipeline were emplaced to contain and remove the gas. Radiation release modeling and calculations were generally consistent with observations. Plug-hole interaction calculations showed that the alluvium near the bottom of the plug may have been overstressed and that improvements in the design of the plug-medium interface can be made. Experimental studies verified that the surface appearance of the plug core was caused by erosion, but, assuming a normal strength for the plug material, that erosion alone could not account for the disappearance of such a large portion of the stemming platform. Samples from downhole plug experiments show that the plug may have been considerably weaker than had been indicted by quality assurance (QA) samples. 19 references, 32 figures, 10 tables.

  12. Riola release report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    Eleven hours after execution of the Riola Event (at 0826 PDT on 25 September 1980) in hole U2eq of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a release of radioactivity began. When the seepage stopped at about noon the following day, up to some 3200 Ci of activity had been dispersed by light variable winds. On 26 September, examination of the geophone records showed six hours of low-level, but fairly continuous, activity before the release. Electrical measurements indicated that most cables were still intact to a depth below the stemming platform. A survey of the ground zero area showed that the seepage came through cracks between the surface conductor and the pad, through cracks in the pad, and through a crack adjacent to the pad around the mousehole (a small hole adjacent to the emplacement hole). To preclude undue radiation exposure or injury from a surprise subsidence, safety measures were instituted. Tritium seepage was suffucient to postpone site activities until a box and pipeline were emplaced to contain and remove the gas. Radiation release modeling and calculations were generally consistent with observations. Plug-hole interaction calculations showed that the alluvium near the bottom of the plug may have been overstressed and that improvements in the design of the plug-medium interface can be made. Experimental studies verified that the surface appearance of the plug core was caused by erosion, but, assuming a normal strength for the plug material, that erosion alone could not account for the disappearance of such a large portion of the stemming platform. Samples from downhole plug experiments show that the plug may have been considerably weaker than had been indicted by quality assurance (QA) samples. 19 references, 32 figures, 10 tables

  13. Allegheny County Toxics Release Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) data provides information about toxic substances released into the environment or managed through recycling, energy recovery, and...

  14. Releasability of asbestos fibers from weathered roof cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberta, Andrew F; Poye, Lee; Compton, Steven P

    2018-03-26

    Chrysotile asbestos fibers were added to roofing products, including roof cement, for several decades. The fibers were described as "encapsulated" and therefore incapable of being released, an assertion that is disproved by the study reported herein. Three test panels of roof cement from the original container were exposed to ambient weathering in 2015 and 2016. Two panels were then sampled using the ASTM D5755 microvacuum method. Sampling revealed a light brown sub-layer under the dark brown surface layer, both of which crumbled and became friable during sampling. Analysis of the microvacuum samples with transmission electron microscopy showed that the material on the two panels contained 4,432,000 and 3,320,000 asbestos structures per cm² with nearly all of the structures consisting of fibers less than 5 µm long. Energy dispersive spectrometry determined that none of the fibers reported were coated with asphalt. The presence of free fibers were confirmed by direct examination of the surfaces of the panels and of dust released from handling the panels via scanning electron microscopy. This study confirmed the releasability of uncoated asbestos fibers from dried roof cement that was indicated in two previous studies published in 2007 and 2010. These results suggest that the finding of the 5th Circuit Court in 1997 that uncoated airborne asbestos fibers cannot be released from roof cement, and therefore do not present a potential exposure by inhalation, was erroneous in retrospect. Theexemption of roof cement from regulation under the Occupational Safety and Health Administration Construction Industry Standard for asbestos by the Court should not be relied on by employers of workers who remove weathered asbestos-containing roof cement, and precautions should be taken against exposure to airborne asbestos fibers during this work.

  15. Newly released EIA-law. A palette of wishes?; Das neue UVP-Recht. Ein Wunschkonzert?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldmann, Ulrike

    2015-05-15

    The EU-directive on Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) for certain public and private projects was once again amended in 2014 after controversial discussions, three previous modifications during 1985 and 2010 and an aggregation of all amendments within the EU-EIA-2011/92 directive. This newly released EU-EIA-directive 2014/52/EU (hereinafter RL 2014/52) is published within the EU-official journal EU L 124 p. 1 from 25.04.2014, came into force on 15. May 2014 and has to be adopted into international law until 16.05.2017. The modifications made are also valid, apart from certain exceptions, for licensing procedures (including decommissioning of nuclear power plants) in the field of nuclear energy, as far as they might have possible, significant environmental effects. The European EIA directive's 30th ''anniversary'' on 27.06.2015 raises the question, which substantial changes will come soon along with the newly released EU-EIA law. All in all it seems like if authorities and industry might get along with the newly released EU-EIA regulations. The responsible Federal Ministry for the Environment is already working on a first preliminary draft. It is under consideration if the EIA-regulation should be submitted additionally, beyond required amendments by EU-law, to a general revision. EIA-law remains exciting.

  16. Preparation of venlafaxine hydrochloride sustained-release tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUO Lingling

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available To prepare venlafxine hydrochloride sustained-release tablets.Hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose(HPMC and methyl cellulose(MC were used as main materials to prepare sustained-release tablets of velafaxine hydrochloride and the influence of important factors on in vitro release curves of venlafaxine hydrochloride sustained-release tablets was investigated.Results:The optimal prescription included 100 mg HPMC,25 mg MC,and 2.5% glidant in one tablet prepared with 30kN.The tablets were prepared with the method of wet granulation by NO.16 mesh sieve.The tablets exhibited good sustained-release property in phosphate buffered solution (pH=6.8.The as-prepared venlafxine hydrochloride sustained-release tablets have good sustained-release property.

  17. Cobalt release from inexpensive jewellery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Menné, Torkil

    2010-01-01

    . Conclusions: This study showed that only a minority of inexpensive jewellery purchased in Denmark released cobalt when analysed with the cobalt spot test. As fashion trends fluctuate and we found cobalt release from dark appearing jewellery, cobalt release from consumer items should be monitored in the future......Objectives: The aim was to study 354 consumer items using the cobalt spot test. Cobalt release was assessed to obtain a risk estimate of cobalt allergy and dermatitis in consumers who would wear the jewellery. Methods: The cobalt spot test was used to assess cobalt release from all items...

  18. Release of RANKERN 16A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bird Adam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available RANKERN 16 is the latest version of the point-kernel gamma radiation transport Monte Carlo code from AMEC Foster Wheeler’s ANSWERS Software Service. RANKERN is well established in the UK shielding community for radiation shielding and dosimetry assessments. Many important developments have been made available to users in this latest release of RANKERN. The existing general 3D geometry capability has been extended to include import of CAD files in the IGES format providing efficient full CAD modelling capability without geometric approximation. Import of tetrahedral mesh and polygon surface formats has also been provided. An efficient voxel geometry type has been added suitable for representing CT data. There have been numerous input syntax enhancements and an extended actinide gamma source library. This paper describes some of the new features and compares the performance of the new geometry capabilities.

  19. Release of RANKERN 16A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Adam; Murphy, Christophe; Dobson, Geoff

    2017-09-01

    RANKERN 16 is the latest version of the point-kernel gamma radiation transport Monte Carlo code from AMEC Foster Wheeler's ANSWERS Software Service. RANKERN is well established in the UK shielding community for radiation shielding and dosimetry assessments. Many important developments have been made available to users in this latest release of RANKERN. The existing general 3D geometry capability has been extended to include import of CAD files in the IGES format providing efficient full CAD modelling capability without geometric approximation. Import of tetrahedral mesh and polygon surface formats has also been provided. An efficient voxel geometry type has been added suitable for representing CT data. There have been numerous input syntax enhancements and an extended actinide gamma source library. This paper describes some of the new features and compares the performance of the new geometry capabilities.

  20. (including travel dates) Proposed itinerary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok

    31 July to 22 August 2012 (including travel dates). Proposed itinerary: Arrival in Bangalore on 1 August. 1-5 August: Bangalore, Karnataka. Suggested institutions: Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. St Johns Medical College & Hospital, Bangalore. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre, Bangalore. 6-8 August: Chennai, TN.

  1. Methodological studies for deriving release criteria for liquid effluents from medical installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, Jane; Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear; Rochedo, Elaine R.R.; Heilbron Filho, Paulo F.L.; Crispim, Verginia R.

    2009-01-01

    This work aims to develop a methodology for the assessment of clearance limits for the release of liquid waste arising from medical installations using radionuclides for medical diagnostic purposes in the town of Rio de Janeiro. The results will be used to assess the need to justify or to revise the current clearance values as specified in regulation CNEN-NE-6.05 - Radioactive Waste Management in Radioactive Facilities. The proposed methodology is based on the mathematical model recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency, adapted to the observed release conditions in the study area. In order to turn the assessment as realistic as possible, two scenarios are simulated. The first scenario simulates the release to the sewage system with access to a sewer treatment stations. The second scenario simulates the releases without passing a treatment station, with direct outflow to surface water. Probabilistic assessments were performed using the Crystal Ball software. Distributions were than compared to current IAEA clearance criteria that include specific values for average and low probability scenarios. The results will be used to derive adequate clearance levels for radionuclides used in nuclear diagnostic medicine in Brazil according to the specific relevant release scenario. (author)

  2. Theory including future not excluded

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagao, K.; Nielsen, H.B.

    2013-01-01

    We study a complex action theory (CAT) whose path runs over not only past but also future. We show that, if we regard a matrix element defined in terms of the future state at time T and the past state at time TA as an expectation value in the CAT, then we are allowed to have the Heisenberg equation......, Ehrenfest's theorem, and the conserved probability current density. In addition,we showthat the expectation value at the present time t of a future-included theory for large T - t and large t - T corresponds to that of a future-not-included theory with a proper inner product for large t - T. Hence, the CAT...

  3. Xyce parallel electronic simulator release notes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R; Hoekstra, Robert John; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Coffey, Todd S; Pawlowski, Roger P; Santarelli, Keith R.

    2010-05-01

    The Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator has been written to support, in a rigorous manner, the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. Specific requirements include, among others, the ability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel computing platforms, improved numerical performance and object-oriented code design and implementation. The Xyce release notes describe: Hardware and software requirements New features and enhancements Any defects fixed since the last release Current known defects and defect workarounds For up-to-date information not available at the time these notes were produced, please visit the Xyce web page at http://www.cs.sandia.gov/xyce.

  4. The offshore hydrocarbon releases (HCR) database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce, R.A.P.

    1995-01-01

    Following Cullen Recommendation 39 which states that: ''The regulatory body should be responsible for maintaining a database with regard to hydrocarbon leaks, spills, and ignitions in the Industry and for the benefit of Industry'', HSE Offshore Safety Division (HSE-OSD) has now been operating the Hydrocarbon Releases (HCR) Database for approximately 3 years. This paper deals with the reporting of Offshore Hydrocarbon Releases, the setting up of the HCR Database, the collection of associated equipment population data, and the main features and benefits of the database, including discussion on the latest output information. (author)

  5. Biological processes influencing contaminant release from sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reible, D.D.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of biological processes, including bioturbation, on the mobility of contaminants in freshwater sediments is described. Effective mass coefficients are estimated for tubificid oligochaetes as a function of worm behavior and biomass density. The mass transfer coefficients were observed to be inversely proportional to water oxygen content and proportional to the square root of biomass density. The sediment reworking and contaminant release are contrasted with those of freshwater amphipods. The implications of these and other biological processes for contaminant release and i n-situ remediation of soils and sediments are summarized. 4 figs., 1 tab

  6. Overview study of LNG release prevention and control systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelto, P.J.; Baker, E.G.; Holter, G.M.; Powers, T.B.

    1982-03-01

    The liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry employs a variety of release prevention and control techniques to reduce the likelihood and the consequences of accidental LNG releases. A study of the effectiveness of these release prevention and control systems is being performed. Reference descriptions for the basic types of LNG facilities were developed. Then an overview study was performed to identify areas that merit subsequent and more detailed analyses. The specific objectives were to characterize the LNG facilities of interest and their release prevention and control systems, identify possible weak links and research needs, and provide an analytical framework for subsequent detailed analyses. The LNG facilities analyzed include a reference export terminal, marine vessel, import terminal, peakshaving facility, truck tanker, and satellite facility. A reference description for these facilities, a preliminary hazards analysis (PHA), and a list of representative release scenarios are included. The reference facility descriptions outline basic process flows, plant layouts, and safety features. The PHA identifies the important release prevention operations. Representative release scenarios provide a format for discussing potential initiating events, effects of the release prevention and control systems, information needs, and potential design changes. These scenarios range from relatively frequent but low consequence releases to unlikely but large releases and are the principal basis for the next stage of analysis.

  7. Development and Characterization of Chitosan Cross-Linked With Tripolyphosphate as a Sustained Release Agent in Tablets, Part I: Design of Experiments and Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Colin A; Saripella, Kalyan K; Loka, Nikhil C; Neau, Steven H

    2018-04-01

    Certain issues with the use of particles of chitosan (Ch) cross-linked with tripolyphosphate (TPP) in sustained release formulations include inefficient drug loading, burst drug release, and incomplete drug release. Acetaminophen was added to Ch:TPP particles to test for advantages of drug addition extragranularly over drug addition made during cross-linking. The influences of Ch concentration, Ch:TPP ratio, temperature, ionic strength, and pH were assessed. Design of experiments allowed identification of factors and 2-factor interactions that have significant effects on average particle size and size distribution, yield, zeta potential, and true density of the particles, as well as drug release from the directly compressed tablets. Statistical model equations directed production of a control batch that minimized span, maximized yield, and targeted a t 50 of 90 min (sample A); sample B that differed by targeting a t 50 of 240-300 min to provide sustained release; and sample C that differed from sample B by maximizing span. Sample B maximized yield and provided its targeted t 50 and the smallest average particle size, with the higher zeta potential and the lower span of samples B and C. Extragranular addition of a drug to Ch:TPP particles achieved 100% drug loading, eliminated a burst drug release, and can accomplish complete drug release. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Direct utilization of geothermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    The worldwide application of geothermal energy for direct utilization is reviewed. This paper is based on the world update for direct-use presented at the World Geothermal Congress 2010 in Bali, Indonesia (WGC2010) which also includes material presented at three world geothermal congresses in Italy, Japan and Turkey (WGC95, WGC2000 and WGC2005). This report is based on country update papers prepared for WGC2010 and data from other sources. Final update papers were received from 70 countries of which 66 reported some direct utilization of geothermal energy for WGC2010. Twelve additional countries were added to the list based on other sources of information. The 78 countries having direct utilization of geothermal energy, is a significant increase from the 72 reported in 2005, the 58 reported in 2000, and the 28 reported in 1995. An estimate of the installed thermal power for direct utilization at the end of 2009, reported from WGC2010 is 48,493 MW th , almost a 72 % increased over the 2005 data, growing at a compound rate of 11.4% annually with a capacity factor of 0.28. The thermal energy used is 423,830 TJ/year (117,740 GWh/yr), about a 55% increase over 2005, growing at a compound rate of 9.2% annually. The distribution of thermal energy used by category is approximately 47.2% for ground-source heat pumps, 25.8% for bathing and swimming (including balneology), 14.9% for space heating (of which 85% is for district heating), 5.5% for greenhouses and open ground heating, 2.8% for industrial process heating, 2.7% for aquaculture pond and raceway heating, 0.4% for agricultural drying, 0.5% for snow melting and cooling, and 0.2% for other uses. Energy savings amounted to 250 million barrels (38 million tonnes) of equivalent oil annually, preventing 33 million tonnes of carbon and 107 million tonnes of CO 2 being released to the atmosphere which includes savings in geothermal heat pump cooling (compared to using fuel oil to generate electricity). (author)

  9. Direct Utilization of Geothermal Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Lund

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide application of geothermal energy for direct utilization is reviewed. This paper is based on the world update for direct-use presented at the World Geothermal Congress 2010 in Bali, Indonesia (WGC2010 [1] which also includes material presented at three world geothermal congresses in Italy, Japan and Turkey (WGC95, WGC2000 and WGC2005. This report is based on country update papers prepared for WGC2010 and data from other sources. Final update papers were received from 70 countries of which 66 reported some direct utilization of geothermal energy for WGC2010. Twelve additional countries were added to the list based on other sources of information. The 78 countries having direct utilization of geothermal energy, is a significant increase from the 72 reported in 2005, the 58 reported in 2000, and the 28 reported in 1995. An estimate of the installed thermal power for direct utilization at the end of 2009, reported from WGC2010 is 48,493 MWt, almost a 72 % increased over the 2005 data, growing at a compound rate of 11.4% annually with a capacity factor of 0.28. The thermal energy used is 423,830 TJ/year (117,740 GWh/yr, about a 55% increase over 2005, growing at a compound rate of 9.2% annually. The distribution of thermal energy used by category is approximately 47.2% for ground-source heat pumps, 25.8% for bathing and swimming (including balneology, 14.9% for space heating (of which 85% is for district heating, 5.5% for greenhouses and open ground heating, 2.8% for industrial process heating, 2.7% for aquaculture pond and raceway heating, 0.4% for agricultural drying, 0.5% for snow melting and cooling, and 0.2% for other uses. Energy savings amounted to 250 million barrels (38 million tonnes of equivalent oil annually, preventing 33 million tonnes of carbon and 107 million tonnes of CO2 being release to the atmosphere which includes savings in geothermal heat pump cooling (compared to using fuel oil to generate electricity.

  10. Role of fission gas release in reactor licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-11-01

    The release of fission gases from oxide pellets to the fuel rod internal voidage (gap) is reviewed with regard to the required safety analysis in reactor licensing. Significant analyzed effects are described, prominent gas release models are reviewed, and various methods used in the licensing process are summarized. The report thus serves as a guide to a large body of literature including company reports and government documents. A discussion of the state of the art of gas release analysis is presented

  11. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants (1976)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, T.R.

    1978-11-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1976 have been compiled and reported. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1976 release data are compared with previous year releases in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized

  12. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants. Annual report 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, T.R.

    1978-11-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1977 have been compiled and reported. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1977 release data are compared with previous years releases in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized

  13. Directing 101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintoff, Ernest

    Providing an introduction to anyone considering directing as a field of study or career, this book takes a broad look at the process of directing and encourages students and professionals alike to look outside of the movie industry for inspiration. Chapters in the book discuss selecting and acquiring material; budgeting and financing; casting and…

  14. Environmental releases for calendar year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleckler, B.P.

    1995-07-01

    This report fulfills the annual environmental release reporting requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders. This report provides supplemental information to the Hanford Site Environmental Report. The Hanford Site Environmental Report provides an update on the environmental status of the entire Hanford Site. The sitewide annual report summarizes the degree of compliance of the Hanford Site with applicable environmental regulations and informs the public about the impact of Hanford operations on the surrounding environment. Like the Hanford Site Environmental Report, this annual report presents a summary of the environmental releases from facilities managed by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and monitored by Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated (BHI). In addition to the summary data, this report also includes detailed data on air emissions, liquid effluents, and hazardous substances released to the environment during calendar year 1994 from these facilities

  15. Launch Lock Assemblies with Reduced Preload and Spacecraft Isolation Systems Including the Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Tim Daniel (Inventor); Young, Ken (Inventor); Hindle, Timothy (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Launch lock assemblies with reduced preload are provided. The launch lock assembly comprises first and second mount pieces, a releasable clamp device, and a pair of retracting assemblies. Each retracting assembly comprises a pair of toothed members having interacting toothed surfaces. The releasable clamp device normally maintains the first and second mount pieces in clamped engagement. When the releasable clamp device is actuated, the first and second mount pieces are released from clamped engagement and one toothed member of each retracting assembly moves in an opposite direction relative to the other one toothed member of the other retracting assembly to define an axial gap on each side of the first mount piece.

  16. Herwig++ 2.5 release note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gieseke, S.; Roehr, C.A.; Siodmok, A.

    2011-02-01

    A new release of the Monte Carlo program Herwig++ (version 2.5) is now available. This version comes with a number of improvements including: new next-to-leading order matrix elements, including weak boson pair production; a colour reconnection model; diffractive processes; additional models of physics beyond the Standard Model; new leading-order matrix elements for hadron-hadron and lepton-lepton collisions as well as photon-initiated processes. (orig.)

  17. Herwig++ 2.5 release note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieseke, S.; Roehr, C.A.; Siodmok, A. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (DE). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik] (and others)

    2011-02-15

    A new release of the Monte Carlo program Herwig++ (version 2.5) is now available. This version comes with a number of improvements including: new next-to-leading order matrix elements, including weak boson pair production; a colour reconnection model; diffractive processes; additional models of physics beyond the Standard Model; new leading-order matrix elements for hadron-hadron and lepton-lepton collisions as well as photon-initiated processes. (orig.)

  18. Device including a contact detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    arms (12) may extend from the supporting body in co-planar relationship with the first surface. The plurality of cantilever arms (12) may extend substantially parallel to each other and each of the plurality of cantilever arms (12) may include an electrical conductive tip for contacting the area......The present invention relates to a probe for determining an electrical property of an area of a surface of a test sample, the probe is intended to be in a specific orientation relative to the test sample. The probe may comprise a supporting body defining a first surface. A plurality of cantilever...... of the test sample by movement of the probe relative to the surface of the test sample into the specific orientation.; The probe may further comprise a contact detector (14) extending from the supporting body arranged so as to contact the surface of the test sample prior to any one of the plurality...

  19. Neoclassical transport including collisional nonlinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candy, J; Belli, E A

    2011-06-10

    In the standard δf theory of neoclassical transport, the zeroth-order (Maxwellian) solution is obtained analytically via the solution of a nonlinear equation. The first-order correction δf is subsequently computed as the solution of a linear, inhomogeneous equation that includes the linearized Fokker-Planck collision operator. This equation admits analytic solutions only in extreme asymptotic limits (banana, plateau, Pfirsch-Schlüter), and so must be solved numerically for realistic plasma parameters. Recently, numerical codes have appeared which attempt to compute the total distribution f more accurately than in the standard ordering by retaining some nonlinear terms related to finite-orbit width, while simultaneously reusing some form of the linearized collision operator. In this work we show that higher-order corrections to the distribution function may be unphysical if collisional nonlinearities are ignored.

  20. Containment and release management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehner, J.R.; Pratt, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    Reducing the risk from potentially severe accidents by appropriate accident management strategies is receiving increased attention from the international reactor safety community. Considerable uncertainty still surrounds some of the physical phenomena likely to occur during a severe accident. The USNRC, in developing its research plan for accident management, wants to ensure that both the developers and implementers of accident management strategies are aware of the uncertainty associated with the plant operators' ability to correctly diagnose an accident, as well as the uncertainties associated with various preventive and mitigative strategies. The use of a particular accident management strategy can have both positive and negative effects on the status of a plant and these effects must be carefully weighed before a particular course of action is chosen and implemented. By using examples of severe accident scenarios, initial insights are presented here regarding the indications plant operators may have to alert them to particular accident states. Insights are also offered on the various management actions operators and plant technical staff might pursue for particular accident situations and the pros and cons associated with such actions. The examples given are taken for the most part from the containment and release phase of accident management, since this is the current focus of the effort in the accident management area at Brookhaven National Laboratory. 2 refs

  1. Released radioactivity reducing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Yumi.

    1995-01-01

    A water scrubber is disposed in a scrubber tank and a stainless steel fiber filter is disposed above the water scrubber. The upper end of the scrubber tank is connected by way of a second bent tube to a capturing vessel incorporating a moisture removing layer and an activated carbon filter. The exit of the capturing vessel is connected to a stack. Upon occurrence of an accident of a BWR-type power plant, gases containing radioactive materials released from a reactor container are discharged into the water scrubber from a first bent tube through a venturi tube nozzle, and water soluble and aerosol-like radioactive materials are captured in the water. Aerosol and splashes of water droplets which can not be captured thoroughly by the water scrubber are captured by the stainless steel fiber filter. Gases passing through the scrubber tank are introduced to a capturing vessel through a second bent tube, and organic iodine is captured by the activated carbon filter. (I.N.)

  2. Released geophysical and geological reports : Newfoundland offshore area September 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-09-01

    This two-part publication contains a list of geophysical and geological data acquired by the Canada-Newfoundland Offshore Petroleum Board (C-NOPB). It is made available to the public in accordance with a subsection of the Canada-Newfoundland Atlantic Accord Implementation Act which states that such data can be released five years after the date of completion of a program. The programs for which the data has been released are listed in chronological order by completion date. A list of wells drilled within the C-NOPB's jurisdictional area is also included along with a map showing the area of jurisdiction. The well data includes category 1 information from exploratory wells, delineation wells, and development wells. It includes factual data obtained directly from well drilling which must be made available for public examination 2 years after well completion. Category 1 data refers to drill cuttings, well fluid samples, open-hole logs, formation stimulation data, petroleum analyses, drill mud reports, and well site survey information. The interpretive geological and geophysical reports are based on industry data from exploratory programs conducted in the Newfoundland offshore area. They include information from synthetic seismograms, velocity surveys, vertical seismic profiles, petrological reports, geochemical reports, and cyberlook logs. The jurisdictional areas include Western Newfoundland, South Grand Banks, North Grand Banks, the Northeast Newfoundland Shelf, and the Labrador Shelf. Program numbers are coded to contain the geographic region to which the program relates, the type of proposed geophysical or geological work, the company operating the program, and the sequential number of that type of program operated by each company. 8 tabs

  3. Underground water stress release models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Dang, Shenjun; Lü, Shaochuan

    2011-08-01

    The accumulation of tectonic stress may cause earthquakes at some epochs. However, in most cases, it leads to crustal deformations. Underground water level is a sensitive indication of the crustal deformations. We incorporate the information of the underground water level into the stress release models (SRM), and obtain the underground water stress release model (USRM). We apply USRM to the earthquakes occurred at Tangshan region. The analysis shows that the underground water stress release model outperforms both Poisson model and stress release model. Monte Carlo simulation shows that the simulated seismicity by USRM is very close to the real seismicity.

  4. Sensitivity of the engineered barrier system (EBS) release rate to alternative conceptual models of advective release from waste packages under dripping fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; Atkins, J.E.; McNeish, J.A.; Vallikat, V.

    1996-01-01

    The first model assumed that dripping water directly contacts the waste form inside the ''failed'' waste package and radionuclides are released from the EBS by advection. The second model assumed that dripping water is diverted around the package (because of corrosion products plugging the perforations), thereby being prevented from directly contacting the waste form. In the second model, radionuclides were assumed to diffuse through the perforations, and, once outside the waste package, to be released from the EBS by advection. For the case with the second EBS release model, most radionuclides had lower peak EBS release rates than with the first model. Impacts of the alternative EBS release models were greater for the radionuclides with low solubility. The analysis indicated that the EBS release model representing advection through a ''failed'' waste package (the first model) may be too conservative; thus a ''failed'' waste package container with multiple perforations may still be an important barrier to radionuclide release

  5. Activated human neutrophils release hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCourt, M

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Hepatocyte growth factor or scatter factor (HGF\\/SF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that has potent angiogenic properties. We have previously demonstrated that neutrophils (PMN) are directly angiogenic by releasing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We hypothesized that the acute inflammatory response can stimulate PMN to release HGF. AIMS: To examine the effects of inflammatory mediators on PMN HGF release and the effect of recombinant human HGF (rhHGF) on PMN adhesion receptor expression and PMN VEGF release. METHODS: In the first experiment, PMN were isolated from healthy volunteers and stimulated with tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP). Culture supernatants were assayed for HGF using ELISA. In the second experiment, PMN were lysed to measure total HGF release and HGF expression in the PMN was detected by Western immunoblotting. Finally, PMN were stimulated with rhHGF. PMN CD 11a, CD 11b, and CD 18 receptor expression and VEGF release was measured using flow cytometry and ELISA respectively. RESULTS: TNF-alpha, LPS and fMLP stimulation resulted in significantly increased release of PMN HGF (755+\\/-216, 484+\\/-221 and 565+\\/-278 pg\\/ml, respectively) compared to controls (118+\\/-42 pg\\/ml). IL-8 had no effect. Total HGF release following cell lysis and Western blot suggests that HGF is released from intracellular stores. Recombinant human HGF did not alter PMN adhesion receptor expression and had no effect on PMN VEGF release. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that pro-inflammatory mediators can stimulate HGF release from a PMN intracellular store and that activated PMN in addition to secreting VEGF have further angiogenic potential by releasing HGF.

  6. Flash release an alternative for releasing complex MEMS devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deladi, S.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2004-01-01

    A novel time-saving and cost-effective release technique has been developed and is described. The physical nature of the process is explained in combination with experimental observations. The results of the flash release process are compared with those of freeze-drying and supercritical CO2

  7. Chemical incidents resulted in hazardous substances releases in the context of human health hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Pałaszewska-Tkacz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The research purpose was to analyze data concerning chemical incidents in Poland collected in 1999–2009 in terms of health hazards. Material and Methods: The data was obtained, using multimodal information technology (IT system, from chemical incidents reports prepared by rescuers at the scene. The final analysis covered sudden events associated with uncontrolled release of hazardous chemical substances or mixtures, which may potentially lead to human exposure. Releases of unidentified substances where emergency services took action to protect human health or environment were also included. Results: The number of analyzed chemical incidents in 1999–2009 was 2930 with more than 200 different substances released. The substances were classified into 13 groups of substances and mixtures posing analogous risks. Most common releases were connected with non-flammable corrosive liquids, including: hydrochloric acid (199 cases, sulfuric(VI acid (131 cases, sodium and potassium hydroxides (69 cases, ammonia solution (52 cases and butyric acid (32 cases. The next group were gases hazardous only due to physico-chemical properties, including: extremely flammable propane-butane (249 cases and methane (79 cases. There was no statistically significant trend associated with the total number of incidents. Only with the number of incidents with flammable corrosive, toxic and/or harmful liquids, the regression analysis revealed a statistically significant downward trend. The number of victims reported was 1997, including 1092 children and 18 fatalities. Conclusions: The number of people injured, number of incidents and the high 9th place of Poland in terms of the number of Seveso establishments, and 4 times higher number of hazardous industrial establishments not covered by the Seveso Directive justify the need for systematic analysis of hazards and their proper identification. It is advisable enhance health risk assessment, both qualitative and

  8. Directing Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darsø, Lotte; Ibbotson, Piers

    2008-01-01

    In this article we argue that leaders facing complex challenges can learn from the arts, specifically that leaders can learn by examining how theatre directors direct creativity through creative constraints. We suggest that perceiving creativity as a boundary phenomenon is helpful for directing it....... Like leaders, who are caught in paradoxical situations where they have to manage production and logistics simultaneously with making space for creativity and innovation, theatre directors need to find the delicate balance between on one hand renewal of perceptions, acting and interaction...... and on the other hand getting ready for the opening night. We conclude that the art of directing creativity is linked to developing competencies of conscious presence, attention and vigilance, whereas the craft of directing creativity concerns communication, framing and choice....

  9. Up-regulation of corticotropin releasing hormone is associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    established in literature that stress signals such as psoriasis prompts the release of CRH from the hypothalamus paraventricular nucleus (PVN). CRH in turn triggers ACTH release from anterior pituitary [8] which ultimately controls the glucocorticoid discharge from adrenal cortex. Several of the glucocorticoids, which include ...

  10. RELEASE OF DRIED RADIOACTIVE WASTE MATERIALS TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KOZLOWSKI, D.S.

    2005-01-01

    The body of this document analyzes scenarios involving releases of dried tank waste from the DBVS dried waste transfer system and OGTS HEPA filters. Analyses of dried waste release scenarios from the CH-TRUM WPU are included as Appendix D

  11. A new release of the S3M code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovic, M.; Bokor, J.; Regodic, M.; Sagatova, A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new release of the code that contains some additional routines and advanced features of displaying the results. Special attention is paid to the processing of the SRIM range file, which was not included in the previous release of the code. Examples of distributions provided by the S 3 M code for implanted ions in thyroid and iron are presented. (authors)

  12. Implementation of Releasing Time to Care - the productive ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Gwyneth

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes the implementation of the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement Productive Ward - releasing time to care programme. It will discuss the benefits and key successes and provides advice for those wishing to implement the programme. In Lord Darzi's Next Stage Review, he advocates an ambitious vision of patient centred - clinician led, locally driven NHS. The Releasing Time to Care programme is a unique opportunity for everyone working within the NHS to improve effectiveness, safety and reliability of the services we provide. Whilst being situated within a National Health Service policy environment learning from this work can be translated nationally and internationally, as the principles underpin the provision of high quality care. Evaluation is currently in relation to each of the 15 modules rather than as the programme as a whole. It uses various methods including audit, observation, activity follow through, satisfaction surveys and process mapping. Each month data is colated for each of the 11 metrics which has shown a reduction in falls, drug administration errors and improvement in the recording of patient observations. One of the key issues is that an essential component for the success of the programme lies in the tangible support of the Trust Board/Board of Directors. Evidence shows that this programme improves patient satisfaction as it enables the provision of an increase in direct patient care by staff and subsequently improved clinical and safety outcomes. Ward Sister/Charge Nurse development includes Leadership, Project management and Lean Methodology techniques. The Releasing Time to Care programme is a key component of the Next Stage Review. It will create productive organisations by being a catalyst for the transformation of Trust services, enabling staff to spend more time caring for patients and users. This release in time will result in better outcomes and subsequent improvement with patient and staff satisfaction and

  13. Sustained release of radioprotective agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shani, J.

    1980-11-01

    New pharmaceutical formulations for the sustained release into the G.I. tract of radioprotective agents have been developed by the authors. The experimental method initially consisted in the production of methylcellulose microcapsules. This method failed apparently because of the premature ''explosion'' of the microcapsules and the consequent premature release of massive amounts of the drug. A new method has been developed which consists in drying and pulverising cysteamine and cysteine preparations, mixing them in various proportions with stearic acid and ethylcellulose as carriers. The mixture is then compressed into cylindrical tablets at several pressure values and the leaching rate of the radioprotective agents is then measured by spectrophotometry. The relation between the concentration of the active drug and its rate of release, and the effect on the release rate of the pressure applied to the tablet during its formation were also investigated. Results indicating that the release rate was linearly related to the square root of ''t'' seem to be in agreement with what is predictable, according to Higuchi's equation, save for the very initial and terminal phases. A clear correlation was also established between the stearic acid/ethylcellulose ratios and the release of 20% cysteine, namely a marked decrease in the rate of cysteine release was observed with increasing concentrations of stearic acid. Finally, it was observed that a higher formation pressure results in quicker release of the drug

  14. Press Oil Final Release Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, Jeffrey Jay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ruedig, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-11

    There are forty-eight 55 gallon barrels filled with hydraulic oil that are candidates for release and recycle. This oil needs to be characterized prior to release. Principles of sampling as provided in MARSAME/MARSSIM approaches were used as guidance for sampling.

  15. Workload Control with Continuous Release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phan, B. S. Nguyen; Land, M. J.; Gaalman, G. J. C.

    2009-01-01

    Workload Control (WLC) is a production planning and control concept which is suitable for the needs of make-to-order job shops. Release decisions based on the workload norms form the core of the concept. This paper develops continuous time WLC release variants and investigates their due date

  16. Directed polymers versus directed percolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin-Healy, Timothy

    1998-10-01

    Universality plays a central role within the rubric of modern statistical mechanics, wherein an insightful continuum formulation rises above irrelevant microscopic details, capturing essential scaling behaviors. Nevertheless, occasions do arise where the lattice or another discrete aspect can constitute a formidable legacy. Directed polymers in random media, along with its close sibling, directed percolation, provide an intriguing case in point. Indeed, the deep blood relation between these two models may have sabotaged past efforts to fully characterize the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class, to which the directed polymer belongs.

  17. Ultrasound enhanced release of therapeutics from drug-releasing implants based on titania nanotube arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Moom Sinn; Losic, Dusan

    2013-02-25

    A non-invasive and external stimulus-driven local drug delivery system (DDS) based on titania nanotube (TNT) arrays loaded with drug encapsulated polymeric micelles as drug carriers and ultrasound generator is described. Ultrasound waves (USW) generated by a pulsating sonication probe (Sonotrode) in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at pH 7.2 as the medium for transmitting pressure waves, were used to release drug-loaded nano-carriers from the TNT arrays. It was demonstrated that a very rapid release in pulsatile mode can be achieved, controlled by several parameters on the ultrasonic generator. This includes pulse length, time, amplitude and power intensity. By optimization of these parameters, an immediate drug-micelles release of 100% that spans a desirable time of 5-50 min was achieved. It was shown that stimulated release can be generated and reproduced at any time throughout the TNT-Ti implant life, suggesting considerable potential of this approach as a feasible and tunable ultrasound-mediated drug delivery system in situ via drug-releasing implants. It is expected that this concept can be translated from an in vitro to in vivo regime for therapeutic applications using drug-releasing implants in orthopedic and coronary stents. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. PAVAN, Atmospheric Dispersion of Radioactive Releases from Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: PAVAN estimates down-wind ground-level air concentrations for potential accidental releases of radioactive material from nuclear facilities. Options can account for variation in the location of release points, additional plume dispersion due to building wakes, plume meander under low wind speed conditions, and adjustments to consider non-straight trajectories. It computes an effective plume height using the physical release height which can be reduced by inputted terrain features. 2 - Method of solution: Using joint frequency distributions of wind direction and wind speed by atmospheric stability, the program provides relative air concentration (X/Q) values as functions of direction for various time periods at the exclusion area boundary (EAB) and the outer boundary of the low population zone (LPZ). Calculations of X/Q values can be made for assumed ground-level releases or evaluated releases from free-standing stacks. The X/Q calculations are based on the theory that material released to the atmosphere will be normally distributed (Gaussian) about the plume centerline. A straight-line trajectory is assumed between the point of release and all distances for which X/Q values are calculated. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: - The code cannot handle multiple emission sources

  19. SRTM Data Release for Eurasia, Index Map and Colored Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The colored regions of this map show the extent of digital elevation data recently released by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). This release includes data for most of Europe and Asia plus numerous islands in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. SRTM flew on board the Space Shuttle Endeavour in February 2000 and used an interferometric radar system to map the topography of Earth's landmass between latitudes 56 degrees south and 60 degrees north.The data were processed into geographic 'tiles,' each of which represents one by one degree of latitude and longitude. A degree of latitude measures 111 kilometers (69 miles) north-south, and a degree of longitude measures 111 kilometers or less east-west, decreasing away from the equator. The data are being released to the public on a continent-by-continent basis. This Eurasia segment includes 5,940 tiles, more than a third of the total data set. Previous releases covered North America and South America. Forthcoming releases will include Africa-Arabia and Australia plus an 'Islands' release for those islands not included in the continental releases. Together these data releases constitute the world's first high-resolution, near-global elevation model. The resolution of the publicly released data is three arcseconds (1/1,200 of a degree of latitude and longitude), which is about 90 meters (295 feet).European coverage in the current data release stretches eastward from the British Isles and the Iberian Peninsula in the west, across the Alps and Carpathian Mountains, as well as the Northern European Plain, to the Ural and Caucasus Mountains bordering Asia. The Asian coverage includes a great diversity of landforms, including the Tibetan Plateau, Tarin Basin, Mongolian Plateau, and the mountains surrounding Lake Baikal, the world's deepest lake. Mt. Everest in the Himalayas, at 8,848 meters (29,029 feet) is the world's highest mountain. From India's Deccan Plateau, to Southeast Asia, coastal China, and Korea, various

  20. Toxic releases from power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, E.S.

    1999-01-01

    Beginning in 1998, electric power plants burning coal or oil must estimate and report their annual releases of toxic chemicals listed in the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) published by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This paper identifies the toxic chemicals of greatest significance for the electric utility sector and develops quantitative estimates of the toxic releases reportable to the TRI for a representative coal-fired power plant. Key factors affecting the magnitude and types of toxic releases for individual power plants also are discussed. A national projection suggests that the magnitude of electric utility industry releases will surpass those of the manufacturing industries which current report to the TRI. Risk communication activities at the community level will be essential to interpret and provide context for the new TRI results

  1. Release from Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmelch, Walter H.

    An overview of the most recent ideas on managerial stress is presented along with worksheets and exercises for a program to help educational administrators, their staffs, and secretaries cope with and reduce organizational and personal stress. Research cited includes the author's survey of 1,200 Oregon school administrators and over 200…

  2. Development of Novel Protocol for Preclinical Monitoring the Release of Adjuvants Encapsulated Mucosal Delivery Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ibrahim-Saeed

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This work contributes in vaccines down-stream process by introducing a novel platform for in-vitro monitoring of vaccine-adjuvant delivery profile as a crucial preclinical optimizing step in mucosal vaccines. Nano and micro particles of Calcium phosphate (Cap vaccine-adjuvant were encapsulated in Chitosan and Alginate polymeric carriers. Adjuvants release profiles monitored in a permeable bag at 37°C, pH 2, incubated in isotonic buffer for 96 hours. The released Calcium in the outer buffer was monitored and compared in-addition to the carrier’s swelling and biophysical properties. The adjuvants and carriers did not interfere with the proliferation of cultured hepatocytes an indicator of their safe use; Chitosan’s viscosity and swelling were higher than Alginate. Chitosan’s Zeta-potential was significantly high positive, while Cap and Alginate were negative. The prepared CaP and Chitosan particles were in nano-size, while the ready-made CaP adjuvant and Alginate were in micro-size using zeta-seizer and scanning electron-micrograph. The release of nano-size particle was in ascending, extended and controlled manner compared to micro-size adjuvant. Moreover, nano-adjuvant release profile from Chitosan was superior compared to Alginate. The core controlling factors in vaccine-adjuvant sustained release includes; smaller adjuvant particles (nano-size, carrier’s low swelling, high viscosity and importantly carrier-adjuvant entrapment reversibility. Chitosan offers sustained ascending superior capacity in releasing Nano-Cap adjuvant. This novel in-vitro pre-clinical study answer a crucial downstream preparative step for optimizing mucosal vaccines before their direct routine in-vivo trial on animal regardless of adjuvant’s particle size or delivery kinetics.

  3. Bacteria-Triggered Release of Antimicrobial Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komnatnyy, Vitaly V.; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Medical devices employed in healthcare practice are often susceptible to microbial contamination. Pathogenic bacteria may attach themselves to device surfaces of catheters or implants by formation of chemically complex biofilms, which may be the direct cause of device failure. Extracellular...... bacterial lipases are particularly abundant at sites of infection. Herein it is shown how active or proactive compounds attached to polymeric surfaces using lipase‐sensitive linkages, such as fatty acid esters or anhydrides, may be released in response to infection. Proof‐of‐concept of the responsive...

  4. Bacteria‐Triggered Release of Antimicrobial Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komnatnyy, Vitaly V.; Chiang, Wen‐Chi; Tolker‐Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Medical devices employed in healthcare practice are often susceptible to microbial contamination. Pathogenic bacteria may attach themselves to device surfaces of catheters or implants by formation of chemically complex biofilms, which may be the direct cause of device failure. Extracellular...... bacterial lipases are particularly abundant at sites of infection. Herein it is shown how active or proactive compounds attached to polymeric surfaces using lipase‐sensitive linkages, such as fatty acid esters or anhydrides, may be released in response to infection. Proof‐of‐concept of the responsive...

  5. Direct marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čičić Muris

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct Marketing (DM is usually treated as unworthy activity, with actions at the edge of legality and activities minded cheating. Despite obvious problems regarding ethics and privacy threat, DM with its size, importance and role in a concept of integrated marketing communication deserves respect and sufficient analysis and review

  6. Atmosphere dependence of fission products release: The Vercors 4 and 5 experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andre, B.; Ducros, G.; Tourasse, M.; Ferroud-Plattet, M.P. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (France). Dept. de Thermohydraulique et de Physique; Boulaud, D. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire

    1996-12-31

    Because of the severe consequences, in terms of radiological and biological effects, of a nuclear accident, the international reactor safety authorities initiated, 25 years ago, numerous experimental programs in order to improve the understanding and the prediction of these situations. In France, the Nuclear Protection and Safety Institute (IPSN) in collaboration with Electricite de France (EDF) co-fund the Heva-Vercors program, since 1983. The experiments are conducted in a shielded hot cell of the LAMA facility at Grenoble. The test specimen is a fuel rod section taken from a power reactor operated by EDF and includes three irradiated pellets in their original cladding. The fuel sample is re-irradiated at low power in the Siloe experimental reactor for seven days in order to recreate the short-lived fission products without inducing any in-pile release. Since the experimental sequence is performed less than 40 hours after the end of the reirradiation, direct measurement of radioactive fission products release is possible using gamma spectrometry. The measurements performed during the tests are essentially aimed at characterising the release kinetics and the total release of fission products and structural materials as a function of fuel temperature and oxidising/reducing conditions of the environment. The four last tests (Vercors 3 to Vercors 6), performed at 2600 K, allowed to measure the kinetic of high and low volatile species release, as well as the total released fraction of non volatile species and the transuranic elements. This paper is devoted to the comparison of the Vercors 4 and Vercors 5 tests. The first one has been conducted up to 2600 K under reducing conditions (hydrogen fluid), after an oxidising period at 1670 K. The second one was performed in a pure steam atmosphere after several plateaus at intermediate temperatures in oxidising conditions. The total release of volatile (Sb, Te, I, Cs) is not significantly modified and a higher release of Mo

  7. Evidence for autocrine and paracrine regulation of allergen-induced mast cell mediator release in the guinea pig airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Li; Liu, Qi; Canning, Brendan J

    2018-03-05

    Mast cells play an essential role in immediate type hypersensitivity reactions and in chronic allergic diseases of the airways, including asthma. Mast cell mediator release can be modulated by locally released autacoids and circulating hormones, but surprisingly little is known about the autocrine effects of mediators released upon mast cell activation. We thus set out to characterize the autocrine and paracrine effects of mast cell mediators on mast cell activation in the guinea pig airways. By direct measures of histamine, cysteinyl-leukotriene and thromboxane release and with studies of allergen-evoked contractions of airway smooth muscle, we describe a complex interplay amongst these autacoids. Notably, we observed an autocrine effect of the cysteinyl-leukotrienes acting through cysLT 1 receptors on mast cell leukotriene release. We confirmed the results of previous studies demonstrating a marked enhancement of mast cell mediator release following cyclooxygenase inhibition, but we have extended these results by showing that COX-2 derived eicosanoids inhibit cysteinyl-leukotriene release and yet are without effect on histamine release. Given the prominent role of COX-1 inhibition in aspirin-sensitive asthma, these data implicate preformed mediators stored in granules as the initial drivers of these adverse reactions. Finally, we describe the paracrine signaling cascade leading to thromboxane synthesis in the guinea pig airways following allergen challenge, which occurs indirectly, secondary to cysLT 1 receptor activation on structural cells and/ or leukocytes within the airway wall, and a COX-2 dependent synthesis of the eicosanoid. The results highlight the importance of cell-cell and autocrine interactions in regulating allergic responses in the airways. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Direct contamination - seasonality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aarkrog, A.

    1994-01-01

    Direct contamination is the primary pathway to terrestrial vegetation in the first period after an activity release to the atmosphere. All radionuclides are able to be transferred via this pathway. Deposition, interception and retention are the three processes involved in direct contamination of crops. Wet deposition is more important than dry deposition in temperature regions. Resuspension and rainsplash both belong to secondary direct deposition and became evident for e.g. radiocaesium after the Chernobyl accident. Seasonality is the varying response to radioactive contamination of crops according to the time of the year when the contamination occurs. Shortlived radionuclides (as 131 I) and those that mainly enter the foodchain by direct contamination (e.g. 137 Cs) are especially important in this connection. In particular, the contamination of cereal crops is influenced by seasonality. As a result of seasonality the impact of the Chernobyl accident on the radioactive contamination of human diet was for the same deposition density higher in southern than in northern Europe. (orig.)

  9. Outcome of open carpal tunnel release surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.A.; Ali, H.; Muhammad, G.; Gul, N.; Zardan, K.K.; Mushtaq, M.; Ali, S.; Bhatti, S.N.; Ali, K.; Rashid, B.; Saboor, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Carpel tunnel syndrome is a common compression neuropathy of the median nerve causing pain, numbness and functional dysfunction of the hand. Among the available treatments, surgical release of the nerve is the most effective and acceptable treatment option. The aim of this study was to see the outcomes of surgical release of carpel tunnel using open technique. Method: This descriptive case series was conducted at the Department of neurosurgery, Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad from April 2013 to March 2014. One hundred consecutive patients with carpel tunnel syndrome were included who underwent open carpel tunnel release surgery. They were followed up at 1, 3 and 6 months. Residual pain, numbness and functional improvement of the hand were the main outcome measures. Results: Out of 100 patients, 19 were males. The age ranged from 32 to 50 years with a mean of 39.29±3.99 years. The duration of symptoms was from 5 to 24 months. In the entire series patient functional outcome and satisfaction was 82 percentage at 1 month, 94 percentage at 3 months and 97 percentage at 6 months. 18 percentage patient had residual pain at 1 month post-operative follow-up, 6percentage at 3 months and 3 percentage at 6 month follow-up. Conclusion: Open carpel tunnel release surgery is an effective procedure for compression neuropathy of the median nerve. It should be offered to all patients with moderate to severe pain and functional disability related to carpel tunnel syndrome. (author)

  10. Minimum Release of Tributyltin to Prevent Macrofouling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-01

    Thain, J.E., M.J. Waldock, and M.E. Wait, Toxicity and degradation studies of Tributyltin ( TBT ) and Dibutyltin (DBT) in the aquatic environment, in...MATERIALS AND METHODS The test system used was designed to pump a known volume of a tributyltin ( TBT ) solution of known concentration through a porous...ELEMENT NO NO NO ACCESSION NO 11 TITLE (Include Security Classification) nimum Release of Tributyltin to Prevent Macrofoulinq 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S

  11. Offsite doses from SRP radioactive releases - 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marter, W.L.

    1986-01-01

    This memorandum summarizes the offsite doses from releases of radioactive materials to the environment from SRP operations in 1985. These doses were calculated for inclusion in the environmental report for 1985 to be issued by the Health Protection Department (DPSPU-86-30-1). The environmental report is prepared annually for distribution to state environmental agencies, the news media, and interested members of the public. More detailed data on offsite exposures by radionuclide and exposure pathway will be included in the environmental report

  12. Regulatory review of releases from HIFAR of radioactive airborne effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westall, D.J.; Macnab, D.I.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The Nuclear Safety Bureau (NSB) was set up by legislation in 1992 as an independent Commonwealth corporate body reporting to the Minister for Health and Family Services. Its functions include monitoring and reviewing the safety of nuclear plant owned or operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The NSB sets requirements for authorisation of the operation of the HIFAR research reactor, and may impose restrictions and conditions on its operation. The authorisation for the operation of HIFAR includes a requirement for arrangements for the treatment, safe storage and disposal of solid, liquid and gaseous radioactive wastes from the reactor. The objective is to establish conditions which would ensure that radiation exposure to plant personnel and the public from radioactive wastes are within acceptable limits and that releases are maintained as low as reasonably achievable. The NSB has developed expectations based on international best practice, against which to review HIFAR's arrangements for satisfying the requirement and achieving the objective. Arrangements for the release of airborne radioactive effluent from HIFAR were reviewed by the NSB as part of an overall review of the upgrade of safety documentation for HIFAR. The NSB's expectations for the review were drawn from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Basic Safety Standards (Safety Series No 115-I) and the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Recommendations for Limiting Exposure to Ionizing Radiation (1995). These expectations included a hierarchy of primary dose limits, stack discharge limits and reference levels for HIFAR aimed at ensuring that radiation doses to the public due to airborne effluent are less than the national dose limits and ANSTO's dose constraints, and are as low as reasonably achievable. An approach favoured by the operator is to work directly to a primary dose limit using an airborne dispersion computer program to

  13. Release plan for Big Pete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, T.A.

    1996-11-01

    This release plan is to provide instructions for the Radiological Control Technician (RCT) to conduct surveys for the unconditional release of ''Big Pete,'' which was used in the removal of ''Spacers'' from the N-Reactor. Prior to performing surveys on the rear end portion of ''Big Pete,'' it shall be cleaned (i.e., free of oil, grease, caked soil, heavy dust). If no contamination is found, the vehicle may be released with the permission of the area RCT Supervisor. If contamination is found by any of the surveys, contact the cognizant Radiological Engineer for decontamination instructions

  14. Building an Efficient Model for Afterburn Energy Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, S; Kuhl, A; Najjar, F; Tringe, J; McMichael, L; Glascoe, L

    2012-02-03

    Many explosives will release additional energy after detonation as the detonation products mix with the ambient environment. This additional energy release, referred to as afterburn, is due to combustion of undetonated fuel with ambient oxygen. While the detonation energy release occurs on a time scale of microseconds, the afterburn energy release occurs on a time scale of milliseconds with a potentially varying energy release rate depending upon the local temperature and pressure. This afterburn energy release is not accounted for in typical equations of state, such as the Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) model, used for modeling the detonation of explosives. Here we construct a straightforward and efficient approach, based on experiments and theory, to account for this additional energy release in a way that is tractable for large finite element fluid-structure problems. Barometric calorimeter experiments have been executed in both nitrogen and air environments to investigate the characteristics of afterburn for C-4 and other materials. These tests, which provide pressure time histories, along with theoretical and analytical solutions provide an engineering basis for modeling afterburn with numerical hydrocodes. It is toward this end that we have constructed a modified JWL equation of state to account for afterburn effects on the response of structures to blast. The modified equation of state includes a two phase afterburn energy release to represent variations in the energy release rate and an afterburn energy cutoff to account for partial reaction of the undetonated fuel.

  15. Conditions affecting the release of phosphorus from surface lake sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophoridis, Christophoros; Fytianos, Konstantinos

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted to determine the effect of pH and redox conditions, as well as the effect of Fe, Mn, Ca, Al, and organic matter, on the release of ortho-phosphates in lake sediments taken from Lakes Koronia and Volvi (Northern Greece). Results were evaluated in combination with experiments to determine P fractionation in the sediment. The study revealed the major effect of redox potential and pH on the release of P from lake sediments. Both lakes showed increased release rates under reductive conditions and high pH values. The fractionation experiments revealed increased mobility of the reductive P fraction as well as of the NaOH-P fraction, indicating participation of both fractions in the overall release of sediment-bound P, depending on the prevailing environmental conditions. The results were assessed in combination with the release patterns of Fe, Mn, Ca, Al, and organic matter, enabling the identification of more specific processes of P release for each lake. The basic release patterns included the redox induced reductive dissolution of P-bearing metal oxides and the competitive exchange of phosphate anions with OH- at high pH values. The formation of an oxidized surface microlayer under oxic conditions acted as a protective film, preventing further P release from the sediments of Lake Volvi, while sediments from Lake Koronia exhibited a continuous and increased tendency to release P under various physicochemical conditions, acting as a constant source of internal P loading.

  16. 12 CFR 510.5 - Release of unpublished OTS information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... ORGANIZATIONAL REGULATIONS § 510.5 Release of unpublished OTS information. (a) Scope. (1) This section applies to... their official capacities. Examples of unpublished information include: (i) Information in the memory of...

  17. 500 Cities: Local Data for Better Health, 2016 release

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This is the complete dataset for the 500 Cities project 2016 release. This dataset includes 2013, 2014 model-based small area estimates for 27 measures of chronic...

  18. 500 Cities: Local Data for Better Health, 2017 release

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This is the complete dataset for the 500 Cities project 2017 release. This dataset includes 2015, 2014 model-based small area estimates for 27 measures of chronic...

  19. Electrochemically controlled release of anticancer drug methotrexate using nanostructured polypyrrole modified with cetylpyridinium: Release kinetics investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizadeh, Naader; Shamaeli, Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    A new simple strategy for direct electrochemical incorporation of chemotherapeutic methotrexate (MTX) into conductive polypyrrole (PPy) has been suggested for an electrochemically controlled loading and release system. Electropolymerization of MTX doped polypyrrole yielded poor quality with low efficiency of doping, but a well-doped, nanostructure and increased capacity of drug loading (24.5 mg g −1 ) has been obtained in the presence of cetylpyridinium (CP) as a modifier. When CP was preloaded onto PPy, the hydrophobic surface of the PPy serves as a backbone to which the hydrophobic chain of the CP can be attached. Electrostatic interaction between cationic CP with anionic MTX and aromatic interaction between pyridinium head of CP with pyrimidine and pyrazine rings of MTX increases drug doping. Then release kinetics were investigated at various applied potentials and temperatures. Kinetics analysis based on Avrami's equation showed that the drug release was controlled and accelerated by increasing temperature and negative potential and sustained by increasing positive potential. At open circuit condition, the release parameter (n) represented a diffusive mechanism and at applying electrochemical potentials, a first-order mode. Activation energy parameters (E a , ΔG ≠ , ΔH ≠ and ΔS ≠ ) and half-life time (t 1/2 ) of drug release are also analyzed as a function of applied potential. The nanostructured polymer films (PPy/CP/MTX) were characterized by several techniques: scanning electron microscopy, Furrier transforms Infrared, UV-vis spectroscopy. Overall, our results demonstrate that the PPy/CP/MTX films, combined with electrical stimulation, permit a programmable release of MTX by altering the interaction strength between the PPy/CP and MTX

  20. Impaired IL-10 transcription and release in animal models of Gaucher disease macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacher, Yaacov; Futerman, Anthony H

    2009-01-01

    A number of studies have shown altered cytokine levels in serum from Gaucher disease patients, including changes in levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-10 (IL-10). However, the source of IL-10, or the mechanisms leading to changes in IL-10 serum levels are not known. We now show that mouse macrophages treated with an active site-directed inhibitor of glucocerebrosidase, or macrophages from a mouse model of Gaucher disease, the L444P mouse, release significantly less IL-10 than their untreated counterparts, but that TNFalpha release is unaffected. These changes are due to reduced transcription of IL-10 mRNA in macrophages. The reduction in IL-10 secretion observed in animal models of Gaucher disease macrophages may be of relevance to explain the increase in inflammation that is often observed in Gaucher disease.

  1. Pharmacological aspects of release from microcapsules - from polymeric multilayers to lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuytens, Pieter; Parakhonskiy, Bogdan; Yashchenok, Alexey; Winterhalter, Mathias; Skirtach, Andre

    2014-10-01

    This review is devoted to pharmacological applications of principles of release from capsules to overcome the membrane barrier. Many of these principles were developed in the context of polymeric multilayer capsule membrane modulation, but they are also pertinent to liposomes, polymersomes, capsosomes, particles, emulsion-based carriers and other carriers. We look at these methods from the physical, chemical or biological driving mechanisms point of view. In addition to applicability for carriers in drug delivery, these release methods are significant for another area directly related to pharmacology - modulation of the permeability of the membranes and thus promoting the action of drugs. Emerging technologies, including ionic current monitoring through a lipid membrane on a nanopore, are also highlighted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Birth control - slow release methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contraception - slow-release hormonal methods; Progestin implants; Progestin injections; Skin patch; Vaginal ring ... might want to consider a different birth control method. SKIN PATCH The skin patch is placed on ...

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF SUSTAINED RELEASE TABLETS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-12-31

    Dec 31, 2013 ... The SR dosage forms that release drugs pH independently in .... were determined; Post compression parameters such as weight variation test, hardness, ... Based on the ICH guidelines 12, the stability studies were carried out ...

  4. Mounting Systems for Structural Members, Fastening Assemblies Thereof, and Vibration Isolation Systems Including the Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ken (Inventor); Hindle, Timothy (Inventor); Barber, Tim Daniel (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Mounting systems for structural members, fastening assemblies thereof, and vibration isolation systems including the same are provided. Mounting systems comprise a pair of mounting brackets, each clamped against a fastening assembly forming a mounting assembly. Fastening assemblies comprise a spherical rod end comprising a spherical member having a through opening and an integrally threaded shaft, first and second seating members on opposite sides of the spherical member and each having a through opening that is substantially coaxial with the spherical member through opening, and a partially threaded fastener that threadably engages each mounting bracket forming the mounting assembly. Structural members have axial end portions, each releasably coupled to a mounting bracket by the integrally threaded shaft. Axial end portions are threaded in opposite directions for permitting structural member rotation to adjust a length thereof to a substantially zero strain position. Structural members may be vibration isolator struts in vibration isolation systems.

  5. PCDD/PCDF release inventories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, H. [UNEP Chemicals, Chatelaine (Switzerland)

    2004-09-15

    The Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) entered into force on 17 May 2004 with 50 Parties. In May 2004, 59 countries had ratified or acceded the Convention. The objective of the Convention is ''to protect human health and the environment from persistent organic pollutants''. For intentionally produced POPs, e.g., pesticides and industrial chemicals such as hexachlorobenzene and polychlorinated biphenyls, this will be achieved by stop of production and use. For unintentionally generated POPs, such as polychlorinated dibenzo-pdioxins (PCDD) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF), measures have to be taken to ''reduce the total releases derived from anthropogenic sources''; the final goal is ultimate elimination, where feasible. Under the Convention, Parties have to establish and maintain release inventories to prove the continuous release reduction. Since many countries do not have the technical and financial capacity to measure all releases from all potential PCDD/PCDF sources, UNEP Chemicals has developed the ''Standardized Toolkit for the Identification of Quantification of Dioxin and Furan Releases'' (''Toolkit'' for short), a methodology to estimate annual releases from a number of sources. With this methodology, annual releases can be estimated by multiplying process-specific default emission factors provided in the Toolkit with national activity data. At the seventh session of the Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee, the Toolkit was recommended to be used by countries when reporting national release data to the Conference of the Parties. The Toolkit is especially used by developing countries and countries with economies in transition where no measured data are available. Results from Uruguay, Thailand, Jordan, Philippines, and Brunei Darussalam have been published.

  6. Waste isolation pilot plant performance assessment: Radionuclide release sensitivity to diminished brine and gas flows to/from transuranic waste disposal areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, Brad A.; Camphouse, R. C.; Zeitler, Todd R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository releases are evaluated through the application of modified parameters to simulate accelerated creep closure, include capillary pressure effects on relative permeability, and increase brine and gas saturation in the operations and experimental (OPS/EXP) areas. The modifications to the repository model result in increased pressures and decreased brine saturations in waste areas and increased pressures and brine saturations in the OPS/EXP areas. Brine flows up the borehole during a hypothetical drilling intrusion are nearly identical and brine flows up the shaft are decreased. The modified parameters essentially halt the flow of gas from the southern waste areas to the northern nonwaste areas, except as transported through the marker beds and anhydrite layers. The combination of slightly increased waste region pressures and very slightly decreased brine saturations result in a modest increase in spallings and no significant effect on direct brine releases, with total releases from the Culebra and cutting and caving releases unaffected. Overall, the effects on total high-probability mean releases from the repository are insignificant, with total low-probability mean releases minimally increased. It is concluded that the modified OPS/EXP area parameters have an insignificant effect on the prediction of total releases.

  7. TOXRISK, Toxic Gas Release Accident Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, D.E.; Chanin, D.I.; Shiver, A.W.

    1993-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: TOXRISK is an interactive program developed to aid in the evaluation of nuclear power plant control room habitability in the event of a nearby toxic material release. The program uses a model which is consistent with the approach described in the NRC Regulatory Guide 1.78. Release of the gas is treated as an initial puff followed by a continuous plume. The relative proportions of these as well as the plume release rate are supplied by the user. Transport of the gas is modeled as a Gaussian distribution and occurs through the action of a constant velocity, constant direction wind. Great flexibility is afforded the user in specifying the release description, meteorological conditions, relative geometry of the accident and plant, and the plant ventilation system characteristics. Two types of simulation can be performed: multiple case (parametric) studies and probabilistic analyses. Upon execution, TOXRISK presents a menu, and the user chooses between the Data Base Manager, the Multiple Case program, and the Probabilistic Study Program. The Data Base Manager provides a convenient means of storing, retrieving, and modifying blocks of data required by the analysis programs. The Multiple Case program calculates resultant gas concentrations inside the control room and presents a summary of information that describes the event for each set of conditions given. Optimally, a time history profile of inside and outside concentrations can also be produced. The Probabilistic Study program provides a means for estimating the annual probability of operator incapacitation due to toxic gas accidents on surrounding transportation routes and storage sites. 2 - Method of solution: Dispersion or diffusion of the gas during transport is described by modified Pasquill-Gifford dispersion coefficients

  8. Fracture patterns and the energy release rate of phosphorene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Hong, Jiawang; Pidaparti, Ramana; Wang, Xianqiao

    2016-03-14

    Phosphorene, also known as monolayer black phosphorus, has been enjoying popularity in electronic devices due to its superior electrical properties. However, it's relatively low Young's modulus, low fracture strength and susceptibility to structural failure have limited its application in mechanical devices. Therefore, in order to design more mechanically reliable devices that utilize phosphorene, it is necessary to explore the fracture patterns and energy release rate of phosphorene. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate phosphorene's fracture mechanism. The results indicate that fracture under uniaxial tension along the armchair direction is attributed to a break in the interlayer bond angles, while failure in the zigzag direction is triggered by the break in both intra-layer angles and bonds. Furthermore, we developed a modified Griffith criterion to analyze the energy release rate of phosphorene and its dependence on the strain rates and orientations of cracks. Simulation results indicate that phosphorene's energy release rate remains almost unchanged in the armchair direction while it fluctuates intensively in the zigzag direction. Additionally, the strain rate was found to play a negligible role in the energy release rate. The geometrical factor α in the Griffith's criterion is almost constant when the crack orientation is smaller than 45 degree, regardless of the crack orientation and loading direction. Overall, these findings provide helpful insights into the mechanical properties and failure behavior of phosphorene.

  9. Hydrogen retention and release from uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, D.F.

    1987-08-01

    The ceramic samples (UO 2 ) are exposed to high pressure hydrogen gas at a fixed temperature for a time sufficient to achieve equilibrium. After rapid quenching, the hydrogen-saturated sample is transferred to a vacuum-outgassing furnace. The sample is outgassed in a linear temperature ramp and the released hydrogen is detected by an in-situ mass spectrometer. This technique measures the rate of release of hydrogen with a sensitivity level of about 2 ng of hydrogen (as D 2 ) per hour. In this study, experiments were conducted on both polycrystalline and single-crystal UO 2 . Experimental variables included temperature (1000 to 1600 0 C) and infusion pressure (5 to 32 atm D 2 ), and for the polycrystalline specimen, stoichiometry. Dissolution of H 2 in both single-crystal and polycrystalline UO 2 was found to obey Seivert's law. The Sievert's law constant of deuterium in single-crystal UO 2 was determined to be: 3.0 x 10 7 exp(-235 kJ/RT) ppM atomic/√atm and for polycrystalline UO 2 : 5.5 x 10 4 exp(-100 kJ/RT) ppM atomic/√atm. The solubility of hydrogen in hypostoichiometric urania was found to be up to three orders of magnitude greater than in stoichiometric UO 2 depending on the O/U ratios, implying the anion vacancy is the primary solution site in the UO 2 lattice. The release-rate curves for the single crystal and polycrystalline UO 2 specimens exhibited multiple peaks, with most of the deuterium released between 600 and 1200 0 C for the polycrystalline samples, and between 700 and 1800 0 C in the single-crystal specimens. This release of hydrogen from UO 2 could not be adequately modeled as diffusion or diffusion with trapping and resolution. It was determined that release was governed by release from traps in both the polycrystalline and single crystal UO 2 specimens. 40 refs., 72 figs., 6 tabs

  10. Altered elementary calcium release events and enhanced calcium release by thymol in rat skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szentesi, Péter; Szappanos, Henrietta; Szegedi, Csaba; Gönczi, Monika; Jona, István; Cseri, Julianna; Kovács, László; Csernoch, László

    2004-03-01

    The effects of thymol on steps of excitation-contraction coupling were studied on fast-twitch muscles of rodents. Thymol was found to increase the depolarization-induced release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, which could not be attributed to a decreased calcium-dependent inactivation of calcium release channels/ryanodine receptors or altered intramembrane charge movement, but rather to a more efficient coupling of depolarization to channel opening. Thymol increased ryanodine binding to heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles, with a half-activating concentration of 144 micro M and a Hill coefficient of 1.89, and the open probability of the isolated and reconstituted ryanodine receptors, from 0.09 +/- 0.03 to 0.22 +/- 0.04 at 30 micro M. At higher concentrations the drug induced long-lasting open events on a full conducting state. Elementary calcium release events imaged using laser scanning confocal microscopy in the line-scan mode were reduced in size, 0.92 +/- 0.01 vs. 0.70 +/- 0.01, but increased in duration, 56 +/- 1 vs. 79 +/- 1 ms, by 30 micro M thymol, with an increase in the relative proportion of lone embers. Higher concentrations favored long events, resembling embers in control, with duration often exceeding 500 ms. These findings provide direct experimental evidence that the opening of a single release channel will generate an ember, rather than a spark, in mammalian skeletal muscle.

  11. Sellafield Site (including Drigg) emergency scheme manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-02-01

    This Scheme defines the organisation and procedures available should there be an accident at the Sellafield Site which results in, or may result in, the release of radioactive material, or the generation of a high radiation field, which might present a hazard to employees and/or the general public. Several categories of emergencies on the Sellafield Site are mentioned; a building emergency which is confined to one building, a Site emergency standby when the effects of a building emergency go outside that building, a Site emergency alert (District Emergency Standby) when a release of activity affects Site operations and could have serious Site effects and a District Emergency Alert when a radioactivity release may interfere with the normal activity of the General Public. A Drigg Emergency Standby situation would operate similarly at the Drigg Site. The detailed arrangements and responsibilities of appointed personnel are set out in this manual. (UK)

  12. Hydraulic running and release tool with mechanical emergency release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, S.F.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a setting tool for connection in a well string to position a tubular member in a well bore. It comprises: a mandrel adapted to be connected to the well string; an outer sleeve surrounding the mandrel and releasably secured thereto; a latch nut releasably connected to the outer sleeve; piston means sealingly engaging the mandrel; shear means releasably securing the piston to the latch nut to maintain the latch nut releasably connected to the tubular member; the mandrel having port means for conducting fluid pressure from the well string to release the piston means from and the latch nut; cooperating engageable surfaces on the piston and latch nut to reengage them together after the piston moves a predetermined longitudinal distance relative to the latch nut; and additional cooperating engageable surfaces on the latch nut and the outer sleeve which are engageable when the piston and engaged latch nut are moved a predetermined additional longitudinal distance by fluid pressure to secure the engaged piston and latch nut with the outer sleeve for retrieval along with the mandrel from the well bore

  13. Herwig++ 2.6 release note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, K.; Gieseke, S.; Roehr, C. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (DE). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik] (and others)

    2012-05-15

    A new release of the Monte Carlo event generator Herwig++ (version 2.6) is now available. This version comes with a number of improvements including: a new structure for the implementation of next-to-leading order matrix elements; an improved treatment of wide-angle gluon radiation; new hard-coded next-to-leading order matrix elements for deep inelastic scattering and weak vector boson fusion; additional models of physics beyond the StandardModel, including the production of colour sextet particles; a statistical colour reconnection model; automated energy scaling of underlying-event tunes.

  14. Herwig++ 2.6 release note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, K.; Gieseke, S.; Roehr, C.

    2012-05-01

    A new release of the Monte Carlo event generator Herwig++ (version 2.6) is now available. This version comes with a number of improvements including: a new structure for the implementation of next-to-leading order matrix elements; an improved treatment of wide-angle gluon radiation; new hard-coded next-to-leading order matrix elements for deep inelastic scattering and weak vector boson fusion; additional models of physics beyond the StandardModel, including the production of colour sextet particles; a statistical colour reconnection model; automated energy scaling of underlying-event tunes.

  15. Ultrasound-assisted endoscopic partial plantar fascia release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohuchi, Hiroshi; Ichikawa, Ken; Shinga, Kotaro; Hattori, Soichi; Yamada, Shin; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2013-01-01

    Various surgical treatment procedures for plantar fasciitis, such as open surgery, percutaneous release, and endoscopic surgery, exist. Skin trouble, nerve disturbance, infection, and persistent pain associated with prolonged recovery time are complications of open surgery. Endoscopic partial plantar fascia release offers the surgeon clear visualization of the anatomy at the surgical site. However, the primary medial portal and portal tract used for this technique have been shown to be in close proximity to the posterior tibial nerves and their branches, and there is always the risk of nerve damage by introducing the endoscope deep to the plantar fascia. By performing endoscopic partial plantar fascia release under ultrasound assistance, we could dynamically visualize the direction of the endoscope and instrument introduction, thus preventing nerve damage from inadvertent insertion deep to the fascia. Full-thickness release of the plantar fascia at the ideal position could also be confirmed under ultrasound imaging. We discuss the technique for this new procedure.

  16. Method and apparatus for releasably connecting first and second objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monford, Leo G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The apparatus and method are disclosed for releasably connecting first and second objects, where a magnetic end effector may include at least one elongated pin number, a proximal end of which is connected to the first object and the distal end of which may be inserted into a receiving portion in the second object. Latch members are carried by the pin member for radial movement between retracted and expanded positions for releasing and locking, respectively, first and second objects. A plunger member carried by the pin member is axially moveable between first and second positions. In the first plunger position, the latch members are located in the expanded (locked) position and in the second plunger position the latch members are released for movement to retracted or unlocked position. The magnetic end effector is provided for releasable attachment to the first object and for moving the plunger member to the second position, releasing the first object.

  17. Direct Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austern, N. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1963-01-15

    In order to give a unified presentation of one point of view, these lectures are devoted only to a detailed development of the standard theories of direct reactions, starting from basic principles. Discussion is given of the present status of the theories, of the techniques used for practical calculation, and of possible future developments. The direct interaction (DI) aspects of a reaction are those which involve only a few of the many degrees of freedom of a nucleus. In fact the minimum number of degrees of freedom which must be involved in a reaction are those required to describe the initial and final channels, and DI studies typically consider these degrees of freedom and no others. Because of this simplicity DI theories may be worked out in painstaking detail. DI processes concern only part of the wave function for a problem. The other part involves complicated excitations of many degrees of freedom, and gives the compound nucleus (CN) effects. While it is extremely interesting to learn how to separate DI and CN effects in an orderly manner, if they are both present in a reaction, no suitable method has yet been found. Instead, current work stresses the kinds of reactions and the kinds of final states in which DI effects dominate and in which CN effects may almost be forgotten. The DI cross-sections which are studied are often extremely large, comparable to elastic scattering cross-sections. (author)

  18. Iliopsoas Tendon Reformation after Psoas Tendon Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Garala

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Internal snapping hip syndrome, or psoas tendonitis, is a recognised cause of nonarthritic hip pain. The majority of patients are treated conservatively; however, occasionally patients require surgical intervention. The two surgical options for iliopsoas tendinopathy are step lengthening of the iliopsoas tendon or releasing the tendon at the lesser trochanter. Although unusual, refractory snapping usually occurs soon after tenotomy. We report a case of a 47-year-old active female with internal snapping and pain following an open psoas tenotomy. Postoperatively she was symptom free for 13 years. An MRI arthrogram revealed reformation of a pseudo iliopsoas tendon reinserting into the lesser trochanter. The pain and snapping resolved after repeat iliopsoas tendon release. Reformation of tendons is an uncommon sequela of tenotomies. However the lack of long-term studies makes it difficult to calculate prevalence rates. Tendon reformation should be included in the differential diagnosis of failed tenotomy procedures after a period of symptom relief.

  19. Calculations in support of a potential definition of large release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, A.L.; Davis, R.E.; Mubayi, V.

    1994-05-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has stated a hierarchy of safety goals with the qualitative safety goals as Level I of the hierarchy, backed up by the quantitative health objectives as Level II and the large release guideline as Level III. The large release guideline has been stated in qualitative terms as a magnitude of release of the core inventory whose frequency should not exceed 10 -6 per reactor year. However, the Commission did not provide a quantitative specification of a large release. This report describes various specifications of a large release and focuses, in particular, on an examination of releases which have a potential to lead to one prompt fatality in the mean. The basic information required to set up the calculations was derived from the simplified source terms which were obtained from approximations of the NUREG-1150 source terms. Since the calculation of consequences is affected by a large number of assumptions, a generic site with a (conservatively determined) population density and meteorology was specified. At this site, various emergency responses (including no response) were assumed based on information derived from earlier studies. For each of the emergency response assumptions, a set of calculations were performed with the simplified source terms; these included adjustments to the source terms, such as the timing of the release, the core inventory, and the release fractions of different radionuclides, to arrive at a result of one mean prompt fatality in each case. Each of the source terms, so defined, has the potential to be a candidate for a large release. The calculations show that there are many possible candidate source terms for a large release depending on the characteristics which are felt to be important

  20. Predicting hydrocarbon release from soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poppendieck, D.; Loehr, R.C.

    2002-01-01

    'Full text:' The remediation of hazardous chemicals from soils can be a lengthy and costly process. As a result, recent regulatory initiatives have focused on risk-based corrective action (RBCA) approaches. Such approaches attempt to identify the amount of chemical that can be left at a site with contaminated soil and still be protective of human health and the environment. For hydrocarbons in soils to pose risk to human heath and the environment, the hydrocarbons must be released from the soil and accessible to microorganisms, earthworms, or other higher level organisms. The sorption of hydrocarbons to soil can reduce the availability of the hydrocarbon to receptors. Typically in soils and sediments, there is an initial fast release of a hydrocarbon from the soil to the aqueous phase followed by a slower release of the remaining hydrocarbon to the aqueous phase. The rate and extent of slow release can influence aqueous hydrocarbon concentrations and the fate and transport of hydrocarbons in the subsurface. Once the fast fraction of the chemical has been removed from the soil, the remaining fraction of a chemical may desorb at a rate that natural mechanisms can attenuate the released hydrocarbon. Hence, active remediation may be needed only until the fast fraction has been removed. However, the fast fraction is a soil and chemical specific parameter. This presentation will present a tier I type protocol that has been developed to quickly estimate the fraction of hydrocarbons that are readily released from the soil matrix to the aqueous phase. Previous research in our laboratory and elsewhere has used long-term desorption (four months) studies to determine the readily released fraction. This research shows that a single short-term (less than two weeks) batch extraction procedure provides a good estimate of the fast released fraction derived from long-term experiments. This procedure can be used as a tool to rapidly evaluate the release and bioavailability of

  1. Aluminum corrosion product release kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Matt, E-mail: Matthew.Edwards@cnl.ca; Semmler, Jaleh; Guzonas, Dave; Chen, Hui Qun; Toor, Arshad; Hoendermis, Seanna

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Release of Al corrosion product was measured in simulated post-LOCA sump solutions. • Increased boron was found to enhance Al release kinetics at similar pH. • Models of Al release as functions of time, temperature, and pH were developed. - Abstract: The kinetics of aluminum corrosion product release was examined in solutions representative of post-LOCA sump water for both pressurized water and pressurized heavy-water reactors. Coupons of AA 6061 T6 were exposed to solutions in the pH 7–11 range at 40, 60, 90 and 130 °C. Solution samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, and coupon samples were analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The results show a distinct “boron effect” on the release kinetics, expected to be caused by an increase in the solubility of the aluminum corrosion products. New models were developed to describe both sets of data as functions of temperature, time, and pH (where applicable)

  2. Scenarios and analytical methods for UF6 releases at NRC-licensed fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siman-Tov, M.; Dykstra, J.; Holt, D.D.; Huxtable, W.P.; Just, R.A.; Williams, W.R.

    1984-06-01

    This report identifies and discusses potential scenarios for the accidental release of UF 6 at NRC-licensed UF 6 production and fuel fabrication facilities based on a literature review, site visits, and DOE enrichment plant experience. Analytical tools needed for evaluating source terms for such releases are discussed, and the applicability of existing methods is reviewed. Accident scenarios are discussed under the broad headings of cylinder failures, UF 6 process system failures, nuclear criticality events, and operator errors and are categorized by location, release source, phase of UF 6 prior to release, release flow characteristics, release causes, initiating events, and UF 6 inventory at risk. At least three types of releases are identified for further examination: (1) a release from a liquid-filled cylinder outdoors, (2) a release from a pigtail or cylinder in a steam chest, (3) an indoor release from either (a) a pigtail or liquid-filled cylinder or (b) other indoor source depending on facility design and operating procedures. Indoor release phenomena may be analyzed to determine input terms for a ventilation model by using a time-dependent homogeneous compartment model or a more complex hydrodynamic model if time-dependent, spatial variations in concentrations, temperature, and pressure are important. Analytical tools for modeling directed jets and explosive releases are discussed as well as some of the complex phenomena to be considered in analyzing UF 6 releases both indoors and outdoors

  3. Future direction of direct writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam-Soo; Han, Kenneth N.

    2010-11-01

    Direct write technology using special inks consisting of finely dispersed metal nanoparticles in liquid is receiving an undivided attention in recent years for its wide range of applicability in modern electronic industry. The application of this technology covers radio frequency identification-tag (RFID-tag), flexible-electronics, organic light emitting diodes (OLED) display, e-paper, antenna, bumpers used in flip-chip, underfilling, frit, miniresistance applications and biological uses, artificial dental applications and many more. In this paper, the authors have reviewed various direct write technologies on the market and discussed their advantages and shortfalls. Emphasis has given on microdispensing deposition write (MDDW), maskless mesoscale materials deposition (M3D), and ink-jet technologies. All of these technologies allow printing various patterns without employing a mask or a resist with an enhanced speed with the aid of computer. MDDW and M3D are capable of drawing patterns in three-dimension and MDDW, in particular, is capable of writing nanoinks with high viscosity. However, it is still far away for direct write to be fully implemented in the commercial arena. One of the hurdles to overcome is in manufacturing conductive inks which are chemically and physically stable, capable of drawing patterns with acceptable conductivity, and also capable of drawing patterns with acceptable adhesiveness with the substrates. The authors have briefly discussed problems involved in manufacturing nanometal inks to be used in various writing devices. There are numerous factors to be considered in manufacturing such inks. They are reducing agents, concentrations, oxidation, compact ability allowing good conductivity, and stability in suspension.

  4. Concerns in assessing radiological releases to a major estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foldesi, Leslie P.

    1989-01-01

    Full text: In the State of Virginia, the James River flows into the Chesapeake Bay and from the mouth of the James River to the fall line the river is under the influence of tidal forces. There are several centers of commerce along the river including an international port of call at the mouth of the James. Associated with the centers of commerce are potential sources of radioactive materials for being released to the river. Two hundred miles inland, the Babcock and Wilcox nuclear fuels processing plants are situated along-side the James River, which has been known to flood its banks quickly in the mountainous regions of Virginia. Storage tanks have been swept downstream from this facility in a previous flood. Fortunately, the tanks were not destroyed. Another source of a possible release is the Suny Nuclear Power Station located on the James River about fifty miles from the Chesapeake Bay. In the cities of Norfolk and Newport News, shipyards are fueling and defueling the Navy's nuclear powered fleet. In addition, many of the Navy's ships are carrying nuclear weapons. These activities may also result in an inadvertent release. In assessing the radiological release from any one of the previously mentioned activities, it is obvious that dilution of the material released into the river is a major factor in dose assessment, as well as the fact that the water is brackish and not suitable as a source of potable water. However, dilution in this case may not be the simple solution. We also have to remember that this estuary is under tidal effects, which means that the materials may not be going out to sea to be further diluted as quickly as we would like to think. It may be possible that the material will be carried up river as far as the fall line and deposited, or deposited along the river's banks. From Virginia's experience with the pesticide, Kepone, materials may be deposited along the estuary and enter the food chain thereby necessitating the limitation of taking

  5. Concerns in assessing radiological releases to a major estuary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foldesi, Leslie P [Virginia Department of Health, Bureau of Radiological Health, Richmond, VA (United States)

    1989-09-01

    Full text: In the State of Virginia, the James River flows into the Chesapeake Bay and from the mouth of the James River to the fall line the river is under the influence of tidal forces. There are several centers of commerce along the river including an international port of call at the mouth of the James. Associated with the centers of commerce are potential sources of radioactive materials for being released to the river. Two hundred miles inland, the Babcock and Wilcox nuclear fuels processing plants are situated along-side the James River, which has been known to flood its banks quickly in the mountainous regions of Virginia. Storage tanks have been swept downstream from this facility in a previous flood. Fortunately, the tanks were not destroyed. Another source of a possible release is the Suny Nuclear Power Station located on the James River about fifty miles from the Chesapeake Bay. In the cities of Norfolk and Newport News, shipyards are fueling and defueling the Navy's nuclear powered fleet. In addition, many of the Navy's ships are carrying nuclear weapons. These activities may also result in an inadvertent release. In assessing the radiological release from any one of the previously mentioned activities, it is obvious that dilution of the material released into the river is a major factor in dose assessment, as well as the fact that the water is brackish and not suitable as a source of potable water. However, dilution in this case may not be the simple solution. We also have to remember that this estuary is under tidal effects, which means that the materials may not be going out to sea to be further diluted as quickly as we would like to think. It may be possible that the material will be carried up river as far as the fall line and deposited, or deposited along the river's banks. From Virginia's experience with the pesticide, Kepone, materials may be deposited along the estuary and enter the food chain thereby necessitating the limitation of taking

  6. Regulating Drug Release Behavior and Kinetics from Matrix Tablets Based on Fine Particle-Sized Ethyl Cellulose Ether Derivatives: An In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kifayat Ullah Shah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The design and fabrication of sustained/controlled release dosage forms, employing new excipients capable of extending/controlling the release of drugs from the dosage forms over prolonged periods, has worked well in achieving optimally enhanced therapeutic levels of the drugs. In this sense, the objective of this study was to investigate the suitability of selected cellulose ether derivatives for use in direct compression (DC and as efficient drug release controlling agents. Controlled release matrix tablets of ciprofloxacin were prepared at different drug-to-polymer (D : P ratios by direct compression using a fine particle sized ethylcellulose ether derivative (ETHOCEL Standard Premium 7FP as rate controlling polymer. The tablets obtained were evaluated for various physico-chemical characteristics and in-vitro drug release studies were conducted in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4 using PharmaTest dissolution apparatus at constant temperature of 37∘C±0.1. Similarity factor 2 was employed to the release profiles of test formulations and were compared with marketed ciprofloxacin conventional tablets. Drug release mechanism and the kinetics involved were investigated by fitting the release profile data to various kinetic models. It was found that with increasing the proportion of ethylcellulose ether derivative in the matrix, the drug release was significantly extended up to 24 hours. The tablets exhibited zero order or nearly zero order drug transport mechanism. In vivo drug release performance of the developed controlled release tablets and reference conventional tablets containing ciprofloxacin were determined in rabbit serum according to randomized two-way crossover study design using High Performance Liquid Chromatography. Several bioavailability parameters of both the test tablets and conventional tablets including max, max and AUC0- were compared which showed an optimized max and max (<0.05. A good correlation was obtained between in vitro

  7. Training Materials for Release 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wake, Jo Dugstad; Hansen, Cecilie; Debus, Kolja

    This document, D7.4 – training materials for release 3, provides an overview of the training material for version 3 of the NEXT-TELL tools and methods. Previous documents submitted as part of work package 7, which is about teacher training, are D7.1 – Training Concept, D7.2 – Training Materials...... for Release 1 and D7.3 – Training Materials for Release 2. D7.4 builds on D7.1 and D7.2 and D7.3. D7.4 contains further development of previous work within WP7, essentially a revised theoretical approach to the teacher training, and expansion of the notion of tool training. The media in use have been expanded...

  8. Update on antiplatelet agents, including MATCH, CHARISMA, and ESPRIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skliut, Maryna; Jamieson, Dara G

    2008-02-01

    Despite recent advances in the acute treatment of stroke, prevention and risk factor modification remain the mainstays of management for patients with ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack. The majority of noncardioembolic ischemic strokes are atherothrombotic, presumed to be associated with the activation and aggregation of platelets. Antiplatelet medications have been shown to be effective in the secondary prevention of stroke of presumed arterial origin, both as monotherapy and in combination. Among combination of antiplatelet agents, aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole has demonstrated statistically significant additive benefit over monotherapy with each agent. Clopidogrel plus aspirin does not prevent recurrent ischemic stroke over each component individually, and the combination increases the risk of hemorrhagic side effects. This article reviews the most recent studies on antiplatelet medications, including the combination of aspirin and clopidogrel or extended-release dipyridamole, and discusses some of the controversies that still exist with the use of antiplatelet agents.

  9. Electrical stimulation of the isolated rat intestine in the presence of nutrient stimulus enhances glucagon-like peptide-1 release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, Ann; Ort, Tatiana; Kajekar, Radhika; Hornby, Pamela J; Wade, Paul R

    2010-01-01

    The release of small intestinal hormones by constituents of ingested food, such as fatty acids, is integral to post-prandial responses that reduce food intake. Recent evidence suggests that small intestinal electrical stimulation reduces food intake, although the mechanism of action is debated. To test the hypothesis that intestinal stimulation directly alters hormone release locally we used isolated rat distal ileum and measured glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) released in the presence or absence of linoleic acid (LA) and electrical field stimulation (EFS). Intact segments were oriented longitudinally between bipolar stimulating electrodes in organ bath chambers containing modified Krebs–Ringers bicarbonate (KRB) buffer including protease inhibitors. Incubation in LA (3 mg ml −1 ) for 45 min increased GLP-1 concentration (21.9 ± 2.6 pM versus KRB buffer alone 3.6 ± 0.1 pM). Eleven electrical stimulation conditions were tested. In the presence of LA none of the stimulation conditions inhibited LA-evoked GLP-1 release, whereas two high frequency short pulse widths (14 V, 20 Hz, 5 ms and 14 V, 40 Hz, 5 ms) and one low frequency long pulse width (14 V, 0.4 Hz, 300 ms) EFS conditions enhanced LA-evoked GLP-1 release by >250%. These results are consistent with a local effect of intestinal electrical stimulation to enhance GLP-1 release in response to luminal nutrients in the intestines. Enhancing hormone release could improve the efficacy of intestinal electrical stimulation and provide a potential treatment for obesity and metabolic conditions

  10. PABLM, Doses from Radioactive Releases to Atmosphere and Food Chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napier, B.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Soldat, J.K.

    1983-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: PABLM calculates internal radiation doses to man from radionuclides in food products and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. Radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment may be calculated from deposition on the soil or plants during an atmospheric or liquid release, or from exposure to residual radionuclides after the releases have ended. Radioactive decay is considered during the release, after deposition, and during holdup of food after harvest. The radiation dose models consider exposure to radionuclides deposited on the ground or crops from contaminated air or irrigation water, radionuclides in contaminated drinking water, aquatic foods raised in contaminated water, and radionuclides in bodies of water and sediments where people might fish, boat, or swim. For vegetation, the radiation dose model considers both direct deposition and uptake through roots. Doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. The program is designed to calculate accumulated radiation doses from the chronic ingestion of food products that contain radionuclides and doses from the external exposure to radionuclides in the environment. A first-year committed dose is calculated as well as an integrated dose for a selected number of years. 2 - Method of solution: A chain decay scheme including branching for transitions to and from isomeric states is used for radioactive decay. The equations for calculating internal radiation doses are derived from those given by the International Commission on Radio- logical Protection (ICRP) for body burdens and the maximum possible concentration (MPC) for each radionuclide. These doses are calculated as a function of radionuclide concentration in food products, ingestion rates, and a radionuclide-specific dose- commitment factor. Radiation doses from external exposure to contaminated water and soil are calculated using the basic assumption

  11. ARRRG/FOOD, Doses from Radioactive Release to Food Chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napier, B.A.; Roswell, R.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Strenge, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: ARRRG calculates radiation doses to humans for radionuclides released to bodies of water from which people might obtain fish, other aquatic foods, or drinking water, and in which they might fish, swim, or boat. FOOD calculates radiation doses to humans from deposition on farm or garden soil and crops during either an atmospheric or water release of radionuclides. Deposition may be either directly from the air or from irrigation water. With both programs, doses may be calculated for either a maximum- exposed individual or for a population group. Doses calculated are a one-year dose and a committed dose from one year of exposure. The exposure is usually considered as chronic; however, equations are included to calculate dose and dose commitment from acute, one-time, exposure. 2 - Method of solution: The radiation doses from external exposure to contaminated farm fields or shorelines are calculated assuming an 'infinite' flat plane source of radionuclides. A factor of two is included for surface roughness, and a modifying factor is used to compensate for finite extent in the shoreline calculations. The radionuclide concentrations in aquatic and irrigated food products are based on the radionuclide concentration in the contaminated water, which is based on the release rate of radioactive contamination and the characteristics of the receiving water body. Concentration of radionuclides in plants depends on the concentrations in the soil, air, and water. Concentration of radionuclides in farm animal products, such as milk, meat, or eggs, depends on the animal's consumption of feed, forage, and water containing radionuclides. For persons swimming in contaminated water, the dose is calculated assuming that the body of water is an infinite medium relative to the range of emitted radiations. Persons boating on the water are assumed to be exposed to a dose rate half that of swimmers. Internal doses are calculated as a function of

  12. Determination of accident related release data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, W.; Nolte, O.; Lange, F.; Martens, R.

    2004-01-01

    For accident safety analyses, for the assessment of potential radiological consequences, for the review of current requirements of the Transport Regulations and for their possible further development as well as for the demonstration that radioactive materials such as LDM candidate material fulfil the regulatory requirements reliable release data following mechanical impact are required. This is definitely one of the demanding issues in the field of transport safety of radioactive materials. In this context special attention has to be paid to radioactive wastes immobilised in brittle materials, e.g. cement/concrete, glass, ceramics or other brittle materials such as fresh and spent fuel. In this presentation we report on a long-term experimental program aiming at improving the general physical understanding of the release process as well as the quantity and the quality of release data. By combining laboratory experiments using small scale test specimens with a few key scaling experiments with large scale test objects significant progress was achieved to meet this objective. The laboratory equipment enables the in-situ determination of the amount and aerodynamic size distribution of the airborne particles generated upon impact of the test specimen on a hard target. Impact energies cover the range experienced in transport accidents including aircraft accidents. The well defined experimental boundary conditions and the good reproducibility of the experimental procedure allowed for systematic studies to exactly measure the amount and aerodynamic size distribution of the airborne release and to quantify its dependence on relevant parameters such as energy input, material properties, and specimen geometry. The experimental program was performed within the scope of various national and international (e.g. EU-funded) projects. The small scale experiments with brittle materials revealed a pronounced universality of the airborne release in view of the material properties and

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Chandra Source Catalog, Release 1.1 (Evans+ 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, I. N.; Primini, F. A.; Glotfelty, C. S.; Anderson, C. S.; Bonaventura, N. R.; Chen, J. C.; Davis, J. E.; Doe, S. M.; Evans, J. D.; Fabbiano, G.; Galle, E. C.; Gibbs, D. G.; Grier, J. D.; Hain, R. M.; Hall, D. M.; Harbo, P. N.; He, X.; Houck, J. C.; Karovska, M.; Kashyap, V. L.; Lauer, J.; McCollough, M. L.; McDowell, J. C.; Miller, J. B.; Mitschang, A. W.; Morgan, D. L.; Mossman, A. E.; Nichols, J. S.; Nowak, M. A.; Plummer, D. A.; Refsdal, B. L.; Rots, A. H.; Siemiginowska, A.; Sundheim, B. A.; Tibbetts, M. S.; van Stone, D. W.; Winkelman, S. L.; Zografou, P.

    2014-01-01

    This version of the catalog is release 1.1. It includes the information contained in release 1.0.1, plus point and compact source data extracted from HRC imaging observations, and catch-up ACIS observations released publicly prior to the end of 2009. (1 data file).

  14. Limited Releases of Krsko NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breznik, B.; Kovac, A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Krsko Nuclear Power Plant is about 700 MW Pressurised Water Reactor plant located in Slovenia close to the border with Croatia. The authorised limit for the radioactive releases is basically set to 50 μSv effective dose per year to the members of the public. There is also additional limitation of total activities released in a year and concentration. The poster presents the effluents of the year 2000 and evaluated dose referring to the limits and to the natural and other sources of radiation around the plant. (author)

  15. Fission gas release from fuel at high burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.O.; Beyer, C.E.; Voglewede, J.C.

    1978-03-01

    The release of fission gas from fuel pellets at high burnup is reviewed in the context of the safety analysis performed for reactor license applications. Licensing actions are described that were taken to correct deficient gas release models used in these safety analyses. A correction function, which was developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff and its consultants, is presented. Related information, which includes some previously unpublished data, is also summarized. The report thus provides guidance for the analysis of high burnup gas release in licensing situations

  16. Release and Decay Kinetics of Copeptin vs AVP in Response to Osmotic Alterations in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, Wiebke K; Schnyder, Ingeborg; Koch, Gilbert; Walti, Carla; Pfister, Marc; Kopp, Peter; Fassnacht, Martin; Strauss, Konrad; Christ-Crain, Mirjam

    2018-02-01

    Copeptin is the C-terminal fragment of the arginine vasopressin (AVP) prohormone whose measurement is more robust than that of AVP. Similar release and clearance characteristics have been suggested promoting copeptin as a surrogate marker. To characterize the physiology of osmotically regulated copeptin release and its half-life in direct comparison with plasma AVP. Ninety-one healthy volunteers underwent a standardized three-phase test protocol including (1) osmotic stimulation into the hypertonic range by hypertonic-saline infusion followed by osmotic suppression via (2) oral water load and (3) subsequent glucose infusion. Plasma copeptin, AVP, serum sodium, and osmolality levels were measured in regular intervals. In phase 1, an increase in median osmotic pressure [289 (286; 291) to 311 (309; 314) mOsm/kg H2O] caused similar release kinetics of plasma copeptin [4 (3.1; 6) to 29.3 (18.6; 48.2) pmol/L] and AVP [1 (0.7; 1.6) to 10.3 (6.8; 18.8) pg/mL]. Subsequent osmotic suppression to 298 (295; 301) mOsm/kg at the end of phase 3 revealed markedly different decay kinetics between both peptides-an estimated initial half-life of copeptin being approximately 2 times longer than that of AVP (26 vs 12 minutes). Copeptin is released in equimolar amounts with AVP in response to osmotic stimulation, suggesting its high potential as an AVP surrogate for differentiation of osmotic disorders. Furthermore, we here describe the decay kinetics of copeptin in response to osmotic depression enabling to identify a half-life for copeptin in direct comparison with AVP. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  17. Kepler Data Release 25 Notes (Q0-Q17)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullally, Susan E.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Barclay, Thomas Stewart; Barentsen, Geert; Clarke, Bruce Donald; Bryson, Stephen T.; Burke, Christopher James; Campbell, Jennifer Roseanna; Catanzarite, Joseph H.; Christiansen, Jessie; hide

    2016-01-01

    These Data Release Notes provide information specific to the current reprocessing and re-export of the Q0-Q17 data. The data products included in this data release include target pixel files, light curve files, FFIs,CBVs, ARP, Background, and Collateral files. This release marks the final processing of the Kepler Mission Data. See Tables 1 and 2 for a list of the reprocessed Kepler cadence data. See Table 3 for a list of the available FFIs. The Long Cadence Data, Short Cadence Data, and FFI data are documented in these data release notes. The ancillary files (i.e., cotrending basis vectors, artifact removal pixels, background, and collateral data) are described in the Archive Manual (Thompson et al., 2016).

  18. Fission gas release behaviour in MOX fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, U.K.; Anantharaman, S.; Sahoo, K.C.

    2002-01-01

    As a part of plutonium recycling programme MOX (U,Pu)O 2 fuels will be used in Indian boiling water reactors (BWR) and pressurised heavy water reactors (PHWR). Based on successful test irradiation of MOX fuel in CIRUS reactor, 10 MOX fuel assemblies have been loaded in the BWR of Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS). Some of these MOX fuel assemblies have successfully completed the initial target average burnup of ∼16,000 MWD/T. Enhancing the burnup target of the MOX fuels and increasing loading of MOX fuels in TAPS core will depend on the feedback information generated from the measurement of released fission gases. Fission gas release behaviour has been studied in the experimental MOX fuel elements (UO 2 - 4% PuO 2 ) irradiated in pressurised water loop (PWL) of CIRUS. Eight (8) MOX fuel elements irradiated to an average burnup of ∼16,000 MWD/T have been examined. Some of these fuel elements contained controlled porosity pellets and chamfered pellets. This paper presents the design details of the experimental set up for studying fission gas release behaviour including measurement of gas pressure, void volume and gas composition. The experimental data generated is compared with the prediction of fuel performance modeling codes of PROFESS and GAPCON THERMAL-3. (author)

  19. Timing crisis information release via television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jiuchang; Zhao, Dingtao; Yang, Feng; Du, Shaofu; Marinova, Dora

    2010-10-01

    When and how often to release information on television are important issues in crisis and emergency risk communication. There is a lot of crisis information, including warnings and news, to which people should have access, but most of it is not significantly urgent to interrupt the broadcasting of television programmes. Hence, the right timing for the release of crisis information should be selected based on the importance of the crisis and any associated communication requirements. Using recursive methods, this paper builds an audience coverage model of crisis information release. Based on 2007 Household Using TV (HUT) data for Hefei City, China, the optimal combination of broadcasting sequence (with frequencies between one and eight times) is obtained using the implicit enumeration method. The developed model is applicable to effective transmission of crisis information, with the aim of reducing interference with the normal television transmission process and decreasing the psychological effect on audiences. The same model can be employed for other purposes, such as news coverage and weather and road information. © 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation © Overseas Development Institute, 2010.

  20. CRUNCH, Dispersion Model for Continuous Dense Vapour Release in Atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagger, S.F.

    1987-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The situation modelled is as follows. A dense gas emerges from a source such that it can be considered to emerge through a rectangular area, placed in the vertical plane and perpendicular to the plume direction, which assumes that of the ambient wind. The gas flux at the source, and in every plane perpendicular to the plume direction, is constant in time and a stationary flow field has been attained. For this to apply, the characteristic time of release must be much larger than that for dispersal of the contaminant. The plume can be thought to consist of a number of rectangular elements or 'puffs' emerging from the source at regular time intervals. The model follows the development of these puffs at a series of downwind points. These puffs are immediately assumed to advect with the ambient wind at their half-height. The plume also slumps due to the action of gravity and is allowed to entrain air through its sides and top surface. Spreading of a fluid element is caused by pressure differences across this element and since the pressure gradient in the wind direction is small, the resulting pressure differences and slumping velocities are small also, thus permitting this convenient approximation. Initially, as the plume slumps, its vertical dimension decreases and with it the slumping velocity and advection velocity. Thus the plume advection velocity varies as a function of downwind distance. With the present steady state modelling, and to satisfy continuity constraints, there must be consequent adjustment of plume height. Calculation of this parameter from the volume flux ensures this occurs. As the cloud height begins to grow, the advection velocity increases and the plume height decreases accordingly. With advection downwind, the cloud gains buoyancy by entraining air and, if the cloud is cold, by absorbing heat from the ground. Eventually the plume begins to disperse as would a passive pollutant, through the action of

  1. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants: Annual report, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tichler, J.; Norden, K.; Congemi, J.

    1987-08-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1984 have been compiled and reported. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1984 release data are summarized in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized.

  2. Natural and technologic hazardous material releases during and after natural disasters: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Stacy; Balluz, Lina; Malilay, Josephine

    2004-04-25

    Natural disasters may be powerful and prominent mechanisms of direct and indirect hazardous material (hazmat) releases. Hazardous materials that are released as the result of a technologic malfunction precipitated by a natural event are referred to as natural-technologic or na-tech events. Na-tech events pose unique environmental and human hazards. Disaster-associated hazardous material releases are of concern, given increases in population density and accelerating industrial development in areas subject to natural disasters. These trends increase the probability of catastrophic future disasters and the potential for mass human exposure to hazardous materials released during disasters. This systematic review summarizes direct and indirect disaster-associated releases, as well as environmental contamination and adverse human health effects that have resulted from natural disaster-related hazmat incidents. Thorough examination of historic disaster-related hazmat releases can be used to identify future threats and improve mitigation and prevention efforts.

  3. Readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles measured at single synaptic contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo, Federico F; Sakaba, Takeshi; Ogden, David; Marty, Alain

    2012-10-30

    To distinguish between different models of vesicular release in brain synapses, it is necessary to know the number of vesicles of transmitter that can be released immediately at individual synapses by a high-calcium stimulus, the readily releasable pool (RRP). We used direct stimulation by calcium uncaging at identified, single-site inhibitory synapses to investigate the statistics of vesicular release and the size of the RRP. Vesicular release, detected as quantal responses in the postsynaptic neuron, showed an unexpected stochastic variation in the number of quanta from stimulus to stimulus at high intracellular calcium, with a mean of 1.9 per stimulus and a maximum of three or four. The results provide direct measurement of the RRP at single synaptic sites. They are consistent with models in which release proceeds from a small number of vesicle docking sites with an average occupancy around 0.7.

  4. Direct economic benefits associated with dietetic internships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, M T; Simko, M D

    1994-02-01

    We explored the direct economic benefits of hospital dietetics departments sponsoring an internship for dietetics studies. Forty-five dietetics departments in US hospitals participated in a mail survey that involved comprehensive data collection procedures using three instruments, including activity logs recorded by 298 dietitians and interns. Direct benefits were defined as the net student labor provided to the department during routine and staff relief experiences that released professional labor for other work. Net student productivity during routine assignments was calculated by subtracting the time dietitians spent teaching during a typical work week from the amount of time dietetic interns spent performing professional services without direct supervision. Student productivity during staff relief rotations was calculated by multiplying the number of students assigned to this type of experience by the length of the rotation. While involved in routine learning experiences, dietetic interns provided a direct benefit. The difference between the time interns spent in independent, professional service in the departments and the time dietitians spent in activities designed specifically for teaching was a mean of 29 hours in favor of the students. All departments received a direct benefit from assigning dietetic interns to a staff relief rotation. The median number of weeks of student labor gained by the departments per year was 24. A paired t test was used to analyze the difference between the time dietitians devoted to teaching interns and the time students spent in independent, professional service in the departments. The difference was very highly significant (P impact of their supervised practice program on the sponsoring organization.

  5. Alternating phase focussing including space charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, W.H.; Gluckstern, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    Longitudinal stability can be obtained in a non-relativistic drift tube accelerator by traversing each gap as the rf accelerating field rises. However, the rising accelerating field leads to a transverse defocusing force which is usually overcome by magnetic focussing inside the drift tubes. The radio frequency quadrupole is one way of providing simultaneous longitudinal and transverse focusing without the use of magnets. One can also avoid the use of magnets by traversing alternate gaps between drift tubes as the field is rising and falling, thus providing an alternation of focussing and defocusing forces in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. The stable longitudinal phase space area is quite small, but recent efforts suggest that alternating phase focussing (APF) may permit low velocity acceleration of currents in the 100-300 ma range. This paper presents a study of the parameter space and a test of crude analytic predictions by adapting the code PARMILA, which includes space charge, to APF. 6 refs., 3 figs

  6. Energy Release in Solar Flares,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    Plasma Research, Stanford University P. Kaufmanu CRAA/CNPq -Conseiho lacional de Desenvolvimento Cientifico e Tecnologico, Slo Paulo, SP, Brasil D.F...three phases of energy release in solar flares (Sturrock, 1980). However, a recent article by Feldman e a.. (1982) points to a significant

  7. Lignin based controlled release coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, W.J.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Vingerhoeds, M.H.; Harmsen, P.F.H.; Eastham, D.

    2011-01-01

    Urea is a commonly used fertilizer. Due to its high water-solubility, misuse easily leads to excess nitrogen levels in the soil. The aim of this research was to develop an economically feasible and biodegradable slow-release coating for urea. For this purpose, lignin was selected as coating

  8. Controlled Release from Zein Matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, Jacob; Belton, Peter; Venema, Paul; Linden, Van Der Erik; Vries, De Renko; Qi, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In earlier studies, the corn protein zein is found to be suitable as a sustained release agent, yet the range of drugs for which zein has been studied remains small. Here, zein is used as a sole excipient for drugs differing in hydrophobicity and isoelectric point: indomethacin,

  9. Dry release of suspended nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsén, Esko Sebastian; Davis, Zachary James; Dong, M.

    2004-01-01

    , the technique enables long time storage and transportation of produced devices without the risk of stiction. By combining the dry release method with a plasma deposited anti-stiction coating both fabrication induced stiction, which is mainly caused by capillary forces originating from the dehydration...

  10. A history of effluent releases from the Texas A and M University reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, E F; Neff, R D; Sandel, P S; Schoenbucher, B [Texas A and M University (United States)

    1974-07-01

    Since 1966 records of radioactive effluents releases from the Texas A and M University Research Reactor have been compiled. These data include particulate activity, noble gases, and liquid effluent releases. Particulate activity releases with half-lives greater than eight days were negligible and are not included in this presentation. Conversion from an MTR plate reactor to a TRIGA fueled reactor was completed in August 1968. Records of effluent releases of Argon-4l and liquids for the past, five years are summarized, in this presentation. These release data are compared to the current limits specified: in 10 CPR 20 and the limits appearing in proposed Appendix.

  11. Radon and aerosol release from open-pit uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, V.W.; Nielson, K.K.; Mauch, M.L.

    1982-08-01

    The quantity of 222 Rn (hereafter called radon) released per unit of uranium produced from open pit mining has been determined. A secondary objective was to determine the nature and quantity of airborne particles resulting from mine operations. To accomplish these objectives, a comprehensive study of the release rates of radon and aerosol material to the atmosphere was made over a one-year period from April 1979 to May 1980 at the Morton Ranch Mine which was operated by United Nuclear Corporation (UNC) in partnership with Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The mine is now operated for TVA by Silver King Mines. Morton Ranch Mine was one of five open pit uranium mines studied in central Wyoming. Corroborative measurements were made of radon flux and 226 Ra (hereafter called radium) concentrations of various surfaces at three of the other mines in October 1980 and again at these three mines plus a fourth in April of 1981. Three of these mines are located in the Powder River Basin, about 80 kilometers east by northeast of Casper. One is located in the Shirley Basin, about 60 km south of Casper, and the remaining one is located in the Gas Hills, approximately 100 km west of Casper. The one-year intensive study included simultaneous measurement of several parameters: continuous measurement of atmospheric radon concentration near the ground at three locations, monthly 24-hour radon flux measurements from various surfaces, radium analyses of soil samples collected under each of the flux monitoring devices, monthly integrations of aerosols on dichotomous aerosol samplers, analysis of aerosol samplers for total dust loading, aerosol elemental and radiochemical composition, aerosol elemental composition by particle size, wind speed, wind direction, temperature, barometric pressure, and rainfall

  12. Sellafield site (including Drigg) emergency scheme manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-02-01

    This Emergency Scheme defines the organisation and procedures available should there be an accident at the Sellafield Site which results in, or may result in, the release of radioactive material, or the generation of a high radiation field, which might present a hazard to employees and/or the general public. This manual covers the general principles of the total emergency scheme and those detailed procedures which are not specific to any single department. (U.K.)

  13. 28 CFR 2.83 - Release planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Release planning. 2.83 Section 2.83... Release planning. (a) All grants of parole shall be conditioned on the development of a suitable release... parole date for purposes of release planning for up to 120 days without a hearing. If efforts to...

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF SUSTAINED RELEASE TABLETS CONTAINING SOLID DISPERSIONS OF BACLOFEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. H. Janardhana

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sustained release tablets containing solid dispersions granules of a poorly water soluble drug were prepared to investigate the controlled release of the drug. Baclofen was chosen because of its poor water solubility and short elimination half-life. Poloxamer 188 and PEG 6000 were used as solid dispersion carrier. Free flowing solid dispersion granules were prepared by adsorbing the melt of the drug and carriers onto the surface of an adsorbent, Carbopol 934P followed by direct compression with HPMC K4M and HPMC K100 to obtain an solid dispersion loaded sustained release tablets. FTIR studies confirmed that the compatibility of drug and carriers. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and X-ray diffraction (XRD revealed partially amorphous structures of the drug in solid dispersion granules. The solid dispersion granules dissolved completely within 30 min, which was much faster than that of pure drug baclofen. The sustained release of baclofen from the solid dispersion containing tablet was achieved for 2 h in gastric fluid (pH 1.2 and for up to 10 h in intestinal fluid (pH 6.8. A combination of solid dispersion techniques using adsorption and sustained release concepts is a promising approach to control the release rate of poorly water-soluble drugs.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF SUSTAINED RELEASE TABLETS CONTAINING SOLID DISPERSIONS OF BACLOFEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. H. Janardhana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Sustained release tablets containing solid dispersions granules of a poorly water soluble drug were prepared to investigate the controlled release of the drug. Baclofen was chosen because of its poor water solubility and short elimination half-life. Poloxamer 188 and PEG 6000 were used as solid dispersion carrier. Free flowing solid dispersion granules were prepared by adsorbing the melt of the drug and carriers onto the surface of an adsorbent, Carbopol 934P followed by direct compression with HPMC K4M and HPMC K100 to obtain an solid dispersion loaded sustained release tablets. FTIR studies confirmed that the compatibility of drug and carriers. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and X-ray diffraction (XRD revealed partially amorphous structures of the drug in solid dispersion granules. The solid dispersion granules dissolved completely within 30 min, which was much faster than that of pure drug baclofen. The sustained release of baclofen from the solid dispersion containing tablet was achieved for 2 h in gastric fluid (pH 1.2 and for up to 10 h in intestinal fluid (pH 6.8. A combination of solid dispersion techniques using adsorption and sustained release concepts is a promising approach to control the release rate of poorly water-soluble drugs.

  16. Future directions for QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1996-10-01

    New directions for exploring QCD at future high-energy colliders are sketched. These include jets within jets. BFKL dynamics, soft and hard diffraction, searches for disoriented chiral condensate, and doing a better job on minimum bias physics. The new experimental opportunities include electron-ion collisions at HERA, a new collider detector at the C0 region of the TeVatron, and the FELIX initiative at the LHC

  17. RELEASE AND MUCOADHESION PROPERTIES OF DICLOFENAC MATRIX TABLETS FROM NATURAL AND SYNTHETIC POLYMER BLENDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odeniyi, Michael A; Khan, Nasir H; Peh, Kok K

    2015-01-01

    The delayed release and mucoadhesive properties of Cedrela gum and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose blend in diclofenac sodium tablet formulations were evaluated. Tablets were prepared by direct compression and the crushing strength and detachment force were found to increase from 74.49 ± 1.22 to 147.25 ± 2.57 N and 0.302 ± 0.36 to 1.141 ± 0.05 N from low to high level of polymers, respectively. The release kinetics followed Korsmeyer-Peppas release and the n varied between 0.834 and 1.273, indicating that the release mechanism shifts from Fickian to super case I (anomalous release). The drug release profile fits a pulsatile-release pattern characterized by a lag time followed by a more or less rapid and complete drug release. The Cedrela gum-hydroxypropylmethylcelluse blend tablets delayed diclofenac release for 2 h and sustained the release for 12 h. The polymer blend delayed drug release in the 0.1 M HCl simulating gastric environment and subsequent release pH 6.8 phosphate buffer.

  18. Controlled-release tablet formulation of isoniazid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, N K; Kulkarni, K; Talwar, N

    1992-04-01

    Guar (GG) and Karaya gums (KG) alone and in combination with hydroxy-propylmethylcellulose (HPMC) were evaluated as release retarding materials to formulate a controlled-release tablet dosage form of isoniazid (1). In vitro release of 1 from tablets followed non-Fickian release profile with rapid initial release. Urinary excretion studies in normal subjects showed steady-state levels of 1 for 13 h. In vitro and in vivo data correlated (r = 0.9794). The studies suggested the potentiality of GG and KG as release retarding materials in formulating controlled-release tablet dosage forms of 1.

  19. Specialists' meeting on fission product release and transport in gas-cooled reactors. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of the Meeting on Fission Product Release and Transport in Gas-Cooled Reactors was to compare and discuss experimental and theoretical results of fission product behaviour in gas-cooled reactors under normal and accidental conditions and to give direction for future development. The technical part of the meeting covered operational experience and laboratory research, activity release, and behaviour of released activity

  20. Specialists' meeting on fission product release and transport in gas-cooled reactors. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1985-07-01

    The purpose of the Meeting on Fission Product Release and Transport in Gas-Cooled Reactors was to compare and discuss experimental and theoretical results of fission product behaviour in gas-cooled reactors under normal and accidental conditions and to give direction for future development. The technical part of the meeting covered operational experience and laboratory research, activity release, and behaviour of released activity.

  1. PAPER ON MISCELLANEOUS ISSUES, INCLUDING WORKPLACE PRIVACY

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, G. W.

    2014-01-01

    EU directives give member states a certain period – say 2 or 3 years – to implement rules at national level. In fact the DPA 1998 replaces earlier UK legislation, the Data Protection Act 1984, so it does more than simply reproduce the directive. Other examples of subjects covered by directives are redundancy information/ consultation, equal treatment, insolvency protection, pregnancy protection, European and domestic works councils and agency work

  2. Release Notes for Whisper-1.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rising, Michael Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Alwin, Jennifer Louise [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-04-27

    Whisper is a statistical analysis package developed in 2014 to support nuclear criticality safety (NCS) validation [1-3]. It uses the sensitivity profile data for an application as computed by MCNP6 [4-6] along with covariance files [7,8] for the nuclear data to determine a baseline upper-subcritical-limit (USL) for the application. Whisper version 1.0 was first developed and used at LANL in 2014 [3]. During 2015-2016, Whisper was updated to version 1.1 [9] and is to be included with the upcoming release of MCNP6.2. This document describes the Whisper-1.1 package that will be included with the MCNP6.2 release during 2017. Specific details are provided on the computer systems supported, the software quality assurance (SQA) procedures, installation, and testing. This document does not address other important topics, such as the importance of sensitivity-uncertainty (SU) methods to NCS validation, the theory underlying SU methodology, tutorials on the usage of MCNP-Whisper, practical approaches to using SU methodology to support and extend traditional validation, etc. There are over 50 documents included with Whisper-1.1 and available in the MCNP Reference Collection on the MCNP website (mcnp.lanl.gov) that address all of those topics and more. In this document, however, a complete bibliography of relevant MCNP-Whisper references is provided.

  3. New mitotic regulators released from chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki eYokoyama

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Faithful action of the mitotic spindle segregates duplicated chromosomes into daughter cells. Perturbations of this process result in chromosome mis-segregation, leading to chromosomal instability and cancer development. Chromosomes are not simply passengers segregated by spindle microtubules but rather play a major active role in spindle assembly. The GTP bound form of the Ran GTPase (RanGTP, produced around chromosomes, locally activates spindle assembly factors. Recent studies have uncovered that chromosomes organize mitosis beyond spindle formation. They distinctly regulate other mitotic events, such as spindle maintenance in anaphase, which is essential for chromosome segregation. Furthermore, the direct function of chromosomes is not only to produce RanGTP but, in addition, to release key mitotic regulators from chromatin. Chromatin-remodeling factors and nuclear pore complex proteins, which have established functions on chromatin in interphase, dissociate from mitotic chromatin and function in spindle assembly or maintenance. Thus, chromosomes actively organize their own segregation using chromatin-releasing mitotic regulators as well as RanGTP.

  4. Massive radiological releases profoundly differ from controlled releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascucci-Cahen, Ludivine; Patrick, Momal

    2012-11-01

    Preparing for a nuclear accident implies understanding potential consequences. While many specialized experts have been working on different particular aspects, surprisingly little effort has been dedicated to establishing the big picture and providing a global and balanced image of all major consequences. IRSN has been working on the cost of nuclear accidents, an exercise which must strive to be as comprehensive as possible since any omission obviously underestimates the cost. It therefore provides (ideally) an estimate of all cost components, thus revealing the structure of accident costs, and hence sketching a global picture. On a French PWR, it appears that controlled releases would cause an 'economical' accident with limited radiological consequences when compared to other costs; in contrast, massive releases would trigger a major crisis with strong radiological consequences. The two types of crises would confront managers with different types of challenges. (authors)

  5. Effect of Including Extruded, Rolled or Ground Corn in Dairy Cow Diets Based on Direct Cut Grass Silage Efecto de la Inclusión de Maíz Extruido, Rolado o Molido en Dietas de Vacas Lecheras Basadas en Ensilaje de Pradera de Corte Directo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Alvarado G

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to determine the effect of corn (Zea mays L. grain processing on intake, digestibility of nutrients and milk production and composition. The effect of extrusion on nutrient digestibility was evaluated in trial 1, using ground corn as a control. In trial 2, the effect of extrusion on intake was evaluated, comparing extruded corn of two densities (357 and 308 g L-1 with rolled corn (507 g L-1 as a control. In trial 3, the effects of extrusion on milk production, digestibility and intake were evaluated; using steam rolled corn and ground corn as controls. No effects on dry matter and metabolizable energy intakes due to differences in the extruded corn grains were observed. Digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, crude protein, gross energy and neutral detergent fiber did not differ among treatments, although a greater digestibility of non-fibrous carbohydrates was observed. Higher milk production was obtained in treatments including extruded and steam rolled corn (21.4 and 21.6 L d-1, compared to ground corn (20.5 L d-1 but differences disappeared when standardizing for fat content. Milk composition was not affected by treatments. Daily protein production was greater (P Se estudiaron los efectos del procesamiento del grano de maíz (Zea mays L. en el consumo y digestibilidad de la dieta, y en la composición y producción láctea. En el ensayo 1, se evaluó el efecto de la extrusión en la digestibilidad de la dieta utilizando maíz molido como control. En el ensayo 2, se evaluó el efecto de la extrusión en el consumo comparando maíz extruido de dos densidades (357 y 308 g L-1 usando maíz rolado (507 gL-1 como control. En el ensayo 3, se evaluó el efecto de la extrusión sobre la producción de leche, digestibilidad y consumo, empleando maíz rolado y maíz molido como controles. No se observaron diferencias en consumo de materia seca (MS ni de energía metabolizable atribuibles a diferencias de densidad del ma

  6. Cost-effectiveness of extended-release methylphenidate in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder sub-optimally treated with immediate release methylphenidate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurjen van der Schans

    Full Text Available Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD is a common psychiatric disorder in children and adolescents. Immediate-release methylphenidate (IR-MPH is the medical treatment of first choice. The necessity to use several IR-MPH tablets per day and associated potential social stigma at school often leads to reduced compliance, sub-optimal treatment, and therefore economic loss. Replacement of IR-MPH with a single-dose extended release (ER-MPH formulation may improve drug response and economic efficiency.To evaluate the cost-effectiveness from a societal perspective of a switch from IR-MPH to ER-MPH in patients who are sub-optimally treated.A daily Markov-cycle model covering a time-span of 10 years was developed including four different health states: (1 optimal response, (2 sub-optimal response, (3 discontinued treatment, and (4 natural remission. ER-MPH options included methylphenidate osmotic release oral system (MPH-OROS and Equasym XL/Medikinet CR. Both direct costs and indirect costs were included in the analysis, and effects were expressed as quality-adjusted life years (QALYs. Univariate, multivariate as well as probabilistic sensitivity analysis were conducted and the main outcomes were incremental cost-effectiveness ratios.Switching sub-optimally treated patients from IR-MPH to MPH-OROS or Equasym XL/Medikinet CR led to per-patient cost-savings of €4200 and €5400, respectively, over a 10-year treatment span. Sensitivity analysis with plausible variations of input parameters resulted in cost-savings in the vast majority of estimations.This study lends economic support to switching patients with ADHD with suboptimal response to short-acting IR-MPH to long-acting ER-MPH regimens.

  7. Review on fluoride-releasing restorative materials--fluoride release and uptake characteristics, antibacterial activity and influence on caries formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Annette; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Attin, Thomas

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the fluoride release and recharge capabilities, and antibacterial properties, of fluoride-releasing dental restoratives, and discuss the current status concerning the prevention or inhibition of caries development and progression. Information from original scientific full papers or reviews listed in PubMed (search term: fluoride release AND (restorative OR glass-ionomer OR compomer OR polyacid-modified composite resin OR composite OR amalgam)), published from 1980 to 2004, was included in the review. Papers dealing with endodontic or orthodontic topics were not taken into consideration. Clinical studies concerning secondary caries development were only included when performed in split-mouth design with an observation period of at least three years. Fluoride-containing dental materials show clear differences in the fluoride release and uptake characteristics. Short- and long-term fluoride releases from restoratives are related to their matrices, setting mechanisms and fluoride content and depend on several environmental conditions. Fluoride-releasing materials may act as a fluoride reservoir and may increase the fluoride level in saliva, plaque and dental hard tissues. However, clinical studies exhibited conflicting data as to whether or not these materials significantly prevent or inhibit secondary caries and affect the growth of caries-associated bacteria compared to non-fluoridated restoratives. Fluoride release and uptake characteristics depend on the matrices, fillers and fluoride content as well as on the setting mechanisms and environmental conditions of the restoratives. Fluoride-releasing materials, predominantly glass-ionomers and compomers, did show cariostatic properties and may affect bacterial metabolism under simulated cariogenic conditions in vitro. However, it is not proven by prospective clinical studies whether the incidence of secondary caries can be significantly reduced by the fluoride release of

  8. Herwig++ 2.3 Release Note

    CERN Document Server

    Bähr, M; Gigg, M; Grellscheid, D; Hamilton, K; Plätzer, S; Richardson, P; Seymour, M H; Tully, J

    2008-01-01

    A new release of the Monte Carlo program Herwig++ (version 2.3) is now available. This version includes a number of improvements including: the extension of the program to lepton-hadron collisions; the inclusion of several processes accurate at next-to-leading order in the POsitive Weight Hardest Emission Generator (POWHEG) scheme; the inclusion of three-body decays and finite-width effects in Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) physics processes; a new procedure for reconstructing the kinematics of the parton shower based on the colour structure of the hard scattering process; a new model for baryon decays including excited baryon multiplets; the addition of a soft component to the multiple scattering model of the underlying event; new matrix elements for Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) and e+e- processes.

  9. How controlled release technology can aid gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Jun-Ichiro; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Many types of gene delivery systems have been developed to enhance the level of gene expression. Controlled release technology is a feasible gene delivery system which enables genes to extend the expression duration by maintaining and releasing them at the injection site in a controlled manner. This technology can reduce the adverse effects by the bolus dose administration and avoid the repeated administration. Biodegradable biomaterials are useful as materials for the controlled release-based gene delivery technology and various biodegradable biomaterials have been developed. Controlled release-based gene delivery plays a critical role in a conventional gene therapy and genetic engineering. In the gene therapy, the therapeutic gene is released from biodegradable biomaterial matrices around the tissue to be treated. On the other hand, the intracellular controlled release of gene from the sub-micro-sized matrices is required for genetic engineering. Genetic engineering is feasible for cell transplantation as well as research of stem cells biology and medicine. DNA hydrogel containing a sequence of therapeutic gene and the exosome including the individual specific nucleic acids may become candidates for controlled release carriers. Technologies to deliver genes to cell aggregates will play an important role in the promotion of regenerative research and therapy.

  10. Radioimmunological and clinical studies with luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LRH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlen, H.G.

    1986-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay for Luteinizing Hormone Releasing Hormone (LRH) has been established, tested and applied. Optimal conditions for the performance with regards to incubation time, incubation temperature, concentration of antiserum and radiolabelled LRH have been established. The specificity of the LRH immunoassay was investigated. Problems with direct measurement of LRH in plasmas of radioimmunoassay are encountered. The LRH distribution in various tissues of the rat are investigated. By means of a system for continuous monitoring of LH and FSH in women the lowest effective dose of LRH causing a significant release of LH and FSH could be established. (Auth.)

  11. A systematic literature review of Releasing Time to Care: The Productive Ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stella; McSherry, Wilfred

    2013-05-01

    This systematic review provides an overview of the literature published on Releasing Time to Care: The Productive Ward between 2005 and June 2011. Releasing Time to Care: The Productive Ward programme was developed by the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement and launched in England in 2007. The programme comprises thirteen modules that aim to increase time for direct patient care, improve the patient and staff experience and make changes to the ward environment to improve efficiency. A systematic literature review. The terms 'Releasing Time to Care' and 'Productive Ward' were applied to key healthcare databases; CINAHL, Medline, Science Direct, ProQuest, Health Business Elite, British Nursing Index, Embase, Health Management Information Consortium and PsychInfo. All papers were read and subject to a quality assessment. The literature search identified 95 unique sources. A lack of research on The Productive Ward programme meant it was necessary to include non-empirical literature. In total, 18 articles met the inclusion criteria. Seven key themes were identified: the patient and staff experience, direct care time, patient safety, financial impact, embedding and sustainability, executive support and leadership, and common barriers and determinants of success. It also highlighted areas that require further exploration such as long-term sustainability of the programme and consistent data measurement between organisations. The review tentatively reports how The Productive Ward programme has been used to transform nursing practice for the benefit of patients and frontline staff, and how it resulted in cost savings. The literature review identified a potential positive results bias in the current literature whereby favourable outcomes were reported. This paper summarises the types of evidence and current literature on The Productive Ward providing a reference for frontline staff implementing the programme. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Sensitivity of the engineered barrier system (EBS) release rate to alternative conceptual models of advective release from waste packages under dripping fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; Atkins, J.E.; McNeish, J.A.; Vallikat, V.

    1996-01-01

    Simulations were conducted to analyze the sensitivity of the engineered barrier system (EBS) release rate to alternative conceptual models of the advective release from waste packages under dripping fractures. The first conceptual model assumed that dripping water directly contacts the waste form inside the 'failed' waste package, and radionuclides are released from the EBS by advection. The second conceptual model assumed that dripping water is diverted around the 'failed' waste package (because of the presence of corrosion products plugging the perforations) and dripping water is prevented from directly contacting the waste form. In the second model, radionuclides were assumed to transport through the perforations by diffusion, and, once outside the waste package, to be released from the EBS by advection. The second model was to incorporate more realism into the EBS release calculations. For the case with the second EBS release model, most radionuclides had significantly lower peak EBS release rates (from at least one to several orders of magnitude) than with the first EBS release model. The impacts of the alternative EBS release models were greater for the radionuclides with a low solubility (or solubility-limited radionuclides) than for the radionuclides with a high solubility (or waste form dissolution-limited radionuclides). The analyses indicated that the EBS release model representing advection through a 'failed' waste package (the first EBS release model) may be too conservative in predicting the EBS performance. One major implication from this sensitivity study was that a 'failed' waste package container with multiple perforations may still be able to perform effectively as an important barrier to radionuclide release. (author)

  13. Arsenic release during managed aquifer recharge (MAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, T.; Lazareva, O.; Druschel, G.

    2013-12-01

    The mobilization and addition of geogenic trace metals to groundwater is typically caused by anthropogenic perturbations of the physicochemical conditions in the aquifer. This can add dangerously high levels of toxins to groundwater, thus compromising its use as a source of drinking water. In several regions world-wide, aquifer storage and recovery (ASR), a form of managed aquifer recharge (MAR), faces the problem of arsenic release due to the injection of oxygenated storage water. To better understand this process we coupled geochemical reactive transport modeling to bench-scale leaching experiments to investigate and verify the mobilization of geogenic arsenic (As) under a range of redox conditions from an arsenic-rich pyrite bearing limestone aquifer in Central Florida. Modeling and experimental observations showed similar results and confirmed the following: (1) native groundwater and aquifer matrix, including pyrite, were in chemical equilibrium, thus preventing the release of As due to pyrite dissolution under ambient conditions; (2) mixing of oxygen-rich surface water with oxygen-depleted native groundwater changed the redox conditions and promoted the dissolution of pyrite, and (3) the behavior of As along a flow path was controlled by a complex series of interconnected reactions. This included the oxidative dissolution of pyrite and simultaneous sorption of As onto neo-formed hydrous ferric oxides (HFO), followed by the reductive dissolution of HFO and secondary release of adsorbed As under reducing conditions. Arsenic contamination of drinking water in these systems is thus controlled by the re-equilibration of the system to more reducing conditions rather than a purely oxidative process.

  14. Microwave Activation of Drug Release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónasson, Sævar Þór

    Due to current limitations in control of pharmaceutical drug release in the body along with increasing medicine use, methods of externally-controlled drug release are of high interest. In this thesis, the use of microwaves is proposed as a technique with the purpose of externally activating...... setup, called the microwave activation system has been developed and tested on a body phantom that emulates the human torso. The system presented in this thesis, operates unobtrusively, i.e. without physically interfering with the target (patient). The torso phantom is a simple dual-layered cylindrical...... the phantom is of interest for disclosing essential information about the limitations of the concept, the phantom and the system. For these purposes, a twofold operation of the microwave activation system was performed, which are reciprocal of each other. In the first operation phase, named mapping...

  15. Deglacial climate modulated by the storage and release of Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condron, A.; Coletti, A. J.; Bradley, R. S.

    2017-12-01

    Periods of abrupt climate cooling during the last deglaciation (20 - 8 kyr ago) are often attributed to glacial outburst floods slowing the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Here, we present results from a series of climate model simulations showing that the episodic break-up and mobilization of thick, perennial, Arctic sea ice during this time would have released considerable volumes of freshwater directly to the Nordic Seas, where processes regulating large-scale climate occur. Massive sea ice export events to the North Atlantic are generated whenever the transport of sea ice is enhanced, either by changes in atmospheric circulation, rising sea level submerging the Bering land bridge, or glacial outburst floods draining into the Arctic Ocean from the Mackenzie River. We find that the volumes of freshwater released to the Nordic Seas are similar to, or larger than, those estimated to have come from terrestrial outburst floods, including the discharge at the onset of the Younger Dryas. Our results provide the first evidence that the storage and release of Arctic sea ice helped drive deglacial climate change by modulating the strength of the AMOC.

  16. Topical report on release scenario analysis of long-term management of high-level defense waste at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, R.W.; Landstrom, D.K.; Blair, S.C.; Howes, B.W.; Robkin, M.A.; Benson, G.L.; Reisenauer, A.E.; Walters, W.H.; Zimmerman, M.G.

    1980-11-01

    Potential release scenarios for the defense high-level waste (HLW) on the Hanford Site are presented. Presented in this report are the three components necessary for evaluating the various alternatives under consideration for long-term management of Hanford defense HLW: identification of scenarios and events which might directly or indirectly disrupt radionuclide containment barriers; geotransport calculations of waste migration through the site media; and consequence (dose) analyses based on groundwater and air pathways calculations. The scenarios described in this report provide the necessary parameters for radionuclide transport and consequence analysis. Scenarios are categorized as either bounding or nonbounding. Bounding scenarios consider worst case or what if situations where an actual and significant release of waste material to the environment would happen if the scenario were to occur. Bounding scenarios include both near-term and long-term scenarios. Near-term scenarios are events which occur at 100 years from 1990. Long term scenarios are potential events considered to occur at 1000 and 10,000 years from 1990. Nonbounding scenarios consider events which result in insignificant releases or no release at all to the environment. Three release mechanisms are described in this report: (1) direct exposure of waste to the biosphere by a defined sequence of events (scenario) such as human intrusion by drilling; (2) radionuclides contacting an unconfined aquifer through downward percolation of groundwater or a rising water table; and (3) cataclysmic or explosive release of radionuclides by such mechanisms as meteorite impact, fire and explosion, criticality, or seismic events. Scenarios in this report present ways in which these release mechanisms could occur at a waste management facility. The scenarios are applied to the two in-tank waste management alternatives: in-situ disposal and continued present action

  17. NK cell-released exosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fais, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    We have recently reported that human natural killer (NK) cells release exosomes that express both NK-cell markers and cytotoxic molecules. Similar results were obtained with circulating exosomes from human healthy donors. Both NK-cell derived and circulating exosomes exerted a full functional activity and killed both tumor and activated immune cells. These findings indicate that NK-cell derived exosomes might constitute a new promising therapeutic tool. PMID:23482694

  18. Release from 'prison' in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagy Anita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In my study I introduce the Hungarian conditional release and presidential pardon and new compulsory presidential pardon system. This study is based on research carried out in the Ministry of Justice at the Pardon Department in which I analyzed several dozen petition pardons. In connection with the new compulsory presidential pardon I examined the judgment of the European Court of Human Rights, which has condemned Hungary because of its adoption of real (whole life imprisonment.

  19. Ririe Dam Release Test Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Notes HEC - RAS Location Station (ft) Observation Notes 1420 Ririe Dam Ririe Dam 119,880 Gates opened and initial release started. 1455 115th St...16°F air temperature. Table A2. Observations made on 11 February 2013. Time Location Notes HEC - RAS Location Station (ft) Observation Notes...ERDC/CRREL TR-13-10 52 Time Location Notes HEC - RAS Location Station (ft) Observation Notes Travel Time* (sec) Vel.** (fps) 1224 5th

  20. Interleukin-6 release from the human brain during prolonged exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars; Nielsen, Bodil; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2002-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-6 is a pleiotropic cytokine, which has a variety of physiological roles including functions within the central nervous system. Circulating IL-6 increases markedly during exercise, partly due to the release of IL-6 from the contracting skeletal muscles, and exercise-induced IL-6 m...... influence of hyperthermia. In conclusion, IL-6 is released from the brain during prolonged exercise in humans and it appears that the duration of the exercise rather than the increase in body temperature dictates the cerebral IL-6 response....... in the brain at rest or after 15 min of exercise, but a small release of IL-6 was observed after 60 min of exercise in the first bout (0.06 +/- 0.03 ng min(-1)). This release of IL-6 from the brain was five-fold greater at the end of the second bout (0.30 +/- 0.08 ng min(-1); P

  1. Iodine-131 releases from the Hanford Site, 1944--1947

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeb, C.M.

    1992-10-01

    Detailed results of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) iodine-131 release reconstruction are presented in this volume. Included are daily data on B, D, and F Plant, reactor operations from the P-Department Daily Reports (General Electric Company 1947). Tables of B and T Plant material processed from the three principal sources on separations plant operations: The Jaech report (Jaech undated), the 200 Area Report (Acken and Bird 1945; Bird and Donihee 1945), and the Metal History Reports (General Electric Company 1946). A transcription of the Jaech report is also provided because it is computer-generated and is not readily readable in its original format. The iodine-131 release data are from the STRM model. Cut-by-cut release estimates are provided, along with daily, monthly, and yearly summations. These summations are based on the hourly release estimates. The hourly data are contained in a 28 megabyte electronic file. Interested individuals may request a copy

  2. Pollutant Release and Transfer Register

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Since 1974 a number of organisations have been working closely together in this pollutant register (PRTR) project to collect and formally establish the yearly releases of pollutants to air, water and soil in the Netherlands. Results of this project serve to underpin the national environmental policy. Data is in this way also provided for the many environmental reports to international organisations such as the European Union and the United Nations, e.g. the National Inventory Report for the Kyoto Protocol. This website shows the yearly releases (emissions) of the most important pollutants in the Netherlands. You can explore the emission data through various channels, such as maps, graphs and tables. But you can also download all the details into your own database. The data shown in this website is updated 2 to 3 times a year. The current release shows emissions for 1990, 1995, 2000, 2004, 2005 and 2006 The 2006 emissions are preliminary data and not yet shown in the maps. We expect to add an extra year in August 2008 [nl

  3. Modelling isothermal fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uffelen, P. van

    2002-01-01

    The present paper presents a new fission gas release model consisting of two coupled modules. The first module treats the behaviour of the fission gas atoms in spherical grains with a distribution of grain sizes. This module considers single atom diffusion, trapping and fission induced re-solution of gas atoms associated with intragranular bubbles, and re-solution from the grain boundary into a few layers adjacent to the grain face. The second module considers the transport of the fission gas atoms along the grain boundaries. Four mechanisms are incorporated: diffusion controlled precipitation of gas atoms into bubbles, grain boundary bubble sweeping, re-solution of gas atoms into the adjacent grains and gas flow through open porosity when grain boundary bubbles are interconnected. The interconnection of the intergranular bubbles is affected both by the fraction of the grain face occupied by the cavities and by the balance between the bubble internal pressure and the hydrostatic pressure surrounding the bubbles. The model is under validation. In a first step, some numerical routines have been tested by means of analytic solutions. In a second step, the fission gas release model has been coupled with the FTEMP2 code of the Halden Reactor Project for the temperature distribution in the pellets. A parametric study of some steady-state irradiations and one power ramp have been simulated successfully. In particular, the Halden threshold for fission gas release and two simplified FUMEX cases have been computed and are summarised. (author)

  4. Considerations When Including Students with Disabilities in Test Security Policies. NCEO Policy Directions. Number 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Sheryl; Thurlow, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Sound test security policies and procedures are needed to ensure test security and confidentiality, and to help prevent cheating. In this era when cheating on tests draws regular media attention, there is a need for thoughtful consideration of the ways in which possible test security measures may affect accessibility for some students with…

  5. PAVAN: an atmospheric-dispersion program for evaluating design-basis accidental releases of radioactive materials from nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bander, T.J.

    1982-11-01

    This report provides a user's guide for the NRC computer program, PAVAN, which is a program used by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to estimate downwind ground-level air concentrations for potential accidental releases of radioactive material from nuclear facilities. Such an assessment is required by 10 CFR Part 100 and 10 CFR Part 50. The program implements the guidance provided in Regulatory Guide 1.145, Atmospheric Dispersion Models for Potential Accident Consequence Assessments at Nuclear Power Plants. Using joint frequency distributions of wind direction and wind speed by atmospheric stability, the program provides relative air concentration (X/Q) values as functions of direction for various time periods at the exclusion area boundary (EAB) and the outer boundary of the low population zone (LPZ). Calculations of X/Q values can be made for assumed ground-level releases (e.g., through building penetrations and vents) or elevated releases from free-standing stacks. Various options may be selected by the user. They can account for variation in the location of release points, additional plume dispersion due to building wakes, plume meander under low wind speed conditions, and adjustments to consider non-straight trajectories. It computes an effective plume height using the physical release height which can be reduced by inputted terrain features. It cannot handle multiple emission sources. A description of the main program and all subroutines is provided. Also included as appendices are a complete listing of the program and two test cases with the required data inputs and the resulting program outputs

  6. Controlled release of biofunctional substances by radiation-induced polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, M.; Kumakura, M.; Kaetsu, I.

    1978-01-01

    The controlled release of potassium chloride from flat circular matrices made by radiation-induced polymerization of a glass-forming monomer at low temperatures has been studied. The water-particle phase content formed in a poly(diethylene glycol dimethacrylate) matrix was controlled by the addition of polyethylene glycol 600. The dispersed water-particle phase content in the matrix was estimated directly and by scanning electron microscopic observations. The release of potassium chloride from the matrix increased linearly with the square root of time. The water content of the matrix had an important effect on the release rate which increases roughly in proportion to water content. This effect can be attributed to the apparent increase of the rate of drug diffusion. (author)

  7. Dose mortality relationships: implications for hypothetical accidental releases from FBRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, G.N.

    1979-01-01

    A summary is given of the findings detailed in the most recent of a series of radiological studies of a liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactor (Kelly, G.N. Simmonds, J.R. Smith, H. and Stather, J.W., The radiological consequences of notional accidental releases of radioactivity from fast breeder reactors: sensitivity to the dose-effect relationships adopted for early biological effects, Harwell, National Radiological Protection Board, NRPB-R87. London, HMSO (1979)). The results have indicated those areas where effort might be most profitably directed to improve the reliability of the predicted consequences. The composition of the released activity has been shown to have a marked influence on the sensitivity of the predicted consequences, and application of simple supportive medical treatment has a potential for reducing the predicted consequences by factors of up to an order of magnitude, depending on the composition of the release. (UK)

  8. Completion of decommissioning: Monitoring for site release and license termination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boing, L.E.

    1997-01-01

    To request termination of a license upon completion of dismantling or decommissioning activities, documenting any residual radioactivity to show that the levels are environmentally acceptable will be necessary. When the regulators approve the decommissioning plan, they establish what the release criteria for the decommissioned site will be at the time of the site release and license termination. The criteria are numeric guidelines for direct radiation in soils and on surfaces. If the regulatory body finds that the measured on-site values are below the guidelines, the site will be acceptable for unrestricted release (no radiological controls or future use). If areas are found above those values, more decontamination or cleanup of these areas may be required unless the regulatory body grants an exemption

  9. A new technique of single portal endoscopic carpal tunnel release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Wing-Yuk Josephine; Sweed, Tamer Ahmed; Fung, Kwok Keung Boris; Tipoe, George L; Pun, Tze Shing

    2012-03-01

    Since the first description of endoscopic carpal tunnel release (ECTR) in 1987 by Okutsu many endoscopic techniques have been developed, but the majority of the literature on ECTR has dealt with the Chow and Agee techniques. ECTR is indicated for carpal tunnel syndrome that is not responding to conservative treatment for 6 months. This new technique of ECTR is a single-portal technique using instruments originally designed for endoscopic cubital tunnel release, with no disposable instruments used. It also has the advantage of performing the release with the median nerve protected under direct vision. Ten cases were operated with this technique after performing the procedure on 8 hands of 4 fresh frozen cadavers. There were no neurovascular or tendon injuries with this technique and patients were satisfied with the results.

  10. 2015 TRI National Analysis: Toxics Release Inventory Releases at Various Summary Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    The TRI National Analysis is EPA's annual interpretation of TRI data at various summary levels. It highlights how toxic chemical wastes were managed, where toxic chemicals were released and how the 2015 TRI data compare to data from previous years. This dataset reports US state, county, large aquatic ecosystem, metro/micropolitan statistical area, and facility level statistics from 2015 TRI releases, including information on: number of 2015 TRI facilities in the geographic area and their releases (total, water, air, land); population information, including populations living within 1 mile of TRI facilities (total, minority, in poverty); and Risk Screening Environmental Indicators (RSEI) model related pounds, toxicity-weighted pounds, and RSEI score. The source of administrative boundary data is the 2013 cartographic boundary shapefiles. Location of facilities is provided by EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS). Large Aquatic Ecosystems boundaries were dissolved from the hydrologic unit boundaries and codes for the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. It was revised for inclusion in the National Atlas of the United States of America (November 2002), and updated to match the streams file created by the USGS National Mapping Division (NMD) for the National Atlas of the United States of America.

  11. ANSYS workbench tutorial release 14 structural & thermal analysis using the ANSYS workbench release 14 environment

    CERN Document Server

    Lawrence, Kent L

    2012-01-01

    The exercises in ANSYS Workbench Tutorial Release 14 introduce you to effective engineering problem solving through the use of this powerful modeling, simulation and optimization software suite. Topics that are covered include solid modeling, stress analysis, conduction/convection heat transfer, thermal stress, vibration, elastic buckling and geometric/material nonlinearities. It is designed for practicing and student engineers alike and is suitable for use with an organized course of instruction or for self-study. The compact presentation includes just over 100 end-of-chapter problems covering all aspects of the tutorials.

  12. The influence of DOM and microbial processes on arsenic release from karst during ASR operations in the Floridan Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, J.; Zimmerman, A. R.

    2011-12-01

    The mobilization of subsurface As poses a serious threat to human health, particularly in a region such as Florida where population is heavily dependent on highly porous karstic aquifers for drinking water. Injection water used in aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) or aquifer recharge (AR) operations is commonly high in dissolved organic matter (DOM) and OM can also be present in the subsurface carbonate rock. Using batch incubation experiments, this study examined the role of core preservation methods, as well as the influence of labile and more refractory DOM on the mobilization of As from carbonate rock. Incubation experiments used sealed reaction vessels with preserved and homogenized core materials collected via coring the Suwannee Formation in southwest Florida and treatment additions consisting of 1) source water (SW) enriched in sterilized soil DOM, 2) SW enriched in soil DOM and microbes, and 3) SW enriched in sodium acetate. During an initial equilibration phase in native groundwater (NGW) with low dissolved oxygen (DO; Phase 1), we found the greatest As release of the whole incubation. In the beginning of Phase 2 (N2 headspace) in which NGW was replaced with treatment solutions, there was little As release except in the vessel with Na-acetate added, which also had the lowest ORP. At the start of Phase 3, when incubations were exposed to air, most vessels saw more ion (including As) release into solution. Vessel with Na-acetate had less As release in Phase 3 than in Phase 2. During all experimental phases, treatments of DOM or microbe additions had no apparent effect on the amount of As release. The core materials was found contain significant amount of indigenous DOM (about 8 g OC/kg core) which was released during the incubation so DOC concentrations displayed no clear pattern among different treatments. At least three abiotic As mobilization mechanisms may play a role in As released during different stages of the experiment. Desorption of As from iron

  13. A Selection of Nitric Oxide-Releasing Materials Incorporating S-Nitrosothiols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutzke, Alec

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a diatomic radical that occurs as a crucial component of mammalian biochemistry. As a signaling molecule, NO participates in the regulation of vascular tone and maintains the natural antithrombotic function of the healthy endothelium. Furthermore, NO is produced by phagocytes as part of the immune response, and exhibits both antimicrobial and wound-healing effects. In combination, these beneficial properties have led to the use of exogenous NO as a multifunctional therapeutic agent. However, the comparatively short half-life of NO under physiological conditions often renders systemic administration infeasible. This limitation is addressed by the use of NO-releasing polymeric materials, which permit the localized delivery of NO directly at the intended site of action. Such polymers have been utilized in the development of antithrombotic or antibacterial materials for biointerfacial applications, including tissue engineering and the fabrication of medical devices. NO release from polymers has most frequently been achieved through the incorporation of functional groups that are susceptible to NO-forming chemical decomposition in response to appropriate environmental stimuli. While numerous synthetic sources of NO are known, the S-nitrosothiol (RSNO) functional group occurs naturally in the form of S-nitrosocysteine residues in both proteins and small molecule species such as S-nitrosoglutathione. RSNOs are synthesized directly from thiol precursors, and their NO-forming decay has generally been established to produce the corresponding disulfide as a relatively benign organic byproduct. For these reasons, RSNOs have been conscripted as practical NO donors within a physiological environment. This dissertation describes the synthesis and characterization of RSNO-based NO-releasing polymers derived from the polysaccharides chitin and chitosan, as well as the development of amino acid ester-based NO-releasing biodegradable poly

  14. CMS Partial Releases Model, Tools, and Applications. Online and Framework-Light Releases

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Christopher D; Meschi, Emilio; Shahzad Muzaffar; Andreas Pfeiffer; Ratnikova, Natalia; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The CMS Software project CMSSW embraces more than a thousand packages organized in subsystems for analysis, event display, reconstruction, simulation, detector description, data formats, framework, utilities and tools. The release integration process is highly automated by using tools developed or adopted by CMS. Packaging in rpm format is a built-in step in the software build process. For several well-defined applications it is highly desirable to have only a subset of the CMSSW full package bundle. For example, High Level Trigger algorithms that run on the Online farm, and need to be rebuilt in a special way, require no simulation, event display, or analysis packages. Physics analysis applications in Root environment require only a few core libraries and the description of CMS specific data formats. We present a model of CMS Partial Releases, used for preparation of the customized CMS software builds, including description of the tools used, the implementation, and how we deal with technical challenges, suc...

  15. Toxic chemical considerations for tank farm releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Keuren, J.C.; Davis, J.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    This topical report contains technical information used to determine the accident consequences of releases of toxic chemical and gases for the Tank Farm Final Safety Analysis report (FSAR).It does not provide results for specific accident scenarios but does provide information for use in those calculations including chemicals to be considered, chemical concentrations, chemical limits and a method of summing the fractional contributions of each chemical. Tank farm composites evaluated were liquids and solids for double shell tanks, single shell tanks, all solids,all liquids, headspace gases, and 241-C-106 solids. Emergency response planning guidelines (ERPGs) were used as the limits.Where ERPGs were not available for the chemicals of interest, surrogate ERPGs were developed. Revision 2 includes updated sample data, an executive summary, and some editorial revisions.

  16. Radioactive releases of nuclear power plants: the code ASTEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sdouz, G.; Pachole, M.

    1999-11-01

    In order to adopt potential countermeasures to protect the population during the course of an accident in a nuclear power plant a fast prediction of the radiation exposure is necessary. The basic input value for such a dispersion calculation is the source term, which is the description of the physical and chemical behavior of the released radioactive nuclides. Based on a source term data base a pilot system has been developed to determine a relevant source term and to generate the input file for the dispersion code TAMOS of the Zentralanstalt fuer Meteorologie und Geodynamik (ZAMG). This file can be sent directly as an attachment of e-mail to the TAMOS user for further processing. The source terms for 56 European nuclear power plant units are included in the pilot version of the code ASTEC (Austrian Source Term Estimation Code). The use of the system is demonstrated in an example based on an accident in the unit TEMELIN-1. In order to calculate typical core inventories for the data bank the international computer code OBIGEN 2.1 was installed and applied. The report has been completed with a discussion on the optimal data transfer. (author)

  17. Kisspeptin stimulates growth hormone release by utilizing Neuropeptide Y pathways and is dependent on the presence of ghrelin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although kisspeptin is the primary stimulator of gonadotropin releasing hormone secretion and therefore the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis, new findings suggest kisspeptin can also regulate additional neuroendocrine processes including release of growth hormone (GH). Central delivery of kisspep...

  18. Environmental releases for calendar year 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleckler, B.P.

    1998-01-01

    This report fulfills the annual environmental release reporting requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. This report provides supplemental information to the Hanford Site Environmental Report (PNNL-11795). The Hanford Site Environmental Report provides an update on the environmental status of the Hanford Site. The sitewide annual report summarizes the degree of compliance with applicable environmental regulations and informs the public concerning the impact of Hanford Site operations on the surrounding environment. Like the Hanford Site Environmental Report, this annual report presents a summary of the environmental releases from facilities and activities managed by the Fluor Daniel Hanford, Incorporated (FDH), and Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated (BHI). In addition to the summary data, this report also includes detailed data on air emissions, liquid effluents, and hazardous substances released to the environment during calendar year 1997. Comprehensive data summaries of air emissions and liquid effluents in 1997 are displayed in Tables ES-1 through ES-5. These tables represent the following: Table ES-1--Radionuclide air emissions data (detailed data on emissions are presented in Section 2.0); Table ES-2--Data on radioactive liquid effluents discharged to the soil (detailed data are presented in Section 3.0); Table ES-3--Radionuclides discharged to the Columbia River (detailed data are presented in Section 3.0); Table ES-4--Nonradioactive air emissions data (detailed data are presented in Section 2.0); Table ES-5--Total Volumes and Flow Rates of 200/600 Area Radioactive Liquid Effluents (detailed data are presented in Section 3.0)

  19. Massive radiological releases profoundly differ from controlled releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascucci-Cahen, Ludivine; Patrick, Momal

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors report identification and assessment of different types of costs associated with nuclear accidents. They first outline that these cost assessments must be as exhaustive or comprehensive as possible. While referring to past accidents, they define the different categories of costs: on-site costs (decontamination and dismantling, electricity not produced on the site), off-site costs (health costs, psychological costs, farming losses), image-related costs (impact on food and farm product exports, decrease of other exports), costs related to energy production, costs related to contaminated areas (refugees, lands). They give an assessment of a severe nuclear accident (i.e. an accident with important but controlled radiological releases) in France and outline that it would be a national catastrophe which could be however managed. They discuss the possible variations of the estimated costs. Then, they show that a major accident (i.e. an accident with massive radiological releases) in France would be an unmanageable European catastrophe because of the radiological consequences, of high economic costs, and of huge losses

  20. Gastrin-releasing peptide stimulates glycoconjugate release from feline trachea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundgren, J.D.; Baraniuk, J.N.; Ostrowski, N.L.; Kaliner, M.A.; Shelhamer, J.H.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) on respiratory glycoconjugate (RGC) secretion was investigated in a feline tracheal organ culture model. RGC secretion was stimulated by GRP in a dose-dependent fashion at concentrations from 10(-8) to 10(-5) M (range 15-38% increase above control) with a peak effect within 0.5-1 h of incubation. GRP-(14-27), the receptor binding portion of GRP, and the related molecule, bombesin, also stimulated RGC secretion by approximately 20% above control. Acetyl-GRP-(20-27) stimulated RGC release by 10%, whereas GRP-(1-16) was inactive. Autoradiographic studies with 125I-GRP revealed that specific binding was restricted to the submucosal glands and the surface epithelium. A specific radioimmunoassay showed the content of GRP in feline trachea after extraction with ethanol-acetic acid to be 156 +/- 91 fmol/g wet wt. Indirect immunohistochemistry indicated that ganglion cells located just outside the cartilage contained GRP-immunoreactive materials. GRP is a novel mucus secretagogue that may participate in regulating airway mucosal gland secretion

  1. Enhancement of aspirin capsulation by porous particles including iron hydrous oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Kenji; Koishi, Masumi; Hosoi, Fumio; Makuuchi, Keizo.

    1986-01-01

    Polymer-coated porous particles containing aspirin as a drug were prepared and the release of rate of aspirin was studied. The impregnation of aspirin was carried out by post-graft polymerization, where methyl methacrylate containing aspirin was treated with porous particles including iron oxide, pre-irradiated with γ-ray form Co-60. Release of aspirin from modified particles was examined with 50 % methanol solution. The amount of aspirin absorbed in porous particles increased by grafting of methyl methacrylate. The particles treated with iron hydrous oxide sols before irradiation led to the increment of aspirin absorption. Diffusion of aspirin through the polymer matrix and the gelled layer was the limiting process in the aspirin release from particles. The rate of aspirin released from modified particles including iron hydrous oxide wasn't affected by the grafting of methyl methacrylate. (author)

  2. A compartment model for nuclide release calculation in the near-and far-field of a HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Hwang, Yong Soo; Kang, Chul Hyung; Hahn, Pil Soo

    2004-01-01

    The HLW-relevant R and D program for disposal of high-level radioactive waste has been carried out at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) since early 1997, from which a conceptual Korea Reference Repository System for direct disposal of nuclear spent fuel is to be introduced by the end of 2007. A preliminary reference geologic repository concept considering such established criteria and requirements as spent fuel and generic site characteristics in Korea was roughly envisaged in 2003. Not only to demonstrate how much a reference repository is safe in the generic point of view with several possible scenarios and cases associated with a preliminary repository concept by conducting calculations for nuclide release and transport in the near - and far - field components of the repository, even though sufficient information has not been available that much yet, but also to show a appropriate methodology by which both a generic and site - specific safety assessment could be performed for further in - depth development of Korea reference repository concept, nuclide release calculation study for various nuclide release cases is mandatory. To this end a similar study done and yet limited for the near - field release case has been extended to the case including far - field system by introducing some more geosphere compartments. Advective and longitudinal dispersive nuclide transports along the fracture with matrix diffusion as well as several retention mechanisms and nuclide ingrowth has been added

  3. Influence of the conditional release of the materials with very low level of radioactivity on the environment - 59132

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prvakova, Slavka; Mrskova, Adela; Pritrsky, Jozef

    2012-01-01

    Significant amount of solid materials (metals, non-metals, building structures) that could be contaminated or activated is produced during operation and especially decommissioning of nuclear power plants. Considerable fraction of these materials has level of radioactivity close to the radiological limits allowing its safe release into the environment thereby could be potentially recycled within the special constructions, as for example tunnels, roads or bridges. If the requirements of legislation on the radiological limits for handling such material and long-term safety of the constructions are met, contaminated material can be incorporated in the form of recycled concrete, remelted steel, etc. The paper presents implementation of the IAEA and EC recommendations into the form of detailed analytical approaches with the aim to develop integrated scenarios and to analyse long-term influence of the conditional release of the material with very low level of radioactivity on the environment. Further, an estimation of the key input parameters characteristic for the specific conditions of Slovak case in order to fulfil the radiological limits according to the Slovak legislation is included. Analysed integrated scenarios represent surface or underground civil construction with radionuclides released directly into the geosphere and transported by a groundwater flow to the biosphere. The migration of radionuclides is modelled in the near-surface conditions with the advection as a dominant transport mechanism. Computer code GoldSim is used to evaluate the long-term safety assessment of the conditionally released material on the environment. (authors)

  4. The Relationship Between the Evolution of an Internal Structure and Drug Dissolution from Controlled-Release Matrix Tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulinowski, Piotr; Hudy, Wiktor; Mendyk, Aleksander; Juszczyk, Ewelina; Węglarz, Władysław P; Jachowicz, Renata; Dorożyński, Przemysław

    2016-06-01

    In the last decade, imaging has been introduced as a supplementary method to the dissolution tests, but a direct relationship of dissolution and imaging data has been almost completely overlooked. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of relating magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and dissolution data to elucidate dissolution profile features (i.e., kinetics, kinetics changes, and variability). Commercial, hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose-based quetiapine fumarate controlled-release matrix tablets were studied using the following two methods: (i) MRI inside the USP4 apparatus with subsequent machine learning-based image segmentation and (ii) dissolution testing with piecewise dissolution modeling. Obtained data were analyzed together using statistical data processing methods, including multiple linear regression. As a result, in this case, zeroth order release was found to be a consequence of internal structure evolution (interplay between region's areas-e.g., linear relationship between interface and core), which eventually resulted in core disappearance. Dry core disappearance had an impact on (i) changes in dissolution kinetics (from zeroth order to nonlinear) and (ii) an increase in variability of drug dissolution results. It can be concluded that it is feasible to parameterize changes in micro/meso morphology of hydrated, controlled release, swellable matrices using MRI to establish a causal relationship between the changes in morphology and drug dissolution. Presented results open new perspectives in practical application of combined MRI/dissolution to controlled-release drug products.

  5. Directed network modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palla, Gergely; Farkas, Illes J; Pollner, Peter; Derenyi, Imre; Vicsek, Tamas

    2007-01-01

    A search technique locating network modules, i.e. internally densely connected groups of nodes in directed networks is introduced by extending the clique percolation method originally proposed for undirected networks. After giving a suitable definition for directed modules we investigate their percolation transition in the Erdos-Renyi graph both analytically and numerically. We also analyse four real-world directed networks, including Google's own web-pages, an email network, a word association graph and the transcriptional regulatory network of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The obtained directed modules are validated by additional information available for the nodes. We find that directed modules of real-world graphs inherently overlap and the investigated networks can be classified into two major groups in terms of the overlaps between the modules. Accordingly, in the word-association network and Google's web-pages, overlaps are likely to contain in-hubs, whereas the modules in the email and transcriptional regulatory network tend to overlap via out-hubs

  6. Estimating directional epistasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Rouzic, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Epistasis, i.e., the fact that gene effects depend on the genetic background, is a direct consequence of the complexity of genetic architectures. Despite this, most of the models used in evolutionary and quantitative genetics pay scant attention to genetic interactions. For instance, the traditional decomposition of genetic effects models epistasis as noise around the evolutionarily-relevant additive effects. Such an approach is only valid if it is assumed that there is no general pattern among interactions—a highly speculative scenario. Systematic interactions generate directional epistasis, which has major evolutionary consequences. In spite of its importance, directional epistasis is rarely measured or reported by quantitative geneticists, not only because its relevance is generally ignored, but also due to the lack of simple, operational, and accessible methods for its estimation. This paper describes conceptual and statistical tools that can be used to estimate directional epistasis from various kinds of data, including QTL mapping results, phenotype measurements in mutants, and artificial selection responses. As an illustration, I measured directional epistasis from a real-life example. I then discuss the interpretation of the estimates, showing how they can be used to draw meaningful biological inferences. PMID:25071828

  7. Hybrid nanostructured drug carrier with tunable and controlled drug release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depan, D.; Misra, R.D.K.

    2012-01-01

    We describe here a transformative approach to synthesize a hybrid nanostructured drug carrier that exhibits the characteristics of controlled drug release. The synthesis of the nanohybrid architecture involved two steps. The first step involved direct crystallization of biocompatible copolymer along the long axis of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs), followed by the second step of attachment of drug molecule to the polymer via hydrogen bonding. The extraordinary inorganic–organic hybrid architecture exhibited high drug loading ability and is physically stable even under extreme conditions of acidic media and ultrasonic irradiation. The temperature and pH sensitive characteristics of the hybrid drug carrier and high drug loading ability merit its consideration as a promising carrier and utilization of the fundamental aspects used for synthesis of other promising drug carriers. The higher drug release response during the application of ultrasonic frequency is ascribed to a cavitation-type process in which the acoustic bubbles nucleate and collapse releasing the drug. Furthermore, the study underscores the potential of uniquely combining CNTs and biopolymers for drug delivery. - Graphical abstract: Block-copolymer crystallized on carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Nanohybrid drug carrier synthesized by attaching doxorubicin (DOX) to polymer crystallized CNTs. Crystallized polymer on CNTs provide mechanical stability. Triggered release of DOX. Highlights: ► The novel synthesis of a hybrid nanostructured drug carrier is described. ► The drug carrier exhibits high drug loading ability and is physically stable. ► The high drug release is ascribed to a cavitation-type process.

  8. Formulation and Release Characteristics of Zidovudine- Loaded ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drug Delivery Research Unit, Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of ... The results show that drug content has influence on drug release from the SLMs, but not ... poor bioavailability [1, 2]. ..... et al [21] this initial in vitro burst release could be.

  9. Toxic Release Inventory Chemicals by Groupings

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) makes available information for more than 600 toxic chemicals that are being used, manufactured, treated, transported, or released...

  10. Safety Precautions for Total Release Foggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total release foggers, also known as bug bombs, are pesticide products containing aerosol propellants that release their contents at once to fumigate an area. They can pose a hazard if used incorrectly. Find safety information and videos on this page.

  11. A multifunctional multimaterial system for on-demand protein release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncaboylu, Deniz Ceylan; Friess, Fabian; Wischke, Christian; Lendlein, Andreas

    2018-06-15

    In order to provide best control of the regeneration process for each individual patient, the release of protein drugs administered during surgery may need to be timely adapted and/or delayed according to the progress of healing/regeneration. This study aims to establish a multifunctional implant system for a local on-demand release, which is applicable for various types of proteins. It was hypothesized that a tubular multimaterial container kit, which hosts the protein of interest as a solution or gel formulation, would enable on-demand release if equipped with the capacity of diameter reduction upon external stimulation. Using devices from poly(ɛ-caprolactone) networks, it could be demonstrated that a shape-memory effect activated by heat or NIR light enabled on-demand tube shrinkage. The decrease of diameter of these shape-memory tubes (SMT) allowed expelling the payload as demonstrated for several proteins including SDF-1α, a therapeutically relevant chemotactic protein, to achieve e.g. continuous release with a triggered add-on dosing (open tube) or an on-demand onset of bolus or sustained release (sealed tube). Considering the clinical relevance of protein factors in (stem) cell attraction to lesions and the progress in monitoring biomarkers in body fluids, such on-demand release systems may be further explored e.g. in heart, nerve, or bone regeneration in the future. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Influence of environmental factors on mercury release in hydroelectric reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, K.; Therien, N.

    1991-04-01

    Due to increased mercury concentrations in fish in hydro-electric reservoirs after flooding, a study was carried out to evaluate the release and transformation of mercury due to vegetation and soil flooded as a result of reservoir creation. Samples of vegetation and soils were immersed in water and concentrations of total mercury, methylmercury and nutrients were followed. The effects of anoxia, pH and temperature on release and transformation were examined. An existing dynamic model of decomposition of flooded materials in reservoirs was modified to include mercury release and transformation, and was calibrated to the experimental data. Amounts of mercury released by the different substrates was of the same order of magnitude. Tree species contributed to the greatest amounts of methylmercury per unit biomass, but the biomass used for these was twigs and foliage. Soil released significant amounts of mercury, but methylation was very low. The model was able to fit well for all substrates except lichen. The model can be adapted to proposed reservoirs to predict nutrient and mecury release and transformation. 175 refs., 38 figs., 38 tabs.

  13. Perspective on direct conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, W B

    1963-10-15

    The objective of direct conversion is high electrical output for minimum total cost, and not always high conversion efficiency. The wide range of techniques embracing cryogenics and hot plasma derives from the special requirements of source, environment, and application. Sources include solar and other radiation, nuclear fission and fusion, chemical energy, and heat. Environments and applications range from space vehicles to submarines and from giant power networks to isolated buoys and pocket devices. (auth)

  14. Concomitant release of ventral tegmental acetylcholine and accumbal dopamine by ghrelin in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabet Jerlhag

    Full Text Available Ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide, regulates energy balance specifically via hypothalamic circuits. Growing evidence suggest that ghrelin increases the incentive value of motivated behaviours via activation of the cholinergic-dopaminergic reward link. It encompasses the cholinergic afferent projection from the laterodorsal tegmental area (LDTg to the dopaminergic cells of the ventral tegmental area (VTA and the mesolimbic dopamine system projecting from the VTA to nucleus accumbens (N.Acc.. Ghrelin receptors (GHS-R1A are expressed in these reward nodes and ghrelin administration into the LDTg increases accumbal dopamine, an effect involving nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the VTA. The present series of experiments were undertaken directly to test this hypothesis. Here we show that ghrelin, administered peripherally or locally into the LDTg concomitantly increases ventral tegmental acetylcholine as well as accumbal dopamine release. A GHS-R1A antagonist blocks this synchronous neurotransmitter release induced by peripheral ghrelin. In addition, local perfusion of the unselective nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine into the VTA blocks the ability of ghrelin (administered into the LDTg to increase N.Acc.-dopamine, but not VTA-acetylcholine. Collectively our data indicate that ghrelin activates the LDTg causing a release of acetylcholine in the VTA, which in turn activates local nicotinic acetylcholine receptors causing a release of accumbal dopamine. Given that a dysfunction in the cholinergic-dopaminergic reward system is involved in addictive behaviours, including compulsive overeating and alcohol use disorder, and that hyperghrelinemia is associated with such addictive behaviours, ghrelin-responsive circuits may serve as a novel pharmacological target for treatment of alcohol use disorder as well as binge eating.

  15. Isotocin Regulates Growth Hormone but Not Prolactin Release From the Pituitary of Ricefield Eels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The neurohypophyseal hormone oxytocin (Oxt has been shown to stimulate prolactin (Prl synthesis and release from the adenohypophysis in rats. However, little is known about the functional roles of Oxt-like neuropeptides in the adenohypophysis of non-mammalian vertebrates. In this study, cDNAs encoding ricefield eel oxytocin-like receptors (Oxtlr, namely isotocin (Ist receptor 1 (Istr1 and 2 (Istr2, were isolated and specific antisera were generated, respectively. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis detected the presence of both Istr1 and Istr2 in the brain and pituitary, but differential expression in some peripheral tissues, including the liver and kidney, where only Istr1 was detected. In the pituitary, immunoreactive Istr1 and Istr2 were differentially distributed, with the former mainly in adenohypophyseal cell layers adjacent to the neurohypophysis, whereas the latter in peripheral areas of the adenohypophysis. Double immunofluorescent images showed that immunostaining of Istr1, but not Istr2 was localized to growth hormone (Gh cells, but neither of them was expressed in Prl cells. Ist inhibited Gh release in primary pituitary cells of ricefield eels and increased Gh contents in the pituitary gland of ricefield eels at 6 h after in vivo administration. Ist inhibition of Gh release is probably mediated by cAMP, PKC/DAG, and IP3/Ca2+ pathways. In contrast, Ist did not affect either prl gene expression or Prl contents in primary pituitary cells. Results of this study demonstrated that Ist may not be involved in the regulation of Prl, but inhibit Gh release via Istr1 rather than Istr2 in ricefield eels, and provided evidence for the direct regulation of Gh cells by oxytocin-like neuropeptides in the pituitary of non-mammalian vertebrates.

  16. Isotocin Regulates Growth Hormone but Not Prolactin Release From the Pituitary of Ricefield Eels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Zhang, Ning; Shi, Boyang; Zhang, Shen; Zhang, Lihong; Zhang, Weimin

    2018-01-01

    The neurohypophyseal hormone oxytocin (Oxt) has been shown to stimulate prolactin (Prl) synthesis and release from the adenohypophysis in rats. However, little is known about the functional roles of Oxt-like neuropeptides in the adenohypophysis of non-mammalian vertebrates. In this study, cDNAs encoding ricefield eel oxytocin-like receptors (Oxtlr), namely isotocin (Ist) receptor 1 (Istr1) and 2 (Istr2), were isolated and specific antisera were generated, respectively. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis detected the presence of both Istr1 and Istr2 in the brain and pituitary, but differential expression in some peripheral tissues, including the liver and kidney, where only Istr1 was detected. In the pituitary, immunoreactive Istr1 and Istr2 were differentially distributed, with the former mainly in adenohypophyseal cell layers adjacent to the neurohypophysis, whereas the latter in peripheral areas of the adenohypophysis. Double immunofluorescent images showed that immunostaining of Istr1, but not Istr2 was localized to growth hormone (Gh) cells, but neither of them was expressed in Prl cells. Ist inhibited Gh release in primary pituitary cells of ricefield eels and increased Gh contents in the pituitary gland of ricefield eels at 6 h after in vivo administration. Ist inhibition of Gh release is probably mediated by cAMP, PKC/DAG, and IP3/Ca2+ pathways. In contrast, Ist did not affect either prl gene expression or Prl contents in primary pituitary cells. Results of this study demonstrated that Ist may not be involved in the regulation of Prl, but inhibit Gh release via Istr1 rather than Istr2 in ricefield eels, and provided evidence for the direct regulation of Gh cells by oxytocin-like neuropeptides in the pituitary of non-mammalian vertebrates.

  17. Design and evaluation of lornoxicam bilayered tablets for biphasic release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songa Ambedkar Sunil

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present investigation was to develop bilayered tablets of lornoxicam to achieve biphasic release pattern. A bilayered tablet, consisting of an immediate and controlled release layer, was prepared by direct compression technique. The controlled release effect was achieved by using various hydrophilic natural, semi synthetic and synthetic controlled release polymers such as xanthan gum, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC and polyethylene oxide (PEO to modulate the release of the drug. The in vitro drug release profiles showed the biphasic release behavior in which the immediate release (IR layer containing the lornoxicam was released within 15 minutes, whereas the controlled release (CR layer controlled the drug release for up to 24 h. All the bilayered tablets formulated have followed the zero order release with non-Fickian diffusion controlled release mechanism after the initial burst release. FTIR studies revealed that there was no interaction between the drug and polymers used in the study. Statistical analysis (ANOVA showed no significant difference in the cumulative amount of drug release after 15 min, but significant difference (p O objetivo do presente trabalho foi desenvolver comprimidos bicamada de lornoxicam para atingir padrão de liberação bifásica. Preparou-se, por compressão direta, comprimido bicamada, consistindo de uma camada de liberação imediata e uma de liberação controlada. A liberação controlada foi obtida pelo uso de vários polímeros naturais hidrofílicos, semi-sintéticos e sintéticos, tais como goma xantana, hidroxipropilmetil celulose (HPMC e óxido de polietileno (PEO para modular a liberação do fármaco. Os perfis de liberação in vitro mostraram comportamento bifásico em que a camada de liberação imediata (IR contendo lornoxicam foi liberada em 15 minutos, enquanto a camada de liberação controlada (CR liberou o fármaco em mais de 24 horas, Todos os comprimidos bicamada

  18. Direct conversion of fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Markus

    2003-03-01

    Deuterium and tritium are expected to be used as fuel in the first fusion reactors. Energy is released as kinetic energy of ions and neutrons, when deuterium reacts with tritium. One way to convert the kinetic energy to electrical energy, is to let the ions and neutrons hit the reactor wall and convert the heat that is caused by the particle bombardment to electrical energy with ordinary thermal conversion. If the kinetic energy of the ions instead is converted directly to electrical energy, a higher efficiency of the energy conversion is possible. The majority of the fusion energy is released as kinetic energy of neutrons, when deuterium reacts with tritium. Fusion reactions such as the D-D reactions, the D- 3 He reaction and the p- 11 B reaction, where a larger part of the fusion energy becomes kinetic energy of charged particles, appears therefore more suitable for direct conversion. Since they have lower reactivity than the D-T reaction, they need a larger βB 2 0 to give sufficiently high fusion power density. Because of this, the fusion configurations spherical torus (ST) and field-reversed configuration (FRC), where high β values are possible, appear interesting. Rosenbluth and Hinton come to the conclusion that efficient direct conversion isn't possible in closed field line systems and that open geometries, which facilitate direct conversion, provide inadequate confinement for D- 3 He. It is confirmed in this study that it doesn't seem possible to achieve as high direct conversion efficiency in closed systems as in open systems. ST and FRC fusion power plants that utilize direct conversion seem however interesting. Calculations with the help of Maple indicate that the reactor parameters needed for a D-D ST and a D 3 He ST hopefully are possible to achieve. The best energy conversion option for a D-D or D 3 He ST appears to be direct electrodynamic conversion (DEC) together with ordinary thermal conversion or liquid metal MHD conversion (LMMHD). For a D

  19. Direct conversion of fusion energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Markus

    2003-03-01

    Deuterium and tritium are expected to be used as fuel in the first fusion reactors. Energy is released as kinetic energy of ions and neutrons, when deuterium reacts with tritium. One way to convert the kinetic energy to electrical energy, is to let the ions and neutrons hit the reactor wall and convert the heat that is caused by the particle bombardment to electrical energy with ordinary thermal conversion. If the kinetic energy of the ions instead is converted directly to electrical energy, a higher efficiency of the energy conversion is possible. The majority of the fusion energy is released as kinetic energy of neutrons, when deuterium reacts with tritium. Fusion reactions such as the D-D reactions, the D-{sup 3}He reaction and the p-{sup 11}B reaction, where a larger part of the fusion energy becomes kinetic energy of charged particles, appears therefore more suitable for direct conversion. Since they have lower reactivity than the D-T reaction, they need a larger {beta}B{sup 2}{sub 0} to give sufficiently high fusion power density. Because of this, the fusion configurations spherical torus (ST) and field-reversed configuration (FRC), where high {beta} values are possible, appear interesting. Rosenbluth and Hinton come to the conclusion that efficient direct conversion isn't possible in closed field line systems and that open geometries, which facilitate direct conversion, provide inadequate confinement for D-{sup 3}He. It is confirmed in this study that it doesn't seem possible to achieve as high direct conversion efficiency in closed systems as in open systems. ST and FRC fusion power plants that utilize direct conversion seem however interesting. Calculations with the help of Maple indicate that the reactor parameters needed for a D-D ST and a D{sub 3} He ST hopefully are possible to achieve. The best energy conversion option for a D-D or D{sub 3} He ST appears to be direct electrodynamic conversion (DEC) together with ordinary thermal conversion

  20. Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid Evsey Fridlyand

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH is produced by the hypothalamus and stimulates growth hormone synthesis and release in the anterior pituitary gland. In addition GHRH is an important regulator of cellular functions in many cells and organs. Expression of GHRH G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GHRHR has been demonstrated in different peripheral tissues and cell types including pancreatic islets. Among the peripheral activities, recent studies demonstrate a novel ability of GHRH analogs to increase and preserve insulin secretion by beta-cells in isolated pancreatic islets, which makes them potentially useful for diabetes treatment. This review considers the role of GHRHR in the beta-cell and addresses the unique engineered GHRH agonists and antagonists for treatment of Type 2 diabetes mellitus. We discuss the similarity of signaling pathways activated by GHRHR in pituitary somatotrophs and in pancreatic beta-cells and possible ways as to how the GHRHR pathway can interact with glucose and other secretagogues to stimulate insulin secretion. We also consider the hypothesis that novel GHRHR agonists can improve glucose metabolism in Type 2 diabetes by preserving the function and survival of pancreatic beta-cells. Wound healing and cardioprotective action with new GHRH agonists suggesting that they may prove useful in ameliorating certain diabetic complications. These findings highlight the future potential therapeutic effectiveness of modulators of GHRHR activity for the development of new therapeutic approaches in diabetes and its complications.

  1. Initial assessment of MHTGR confinement releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maneke, J.L.; Lanning, D.D.; Lidsky, L.M.

    1986-01-01

    Initial investigation of Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) designs suggest that source terms during postulated accidents will be considerably lower than Light Water Reactor (LWR) source term estimates. These lower postulated accident releases are not only a safety incentive, but also an economic incentive for the development of this reactor type. For example, it is hoped that a filtered confinement building, rather than a more expensive LWR-like containment building, would adequately protect the public from radiological releases. The ability of a confinement building to satisfy safety requirements for the MHTGR depends on several reactor parameters, such as fuel quality, reactor design, and the design of the reactor building. SCIMCA, a Simple Code for Initial MHTGR Confinement Assessment has been developed for preliminary MHTGR building requirement calculations. The code is capable of modeling a decay chain with a maximum of five regions. Phenomena such as fission product decay and buildup, natural deposition, building filtration, and intercompartmental transport are incorporated. SCIMCA models reduction mechanisms, such as dispersion and decay, occurring as radioactivity is transported through the environment. A subroutine for calculating doses at specified distances has also been included

  2. Myocardial myoglobin release after acute myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, P S; Saltissi, S; Coltart, D J; Croft, D N [Saint Thomas' Hospital, London (UK)

    1980-03-01

    The magnitude and time course of myoglobin release from the myocardium following infarction was assessed by radioimmunoassay. The assay showed acceptable precision over a working range from 50 to 750 ng cm/sup -3/, provided careful control of the assay temperature was maintained. The use of this radioimmunoassay as an early diagnostic test for infarction and as a potential measure of the extent of necrosis is considered and comparison made with the release of CK-MB, the myocardial specific isoenzyme of creatine kinase. Of the twenty patients studied with myocardial infarction, all had elevated levels of serum myoglobin including those admitted within 3 hours of the onset of pain. In contrast, CK-MB was not detected in the serum within 5 hours of the onset of pain. Peak serum levels of myoglobin (mean 852 +- 365 ng cm/sup -3/) and CK-MB (mean 71 +- 25 mIU cm/sup -3/) were detected at 8-16 hours and 20-24 hours respectively after the onset of pain. A comparison of peak serum levels of myoglobin and CK-MB showed a good correlation (r = 0.84).

  3. Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project site release protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handy, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    The Richland, Washington field office of the DOE and its Remedial Actions Contractor, GE, took possession of the SSDP site in September 1984. In February of the following year, DOE-HQ issued generic, site independent guidelines taken from existing radiation protection standards. Basic generic dose limits were English equivalents of 1 mSv (100 mrem) per year averaged over the lifetime of any individual member of the general public. Hot spot limits were given. Occupied or habitable structures were limited to 5.2 x 10 -9 C/Kg h (20mR/h). Surface contamination was limited to standards plus average and maximum contact dose rates of 2 microGy (0.2 mrad) per hour and 10 microGy (1 mrad) per hour respectively. In addition, ''all exposures ... were to be limited to levels that (were) as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA).'' Authorized limits higher than these guidelines were allowed under given exceptional circumstances. GE determined the allowable radionuclide concentrations that could remain in soil and included rubble, and not dose the resident farmer to more than 1 mSv (100 mrem) per year. Under more conservative scenarios, however, exposures were controlled for buried, potentially occupationally occupiable, concrete substructures, to souvenir items, or to buried, but potentially exposed, concrete slabs. GE incorporated the scenario's pathways into a document implementing specific site release criteria which cannot be exceeded if the site is to be released unconditionally. 3 refs., 1 fig

  4. Burnable absorber rod releasable latching structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjertsen, R.K.; Wilson, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    An elongated nuclear reactivity control member, a releasable latching structure useful for releasably attaching the control member at an end to a top nozzle adapter plate of a nuclear fuel assembly is described comprising: (a) a mounting body including an inner plug portion attached to the end of the control member and an outer end portion disposed axially outward from the inner plug portion and the end of the member; and (b) a spring latch disposed about the mounting body and being attached to the outer end portion. The spring latch has at least one latch finger extending toward the inner plug portion of the body and is movable toward and away from the body between an outer latching position in which the finger is adapted to engage a fuel assembly top nozzle adapter plate and retain the elongated member in a stationary relationship with respect to the adapter plate and an inner unlatching position in which the finger is adapted to disengage from the adapter plate and allow removal of the member from the adapter plate

  5. SU-F-19A-08: Optimal Time Release Schedule of In-Situ Drug Release During Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormack, R; Ngwa, W; Makrigiorgos, G; Tangutoori, S; Rajiv, K; Sridhar, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Permanent prostate brachytherapy spacers can be used to deliver sustained doses of radiosentitizing drug directly to the target, in order to enhance the radiation effect. Implantable nanoplatforms for chemo-radiation therapy (INCeRTs) have a maximum drug capacity and can be engineered to control the drug release schedule. The optimal schedule for sensitization during continuous low dose rate irradiation is unknown. This work studies the optimal release schedule of drug for both traditional sensitizers, and those that work by suppressing DNA repair processes. Methods: Six brachytherapy treatment plans were used to model the anatomy, implant geometry and calculate the spatial distribution of radiation dose and drug concentrations for a range of drug diffusion parameters. Three state partial differential equations (cells healthy, damaged or dead) modeled the effect of continuous radiation (radiosensitivities α,β) and cellular repair (time tr) on a cell population. Radiosensitization was modeled as concentration dependent change in α,β or tr which with variable duration under the constraint of fixed total drug release. Average cell kill was used to measure effectiveness. Sensitization by means of both enhanced damage and reduced repair were studied. Results: Optimal release duration is dependent on the concentration of radiosensitizer compared to the saturation concentration (csat) above which additional sensitization does not occur. Long duration drug release when enhancing α or β maximizes cell death when drug concentrations are generally over csat. Short term release is optimal for concentrations below saturation. Sensitization by suppressing repair has a similar though less distinct trend that is more affected by the radiation dose distribution. Conclusion: Models of sustained local radiosensitization show potential to increase the effectiveness of radiation in permanent prostate brachytherapy. INCeRTs with high drug capacity produce the greatest

  6. Techniques for Reaeration of Hydropower Releases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-01

    release improvement. However, selected reservoir aeration studies not conducted primarily for improving hydroturbine releases but which have application...for hydroturbine release reaeration were also reviewed. Because oxygen transfer mechanisms are vitally important to the development of more efficient...the key words turbine aeration, turbine vent, turbine I’ aspiration, hydroturbine aeration, tailrace aeration, draft tube vent, and vacuum breaker. A

  7. 21 CFR 178.3860 - Release agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Release agents. 178.3860 Section 178.3860 Food and... and Production Aids § 178.3860 Release agents. Substances listed in paragraph (b) of this section may be safely used as release agents in petroleum wax complying with § 178.3710 and in polymeric resins...

  8. 21 CFR 181.28 - Release agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Release agents. 181.28 Section 181.28 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Release agents. Substances classified as release agents, when migrating from food-packaging material shall...

  9. ATP Release and Effects in Pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, Ivana; Amstrup, Jan; Henriksen, Katrine Lütken

    2003-01-01

    ATP and other nucleotides are released from various cells, but the pathway and physiological stimulus for ATP release are often unclear. The focus of our studies is the understanding of ATP release and signaling in rat exocrine pancreas. In acinar suspension mechanical stimulation, hypotonic shock...

  10. 40 CFR 281.33 - Release detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... equipped with release detection that detects a release within an hour by restricting or shutting off flow... designed to allow the contents of the pipe to drain back into the storage tank if the suction is released... UST systems must use interstitial monitoring within secondary containment of the tanks and the...

  11. Understanding release kinetics of biopolymer drug delivery microcapsules for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Salil; Perkins, Jessica; Harrison, Benjamin S.; Sankar, Jag

    2010-01-01

    Drug delivery and dosage concentrations are considered as major focal points in conventional as well as battlefield emergency medicine. The concept of localizing drug delivery via microcapsules is an evolving field to confine the adverse side effects of high concentration drug doses. This paper focuses on understanding release kinetics through biopolymer microcapsules for time-dependent drug release. Calcium alginate microcapsules were manufactured using a direct-write inkjet technique. Rhodamine 6G was used as the release agent to observe the release kinetics from calcium alginate beads in distilled water. A design of experiments was constructed to compare the effect of the microcapsule diameter and different concentrations of calcium chloride (M) and sodium alginate (%, w/v) solutions on the release kinetics profiles of the microcapsules. This research gives insight to identify favorable sizes of microcapsules and concentrations of sodium alginate and calcium chloride solutions for controlled release behavior of drug delivery microcapsules.

  12. Characterization of unsaturated fatty acid sustained-release microspheres for long-term algal inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Lixiao; Jie, Xiaoting; Wang, Peifang; Li, Shiyin; Hu, Shuzhen; Li, Yiping; Li, Yong; Acharya, Kumud

    2015-02-01

    The unsaturated fatty acid (linoleic acid) sustained-release microspheres were prepared with linoleic acid (LA) using alginate-chitosan microcapsule technology. These LA sustained-release microspheres had a high encapsulation efficiency (up to 62%) tested by high performance liquid chromatography with a photo diode array. The dry microspheres were characterized by a scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction measurement, dynamic thermogravimetric analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectral analysis. The results of characterization showed that the microspheres had good thermal stability (decomposition temperature of 236°C), stable and temperature independent release properties (release time of more than 40 d). Compared to direct dosing of LA, LA sustained-released microspheres could inhibit Microcystis aeruginosa growth to the non-growth state. The results of this study suggested that the LA sustained-release microspheres may be a potential candidate for algal inhibition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fluoride and sodium trimetaphosphate (TMP release from fluoride varnishes supplemented with TMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Mauricio MANARELLI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study assessed fluoride (F and sodium trimetaphosphate (TMP release into artificial saliva from varnishes containing 0%, 2.5%, and 5% NaF, supplemented or not with 5% TMP. The varnishes were applied on polyester sheets (n = 8/group, and F and TMP released into artificial saliva were measured for up to 24 hours. The amount of F and TMP released were directly related to NaF and TMP concentrations in the varnishes. The highest F release was seen for 5% NaF and 5% NaF + 5% TMP, whereas 5% TMP released the highest amount of TMP. However, the simultaneous addition of NaF and TMP to varnishes significantly reduced the amount of F and TMP released from the products.

  14. Nuclear energy release from fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Cheng [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Souza, S.R. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro Cidade Universitária, Caixa Postal 68528, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tsang, M.B. [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Zhang, Feng-Shou, E-mail: fszhang@bnu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-08-15

    It is well known that binary fission occurs with positive energy gain. In this article we examine the energetics of splitting uranium and thorium isotopes into various numbers of fragments (from two to eight) with nearly equal size. We find that the energy released by splitting {sup 230,232}Th and {sup 235,238}U into three equal size fragments is largest. The statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) is applied to calculate the probability of different breakup channels for excited nuclei. By weighing the probability distributions of fragment multiplicity at different excitation energies, we find the peaks of energy release for {sup 230,232}Th and {sup 235,238}U are around 0.7–0.75 MeV/u at excitation energy between 1.2 and 2 MeV/u in the primary breakup process. Taking into account the secondary de-excitation processes of primary fragments with the GEMINI code, these energy peaks fall to about 0.45 MeV/u.

  15. Diffusion rates for elevated releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsdell, J.V.

    1983-11-01

    A search of the literature related to diffusion from elevated sources has determined that an adequate data base exists for use in developing parameterizations for estimating diffusion rates for material released from free standing stacks at nuclear power plants. A review of published data analyses indicates that a new parameterization of horizontal diffusion rates specifically for elevated releases is not likely to significantly change the magnitudes of horizontal diffusion coefficients on the average. However, the uncertainties associated with horizontal diffusion coefficient estimates under any given set of atmospheric conditions could be reduced by a new parameterization. Similarly, a new parameterization of vertical diffusion rates would be unlikely to significantly alter the magnitudes of diffusion coefficients for unstable atmospheric conditons. However, for neutral and stable atmospheric conditions, a new parameterization of vertical diffusion rates might increase vertical diffusion coefficients significantly. The increase would move ground-level time-integrated concentration maxima closer to the plant and would increase the maxima. 55 references, 2 figures, 4 tables

  16. Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerson, M.H.

    1975-01-01

    The chief purpose of ARAC data acquisition program is to provide site officials, who are responsible for ensuring maximum health protection for the endangered site personnel and public, with estimates of the effects of atmospheric releases of hazardous material as rapidly and accurately as possible. ARAC is in the initial stages of being implemented and is therefore susceptible to changes before it reaches its final form. However the concept of ARAC is fully developed and was successfully demonstrated during a feasibility study conducted in June 1974, as a joint effort between the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL). Additional tests between SRL and LLL are scheduled for December 1975. While the immediate goal is the application of ARAC to assist a limited number of ERDA sites, the system is designed with sufficient flexibility to permit expanding the service to a large number of sites. Success in ARAC application should provide nuclear facilities with a means to handle better the urgent questions concerning the potential accidental hazards from atmospheric releases in addition to providing the sites with a capability to assess the effort of their normal operations

  17. Barrier and operational risk analysis of hydrocarbon releases (BORA-Release)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sklet, Snorre; Vinnem, Jan Erik; Aven, Terje

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents results from a case study carried out on an offshore oil and gas production platform with the purpose to apply and test BORA-Release, a method for barrier and operational risk analysis of hydrocarbon releases. A description of the BORA-Release method is given in Part I of the paper. BORA-Release is applied to express the platform specific hydrocarbon release frequencies for three release scenarios for selected systems and activities on the platform. The case study demonstrated that the BORA-Release method is a useful tool for analysing the effect on the release frequency of safety barriers introduced to prevent hydrocarbon releases, and to study the effect on the barrier performance of platform specific conditions of technical, human, operational, and organisational risk influencing factors (RIFs). BORA-Release may also be used to analyse the effect on the release frequency of risk reducing measures

  18. Application of time release electron donors and electron acceptors for accelerated bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joksimovich, V.; Koenigsberg, S.

    2002-01-01

    Currently, there are limited options for cost effective approaches to soil and groundwater contamination. One technology that has proven its potential involves the use of time release electron acceptors to accelerate the natural bioattenuation of aerobically degradable compounds and time release electron donors to accelerate the natural bioattenuation of anaerobic compounds. This technology enjoys its reputations as a sensible strategy for engineering accelerated bioattenuation, because it delivers results while 1) limiting or eliminating design, capital and management costs and 2) allowing for the engineering of a low-impact application and a subsequently invisible remediation process. Oxygen Release Compound (ORC ) is proprietary formulation of intercalated magnesium peroxide that releases oxygen slowly, for about a year, and facilitates the aerobic degradation of a range of environmental contaminants including petroleum hydrocarbons, certain chlorinated hydrocarbons, ether oxygenates and nitroaromatics. The history of ORC's introduction and acceptance represents a model for the evolution of an innovative technology. This statement comes by virtue of the fact that since 1994 ORC has been used on over 7000 sites worldwide and has been the subject of an extensive body of literature. Hydrogen Release Compound (HRC) is also a proprietary polylactate ester that is food grade and, upon being deposited into the aquifer, is slowly hydrolyzed to release lactic acid and other organic acid derivatives for about one to two years. The organic acids are fermented to hydrogen, which in turn donates electrons that drive reductive bioattenuation processes. This is primarily directed at a wide range of chlorinated hydrocarbons, but can be applied to the remediation of metals by redox induced precipitation. HRC has now been used on over 220 sites, which we believe make it the most widely used electron donor for accelerating bioattenuation. ORC and HRC can be configured as a

  19. Update on extended release quetiapine fumarate in schizophrenia and bipolar disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Khalili N

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Nizar El-KhaliliAlpine Clinic, Lafayette, IN, USAAbstract: The atypical antipsychotic quetiapine fumarate is available both as an immediate release (IR and as an extended release (XR formulation allowing flexibility of dosing for individual patients. Approved uses of quetiapine XR include the treatment of schizophrenia (including maintenance therapy for prevention of relapse, the treatment of bipolar disorder (manic and depressive episodes, and the prevention of recurrence in patients with bipolar disorder who respond to quetiapine XR. This narrative review provides an update on quetiapine XR in these indications. The pharmacological profile of quetiapine, including a moderate affinity for dopamine D2 receptors and higher affinity for serotonin 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HT2A receptors, may explain its broad efficacy and low propensity for extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS. The XR formulation has similar bioavailability but prolonged plasma levels compared with the IR formulation, allowing for less frequent (once-daily dosing. Clinical studies have confirmed the efficacy of quetiapine XR in relieving the acute symptoms of schizophrenia during short-term trials, and reducing the risk for relapse in long-term studies. Direct switching from the IR formulation to the same dose of the XR formulation did not reveal any loss of efficacy or tolerability issues, and switching patients to quetiapine XR from conventional or other atypical antipsychotics (for reasons of insufficient efficacy or tolerability also proved to be beneficial and generally well tolerated. In bipolar disorder, quetiapine XR has also proven effective in relieving acute depressive and manic symptoms. Adverse events with quetiapine XR in patients with either schizophrenia or bipolar disorder are similar to those associated with the IR formulation, the most common being sedation, dry mouth, somnolence, dizziness, and headache. The low propensity for EPS is maintained with the XR formulation

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The SDSS Photometric Catalogue, Release 12 (Alam+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, S.; et al.

    2016-03-01

    Data Release 12 (DR12) is the final data release of the SDSS-III, containing all SDSS observations through July 2014. It includes the complete dataset of the BOSS and APOGEE surveys, and also newly includes stellar radial velocity measurements from MARVELS. The principal changes from previous versions are summarized at http://www.sdss.org/dr12/whatsnew/ (1 data file).

  1. Release of HWVP design media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevins, R.R.

    1994-01-01

    Late in 1993 the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Project was given direction by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) to defer design activities on the project. As a result of this direction, detailed design work on most structures was stopped and the design information was stored. Design and construction work was carried to completion on a few of the HWVP packages. The packages that were carried to completion are the subject of this work plan

  2. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... service; however, maintenance therapy itself is not covered as part of these services. (c) Occupational... increase respiratory function, such as graded activity services; these services include physiologic... rehabilitation plan of treatment, including physical therapy services, occupational therapy services, speech...

  3. Tailored sequential drug release from bilayered calcium sulfate composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orellana, Bryan R.; Puleo, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The current standard for treating infected bony defects, such as those caused by periodontal disease, requires multiple time-consuming steps and often multiple procedures to fight the infection and recover lost tissue. Releasing an antibiotic followed by an osteogenic agent from a synthetic bone graft substitute could allow for a streamlined treatment, reducing the need for multiple surgeries and thereby shortening recovery time. Tailorable bilayered calcium sulfate (CS) bone graft substitutes were developed with the ability to sequentially release multiple therapeutic agents. Bilayered composite samples having a shell and core geometry were fabricated with varying amounts (1 or 10 wt.%) of metronidazole-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particles embedded in the shell and simvastatin directly loaded into either the shell, core, or both. Microcomputed tomography showed the overall layered geometry as well as the uniform distribution of PLGA within the shells. Dissolution studies demonstrated that the amount of PLGA particles (i.e., 1 vs. 10 wt.%) had a small but significant effect on the erosion rate (3% vs. 3.4%/d). Mechanical testing determined that introducing a layered geometry had a significant effect on the compressive strength, with an average reduction of 35%, but properties were comparable to those of mandibular trabecular bone. Sustained release of simvastatin directly loaded into CS demonstrated that changing the shell to core volume ratio dictates the duration of drug release from each layer. When loaded together in the shell or in separate layers, sequential release of metronidazole and simvastatin was achieved. By introducing a tunable, layered geometry capable of releasing multiple drugs, CS-based bone graft substitutes could be tailored in order to help streamline the multiple steps needed to regenerate tissue in infected defects. - Highlights: • Bilayered CS composites were fabricated as potential bone graft substitutes. • The shell

  4. Tailored sequential drug release from bilayered calcium sulfate composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orellana, Bryan R.; Puleo, David A., E-mail: puleo@uky.edu

    2014-10-01

    The current standard for treating infected bony defects, such as those caused by periodontal disease, requires multiple time-consuming steps and often multiple procedures to fight the infection and recover lost tissue. Releasing an antibiotic followed by an osteogenic agent from a synthetic bone graft substitute could allow for a streamlined treatment, reducing the need for multiple surgeries and thereby shortening recovery time. Tailorable bilayered calcium sulfate (CS) bone graft substitutes were developed with the ability to sequentially release multiple therapeutic agents. Bilayered composite samples having a shell and core geometry were fabricated with varying amounts (1 or 10 wt.%) of metronidazole-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particles embedded in the shell and simvastatin directly loaded into either the shell, core, or both. Microcomputed tomography showed the overall layered geometry as well as the uniform distribution of PLGA within the shells. Dissolution studies demonstrated that the amount of PLGA particles (i.e., 1 vs. 10 wt.%) had a small but significant effect on the erosion rate (3% vs. 3.4%/d). Mechanical testing determined that introducing a layered geometry had a significant effect on the compressive strength, with an average reduction of 35%, but properties were comparable to those of mandibular trabecular bone. Sustained release of simvastatin directly loaded into CS demonstrated that changing the shell to core volume ratio dictates the duration of drug release from each layer. When loaded together in the shell or in separate layers, sequential release of metronidazole and simvastatin was achieved. By introducing a tunable, layered geometry capable of releasing multiple drugs, CS-based bone graft substitutes could be tailored in order to help streamline the multiple steps needed to regenerate tissue in infected defects. - Highlights: • Bilayered CS composites were fabricated as potential bone graft substitutes. • The shell

  5. Development of theophylline sustained release dosage form based on Kollidon SR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, Md Selim; Quadir, Mohiuddin Abdul; Haider, Syed Shabbir

    2002-01-01

    Sustained release theophylline matrix tablets constituting Kollidon SR (Polyvinyl acetate and povidone based matrix retarding polymer) were developed in this study in an attempt to design a dosage form that manifests desirable release profile and thorough adherence to official monographs. Four matrix tablet formulations were prepared by dry blending and direct compression of Kollidon SR and HPMC-15cps (hydroxypropylmethylcellulose) in varying proportion with fixed percentage of theophylline. Tablets containing only Kollidon SR with the active ingredient demonstrated a rapid rate of drug release with an initial burst effect. Incorporation of HPMC-15cps in the matrix tablet prolonged the release of drug with subsequent minimization of burst effect as confirmed by mean dissolution time, T50 and Higuchi release rate data. Among the batches containing HPMC-15 cps, a direct relationship was obtained between release rate and the percentage of HPMC used. A suitable controlled release profile was obtained with the matrix tablets containing 20% Kollidon SR and 30% HPMC-15cps. The formulation showed close resemblance to commercial products and compliance with USP specification. The results were explored and explained by the difference of physico-chemical property and hydration characteristics of the polymers. In addition to this result, the exponential model was applied to characterize the drug release behaviour from polymeric systems. It was found that, Fickian release is predominant in tablets containing Kollidon SR alone and non-Fickian mechanism plays an important role in the release of drug from HPMC containing tablets with a trend towards zero-order or case II release. In vitro release profile of two commercial brands were also undertaken for comparison and modulation of the experimental batches.

  6. Static, Lightweight Includes Resolution for PHP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Hills (Mark); P. Klint (Paul); J.J. Vinju (Jurgen)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractDynamic languages include a number of features that are challenging to model properly in static analysis tools. In PHP, one of these features is the include expression, where an arbitrary expression provides the path of the file to include at runtime. In this paper we present two

  7. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  8. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; van der Zwan, Jan Maarten; Izarzugaza, Isabel; Jaal, Jana; Treasure, Tom; Foschi, Roberto; Ricardi, Umberto; Groen, Harry; Tavilla, Andrea; Ardanaz, Eva

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002,

  9. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; Zwan, J.M.V.D.; Izarzugaza, I.; Jaal, J.; Treasure, T.; Foschi, R.; Ricardi, U.; Groen, H.; Tavilla, A.; Ardanaz, E.

    2012-01-01

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002,

  10. Regulation of ACh release from guinea pig bladder urothelial cells: potential role in bladder filling sensations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLatchie, L M; Young, J S; Fry, C H

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify and characterize the mechanism of non-neuronal ACh release from bladder urothelial cells and to determine if urothelial cells could be a site of action of anti-muscarinic drugs. A novel technique was developed whereby ACh could be measured from freshly isolated guinea pig urothelial cells in suspension following mechanical stimulation. Various agents were used to manipulate possible ACh release pathways in turn and to study the effects of muscarinic receptor activation and inhibition on urothelial ATP release. Minimal mechanical stimulus achieved full ACh release, indicating a small dynamic range and possible all-or-none signal. ACh release involved a mechanism dependent on the anion channel CFTR and intracellular calcium concentration, but was independent of extracellular calcium, vesicular trafficking, connexins or pannexins, organic cation transporters and was not affected by botulinum-A toxin. Stimulating ACh receptors increased ATP production and antagonizing them reduced ATP release, suggesting a link between ACh and ATP release. These results suggest that release of non-neuronal ACh from the urothelium is large enough and well located to act as a modulator of ATP release. It is hypothesized that this pathway may contribute to the actions of anti-muscarinic drugs in reducing the symptoms of lower urinary tract syndromes. Additionally the involvement of CFTR in ACh release suggests an exciting new direction for the treatment of these conditions. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  11. Dispersion studies with continuous release near Petten, 3.5 km from the shore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westhoff, J.W.; Dam, G.C. van; Davids, J.A.G.

    1971-01-01

    An experiment is described in which the spread of a continuously injected tracer, rhodamine-B, was studied as a function of time and place. The tracer was released over a period of 12 days at a constant rate with the implementation of an existing pipeline which debouches into the sea at a distance of 3.5 km from the Netherlands' coast near Petten. The main experiment was performed in the fall of 1966; a preparative experiment on a smaller scale was made in 1965. The investigation as a whole has three purposes: a) acquisition of an immediate and direct insight into the pattern of spreading arising with continuous release of conservative, dissolvable materials at the Petten disposal site; b) the obtaining of parametric values to be used in mathematical models by which situations other than the one observed can be computed (e.g. release of non-conservative substances, longer release periods, periods with different net current values etc.); c) an increase in the understanding of diffusion and advection processes in the sea, as well as pertinent information concerning currents and turbulence patterns. In broadening this understanding, mathematical models play the part of an auxiliary tool. Comparison with results from other times and places is important. The knowledge gained may lead, among other things, to an extension of the set of models or to modifications within the existing models and in this way achieve a certain degree of feedback for various practical applications. For direct application the report at hand can only be used for purpose a). The remaining two purposes require a further examination of the material, for which the reader is referred to the proposed supplementary report (ref. 8). The principal expedients used for the observations in the present experiments have been fluorimetric determination of tracer concentration (by means of both surf zone samples and continuous sampling with direct detection and recording aboard cruising ships) and aerial

  12. Release of segregated nuclides from spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.H.; Tait, J.C. [Atomic Energy Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Laboratories

    1997-10-01

    The potential release of fission and activation products from spent nuclear fuel into groundwater after container failure in the Swedish deep repository is discussed. Data from studies of fission gas release from representative Swedish BWR fuel are used to estimate the average fission gas release for the spent fuel population. Information from a variety of leaching studies on LWR and CANDU fuel are then reviewed as a basis for estimating the fraction of the inventory of key radionuclides that could be released preferentially (the Instant Release Fraction of IRF) upon failure of the fuel cladding. The uncertainties associated with these estimates are discussed. 33 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs.

  13. Tick saliva increases production of three chemokines including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, a histamine-releasing cytokine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Langhansová, Helena; Bopp, T.; Schmitt, E.; Kopecký, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 2 (2015), s. 92-96 ISSN 0141-9838 R&D Projects: GA ČR GCP302/11/J029 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : chemokine * histamine * Ixodes ricinus * mcp-1 * Th2 response * tick saliva Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 1.917, year: 2015

  14. Case study : environmental considerations of horizontal directional drills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slade, D.A.

    2000-01-01

    A pipeline construction project by Enbridge Pipelines (Toledo) Inc. which relied on horizontal directional drilling (HDD) techniques to install the pipe was analyzed with particular focus on the environmental benefits and risks of using directional drills compared to open cut installation. The construction of the 35-mile, 16-inch crude petroleum pipeline from Stockbridge to Freedom Junction in Michigan involved the use of 11 separate directional drills to cross through wetlands, streams and state recreational areas. The role that HDD played in route selection and environmental permit considerations was discussed along with some of the problems encountered with directional drilling. A successful HDD program must have adequate geotechnical information to properly design and plan the crossings. It was recommended that geotechnical borings should be conducted every 300 to 500 feet across the HDD alignment. It was also recommended that a frac-out contingency plan should be developed and to be prepared for the temporary shut down of the HDD rig if a frac-out occurs. Frac-outs must be investigated, contained and any released fluid should be removed. Some recommendations from past experiences were also presented as a guide for future planning of pipeline projects that include HDD techniques, particularly in wetland areas. Appendix A to this presentation included a contingency plan for illustrative purposes only. The plan was developed for the above project and was included as an example only. It described the planning, prevention and control measures to minimize impacts resulting from inadvertent spill of drilling mud during directional drilling in wetlands. It also included a drilling mud 'Containment, Response and Notification Plan' to be implemented as determined by the contractor under the supervision of Enbridge Pipelines (Toledo) Inc. 5 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig., 1 appendix

  15. LAPACK users` guide: Release 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, E.; Bai, Z.; Bischof, C.; Demmel, J.; Dongarra, J.; Du Croz, J.; Greenbaum, A.; Hammarling, S.; McKenney, A.; Ostrouchov, S.; Sorensen, D.

    1992-01-31

    LAPACK is a transportable library of Fortran 77 subroutines for solving the most common problems in numerical linear algebra: systems of linear equations, linear least squares problems, eigenvalue problems and singular value problems. LAPACK is designed to supersede LINPACK and EISPACK, principally by restructuring the software to achieve much greater efficiency on vector processors, high-performance ``superscalar`` workstations, and shared-memory multi-processors. LAPACK also adds extra functionality, uses some new or improved algorithms, and integrates the two sets of algorithms into a unified package. The LAPACK Users` Guide gives an informal introduction to the design of the algorithms and software, summarizes the contents of the package, describes conventions used in the software and documentation, and includes complete specifications for calling the routines. This edition of the Users` guide describes Release 1.0 of LAPACK.

  16. Release fractions for Rocky Flats specific accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    As Rocky Flats and other DOE facilities begin the transition process towards decommissioning, the nature of the scenarios to be studied in safety analysis will change. Whereas the previous emphasis in safety accidents related to production, now the emphasis is shifting to accidents related tc decommissioning and waste management. Accident scenarios of concern at Rocky Flats now include situations of a different nature and different scale than are represented by most of the existing experimental accident data. This presentation will discuss approaches at sign to use for applying the existing body of release fraction data to this new emphasis. Mention will also be made of ongoing efforts to produce new data and improve the understanding of physical mechanisms involved

  17. ADSORPTION AND RELEASING PROPERTIES OF BEAD CELLULOSE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. Morales; E. Bordallo; V. Leon; J. Rieumont

    2004-01-01

    The adsorption of some dyes on samples of bead cellulose obtained in the Unit of Research-Production "Cuba 9"was studied. Methylene blue, alizarin red and congo red fitted the adsorption isotherm of Langmuir. Adsorption kinetics at pH = 6 was linear with the square root of time indicating the diffusion is the controlling step. At pH = 12 a non-Fickian trend was observed and adsorption was higher for the first two dyes. Experiments carried out to release the methylene blue occluded in the cellulose beads gave a kinetic behavior of zero order. The study of cytochrome C adsorption was included to test a proteinic material. Crosslinking of bead cellulose was performed with epichlorohydrin decreasing its adsorption capacity in acidic or alkaline solution.

  18. Herwig++ 2.7 release note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellm, J.; Gieseke, S.; Grellscheid, D.

    2013-10-01

    A new release of the Monte Carlo event generator Herwig++ (version 2.7) is now available. This version comes with a number of improvements including: an interface to the Universal FeynRules Output (UFO) format allowing the simulation of a wide range of new-physics models; developments of the Matchbox framework for next-to-leading order (NLO) simulations; better treatment of QCD radiation in heavy particle decays in new-physics models; a new tune of underlying event and colour connection parameters that allows a good simultaneous description of both Tevatron and LHC underlying event data and the effective cross-section parameter for double-parton scattering parameter σ eff .

  19. Herwig++ 2.7 release note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellm, J.; Gieseke, S. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Grellscheid, D. [IPPP, Durham (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics] [and others

    2013-10-15

    A new release of the Monte Carlo event generator Herwig++ (version 2.7) is now available. This version comes with a number of improvements including: an interface to the Universal FeynRules Output (UFO) format allowing the simulation of a wide range of new-physics models; developments of the Matchbox framework for next-to-leading order (NLO) simulations; better treatment of QCD radiation in heavy particle decays in new-physics models; a new tune of underlying event and colour connection parameters that allows a good simultaneous description of both Tevatron and LHC underlying event data and the effective cross-section parameter for double-parton scattering parameter {sigma}{sub eff}.

  20. Release and characteristics of fungal fragments in various conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mensah-Attipoe, Jacob [Department of Environmental Science, University of Eastern Finland, Yliopistonranta 1D, P. O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Saari, Sampo [Department of Physics, Tampere University of Technology, Korkeakoulunkatu 3, 33720 Tampere (Finland); Veijalainen, Anna-Maria; Pasanen, Pertti [Department of Environmental Science, University of Eastern Finland, Yliopistonranta 1D, P. O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Keskinen, Jorma [Department of Physics, Tampere University of Technology, Korkeakoulunkatu 3, 33720 Tampere (Finland); Leskinen, Jari T.T. [SIB Labs, University of Eastern Finland, Yliopistonranta 1E, P. O. Box 1627, FI-70211, Kuopio (Finland); Reponen, Tiina, E-mail: reponeta@ucmail.uc.edu [Department of Environmental Science, University of Eastern Finland, Yliopistonranta 1D, P. O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 670056, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0056 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Intact spores and submicrometer size fragments are released from moldy building materials during growth and sporulation. It is unclear whether all fragments originate from fungal growth or if small pieces of building materials are also aerosolized as a result of microbial decomposition. In addition, particles may be formed through nucleation from secondary metabolites of fungi, such as microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs). In this study, we used the elemental composition of particles to characterize the origin of submicrometer fragments released from materials contaminated by fungi. Particles from three fungal species (Aspergillus versicolor, Cladosporium cladosporioides and Penicillium brevicompactum), grown on agar, wood and gypsum board were aerosolized using the Fungal Spore Source Strength Tester (FSSST) at three air velocities (5, 16 and 27 m/s). Released spores (optical size, d{sub p} ≥ 0.8 μm) and fragments (d{sub p} ≤ 0.8 μm) were counted using direct-reading optical aerosol instruments. Particles were also collected on filters, and their morphology and elemental composition analyzed using scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) coupled with an Energy-Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Among the studied factors, air velocity resulted in the most consistent trends in the release of fungal particles. Total concentrations of both fragments and spores increased with an increase in air velocity for all species whereas fragment–spore (F/S) ratios decreased. EDX analysis showed common elements, such as C, O, Mg and Ca, for blank material samples and fungal growth. However, N and P were exclusive to the fungal growth, and therefore were used to differentiate biological fragments from non-biological ones. Our results indicated that majority of fragments contained N and P. Because we observed increased release of fragments with increased air velocities, nucleation of MVOCs was likely not a relevant process in the formation of fungal fragments. Based

  1. Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Part 5. Accidental Releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, S

    2007-08-15

    Over the course of fifty-three years, LLNL had six acute releases of tritiated hydrogen gas (HT) and one acute release of tritiated water vapor (HTO) that were too large relative to the annual releases to be included as part of the annual releases from normal operations detailed in Parts 3 and 4 of the Tritium Dose Reconstruction (TDR). Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) had one such release of HT and one of HTO. Doses to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) for these accidents have been modeled using an equation derived from the time-dependent tritium model, UFOTRI, and parameter values based on expert judgment. All of these acute releases are described in this report. Doses that could not have been exceeded from the large HT releases of 1965 and 1970 were calculated to be 43 {micro}Sv (4.3 mrem) and 120 {micro}Sv (12 mrem) to an adult, respectively. Two published sets of dose predictions for the accidental HT release in 1970 are compared with the dose predictions of this TDR. The highest predicted dose was for an acute release of HTO in 1954. For this release, the dose that could not have been exceeded was estimated to have been 2 mSv (200 mrem), although, because of the high uncertainty about the predictions, the likely dose may have been as low as 360 {micro}Sv (36 mrem) or less. The estimated maximum exposures from the accidental releases were such that no adverse health effects would be expected. Appendix A lists all accidents and large routine puff releases that have occurred at LLNL and SNL/CA between 1953 and 2005. Appendix B describes the processes unique to tritium that must be modeled after an acute release, some of the time-dependent tritium models being used today, and the results of tests of these models.

  2. Colloid Release from Soil Aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2012-01-01

    The content of water-dispersible colloids (WDC) has a major impact on soil functions and structural stability. In addition, the presence of mobile colloids may increase the risk of colloid-facilitated transport of strongly sorbing environmental contaminants. The WDC content was measured in 39 soils......, using laser diffraction, by agitating the samples using a wet-dispersion unit. This approach eliminated the need for long sedimentation times required by the more classical end-over-end shaking approach and provided information about the time-dependent release of WDC. The total clay content of the soils...... ranged from 0.1 to 0.44 kg kg−1. The WDC content was measured on air-dry and moist 1- to 2-mm aggregates. The WDC content at a reference time was highly correlated to the total clay content (r > 0.91, P soils. Only for two sites was the WDC content correlated to the content of clay...

  3. The Dark Energy Survey Data Release 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, T.M.C.; et al.

    2018-01-09

    We describe the first public data release of the Dark Energy Survey, DES DR1, consisting of reduced single epoch images, coadded images, coadded source catalogs, and associated products and services assembled over the first three years of DES science operations. DES DR1 is based on optical/near-infrared imaging from 345 distinct nights (August 2013 to February 2016) by the Dark Energy Camera mounted on the 4-m Blanco telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. We release data from the DES wide-area survey covering ~5,000 sq. deg. of the southern Galactic cap in five broad photometric bands, grizY. DES DR1 has a median delivered point-spread function of g = 1.12, r = 0.96, i = 0.88, z = 0.84, and Y = 0.90 arcsec FWHM, a photometric precision of < 1% in all bands, and an astrometric precision of 151 mas. The median coadded catalog depth for a 1.95" diameter aperture at S/N = 10 is g = 24.33, r = 24.08, i = 23.44, z = 22.69, and Y = 21.44 mag. DES DR1 includes nearly 400M distinct astronomical objects detected in ~10,000 coadd tiles of size 0.534 sq. deg. produced from ~39,000 individual exposures. Benchmark galaxy and stellar samples contain ~310M and ~ 80M objects, respectively, following a basic object quality selection. These data are accessible through a range of interfaces, including query web clients, image cutout servers, jupyter notebooks, and an interactive coadd image visualization tool. DES DR1 constitutes the largest photometric data set to date at the achieved depth and photometric precision.

  4. Evaluation of the coat quality of sustained release pellets by individual pellet dissolution methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Min; Liew, Celine Valeria; Heng, Paul Wan Sia

    2015-01-15

    This study explored the application of 400-DS dissolution apparatus 7 for individual pellet dissolution methodology by a design of experiment approach and compared its capability with that of the USP dissolution apparatus 1 and 2 for differentiating the coat quality of sustained release pellets. Drug loaded pellets were prepared by extrusion-spheronization from powder blends comprising 50%, w/w metformin, 25%, w/w microcrystalline cellulose and 25%, w/w lactose, and then coated with ethyl cellulose to produce sustained release pellets with 8% and 10%, w/w coat weight gains. Various pellet properties were investigated, including cumulative drug release behaviours of ensemble and individual pellets. When USP dissolution apparatus 1 and 2 were used for drug release study of the sustained release pellets prepared, floating and clumping of pellets were observed and confounded the release profiles of the ensemble pellets. Hence, the release profiles obtained did not characterize the actual drug release from individual pellet and the applicability of USP dissolution apparatus 1 and 2 to evaluate the coat quality of sustained release pellets was limited. The cumulative release profile of individual pellet using the 400-DS dissolution apparatus 7 was found to be more precise at distinguishing differences in the applied coat quality. The dip speed and dip interval of the reciprocating holder were critical operational parameters of 400-DS dissolution apparatus 7 that affected the drug release rate of a sustained release pellet during the individual dissolution study. The individual dissolution methodology using the 400-DS dissolution apparatus 7 is a promising technique to evaluate the individual pellet coat quality without the influence of confounding factors such as pellet floating and clumping observed during drug release test with dissolution apparatus 1 and 2, as well as to facilitate the elucidation of the actual drug release mechanism conferred by the applied sustained

  5. SIGMA Release v1.2 - Capabilities, Enhancements and Fixes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadevan, Vijay [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Grindeanu, Iulian R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ray, Navamita [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jain, Rajeev [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wu, Danqing [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-30

    In this report, we present details on SIGMA toolkit along with its component structure, capabilities, and feature additions in FY15, release cycles, and continuous integration process. These software processes along with updated documentation are imperative to successfully integrate and utilize in several applications including the SHARP coupled analysis toolkit for reactor core systems funded under the NEAMS DOE-NE program.

  6. Shape memory-based actuators and release mechanisms therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Rajan (Inventor); Snyder, Daniel W. (Inventor); Schoenwald, David K. (Inventor); Lam, Nhin S. (Inventor); Watson, Daniel S. (Inventor); Krishnan, Vinu B. (Inventor); Noebe, Ronald D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    SM-based actuators (110) and release mechanisms (100) therefrom and systems (500) including one or more release mechanisms (100). The actuators (110) comprise a SM member (118) and a deformable member (140) mechanically coupled to the SM member (118) which deforms upon a shape change of the SM member triggered by a phase transition of the SM member. A retaining element (160) is mechanically coupled to the deformable member (140), wherein the retaining element (160) moves upon the shape change. Release mechanism (100) include an actuator, a rotatable mechanism (120) including at least one restraining feature (178) for restraining rotational movement of the retaining element (160) before the shape change, and at least one spring (315) that provides at least one locked spring-loaded position when the retaining element is in the restraining feature and at least one released position that is reached when the retaining element is in a position beyond the restraining feature (178). The rotatable mechanism (120) includes at least one load-bearing protrusion (310). A hitch (400) is for mechanically coupling to the load, wherein the hitch is supported on the load bearing protrusion (310) when the rotatable mechanism is in the locked spring-loaded position.

  7. Antibiotic-Releasing Silk Biomaterials for Infection Prevention and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Pritchard, Eleanor M.; Valentin, Thomas; Panilaitis, Bruce; Omenetto, Fiorenzo; Kaplan, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Effective treatment of infections in avascular and necrotic tissues can be challenging due to limited penetration into the target tissue and systemic toxicities. Controlled release polymer implants have the potential to achieve the high local concentrations needed while also minimizing systemic exposure. Silk biomaterials possess unique characteristics for antibiotic delivery including biocompatibility, tunable biodegradation, stabilizing effects, water-based processing and diverse material f...

  8. Study of firedamp release in sub-level caving

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castano, F.S.; Sanz Delgado, M.A.; Iturriaga Trenor, S.; Alberdi Vinas, C.

    1988-01-01

    The field work developed in the pits of 'Hullera Vasco-Leonesa' in Santa Lucia (Leon) to control firedamp release is described. Conclusions obtained concerning gas emission, irregularity and firedamp balance in sub-level caving winning faces are discussed. Some definitions of basic concepts in firedamp studies are also included. 7 figs.

  9. ASTP 15th Anniversary Clip-Media Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    This release is comprised of 5 separate clips, including the following: CL 762 Astronauts/Cosmonauts Visit to KSC and Walt Disney World; CL 739 ASTP Joint Crew Activities; CL 748 ASTP Astronauts/Cosmonauts Horlock Ranch Visit; CL 758 T-21 ASTP Training - US/USSR; and CL 743 ASTP Joint Crew Training in the Soviet Union.

  10. THE RAVE CATALOG OF STELLAR ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCES: FIRST DATA RELEASE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeche, C.; Williams, M.; De Jong, R. S.; Steinmetz, M.; Siebert, A.; Bienaymé, O.; Fulbright, J. P.; Ruchti, G. R.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Campbell, R.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Munari, U.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G. M.

    2011-01-01

    We present chemical elemental abundances for 36,561 stars observed by the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE), an ambitious spectroscopic survey of our Galaxy at Galactic latitudes |b| > 25° and with magnitudes in the range 9 DENIS 2 minimization technique. We plan to extend this pipeline to include estimates for other elements, such as oxygen and sulfur, in future data releases.

  11. SIGMA Release v1.2 - Capabilities, Enhancements and Fixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahadevan, Vijay; Grindeanu, Iulian R.; Ray, Navamita; Jain, Rajeev; Wu, Danqing

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we present details on SIGMA toolkit along with its component structure, capabilities, and feature additions in FY15, release cycles, and continuous integration process. These software processes along with updated documentation are imperative to successfully integrate and utilize in several applications including the SHARP coupled analysis toolkit for reactor core systems funded under the NEAMS DOE-NE program.

  12. RANTES modulates the release of glutamate in human neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musante, Veronica; Longordo, Fabio; Neri, Elisa; Pedrazzi, Marco; Kalfas, Fotios; Severi, Paolo; Raiteri, Maurizio; Pittaluga, Anna

    2008-11-19

    The effects of the recombinant chemokine human RANTES (hRANTES) on the release of glutamate from human neocortex glutamatergic nerve endings were investigated. hRANTES facilitated the spontaneous release of d [(3)H]D-aspartate ([(3)H]DASP-) by binding Pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), whose activation caused Ca(2+) mobilization from inositol trisphosphate-sensitive stores and cytosolic tyrosine kinase-mediated phosphorylations. Facilitation of release switched to inhibition when the effects of hRANTES on the 12 mM K(+)-evoked [(3)H]D-ASP exocytosis were studied. Inhibition of exocytosis relied on activation of Pertussis toxin-sensitive GPCRs negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase. Both hRANTES effects were prevented by met-RANTES, an antagonist at the chemokine receptors (CCRs) of the CCR1, CCR3, and CCR5 subtypes. Interestingly, human neocortex glutamatergic nerve endings seem to possess all three receptor subtypes. Blockade of CCR1 and CCR5 by antibodies against the extracellular domain of CCRs prevented both the hRANTES effect on [(3)H]D-ASP release, whereas blockade of CCR3 prevented inhibition, but not facilitation, of release. The effects of RANTES on the spontaneous and the evoked release of [(3)H]D-ASP were also observed in experiments with mouse cortical synaptosomes, which may therefore represent an appropriate animal model to study RANTES-induced effects on neurotransmission. It is concluded that glutamate transmission can be modulated in opposite directions by RANTES acting at distinct CCR receptor subtypes coupled to different transduction pathways, consistent with the multiple and sometimes contrasting effects of the chemokine.

  13. Elastic energy release in great earthquakes and eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agust eGudmundsson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The sizes of earthquakes are measured using well-defined, measurable quantities such as seismic moment and released (transformed elastic energy. No similar measures exist for the sizes of volcanic eruptions, making it difficult to compare the energies released in earthquakes and eruptions. Here I provide a new measure of the elastic energy (the potential mechanical energy associated with magma chamber rupture and contraction (shrinkage during an eruption. For earthquakes and eruptions, elastic energy derives from two sources: (1 the strain energy stored in the volcano/fault zone before rupture, and (2 the external applied load (force, pressure, stress, displacement on the volcano/fault zone. From thermodynamic considerations it follows that the elastic energy released or transformed (dU during an eruption is directly proportional to the excess pressure (pe in the magma chamber at the time of rupture multiplied by the volume decrease (-dVc of the chamber, so that . This formula can be used as a basis for a new eruption magnitude scale, based on elastic energy released, which can be related to the moment-magnitude scale for earthquakes. For very large eruptions (>100 km3, the volume of the feeder-dike is negligible, so that the decrease in chamber volume during an eruption corresponds roughly to the associated volume of erupted materials , so that the elastic energy is . Using a typical excess pressures of 5 MPa, it is shown that the largest known eruptions on Earth, such as the explosive La Garita Caldera eruption (27-28 million years ago and largest single (effusive Colombia River basalt lava flows (15-16 million years ago, both of which have estimated volumes of about 5000 km3, released elastic energy of the order of 10EJ. For comparison, the seismic moment of the largest earthquake ever recorded, the M9.5 1960 Chile earthquake, is estimated at 100 ZJ and the associated elastic energy release at 10EJ.

  14. Profile of Fluoride Release from a Nanohybrid Composite Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Assed Bezerra Silva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the amount and profile of fluoride release from a fluoride-containing nanohybrid composite resin (Tetric® N-Ceram by direct potentiometry. Thirty specimens (5 mm diameter x 3 mm high; n=10/material were made of Tetric® N-Ceram, Vitremer® resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC (positive control or Filtek® Z350 nanofill composite resin (negative control. The specimens were stored individually in plastic tubes containing 1 mL of artificial saliva at 37°C, which was daily renewed during 15 days. At each renewal of saliva, the amount of fluoride ions released in the solution was measured using a fluoride ion-selective electrode with ion analyzer, and the values obtained in mV were converted to ppm (µg/mL. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc test at a significance level of 5%. The results showed that the resins Tetric® N-Ceram and Filtek® Z350 did not release significant amounts of fluoride during the whole period of evaluation (p>0.05. Only Vitremer® released significant amounts of fluoride ions during the 15 days of the experiment, with greater release in first 2 days (p0.05. In conclusion, the nanohybrid composite resin Tetric® N-Ceram did not present in vitro fluoride-releasing capacity throughout the 15 days of study.

  15. Role of various natural, synthetic and semi-synthetic polymers on drug release kinetics of losartan potassium oral controlled release tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasree, J; Sivaneswari, S; Hemalatha, G; Preethi, N; Mounika, B; Murthy, S Vasudeva

    2014-10-01

    The objective of the present work was to formulate and to characterize controlled release matrix tablets of losartan potassium in order to improve bioavailability and to minimize the frequency of administration and increase the patient compliance. Losartan potassium controlled release matrix tablets were prepared by direct compression technique by the use of different natural, synthetic and semisynthetic polymers such as gum copal, gum acacia, hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose K100 (HPMC K100), eudragit RL 100 and carboxy methyl ethyl cellulose (CMEC) individually and also in combination. Studies were carried out to study the influence of type of polymer on drug release rate. All the formulations were subjected to physiochemical characterization such as weight variation, hardness, thickness, friability, drug content, and swelling index. In vitro dissolution studies were carried out simulated gastric fluid (pH 1.2) for first 2 h and followed by simulated intestinal fluid (pH 6.8) up to 24 h, and obtained dissolution data were fitted to in vitro release kinetic equations in order to know the order of kinetics and mechanism of drug release. Results of physiochemical characterization of losartan potassium matrix tablets were within acceptable limits. Formulation containing HPMC K100 and CMEC achieved the desired drug release profile up to 24 h followed zero order kinetics, release pattern dominated by Korsmeyer - Peppas model and mechanism of drug release by nonfickian diffusion. The good correlation obtained from Hixson-Crowell model indicates that changes in surface area of the tablet also influences the drug release. Based on the results, losartan potassium controlled release matrix tablets prepared by employing HPMC K100 and CMEC can attain the desired drug release up to 24 h, which results in maintaining steady state concentration and improving bioavailability.

  16. Mechanisms of iodine release from iodoapatite in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Wang, J.

    2017-12-01

    Immobilization of iodine-129 with waste forms in geological setting is challenging due to its extremely long half-life and high volatility in the environment. To evaluate the long-term performance of waste form, it is imperative to determine the release mechanism of iodine hosted in the waste form materials. This study investigated the iodine released from apatite structured waste form Pb9.85 (VO4)6 I1.7 to understand how diffusion and dissolution control the durability of apatite waste form. A standard semi-dynamic leach test was adopted in this study. Samples were exposed in fresh leachant periodically and the leachant was replaced after each interval. Each experiment was carried out in cap-sealed Teflon vessels under constant temperature (e.g. 90 °C). ICP-MS analysis on the reacted leachates shows that Pb and V were released constantly and congruently with the stoichiometric ratio of Pb/V. However, iodine release is incongruent and time dependent. The iodine release rate starts significantly higher than the corresponding stoichiometric value and gradually decreases, approaching the stoichiometric value. Therefore, a dual-mode mechanism is proposed to account for the iodine release from apatite, which is dominated by short-term diffusion and long-term dissolution processes. Additional tests show that the element release rates depend on a number of test parameters, including sample surface to solution volume ratio (m-1), interval (day), temperature (°C), and solution pH. This study provides a quantitative characterization of iodine release mechanism. The activation energy of iodine leaching 21±1.6 kJ/mol was obtained by varying the test temperature. At the test conditions of to neutral pH and 90 °C, the long-term iodine release rate 3.3 mg/(m2 • day) is projected by normalizing sample surface area to solution volume ratio (S/V) to 1.0 m-1 and interval to 1 day. These findings demonstrate i) the feasibility of our approach to quantify the release mechanism

  17. Measurement and characterization of fission products released from LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, M.F.; Collins, J.L.; Lorenz, R.A.; Norwood, K.S.; Strain, R.V.

    1984-01-01

    Samples of commercial LWR fuel have been heated under simulated accident conditions to determine the extent and the chemical forms of fission product release. This project was sponsored by the USNRC under a broad program of reactor safety studies. Of the five tests discussed, the fractional releases of Kr, I, and Cs varied from approx. 2% at 1400 0 C to >50% at 2000 0 C; much smaller fractions of Ru, Ag, Sb, and Te were measured in some tests. The major chemical forms in the effluent appeared to include CsI, CsOH, Sb, Te, and Ag

  18. Measurement and characterization of fission products released from LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, M.F.; Collins, J.L.; Lorenz, R.A.; Norwood, K.S.; Strain, R.V.

    1984-01-01

    Samples of commercial LWR fuel have been heated under simulated accident conditions to determine the extent and the chemical forms of fission product release. Of the five tests discussed, the fractional releases of Kr, I, and Cs varied from proportional 2% at 1400 0 C to >50% at 2000 0 C; much smaller fractions of Ru, Ag, Sb, and Te were measured in some tests. The major chemical forms in the effluent appeared to include CsI, CsOH, Sb, Te, and Ag. (orig./HP)

  19. Methodology for performing measurements to release material from radiological control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, J.S.; Gardner, D.L.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes the existing and proposed methodologies for performing measurements of contamination prior to releasing material for uncontrolled use at the Hanford Site. The technical basis for the proposed methodology, a modification to the existing contamination survey protocol, is also described. The modified methodology, which includes a large-area swipe followed by a statistical survey, can be used to survey material that is unlikely to be contaminated for release to controlled and uncontrolled areas. The material evaluation procedure that is used to determine the likelihood of contamination is also described

  20. History of the CERN Web Software Public Releases

    CERN Document Server

    Fluckiger, Francois; CERN. Geneva. IT Department

    2016-01-01

    This note is an extended version of the article “Licencing the Web” (http://home.web.cern.ch/topics/birthweb/licensing-web) published by CERN, Nov 2013, in the “Birth of the Web” series of articles (http://home.cern/topics/birth-web). It describes the successive steps of the public release of the CERN Web software, from public domain to open source, and explains their rationale. It provides in annexes historical documents including release announcement and texts of the licences used by CERN and MIT in public software distributions.

  1. SIMULATION OF VINPOCETINE RELEASE PROCESS FROM MICROCAPSULES WITH HYDROPHOBIC SHELL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Polkovnikova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays microcapsules are widely spread in different industries. Microcapsules with vitamins, etheric and fatty oils are included into different cosmetics (creams, gels, serums. Microencapsulated probiotics are used in foods and fodder additives in veterinary. An important field of application of microencapsulation in pharmacy is the combination in the total dosage of drugs that are incompatible when mixed in free form.The aim of work is a comparative analysis of thermodynamic characteristics of vinpocetine release from the melt of beeswax and cacao butter 3:2 into water, solution of hydrochloric acid 0.01 M and ethanol.Materials and methods. For simulation of the process of vinpocetine release from the melt into different environments models component models of the studied systems were built and their atom charges were calculated by quantum-chemical method. Spatial models of the components were built in Hyper Chem 8.01. As an initial state for the thermodynamic characteristics of the calculation of vinpocetine release from the melt, a conformation of «melt-vinpocetine» system was used after thermodynamic equilibration by molecular dynamics simulation in Bioeurica program for 5 ns. For isolated systems a vibrational analysis was performed with the use of unrestricted Hartree-Fock method in STO-3G basis set in Orca 4.0 program.Results and discussion. Vinpocetine release from the melt of beeswax and cacao butter 3:2 into water with different pH values and to ethanol depends on its solubility in these environments, and also on solubility of the melt.Conclusion. The performed study of vinpocetine release from the melt of beeswax and cacao butter 3:2 by molecular dynamics simulation demonstrates the opportunity of vinpocetine release into water with pH=2 and into ethanol. The obtained results make it possible to assume a lower degree of vinpocetine release from the melt into ethanol compared with the solution of hydrochloric acid 0,01 M.

  2. Sustained release of verapamil hydrochloride from sodium alginate microcapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhana, S Ayesha; Shantakumar, S M; Shyale, Somashekar; Shalam, Md; Narasu, Laxmi

    2010-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop sustained release microcapsules of verapamil hydrochloride (VH) using biodegradable polymers. For this purpose microcapsules embedded verapamil hydrochloride were prepared using sodium alginate alone and also by incorporating some co polymers like methyl cellulose (MC), sodium carboxy methyl cellulose (SCMC) , poly vinyl pyrollidone (PVP) and xanthan gum by employing complex emulsion method of microencapsulation. Microcapsules were prepared in various core: coat ratios to know the effect of polymer and co polymers on drug release. Overall ten formulations were prepared and evaluated for flow behaviour, sieve analysis, drug entrapment efficiency, in vitro dissolution studies, stability studies, including scanning electron microscopy and DSC. The resulting microcapsules were discrete, large, spherical and also free flowing. The drug content in all the batches of microcapsules was found to be uniform. The release was depended on core: coat ratio and nature of the polymers. FTIR analysis revealed chemical integrity between Verapamil hydrochloride (VH), sodium alginate and between the copolymers. Among the four copolymers used methyl cellulose retarded the drug release more than the other three, hence the same formulation was subjected for in vivo studies. The drug release from the microcapsules was found to be following non fickian diffusion. Mechanism of drug release was diffusion controlled first order kinetics. Drug diffusion co efficient and correlation co efficient were also assessed by using various mathematical models. In vivo result analysis of pharmacokinetic parameters revealed that t max of reference and test formulations were almost same. From the study it was concluded that, sustained release Verapamil hydro chloride microcapsules could be achieved with success using sodium alginate alone and also in combination with other biodegradable polymers.

  3. Evaluation of olibanum and its resin as rate controlling matrix for controlled release of diclofenac

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdary KPR; Mohapatra P; Murali Krishna M

    2006-01-01

    Olibanum and its resin and carbohydrate fractions were evaluated as rate controlling matrix materials in tablets for controlled release of diclofenac. Diclofenac matrix tablets were formulated employing olibanum and its resin and carbohydrate fractions in different concentrations and the tablets were evaluated for various tablet characters including drug release kinetics and mechanism. Olibanum and its resin component exhibited excellent retarding effect on drug release from the matrix tablet...

  4. Effects of crown release on growth and quality of even-aged red maple stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry F. Strong; Audra E. Hubbell; Adam H. Weise; Gayne G. Erdmann

    2006-01-01

    The effects of six crown-release treatments on growth and bole quality of 54 dominant, codominant, and intermediate red maples (Acer rubrum L.) were examined in an even-aged stand in upper Michigan. Treatments included an unreleased control, a single-tree and a two-tree crown release, and a full crown-to-crown release of 5, 10, and 15ft. Twenty-two...

  5. Materials for Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms: Molecular Pharmaceutics and Controlled Release Drug Delivery Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick P. DeLuca

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Controlled release delivery is available for many routes of administration and offers many advantages (as microparticles and nanoparticles over immediate release delivery. These advantages include reduced dosing frequency, better therapeutic control, fewer side effects, and, consequently, these dosage forms are well accepted by patients. Advances in polymer material science, particle engineering design, manufacture, and nanotechnology have led the way to the introduction of several marketed controlled release products and several more are in pre-clinical and clinical development.

  6. Photoactivation and photocontrolled release of bioactive materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, D; Petrak, K

    1989-01-01

    Photoresponsive systems are widespread in nature, and life processes such as photosynthesis, vision, phototropism, and phototaxis are linked with structural changes of molecules caused by sunlight. Similar photochemical transformations can be employed to render synthetic agrochemicals and drugs active or to govern their bioavailability at the site of action. Related fundamental physical and chemical processes are discussed as part of the introductory paragraph. In agrochemical applications mainly three different ways have been reported as to how light can be utilized to optimize pesticidal effects in crop protection. The hypersensitization of certain pests to sunlight by chemical compounds represents an effective approach and exists also as a natural mechanism of defense. Photo-removable protective groups and various photoreactive structural moieties have successfully been applied for the rational design of light-activated propesticides. Finally, daylight can function as a triggering and governing factor in controlled-release systems based on photoresponsive polymers. Among the major advantages of light-regulated pesticides, the target-directed activation and the inherent detoxification predominate. In biomedical applications, light has also been used to activate compounds to time their action. Although radiation of various types (microwave, X-ray, and gamma radiation) has been used extensively for both treatment and diagnostics, the limited access of UV and visible light to most tissues of the body prevents its general use as the activating trigger. We review here three areas only: cutaneous photobiology-related applications; photoaffinity labeling; and porphyrins as therapeutic agents.

  7. Lithium ceramics: sol-gel preparation and tritium release; Ceramiques lithiees: elaboration sol-gel et relachement du tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renoult, O

    1994-04-01

    Ceramics based on lithium aluminate (LiA1O{sub 2}), lithium zirconate (Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}) and lithium titanate (Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}) are candidates as tritium breeder blanket materials for forthcoming nuclear fusion reactors. Lithium silico-aluminate Li{sub 4+x}A1{sub 4-3x}Si{sub 2x}O{sub 8} (0 {<=} x {<=} 0,25) powders were synthetized from alkoxyde-hydroxyde sol-gel route. By direct sintering at 850-1100 deg C (without prior calcination), ceramics with controlled stoichiometry and homogenous microstructure were obtained. We have also prepared, using a comparable method, Li{sub 2}Zr{sub 1-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3} (x = 0, x = 0,1 et x = 1) materials. All these ceramics, with different microstructures and compositions, have been tested in out-of-reactor experiments. Concerning lithium aluminate microporous ceramics, the silicon substitution leads to a significant improvement of the tritrium release. Classical models taking into account independent surface mechanisms are not able to describe correctly the observed tritium release kinetics. We show, using a simple model, that the release kinetics is in fact limited by an intergranular diffusion followed by a desorption. The delay in tritium release, which occurs when the ceramic compacity increases, is explained in terms of an enhancement of the ionic T{sup +} diffusion path length. The energy required for desorption includes a leading term independent of hydrogen contained in the sweep gas. This term is attributed to the limiting recombination step of T{sup +} in molecular species HTO. For similar microstructures, the facility of tritium release for the different studied materials is explained by three properties: the crystal structure of the ceramic, the acidity of oxides and finally the presence of electronic non-stoichiometric defects. (author). 89 refs., 50 figs., 2 tabs., 1 annexe.

  8. Timing of pollen release and stigma receptivity period of Piper vicosanum: New insights into sexual reproduction of the genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin-Silva, Adriano; Coelho, Victor Peçanha de Miranda; Ventrella, Marília Contin; Vieira, Milene Faria

    2015-04-01

    Dichogamy is a common characteristic among angiosperms, including Piper species. In this genus, the tiny flowers are morphologically similar and have an asynchronous stamen development. However, there is no information on the duration of stigma receptivity and whether it overlaps with pollen release. To better understand mechanisms of floral function in Piper vicosanum, we provide a detailed characterization of the timing of pollen release from the four stamens and the period of stigma receptivity and exposure mode of the receptive areas. We investigated plants of a natural population in a semideciduous seasonal forest (Viçosa, Minas Gerais State, southeastern Brazil), based on chemical tests, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy analyses. Incomplete protogyny-a mechanism that favors outcrossing-was recorded. The period of stigma receptivity was long (14 d), and the sequential exposure and senescence of stigmatic papillae occurred gradually and in a basipetal direction. Pollen release began 2-6 d after the beginning of the pistillate phase, with an average pollen viability of 87.7%, during the bisexual flower phase. Pollen was released for up to 6 d and occurred in one stamen at a time. The fruit set observed in tests of self-pollination indicated self-compatibility. The gradual and sequential exposure of stigmatic papillae in P. vicosanum flowers is described here as the mechanism for the long duration of receptivity. Anther development and pollen release were also sequential. These findings are yet unreported reproductive characteristics of the genus and offer new perspectives for future studies on the floral biology of other Piper species. © 2015 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  9. Ball Screw Actuator Including an Axial Soft Stop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Forrest, Steven Talbert (Inventor); Abel, Steve (Inventor); Woessner, George (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An actuator includes an actuator housing, a ball screw, and an axial soft stop assembly. The ball screw extends through the actuator housing and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw is coupled to receive a drive force and is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively move in a retract direction and an extend direction. The axial soft stop assembly is disposed within the actuator housing. The axial soft stop assembly is configured to be selectively engaged by the ball screw and, upon being engaged thereby, to translate, with compliance, a predetermined distance in the extend direction, and to prevent further movement of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  10. A fission gas release model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denis, A; Piotrkowski, R [Argentine Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1997-08-01

    The hypothesis contained in the model developed in this work are as follows. The UO{sub 2} is considered as a collection of spherical grains. Nuclear reactions produce fission gases, mainly Xe and Kr, within the grains. Due to the very low solubility of these gases in UO{sub 2}, intragranular bubbles are formed, of a few nanometers is size. The bubbles are assumed to be immobile and to act as traps which capture gas atoms. Free atoms diffuse towards the grain boundaries, where they give origin to intergranular, lenticular bubbles, of the order of microns. The gas atoms in bubbles, either inter or intragranular, can re-enter the matrix through the mechanism of resolution induced by fission fragment impact. The amount of gas stored in intergranular bubbles grows up to a saturation value. Once saturation is reached, intergranular bubbles inter-connect and the gas in excess is released through different channels to the external surface of the fuel. The resolution of intergranular bubbles particularly affects the region of the grain adjacent to the grain boundary. During grain growth, the grain boundary traps the gas atoms, either free or in intragranular bubbles, contained in the swept volume. The grain boundary is considered as a perfect sink, i.e. the gas concentration is zero at that surface of the grain. Due to the spherical symmetry of the problem, the concentration gradient is null at the centre of the grain. The diffusion equation was solved using the implicit finite difference method. The initial solution was analytically obtained by the Laplace transform. The calculations were performed at different constant temperatures and were compared with experimental results. They show the asymptotic growth of the grain radius as a function of burnup, the gas distribution within the grain at every instant, the growth of the gas content at the grain boundary up to the saturation value and the fraction of gas released by the fuel element referred to the total gas generated

  11. Controlled antiseptic release by alginate polymer films and beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakos, Ioannis; Rizzello, Loris; Bayer, Ilker S; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Cingolani, Roberto; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2013-01-30

    Biodegradable polymeric materials based on blending aqueous dispersions of natural polymer sodium alginate (NaAlg) and povidone iodine (PVPI) complex, which allow controlled antiseptic release, are presented. The developed materials are either free standing NaAlg films or Ca(2+)-cross-linked alginate beads, which properly combined with PVPI demonstrate antibacterial and antifungal activity, suitable for therapeutic applications, such as wound dressing. Glycerol was used as the plasticizing agent. Film morphology was studied by optical and atomic force microscopy. It was found that PVPI complex forms well dispersed circular micro-domains within the NaAlg matrix. The beads were fabricated by drop-wise immersion of NaAlg/PVPI/glycerol solutions into aqueous calcium chloride solutions to form calcium alginate beads encapsulating PVPI solution (CaAlg/PVPI). Controlled release of PVPI was possible when the composite films and beads were brought into direct contact with water or with moist media. Bactericidal and fungicidal properties of the materials were tested against Escherichia coli bacteria and Candida albicans fungi. The results indicated very efficient antibacterial and antifungal activity within 48 h. Controlled release of PVPI into open wounds is highly desired in clinical applications to avoid toxic doses of iodine absorption by the wound. A wide variety of applications are envisioned such as external and internal wound dressings with controlled antiseptic release, hygienic and protective packaging films for medical devices, and polymer beads as water disinfectants. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Release mitigation spray safety systems for chemical demilitarization applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, Jonathan; Tezak, Matthew Stephen; Brockmann, John E.; Servantes, Brandon; Sanchez, Andres L.; Tucker, Mark David; Allen, Ashley N.; Wilson, Mollye C.; Lucero, Daniel A.; Betty, Rita G.

    2010-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has conducted proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating effective knockdown and neutralization of aerosolized CBW simulants using charged DF-200 decontaminant sprays. DF-200 is an aqueous decontaminant, developed by Sandia National Laboratories, and procured and fielded by the US Military. Of significance is the potential application of this fundamental technology to numerous applications including mitigation and neutralization of releases arising during chemical demilitarization operations. A release mitigation spray safety system will remove airborne contaminants from an accidental release during operations, to protect personnel and limit contamination. Sandia National Laboratories recently (November, 2008) secured funding from the US Army's Program Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materials Agency (PMNSCMA) to investigate use of mitigation spray systems for chemical demilitarization applications. For non-stockpile processes, mitigation spray systems co-located with the current Explosive Destruction System (EDS) will provide security both as an operational protective measure and in the event of an accidental release. Additionally, 'tented' mitigation spray systems for native or foreign remediation and recovery operations will contain accidental releases arising from removal of underground, unstable CBW munitions. A mitigation spray system for highly controlled stockpile operations will provide defense from accidental spills or leaks during routine procedures.

  13. Births and deaths including fetal deaths

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Access to a variety of United States birth and death files including fetal deaths: Birth Files, 1968-2009; 1995-2005; Fetal death file, 1982-2005; Mortality files,...

  14. Including Indigenous Minorities in Decision-Making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pristed Nielsen, Helene

    Based on theories of public sphere participation and deliberative democracy, this book presents empirical results from a study of experiences with including Aboriginal and Maori groups in political decision-making in respectively Western Australia and New Zealand......Based on theories of public sphere participation and deliberative democracy, this book presents empirical results from a study of experiences with including Aboriginal and Maori groups in political decision-making in respectively Western Australia and New Zealand...

  15. Fission-product release during accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, C.E.L.; Cox, D.S.

    1991-09-01

    One of the aims when managing a reactor accident is to minimize the release of radioactive fission products. Release is dependent not only on the temperature, but also on the partial pressure of oxygen. Strongly oxidizing atmospheres, such as those that occurred during the Chernobyl accident, released semi-volatile elements like ruthenium, which has volatile oxides. At low temperatures, UO 2 oxidization to U 3 O 8 can result in extensive breakup of the fuel, resulting in the release of non-volatile fission products as aerosols. Under less oxidizing conditions, when hydrogen accumulates from the zirconium-water reaction, the resulting low oxygen partial pressure can significantly reduce these reactions. At TMI-2, only the noble gases and volatile fission products were released in significant quantities. A knowledge of the effect of atmosphere as well as temperature on the release of fission products from damaged reactor cores is therefore a useful, if not necessary, component of information required for accident management

  16. Sustained Release Drug Delivery Applications of Polyurethanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B. Lowinger

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Since their introduction over 50 years ago, polyurethanes have been applied to nearly every industry. This review describes applications of polyurethanes to the development of modified release drug delivery. Although drug delivery research leveraging polyurethanes has been ongoing for decades, there has been renewed and substantial interest in the field in recent years. The chemistry of polyurethanes and the mechanisms of drug release from sustained release dosage forms are briefly reviewed. Studies to assess the impact of intrinsic drug properties on release from polyurethane-based formulations are considered. The impact of hydrophilic water swelling polyurethanes on drug diffusivity and release rate is discussed. The role of pore formers in modulating drug release rate is examined. Finally, the value of assessing mechanical properties of the dosage form and approaches taken in the literature are described.

  17. Attenuated Tonic and Enhanced Phasic Release of Dopamine in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra D Badgaiyan

    Full Text Available It is unclear whether attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD is a hypodopaminergic or hyperdopaminergic condition. Different sets of data suggest either hyperactive or hypoactive dopamine system. Since indirect methods used in earlier studies have arrived at contradictory conclusions, we directly measured the tonic and phasic release of dopamine in ADHD volunteers. The tonic release in ADHD and healthy control volunteers was measured and compared using dynamic molecular imaging technique. The phasic release during performance of Eriksen's flanker task was measured in the two groups using single scan dynamic molecular imaging technique. In these experiments volunteers were positioned in a positron emission tomography (PET camera and administered a dopamine receptor ligand (11C-raclopride intravenously. After the injection PET data were acquired dynamically while volunteers either stayed still (tonic release experiments or performed the flanker task (phasic release experiments. PET data were analyzed to measure dynamic changes in ligand binding potential (BP and other receptor kinetic parameters. The analysis revealed that at rest the ligand BP was significantly higher in the right caudate of ADHD volunteers suggesting reduced tonic release. During task performance significantly lower ligand BP was observed in the same area, indicating increased phasic release. In ADHD tonic release of dopamine is attenuated and the phasic release is enhanced in the right caudate. By characterizing the nature of dysregulated dopamine neurotransmission in ADHD, the results explain earlier findings of reduced or increased dopaminergic activity.

  18. Study on mitigation of in-vessel release of fission products in severe accidents of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, G.F.; Tong, L.L.; Li, J.X.; Cao, X.W.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → In-vessel release of fission products in severe accidents for 600 MW PWR is analyzed. → Mitigation effect of primary feed-and-bleed on in-vessel release is investigated. → Mitigation effect of secondary feed-and-bleed on in-vessel release is studied. → Mitigation effect of ex-vessel cooling on in-vessel release is evaluated. - Abstract: During the severe accidents in a nuclear power plant, large amounts of fission products release with accident progression, including in-vessel and ex-vessel release. Mitigation of fission products release is demanded for alleviating radiological consequence in severe accidents. Mitigation countermeasures to in-vessel release are studied for Chinese 600 MW pressurized water reactor (PWR), including feed-and-bleed in primary circuit, feed-and-bleed in secondary circuit and ex-vessel cooling. SBO, LOFW, SBLOCA and LBLOCA are selected as typical severe accident sequences. Based on the evaluation of in-vessel release with different startup time of countermeasure, and the coupling relationship between thermohydraulics and in-vessel release of fission products, some results are achieved. Feed-and-bleed in primary circuit is an effective countermeasure to mitigate in-vessel release of fission products, and earlier startup time of countermeasure is more feasible. Feed-and-bleed in secondary circuit is also an effective countermeasure to mitigate in-vessel release for most severe accident sequences that can cease core melt progression, e.g. SBO, LOFW and SBLOCA. Ex-vessel cooling has no mitigation effect on in-vessel release owing to inevitable core melt and relocation.

  19. Functional Testing Differences in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Patients Released Versus Not Released to Return to Sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Stephanie W; Queen, Robin M; Taylor, Dean; Moorman, Claude T; Toth, Allison P; Garrett, William E; Butler, Robert J

    2015-07-01

    No standardized return-to-activity or sport guidelines currently exist after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Isokinetic testing and unilateral hop testing, which have construct validity, are often used to make the determination of when a patient is ready to return to sport. Neither of these measures has been reported to be predictive of subsequent injuries. To compare the performance on 2 functional tests of ACL reconstruction patients released to return to activity versus those who have not been released based on clinical impairment measures. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 98 patients were examined by the treating orthopaedic surgeon 6 months after ACL reconstruction for traditional impairment measures, including swelling, range of motion, strength, and graft stability. After this examination, all subjects completed the functional testing, consisting of the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and the Lower Quarter Y Balance Test (YBT-LQ), by an experienced tester who was blinded to the results of the clinical examination. On the basis of the clinical examination, all patients were grouped as being ready to return to sport or not being ready. Performance on the functional tests, as measured by overall performance and side-to-side asymmetry, was compared between the 2 groups using independent-samples t tests (P < .05). No difference existed between the groups with regard to the descriptive characteristics, with the exception that the group not cleared was younger (21.0 ± 7.4 years) than the group that was cleared (25.6 ± 13.2 years). Performance on the YBT-LQ revealed that no differences existed between groups when examining reach symmetry for any of the reach directions. In addition, no differences were found between groups when looking at the average reach score normalized to limb length for either the surgical or nonsurgical leg. Patients in the cleared group exhibited a similar score on the FMS (12.7 ± 2.9) compared with the

  20. IDSA releases updated coccidioidomycosis guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA has released updated Guidelines for the Treatment of Coccidioidomycosis, also known as cocci or Valley Fever (1. Coccidioidomycosis is a fungal infection endemic to the southwestern United States and a common cause of pneumonia and pulmonary nodules in this area. However, the infection can disseminate systemically especially in immunocompromised hosts and certain ethnic populations resulting in a variety of pulmonary and extrapulmonary complications. In addition to recommendations for these complications, the new guidelines address management of special at-risk populations, preemptive management strategies in at-risk populations and after unintentional laboratory exposure. The guidelines also suggest shorter courses of antibiotics for hospitalized patients and more ambulatory treatment for most individuals who have contracted Valley Fever. The panel was led by John N. Galgiani, MD, director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at the University of Arizona Health Sciences. Galgiani led a panel of 16 ...

  1. Cumulative release to the accessible environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanehiro, B.

    1985-01-01

    The Containment and Isolation Working Group considered issues related to the postclosure behavior of repositories in crystalline rock. This working group was further divided into subgroups to consider the progress since the 1978 GAIN Symposium and identify research needs in the individual areas of regional ground-water flow, ground-water travel time, fractional release, and cumulative release. The analysis and findings of the Fractional Release Subgroup are presented

  2. Tunable Molecular Logic Gates Designed for Imaging Released Neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockow, Jessica L; Hettie, Kenneth S; Secor, Kristen E; Barman, Dipti N; Glass, Timothy E

    2015-08-03

    Tunable dual-analyte fluorescent molecular logic gates (ExoSensors) were designed for the purpose of imaging select vesicular primary-amine neurotransmitters that are released from secretory vesicles upon exocytosis. ExoSensors are based on the coumarin-3-aldehyde scaffold and rely on both neurotransmitter binding and the change in environmental pH associated with exocytosis to afford a unique turn-on fluorescence output. A pH-functionality was directly integrated into the fluorophore π-system of the scaffold, thereby allowing for an enhanced fluorescence output upon the release of labeled neurotransmitters. By altering the pH-sensitive unit with various electron-donating and -withdrawing sulfonamide substituents, we identified a correlation between the pKa of the pH-sensitive group and the fluorescence output from the activated fluorophore. In doing so, we achieved a twelvefold fluorescence enhancement upon evaluating the ExoSensors under conditions that mimic exocytosis. ExoSensors are aptly suited to serve as molecular imaging tools that allow for the direct visualization of only the neurotransmitters that are released from secretory vesicles upon exocytosis. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Sterile insect supply, emergence, and release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowell, R.V.; Worley, J.; Gomes, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    Insect mass-rearing for a sterile insect technique (SIT) programme is designed to move beyond the large-scale rearing of insects in a laboratory to the industrial production of consistently high-quality insects for sterilization and release. Each facility reflects the unique biology of the insect reared within it, but there are some generalities for all rearing facilities. Rearing insects in self-contained modules offers flexibility, and increased safety from catastrophic occurrences, compared with using a single building which houses all facets of the rearing process. Although mechanizing certain aspects of the rearing steps helps provide a consistently high-quality insect, successful mass-rearing and delivery depends largely upon the human component. Besides production in centralized facilities, insects can be produced from purchased eggs, or nowadays, adult insects are often obtained from specialized satellite emergence/collection facilities. Interest in commercializing insect production and release is increasing. Shipping sterile insects, sometimes over long distances, is now common practice. Procedures for handling and chilling adult insects, and providing food and water prior to release, are continually being improved. Sterile insects are released via static-release receptacles, ground-release systems, or most commonly from the air. The aerial release of chilled sterile insects is the most efficient method of release, especially when aircraft flight paths are guided by a Global Positioning System (GPS) linked to a computer-controlled release mechanism. (author)

  4. Effluent release limits, sources and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindell, G.E.

    1977-01-01

    Objectives of radiation protection in relation to releases. Environmental transfer models for radionuclides. Relationship between releases, environmental levels and doses to persons. Establishment of release limits: Limits based on critical population group concept critical pathway analysis and identification of critical group. Limits based on optimization of radiation protection individual dose limits, collective doses and dose commitments 1) differential cost benefit analysis 2) authorized and operational limits taking account of future exposures. Monitoring of releases to the environment: Objectives of effluent monitoring. Typical sources and composition of effluents; design and operation of monitoring programmes; recording and reporting of monitoring results; complementary environmental monitoring. (orig.) [de

  5. Analysis of accidental UF6 releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Yumao; Tan Rui; Gao Qifa

    2012-01-01

    As interim substance in the nuclear fuel enrichment process, Uranium Hexafluoride (UF 6 ) is widely applied in nuclear processing, enrichment and fuel fabrication plants. Because of its vivid chemical characteristics and special radiological hazard and chemical toxicity, great attention must be paid to accident of UF 6 leakage. The chemical reactions involved in UF 6 release processes were introduced, therewith potential release styles, pathways and characteristics of diffusion were analyzed. The results indicated that the accidental release process of UF 6 is not a simple passive diffusion. So, specific atmospheric diffusion model related to UF 6 releases need be used in order to analyze and evaluate accurately the accidental consequences. (authors)

  6. Preparation and Optimization of Immediate Release/Sustained Release Bilayered Tablets of Loxoprofen Using Box-Behnken Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Jin Wook; Gupta, Biki; Thapa, Raj Kumar; Woo, Kyu Bong; Kim, Sung Yub; Go, Toe Gyeong; Choi, Yongjoo; Choi, Ju Yeon; Jeong, Jee-Heon; Choi, Han-Gon; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh

    2017-05-01

    The aim of our current study was to characterize and optimize loxoprofen immediate release (IR)/sustained release (SR) tablet utilizing a three-factor, three-level Box-Behnken design (BBD) combined with a desirability function. The independent factors included ratio of drug in the IR layer to total drug (X 1 ), ratio of HPMC to drug in the SR layer (X 2 ), and ratio of Eudragit RL PO to drug in the SR layer (X 3 ). The dependent variables assessed were % drug released in distilled water at 30 min (Y 1 ), % drug released in pH 1.2 at 2 h (Y 2 ), and % drug released in pH 6.8 at 12 h (Y 3 ). The responses were fitted to suitable models and statistical validation was performed using analysis of variance. In addition, response surface graphs and contour plots were constructed to determine the effects of different factor level combinations on the responses. The optimized loxoprofen IR/SR tablets were successfully prepared with the determined amounts of ingredients that showed close agreement in the predicted and experimental values of tablet characterization and drug dissolution profile. Therefore, BBD can be utilized for successful optimization of loxoprofen IR/SR tablet, which can be regarded as a suitable substitute for the current marketed formulations.

  7. Mineral sources and transport pathways for arsenic release in a coastal watershed, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Nora K.; Ayuso, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Metasedimentary bedrock of coastal Maine contains a diverse suite of As-bearing minerals that act as significant sources of elements found in ground and surface waters in the region. Arsenic sources in the Penobscot Formation include, in order of decreasing As content by weight: löllingite and realgar (c.70%), arsenopyrite, cobaltite, glaucodot, and gersdorffite (in the range of 34–45%), arsenian pyrite (Formation, the relative stability of primary As-bearing minerals follows a pattern where the most commonly observed highly altered minerals are pyrrhotite, realgar, niccolite, löllingite > glaucodot, arsenopyrite-cobaltian > arsenopyrite, cobaltite, gersdorffite, fine-grained pyrite, Ni-pyrite > coarse-grained pyrite. Reactions illustrate that oxidation of Fe-As disulphide group and As-sulphide minerals is the primary release process for As. Liberation of As by carbonation of realgar and orpiment in contact with high-pH groundwaters may contribute locally to elevated contents of As in groundwater, especially where As is decoupled from Fe. Released metals are sequestered in secondary minerals by sorption or by incorporation in crystal structures. Secondary minerals acting as intermediate As reservoirs include claudetite (c.75%), orpiment (61%), scorodite (c. 45%), secondary arsenopyrite (c. 46%), goethite (minerals. Reductive dissolution of Fe-oxide minerals may govern the ultimate release of iron and arsenic – especially As(V) – to groundwater; however, dissolution of claudetite (arsenic trioxide) may directly contribute As(III). Processes thought to explain the release of As from minerals in bedrock include oxidation of arsenian pyrite or arsenopyrite, or carbonation of As-sulphides, and most models based on these generally rely on discrete minerals or on a fairly limited series of minerals. In contrast, in the Penobscot Formation and other metasedimentary rocks of coastal Maine, oxidation of As-bearing Fe-cobalt-nickel-sulphide minerals, dissolution (by

  8. Pest control and resistance management through release of insects carrying a male-selecting transgene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey-Samuel, Tim; Morrison, Neil I; Walker, Adam S; Marubbi, Thea; Yao, Ju; Collins, Hilda L; Gorman, Kevin; Davies, T G Emyr; Alphey, Nina; Warner, Simon; Shelton, Anthony M; Alphey, Luke

    2015-07-16

    Development and evaluation of new insect pest management tools is critical for overcoming over-reliance upon, and growing resistance to, synthetic, biological and plant-expressed insecticides. For transgenic crops expressing insecticidal proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis ('Bt crops') emergence of resistance is slowed by maintaining a proportion of the crop as non-Bt varieties, which produce pest insects unselected for resistance. While this strategy has been largely successful, multiple cases of Bt resistance have now been reported. One new approach to pest management is the use of genetically engineered insects to suppress populations of their own species. Models suggest that released insects carrying male-selecting (MS) transgenes would be effective agents of direct, species-specific pest management by preventing survival of female progeny, and simultaneously provide an alternative insecticide resistance management strategy by introgression of susceptibility alleles into target populations. We developed a MS strain of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, a serious global pest of crucifers. MS-strain larvae are reared as normal with dietary tetracycline, but, when reared without tetracycline or on host plants, only males will survive to adulthood. We used this strain in glasshouse-cages to study the effect of MS male P. xylostella releases on target pest population size and spread of Bt resistance in these populations. Introductions of MS-engineered P. xylostella males into wild-type populations led to rapid pest population decline, and then elimination. In separate experiments on broccoli plants, relatively low-level releases of MS males in combination with broccoli expressing Cry1Ac (Bt broccoli) suppressed population growth and delayed the spread of Bt resistance. Higher rates of MS male releases in the absence of Bt broccoli were also able to suppress P. xylostella populations, whereas either low-level MS male releases or Bt broccoli

  9. Alveolar macrophage release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in chronic alcoholics without liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvari, K; Casey, R; Nelson, S; Olariu, R; Shellito, J E

    1998-05-01

    Alcohol is an immunosuppressive drug, and chronic abuse has been associated with increased susceptibility to a variety of infections, including bacterial pneumonia and tuberculosis. Alveolar macrophages are the resident phagocytes of the lung and play a central role in lung host defenses against infection ranging from direct antibacterial activity to the release of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha). TNFalpha, in particular, plays a key role in the development of the early inflammatory response. In this study, we investigated the effects of chronic alcohol consumption on alveolar macrophage release of TNFalpha in vitro. We prospectively studied lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated release of TNFalpha from alveolar macrophages obtained from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in 22 alcoholic (18 smokers, 4 nonsmokers) and 7 nondrinking healthy volunteers (3 smokers, 4 nonsmokers). The total number of cells recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and their differential distribution were not significantly different in alcoholics versus controls (43 +/- 8 x 10(6) and 39 +/- 13 x 10(6), respectively). However, the total number of cells recovered from BALF was significantly higher in smokers (51 +/- 8 x 10(6)) than in nonsmokers (19 +/- 5 x 10(6)). Spontaneous (basal) release of TNFalpha by alveolar macrophages was the same in alcoholics and controls. In contrast, LPS-stimulated release of TNFalpha was significantly suppressed in alcoholics compared with that of controls (1343 +/- 271 vs. 3806 +/- 926 U TNF/ml/10(6) cells, respectively, p < 0.015). When controlled for smoking, LPS-stimulated TNFalpha production was suppressed in alcoholic nonsmokers (563 +/- 413 U TNF/ml/10(6)) compared with control nonsmokers (5113 +/- 1264 U TNF/ml/10(6)). LPS-stimulated TNFalpha production was also less in control smokers (2063 +/- 386 U TNF/ml/10(6) cells) than in control nonsmokers (5113 +/- 1264 U TNF/ml/10(6) cells). There was no difference

  10. Translational and extensional energy release rates (the J- and M-integrals) for a crack layer in thermoelasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Gommerstadt, B.

    1985-01-01

    A number of papers have been presented on the evaluation of energy release rate for thermoelasticity and corresponding J integral. Two main approaches were developed to treat energy release rate in elasticity. The first is based on direct calculation of the potential energy rate with respect to crack length. The second makes use of Lagrangian formalism. The translational and expansional energy release rates in thermoelasticity are studied by employing the formalism of irreversible thermodynamics and the Crack Layer Approach.

  11. Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

  12. Isolators Including Main Spring Linear Guide Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goold, Ryan (Inventor); Buchele, Paul (Inventor); Hindle, Timothy (Inventor); Ruebsamen, Dale Thomas (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Embodiments of isolators, such as three parameter isolators, including a main spring linear guide system are provided. In one embodiment, the isolator includes first and second opposing end portions, a main spring mechanically coupled between the first and second end portions, and a linear guide system extending from the first end portion, across the main spring, and toward the second end portion. The linear guide system expands and contracts in conjunction with deflection of the main spring along the working axis, while restricting displacement and rotation of the main spring along first and second axes orthogonal to the working axis.

  13. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    The dilemma of designing an advanced undergraduate laboratory lies in the desire to teach and reinforce basic principles and techniques while at the same time exposing students to the excitement of research. We report here on a one-semester, project-based biochemistry laboratory that combines the best features of a cookbook approach (high success rate, achievement of defined goals) with those of an investigative, discovery-based approach (student involvement in the experimental design, excitement of real research). Individual modules may be selected and combined to meet the needs of different courses and different institutions. The central theme of this lab is protein purification and design. This laboratory accompanies the first semester of biochemistry (Structure and Function of Macromolecules, a course taken mainly by junior and senior chemistry and biological chemistry majors). The protein chosen as the object of study is the enzyme lysozyme, which is utilized in all projects. It is suitable for a student lab because it is easily and inexpensively obtained from egg white and is extremely stable, and its high isoelectric point (pI = 11) allows for efficient separation from other proteins by ion-exchange chromatography. Furthermore, a literature search conducted by the resourceful student reveals a wealth of information, since lysozyme has been the subject of numerous studies. It was the first enzyme whose structure was determined by crystallography (1). Hendrickson et al. (2) have previously described an intensive one-month laboratory course centered around lysozyme, although their emphasis is on protein stability rather than purification and engineering. Lysozyme continues to be the focus of much exciting new work on protein folding and dynamics, structure and activity (3 - 5). This lab course includes the following features: (i) reinforcement of basic techniques, such as preparation of buffers, simple enzyme kinetics, and absorption spectroscopy; (ii

  14. Observation of ultraslow stress release in silicon nitride films on CaF2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Tianyi; Deen, M. Jamal; Xu, Changqing; Fang, Qiyin; Selvaganapathy, P. Ravi; Zhang, Haiying

    2015-01-01

    Silicon nitride thin films are deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on (100) and (111) CaF 2 crystalline substrates. Delaminated wavy buckles formed during the release of internal compressive stress in the films and the stress releasing processes are observed macroscopically and microscopically. The stress release patterns start from the substrate edges and propagate to the center along defined directions aligned with the crystallographic orientations of the substrate. The stress releasing velocity of SiN x film on (111) CaF 2 is larger than that of SiN x film with the same thickness on (100) CaF 2 . The velocities of SiN x film on both (100) and (111) CaF 2 increase with the film thickness. The stress releasing process is initiated when the films are exposed to atmosphere, but it is not a chemical change from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

  15. Simulation experiments on the radial pool growth in gas-releasing melting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhadieh, R.; Purviance, R.; Carlson, N.

    1983-01-01

    Following an HCDA, molten core-debris can contact the concrete foundation of the reactor building resulting in a molten UO 2 /concrete interaction and considerable gas release. The released gas can pressurize the containment building potentially leading to radiological releases. Furthermore, directional growth of the molten core-debris pool can reduce the reactor building structural integrity. To implement design changes that insure structural integrity, an understanding of the thermal-hydraulic and mass-transfer process associated with such a growth is most desirable. Owing to the complex nature of the combined heat, mass, and hydrodynamic processes associated with the two-dimensional problem of gas release and melting, the downward and radial penetration problems have been investigated separately. The present experimental study addresses the question of sideward penetration of the molten core debris into a gas-releasing, meltable, miscible solid

  16. The effects of membrane cholesterol and simvastatin on red blood cell deformability and ATP release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Alison M; Braunmüller, Susanne; Wan, Jiandi; Franke, Thomas; Stone, Howard A

    2012-05-01

    It is known that deformation of red blood cells (RBCs) is linked to ATP release from the cells. Further, membrane cholesterol has been shown to alter properties of the cell membrane such as fluidity and bending stiffness. Membrane cholesterol content is increased in some cardiovascular diseases, for example, in individuals with acute coronary syndromes and chronic stable angina, and therefore, because of the potential clinical relevance, we investigated the influence of altered RBC membrane cholesterol levels on ATP release. Because of the correlation between statins and reduced membrane cholesterol in vivo, we also investigated the effects of simvastatin on RBC deformation and ATP release. We found that reducing membrane cholesterol increases cell deformability and ATP release. We also found that simvastatin increases deformability by acting directly on the membrane in the absence of the liver, and that ATP release was increased for cells with enriched cholesterol after treatment with simvastatin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Observation of ultraslow stress release in silicon nitride films on CaF{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Tianyi [School of Biomedical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St W, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1, Canada and Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100029 (China); Deen, M. Jamal, E-mail: jamal@mcmaster.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St W, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1, Canada and School of Biomedical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St W, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada); Xu, Changqing; Fang, Qiyin [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, 1280 Main St W, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Selvaganapathy, P. Ravi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St W, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Zhang, Haiying [Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Silicon nitride thin films are deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on (100) and (111) CaF{sub 2} crystalline substrates. Delaminated wavy buckles formed during the release of internal compressive stress in the films and the stress releasing processes are observed macroscopically and microscopically. The stress release patterns start from the substrate edges and propagate to the center along defined directions aligned with the crystallographic orientations of the substrate. The stress releasing velocity of SiN{sub x} film on (111) CaF{sub 2} is larger than that of SiN{sub x} film with the same thickness on (100) CaF{sub 2}. The velocities of SiN{sub x} film on both (100) and (111) CaF{sub 2} increase with the film thickness. The stress releasing process is initiated when the films are exposed to atmosphere, but it is not a chemical change from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  18. Acoustically Triggered Disassembly of Multilayered Polyelectrolyte Thin Films through Gigahertz Resonators for Controlled Drug Release Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixin Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Controlled drug release has a high priority for the development of modern medicine and biochemistry. To develop a versatile method for controlled release, a miniaturized acoustic gigahertz (GHz resonator is designed and fabricated which can transfer electric supply to mechanical vibrations. By contacting with liquid, the GHz resonator directly excites streaming flows and induces physical shear stress to tear the multilayered polyelectrolyte (PET thin films. Due to the ultra-high working frequency, the shear stress is greatly intensified, which results in a controlled disassembling of the PET thin films. This technique is demonstrated as an effective method to trigger and control the drug release. Both theory analysis and controlled release experiments prove the thin film destruction and the drug release.

  19. Release mechanisms of acetaminophen from polyethylene oxide/polyethylene glycol matrix tablets utilizing magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajiri, Tomokazu; Morita, Shigeaki; Sakamoto, Ryosaku; Suzuki, Masazumi; Yamanashi, Shigeyuki; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Kitamura, Satoshi

    2010-08-16

    Release mechanism of acetaminophen (AAP) from extended-release tablets of hydrogel polymer matrices containing polyethylene oxide (PEO) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) were achieved using flow-through cell with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The hydrogel forming abilities are observed characteristically and the layer thickness which is corresponding to the diffusion length of AAP has a good correlation with the drug release profiles. In addition, polymeric erosion contribution to AAP releasing from hydrogel matrix tablets was directly quantified using size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). The matrix erosion profile indicates that the PEG erosion kinetic depends primarily on the composition ratio of PEG to PEO. The present study has confirmed that the combination of in situ MRI and SEC should be well suited to investigate the drug release mechanisms of hydrogel matrix such as PEO/PEG. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Measuring dopamine release in the human brain with PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkow, N.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry; Fowler, J.S.; Logan, J.; Wang, G.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The dopamine system is involved in the regulation of brain regions that subserve motor, cognitive and motivational behaviors. Disruptions of dopamine (DA) function have ben implicated in neurological and psychiatric illnesses including substance abuse as well as on some of the deficits associated with aging of the human brain. This has made the DA system an important topic in research in the neurosciences and neuroimaging as well as an important molecular target for drug development. Positron Emission Tomography (PET), was the first technology that enabled direct measurement of components of the DA system in the living human brain. Imaging studies of DA in the living brain have been indirect, relying on the development of radiotracers to label DA receptors, DA transporters, compounds which have specificity for the enzymes which degrade synaptic DA. Additionally, through the use of tracers that provide information on regional brain activity (ie brain glucose metabolism and cerebral blood flow) and of appropriate pharmacological interventions, it has been possible to assess the functional consequences of changes in brain DA activity. DA specific ligands have been useful in the evaluation of patients with neuropsychiatric illnesses as well as to investigate receptor blockade by antipsychotic drugs. A limitation of strategies that rely on the use of DA specific ligands is that the measures do not necessarily reflect the functional state of the dopaminergic system and that there use to study the effects of drugs is limited to the investigation of receptor or transporter occupancy. Newer strategies have been developed in an attempt to provide with information on dopamine release and on the functional responsivity of the DA system in the human brain. This in turn allows to investigate the effects of pharmacological agent in an analogous way to what is done with microdialysis techniques.