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Sample records for relaxed mhd states

  1. Extended MHD Modeling of Tearing-Driven Magnetic Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauppe, Joshua

    2016-10-01

    Driven plasma pinch configurations are characterized by the gradual accumulation and episodic release of free energy in discrete relaxation events. The hallmark of this relaxation in a reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasma is flattening of the parallel current density profile effected by a fluctuation-induced dynamo emf in Ohm's law. Nonlinear two-fluid modeling of macroscopic RFP dynamics has shown appreciable coupling of magnetic relaxation and the evolution of plasma flow. Accurate modeling of RFP dynamics requires the Hall effect in Ohm's law as well as first order ion finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects, represented by the Braginskii ion gyroviscous stress tensor. New results find that the Hall dynamo effect from / ne can counter the MHD effect from - in some of the relaxation events. The MHD effect dominates these events and relaxes the current profile toward the Taylor state, but the opposition of the two dynamos generates plasma flow in the direction of equilibrium current density, consistent with experimental measurements. Detailed experimental measurements of the MHD and Hall emf terms are compared to these extended MHD predictions. Tracking the evolution of magnetic energy, helicity, and hybrid helicity during relaxation identifies the most important contributions in single-fluid and two-fluid models. Magnetic helicity is well conserved relative to the magnetic energy during relaxation. The hybrid helicity is dominated by magnetic helicity in realistic low-beta pinch conditions and is also well conserved. Differences of less than 1 % between magnetic helicity and hybrid helicity are observed with two-fluid modeling and result from cross helicity evolution through ion FLR effects, which have not been included in contemporary relaxation theories. The kinetic energy driven by relaxation in the computations is dominated by velocity components perpendicular to the magnetic field, an effect that had not been predicted. Work performed at University of Wisconsin

  2. FOI-PERFECT code: 3D relaxation MHD modeling and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang-Hua; Duan, Shu-Chao; Comutational Physics Team Team

    2016-10-01

    One of the challenges in numerical simulations of electromagnetically driven high energy density (HED) systems is the existence of vacuum region. FOI-PERFECT code adopts a full relaxation magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. The electromagnetic part of the conventional model adopts the magnetic diffusion approximation. The vacuum region is approximated by artificially increasing the resistivity. On one hand the phase/group velocity is superluminal and hence non-physical in the vacuum region, on the other hand a diffusion equation with large diffusion coefficient can only be solved by implicit scheme which is difficult to be parallelized and converge. A better alternative is to solve the full electromagnetic equations. Maxwell's equations coupled with the constitutive equation, generalized Ohm's law, constitute a relaxation model. The dispersion relation is given to show its transition from electromagnetic propagation in vacuum to resistive MHD in plasma in a natural way. The phase and group velocities are finite for this system. A better time stepping is adopted to give a 3rd full order convergence in time domain without the stiff relaxation term restriction. Therefore it is convenient for explicit & parallel computations. Some numerical results of FOI-PERFECT code are also given. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11571293) And Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant No. 2015B0201023).

  3. Steady-State Axisymmetric MHD Solutions with Various Boundary Conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lile

    2014-01-01

    Axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) can be invoked for describing astrophysical magnetized flows and formulated to model stellar magnetospheres including main sequence stars (e.g. the Sun), compact stellar objects [e.g. magnetic white dwarfs (MWDs), radio pulsars, anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs), magnetars, isolated neutron stars etc.], and planets as a major step forward towards a full three-dimensional model construction. Using powerful and reliable numerical solvers based on two distinct finite-difference method (FDM) and finite-element method (FEM) schemes of algorithm, we examine axisymmetric steady-state or stationary MHD models in Throumoulopoulos & Tasso (2001), finding that their separable semi-analytic nonlinear solutions are actually not unique given their specific selection of several free functionals and chosen boundary conditions. The multiplicity of nonlinear steady MHD solutions gives rise to differences in the total energies contained in the magnetic fields and flow velocity fields as ...

  4. Equations of state for self-excited MHD generator studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, F.J.; Ross, M.; Haggin, G.L.; Wong, L.K.

    1980-02-26

    We have constructed a state-of-the-art equation of state (EOS) for argon covering the temperature density range attainable by currently proposed self-excited MHD generators. The EOS for conditions in the flow channel was obtained primarily by a non-ideal plasma code (ACTEX) that is based on a many body activity expansion. For conditions in the driver chamber the EOS was primarily obtained from a fluid code (HDFP) that calculates the fluid properties from perturbation theory based on the insulator interatomic pair potential but including electronic excitations. The results are in agreement with several sets of experimental data in the 0.6 - 91 GPa pressure range.

  5. A two-dimensional MHD global coronal model - Steady-state streamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, A.-H.; Wu, S. T.; Suess, S. T.; Poletto, G.

    1992-01-01

    A 2D, time-dependent, numerical, MHD model for the simulation of coronal streamers from the solar surface to 15 solar is presented. Three examples are given; for dipole, quadrupole and hexapole (Legendre polynomials P1, P2, and P3) initial field topologies. The computed properties are density, temperature, velocity, and magnetic field. The calculation is set up as an initial-boundary value problem wherein a relaxation in time produces the steady state solution. In addition to the properties of the solutions, their accuracy is discussed. Besides solutions for dipole, quadrupole, and hexapole geometries, the model use of realistic values for the density and Alfven speed while still meeting the requirement that the flow speed be super-Alfvenic at the outer boundary by extending the outer boundary to 15 solar radii.

  6. Excited-state relaxation of some aminoquinolines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The absorption and fluorescence spectra, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetimes, and fluorescence rate constants ( k f of 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -benzoxazolylquinoline (I, 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -benzothiazolylquinoline (II, 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -methoxybenzothiazolyl-quinoline (III, 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -benzothiazolylbenzoquinoline (IV at different temperatures have been measured. The shortwavelength shift of fluorescence spectra of compounds studied (23–49 nm in ethanol as the temperature decreases (the solvent viscosity increases points out that the excited-state relaxation process takes place. The rate of this process depends essentially on the solvent viscosity, but not the solvent polarity. The essential increasing of fluorescence rate constant k f (up to about 7 times as the solvent viscosity increases proves the existence of excited-state structural relaxation consisting in the mutual internal rotation of molecular fragments of aminoquinolines studied, followed by the solvent orientational relaxation.

  7. Relaxed excited states of color centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldacchini, G.

    1992-12-31

    Color centers in alkali halides display an optical cycle which has been, and it is still today, a model case for similar processes in other materials. Moreover, the luminescence of some color centers is so efficient that it has been used in laser applications. However, the quantum state from which the emission of light is originated, the so called relaxed excited state (RES), is not very well known. Indeed, in spite of the wealth of experimental results collected and of the theoretical approaches attempted, an exact description of the RES is still missing. This paper, confined mainly to F centers which are the simplest point defects in crystals, contains a review of the main experimental evidences which has some light on the nature of the RES, with special emphasis on the latest magneto-optical experiments. Also, a description of the theoretical models is attempted whenever required by a particular argument.

  8. Chemical reaction, thermal relaxation time and internal material parameter effects on MHD viscoelastic fluid with internal structure using the Cattaneo-Christov heat flux equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sabeel M.; Hammad, M.; Sunny, D. A.

    2017-08-01

    In this article, the influence of thermal relaxation time and chemical reaction is studied on the MHD upper-convected viscoelastic fluid with internal structure using the Cattaneo-Christov heat flux equation for the first time in the literature. The flow-governing equations are formulated and are converted into their respective ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with the application of similarity functions. The resulting system of coupled nonlinear ODEs is solved along with the prescribed conditions at boundary using a finite-difference code in MATLAB. Influence of chemical reaction, thermal relaxation time and internal material parameter on the macroscopic and micropolar velocities as well as on the temperature and concentration profiles is examined along with other physical parameters ( e.g., magnetic parameter, Eckert number, Prandtl number and fluid relaxation time). The accuracy of the obtained numerical solution is shown by comparing the physical parameters of interest with particular cases of existing results in the literature.

  9. Mozart versus new age music: relaxation states, stress, and ABC relaxation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jonathan C; Joyce, Carol A

    2004-01-01

    Smith's (2001) Attentional Behavioral Cognitive (ABC) relaxation theory proposes that all approaches to relaxation (including music) have the potential for evoking one or more of 15 factor-analytically derived relaxation states, or "R-States" (Sleepiness, Disengagement, Rested / Refreshed, Energized, Physical Relaxation, At Ease/Peace, Joy, Mental Quiet, Childlike Innocence, Thankfulness and Love, Mystery, Awe and Wonder, Prayerfulness, Timeless/Boundless/Infinite, and Aware). The present study investigated R-States and stress symptom-patterns associated with listening to Mozart versus New Age music. Students (N = 63) were divided into three relaxation groups based on previously determined preferences. Fourteen listened to a 28-minute tape recording of Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik and 14 listened to a 28-minute tape of Steven Halpern's New Age Serenity Suite. Others (n = 35) did not want music and instead chose a set of popular recreational magazines. Participants engaged in their relaxation activity at home for three consecutive days for 28 minutes a session. Before and after each session, each person completed the Smith Relaxation States Inventory (Smith, 2001), a comprehensive questionnaire tapping 15 R-States as well as the stress states of somatic stress, worry, and negative emotion. Results revealed no differences at Session 1. At Session 2, those who listened to Mozart reported higher levels of At Ease/Peace and lower levels of Negative Emotion. Pronounced differences emerged at Session 3. Mozart listeners uniquely reported substantially higher levels of Mental Quiet, Awe and Wonder, and Mystery. Mozart listeners reported higher levels, and New Age listeners slightly elevated levels, of At Ease/Peace and Rested/Refreshed. Both Mozart and New Age listeners reported higher levels of Thankfulness and Love. In summary, those who listened to Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik reported more psychological relaxation and less stress than either those who listened to

  10. Plasma Relaxation Dynamics Moderated by Current Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, Robert; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Yoshida, Zensho

    2014-10-01

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamics (IMHD) is strongly constrained by an infinite number of microscopic constraints expressing mass, entropy and magnetic flux conservation in each infinitesimal fluid element, the latter preventing magnetic reconnection. By contrast, in the Taylor-relaxed equilibrium model all these constraints are relaxed save for global magnetic flux and helicity. A Lagrangian is presented that leads to a new variational formulation of magnetized fluid dynamics, relaxed MHD (RxMHD), all static solutions of which are Taylor equilibrium states. By postulating that some long-lived macroscopic current sheets can act as barriers to relaxation, separating the plasma into multiple relaxation regions, a further generalization, multi-relaxed MHD (MRxMHD), is developed. These concepts are illustrated using a simple two-region slab model similar to that proposed by Hahm and Kulsrud--the formation of an initial shielding current sheet after perturbation by boundary rippling is calculated using MRxMHD and the final island state, after the current sheet has relaxed through a reconnection sequence, is calculated using RxMHD. Australian Research Council Grant DP110102881.

  11. Multi-region relaxed Hall magnetohydrodynamics with flow

    CERN Document Server

    Lingam, Manasvi; Hudson, Stuart R

    2016-01-01

    The recent formulations of multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics (MRxMHD) have generalized the famous Woltjer-Taylor states by incorporating a collection of "ideal barriers" that prevent global relaxation, and flow. In this paper, we generalize MRxMHD with flow to include Hall effects (MRxHMHD), and thereby obtain the partially relaxed counterparts of the famous double Beltrami states as a special subset. The physical and mathematical consequences arising from the introduction of the Hall term are also presented. We demonstrate that our results (in the ideal MHD limit) constitute an important subset of ideal MHD equilibria, and we compare our approach against other variational principles proposed for deriving the relaxed states.

  12. Multi-region relaxed Hall magnetohydrodynamics with flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingam, Manasvi; Abdelhamid, Hamdi M.; Hudson, Stuart R.

    2016-08-01

    The recent formulations of multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics (MRxMHD) have generalized the famous Woltjer-Taylor states by incorporating a collection of "ideal barriers" that prevent global relaxation and flow. In this paper, we generalize MRxMHD with flow to include Hall effects, and thereby obtain the partially relaxed counterparts of the famous double Beltrami states as a special subset. The physical and mathematical consequences arising from the introduction of the Hall term are also presented. We demonstrate that our results (in the ideal MHD limit) constitute an important subset of ideal MHD equilibria, and we compare our approach against other variational principles proposed for deriving the partially relaxed states.

  13. Relaxation versus adiabatic quantum steady-state preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venuti, Lorenzo Campos; Albash, Tameem; Marvian, Milad; Lidar, Daniel; Zanardi, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    Adiabatic preparation of the ground states of many-body Hamiltonians in the closed-system limit is at the heart of adiabatic quantum computation, but in reality systems are always open. This motivates a natural comparison between, on the one hand, adiabatic preparation of steady states of Lindbladian generators and, on the other hand, relaxation towards the same steady states subject to the final Lindbladian of the adiabatic process. In this work we thus adopt the perspective that the goal is the most efficient possible preparation of such steady states, rather than ground states. Using known rigorous bounds for the open-system adiabatic theorem and for mixing times, we are then led to a disturbing conclusion that at first appears to doom efforts to build physical quantum annealers: relaxation seems to always converge faster than adiabatic preparation. However, by carefully estimating the adiabatic preparation time for Lindbladians describing thermalization in the low-temperature limit, we show that there is, after all, room for an adiabatic speedup over relaxation. To test the analytically derived bounds for the adiabatic preparation time and the relaxation time, we numerically study three models: a dissipative quasifree fermionic chain, a single qubit coupled to a thermal bath, and the "spike" problem of n qubits coupled to a thermal bath. Via these models we find that the answer to the "which wins" question depends for each model on the temperature and the system-bath coupling strength. In the case of the "spike" problem we find that relaxation during the adiabatic evolution plays an important role in ensuring a speedup over the final-time relaxation procedure. Thus, relaxation-assisted adiabatic preparation can be more efficient than both pure adiabatic evolution and pure relaxation.

  14. State resolved vibrational relaxation modeling for strongly nonequilibrium flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Iain D.; Josyula, Eswar

    2011-05-01

    Vibrational relaxation is an important physical process in hypersonic flows. Activation of the vibrational mode affects the fundamental thermodynamic properties and finite rate relaxation can reduce the degree of dissociation of a gas. Low fidelity models of vibrational activation employ a relaxation time to capture the process at a macroscopic level. High fidelity, state-resolved models have been developed for use in continuum gas dynamics simulations based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD). By comparison, such models are not as common for use with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. In this study, a high fidelity, state-resolved vibrational relaxation model is developed for the DSMC technique. The model is based on the forced harmonic oscillator approach in which multi-quantum transitions may become dominant at high temperature. Results obtained for integrated rate coefficients from the DSMC model are consistent with the corresponding CFD model. Comparison of relaxation results obtained with the high-fidelity DSMC model shows significantly less excitation of upper vibrational levels in comparison to the standard, lower fidelity DSMC vibrational relaxation model. Application of the new DSMC model to a Mach 7 normal shock wave in carbon monoxide provides better agreement with experimental measurements than the standard DSMC relaxation model.

  15. Ideal MHD Stability of ITER Steady State Scenarios with ITBs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F.M. Poli, C.E. Kessel, S. Jardin, J. Manickam, M. Chance, J. Chen

    2011-07-27

    One of ITER goals is to demonstrate feasibility of continuous operations using non-inductive current drive. Two main candidates have been identified for advanced operations: the long duration, high neutron fluency hybrid scenario and the steady state scenario, both operating at a plasma current lower than the reference ELMy scenario [1][2] to minimize the required current drive. The steady state scenario targets plasmas with current 7-10 MA in the flat-top, 50% of which will be provided by the self-generated, pressure-driven bootstrap current. It has been estimated that, in order to obtain a fusion gain Q > 5 at a current of 9 MA, it should be ΒN > 2.5 and H > 1.5 [3]. This implies the presence of an Internal Transport Barrier (ITB). This work discusses how the stability of steady state scenarios with ITBs is affected by the external heating sources and by perturbations of the equilibrium profiles.

  16. Excited-state relaxation in π-conjugated polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, S. V.; Bao, Z.; Wohlgenannt, M.; Vardeny, Z. V.

    2002-05-01

    We study ultrafast relaxation processes of odd- (Bu) and even-parity (Ag) exciton states in poly(p-phenylene vinylene) derivatives. The Bu states are studied using a regular two-beam pump-and-probe spectroscopy, which can monitor vibronic relaxation and exciton diffusion. In order to observe the Ag states, a three-beam femtosecond transient spectroscopy is developed, in which two different excitation pulses successively generate odd-parity (1Bu) excitons at 2.2 eV and then reexcite them to higher Ag states. We are able to distinguish two different classes of Ag states: one class (mAg) experiences ultrafast internal conversion back to the lowest singlet exciton, whereas the other class (kAg) in violation of the Vavilov-Kasha's rule undergoes a different relaxation pathway. The excitons subsequently dissociate into long-lived polaron pairs, which results in emission quenching with the action spectrum similar to that of the intrinsic photoconductivity. We conclude that the Ag states above 3.3 eV (kAg) are charge-transfer states, that mediate carrier photogeneration.

  17. The variational-relaxation algorithm for finding quantum bound states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Daniel V.

    2017-09-01

    I describe a simple algorithm for numerically finding the ground state and low-lying excited states of a quantum system. The algorithm is an adaptation of the relaxation method for solving Poisson's equation, and is fundamentally based on the variational principle. It is especially useful for two-dimensional systems with nonseparable potentials, for which simpler techniques are inapplicable yet the computation time is minimal.

  18. On Spectral Relaxation Method for Entropy Generation on a MHD Flow and Heat Transfer of a Maxwell Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanford Shateyi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates entropy generation on a magnetohydrodynamic flow and heat transfer of a Maxwell fluid using a spectral relaxation method. The method is based on simple iteration schemes formed by reduction of the order of the momentum equation followed by a rearrangement of the resulting governing nonlinear equation systems which are then solved using spectral methods. The velocity and temperature profiles are obtained numerically and used to generate the entropy generation number. Entropy generation increased with the Reynolds number, the magnetic parameter and the dimensionless group parameter while decreased for higher Prandtl numbers. The effect of the flow parameters on the velocity and temperature of the flow were also investigated. The results were validated using the bvp4c where the spectral relaxation method was found to be accurate and rapidly convergent to the numerical results.

  19. Modelling stellar jets with magnetospheres using as initial states analytical MHD solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Todorov, P; Cayatte, V; Sauty, C; Lima, J J G; Tsinganos, K

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we focus on the construction of stellar outflow models emerging from a polar coronal hole-type region surrounded by a magnetosphere in the equatorial regions during phases of quiescent accretion. The models are based on initial analytical solutions. We adopt a meridionally self-similar solution of the time-independent and axisymmetric MHD equations which describes effectively a jet originating from the corona of a star. We modify appropriately this solution in order to incorporate a physically consistent stellar magnetosphere. We find that the closed fieldline region may exhibit different behaviour depending on the associated boundary conditions and the distribution of the heat flux. However, the stellar jet in all final equilibrium states is very similar to the analytical one prescribed in the initial conditions. When the initial net heat flux is maintained, the magnetosphere takes the form of a dynamical helmet streamer with a quasi steady state slow magnetospheric wind. With no heat flux, a s...

  20. Identification of standing fronts in steady state fluid flows: exact and approximate solutions for propagating MHD modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantellini, Filippo; Griton, Léa

    2016-10-01

    The spatial structure of a steady state plasma flow is shaped by the standing modes with local phase velocity exactly opposite to the flow velocity. The general procedure of finding the wave vectors of all possible standing MHD modes in any given point of a stationary flow requires numerically solving an algebraic equation. We present the graphical procedure (already mentioned by some authors in the 1960's) along with the exact solution for the Alfvén mode and approximate analytic solutions for both fast and slow modes. The technique can be used to identify MHD modes in space and laboratory plasmas as well as in numerical simulations.

  1. Relaxation Mode Analysis and Markov State Relaxation Mode Analysis for Chignolin in Aqueous Solution at a Transition Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Mitsutake, Ayori

    2015-01-01

    It is important to extract reaction coordinates or order parameters from protein simulations in order to investigate the local-minimum-energy states and the transition between them. The most popular method is principal component analysis, which extracts modes with large conformational fluctuation around an average structure. For protein systems, we recently have applied relaxation mode analysis, which investigate dynamics properties of structural fluctuations of proteins and extract slow relaxation modes. In this article, we apply relaxation mode analysis to extract reaction coordinates for the system, in which there are large conformational changes such as folding/unfolding simulation. We have performed a 750 ns simulation of chignolin at a transition temperature and observed many transitions between the most stable, misfolded and unfolded states. Here, we apply principal component analysis and relaxation mode analysis to the system. In relaxation mode analysis, we extract good reaction coordinates automatic...

  2. Vibrational state distribution and relaxation of vinoxy radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hongmei; Bersohn, Richard

    2001-07-01

    The vinoxy radical ṡCH2CHO is a product of the reaction of O(3P) atoms with terminal alkenes and can also be made by photodissociation of an alkyl vinyl ether. In either case it is formed in a vibrationally excited state. The nascent radical displays a rich electronic spectrum to the red of its X→B band origin consisting of bands originating from vibrationally excited states. Some transitions, true "hot bands," terminate on the vibrationless B state; others, sequence bands, terminate on vibrationally excited B states. The spectra become unobservably weak at a certain energy. The difference between that energy and the energy of the band origin is roughly the maximum vibrational energy in the radical. This is 5600 cm-1 for the vinoxy produced by photodissociation of ethyl vinyl ether at 193 nm and 3200 cm-1 for the product of the reaction of O(3P) with ethylene, propene, 1-butene, and 1-pentene. There is a remarkable cooling of the vibrations as the hydrocarbon chain lengthens. The average vibrational energy of the vinoxy product of the reaction O(3P) with ethylene, propene, 1-butene, and 1-pentene is 2100, 1800, 1570, and 1180 cm-1, respectively. This cooling implies that the reaction complex lives long enough for internal vibrational relaxation to occur. The average vibrational energy in the reaction-produced vinoxy is small, which implies that there is considerable kinetic energy. The time dependence of the intensity of the hot bands measures the relaxation rates of different energies, some of which are the energies of a single vibrational state. The ground-state population increases monotonically to an asymptote. The population of most states grows with time and then decays. The growth is due to a cascading from upper states. The populations of the highest energy states decay monotonically; the still higher energy states are almost unpopulated. These results prove that the relaxation proceeds stepwise. The magnitude of the step, ˜200-300 cm-1, can be

  3. Characterizing RNA Excited States using NMR Relaxation Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yi; Kellogg, Dawn; Kimsey, Isaac J; Sathyamoorthy, Bharathwaj; Stein, Zachary W; McBrairty, Mitchell; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in RNA secondary structure play fundamental roles in the cellular functions of a growing number of non-coding RNAs. This chapter describes NMR-based approaches for characterizing microsecond-to-millisecond changes in RNA secondary structure that are directed toward short-lived and low-populated species often referred to as “excited states”. Compared to larger-scale changes in RNA secondary structure, transitions towards excited states do not require assistance from chaperones, are often orders of magnitude faster, and are localized to a small number of nearby base pairs in and around non-canonical motifs. Here we describe a procedure for characterizing RNA excited states using off-resonance R1ρ NMR relaxation dispersion utilizing low-to-high spin-lock fields (25–3000 Hz). R1ρ NMR relaxation dispersion experiments are used to measure carbon and nitrogen chemical shifts in base and sugar moieties of the excited state. The chemical shift data is then interpreted with the aid of secondary structure prediction to infer potential excited states that feature alternative secondary structures. Candidate structures are then tested by using mutations, single-atom substitutions, or by changing physiochemical conditions, such as pH and temperature, to either stabilize or destabilize the candidate excited state. The resulting chemical shifts of the mutants or under different physiochemical conditions are then compared to those of the ground and excited state. Application is illustrated with a focus on the transactivation response element (TAR) from the human immune deficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), which exists in dynamic equilibrium with at least two distinct excited states. PMID:26068737

  4. Electronic excited states and relaxation dynamics in polymer heterojunction systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramon, John Glenn Santos

    The potential for using conducting polymers as the active material in optoelectronic devices has come to fruition in the past few years. Understanding the fundamental photophysics behind their operations points to the significant role played by the polymer interface in their performance. Current device architectures involve the use of bulk heterojunctions which intimately blend the donor and acceptor polymers to significantly increase not only their interfacial surface area but also the probability of exciton formation within the vicinity of the interface. In this dissertation, we detail the role played by the interface on the behavior and performance of bulk heterojunction systems. First, we explore the relation between the exciton binding energy to the band offset in determining device characteristics. As a general rule, when the exciton binding energy is greater than the band offset, the exciton remains the lowest energy excited state leading to efficient light-emitting properties. On the other hand, if the offset is greater than the binding energy, charge separation becomes favorable leading to better photovoltaic behavior. Here, we use a Wannier function, configuration interaction based approach to examine the essential excited states and predict the vibronic absorption and emission spectra of the PPV/BBL, TFB/F8BT and PFB/F8BT heterojunctions. Our results underscore the role of vibrational relaxation in the formation of charge-transfer states following photoexcitation. In addition, we look at the relaxation dynamics that occur upon photoexcitation. For this, we adopt the Marcus-Hush semiclassical method to account for lattice reorganization in the calculation of the interconversion rates in TFB/F8BT and PFB/F8BT. We find that, while a tightly bound charge-transfer state (exciplex) remains the lowest excited state, a regeneration pathway to the optically active lowest excitonic state in TFB/F8BT is possible via thermal repopulation from the exciplex. Finally

  5. Heating and current drive requirements for ideal MHD stability and ITB sustainment in ITER steady state scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Francesca

    2012-10-01

    Steady state scenarios envisaged for ITER aim at optimizing the bootstrap current, while maintaining sufficient confinement and stability to provide the necessary fusion yield. Non-inductive scenarios will need to operate with Internal Transport Barriers (ITBs) in order to reach adequate fusion gain at typical currents of 9 MA. However, the large pressure gradients associated with ITBs in regions of weak or negative magnetic shear can be conducive to ideal MHD instabilities in a wide range of βN, reducing the no-wall limit. Scenarios are established as relaxed flattop states with time-dependent transport simulations with TSC [1]. Fully non-inductive configurations with current in the range of 7-10 MA and various heating mixes (NB, EC, IC and LH) have been studied against variations of the pressure profile peaking and of the Greenwald fraction. It is found that stable equilibria have qmin> 2 and moderate ITBs at 2/3 of the minor radius [2]. The ExB flow shear from toroidal plasma rotation is expected to be low in ITER, with a major role in the ITB dynamics being played by magnetic geometry. Combinations of H&CD sources that maintain reverse or weak magnetic shear profiles throughout the discharge and ρ(qmin)>=0.5 are the focus of this work. The ITER EC upper launcher, designed for NTM control, can provide enough current drive off-axis to sustain moderate ITBs at mid-radius and maintain a non-inductive current of 8-9MA and H98>=1.5 with the day one heating mix. LH heating and current drive is effective in modifying the current profile off-axis, facilitating the formation of stronger ITBs in the rampup phase, their sustainment at larger radii and larger bootstrap fraction. The implications for steady state operation and fusion performance are discussed.[4pt] [1] Jardin S.C. et al, J. Comput. Phys. 66 (1986) 481[0pt] [2] Poli F.M. et al, Nucl. Fusion 52 (2012) 063027.

  6. Simple MHD Equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnack, Dalton D.

    In this lecture we will examine some simple examples of MHD equilibrium configurations. These will all be in cylindrical geometry. They form the basis for more complicated equilibrium states in toroidal geometry.

  7. Plasma Processes : Minimum dissipative relaxed states in toroidal plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Bhattacharyya; M S Janaki; B Dasgupta

    2000-11-01

    Relaxation of toroidal discharges is described by the principle of minimum energy dissipation together with the constraint of conserved global helicity. The resulting Euler-Lagrange equation is solved in toroidal coordinates for an axisymmetric torus by expressing the solutions in terms of Chandrasekhar-Kendall (C-K) eigenfunctions analytically continued in the complex domain. The C-K eigenfunctions are obtained as hypergeometric functions that are solutions of scalar Helmholtz equation in toroidal coordinates in the large aspect-ratio approximation. Equilibria are constructed by assuming the current to vanish at the edge of plasma. For the = 0; = 0 ( and are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers respectively) relaxed states, the magnetic field, current, (safety factor) and pressure profiles are calculated for a given value of aspect-ratio of the torus and for different values of the eigenvalue 0. The new feature of the present model is that solutions allow for both tokamak as well as RFP-like behaviour with increase in the values of 0, which is related directly to volt-sec in the experiment.

  8. Effects of flotation therapy on relaxation and mental state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡佩诚; 苏英

    2004-01-01

    @@ Flotation therapy is one of the models of Restricted Environmental Stimulation Therapy (REST). It has been studied and used in clinics in western countries for many years. According to the research results, flotation therapy can be used effectively in many ways.1 Some of the research done in China showed that flotation therapy could be helpful in the treatment of hypertension2 as well as cerebral paraplegia. It has also been observed in clinics that flotation therapy can induce deep relaxation, improve emotional states and have beneficial effects on some kinds of neurosis and psychosomatic diseases. But the effect of flotation therapy on the basic psychological and physiological function of ordinary Chinese has not been studied systemically. And there is no objective research result that has demonstrated the benefits of flotation therapy in Chinese clinics.

  9. First principles calculations of relationship between the Cu surface states and relaxations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Yao-Ping; Luo Ying; Liu Shao-Jun

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the relationship between the surface relaxations and the electron density distributions of surface states of Cu(100), Cu(110), and Cu(111) surfaces is obtained by first-principles calculations. The calculations indicate that relaxations mainly occur in the layers at which the surface states electrons are localized, and the magnitudes of the multilayer relaxations correspond to the difference of electron density of surface states between adjacent layers. The larger the interlayer relaxation is, the larger the difference of electron density of surface states between two layers is.

  10. Plasma Relaxation in Hall Magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Shivamoggi, B K

    2011-01-01

    Parker's formulation of isotopological plasma relaxation process in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is extended to Hall MHD. The torsion coefficient alpha in the Hall MHD Beltrami condition turns out now to be proportional to the "potential vorticity." The Hall MHD Beltrami condition becomes equivalent to the "potential vorticity" conservation equation in two-dimensional hydrodynamics if the Hall MHD Lagrange multiplier beta is taken to be proportional to the "potential vorticity" as well. The winding pattern of the magnetic field lines in Hall MHD then appears to evolve in the same way as "potential vorticity" lines in 2D hydrodynamics.

  11. Analysis of Relaxed States in Coaxial Helicity Injection Tokamaks on the Basis of Analytical Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周登; 张澄

    2002-01-01

    The principle of the minimum energy dissipation rate is applied to toroidal plasmas with a coaxial direct current helicity injection. The relaxed states are analysed based on the analytical solutions of the resulting Euler-Lagrangian equations. Three typical states are found. The relaxed states are close to the Taylor state if the ratio of current density to magnetic field on the boundary is small enough. The states will deviate from the Taylor state when the ratio increases, but when it approaches a critical value the central part of relaxed plasmas may approach a force free state, and above the critical value both current and magnetic field may reverse in the central part.

  12. Woltjer-Taylor State Without Taylor's Conjecture - Plasma Relaxation at all Wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Hong; Liu, Wandong; Li, Hong; Squire, Jonathan

    2012-10-10

    In astrophysical and laboratory plasmas, it has been discovered that plasmas relax towards the well-known Woltjer-Taylor state specified by ∇ x B = αB for a constant α . To explain how such a relaxed state is reached, Taylor developed his famous relaxation theory based on the conjecture that the relaxation is dominated by short wavelength fluctuations. However, there is no conclusive experimental and numerical evidence to support Taylor's conjecture. A new theory is developed, which predicts that the system will evolve towards the Woltjer-Taylor state for an arbitrary fluctuation spectrum.

  13. Proceedings of the workshop on nonlinear MHD and extended MHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    Nonlinear MHD simulations have proven their value in interpreting experimental results over the years. As magnetic fusion experiments reach higher performance regimes, more sophisticated experimental diagnostics coupled with ever expanding computer capabilities have increased both the need for and the feasibility of nonlinear global simulations using models more realistic than regular ideal and resistive MHD. Such extended-MHD nonlinear simulations have already begun to produce useful results. These studies are expected to lead to ever more comprehensive simulation models in the future and to play a vital role in fully understanding fusion plasmas. Topics include the following: (1) current state of nonlinear MHD and extended-MHD simulations; (2) comparisons to experimental data; (3) discussions between experimentalists and theorists; (4) /equations for extended-MHD models, kinetic-based closures; and (5) paths toward more comprehensive simulation models, etc. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  14. A New MHD-assisted Stokes Inversion Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riethmüller, T. L.; Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; Gizon, L.; Hirzberger, J.; van Noort, M.; Blanco Rodríguez, J.; Del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Orozco Suárez, D.; Schmidt, W.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Knölker, M.

    2017-03-01

    We present a new method of Stokes inversion of spectropolarimetric data and evaluate it by taking the example of a Sunrise/IMaX observation. An archive of synthetic Stokes profiles is obtained by the spectral synthesis of state-of-the-art magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations and a realistic degradation to the level of the observed data. The definition of a merit function allows the archive to be searched for the synthetic Stokes profiles that best match the observed profiles. In contrast to traditional Stokes inversion codes, which solve the Unno-Rachkovsky equations for the polarized radiative transfer numerically and fit the Stokes profiles iteratively, the new technique provides the full set of atmospheric parameters. This gives us the ability to start an MHD simulation that takes the inversion result as an initial condition. After a relaxation process of half an hour solar time we obtain physically consistent MHD data sets with a target similar to the observation. The new MHD simulation is used to repeat the method in a second iteration, which further improves the match between observation and simulation, resulting in a factor of 2.2 lower mean {χ }2 value. One advantage of the new technique is that it provides the physical parameters on a geometrical height scale. It constitutes a first step toward inversions that give results consistent with the MHD equations.

  15. Impact of luminescence quenching on relaxation-oscillation frequency in solid-state lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agazzi, L.; Bernhardi, Edward; Worhoff, Kerstin; Pollnau, Markus

    Measurement of the laser relaxation-oscillation frequency as a function of pump rate allows one to determine parameters of the laser medium or cavity. We show that luminescence quenching of a fraction of the rare-earth ions in a solid-state laser affects the relaxation oscillations, resulting in

  16. Feature Extraction for Mental Fatigue and Relaxation States Based on Systematic Evaluation Considering Individual Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lanlan; Sugi, Takenao; Shirakawa, Shuichiro; Zou, Junzhong; Nakamura, Masatoshi

    Feature extraction for mental fatigue and relaxation states is helpful to understand the mechanisms of mental fatigue and search effective relaxation technique in sustained work environments. Experiment data of human states are often affected by external and internal factors, which increase the difficulties to extract common features. The aim of this study is to explore appropriate methods to eliminate individual difference and enhance common features. Mental fatigue and relaxation experiments are executed on 12 subjects. An integrated and evaluation system is proposed, which consists of subjective evaluation (visual analogue scale), calculation performance and neurophysiological signals especially EEG signals. With consideration of individual difference, the common features of multi-estimators testify the effectiveness of relaxation in sustained mental work. Relaxation technique can be practically applied to prevent accumulation of mental fatigue and keep mental health. The proposed feature extraction methods are widely applicable to obtain common features and release the restriction for subjection selection and experiment design.

  17. Energy Cascades in MHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexakis, A.

    2009-04-01

    Most astrophysical and planetary systems e.g., solar convection and stellar winds, are in a turbulent state and coupled to magnetic fields. Understanding and quantifying the statistical properties of magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) turbulence is crucial to explain the involved physical processes. Although the phenomenological theory of hydro-dynamic (HD) turbulence has been verified up to small corrections, a similar statement cannot be made for MHD turbulence. Since the phenomenological description of Hydrodynamic turbulence by Kolmogorov in 1941 there have been many attempts to derive a similar description for turbulence in conducting fluids (i.e Magneto-Hydrodynamic turbulence). However such a description is going to be based inevitably on strong assumptions (typically borrowed from hydrodynamics) that do not however necessarily apply to the MHD case. In this talk I will discuss some of the properties and differences of the energy and helicity cascades in turbulent MHD and HD flows. The investigation is going to be based on the analysis of direct numerical simulations. The cascades in MHD turbulence appear to be a more non-local process (in scale space) than in Hydrodynamics. Some implications of these results to turbulent modeling will be discussed

  18. Liquid-state paramagnetic relaxation from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantaharju, Jyrki; Vaara, Juha

    2016-10-01

    We simulate nuclear and electron spin relaxation rates in a paramagnetic system from first principles. Sampling a molecular dynamics trajectory with quantum-chemical calculations produces a time series of the instantaneous parameters of the relevant spin Hamiltonian. The Hamiltonians are, in turn, used to numerically solve the Liouville-von Neumann equation for the time evolution of the spin density matrix. We demonstrate the approach by studying the aqueous solution of the Ni2 + ion. Taking advantage of Kubo's theory, the spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation rates are extracted from the simulations of the time dependence of the longitudinal and transverse magnetization, respectively. Good agreement with the available experimental data is obtained by the method.

  19. Ultrafast Excited State Relaxation of a Metalloporphyrin Revealed by Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shelby, Megan L.; Lestrange, Patrick J.; Jackson, Nicholas E.

    2016-01-01

    Photoexcited Nickel(II) tetramesitylporphyrin (NiTMP), like many open-shell metalloporphyrins, relaxes rapidly through multiple electronic states following an initial porphyrin-based excitation, some involving metal centered electronic configuration changes that could be harnessed catalytically b...

  20. Research on relaxation modulus of viscoelastic materials under unsteady temperature states based on TTSP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinsheng; Ju, Yutao; Han, Bo; Zhou, Changsheng; Zheng, Jian

    2013-11-01

    The main goal of this work is to obtain relaxation curves of Hydroxyl-Terminated Polybutadiene (HTPB) propellant under unsteady temperature states. A series of relaxation tests of HTPB were carried out, with the strain level ɛ 0 of the tests being applied with a ramp time of strain rate . A method is proposed to compensate for stress relaxation during the period of strain rate loading. The proposed method is compared to a numerical method and a general method in terms of accuracy of determination of relaxation modulus. The results show that the relaxation moduli obtained by the proposed method and the numerical method are more accurate than those from the general method; in addition, the proposed method is more convenient in data processing. The relaxation modulus values under unsteady temperature states were obtained from a series of relaxation curves under constant temperature, and at different temperatures according to Time-Temperature Superposition Principle (TTSP). In this work, reduced time is defined as a function of time-temperature shift factor a T and a variable ψ( T) called `zero time' which depends on temperature. A comparison of test results showed that the values of relaxation modulus that take `zero time' into account are more accurate than those without `zero time'.

  1. Variational Integration for Ideal MHD with Built-in Advection Equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yao [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Qin, Hong [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Burby, J. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Bhattacharjee, A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2014-08-05

    Newcomb's Lagrangian for ideal MHD in Lagrangian labeling is discretized using discrete exterior calculus. Variational integrators for ideal MHD are derived thereafter. Besides being symplectic and momentum preserving, the schemes inherit built-in advection equations from Newcomb's formulation, and therefore avoid solving them and the accompanying error and dissipation. We implement the method in 2D and show that numerical reconnection does not take place when singular current sheets are present. We then apply it to studying the dynamics of the ideal coalescence instability with multiple islands. The relaxed equilibrium state with embedded current sheets is obtained numerically.

  2. Relaxed states in electron-depleted electronegative dusty plasmas with two-negative ion species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, M.; Iqbal

    2014-02-01

    The relaxation of an electron-depleted electronegative dusty plasma with two-negative ions is investigated. When the ratio of canonical vorticities to corresponding flows of all the plasma species is the same and all inertial and non-inertial forces are present, the relaxed state appears as a double Beltrami magnetic field which is the superposition of two force-free relaxed states. The numerical results show that highly diamagnetic relaxed magnetic fields can be obtained by controlling the flow and vorticities through a single Beltrami parameter. The study is useful to investigate the creation of diamagnetic plasma configurations which are considered to be very important in the context of nuclear fusion.

  3. Relaxation of coherent states in a two-qubit NMR quadrupole system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarthour, R.S.; Guimaraes, A.P.; Oliveira, I.S. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Azevedo, E.R. de; Bonk, F.A.; Vidoto, E.L.G.; Bonagamba, T.J. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IFSC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Freitas, J.C.C. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2003-07-01

    Full text: Pulse Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is one of the most serious candidates as an experimental technique for implementing quantum algorithms. To the present date, this technique is in fact the only one where full demonstrations of quantum algorithms implementations have been carried out, in spite of various technical difficulties. On NMR quantum computers, gates and subroutines are encoded as radiofrequency pulse sequences, which must act over coherent states. These sequences usually take tens of milliseconds to be implemented, and during this time the system relax towards equilibrium. Therefore, studies of relaxation times are very important to the realization of quantum algorithms via NMR. In this work we studied the longitudinal relaxation of various coherent states on the NMR quantum computing two-qubit quadrupole system, {sup 23}Na in C{sub 10}H{sub 21}NaO{sub 4}S liquid crystal at room temperature. Relaxation of pseudo-pure states |00>, |01>, |10>, |11>, pseudo-Bell states |01> + |10> and |00> + |11> and Hadamard states |00> + |01> and |10> + |11> were investigated. Experimental curves follow a multi exponential model of relaxation which takes into account mixed, dipolar magnetic and quadrupolar electric interactions. (author)

  4. A new MHD-assisted Stokes inversion technique

    CERN Document Server

    Riethmüller, T L; Barthol, P; Gandorfer, A; Gizon, L; Hirzberger, J; van Noort, M; Rodríguez, J Blanco; Iniesta, J C Del Toro; Suárez, D Orozco; Schmidt, W; Pillet, V Martínez; Knölker, M

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method of Stokes inversion of spectropolarimetric data and evaluate it by taking the example of a SUNRISE/IMaX observation. An archive of synthetic Stokes profiles is obtained by the spectral synthesis of state-of-the-art magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations and a realistic degradation to the level of the observed data. The definition of a merit function allows the archive to be searched for the synthetic Stokes profiles that match the observed profiles best. In contrast to traditional Stokes inversion codes, which solve the Unno-Rachkovsky equations for the polarized radiative transfer numerically and fit the Stokes profiles iteratively, the new technique provides the full set of atmospheric parameters. This gives us the ability to start an MHD simulation that takes the inversion result as initial condition. After a relaxation process of half an hour solar time we obtain physically consistent MHD data sets with a target similar to the observation. The new MHD simulation is used to repeat t...

  5. Relaxed, minimum dissipation states, for a flux core spheromak sustained by helicity injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farengo, R; Caputi, KI

    Minimum dissipation states of a flux core spheromak sustained by helicity injection are presented. Helicity balance is used as a constraint and the resistivity is considered to be non-uniform. Two types of relaxed states are found: one has a central core formed by the flux that links the electrodes

  6. Determination of Leu Side-Chain Conformations in Excited Protein States by NMR Relaxation Dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, D. Flemming; Neudecker, Philipp; Vallurupalli, Pramodh; Mulder, Frans A. A.; Kay, Lewis E.

    2010-01-01

    Fits of Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion profiles allow extraction of the kinetics and thermodynamics of exchange reactions that interconvert highly populated, ground state and low Populated, excited state conformers. Structural information is also available in the form of chem

  7. Ultrafast excited state relaxation in long-chain polyenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antognazza, Maria Rosa, E-mail: mariarosa.antognazza@polimi.it [Center for Nano Science and Technology of IIT-PoliMI, via Pascoli 70/3, 20133 Milano (Italy); Lueer, Larry [National Laboratory for Ultrafast and Ultraintense Optical Science, CNR-INFM, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, P.za L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Madrid Institute of Advanced Studies, IMDEA Nanociencia, Faculdad de Ciencias, Av. Tomas y Valiente 7, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Polli, Dario [National Laboratory for Ultrafast and Ultraintense Optical Science, CNR-INFM, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, P.za L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Christensen, Ronald L. [Department of Chemistry, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, ME 04011 (United States); Schrock, Richard R. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Lanzani, Guglielmo [Center for Nano Science and Technology of IIT-PoliMI, via Pascoli 70/3, 20133 Milano (Italy); National Laboratory for Ultrafast and Ultraintense Optical Science, CNR-INFM, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, P.za L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Cerullo, Giulio [National Laboratory for Ultrafast and Ultraintense Optical Science, CNR-INFM, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, P.za L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2010-07-19

    Graphical abstract: Excited state dynamics of a long-chain polyene studied by femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. - Abstract: We present a comprehensive study, by femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy, of excited state dynamics in a polyene that approaches the infinite chain limit. By excitation with sub-10-fs pulses resonant with the 0-0 S{sub 0} {yields} S{sub 2} transition, we observe rapid loss of stimulated emission from the bright excited state S{sub 2}, followed by population of the hot S{sub 1} state within 150 fs. Vibrational cooling of S{sub 1} takes place within 500 fs and is followed by decay back to S{sub 0} with 1 ps time constant. By excitation with excess vibrational energy we also observe the ultrafast formation of a long-living absorption, that is assigned to the triplet state generated by singlet fission.

  8. Electronic relaxation of deep bulk trap and interface state in ZnO ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Yan; Li Sheng-Tao; Ding Can; Cheng Peng-Fei

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the electronic relaxation of deep bulk trap and interface state in ZnO ceramics based on dielectric spectra measured in a wide range of temperature, frequency and bias, in addition to the steady state response. It discusses the nature of net current flowing over the barrier affected by interface state, and then obtains temperature-dependent barrier height by approximate calculation from steady Ⅰ-Ⅴ (current-voltage) characteristics. Additional conductance and capacitance arising from deep bulk trap relaxation are calculated based on the displacement of the cross point between deep bulk trap and Fermi level under small AC signal. Prom the resonances due to deep bulk trap relaxation on dielectric spectra, the activation energies are obtained as 0.22 eV and 0.35 eV, which are consistent with the electronic levels of the main defect interstitial Zn and vacancy oxygen in the depletion layer. Under moderate bias, another resonance due to interface relaxation is shown on the dielectric spectra. The DC-like conductance is also observed in high temperature region on dielectric spectra, and the activation energy is much smaller than the barrier height in steady state condition, which is attributed to the displacement current coming from the shallow bulk trap relaxation or other factors.

  9. Relaxation dynamics in the excited states of a ketocyanine dye probed by femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jahur A Mondal; Sandeep Verma; Hirendra N Ghosh; Dipak K Palit

    2008-01-01

    Relaxation dynamics of the excited singlet states of 2,5-bis-(N-methyl-N-1,3-propdienylaniline)-cyclopentanone (MPAC), a ketocyanine dye, have been investigated using steady-state absorption and emission as well as femtosecond time-resolved absorption spectroscopic techniques. Following photoexcitation using 400 nm light, the molecule is excited to the S2 state, which is fluorescent in rigid matrices at 77 K. S2 state is nearly non-fluorescent in solution and has a very short lifetime (0.5 ± 0.2 ps). In polar aprotic solvents, the S1 state follows a complex multi-exponential relaxation dynamics consisting of torsional motion of the donor groups, solvent re-organization as well as photoisomerization processes. However, in alcoholic solvents, solvent re-organization via intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interaction is the only relaxation process observed in the S1 state. In trifluoroethanol, a strong hydrogen bonding solvent, conversion of the non-hydrogen-bonded form, which is formed following photoexcitation, to the hydrogen-bonded complex has been clearly evident in the relaxation process of the S1 state.

  10. Ultrafast excited state relaxation in long-chain polyenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antognazza, Maria Rosa; Lüer, Larry; Polli, Dario; Christensen, Ronald L.; Schrock, Richard R.; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Cerullo, Giulio

    2010-07-01

    We present a comprehensive study, by femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy, of excited state dynamics in a polyene that approaches the infinite chain limit. By excitation with sub-10-fs pulses resonant with the 0-0 S 0 → S 2 transition, we observe rapid loss of stimulated emission from the bright excited state S 2, followed by population of the hot S 1 state within 150 fs. Vibrational cooling of S 1 takes place within 500 fs and is followed by decay back to S 0 with 1 ps time constant. By excitation with excess vibrational energy we also observe the ultrafast formation of a long-living absorption, that is assigned to the triplet state generated by singlet fission.

  11. Statistical theory of relaxation of high-energy electrons in quantum Hall edge states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunde, Anders Mathias; Nigg, Simon E.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate theoretically the energy exchange between the electrons of two copropagating, out-of-equilibrium edge states with opposite spin polarization in the integer quantum Hall regime. A quantum dot tunnel coupled to one of the edge states locally injects electrons at high energy. Thereby a narrow peak in the energy distribution is created at high energy above the Fermi level. A second downstream quantum dot performs an energy-resolved measurement of the electronic distribution function. By varying the distance between the two dots, we are able to follow every step of the energy exchange and relaxation between the edge states, even analytically under certain conditions. In the absence of translational invariance along the edge, e.g., due to the presence of disorder, energy can be exchanged by non-momentum-conserving two-particle collisions. For weakly broken translational invariance, we show that the relaxation is described by coupled Fokker-Planck equations. From these we find that relaxation of the injected electrons can be understood statistically as a generalized drift-diffusion process in energy space for which we determine the drift velocity and the dynamical diffusion parameter. Finally, we provide a physically appealing picture in terms of individual edge-state heating as a result of the relaxation of the injected electrons.

  12. Determining the structural relaxation times deep in the glassy state of the pharmaceutical Telmisartan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrjanowicz, K.; Paluch, M.; Ngai, K. L.

    2010-03-01

    By using the dielectric relaxation method proposed recently by Casalini and Roland (2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 102 035701), we were able to determine the structural α-relaxation times deep in the glassy state of the pharmaceutical, Telmisartan. Normally, deep in the glassy state τα is so long that it cannot be measured but τβ, which is usually much shorter, can be directly determined. The method basically takes advantage of the connection between the α-relaxation and the secondary β-relaxation of the Johari-Goldstein kind, including a relation between their relaxation times τα and τβ, respectively. Thus, τα of Telmisartan were determined by monitoring the change of the dielectric β-loss, ɛ'', with physical aging time at temperatures well below the vitrification temperature. The values of τα were compared with those expected by the coupling model (CM). Unequivocal comparison cannot be made in the case of Telmisartan because its β-loss peak is extremely broad, and the CM predicts only an order of magnitude agreement between the primitive relaxation frequency and the β-peak frequency. We also made an attempt to analyze all isothermal and aging susceptibility data after transformation into the electric modulus representation. The τα found in the glass state by using the method of Casalini and Roland in the modulus representation are similar to those obtained in the susceptibility representation. However, it is remarkable that the stretching parameter βKWW - M = 0.51 in the electric modulus representation gives more precise fits to the aging data than in the susceptibility representation with βKWW = 0.61. Our results suggest that the electric modulus representation may be useful as an alternative to analyze aging data, especially in the case of highly polar glassformers having a large ratio of low frequency and high frequency dielectric constants, such as the Telmisartan studied.

  13. Diffusion-relaxation distribution functions of sedimentary rocks in different saturation states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hürlimann, M D; Flaum, M; Venkataramanan, L; Flaum, C; Freedman, R; Hirasaki, G J

    2003-01-01

    We present diffusion-relaxation distribution functions measured on four rock cores that were prepared in a succession of different saturation states of brine and crude oil. The measurements were performed in a static gradient field at a Larmor frequency of 1.76 MHz. The diffusion-relaxation distribution functions clearly separate the contributions from the two fluid phases. The results can be used to identify the wetting and non-wetting phase, to infer fluid properties of the phases, and to obtain additional information on the geometrical arrangement of the phases. We also observe effects due to restricted diffusion and susceptibility induced internal gradients.

  14. Enhancement of relaxation rates in the normal state of superconductor PuRhGa{sub 5}:NQR relaxation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, H. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)]. E-mail: sakai.hironori@jaea.go.jp; Kambe, S. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Tokunaga, Y. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Fujimoto, T. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Walstedt, R.E. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Yasuoka, H. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Aoki, D. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Homma, Y. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Yamamoto, E. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Nakamura, A. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Shiokawa, Y. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nakajima, K. [Department of Nuclear Energy System, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Arai, Y. [Department of Nuclear Energy System, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Matsuda, T.D. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Haga, Y. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Onuki, Y. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2007-03-15

    The spin-lattice relaxation rates (1/T{sub 1}) have been measured under zero field using nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) lines in superconductor PuRhGa{sub 5} and Pauli-paramagnet LuCoGa{sub 5}. In the reference LuCoGa{sub 5} with fully-occupied 4f shell, the 1/T{sub 1} shows the constant behavior of (T{sub 1}T){sup -1}=0.495+/-0.002(sK){sup -1}. On the other hand, in PuRhGa{sub 5}, 1/T{sub 1} is much larger than in LuCoGa{sub 5} and the 1/T{sub 1}{proportional_to}T behavior below {approx}30K is seen, where its (T{sub 1}T){sup -1} value is 3.27+/-0.005(sK){sup -1}. These results suggest a development of coherent Fermi liquid state incorporated with 5f electrons below {approx}30K in PuRhGa{sub 5}.

  15. The logarithmic relaxation process and the critical temperature of liquids in nano-confined states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changjiu; Wong, Kaikin; Mole, Richard A.; Yu, Dehong; Chathoth, Suresh M.

    2016-09-01

    The logarithmic relaxation process is the slowest of all relaxation processes and is exhibited by only a few molecular liquids and proteins. Bulk salol, which is a glass-forming liquid, is known to exhibit logarithmic decay of intermediate scattering function for the β-relaxation process. In this article, we report the influence of nanoscale confinements on the logarithmic relaxation process and changes in the microscopic glass-transition temperature of salol in the carbon and silica nanopores. The generalized vibrational density-of-states of the confined salol indicates that the interaction of salol with ordered nanoporous carbon is hydrophilic in nature whereas the interaction with silica surfaces is more hydrophobic. The mode-coupling theory critical temperature derived from the QENS data shows that the dynamic transition occurs at much lower temperature in the carbon pores than in silica pores. The results of this study indicate that, under nano-confinements, liquids that display logarithmic β-relaxation phenomenon undergo a unique glass transition process.

  16. Comparison between Spectral perturbation and Spectral relaxation approach for unsteady heat and mass transfer by MHD mixed convection flow over an impulsively stretched vertical surface with chemical reaction effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Agbaje

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the spectral perturbation method (SPM is utilized to solve the momentum, heat and mass transfer equations describing the unsteady MHD mixed convection flow over an impulsively stretched vertical surface in the presence of chemical reaction effect. The governing partial differential equations are reduced into a set of coupled non similar equations and then solved numerically using the SPM. The SPM combines the standard perturbation method idea with the Chebyshev pseudo-spectral collocation method. In order to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method, the spectral perturbation (SPM numerical results are compared with numerical results generated using the spectral relaxation method (SRM and a good agreement between the two methods is observed up to a minimum of eight decimal digits. Several simulation are conducted to ascertain the accuracy of the SPM and the SRM. The computational speed of the SPM is demonstrated by comparing the SPM computational time with the SRM computational time. A residual error analysis is also conducted for the SPM and the SRM in order to further assess the accuracy of the SPM. The study shows that the spectral perturbation method (SPM is more efficient in terms of computational speed when compared with the SRM. The study also shows that the SPM can be used as an efficient and reliable tool for solving strongly nonlinear boundary value partial differential equation problems that are defined under the Williams and Rhyne [3] transformation. In addition, the study shows that accurate results can be obtained using the perturbation method and thus, the conclusions earlier drawn by researchers regarding the accuracy of perturbation methods is corrected.

  17. Observation of a relaxed plasma state in a quasi-infinite cylinder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, T; Brown, M R; Dandurand, D

    2013-02-22

    A helical relaxed plasma state is observed in a long cylindrical volume. The cylinder is long enough so that the predicted minimum energy state is a close approximation to the infinite cylinder solution. The plasma is injected at v ≥ 50 km/s by a coaxial magnetized plasma gun located at one end of the cylindrical volume. The relaxed state is rapidly attained in 1-2 axial Alfvén times after initiation of the plasma. Magnetic data are favorably compared with an analytical model. Magnetic data exhibit broadband fluctuations of the measured axial modes during the formation period. The broadband activity rapidly decays as the energy condenses into the lowest energy mode, which is in agreement with the minimum energy eigenstate of [Symbol: see text] × B = λB.

  18. Observation of a Relaxed Plasma State in a Quasi-Infinite Cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, T.; Brown, M. R.; Dandurand, D.

    2013-02-01

    A helical relaxed plasma state is observed in a long cylindrical volume. The cylinder is long enough so that the predicted minimum energy state is a close approximation to the infinite cylinder solution. The plasma is injected at v≥50km/s by a coaxial magnetized plasma gun located at one end of the cylindrical volume. The relaxed state is rapidly attained in 1-2 axial Alfvén times after initiation of the plasma. Magnetic data are favorably compared with an analytical model. Magnetic data exhibit broadband fluctuations of the measured axial modes during the formation period. The broadband activity rapidly decays as the energy condenses into the lowest energy mode, which is in agreement with the minimum energy eigenstate of ∇×B=λB.

  19. Solid-state NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancement immersion depth studies in phospholipid bilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Chu, Shidong

    2010-11-01

    A new approach for determining the membrane immersion depth of a spin-labeled probe has been developed using paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) in solid-state NMR spectroscopy. A DOXYL spin label was placed at different sites of 1-palmitoyl-2-stearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PSPC) phospholipid bilayers as paramagnetic moieties and the resulting enhancements of the longitudinal relaxation (T1) times of 31P nuclei on the surface of the bilayers were measured by a standard inversion recovery pulse sequence. The 31P NMR spin-lattice relaxation times decrease steadily as the DOXYL spin label moves closer to the surface as well as the concentration of the spin-labeled lipids increase. The enhanced relaxation vs. the position and concentration of spin-labels indicate that PRE induced by the DOXYL spin label are significant to determine longer distances over the whole range of the membrane depths. When these data were combined with estimated correlation times τc, the r-6-weighted, time-averaged distances between the spin-labels and the 31P nuclei on the membrane surface were estimated. The application of using this solid-state NMR PRE approach coupled with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) may be a powerful method for measuring membrane protein immersion depth. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Nonaxisymmetric MHD Instabilities of Chandrasekhar States in Taylor-Couette Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellert, M.; Rüdiger, G.; Schultz, M.; Guseva, A.; Hollerbach, R.

    2016-06-01

    We consider axially periodic Taylor-Couette geometry with insulating boundary conditions. The imposed basic states are so-called Chandrasekhar states, where the azimuthal flow U ϕ and magnetic field B ϕ have the same radial profiles. Mainly three particular profiles are considered: the Rayleigh limit, quasi-Keplerian, and solid-body rotation. In each case we begin by computing linear instability curves and their dependence on the magnetic Prandtl number {{Pm}}. For the azimuthal wavenumber m = 1 modes, the instability curves always scale with the Reynolds number and the Hartmann number. For sufficiently small {{Pm}} these modes therefore only become unstable for magnetic Mach numbers less than unity, and are thus not relevant for most astrophysical applications. However, modes with m\\gt 1 can behave very differently. For sufficiently flat profiles, they scale with the magnetic Reynolds number and the Lundquist number, thereby allowing instability also for the large magnetic Mach numbers of astrophysical objects. We further compute fully nonlinear, three-dimensional equilibration of these instabilities, and investigate how the energy is distributed among the azimuthal (m) and axial (k) wavenumbers. In comparison spectra become steeper for large m, reflecting the smoothing action of shear. On the other hand kinetic and magnetic energy spectra exhibit similar behavior: if several azimuthal modes are already linearly unstable they are relatively flat, but for the rigidly rotating case where m = 1 is the only unstable mode they are so steep that neither Kolmogorov nor Iroshnikov-Kraichnan spectra fit the results. The total magnetic energy exceeds the kinetic energy only for large magnetic Reynolds numbers {{Rm}}\\gt 100.

  1. Density Relaxation in Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Combining Relaxed Density Natural Orbitals and Multireference Perturbation Theories for an Improved Description of Excited States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronca, Enrico; Angeli, Celestino; Belpassi, Leonardo; De Angelis, Filippo; Tarantelli, Francesco; Pastore, Mariachiara

    2014-09-09

    Making use of the recently developed excited state charge displacement analysis [E. Ronca et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 054110 (2014)], suited to quantitatively characterize the charge fluxes coming along an electronic excitation, we investigate the role of the density relaxation effects in the overall description of electronically excited states of different nature, namely, valence, ionic, and charge transfer (CT), considering a large set of prototypical small and medium-sized molecular systems. By comparing the response densities provided by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and the corresponding relaxed densities obtained by applying the Z-vector postlinear-response approach [N. C. Handy and H. F. Schaefer, J. Chem. Phys. 81, 5031 (1984)] with those obtained by highly correlated state-of-the-art wave function calculations, we show that the inclusion of the relaxation effects is imperative to get an accurate description of the considered excited states. We also examine what happens at the quality of the response function when an increasing amount of Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange is included in the functional, showing that the usually improved excitation energies in the case of CT states are not always the consequence of an improved description of their overall properties. Remarkably, we find that the relaxation of the response densities is always able to reproduce, independently of the extent of HF exchange in the functional, the benchmark wave function densities. Finally, we propose a novel and computationally convenient strategy, based on the use of the natural orbitals derived from the relaxed TDDFT density to build zero-order wave function for multireference perturbation theory calculations. For a significant set of different excited states, the proposed approach provided accurate excitation energies, comparable to those obtained by computationally demanding ab initio calculations.

  2. High frequency characteristics of elasticity of skeletal muscle fibres kept in relaxed and rigor state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Winkel, M E; Blangé, T; Treijtel, B W

    1994-04-01

    The viscoelastic properties of crossbridges in rigor state are studied by means of application of small length changes, completed within 30 microseconds, to isometric skinned fibre segments of the iliofibularis muscle of the frog in relaxed and rigor state and measurement of the tension response. Results are expressed as a complex Young's modulus, the real part of which denotes normalized stiffness, while the imaginary part denotes normalized viscous mechanical impedance. Young's modulus was examined over a wide frequency range varying from 5 Hz up to 50 kHz. Young's modulus can be interpreted in terms of stiffness and viscous friction of the half-sarcomere or in terms of elastic changes in tension and recovery upon a step length change. The viscoelastic properties of half-sarcomeres of muscle fibre segments in rigor state showed strong resemblance to those of activated fibres in that shortening a muscle fibre in rigor state resulted in an immediate drop in tension, after which half of the drop in tension was recovered. The following slower phases of tension recovery--a subsequent drop in tension and slow completion of tension recovery--as seen in the activated state, do not occur in rigor state. The magnitude of Young's moduli of fibres in rigor state generally decreased from a value of 3.12 x 10(7) N m-2 at 40 kHz to 1.61 x 10(7) N m-2 at about 100 Hz. Effects of increased viscosity of the incubation medium, decreased interfilament distance in the relaxed state and variation of rigor tension upon frequency dependence of complex Young's modulus have been investigated. Variation of tension of crossbridges in rigor state influenced to some extent the frequency dependence of the Young's modulus. Recovery in relaxed state is not dependent on the viscosity of the medium. Recovery in rigor is slowed down at raised viscosity of the incubation medium, but less than half the amount expected if viscosity of the medium would be the cause of internal friction of the half

  3. Multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics with flow

    CERN Document Server

    Dennis, G R; Dewar, R L; Hole, M J

    2014-01-01

    We present an extension of the multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics (MRxMHD) equilibrium model that includes plasma flow. This new model is a generalization of Woltjer's model of relaxed magnetohydrodynamics equilibria with flow. We prove that as the number of plasma regions becomes infinite our extension of MRxMHD reduces to ideal MHD with flow. We also prove that some solutions to MRxMHD with flow are not time-independent in the laboratory frame, and instead have 3D structure which rotates in the toroidal direction with fixed angular velocity. This capability gives MRxMHD potential application to describing rotating 3D MHD structures such as 'snakes' and long-lived modes.

  4. Multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics with flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, G. R., E-mail: graham.dennis@anu.edu.au; Dewar, R. L.; Hole, M. J. [Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, ACT 0200 (Australia); Hudson, S. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    We present an extension of the multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics (MRxMHD) equilibrium model that includes plasma flow. This new model is a generalization of Woltjer's model of relaxed magnetohydrodynamics equilibria with flow. We prove that as the number of plasma regions becomes infinite, our extension of MRxMHD reduces to ideal MHD with flow. We also prove that some solutions to MRxMHD with flow are not time-independent in the laboratory frame, and instead have 3D structure which rotates in the toroidal direction with fixed angular velocity. This capability gives MRxMHD potential application to describing rotating 3D MHD structures such as 'snakes' and long-lived modes.

  5. Determining the structural relaxation times deep in the glassy state of the pharmaceutical Telmisartan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adrjanowicz, K; Paluch, M [Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Ngai, K L [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5320 (United States)

    2010-03-31

    By using the dielectric relaxation method proposed recently by Casalini and Roland (2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 102 035701), we were able to determine the structural alpha-relaxation times deep in the glassy state of the pharmaceutical, Telmisartan. Normally, deep in the glassy state tau{sub a}lpha is so long that it cannot be measured but tau{sub b}eta, which is usually much shorter, can be directly determined. The method basically takes advantage of the connection between the alpha-relaxation and the secondary beta-relaxation of the Johari-Goldstein kind, including a relation between their relaxation times tau{sub a}lpha and tau{sub b}eta, respectively. Thus, tau{sub a}lpha of Telmisartan were determined by monitoring the change of the dielectric beta-loss, epsilon'', with physical aging time at temperatures well below the vitrification temperature. The values of tau{sub a}lpha were compared with those expected by the coupling model (CM). Unequivocal comparison cannot be made in the case of Telmisartan because its beta-loss peak is extremely broad, and the CM predicts only an order of magnitude agreement between the primitive relaxation frequency and the beta-peak frequency. We also made an attempt to analyze all isothermal and aging susceptibility data after transformation into the electric modulus representation. The tau{sub a}lpha found in the glass state by using the method of Casalini and Roland in the modulus representation are similar to those obtained in the susceptibility representation. However, it is remarkable that the stretching parameter beta{sub KWWM} = 0.51 in the electric modulus representation gives more precise fits to the aging data than in the susceptibility representation with beta{sub KWW} = 0.61. Our results suggest that the electric modulus representation may be useful as an alternative to analyze aging data, especially in the case of highly polar glassformers having a large ratio of low frequency and high frequency dielectric

  6. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) Project represents the culmination of the proof-of-concept (POC) development stage in the US Department of Energy (DOE) program to advance MHD technology to early commercial development stage utility power applications. The project is a joint effort, combining the skills of three topping cycle component developers: TRW, Avco/TDS, and Westinghouse. TRW, the prime contractor and system integrator, is responsible for the 50 thermal megawatt (50 MW{sub t}) slagging coal combustion subsystem. Avco/TDS is responsible for the MHD channel subsystem (nozzle, channel, diffuser, and power conditioning circuits), and Westinghouse is responsible for the current consolidation subsystem. The ITC Project will advance the state-of-the-art in MHD power systems with the design, construction, and integrated testing of 50 MW{sub t} power train components which are prototypical of the equipment that will be used in an early commercial scale MHD utility retrofit. Long duration testing of the integrated power train at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) in Butte, Montana will be performed, so that by the early 1990's, an engineering data base on the reliability, availability, maintainability and performance of the system will be available to allow scaleup of the prototypical designs to the next development level. This Sixteenth Quarterly Technical Progress Report covers the period May 1, 1991 to July 31, 1991.

  7. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) Project represents the culmination of the proof-of-concept (POC) development stage in the US Department of Energy (DOE) program to advance MHD technology to early commercial development stage utility power applications. The project is a joint effort, combining the skills of three topping cycle component developers: TRW, Avco/TDS, and Westinghouse. TRW, the prime contractor and system integrator, is responsible for the 50 thermal megawatt (50 MW{sub t}) slagging coal combustion subsystem. Avco/TDS is responsible for the MHD channel subsystem (nozzle, channel, diffuser, and power conditioning circuits), and Westinghouse is responsible for the current consolidation subsystem. The ITC Project will advance the state-of-the-art in MHD power systems with the design, construction, and integrated testing of 50 MW{sub t} power train components which are prototypical of the equipment that will be used in an early commercial scale MHD utility retrofit. Long duration testing of the integrated power train at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) in Butte, Montana will be performed, so that by the early 1990's, an engineering data base on the reliability, availability, maintainability and performance of the system will be available to allow scaleup of the prototypical designs to the next development level. This Sixteenth Quarterly Technical Progress Report covers the period May 1, 1991 to July 31, 1991.

  8. Effect of two yoga-based relaxation techniques on memory scores and state anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telles Shirley

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A yoga practice involving cycles of yoga postures and supine rest (called cyclic meditation was previously shown to improve performance in attention tasks more than relaxation in the corpse posture (shavasana. This was ascribed to reduced anxiety, though this was not assessed. Methods In fifty-seven male volunteers (group average age ± S.D., 26.6 ± 4.5 years the immediate effect of two yoga relaxation techniques was studied on memory and state anxiety. All participants were assessed before and after (i Cyclic meditation (CM practiced for 22:30 minutes on one day and (ii an equal duration of Supine rest (SR or the corpse posture (shavasana, on another day. Sections of the Wechsler memory scale (WMS were used to assess; (i attention and concentration (digit span forward and backward, and (ii associate learning. State anxiety was assessed using Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI. Results There was a significant improvement in the scores of all sections of the WMS studied after both CM and SR, but, the magnitude of change was more after CM compared to after SR. The state anxiety scores decreased after both CM and SR, with a greater magnitude of decrease after CM. There was no correlation between percentage change in memory scores and state anxiety for either session. Conclusion A cyclical combination of yoga postures and supine rest in CM improved memory scores immediately after the practice and decreased state anxiety more than rest in a classical yoga relaxation posture (shavasana.

  9. Description of plasma focus current sheath as the Turner relaxed state of a Hall magnetofluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auluck, S. K. H.

    2009-12-01

    The central mystery of plasma focus research is the two orders-of-magnitude-higher-than-thermal fusion reaction rate and the fact that both the space-resolved neutron spectra and space-resolved reaction proton spectra show features which can be ascribed only to a rotational motion of the center-of-mass of the reacting deuteron population. It has been suggested earlier [S. K. H. Auluck, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 25, 37 (1997)] that this and other experimental observations can be consistently explained in terms of a hypothesis involving rotation of the current carrying plasma annulus behind the imploding gas-dynamic shock. Such rotation (more generally, mass flow) is an in-built feature of relaxed state of a two-fluid plasma [R. N. Sudan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 42, 1277 (1979)]. Relaxation in the "Hall magnetofluid" approximation, in which the generalized Ohm's law includes the Hall effect term and the magnetic convection term but omits the contributions to the electric field from resistive dissipation, electron pressure gradient, thermoelectric effect, electron inertia, etc., has been extensively studied by many authors. In the present paper, Turner's [IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. PS-14, 849 (1986)] degenerate solution for the relaxed state of the Hall magnetohydrodynamic plasma has been adapted to the case of an infinitely long annular current carrying plasma, a tractable idealization of the current sheath of a plasma focus. The resulting model is consistent with experimental values of ion kinetic energy and observation of predominantly radially directed neutron emission in good shots.

  10. Formation and relaxation of quasistationary states in particle systems with power-law interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, B.; Gabrielli, A.; Joyce, M.

    2017-09-01

    We explore the formation and relaxation of the so-called quasistationary states (QSS) for particle distributions in three dimensions interacting via an attractive radial pair potential V (r →∞ ) ˜1 /rγ with γ >0 , and either a soft core or hard core regularization at small r . In the first part of the paper, we generalize, for any spatial dimension d ≥2 , Chandrasekhar's approach for the case of gravity to obtain analytic estimates of the rate of collisional relaxation due to two-body collisions. The resultant relaxation rates indicate an essential qualitative difference depending on the integrability of the pair force at large distances: for γ >d -1 , the rate diverges in the large particle number N (mean-field) limit, unless a sufficiently large soft core is present; for γ mean interparticle distance). Our results provide strong evidence that the existence of QSS is robust only for long-range interactions with a large distance behavior γ states will be conditioned strongly on the short-range properties of the interaction.

  11. Kinetic relaxation of a non-Maxwellian monatomic gas in a state of gross rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baganoff, D.

    1993-01-01

    The kinetic relaxation of a monatomic gas in a state of gross rest is studied by use of Maxwell's second-order moment equation. The molecular models considered range from the hard sphere to the Maxwell molecule. The development is exact for an ellipsoidal distribution and becomes a good approximation for more general distributions. The results show that the relaxation of second-order moments is nearly exponential for power-law molecules and that the characteristic time mu/p appears as the principal controlling parameter while the power-law constant plays a secondary role. Comparisons between results of numerical simulations using Bird's direct simulation Monte Carlo method and theory show excellent agreement for both hard-sphere and Maxwell molecules.

  12. Turbulent relaxation and meta-stable equilibrium states of an electron plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Douglas J.

    A Malmberg-Penning electron trap allows for the experimental study of nearly ideal, two-dimensional (2D) inviscid (Euler) hydrodynamics. This is perhaps the simplest case of self organizing nonlinear turbulence, and is therefore a paradigm for dynamo theory, Taylor relaxation, selective decay and other nonlinear fluid processes. The dynamical relaxation of a pure electron plasma in the guiding-center-drift approximation is studied, comparing experiments, numerical simulations and statistical theories of weakly-dissipative 2D turbulence. The nonuniform metastable equilibrium states resulting from turbulent evolution are examined, and are well-described by a maximum entropy principle for constrained circulation, energy, and angular momentum. The turbulent decay of the system is also examined, and a similarity decay law is proposed which incorporates the substantial enstrophy trapped in the metastable equilibrium. This law approaches Batchelor's t-2 self-similar decay in the limit of strong turbulence, and is verified in turbulent evolution in the electron plasma experiment.

  13. Ground-state atomic polarization relaxation-time measurement of Rb filled hypocycloidal core-shaped Kagome HC-PCF

    CERN Document Server

    Bradley, T D; McFerran, J J; Jouin, J; Debord, B; Alharbi, M; Thomas, P; Gerome, F; Benabid, F

    2015-01-01

    We report on the measurement of ground state atomic polarization relaxation tile of Rb vapor confined in five different hypocycloidal core shape Kagome hollow core photonic crystal fibers made with uncoated silica glass. We are able to distinguish between wall-collision and transit-time effects in optical waveguide and deduce the contribution of the atom's dwell time at the core wall surface. In contrast with convetional macroscopic atomic cell configuration, and in agreement with Monte Carlo simulations, the measured relaxation times were found to be at least one order of magnitude longer than the limit set by the atom-wall collisional relaxation from thermal atoms. This extended relaxation time is explained by the combination of a stronger contribution of the slow atoms in the atomic polarization build-up, and of the relatively significant contribution of dwell time to the relaxation process of the ground state polarization.

  14. An MHD model of the earth's magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that the earth's magnetosphere arises from the interaction of the solar wind with the earth's geomagnetic field. A global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model of the earth's magnetosphere has drawn much attention in recent years. In this model, MHD equations are used to describe the solar wind interaction with the magnetosphere. In the present paper, some numerical aspects of the model are considered. Attention is given to the ideal MHD equations, an equation of state for the plasma, the model as an initial- and boundary-value problem, the shock capturing technique, computational requirements and techniques for global MHD modeling, a three-dimensional mesh system employed in the global MHD model, and some computational results.

  15. Excited states in electron-transfer reaction products: ultrafast relaxation dynamics of an isolated acceptor radical anion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horke, Daniel A; Roberts, Gareth M; Verlet, Jan R R

    2011-08-04

    The spectroscopy and ultrafast relaxation dynamics of excited states of the radical anion of a representative charge-transfer acceptor molecule, 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane, have been studied in the gas phase using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. The photoelectron spectra reveal that at least two anion excited states are bound. Time-resolved studies show that both excited states are very short-lived and internally convert to the anion ground state, with the lower energy state relaxing within 200 fs and a near-threshold valence-excited state relaxing on a 60 fs time scale. These excited states, and in particular the valence-excited state, present efficient pathways for electron-transfer reactions in the highly exergonic inverted region which commonly displays rates exceeding predictions from electron-transfer theory.

  16. Dielectric relaxation and crystallization of ultraviscous melt and glassy states of aspirin, ibuprofen, progesterone, and quinidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, G P; Kim, S; Shanker, Ravi M

    2007-05-01

    Molecular relaxation in ultraviscous melt and glassy states of aspirin, ibuprofen, progesterone, and quinidine has been studied by dielectric spectroscopy. The asymmetric relaxation spectra is characterized by the Kohlrausch distribution parameter of 0.46 +/- 0.02 for aspirin to 0.67 +/- 0.02 for progesterone. The dielectric relaxation time varies with the temperature, T, according to the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann Equation, log(10)(tau(0)) = A(VFT) + [B(VFT)/(T - T(0))], where A(VFT), B(VFT), and T(0) are empirical constants. The extrapolated tau(0) at calorimetric glass-softening temperature is close to the value expected. The equilibrium permittivity, epsilon(0), is lowest for ibuprofen which indicates an antiparallel orientation of dipoles in its liquid's hydrogen-bonded structure. A decrease in epsilon(0) with time shows that ultraviscous aspirin, progesterone, and quinidine begin to cold-crystallize at a relatively lower temperature than ibuprofen. epsilon(0) of the cold-crystallized phases are, 4.7 for aspirin at 290 K, 2.55 for ibuprofen at 287 K, 2.6 for progesterone at 320 K, and 3.2 for quinidine at 375 K. It is argued that hydrogen-bonding, the Kohlrausch parameter, extent of localized motions and the long-range diffusion times all determine the physical and chemical stability of an amorphous pharmaceutical during storage. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  17. Tuning Morphologies of Langmuir Polymer Films Through Controlled Relaxations of Non-Equilibrium States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Sivasurender; Dold, Stefanie; Buvignier, Amaury; Krannig, Kai-Steffen; Schlaad, Helmut; Reiter, Günter; Reiter, Renate

    2015-06-16

    Langmuir polymers films (LPFs) frequently form nonequilibrium states which are manifested in a decay of the surface pressure with time when the system is allowed to relax. Monitoring and manipulating the temporal evolution of these relaxations experimentally helps to shed light on the associated molecular reorganization processes. We present a systematic study based on different compression protocols and show how these reorganization processes impact the morphology of LPFs of poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate)(PBLG), visualized by means of atomic force microscopy. Upon continuous compression, a fibrillar morphology was formed with a surface decorated by squeezed-out islands. By contrast, stepwise compression promoted the formation of a fibrillar network with a bimodal distribution of fibril diameters, caused by merging of fibrils. Finally, isobaric compression induced in-plane compaction of the monolayer. We correlate these morphological observations with the kinetics of the corresponding relaxations, described best by a sum of two exponential functions with different time scales representing two molecular processes. We discuss the observed kinetics and the resulting morphologies in the context of nucleation and growth, characteristic for first-order phase transitions. Our results demonstrate that the preparation conditions of LPFs have tremendous impact on ordering of the molecules and hence various macroscopic properties of such films.

  18. Critical behavior of the absorbing state transition in the contact process with relaxing immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Claudia P. T.; Lyra, M. L.; Fulco, U. L.; Corso, Gilberto

    2012-11-01

    We introduce a model for the Contact Process with relaxing immunization CPRI. In this model, local memory is introduced by a time and space dependence of the contamination probability. The model has two parameters: a typical immunization time τ and a maximum contamination probability a. The system presents an absorbing state phase transition whenever the contamination probability a is above a minimum threshold. For short immunization times, the system evolves to a statistically stationary active state. Above τc(a), immunization predominates and the system evolves to the absorbing vacuum state. We employ a finite-size scaling analysis to show that the transition belongs to the standard directed percolation universality class. The critical immunization time diverges in the limit of a→1. In this regime, the density of active sites decays exponentially as τ increases, but never reaches the vacuum state in the thermodynamic limit.

  19. Using relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy to determine structures of excited, invisible protein states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, D. Flemming; Vallurupalli, Pramodh; Kay, Lewis E. [University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry (Canada)], E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca

    2008-07-15

    Currently the main focus of structural biology is the determination of static three-dimensional representations of biomolecules that for the most part correspond to low energy (ground state) conformations. However, it is becoming increasingly well recognized that higher energy structures often play important roles in function as well. Because these conformers are populated to only low levels and are often only transiently formed their study is not amenable to many of the tools of structural biology. In this perspective we discuss the role of CPMG-based relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy in characterizing these low populated, invisible states. It is shown that robust methods for measuring both backbone chemical shifts and residual anisotropic interactions in the excited state are in place and that these data provide valuable restraints for structural studies of invisible conformers.

  20. Adaptive relaxation for the steady-state analysis of Markov chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Graham

    1994-01-01

    We consider a variant of the well-known Gauss-Seidel method for the solution of Markov chains in steady state. Whereas the standard algorithm visits each state exactly once per iteration in a predetermined order, the alternative approach uses a dynamic strategy. A set of states to be visited is maintained which can grow and shrink as the computation progresses. In this manner, we hope to concentrate the computational work in those areas of the chain in which maximum improvement in the solution can be achieved. We consider the adaptive approach both as a solver in its own right and as a relaxation method within the multi-level algorithm. Experimental results show significant computational savings in both cases.

  1. Slow Intramolecular Vibrational Relaxation Leads to Long-Lived Excited-State Wavepackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Shahnawaz; Scholes, Gregory D

    2016-09-01

    Broadband optical pump and compressed white light continuum probe were used to measure the transient excited-state absorption, ground-state bleach, and stimulated emission signals of cresyl violet solution in methanol. Amplitude oscillations caused by wavepacket motion in the ground and excited electronic states were analyzed. It was found that vibrational coherences in the excited state persist for more than the experimental waiting time window of 6 ps, and the strongest mode had a dephasing time constant of 2.4 ps. We hypothesize the dephasing of the wavepacket in the excited state is predominantly caused by intramolecular vibrational relaxation (IVR). Slow IVR indicates weak mode-mode coupling and therefore weak anharmonicity of the potential of this vibration. Thus, the initially prepared vibrational wavepacket in the excited state is not significantly perturbed by nonadiabatic coupling to other electronic states, and hence the diabatic and adiabatic representations of the system are essentially identical within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The wavepacket therefore evolves with time in an almost harmonic potential, slowly dephased by IVR and the pure vibrational decoherence. The consistency in the position of node (phase change in the wavepacket) in the excited-state absorption and stimulated emission signals without undergoing any frequency shift until the wavepacket is completely dephased conforms to the absence of any reactive internal conversion.

  2. Unraveling the complexity of protein backbone dynamics with combined (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR relaxation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamley, Jonathan M; Lougher, Matthew J; Sass, Hans Juergen; Rogowski, Marco; Grzesiek, Stephan; Lewandowski, Józef R

    2015-09-14

    Typically, protein dynamics involve a complex hierarchy of motions occurring on different time scales between conformations separated by a range of different energy barriers. NMR relaxation can in principle provide a site-specific picture of both the time scales and amplitudes of these motions, but independent relaxation rates sensitive to fluctuations in different time scale ranges are required to obtain a faithful representation of the underlying dynamic complexity. This is especially pertinent for relaxation measurements in the solid state, which report on dynamics in a broader window of time scales by more than 3 orders of magnitudes compared to solution NMR relaxation. To aid in unraveling the intricacies of biomolecular dynamics we introduce (13)C spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame (R1ρ) as a probe of backbone nanosecond-microsecond motions in proteins in the solid state. We present measurements of (13)C'R1ρ rates in fully protonated crystalline protein GB1 at 600 and 850 MHz (1)H Larmor frequencies and compare them to (13)C'R1, (15)N R1 and R1ρ measured under the same conditions. The addition of carbon relaxation data to the model free analysis of nitrogen relaxation data leads to greatly improved characterization of time scales of protein backbone motions, minimizing the occurrence of fitting artifacts that may be present when (15)N data is used alone. We also discuss how internal motions characterized by different time scales contribute to (15)N and (13)C relaxation rates in the solid state and solution state, leading to fundamental differences between them, as well as phenomena such as underestimation of picosecond-range motions in the solid state and nanosecond-range motions in solution.

  3. Eigenanalysis of Ideal Hall MHD Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, T.; Shebalin, J. V.

    2011-12-01

    Ideal, incompressible, homogeneous, Hall magnetohydrodynamic (HMHD) turbulence may be investigated through a Fourier spectral method. In three-dimensional periodic geometry, the independent Fourier coefficients represent a canonical ensemble described by a Gaussian probability density. The canonical ensemble is based on the conservation of three invariants: total energy, generalized helicity, and magnetic helicity. Generalized helicity in HMHD takes the place of cross helicity in MHD. The invariants determine the modal probability density giving the spectral structure and equilibrium statistics of ideal HMHD, which are compared to known MHD results. New results in absolute equilibrium ensemble theory are derived using a novel approach that involves finding the eigenvalues of a Hermitian covariance matrix for each modal probability density. The associated eigenvectors transform the original phase space variables into eigenvariables through a special unitary transformation. These are the normal modes which facilitate the analysis of ideal HMHD non-linear dynamics. The eigenanalysis predicts that the low wavenumber modes with very small eigenvalues may have mean values that are large compared to their standard deviations, contrary to the ideal ensemble prediction of zero mean values. (Expectation values may also be relatively large at the highest wave numbers, but the addition of even small levels of dissipation removes any relevance this may have for real-world turbulence.) This behavior is non-ergodic over very long times for a numerical simulation and is termed 'broken ergodicity'. For fixed values of the ideal invariants, the effect is seen to be enhanced with increased numerical grid size. Broken ergodicity at low wave number modes gives rise to large-scale, quasi-stationary, coherent structure. Physically, this corresponds to plasma relaxation to force-free states. For real HMHD turbulence with dissipation, broken ergodicity and coherent structure are still

  4. Ultrafast Relaxation Dynamics of Photoexcited Heme Model Compounds: Observation of Multiple Electronic Spin States and Vibrational Cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govind, Chinju; Karunakaran, Venugopal

    2017-04-13

    Hemin is a unique model compound of heme proteins carrying out variable biological functions. Here, the excited state relaxation dynamics of heme model compounds in the ferric form are systematically investigated by changing the axial ligand (Cl/Br), the peripheral substituent (vinyl/ethyl-meso), and the solvent (methanol/DMSO) using femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy upon excitation at 380 nm. The relaxation time constants of these model compounds are obtained by global analysis. Excited state deactivation pathway of the model compounds comprising the decay of the porphyrin excited state (S*) to ligand to metal charge transfer state (LMCT, τ1), back electron transfer from metal to ligand (MLCT, τ2), and relaxation to the ground state through different electronic spin states of iron (τ3 and τ4) are proposed along with the vibrational cooling processes. This is based on the excited state absorption spectral evolution, similarities between the transient absorption spectra of the ferric form and steady state absorption spectra of the low-spin ferrous form, and the data analysis. The observation of an increase of all the relaxation time constants in DMSO compared to the methanol reflects the stabilization of intermediate states involved in the electronic relaxation. The transient absorption spectra of met-myoglobin are also measured for comparison. Thus, the transient absorption spectra of these model compounds reveal the involvement of multiple iron spin states in the electronic relaxation dynamics, which could be an alternative pathway to the ground state beside the vibrational cooling processes and associated with the inherent features of the heme b type.

  5. Ground-state atomic polarization relaxation-time measurement of Rb filled hypocycloidal core-shaped Kagome HC-PCF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, T. D.; Ilinova, E.; McFerran, J. J.; Jouin, J.; Debord, B.; Alharbi, M.; Thomas, P.; Gérôme, F.; Benabid, F.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the measurement of ground-state atomic polarization relaxation time of Rb vapor confined in five different hypocycloidal core-shape Kagome hollow-core photonic crystal fibers made with uncoated silica glass. We are able to distinguish between wall-collision and transit-time effects in an optical waveguide and deduce the contribution of the atom’s dwell time at the core wall surface. In contrast with conventional macroscopic atomic cell configuration, and in agreement with Monte Carlo simulations, the measured relaxation times were found to be at least one order of magnitude longer than the limit set by atom-wall collisional from thermal atoms. This extended relaxation time is explained by the combination of a stronger contribution of the slow atoms in the atomic polarization build-up, and of the relatively significant contribution of dwell time to the relaxation process of the ground state polarization.

  6. Solvent-dependent activation of intermediate excited states in the energy relaxation pathways of spheroidene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiuri, Margherita; Polli, Dario; Brida, Daniele; Lüer, Larry; LaFountain, Amy M; Fuciman, Marcel; Cogdell, Richard J; Frank, Harry A; Cerullo, Giulio

    2012-05-14

    In carotenoids internal conversion between the allowed (S(2)) and forbidden (S(1)) excited states occurs on a sub-picosecond timescale; the involvement of an intermediate excited state(s) (S(x)) mediating the process is controversial. Here we use high time resolution (sub-20 fs) broadband (1.2-2.5 eV) pump-probe spectroscopy to study the solvent dependence of excited state dynamics of spheroidene, a naturally-occurring carotenoid with ten conjugated double bonds. In the high polarizability solvent, CS(2), we find no evidence of an intermediate state, and the traditional three-level (S(0), S(1), S(2)) model fully accounts for the S(2)→ S(1) process. On the other hand, in the low polarizability solvent, cyclohexane, we find that rapid (~30 fs) relaxation to an intermediate state, S(x), lying between S(1) and S(2) is required to account for the data. We interpret these results as due to a shift of the S(2) energy, which positions the state above or below the energy of S(x) in response to changes in solvent polarizability. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2012

  7. Collisional relaxation of apocarotenals: identifying the S* state with vibrationally excited molecules in the ground electronic state S(0)*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Florian; Scholz, Mirko; Schimpfhauser, Jens; Bienert, Jürgen; Oum, Kawon; Lenzer, Thomas

    2015-04-28

    In recent work, we demonstrated that the S* signal of β-carotene observed in transient pump-supercontinuum probe absorption experiments agrees well with the independently measured steady-state difference absorption spectrum of vibrationally hot ground state molecules S0* in solution, recorded at elevated temperatures (Oum et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2010, 12, 8832). Here, we extend our support for this "vibrationally hot ground state model" of S* by experiments for the three terminally aldehyde-substituted carotenes β-apo-12'-carotenal, β-apo-4'-carotenal and 3',4'-didehydro-β,ψ-caroten-16'-al ("torularhodinaldehyde") which were investigated by ultrafast pump-supercontinuum probe spectroscopy in the range 350-770 nm. The apocarotenals feature an increasing conjugation length, resulting in a systematically shorter S1 lifetime of 192, 4.9 and 1.2 ps, respectively, in the solvent n-hexane. Consequently, for torularhodinaldehyde a large population of highly vibrationally excited molecules in the ground electronic state is quickly generated by internal conversion (IC) from S1 already within the first picosecond of relaxation. As a result, a clear S* signal is visible which exhibits the same spectral characteristics as in the aforementioned study of β-carotene: a pronounced S0 → S2 red-edge absorption and a "finger-type" structure in the S0 → S2 bleach region. The cooling process is described in a simplified way by assuming an initially formed vibrationally very hot species S0** which subsequently decays with a time constant of 3.4 ps to form a still hot S0* species which relaxes with a time constant of 10.5 ps to form S0 molecules at 298 K. β-Apo-4'-carotenal behaves in a quite similar way. Here, a single vibrationally hot S0* species is sufficient in the kinetic modeling procedure. S0* relaxes with a time constant of 12.1 ps to form cold S0. Finally, no S0* features are visible for β-apo-12'-carotenal. In that case, the S1 → S0 IC process is expected

  8. MHD Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    Aerospace Applications, AIAA-Paper 96-2355, New Orleans, 1996 2. V.A.Bityurin, A.N.Bocharov, J.Lineberry, MHD Aerospace Applications, Invited Lecture ...Paper 2003- 4303, Orlando, FL 8. V.A.Bityurin, Prospective of MHD Interaction in Hypersonic and Propulsion Technologies, In: von Karman Series : Lectures ...Efforts in MHD AeoSpace Applications, In: von Karman Series : Lectures , Introduction of Magneto-Fluid Dynamics for AeroSpace Applications, von Karman

  9. Dielectric relaxation and the conformer equilibrium in the liquid and glassy states of β- D-fructose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombari, E.; Cardelli, C.; Salvetti, G.; Johari, G. P.

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the ionic and molecular dynamics in the liquid and glassy states of β- D-fructose, its dielectric relaxation spectra (12 Hz-500 kHz) and dynamic heat capacity (3.33 mHz) have been measured from 5 K above its melting point through the vitrification range, by allowing sufficient time for attainment of the conformer (or chemical) equilibria. Effects of the change in the conformer population on thermal cycling has been further studied. The dielectric behavior of liquid β- D-fructose is characteristically different from that of other molecular liquids in three ways: (i) the contribution to orientation polarization associated with the fast relaxation process, which persists in the glassy state, is relatively high in the liquid state of β- D-fructose; (ii) this contribution decreases with temperature exceptionally rapidly on cooling; and (iii) the difference in the rates of the two process is exceptionally large. The dynamic heat capacity change through the vitrification region is ˜160 J/(mol K), and is spread over ˜20 K range, and the enthalpy relaxation time is ˜50 s at 383 K. Transformation of β-pyranose to other conformers and other conformer transformation equilibria change on thermal cycling with the result that the overall relaxation rate increases at T>315 K and decreases at T<315 K. The relaxation spectrum becomes broader, the dc conductivity increases and the rate of the Johari-Goldstein relaxation whose Arrhenius energy is 42.1 kJ/mol increases.

  10. Predicting the activation states of the muscles governing upper esophageal sphincter relaxation and opening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omari, Taher I; Jones, Corinne A; Hammer, Michael J; Cock, Charles; Dinning, Philip; Wiklendt, Lukasz; Costa, Marcello; McCulloch, Timothy M

    2016-03-15

    The swallowing muscles that influence upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening are centrally controlled and modulated by sensory information. Activation and deactivation of neural inputs to these muscles, including the intrinsic cricopharyngeus (CP) and extrinsic submental (SM) muscles, results in their mechanical activation or deactivation, which changes the diameter of the lumen, alters the intraluminal pressure, and ultimately reduces or promotes flow of content. By measuring the changes in diameter, using intraluminal impedance, and the concurrent changes in intraluminal pressure, it is possible to determine when the muscles are passively or actively relaxing or contracting. From these "mechanical states" of the muscle, the neural inputs driving the specific motor behaviors of the UES can be inferred. In this study we compared predictions of UES mechanical states directly with the activity measured by electromyography (EMG). In eight subjects, pharyngeal pressure and impedance were recorded in parallel with CP- and SM-EMG activity. UES pressure and impedance swallow profiles correlated with the CP-EMG and SM-EMG recordings, respectively. Eight UES muscle states were determined by using the gradient of pressure and impedance with respect to time. Guided by the level and gradient change of EMG activity, mechanical states successfully predicted the activity of the CP muscle and SM muscle independently. Mechanical state predictions revealed patterns consistent with the known neural inputs activating the different muscles during swallowing. Derivation of "activation state" maps may allow better physiological and pathophysiological interpretations of UES function.

  11. Excited state dynamics in SO2. I. Bound state relaxation studied by time-resolved photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Iain; Boguslavskiy, Andrey E; Mikosch, Jochen; Bertrand, Julien B; Wörner, Hans Jakob; Villeneuve, David M; Spanner, Michael; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Stolow, Albert

    2014-05-28

    The excited state dynamics of isolated sulfur dioxide molecules have been investigated using the time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and time-resolved photoelectron-photoion coincidence techniques. Excited state wavepackets were prepared in the spectroscopically complex, electronically mixed (B̃)(1)B1/(Ã)(1)A2, Clements manifold following broadband excitation at a range of photon energies between 4.03 eV and 4.28 eV (308 nm and 290 nm, respectively). The resulting wavepacket dynamics were monitored using a multiphoton ionisation probe. The extensive literature associated with the Clements bands has been summarised and a detailed time domain description of the ultrafast relaxation pathways occurring from the optically bright (B̃)(1)B1 diabatic state is presented. Signatures of the oscillatory motion on the (B̃)(1)B1/(Ã)(1)A2 lower adiabatic surface responsible for the Clements band structure were observed. The recorded spectra also indicate that a component of the excited state wavepacket undergoes intersystem crossing from the Clements manifold to the underlying triplet states on a sub-picosecond time scale. Photoelectron signal growth time constants have been predominantly associated with intersystem crossing to the (c̃)(3)B2 state and were measured to vary between 750 and 150 fs over the implemented pump photon energy range. Additionally, pump beam intensity studies were performed. These experiments highlighted parallel relaxation processes that occurred at the one- and two-pump-photon levels of excitation on similar time scales, obscuring the Clements band dynamics when high pump beam intensities were implemented. Hence, the Clements band dynamics may be difficult to disentangle from higher order processes when ultrashort laser pulses and less-differential probe techniques are implemented.

  12. Nature of excited states and relaxation mechanisms in C-phycocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womick, Jordan M; Moran, Andrew M

    2009-12-03

    The electronic structure and photoinduced relaxation dynamics of the cyanobacterial light harvesting protein, C-Phycocyanin (CPC), are examined using transient grating and two-dimensional (2D) photon echo spectroscopies possessing sub-20 fs time resolution. In combination with linear absorption and fluorescence measurements, these time-resolved experiments are used to constrain the parameters of a Frenkel exciton Hamiltonian. Particular emphasis is placed on elucidating the nature of excited states involving the alpha84 and beta84 phycocyanobilin pigment dimers of CPC. This paper obtains new experimental evidence suggesting that electronic relaxation proceeds by way of incoherent energy transfer between the alpha84 and beta84 pigment sites (i.e., the weak coupling limit of energy transfer). Transient absorption anisotropies simulated in the weak coupling limit agree well with measurements, whereas signals computed in an exciton basis possess short-lived (electronic) coherent components not present in the experimental data. In addition, 2D photon echo spectra for CPC show no sign of the interfering nonlinearities predicted by a theoretical model to be characteristic of exciton formation. Another important new observation is that the sub-100 fs dynamics in the transient absorption anisotropy are dominated by an impulsively excited hydrogen out-of-plane wagging mode similar to those observed in phytochrome and retinal. Detection of this 795 cm(-1) coherence is of particular interest because our recent study of a closely related protein, Allophycocyanin (APC), assigns a similar coordinate as a promoting mode enabling ultrafast internal conversion. Together, the experiments conducted for APC and CPC suggest that interactions between the pigments and environment are the key to understanding why electronic relaxation in CPC is more than three times slower than APC despite the nearly identical geometries of the pigment dimers. Most important in reaching this conclusion is

  13. A randomized controlled trial of mindfulness meditation versus relaxation training: effects on distress, positive states of mind, rumination, and distraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shamini; Shapiro, Shauna L; Swanick, Summer; Roesch, Scott C; Mills, Paul J; Bell, Iris; Schwartz, Gary E R

    2007-02-01

    Although mindfulness meditation interventions have recently shown benefits for reducing stress in various populations, little is known about their relative efficacy compared with relaxation interventions. This randomized controlled trial examines the effects of a 1-month mindfulness meditation versus somatic relaxation training as compared to a control group in 83 students (M age = 25; 16 men and 67 women) reporting distress. Psychological distress, positive states of mind, distractive and ruminative thoughts and behaviors, and spiritual experience were measured, while controlling for social desirability. Hierarchical linear modeling reveals that both meditation and relaxation groups experienced significant decreases in distress as well as increases in positive mood states over time, compared with the control group (p differences between meditation and relaxation on distress and positive mood states over time. Effect sizes for distress were large for both meditation and relaxation (Cohen's d = 1.36 and .91, respectively), whereas the meditation group showed a larger effect size for positive states of mind than relaxation (Cohen's d =.71 and .25, respectively). The meditation group also demonstrated significant pre-post decreases in both distractive and ruminative thoughts/behaviors compared with the control group (p mindfulness meditation's effects on reducing distress were partially mediated by reducing rumination. No significant effects were found for spiritual experience. The data suggest that compared with a no-treatment control, brief training in mindfulness meditation or somatic relaxation reduces distress and improves positive mood states. However, mindfulness meditation may be specific in its ability to reduce distractive and ruminative thoughts and behaviors, and this ability may provide a unique mechanism by which mindfulness meditation reduces distress.

  14. Upper esophageal sphincter mechanical states analysis: A novel methodology to describe UES relaxation and opening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taher eOmari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The swallowing muscles that influence upper esophageal sphincter (UES opening are centrally controlled and modulated by sensory information. Activation of neural inputs to these muscles, the intrinsic cricopharyngeus muscle and extrinsic suprahyoid muscles, results in their contraction or relaxation, which changes the diameter of the lumen, alters the intraluminal pressure and ultimately inhibits or promotes flow of content. This relationship that exists between the changes in diameter and concurrent changes in intraluminal pressure has been used previously to calculate the ‘mechanical states’ of the muscle; that is when the muscles are passively or actively, relaxing or contracting. Diseases that alter the neural pathways to these muscles can result in weakening the muscle contractility and/or decreasing the muscle compliance, all of which can cause dysphagia. Detecting these changes in the mechanical state of the muscle is difficult and as the current interpretation of UES motility is based largely upon pressure measurement (manometry, subtle changes in the muscle function during swallow can be missed. We hypothesised that quantification of mechanical states of the UES and the pressure-diameter properties that define them, would allow objective characterisation of the mechanisms that govern the timing and extent of UES opening during swallowing. To achieve this we initially analysed swallows captured by simultaneous videofluoroscopy and UES pressure with impedance recording. From these data we demonstrated that intraluminal impedance measurements could be used to determine changes in the internal diameter of the lumen when compared to videofluoroscopy. Then using a database of pressure-impedance studies, recorded from young and aged healthy controls and patients with motor neuron disease, we calculated the UES mechanical states in relation to a standardised swallowed bolus volume, normal aging and dysphagia pathology. Our results indicated

  15. Upper esophageal sphincter mechanical states analysis: a novel methodology to describe UES relaxation and opening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omari, Taher I; Wiklendt, Lukasz; Dinning, Philip; Costa, Marcello; Rommel, Nathalie; Cock, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The swallowing muscles that influence upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening are centrally controlled and modulated by sensory information. Activation of neural inputs to these muscles, the intrinsic cricopharyngeus muscle and extrinsic suprahyoid muscles, results in their contraction or relaxation, which changes the diameter of the lumen, alters the intraluminal pressure and ultimately inhibits or promotes flow of content. This relationship that exists between the changes in diameter and concurrent changes in intraluminal pressure has been used previously to calculate the "mechanical states" of the muscle; that is when the muscles are passively or actively, relaxing or contracting. Diseases that alter the neural pathways to these muscles can result in weakening the muscle contractility and/or decreasing the muscle compliance, all of which can cause dysphagia. Detecting these changes in the mechanical state of the muscle is difficult and as the current interpretation of UES motility is based largely upon pressure measurement (manometry), subtle changes in the muscle function during swallow can be missed. We hypothesized that quantification of mechanical states of the UES and the pressure-diameter properties that define them, would allow objective characterization of the mechanisms that govern the timing and extent of UES opening during swallowing. To achieve this we initially analyzed swallows captured by simultaneous videofluoroscopy and UES pressure with impedance recording. From these data we demonstrated that intraluminal impedance measurements could be used to determine changes in the internal diameter of the lumen when compared to videofluoroscopy. Then using a database of pressure-impedance studies, recorded from young and aged healthy controls and patients with motor neuron disease, we calculated the UES mechanical states in relation to a standardized swallowed bolus volume, normal aging and dysphagia pathology. Our results indicated that eight different

  16. Study of cross - relaxation and molecular dynamics in the solid 3-(trifluoromethyl) benzoic acid by solid state NMR off - resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak-Braszak, Aneta

    2017-02-01

    Molecular dynamics of the solid 3-(trifluoromethyl) benzoic acid containing proton (1)H and fluorine (19)F nuclei was explored by the solid-state NMR off - resonance technique. Contrary to the previous experiments the proton nuclei system I relaxed in the off - resonance effective field B→e while fluorine nuclei system S was saturated for short time in comparison to the relaxation time T1I. New cross - relaxation solid - state NMR off - resonance experiments were conducted on a homebuilt pulse spectrometer operating at the on-resonance frequency of 30.2MHz, at the off - resonance frequency varied between 30.2 and 30.6MHz for protons and at the frequency of 28.411MHz for fluorines, respectively. Based on the experimental data the dispersions of the proton off - resonance spin - lattice relaxation rate ρρ(I), the fluorine off - resonance spin - lattice relaxation rate ρρ(S) and the cross - relaxation rate σρ in the rotating frame were determined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. S3-S4 linker length modulates the relaxed state of a voltage-gated potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Michael F; Lacroix, Jérôme J; Villalba-Galea, Carlos A; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2013-11-19

    Voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) are membrane protein modules found in ion channels and enzymes that are responsible for a large number of fundamental biological tasks, such as neuronal electrical activity. The VSDs switch from a resting to an active conformation upon membrane depolarization, altering the activity of the protein in response to voltage changes. Interestingly, numerous studies describe the existence of a third distinct state, called the relaxed state, also populated at positive potentials. Although some physiological roles for the relaxed state have been suggested, little is known about the molecular determinants responsible for the development and modulation of VSD relaxation. Several lines of evidence have suggested that the linker (S3-S4 linker) between the third (S3) and fourth (S4) transmembrane segments of the VSD alters the equilibrium between resting and active conformations. By measuring gating currents from the Shaker potassium channel, we demonstrate here that shortening the S3-S4 linker stabilizes the relaxed state, whereas lengthening the linker or splitting it and coinjecting two fragments of the channel have little effect. We propose that natural variations of the length of the S3-S4 linker in various VSD-containing proteins may produce differential VSD relaxation in vivo.

  18. State of water in starch-water systems in the gelatinization temperature range as investigated using dielectric relaxation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motwani, Tanuj

    Starch-water interactions occurring during gelatinization are critical for developing a mechanistic understanding of the gelatinization process. The overall goal of this project was to investigate the state of water in starch-water systems in the gelatinization temperature range using dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. In the first part of the project, the dielectric response of native wheat starch-water slurries was measured at seven different starch concentrations between 5--60% starch (w/w) in the frequency range of 200 MHz--20 GHz at 25°C. The deconvolution of the dielectric spectra using the Debye model revealed presence of up to three relaxation processes. The relaxation time range of what were considered to be the high, intermediate and low frequency relaxations were 4--9 ps, 20--25 ps and 230--620 ps, respectively. The high frequency relaxation was observed at all starch concentrations, while the intermediate and low frequency relaxation were only observed at starch concentrations of 10% and above, and 30% and above, respectively. The high frequency relaxation was attributed to bulk water, while the intermediate and low frequency relaxations were attributed to rotationally restrained water molecules present in the starch-water system. To investigate the state of water in the gelatinization temperature range, the dielectric response, gelatinization enthalpy and water absorption by 10%, 30% or 50% starch slurries were measured after heating the slurries to different end temperatures between 40--90°C for 30 min. The high frequency relaxation time for 10% starch slurry dropped significantly (P0.159) by heating up to 80°C. The intermediate and low frequency relaxation times were not significantly influenced (P>0.712) by heating for all starch concentrations. Also, the amount of water associated with the three relaxations was not significantly influenced by heating (P >0.187). The water absorption results indicated that highest water uptake was achieved in

  19. Excited states in electron-transfer reaction products : ultrafast relaxation dynamics of an isolated acceptor radical anion.

    OpenAIRE

    D. A. Horke; Roberts, G.M.; Verlet, J. R. R.

    2011-01-01

    The spectroscopy and ultrafast relaxation dynamics of excited states of the radical anion of a representative charge-transfer acceptor molecule, 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane, have been studied in the gas phase using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. The photoelectron spectra reveal that at least two anion excited states are bound. Time-resolved studies show that both excited states are very short-lived and internally convert to the anion ground state, with the ...

  20. Spin relaxation and the Elliott-Yafet parameter in W(001) ultrathin films: Surface states, anisotropy, and oscillation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Nguyen H.; Mavropoulos, Phivos; Zimmermann, Bernd; Heers, Swantje; Bauer, David S. G.; Blügel, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2013-06-01

    Using first-principles methods based on density-functional theory, we investigate the spin relaxation in W(001) ultrathin films. Within the framework of the Elliott-Yafet theory, we calculate the spin mixing of the Bloch states and we explicitly consider spin-flip scattering off self-adatoms. At small film thicknesses, we find an oscillatory behavior of the spin-mixing parameter and relaxation rate as a function of the film thickness, which we trace back to surface-state properties. We also analyze the Rashba effect experienced by the surface states and discuss its influence on the spin relaxation. Finally, we calculate the anisotropy of the spin-relaxation rate with respect to the polarization direction of the excited spin population relative to the crystallographic axes of the film. We find that the spin-relaxation rate can increase by as much as 27% when the spin polarization is directed out of plane, compared to the case when it is in plane. Our calculations are based on the multiple-scattering formalism of the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Green-function method.

  1. Temperature dependence of the hydrated electron's excited-state relaxation. II. Elucidating the relaxation mechanism through ultrafast transient absorption and stimulated emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Erik P.; Zho, Chen-Chen; Challa, Jagannadha R.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.

    2017-08-01

    The structure of the hydrated electron, particularly whether it exists primarily within a cavity or encompasses interior water molecules, has been the subject of much recent debate. In Paper I [C.-C. Zho et al., J. Chem. Phys. 147, 074503 (2017)], we found that mixed quantum/classical simulations with cavity and non-cavity pseudopotentials gave different predictions for the temperature dependence of the rate of the photoexcited hydrated electron's relaxation back to the ground state. In this paper, we measure the ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy of the photoexcited hydrated electron as a function of temperature to confront the predictions of our simulations. The ultrafast spectroscopy clearly shows faster relaxation dynamics at higher temperatures. In particular, the transient absorption data show a clear excess bleach beyond that of the equilibrium hydrated electron's ground-state absorption that can only be explained by stimulated emission. This stimulated emission component, which is consistent with the experimentally known fluorescence spectrum of the hydrated electron, decreases in both amplitude and lifetime as the temperature is increased. We use a kinetic model to globally fit the temperature-dependent transient absorption data at multiple temperatures ranging from 0 to 45 °C. We find the room-temperature lifetime of the excited-state hydrated electron to be 137 ±40 fs, in close agreement with recent time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES) experiments and in strong support of the "non-adiabatic" picture of the hydrated electron's excited-state relaxation. Moreover, we find that the excited-state lifetime is strongly temperature dependent, changing by slightly more than a factor of two over the 45 °C temperature range explored. This temperature dependence of the lifetime, along with a faster rate of ground-state cooling with increasing bulk temperature, should be directly observable by future TRPES experiments. Our data also suggest

  2. Excited-state structure, vibrations, and nonradiative relaxation of jet-cooled 5-fluorocytosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobsiger, Simon; Trachsel, Maria A; Den, Takuya; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2014-03-20

    The S0 → S1 vibronic spectrum and S1 state nonradiative relaxation of jet-cooled keto-amino 5-fluorocytosine (5FCyt) are investigated by two-color resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy at 0.3 and 0.05 cm(–1) resolution. The 0(0)(0) rotational band contour is polarized in-plane, implying that the electronic transition is (1)ππ*. The electronic transition dipole moment orientation and the changes of rotational constants agree closely with the SCS-CC2 calculated values for the (1)ππ* (S1) transition of 5FCyt. The spectral region from 0 to 300 cm(–1) is dominated by overtone and combination bands of the out-of-plane ν1′ (boat), ν2′ (butterfly), and ν3′ (HN–C6H twist) vibrations, implying that the pyrimidinone frame is distorted out-of-plane by the (1)ππ* excitation, in agreement with SCS-CC2 calculations. The number of vibronic bands rises strongly around +350 cm(–1); this is attributed to the (1)ππ* state barrier to planarity that corresponds to the central maximum of the double-minimum out-of-plane vibrational potentials along the ν1′, ν2′, and ν3′ coordinates, which gives rise to a high density of vibronic excitations. At +1200 cm(–1), rapid nonradiative relaxation (k(nr) ≥ 10(12) s(–1)) sets in, which we interpret as the height of the (1)ππ* state barrier in front of the lowest S1/S0 conical intersection. This barrier in 5FCyt is 3 times higher than that in cytosine. The lifetimes of the ν′ = 0, 2ν1′, 2ν2′, 2ν1′ + 2ν2′, 4ν2′, and 2ν1′ + 4ν2′ levels are determined from Lorentzian widths fitted to the rotational band contours and are τ ≥ 75 ps for ν′ = 0, decreasing to τ ≥ 55 ps at the 2ν1′ + 4ν2′ level at +234 cm(–1). These gas-phase lifetimes are twice those of S1 state cytosine and 10–100 times those of the other canonical nucleobases in the gas phase. On the other hand, the 5FCyt gas-phase lifetime is close to the 73 ps lifetime in room-temperature solvents. This lack of

  3. MHD Turbulence and Magnetic Dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V

    2014-01-01

    investigation, by greatly extending the statistical theory of ideal MHD turbulence. The mathematical details of broken ergodicity, in fact, give a quantitative explanation of how coherent structure, dynamic alignment and force-free states appear in turbulent magnetofluids. The relevance of these ideal results to real MHD turbulence occurs because broken ergodicity is most manifest in the ideal case at the largest length scales and it is in these largest scales that a real magnetofluid has the least dissipation, i.e., most closely approaches the behavior of an ideal magnetofluid. Furthermore, the effects grow stronger when cross and magnetic helicities grow large with respect to energy, and this is exactly what occurs with time in a real magnetofluid, where it is called selective decay. The relevance of these results found in ideal MHD turbulence theory to the real world is that they provide at least a qualitative explanation of why confined turbulent magnetofluids, such as the liquid iron that fills the Earth's outer core, produce stationary, large-scale magnetic fields, i.e., the geomagnetic field. These results should also apply to other planets as well as to plasma confinement devices on Earth and in space, and the effects should be manifest if Reynolds numbers are high enough and there is enough time for stationarity to occur, at least approximately. In the presentation, details will be given for both theoretical and numerical results, and references will be provided.

  4. Solid-state NMR (31)P paramagnetic relaxation enhancement membrane protein immersion depth measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Sergey; Hudson, Stephen M; Sahu, Indra D; Liu, Lishan; Lorigan, Gary A

    2014-04-24

    Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) is a widely used approach for measuring long-range distance constraints in biomolecular solution NMR spectroscopy. In this paper, we show that (31)P PRE solid-state NMR spectroscopy can be utilized to determine the immersion depth of spin-labeled membrane peptides and proteins. Changes in the (31)P NMR PRE times coupled with modeling studies can be used to describe the spin-label position/amino acid within the lipid bilayer and the corresponding helical tilt. This method provides valuable insight on protein-lipid interactions and membrane protein structural topology. Solid-state (31)P NMR data on the 23 amino acid α-helical nicotinic acetylcholine receptor nAChR M2δ transmembrane domain model peptide followed predicted behavior of (31)P PRE rates of the phospholipid headgroup as the spin-label moves from the membrane surface toward the center of the membrane. Residue 11 showed the smallest changes in (31)P PRE (center of the membrane), while residue 22 shows the largest (31)P PRE change (near the membrane surface), when compared to the diamagnetic control M2δ sample. This PRE SS-NMR technique can be used as a molecular ruler to measure membrane immersion depth.

  5. Adsorption geometry and interface states: Relaxed and compressed phases of NTCDA/Ag(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, P.; Zaitsev, N. L.; Namgalies, A.; Tonner, R.; Nechaev, I. A.; Tautz, F. S.; Höfer, U.; Sánchez-Portal, D.

    2016-09-01

    The theoretical modeling of metal-organic interfaces represents a formidable challenge, especially considering the delicate balance of various interaction mechanisms and the large size of the involved molecular species. In the present study, the energies of interface states, which are known to display a high sensitivity to the adsorption geometry and electronic structure of the deposited molecular species, have been used to test the suitability and reliability of current theoretical approaches. Two well-ordered overlayer structures (relaxed and compressed monolayers) of 1,4,5,8-naphthalene-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (NTCDA) on Ag(111) have been investigated using two-photon photoemission to derive precise interface-state energies for these closely related systems. The experimental values are reproduced by our density-functional theory (DFT) calculations with two approaches to treat dispersion interactions (semi-empirical correction DFT-D3 and parametrized functional optB88) and basis set approaches (localized numerical atomic orbitals, plane waves) with remarkable accuracy. Our results underline the trustworthiness and some of the limitations of current DFT-based methods regarding the description of geometric and electronic properties of metal-organic interfaces.

  6. Magnetic levitation and MHD propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tixador, P.

    1994-04-01

    Magnetic levitation and MHD propulsion are now attracting attention in several countries. Different superconducting MagLev and MHD systems will be described concentrating on, above all, the electromagnetic aspect. Some programmes occurring throughout the world will be described. Magnetic levitated trains could be the new high speed transportation system for the 21st century. Intensive studies involving MagLev trains using superconductivity have been carried out in Japan since 1970. The construction of a 43 km long track is to be the next step. In 1991 a six year programme was launched in the United States to evaluate the performances of MagLev systems for transportation. The MHD (MagnetoHydroDynamic) offers some interesting advantages (efficiency, stealth characteristics, ...) for naval propulsion and increasing attention is being paid towards it nowadays. Japan is also up at the top with the tests of Yamato I, a 260 ton MHD propulsed ship. Depuis quelques années nous assistons à un redémarrage de programmes concernant la lévitation et la propulsion supraconductrices. Différents systèmes supraconducteurs de lévitation et de propulsion seront décrits en examinant plus particulièrement l'aspect électromagnétique. Quelques programmes à travers le monde seront abordés. Les trains à sustentation magnétique pourraient constituer un nouveau mode de transport terrestre à vitesse élevée (500 km/h) pour le 21^e siècle. Les japonais n'ont cessé de s'intéresser à ce système avec bobine supraconductrice. Ils envisagent un stade préindustriel avec la construction d'une ligne de 43 km. En 1991 un programme américain pour une durée de six ans a été lancé pour évaluer les performances des systèmes à lévitation pour le transport aux Etats Unis. La MHD (Magnéto- Hydro-Dynamique) présente des avantages intéressants pour la propulsion navale et un regain d'intérêt apparaît à l'heure actuelle. Le japon se situe là encore à la pointe des d

  7. The electronic structure of NiO for Ni 3s-hole states including full orbital relaxation and localization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagus, Paul S.; Broer, R; Graaf, C. de; Nieuwpoort, W.C.

    1999-01-01

    The electronic structure of NiO, with emphasis on the Ni 3s-hole ionic states, is studied using non-orthogonal configuration interaction, NOCI, wavefunctions for an NiO6 model of the crystal. Orbital sets are relaxed, or optimized, separately for each configuration used in the NOCI and orbital

  8. Model-independent interpretation of NMR relaxation data for unfolded proteins: the acid-denatured state of ACBP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modig, Kristofer; Poulsen, Flemming

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the acid-unfolded state of acyl-coenzyme A binding protein (ACBP) using (15)N laboratory frame nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation experiments at three magnetic field strengths. The data have been analyzed using standard model-free fitting and models involving....... The analysis also shows that the relaxation data are consistent with and complementary to information obtained from other parameters, especially secondary chemical shifts and residual dipolar couplings, and strengthens the conclusions of previous observations that three out of the four regions that form...

  9. State-specific Multi-reference Perturbation Theories with Relaxed Coefficients: Molecular Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashis Mukherjee

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We present in this paper two new versions of Rayleigh-Schr¨odinger (RS and the Brillouin-Wigner (BW state-specific multi-reference perturbative theories (SSMRPT which stem from our state-specific multi-reference coupled-cluster formalism (SS-MRCC, developed with a complete active space (CAS. They are manifestly sizeextensive and are designed to avoid intruders. The combining coefficients cμ for the model functions φμ are completely relaxed and are obtained by diagonalizing an effective operator in the model space, one root of which is the target eigenvalue of interest. By invoking suitable partitioning of the hamiltonian, very convenient perturbative versions of the formalism in both the RS and the BW forms are developed for the second order energy. The unperturbed hamiltonians for these theories can be chosen to be of both Mφller-Plesset (MP and Epstein-Nesbet (EN type. However, we choose the corresponding Fock operator fμ for each model function φμ, whose diagonal elements are used to define the unperturbed hamiltonian in the MP partition. In the EN partition, we additionally include all the diagonal direct and exchange ladders. Our SS-MRPT thus utilizes a multi-partitioning strategy. Illustrative numerical applications are presented for potential energy surfaces (PES of the ground (1Σ+ and the first delta (1Δ states of CH+ which possess pronounced multi-reference character. Comparison of the results with the corresponding full CI values indicates the efficacy of our formalisms.

  10. The relation between stretched-exponential relaxation and the vibrational density of states in glassy disordered systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Bingyu; Milkus, Rico; Zaccone, Alessio

    2017-02-01

    Amorphous solids or glasses are known to exhibit stretched-exponential decay over broad time intervals in several of their macroscopic observables: intermediate scattering function, dielectric relaxation modulus, time-dependent elastic modulus, etc. This behaviour is prominent especially near the glass transition. In this Letter we show, on the example of dielectric relaxation, that stretched-exponential relaxation is intimately related to the peculiar lattice dynamics of glasses. By reformulating the Lorentz model of dielectric matter in a more general form, we express the dielectric response as a function of the vibrational density of states (DOS) for a random assembly of spherical particles interacting harmonically with their nearest-neighbours. Surprisingly we find that near the glass transition for this system (which coincides with the Maxwell rigidity transition in this model), the dielectric relaxation is perfectly consistent with stretched-exponential behaviour with Kohlrausch exponents 0.56 stretched-exponential relaxation can be traced back to soft modes (boson-peak) in the DOS.

  11. Non-equilibrium relaxation between two quasi-stationary states in a stochastic lattice Lotka-Volterra model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng; Täuber, Uwe C.

    2015-03-01

    Spatially extended stochastic models for predator-prey competition and coexistence display complex, correlated spatio-temporal structures and are governed by remarkably large fluctuations. Both populations are characterized by damped erratic oscillations whose properties are governed by the reaction rates. Here, we specifically study a stochastic lattice Lotka-Volterra model by means of Monte Carlo simulations that impose spatial restrictions on the number of occupants per site. The system tends to relax into a quasi-stationary state, independent of the imposed initial conditions. We investigate the non-equilibrium relaxation between two such quasi-stationary states, following an instantaneous change of the predation rate. The ensuing relaxation times are measured via the peak width of the population density Fourier transforms. As expected, we find that the initial state only influences the oscillations for the duration of this relaxation time, implying that the system quickly loses any memory of the initial configuration. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Award DE-FG02-09ER46613.

  12. Diffusion relaxation times of nonequilibrium isolated small bodies and their solid phase ensembles to equilibrium states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovbin, Yu. K.

    2017-08-01

    The possibility of obtaining analytical estimates in a diffusion approximation of the times needed by nonequilibrium small bodies to relax to their equilibrium states based on knowledge of the mass transfer coefficient is considered. This coefficient is expressed as the product of the self-diffusion coefficient and the thermodynamic factor. A set of equations for the diffusion transport of mixture components is formulated, characteristic scales of the size of microheterogeneous phases are identified, and effective mass transfer coefficients are constructed for them. Allowing for the developed interface of coexisting and immiscible phases along with the porosity of solid phases is discussed. This approach can be applied to the diffusion equalization of concentrations of solid mixture components in many physicochemical systems: the mutual diffusion of components in multicomponent systems (alloys, semiconductors, solid mixtures of inert gases) and the mass transfer of an absorbed mobile component in the voids of a matrix consisting of slow components or a mixed composition of mobile and slow components (e.g., hydrogen in metals, oxygen in oxides, and the transfer of molecules through membranes of different natures, including polymeric).

  13. Importance of out-of-state spin-orbit coupling for slow magnetic relaxation in mononuclear Fe(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Po-Heng; Smythe, Nathan C; Gorelsky, Serge I; Maguire, Steven; Henson, Neil J; Korobkov, Ilia; Scott, Brian L; Gordon, John C; Baker, R Tom; Murugesu, Muralee

    2011-10-12

    Two mononuclear high-spin Fe(II) complexes with trigonal planar ([Fe(II)(N(TMS)(2))(2)(PCy(3))] (1) and distorted tetrahedral ([Fe(II)(N(TMS)(2))(2)(depe)] (2) geometries are reported (TMS = SiMe(3), Cy = cyclohexyl, depe = 1,2-bis(diethylphosphino)ethane). The magnetic properties of 1 and 2 reveal the profound effect of out-of-state spin-orbit coupling (SOC) on slow magnetic relaxation. Complex 1 exhibits slow relaxation of the magnetization under an applied optimal dc field of 600 Oe due to the presence of low-lying electronic excited states that mix with the ground electronic state. This mixing re-introduces orbital angular momentum into the electronic ground state via SOC, and 1 thus behaves as a field-induced single-molecule magnet. In complex 2, the lowest-energy excited states have higher energy due to the ligand field of the distorted tetrahedral geometry. This higher energy gap minimizes out-of-state SOC mixing and zero-field splitting, thus precluding slow relaxation of the magnetization for 2.

  14. From MHD regime to quiescent non-inductive discharges in Tore Supra: experimental observations and MHD modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maget, P.; Huysmans, G. T. A.; Lütjens, H.; Ottaviani, M.; Moreau, Ph; Ségui, J.-L.

    2009-06-01

    Attempts to run non-inductive plasma discharges on Tore Supra sometimes fail due to the triggering of magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) instabilities that saturate at a large amplitude, producing degraded confinement and loss of wave driven fast electrons (the so-called MHD regime (Maget et al 2005 Nucl. Fusion 45 69-80)). In this paper we investigate the transition to this soft (in the sense of non-disruptive) MHD limit from experimental observations, and compare it with non-linear code predictions. Such a comparison suggests that different non-linear regimes, with periodic relaxations or saturation, are correctly understood. However, successful non-inductive discharges without detectable magnetic island at q = 2 cannot be reproduced if realistic transport coefficients are used in the computation. Additional physics seems mandatory for explaining these discharges, such as diamagnetic effects, that could also justify cases of abrupt transition to the MHD regime.

  15. Relaxation dynamics of a quantum emitter resonantly coupled to a coherent state of a localized surface plasmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerkararyan, Khachatur V; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the relaxation dynamics of a quantum dipole emitter (QDE), e.g., a molecule or quantum dot, located near a metal nanoparticle (MNP) exhibiting a dipolar localized surface plasmon (LSP) resonance at the frequency of the QDE radiative transition. A generic three-level QDE, which is pumped with an external laser pulse and thereby brought into an optically active excited state, is considered to be weakly coupled to the resonant LSP described by a coherent state. It is shown that, under the condition of the QDE-MNP characteristic relaxation time being much shorter than that of the QDE in free space but much longer than the LSP lifetime, the QDE relaxation dynamics can be described analytically and feature, in general, non-exponential decay with complicated transient behaviour. The main physical consequence of this relaxation process is that the emission, being largely determined by the MNP, comes out with a substantial delay. It is also shown that energy dissipation in the QDE-MNP system is relatively weak with the probability of the photon emission being ∼0.75, a number which, rather surprisingly, does not explicitly depend on the metal absorption characteristics. A large number of QDE-MNP system parameters in our analytical description open new possibilities for controlling quantum emitter dynamics.

  16. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as 13C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. 13C) and abundant I (e.g. 1H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of 1H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance L-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions.

  17. Molecular Relaxations in Supercooled Liquid and Glassy States of Amorphous Quinidine: Dielectric Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schammé, Benjamin; Mignot, Mélanie; Couvrat, Nicolas; Tognetti, Vincent; Joubert, Laurent; Dupray, Valérie; Delbreilh, Laurent; Dargent, Eric; Coquerel, Gérard

    2016-08-04

    In this article, we conduct a comprehensive molecular relaxation study of amorphous Quinidine above and below the glass-transition temperature (Tg) through broadband dielectric relaxation spectroscopy (BDS) experiments and theoretical density functional theory (DFT) calculations, as one major issue with the amorphous state of pharmaceuticals is life expectancy. These techniques enabled us to determine what kind of molecular motions are responsible, or not, for the devitrification of Quinidine. Parameters describing the complex molecular dynamics of amorphous Quinidine, such as Tg, the width of the α relaxation (βKWW), the temperature dependence of α-relaxation times (τα), the fragility index (m), and the apparent activation energy of secondary γ relaxation (Ea-γ), were characterized. Above Tg (> 60 °C), a medium degree of nonexponentiality (βKWW = 0.5) was evidenced. An intermediate value of the fragility index (m = 86) enabled us to consider Quinidine as a glass former of medium fragility. Below Tg (origin coming from the rotation of the CH(OH)C9H14N end group. An excess wing observed in amorphous Quinidine was found to be an unresolved Johari-Goldstein relaxation. These studies were supplemented by sub-Tg experimental evaluations of the life expectancy of amorphous Quinidine by X-ray powder diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. We show that the difference between Tg and the onset temperature for crystallization, Tc, which is 30 K, is sufficiently large to avoid recrystallization of amorphous Quinidine during 16 months of storage under ambient conditions.

  18. Role of Loss of Equilibrium and Magnetic Reconnection in Coronal Eruptions: Resistive and Hall MHD simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Forbes, T. G.

    2008-12-01

    It has long been suggested that eruptive phenomena such as coronal mass ejections, prominence eruptions, and large flares might be caused by a loss of equilibrium in a coronal flux rope (Van Tend and Kuperus, 1978). Forbes et al. (1994) developed an analytical two-dimensional model in which eruptions occur due to a catastrophic loss of equilibrium and relaxation to a lower-energy state containing a thin current sheet. Magnetic reconnection then intervenes dynamically, leading to the release of magnetic energy and expulsion of a plasmoid. We have carried out high-Lundquist-number simulations to test the loss-of equilibrium mechanism, and demonstrated that it does indeed occur in the quasi-ideal limit. We have studied the subsequent dynamical evolution of the system in resistive and Hall MHD models for single as well as multiple arcades. The typical parallel electric fields are super-Dreicer, which makes it necessary to include collisionless effects via a generalized Ohm's law. It is shown that the nature of the local dissipation mechanism has a significant effect on the global geometry and dynamics of the magnetic configuration. The presence of Hall currents is shown to alter the length of the current sheet and the jets emerging from the reconnection site, directed towards the chromosphere. Furthermore, Hall MHD effects break certain symmetries of resistive MHD dynamics, and we explore their observational consequences.

  19. Decay of Metastable State with Account of Agglomeration and Relaxation Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Kurasov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical description of the metastable phase decay kinetics in the presence of specific connections between the embryos of small sizes has been given. The theory of the decay kinetics in the presence of relaxation processes is constructed in analytical manner. The m-mers nucleation is investigated and the global kinetics of decay is also constructed in this case analytically.

  20. Analysis and Application of Distribution of Relaxation Times in Solid State Ionics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boukamp, B.A.; Rolle, A.

    2017-01-01

    Three methods for obtaining a Distribution (Function) of Relaxation Times (DFRT) are compared, Fourier transform (FT), Tikhonov regularization (TR) and a multiple-(RQ) CNLS-fit. The FT method was written in the programming package ‘Borland Delphi’, for the Tikhonov regularization (TR) a freely avail

  1. Enhancing relaxation states and positive emotions in physicians through a mindfulness training program: A one-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amutio, Alberto; Martínez-Taboada, Cristina; Hermosilla, Daniel; Delgado, Luis Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on mindfulness has focused mainly on stress-related negative symptoms and short-term effects. In contrast, the present article focuses on the impact of a mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) program on improving well-being (i.e. relaxation states and related positive emotions) in a longitudinal study for a period of one year. A randomized controlled trial in a sample of 42 physicians was used. The intervention group participated in an 8-week MBSR program, with an additional 10-month maintenance period and completed measures of mindfulness and relaxation at pre-intervention, post-intervention and after 10 months. Heart rate measures were also obtained. Significant improvements in favor of the experimental group compared with the control group on the levels of mindfulness and relaxation (including positive emotional states, such as at ease/peace, renewal, energy, optimism, happiness, acceptance, and even transcendence) were obtained after eight weeks. Remarkably, change magnitudes (effect size) significantly increased at the end of the maintenance period after a year, especially for mindfulness and positive energy. Additionally, heart rate significantly decreased for the intervention group and maintained a year after the beginning of the treatment. Results are relevant in terms of practical consequences for improving health and well-being in this population and also in terms of cost-efficiency.

  2. The relaxation of initial condition in systems with infinitely many absorbing states

    CERN Document Server

    Ódor, G; Dos Santos, M A; Marques, M C; Odor, Geza

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of the initial condition on the spreading exponents of the one-dimensional pair contact process (PCP) and threshold transfer process (TTP).The non-order field was found to exhibit critical fluctuations, relaxing to its natural value with the same power-law as the order parameter field. We argue that this slow relaxation, which was not taken into account in earlier studies of these models, is responsible for the continuously changing survival probability exponent. High precision numerical simulations show evidence of a(slight) dependence of the location of the transition point on the initial concentration, in the case of PCP. The damage spreading (DS) point and the spreading exponents coincide with those of the ordinary critical point in both cases.

  3. Biaxial stress relaxation of semilunar heart valve leaflets during simulated collagen catabolism: Effects of collagenase concentration and equibiaxial strain state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Siyao; Huang, Hsiao-Ying Shadow

    2015-10-01

    Heart valve leaflet collagen turnover and remodeling are innate to physiological homeostasis; valvular interstitial cells routinely catabolize damaged collagen and affect repair. Moreover, evidence indicates that leaflets can adapt to altered physiological (e.g. pregnancy) and pathological (e.g. hypertension) mechanical load states, tuning collagen structure and composition to changes in pressure and flow. However, while valvular interstitial cell-secreted matrix metalloproteinases are considered the primary effectors of collagen catabolism, the mechanisms by which damaged collagen fibers are selectively degraded remain unclear. Growing evidence suggests that the collagen fiber strain state plays a key role, with the strain-dependent configuration of the collagen molecules either masking or presenting proteolytic sites, thereby protecting or accelerating collagen proteolysis. In this study, the effects of equibiaxial strain state on collagen catabolism were investigated in porcine aortic valve and pulmonary valve tissues. Bacterial collagenase (0.2 and 0.5 mg/mL) was utilized to simulate endogenous matrix metalloproteinases, and biaxial stress relaxation and biochemical collagen concentration served as functional and compositional measures of collagen catabolism, respectively. At a collagenase concentration of 0.5 mg/mL, increasing the equibiaxial strain imposed during stress relaxation (0%, 37.5%, and 50%) yielded significantly lower median collagen concentrations in the aortic valve (p = 0.0231) and pulmonary valve (p = 0.0183), suggesting that relatively large strain magnitudes may enhance collagen catabolism. Collagen concentration decreases were paralleled by trends of accelerated normalized stress relaxation rate with equibiaxial strain in aortic valve tissues. Collectively, these in vitro results indicate that biaxial strain state is capable of affecting the susceptibility of valvular collagens to catabolism, providing a basis for further investigation of

  4. An Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Discretization of MHD on 3D Unstructured Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieben, R N; White, D A; Wallin, B K; Solberg, J M

    2006-06-12

    We present an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) discretization of the equations of resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) on unstructured hexahedral grids. The method is formulated using an operator-split approach with three distinct phases: electromagnetic diffusion, Lagrangian motion, and Eulerian advection. The resistive magnetic dynamo equation is discretized using a compatible mixed finite element method with a 2nd order accurate implicit time differencing scheme which preserves the divergence-free nature of the magnetic field. At each discrete time step, electromagnetic force and heat terms are calculated and coupled to the hydrodynamic equations to compute the Lagrangian motion of the conducting materials. By virtue of the compatible discretization method used, the invariants of Lagrangian MHD motion are preserved in a discrete sense. When the Lagrangian motion of the mesh causes significant distortion, that distortion is corrected with a relaxation of the mesh, followed by a 2nd order monotonic remap of the electromagnetic state variables. The remap is equivalent to Eulerian advection of the magnetic flux density with a fictitious mesh relaxation velocity. The magnetic advection is performed using a novel variant of constrained transport (CT) that is valid for unstructured hexahedral grids with arbitrary mesh velocities. The advection method maintains the divergence free nature of the magnetic field and is second order accurate in regions where the solution is sufficiently smooth. For regions in which the magnetic field is discontinuous (e.g. MHD shocks) the method is limited using a novel variant of algebraic flux correction (AFC) which is local extremum diminishing (LED) and divergence preserving. Finally, we verify each stage of the discretization via a set of numerical experiments.

  5. Lattice Boltzmann Large Eddy Simulation Model of MHD

    CERN Document Server

    Flint, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The work of Ansumali \\textit{et al.}\\cite{Ansumali} is extended to Two Dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in which energy is cascaded to small spatial scales and thus requires subgrid modeling. Applying large eddy simulation (LES) modeling of the macroscopic fluid equations results in the need to apply ad-hoc closure schemes. LES is applied to a suitable mesoscopic lattice Boltzmann representation from which one can recover the MHD equations in the long wavelength, long time scale Chapman-Enskog limit (i.e., the Knudsen limit). Thus on first performing filter width expansions on the lattice Boltzmann equations followed by the standard small Knudsen expansion on the filtered lattice Boltzmann system results in a closed set of MHD turbulence equations provided we enforce the physical constraint that the subgrid effects first enter the dynamics at the transport time scales. In particular, a multi-time relaxation collision operator is considered for the density distribution function and a single rel...

  6. MHD Generation Code

    CERN Document Server

    Frutos-Alfaro, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    A program to generate codes in Fortran and C of the full Magnetohydrodynamic equations is shown. The program used the free computer algebra system software REDUCE. This software has a package called EXCALC, which is an exterior calculus program. The advantage of this program is that it can be modified to include another complex metric or spacetime. The output of this program is modified by means of a LINUX script which creates a new REDUCE program to manipulate the MHD equations to obtain a code that can be used as a seed for a MHD code for numerical applications. As an example, we present part of output of our programs for Cartesian coordinates and how to do the discretization.

  7. Generation of bound states of pulses in a soliton laser with complex relaxation of a saturable absorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolotovskii, I O; Korobko, D A; Okhotnikov, O G [Ulyanovsk State University, Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Gumenyuk, R V [Optoelectronics Research Center, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere (Finland)

    2015-01-31

    A numerical model of a soliton fibre laser with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM), characterised by the complex dynamics of absorption relaxation, is considered. It is shown that stationary bound states of pulses can be formed in this laser as a result of their interaction via the dispersion-wave field. The stability of stationary bound states of several pulses is analysed. It is shown that an increase in the number of pulses in a stationary bound state leads eventually to its decay and formation of a random bunch. It is found that the bunch stability is caused by the manifestation of nonlinear self-phase modulation, which attracts pulses to the bunch centre. The simulation results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  8. Mobility and relaxation determinations of lithium in lithium aluminate ceramics using solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, F.F.; Peterson, E.S. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Stebbins, J.F. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-02-01

    Lithium aluminate is one of the materials being considered for fusion reactor blankets. When preparing the ceramic, it is important to be able to monitor the microstructures since it is a controlling factor in the rate of tritium release from the blanket. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) has been shown to be a useful tool for the nondestructive analysis of ceramics. Studies detailed in this paper include spectral acquisition, assignment, spin-lattice relaxation time measurements, temperature effects, their correlation to structure, and material purity. The ceramic of interest was lithium aluminate, LiAl{sub 5}O{sub 8}. This material was studied by observation of the NMR active nuclei {sup 6}Li, {sup 7}Li, and {sup 27}Al. For these nuclei, spin-lattice relaxation times (T{sub 1}) were measured and were found to vary considerably, correlating to the presence of paramagnetic impurities within the crystalline lattice. Previous research has shown that the coordination about the aluminum nucleus can be determined using {sup 27}Al NMR spectroscopy. Aluminum-27 NMR spectroscopy was successfully applied, and it provided valuable insight into composition of the ceramic. 20 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Nonlinear helical MHD instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zueva, N.M.; Solov' ev, L.S.

    1977-07-01

    An examination is made of the boundary problem on the development of MHD instability in a toroidal plasma. Two types of local helical instability are noted - Alfven and thermal, and the corresponding criteria of instability are cited. An evaluation is made of the maximum attainable kinetic energy, limited by the degree to which the law of conservation is fulfilled. An examination is made of a precise solution to a kinematic problem on the helical evolution of a cylindrical magnetic configuration at a given velocity distribution in a plasma. A numerical computation of the development of MHD instability in a plasma cylinder by a computerized solution of MHD equations is made where the process's helical symmetry is conserved. The development of instability is of a resonance nature. The instability involves the entire cross section of the plasma and leads to an inside-out reversal of the magnetic surfaces when there is a maximum unstable equilibrium configuration in the nonlinear stage. The examined instability in the tore is apparently stabilized by a magnetic hole when certain limitations are placed on the distribution of flows in the plasma. 29 references, 8 figures.

  10. Measuring {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts of invisible excited states in proteins by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundstroem, Patrik [Linkoeping University, Molecular Biotechnology/IFM (Sweden); Lin Hong [Hospital for Sick Children, Molecular Structure and Function (Canada); Kay, Lewis E. [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Genetics (Canada)], E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca

    2009-07-15

    A labeling scheme is introduced that facilitates the measurement of accurate {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts of invisible, excited states of proteins by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy. The approach makes use of protein over-expression in a strain of E. coli in which the TCA cycle enzyme succinate dehydrogenase is knocked out, leading to the production of samples with high levels of {sup 13}C enrichment (30-40%) at C{sup {beta}} side-chain carbon positions for 15 of the amino acids with little {sup 13}C label at positions one bond removed ({approx}5%). A pair of samples are produced using [1-{sup 13}C]-glucose/NaH{sup 12}CO{sub 3} or [2-{sup 13}C]-glucose as carbon sources with isolated and enriched (>30%) {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} positions for 11 and 4 residues, respectively. The efficacy of the labeling procedure is established by NMR spectroscopy. The utility of such samples for measurement of {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts of invisible, excited states in exchange with visible, ground conformations is confirmed by relaxation dispersion studies of a protein-ligand binding exchange reaction in which the extracted chemical shift differences from dispersion profiles compare favorably with those obtained directly from measurements on ligand free and fully bound protein samples.

  11. Relaxation of two coupled quantum oscillators to quasi-equilibrium states based on path integrals

    CERN Document Server

    Dorofeyev, Illarion

    2013-01-01

    The paper addresses the problem of relaxation of open quantum systems. Using the path integral methods we found an analytical expression for time-dependent density matrix of two coupled quantum oscillators interacting with different baths of oscillators. The expression for density matrix was found in the linear regime with respect to the coupling constant between selected oscillators. Time-dependent spatial variances and covariance were investigated analytically and numerically. It was shown that asymptotic variances in the long-time limit are always in accordance with the fluctuation dissipation theorem despite on their initial values. In the weak coupling approach there is good reason to believe that subsystems asymptotically in equilibrium at their own temperatures even despite of the arbitrary difference in temperatures within the whole system.

  12. Rovibrational relaxation in collisions between H{sub 2} molecules: II. Influence of the rotational state of the perturber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flower, D.R. [Physics Department, The University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Roueff, E. [URA 173, associee au CNRS et a l' Universite Paris 7, et DAEC, Observatoire de Paris, F-92195 Meudon Principal Cedex (France)

    1999-07-28

    We have computed cross sections and rate coefficients for rovibrational transitions in ortho- and para-H{sub 2}, induced by ground state ({nu}=0, J=1) ortho-H{sub 2}. These results complement our previous calculations relating to excitation by para-H{sub 2} ({nu}=0, J=0). The cross sections are found to be insensitive to the rotational state of the perturber. Discrepancies with measurements of the rate coefficient for v=1{yields}0 vibrational relaxation at low temperatures persist. The value of this rate coefficient at low temperatures is shown to be determined by a combination of the Wigner threshold law and the presence of a quantal interference minimum. Further experimental and theoretical work on the H{sub 2}-H{sub 2} system is called for in order to resolve the remaining discrepancies. (author)

  13. The MHD Kelvin-Helmholtz instability a two-dimensional numerical study

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, A I; Ryu, D; Gaalaas, J B; Frank, Adam; Ryu, Dongsu; Gaalaas, Joseph B

    1995-01-01

    Using a new numerical code we have carried out two-dimensional simulations of the nonlinear evolution of unstable sheared magnetohydrodynamic flows. We considered two cases: a strong magnetic field (Alfven Mach number, M_a = 2.5) and a weak field (M_a =5). Each flow rapidly evolves until it reaches a nearly steady condition, which is fundamentally different from the analogous gasdynamic state. Both MHD flows relax to a stable, laminar flow on timescales less than or of the order of 15 linear growth times, measured from saturation of the instability. That timescale is several orders of magnitude less than the nominal dissipation time for these simulated flows, so this condition represents an quasi-steady relaxed state. The strong magnetic field case reaches saturation as magnetic tension in the displaced flow boundary becomes sufficient to stabilize it. That flow then relaxes in a straightforward way to the steady, laminar flow condition. The weak magnetic field case, on the other hand, begins development of t...

  14. Radical ions with nearly degenerate ground state: correlation between the rate of spin-lattice relaxation and the structure of adiabatic potential energy surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovkov, V I; Beregovaya, I V; Shchegoleva, L N; Potashov, P A; Bagryansky, V A; Molin, Y N

    2012-09-14

    Paramagnetic spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) in radical cations (RCs) of the cycloalkane series in liquid solution was studied and analyzed from the point of view of the correlation between the relaxation rate and the structure of the adiabatic potential energy surface (PES) of the RCs. SLR rates in the RCs formed in x-ray irradiated n-hexane solutions of the cycloalkanes studied were measured with the method of time-resolved magnetic field effect in the recombination fluorescence of spin-correlated radical ion pairs. Temperature and, for some cycloalkanes, magnetic field dependences of the relaxation rate were determined. It was found that the conventional Redfield theory of the paramagnetic relaxation as applied to the results on cyclohexane RC, gave a value of about 0.2 ps for the correlation time of the perturbation together with an unrealistically high value of 0.1 T in field units for the matrix element of the relaxation transition. The PES structure was obtained with the DFT quantum-chemical calculations. It was found that for all of the cycloalkanes RCs considered, including low symmetric alkyl-substituted ones, the adiabatic PESes were surfaces of pseudorotation due to avoided crossing. In the RCs studied, a correlation between the SLR rate and the calculated barrier height to the pseudorotation was revealed. For RCs with a higher relaxation rate, the apparent activation energies for the SLR were similar to the calculated heights of the barrier. To rationalize the data obtained it was assumed that the vibronic states degeneracy, which is specific for Jahn-Teller active cyclohexane RC, was approximately kept in the RCs of substituted cycloalkanes for the vibronic states with the energies above and close to the barrier height to the pseudorotation. It was proposed that the effective spin-lattice relaxation in a radical with nearly degenerate low-lying vibronic states originated from stochastic crossings of the vibronic levels that occur due to fluctuations of

  15. MHD Generation Code

    OpenAIRE

    Frutos-Alfaro, Francisco; Carboni-Mendez, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    A program to generate codes in Fortran and C of the full Magnetohydrodynamic equations is shown. The program used the free computer algebra system software REDUCE. This software has a package called EXCALC, which is an exterior calculus program. The advantage of this program is that it can be modified to include another complex metric or spacetime. The output of this program is modified by means of a LINUX script which creates a new REDUCE program to manipulate the MHD equations to obtain a c...

  16. Mhd models for pne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. García Segura

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un escenario auto consistente para explicar la morfolog a de las nebulosas planetarias. El escenario es consistente con la distribuci on Gal actica de los diferentes tipos morfol ogicos. Este trabajo resuelve, por medio de efectos MHD, algunas de las caracter sticas controversiales que aparecen en las nebulosas planetarias. Estas caracter sticas incluyen la presencia de ujos axisim etricos y colimados, con una cinem atica que aumenta linealmente con la distancia y la existencia de morfolog as asim etricas tales como las de las nebulosas con simetr a de punto.

  17. Interdomain orientation of cardiac troponin C characterized by paramagnetic relaxation enhancement NMR reveals a compact state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordina, Nicole M; Liew, Chu Kong; Gell, David A; Fajer, Piotr G; Mackay, Joel P; Brown, Louise J

    2012-09-01

    Cardiac troponin C (cTnC) is the calcium binding subunit of the troponin complex that triggers the thin filament response to calcium influx into the sarcomere. cTnC consists of two globular EF-hand domains (termed the N- and C-domains) connected by a flexible linker. While the conformation of each domain of cTnC has been thoroughly characterized through NMR studies involving either the isolated N-domain (N-cTnC) or C-domain (C-cTnC), little attention has been paid to the range of interdomain orientations possible in full-length cTnC that arises as a consequence of the flexibility of the domain linker. Flexibility in the domain linker of cTnC is essential for effective regulatory function of troponin. We have therefore utilized paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) NMR to assess the interdomain orientation of cTnC. Ensemble fitting of our interdomain PRE measurements reveals that isolated cTnC has considerable interdomain flexibility and preferentially adopts a bent conformation in solution, with a defined range of relative domain orientations.

  18. Magnetic Reconnection in a Compressible MHD Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Michael; Birn, Joachim; Zenitani, Seiji

    2011-01-01

    Using steady-state resistive MHD, magnetic reconnection is reinvestigated for conditions of high resistivity/low magnetic Reynolds number, when the thickness of the diffusion region is no longer small compared to its length. Implicit expressions for the reconnection rate and other reconnection parameters are derived based on the requirements of mass, momentum, and energy conservation. These expressions are solved via simple iterative procedures. Implications specifically for low Reynolds number/high resistivity are being discussed

  19. MHD-ETF design criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Retallick, F.D.

    1978-04-01

    This document establishes criteria to be utilized for the design of a pilot-scale (150 to 300 MW thermal) open cycle, coal-fired MHD/steam plant. Criteria for this Engineering Test Facility (ETF) are presented relative to plant siting, plant engineering and operations, MHD-ETF testing, costing and scheduling.

  20. MHD turbulence and distributed chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2016-01-01

    It is shown, using results of recent direct numerical simulations, that spectral properties of distributed chaos in MHD turbulence with zero mean magnetic field are similar to those of hydrodynamic turbulence. An exception is MHD spontaneous breaking of space translational symmetry, when the stretched exponential spectrum $\\exp(-k/k_{\\beta})^{\\beta}$ has $\\beta=4/7$.

  1. Nonlinear MHD simulation of current drive by multi-pulsed coaxial helicity injection in spherical torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanki, Takashi; Nagata, Masayoshi; Kagei, Yasuhiro

    2011-10-01

    The dynamics of structures of magnetic field, current density, and plasma flow generated during multi-pulsed coaxial helicity injection in spherical torus is investigated by 3-D nonlinear MHD simulations. During the driven phase, the flux and current amplifications occur due to the merging and magnetic reconnection between the preexisting plasma in the confinement region and the ejected plasma from the gun region involving the n = 1 helical kink distortion of the central open flux column (COFC). Interestingly, the diamagnetic poloidal flow which tends toward the gun region is then observed due to the steep pressure gradients of the COFC generated by ohmic heating through an injection current winding around the inboard field lines, resulting in the formation of the strong poloidal flow shear at the interface between the COFC and the core region. This result is consistent with the flow shear observed in the HIST. During the decay phase, the configuration approaches the axisymmetric MHD equilibrium state without flow because of the dissipation of magnetic fluctuation energy to increase the closed flux surfaces, suggesting the generation of ordered magnetic field structure. The parallel current density λ concentrated in the COFC then diffuses to the core region so as to reduce the gradient in λ, relaxing in the direction of the Taylor state.

  2. Measuring {sup 1}H{sup N} temperature coefficients in invisible protein states by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouvignies, Guillaume; Vallurupalli, Pramodh [University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry (Canada); Cordes, Matthew H. J. [The University of Arizona, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Hansen, D. Flemming [University College London, Institute of Structural and Molecular Biology (United Kingdom); Kay, Lewis E., E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca [University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry (Canada)

    2011-05-15

    A method based on the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation dispersion experiment is presented for measuring the temperature coefficients of amide proton chemical shifts of low populated 'invisible' protein states that exchange with a 'visible' ground state on the millisecond time-scale. The utility of the approach is demonstrated with an application to an I58D mutant of the Pfl6 Cro protein that undergoes exchange between the native, folded state and a cold denatured, unfolded conformational ensemble that is populated at a level of 6% at 2.5 Degree-Sign C. A wide distribution of amide temperature coefficients is measured for the unfolded state. The distribution is centered about -5.6 ppb/K, consistent with an absence of intra-molecular hydrogen bonds, on average. However, the large range of values (standard deviation of 2.1 ppb/K) strongly supports the notion that the unfolded state of the protein is not a true random coil polypeptide chain.

  3. Ultrafast electronic relaxation of excited state vitamin B{sub 12} in the gas phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafizadeh, Niloufar [Laboratoire de Photophysique Moleculaire, U.P.R. 3361 CNRS Bat 210, Universite de Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay, Cedex (France)], E-mail: Niloufar.Shafizadeh@u-psud.fr; Poisson, Lionel; Soep, Benoit [Laboratoire Francis Perrin, CEA/DSM/DRECAM/SPAM - CNRS URA 2453, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2008-06-23

    The time evolution of electronically excited vitamin B{sub 12} (cyanocobalamin) has been observed for the first time in the gas phase. It reveals an ultrafast decay to a state corresponding to metal excitation. This decay is interpreted as resulting from a ring to metal electron transfer. This opens the observation of the excited state of other complex biomimetic systems in the gas phase, the key to the characterisation of their complex evolution through excited electronic states.

  4. Ultrafast electronic relaxation of excited state vitamin B 12 in the gas phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafizadeh, Niloufar; Poisson, Lionel; Soep, Benoıˆt

    2008-06-01

    The time evolution of electronically excited vitamin B 12 (cyanocobalamin) has been observed for the first time in the gas phase. It reveals an ultrafast decay to a state corresponding to metal excitation. This decay is interpreted as resulting from a ring to metal electron transfer. This opens the observation of the excited state of other complex biomimetic systems in the gas phase, the key to the characterisation of their complex evolution through excited electronic states.

  5. Comparison of solid-state dipolar couplings and solution relaxation data provides insight into protein backbone dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Xue, Yi; Linser, Rasmus; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R; Reif, Bernd

    2010-04-14

    Analyses of solution (15)N relaxation data and solid-state (1)H(N)-(15)N dipolar couplings from a small globular protein, alpha-spectrin SH3 domain, produce a surprisingly similar pattern of order parameters. This result suggests that there is little or no ns-mus dynamics throughout most of the sequence and, in particular, in the structured portion of the backbone. At the same time, evidence of ns-mus motions is found in the flexible loops and termini. These findings, corroborated by the MD simulations of alpha-spectrin SH3 in a hydrated crystalline environment and in solution, are consistent with the picture of protein dynamics that has recently emerged from the solution studies employing residual dipolar couplings.

  6. Simulating solar MHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schüssler

    Full Text Available Two aspects of solar MHD are discussed in relation to the work of the MHD simulation group at KIS. Photospheric magneto-convection, the nonlinear interaction of magnetic field and convection in a strongly stratified, radiating fluid, is a key process of general astrophysical relevance. Comprehensive numerical simulations including radiative transfer have significantly improved our understanding of the processes and have become an important tool for the interpretation of observational data. Examples of field intensification in the solar photosphere ('convective collapse' are shown. The second line of research is concerned with the dynamics of flux tubes in the convection zone, which has far-reaching implications for our understanding of the solar dynamo. Simulations indicate that the field strength in the region where the flux is stored before erupting to form sunspot groups is of the order of 105 G, an order of magnitude larger than previous estimates based on equipartition with the kinetic energy of convective flows.

    Key words. Solar physics · astrophysics and astronomy (photosphere and chromosphere; stellar interiors and dynamo theory; numerical simulation studies.

  7. A Steady-State Picture of Solar Wind Acceleration and Charge State Composition Derived from a Global Wave-Driven MHD Model

    CERN Document Server

    Oran, Rona; van der Holst, Bart; Lepri, Susan T; Frazin, Alberto M Vásquez Federico A Nuevo Richard; Manchester, Ward B; Sokolov, Igor V; Gombosi, Tamas I

    2014-01-01

    The higher charge states found in slow ($<$400km s$^{-1}$) solar wind streams compared to fast streams have supported the hypothesis that the slow wind originates in closed coronal loops, and released intermittently through reconnection. Here we examine whether a highly ionized slow wind can also form along steady and open magnetic field lines. We model the steady-state solar atmosphere using AWSoM, a global magnetohydrodynamic model driven by Alfv{\\'e}n waves, and apply an ionization code to calculate the charge state evolution along modeled open field lines. This constitutes the first charge states calculation covering all latitudes in a realistic magnetic field. The ratios $O^{+7}/O^{+6}$ and $C^{+6}/C^{+5}$ are compared to in-situ Ulysses observations, and are found to be higher in the slow wind, as observed; however, they are under-predicted in both wind types. The modeled ion fractions of S, Si, and Fe are used to calculate line-of-sight intensities, which are compared to EIS observations above a cor...

  8. Natural relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzola, Luca; Raidal, Martti

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by natural inflation, we propose a relaxation mechanism consistent with inflationary cosmology that explains the hierarchy between the electroweak scale and Planck scale. This scenario is based on a selection mechanism that identifies the low-scale dynamics as the one that is screened from UV physics. The scenario also predicts the near-criticality and metastability of the Standard Model (SM) vacuum state, explaining the Higgs boson mass observed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Once Majorana right-handed neutrinos are introduced to provide a viable reheating channel, our framework yields a corresponding mass scale that allows for the seesaw mechanism as well as for standard thermal leptogenesis. We argue that considering singlet scalar dark matter extensions of the proposed scenario could solve the vacuum stability problem and discuss how the cosmological constant problem is possibly addressed.

  9. In-medium mathaccent "7016relax K- and eta -meson Interactions and Bound States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, A.; Friedman, E.; Barnea, N.; Cieplý, A.; Mareš, J.; Gazda, D.

    The role played by subthreshold meson-baryon dynamics is demonstrated in kaonic-atom, Kbar-nuclear and eta-nuclear bound-state calculations within in-medium models of Kbar-N and eta-N interactions. New analyses of kaonic atom data reveal appreciable multi-nucleon contributions. Calculations of eta-nuclear bound states show, in particular, that the eta-N scattering length is not a useful indicator of whether or not eta mesons bind in nuclei nor of the widths anticipated for such states.

  10. Role of electric fields in the MHD evolution of the kink instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Skender, Marina

    2017-02-01

    The discovery (Bonfiglio et al 2005 Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 145001) of electrostatic fields playing a crucial role in establishing plasma motion in the flux conversion and dynamo processes in reversed field pinches is revisited. In order to further elucidate the role of the electrostatic fields, a flux rope configuration susceptible to the kink instability is numerically studied with an MHD code. Simulated nonlinear evolution of the kink instability is found to confirm the crucial role of the electrostatic fields. A new insight is gained on the special function of the electrostatic fields: they lead the plasma towards the reconnection site at the mode resonant surface. Without this step the plasma column could not relax to its nonlinear state, since no other agent is present to perform this role. While the inductive field generated directly by the kink instability is the dominant flow driver, the electrostatic field is found to allow the motion in the vicinity of the reconnection region.

  11. Two-dimensional MHD model of the reconnection diffusion region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Erkaev

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic reconnection is an important process providing a fast conversion of magnetic energy into thermal and kinetic plasma energy. In this concern, a key problem is that of the resistive diffusion region where the reconnection process is initiated. In this paper, the diffusion region is associated with a nonuniform conductivity localized to a small region. The nonsteady resistive incompressible MHD equations are solved numerically for the case of symmetric reconnection of antiparallel magnetic fields. A Petschek type steady-state solution is obtained as a result of time relaxation of the reconnection layer structure from an arbitrary initial stage. The structure of the diffusion region is studied for various ratios of maximum and minimum values of the plasma resistivity. The effective length of the diffusion region and the reconnection rate are determined as functions of the length scale and the maximum of the resistivity. For sufficiently small length scale of the resistivity, the reconnection rate is shown to be consistent with Petschek's formula. By increasing the resistivity length scale and decreasing the resistivity maximum, the reconnection layer tends to be wider, and correspondingly, the reconnection rate tends to be more consistent with that of the Parker-Sweet regime.

  12. Adiabatic fast passage application in solid state NMR study of cross relaxation and molecular dynamics in heteronuclear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowski, M.; Woźniak-Braszak, A.; Jurga, K.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the benefits of using fast adiabatic passage for the study of molecular dynamics in the solid state heteronuclear systems in the laboratory frame. A homemade pulse spectrometer operating at the frequency of 30.2 MHz and 28.411 MHz for protons and fluorines, respectively, has been enhanced with microcontroller direct digital synthesizer DDS controller [1-4]. This work briefly describes how to construct a low-cost and easy-to-assemble adiabatic extension set for homemade and commercial spectrometers based on recently very popular Arduino shields. The described set was designed for fast adiabatic generation. Timing and synchronization problems are discussed. The cross-relaxation experiments with different initial states of the two spin systems have been performed. Contrary to our previous work [5] where the steady-state NOE experiments were conducted now proton spins 1H are polarized in the magnetic field B0 while fluorine spins 19F are perturbed by selective saturation for a short time and then the system is allowed to evolve for a period in the absence of a saturating field. The adiabatic passage application leads to a reversal of magnetization of fluorine spins and increases the amplitude of the signal.

  13. Spin state relaxation of iron complexes: The case for OPBE and S12g

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruden Maja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The structures of nine iron complexes that show a diversity of experimentally observed spin ground states are optimized and analyzed with Density Functional Theory (DFT. An extensive validation study of the new S12g functional is performed, with the discussion concerning the influence of the environment, geometry and its overall performance based on the comparison with the well proven OPBE functional. The OPBE and S12g functionals give the correct spin ground state for all investigated iron complexes. Since S12g performs remarkably well it can be considered a reliable tool for studying spin state energetics in complicated transition metal systems. [Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (MICINN, project CTQ2011-25086/BQU, the Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad (MINECO, project CTQ2014-59212/BQU and the DIUE of the Generalitat de Catalunya (project 2014SGR1202, and Xarxa de Referència en Química Teòrica i Computacional; MICINN and the FEDER fund (European Fund for Regional Development under grant UNGI10-4E-801, and the Serbian Ministry of Education and Science (Grant No. 172035. This work was performed in the framework of the COST action CM1305 "Explicit Control Over Spin-states in Technology and Biochemistry (ECOSTBio" (STSM reference: ECOST-STSM-CM1305-27360.

  14. Manipulating charge transfer excited state relaxation and spin crossover in iron coordination complexes with ligand substitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenkai; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Alonso-Mori, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    ) Kβ hard X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy with femtosecond time-resolved UV-visible absorption spectroscopy to characterize the electronic excited state dynamics initiated by MLCT excitation of [Fe(CN)4(bpy)]2-. The two experimental techniques are highly complementary; the time-resolved UV...

  15. Study of MHD activities in the plasma of SST-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhongde, Jasraj; Bhandarkar, Manisha; Pradhan, Subrata, E-mail: pradhan@ipr.res.in; Kumar, Sameer

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • An account of MHD activity in the plasma of SST-1 • Observation of MHD instabilities with mode m = 2, n = 1 in SST-1 plasma. • MHD instabilities study of characteristic growth time, growth rate of island and island width etc. in SST-1 plasma. - Abstract: Steady State Superconducting Tokamak (SST-1) is a medium size Tokamak in operation at the Institute for Plasma Research, India. SST-1 has been consistently producing plasma currents in excess of 60 kA, with plasma durations above 400 ms and a central magnetic field of 1.5 T over last few experimental campaigns of 2014. Investigation of these experimental data suggests the presence of MHD activity in the SST-1 plasma. Further analysis clearly explains the behavior of MHD instabilities observed (i.e. tearing modes with m = 2, n = 1), estimating the growth rate and the island width in the SST-1 plasma. Poloidal magnetic field and Toroidal magnetic field fluctuations in SST-1 are observed using Mirnov coils. Onsets of disruptions in connection with MHD activities have been correlated with other diagnostics such as ECE, Density and Hα etc. The observations have been cross compared with the theoretical calculations and are found to be in good agreement.

  16. MHD Energy Bypass Scramjet Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Unmeel B.; Bogdanoff, David W.; Park, Chul; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Revolutionary rather than evolutionary changes in propulsion systems are most likely to decrease cost of space transportation and to provide a global range capability. Hypersonic air-breathing propulsion is a revolutionary propulsion system. The performance of scramjet engines can be improved by the AJAX energy management concept. A magneto-hydro-dynamics (MHD) generator controls the flow and extracts flow energy in the engine inlet and a MHD accelerator downstream of the combustor accelerates the nozzle flow. A progress report toward developing the MHD technology is presented herein. Recent theoretical efforts are reviewed and ongoing experimental efforts are discussed. The latter efforts also include an ongoing collaboration between NASA, the US Air Force Research Laboratory, US industry, and Russian scientific organizations. Two of the critical technologies, the ionization of the air and the MHD accelerator, are briefly discussed. Examples of limiting the combustor entrance Mach number to a low supersonic value with a MHD energy bypass scheme are presented, demonstrating an improvement in scramjet performance. The results for a simplified design of an aerospace plane show that the specific impulse of the MHD-bypass system is better than the non-MHD system and typical rocket over a narrow region of flight speeds and design parameters. Equilibrium ionization and non-equilibrium ionization are discussed. The thermodynamic condition of air at the entrance of the engine inlet determines the method of ionization. The required external power for non-equilibrium ionization is computed. There have been many experiments in which electrical power generation has successfully been achieved by magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) means. However, relatively few experiments have been made to date for the reverse case of achieving gas acceleration by the MHD means. An experiment in a shock tunnel is described in which MHD acceleration is investigated experimentally. MHD has several

  17. Acceleration of natural-abundance solid-state MAS NMR measurements on bone by paramagnetic relaxation from gadolinium-DTPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Zhang, Rongchun; Zhu, Peizhi; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-07-01

    Reducing the data collection time without affecting the signal intensity and spectral resolution is one of the major challenges for the widespread application of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, especially in experiments conducted on complex heterogeneous biological systems such as bone. In most of these experiments, the NMR data collection time is ultimately governed by the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1). For over two decades, gadolinium(III)-DTPA (Gd-DTPA, DTPA = Diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid) has been one of the most widely used contrast-enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we demonstrate that Gd-DTPA can also be effectively used to enhance the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons in solid-state NMR experiments conducted on bone without significant line-broadening and chemical-shift-perturbation side effects. Using bovine cortical bone samples incubated in different concentrations of Gd-DTPA complex, the 1H T1 values were calculated from data collected by 1H spin-inversion recovery method detected in natural-abundance 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR experiments. Our results reveal that the 1H T1 values can be successfully reduced by a factor of 3.5 using as low as 10 mM Gd-DTPA without reducing the spectral resolution and thus enabling faster data acquisition of the 13C CPMAS spectra. These results obtained from 13C-detected CPMAS experiments were further confirmed using 1H-detected ultrafast MAS experiments on Gd-DTPA doped bone samples. This approach considerably improves the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of NMR experiments applied to bone samples by reducing the experimental time required to acquire the same number of scans.

  18. Effects of hydrolysis on solid-state relaxation and stickiness behavior of sodium caseinate-lactose powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounsey, J S; Hogan, S A; Murray, B A; O'Callaghan, D J

    2012-05-01

    Hydrolyzed or nonhydrolyzed sodium caseinate-lactose dispersions were spray dried, at a protein: lactose ratio of 0.5, to examine the effects of protein hydrolysis on relaxation behavior and stickiness of model powders. Sodium caseinate (NC) used included a nonhydrolyzed control (DH 0) and 2 hydrolyzed variants (DH 8.3 and DH 15), where DH = degree of hydrolysis (%). Prior to spray drying, apparent viscosities of liquid feeds (at 70°C) at a shear rate of 20/s were 37.6, 3.14, and 3.19 mPa·s, respectively, for DH 0, DH 8, and DH 15 dispersions. Powders containing hydrolyzed casein were more susceptible to sticking than those containing intact NC. The former had also lower bulk densities and powder particle sizes. Scanning electron microscopy showed that hydrolyzed powders had thinner particle walls and were more friable than powders containing intact NC. Secondary structure of caseinates, determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, was affected by the relative humidity of storage and the presence of lactose as co-solvent rather than its physical state. Glass transition temperatures and lactose crystallization temperatures, determined by differential scanning calorimetry were not affected by caseinate hydrolysis, although the effects of protein hydrolysis on glass-rubber transitions (T(gr)) could be determined by thermo-mechanical analysis. Powders containing hydrolyzed NC had lower T(gr) values (~30°C) following storage at a higher subcrystallization relative humidity (33%) compared with powder with nonhydrolyzed NC (T(gr) value of ~40°C), an effect that reflects more extensive plasticization of powder matrices by moisture. Results support that sodium caseinate-lactose interactions were weak but that relaxation behavior, as determined by the susceptibility of powder to sticking, was affected by hydrolysis of sodium caseinate. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Free Magnetic Energy in Solar Active Regions above the Minimum-Energy Relaxed State

    OpenAIRE

    Regnier, Stephane; Priest, Eric

    2007-01-01

    To understand the physics of solar flares, including the local reorganisation of the magnetic field and the acceleration of energetic particles, we have first to estimate the free magnetic energy available for such phenomena, which can be converted into kinetic and thermal energy. The free magnetic energy is the excess energy of a magnetic configuration compared to the minimum-energy state, which is a linear force-free field if the magnetic helicity of the configuration is conserved. We inves...

  20. Efficient charge generation by relaxed charge-transfer states at organic interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandewal, Koen; Albrecht, Steve; Hoke, Eric T.; Graham, Kenneth R.; Widmer, Johannes; Douglas, Jessica D.; Schubert, Marcel; Mateker, William R.; Bloking, Jason T.; Burkhard, George F.; Sellinger, Alan; Fréchet, Jean M. J.; Amassian, Aram; Riede, Moritz K.; McGehee, Michael D.; Neher, Dieter; Salleo, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Interfaces between organic electron-donating (D) and electron-accepting (A) materials have the ability to generate charge carriers on illumination. Efficient organic solar cells require a high yield for this process, combined with a minimum of energy losses. Here, we investigate the role of the lowest energy emissive interfacial charge-transfer state (CT1) in the charge generation process. We measure the quantum yield and the electric field dependence of charge generation on excitation of the charge-transfer (CT) state manifold via weakly allowed, low-energy optical transitions. For a wide range of photovoltaic devices based on polymer:fullerene, small-molecule:C60 and polymer:polymer blends, our study reveals that the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) is essentially independent of whether or not D, A or CT states with an energy higher than that of CT1 are excited. The best materials systems show an IQE higher than 90% without the need for excess electronic or vibrational energy.

  1. Efficient charge generation by relaxed charge-transfer states at organic interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Vandewal, Koen

    2013-11-17

    Interfaces between organic electron-donating (D) and electron-accepting (A) materials have the ability to generate charge carriers on illumination. Efficient organic solar cells require a high yield for this process, combined with a minimum of energy losses. Here, we investigate the role of the lowest energy emissive interfacial charge-transfer state (CT1) in the charge generation process. We measure the quantum yield and the electric field dependence of charge generation on excitation of the charge-transfer (CT) state manifold via weakly allowed, low-energy optical transitions. For a wide range of photovoltaic devices based on polymer:fullerene, small-molecule:C60 and polymer:polymer blends, our study reveals that the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) is essentially independent of whether or not D, A or CT states with an energy higher than that of CT1 are excited. The best materials systems show an IQE higher than 90% without the need for excess electronic or vibrational energy. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  2. Beltrami States for Plasma Dynamics Models

    OpenAIRE

    Shivamoggi, B. K.

    2007-01-01

    The various plasma models - incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, compressible MHD model, incompressible Hall MHD model, compressible Hall MHD model, electron MHD model, compressible Hall MHD with electron inertia model - notwithstanding the diversity of the underlying physics, are shown to exhibit some common features in the Beltrami states like certain robustness with respect to the plasma compressibility effects (albeit in the barotropy assumption) and the {\\it Bernoulli} conditi...

  3. Nonlinear MHD dynamo operating at equipartition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archontis, V.; Dorch, Bertil; Nordlund, Åke

    2007-01-01

    Context.We present results from non linear MHD dynamo experiments with a three-dimensional steady and smooth flow that drives fast dynamo action in the kinematic regime. In the saturation regime, the system yields strong magnetic fields, which undergo transitions between an energy-equipartition a......Context.We present results from non linear MHD dynamo experiments with a three-dimensional steady and smooth flow that drives fast dynamo action in the kinematic regime. In the saturation regime, the system yields strong magnetic fields, which undergo transitions between an energy......-equipartition and a turbulent state. The generation and evolution of such strong magnetic fields is relevant for the understanding of dynamo action that occurs in stars and other astrophysical objects. Aims.We study the mode of operation of this dynamo, in the linear and non-linear saturation regimes. We also consider...... the effect of varying the magnetic and fluid Reymolds number on the non-linear behaviour of the system. Methods.We perform three-dimensional non-linear MHD simulations and visualization using a high resolution numerical scheme. Results.We find that this dynamo has a high growth rate in the linear regime...

  4. Stress states and moment rates of a two-asperity fault in the presence of viscoelastic relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dragoni

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A fault containing two asperities with different strengths is considered. The fault is embedded in a viscoelastic shear zone, subject to a constant strain rate by the motions of adjacent tectonic plates. The fault is modelled as a discrete dynamical system where the average values of stress, friction and slip on each asperity are considered. The state of the fault is described by three variables: the slip deficits of the asperities and the viscoelastic deformation. The system has four dynamic modes, for which the analytical solutions are calculated. The relationship between the state of the fault before a seismic event and the sequence of slipping modes in the event is enlightened. Since the moment rate depends on the number and sequence of slipping modes, the knowledge of the source function of an earthquake constrains the orbit of the system in the phase space. If the source functions of a larger number of consecutive earthquakes were known, the orbit could be constrained more and more and its evolution could be predicted with a smaller uncertainty. The model is applied to the 1964 Alaska earthquake, which was the effect of the failure of two asperities and for which a remarkable postseismic relaxation has been observed in the subsequent decades. The evolution of the system after the 1964 event depends on the state from which the event was originated, that is constrained by the observed moment rate. The possible durations of the interseismic interval and the possible moment rates of the next earthquake are calculated as functions of the initial state.

  5. Structural and magnetic conformation of a cerocene [Ce(COT'')2]- exhibiting a uniconfigurational f1 ground state and slow-magnetic relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roy, Jennifer J; Korobkov, Ilia; Kim, Jee Eon; Schelter, Eric J; Murugesu, Muralee

    2014-02-21

    Magnet-like behaviour, in the form of slow relaxation of the magnetization, was observed for a monometallic cerium(III) sandwich complex. The use of trimethylsilyl substituted COT ligands (COT'') led to the formation of a staggered COT'' arrangement in the cerocene-type sandwich complex with a well-defined oxidation state of +3 for the Ce ion.

  6. MHD stability limits in the TCV Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimerdes, H. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2001-07-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities can limit the performance and degrade the confinement of tokamak plasmas. The Tokamak a Configuration Variable (TCV), unique for its capability to produce a variety of poloidal plasma shapes, has been used to analyse various instabilities and compare their behaviour with theoretical predictions. These instabilities are perturbations of the magnetic field, which usually extend to the plasma edge where they can be detected with magnetic pick-up coils as magnetic fluctuations. A spatially dense set of magnetic probes, installed inside the TCV vacuum vessel, allows for a fast observation of these fluctuations. The structure and temporal evolution of coherent modes is extracted using several numerical methods. In addition to the setup of the magnetic diagnostic and the implementation of analysis methods, the subject matter of this thesis focuses on four instabilities, which impose local and global stability limits. All of these instabilities are relevant for the operation of a fusion reactor and a profound understanding of their behaviour is required in order to optimise the performance of such a reactor. Sawteeth, which are central relaxation oscillations common to most standard tokamak scenarios, have a significant effect on central plasma parameters. In TCV, systematic scans of the plasma shape have revealed a strong dependence of their behaviour on elongation {kappa} and triangularity {delta}, with high {kappa}, and low {delta} leading to shorter sawteeth with smaller crashes. This shape dependence is increased by applying central electron cyclotron heating. The response to additional heating power is determined by the role of ideal or resistive MHD in triggering the sawtooth crash. For plasma shapes where additional heating and consequently, a faster increase of the central pressure shortens the sawteeth, the low experimental limit of the pressure gradient within the q = 1 surface is consistent with ideal MHD predictions. The

  7. DEVICE FOR MEASURMENT OF RELAXATION TIME OF THE BLEACHED STATE OF OPTICAL MATERIALS BY THE «PUMP-PROBE» METHOD IN SUB-ΜS TIME DOMAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Glazunov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of passive shutters to control the duration of the light pulses is an important aspect in the miniature and microchip lasers. One of the key spectroscopic characteristics which determine the properties of the material, which can be used as a passive shutter is relaxation time of its bleached state.We describe a device for determination of relaxation time of the bleached state in optical materials by the «pump-probe» method in the sub-μs time domain. This device allows one to determine relaxation times for materials which absorb at the light wavelength of 1.5 μm, e.g., materials doped with cobalt ions Co2+. The results of test examinations of the device are described, and the relaxation time of the bleached state of Co2+ ions is measured for a novel material – transparent glass-ceramics with Co2+:Ga2 O3 nanophase – amounting to 190 ± 6 ns. 

  8. MYBPC3 mutations are associated with a reduced super-relaxed state in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, James W; Li, Amy; Lal, Sean; Bos, J Martijn; Harris, Samantha P; van der Velden, Jolanda; Ackerman, Michael J; Cooke, Roger; Dos Remedios, Cristobal G

    2017-01-01

    The "super-relaxed state" (SRX) of myosin represents a 'reserve' of motors in the heart. Myosin heads in the SRX are bound to the thick filament and have a very low ATPase rate. Changes in the SRX are likely to modulate cardiac contractility. We previously demonstrated that the SRX is significantly reduced in mouse cardiomyocytes lacking cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C). Here, we report the effect of mutations in the cMyBP-C gene (MYBPC3) using samples from human patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Left ventricular (LV) samples from 11 HCM patients were obtained following myectomy surgery to relieve LV outflow tract obstruction. HCM samples were genotyped as either MYBPC3 mutation positive (MYBPC3mut) or negative (HCMsmn) and were compared to eight non-failing donor hearts. Compared to donors, only MYBPC3mut samples display a significantly diminished SRX, characterised by a decrease in both the number of myosin heads in the SRX and the lifetime of ATP turnover. These changes were not observed in HCMsmn samples. There was a positive correlation (p requirements, a reduced SRX may be an important disease mechanism in patients with MYBPC3 mutations.

  9. Analysis of amorphous solid dispersions using 2D solid-state NMR and (1)H T(1) relaxation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tran N; Watson, Simon A; Edwards, Andrew J; Chavda, Manisha; Clawson, Jacalyn S; Strohmeier, Mark; Vogt, Frederick G

    2010-10-04

    Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) can provide detailed structural information about amorphous solid dispersions of pharmaceutical small molecules. In this study, the ability of SSNMR experiments based on dipolar correlation, spin diffusion, and relaxation measurements to characterize the structure of solid dispersions is explored. Observation of spin diffusion effects using the 2D (1)H-(13)C cross-polarization heteronuclear correlation (CP-HETCOR) experiment is shown to be a useful probe of association between the amorphous drug and polymer that is capable of directly proving glass solution formation. Dispersions of acetaminophen and indomethacin in different polymers are examined using this approach, as well as (1)H double-quantum correlation experiments to probe additional structural features. (1)H-(19)F CP-HETCOR serves a similar role for fluorinated drug molecules such as diflunisal in dispersions, providing a rapid means to prove the formation of a glass solution. Phase separation is detected using (13)C, (19)F, and (23)Na-detected (1)H T(1) experiments in crystalline and amorphous solid dispersions that contain small domains. (1)H T(1) measurements of amorphous nanosuspensions of trehalose and dextran illustrate the ability of SSNMR to detect domain size effects in dispersions that are not glass solutions via spin diffusion effects. Two previously unreported amorphous solid dispersions involving up to three components and containing voriconazole and telithromycin are analyzed using these experiments to demonstrate the general applicability of the approach.

  10. Perturbations and quantum relaxation

    CERN Document Server

    Kandhadai, Adithya

    2016-01-01

    We investigate whether small perturbations can cause relaxation to quantum equilibrium over very long timescales. We consider in particular a two-dimensional harmonic oscillator, which can serve as a model of a field mode on expanding space. We assume an initial wave function with small perturbations to the ground state. We present evidence that the trajectories are highly confined so as to preclude relaxation to equilibrium even over very long timescales. Cosmological implications are briefly discussed.

  11. MHD Stability Analysis and Flow Controls of Liquid Metal Free Surface Film Flows as Fusion Reactor PFCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiujie; Pan, Chuanjie; Xu, Zengyu

    2016-12-01

    Numerical and experimental investigation results on the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) film flows along flat and curved bottom surfaces are summarized in this study. A simplified modeling has been developed to study the liquid metal MHD film state, which has been validated by the existing experimental results. Numerical results on how the inlet velocity (V), the chute width (W) and the inlet film thickness (d0) affect the MHD film flow state are obtained. MHD stability analysis results are also provided in this study. The results show that strong magnetic fields make the stable V decrease several times compared to the case with no magnetic field, especially small radial magnetic fields (Bn) will have a significant impact on the MHD film flow state. Based on the above numerical and MHD stability analysis results flow control methods are proposed for flat and curved MHD film flows. For curved film flow we firstly proposed a new multi-layers MHD film flow system with a solid metal mesh to get the stable MHD film flows along the curved bottom surface. Experiments on flat and curved MHD film flows are also carried out and some firstly observed results are achieved. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2014GB125003 and 2013GB114002), National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11105044)

  12. MHD equilibrium of toroidal fusion plasma with stationary flows; Rownowaga MHD toroidalnej plazmy termojadrowej z przeplywami

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galkowski, A. [Institute of Atomic Energy, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    Non-linear ideal MHD equilibria in axisymmetric system with flows are examined, both in 1st and 2nd ellipticity regions. Evidence of the bifurcation of solutions is provided and numerical solutions of several problems in a tokamak geometry are given, exhibiting bifurcation phenomena. Relaxation of plasma in the presence of zero-order flows is studied in a realistic toroidal geometry. The field aligned flow allows equilibria with finite pressure gradient but with homogeneous temperature distribution. Numerical calculations have been performed for the 1st and 2nd ellipticity regimes of the extended Grad-Shafranov-Schlueter equation. Numerical technique, alternative to the well-known Grad`s ADM methods has been proposed to deal with slow adiabatic evolution of toroidal plasma with flows. The equilibrium problem with prescribed adiabatic constraints may be solved by simultaneous calculations of flux surface geometry and original profile functions. (author). 178 refs, 37 figs, 5 tabs.

  13. Results from a large-scale MHD propulsion experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrick, M.; Libera, J.; Bouillard, J. X.; Pierson, E. S.; Hill, D.

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) thrusters have long been recognized as potentially attractive candidates for ship propulsion because such systems eliminate the conventional rotating drive components. The MHD thruster is essentially an electromagnetic (EM) pump operating in seawater. An electrical current is passed directly through the seawater and interacts with an applied magnetic field; the interaction of the magnetic field and the electrode current in the seawater results in a Lorentz force acting on the water, and the reaction to this force propels the vessel forward. The concept of EM propulsion has been examined periodically during the past 35 years as an alternative method of propulsion for surface ships and submersibles. The conclusions reached in early studies were that MHD thrusters restricted to fields of 2 T (the state-of-the-art at that time) were impractical and very inefficient. With the evolution of superconducting magnet technology, later studies investigated the performance of MHD thrusters with much higher magnetic field strengths and concluded that at higher fields (greater than 6-T) practical MHD propulsion systems appear possible. The feasibility of attaining the requisite higher magnetic fields has increased markedly because of rapid advances in building high-field superconducting magnets and the recent evolution of high-temperature superconductors.

  14. Quasiparticle spin relaxation with superconducting velocity-tunable state in GaAs(100) quantum wells in proximity to s -wave superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, T.; Wu, M. W.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the quasiparticle spin relaxation with superconducting-velocity-tunable state in GaAs (100) quantum wells in proximity to an s -wave superconductor. We first present the influence of the supercurrent on the quasiparticle state in GaAs (100) quantum wells, which can be tuned by the superconducting velocity. Rich features such as the suppressed Cooper pairings, large quasiparticle density and nonmonotonically tunable momentum current can be realized by varying the superconducting velocity. In the degenerate regime, the quasiparticle Fermi surface is composed by two arcs, referred to as Fermi arcs, which are contributed by the electron- and holelike branches. The D'yakonov-Perel' spin relaxation is then explored, and intriguing physics is revealed when the Fermi arc emerges. Specifically, when the order parameter tends to zero, it is found that the branch-mixing scattering is forbidden in the quasielectron band. When the condensation process associated with the annihilation of the quasielectron and quasihole is slow, this indicates that the electron- and holelike Fermi arcs in the quasielectron band are independent. The open structure of the Fermi arc leads to the nonzero angular average of the effective magnetic field due to the spin-orbit coupling, which acts as an effective Zeeman field. This Zeeman field leads to spin oscillations even in the strong-scattering regime. Moreover, in the strong-scattering regime, we show that the open structure of the Fermi arc also leads to the insensitiveness of the spin relaxation to the momentum scattering, in contrast to the conventional motional narrowing situation. Nevertheless, with a finite order parameter, the branch-mixing scattering can be triggered, opening the interbranch spin relaxation channel, which is dominant in the strong-scattering regime. In contrast to the situation with an extremely small order parameter, due to the interbranch channel, the spin oscillations vanish and the spin relaxation

  15. Problems in nonlinear resistive MHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turnbull, A.D.; Strait, E.J.; La Haye, R.J.; Chu, M.S.; Miller, R.L. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Two experimentally relevant problems can relatively easily be tackled by nonlinear MHD codes. Both problems require plasma rotation in addition to the nonlinear mode coupling and full geometry already incorporated into the codes, but no additional physics seems to be crucial. These problems discussed here are: (1) nonlinear coupling and interaction of multiple MHD modes near the B limit and (2) nonlinear coupling of the m/n = 1/1 sawtooth mode with higher n gongs and development of seed islands outside q = 1.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) channel corner seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurrier, Francis R.

    1980-01-01

    A corner seal for an MHD duct includes a compressible portion which contacts the duct walls and an insulating portion which contacts the electrodes, sidewall bars and insulators. The compressible portion may be a pneumatic or hydraulic gasket or an open-cell foam rubber. The insulating portion is segmented into a plurality of pieces of the same thickness as the electrodes, insulators and sidewall bars and aligned therewith, the pieces aligned with the insulator being of a different size from the pieces aligned with the electrodes and sidewall bars to create a stepped configuration along the corners of the MHD channel.

  17. Theory of Metastable State Relaxation in a Gravitational Field for Non-Critical Binary Systems with Non-Conserved Order Parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmailov, Alexander F.; Myerson, Allan S.

    1993-01-01

    A new mathematical ansatz is developed for solution of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau nonlinear partial differential equation describing metastable state relaxation in binary (solute+solvent) non-critical solutions with non-conserved scalar order parameter in presence of a gravitational field. It has been demonstrated analytically that in such systems metastability initiates heterogeneous solute redistribution which results in the formation of a non-equilibrium singly-periodic spatial solute structure in the new solute-rich phase. The critical radius of nucleation and the induction time in these systems are gravity-dependent. It has also been proved that metastable state relaxation in vertical columns of supersaturated non-critical binary solutions leads to formation of the solute concentration gradient. Analytical expression for this concentration gradient is found and analysed. It is concluded that gravity can initiate phase separation (nucleation or spinodal decomposition).

  18. Ultrafast relaxation kinetics of the dark S{sub 1} state in all-trans-{beta}-carotene explored by one- and two-photon pump-probe spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosumi, Daisuke, E-mail: kosumi@sci.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aramaki-Aza-Aoba, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Abe, Kenta; Karasawa, Hiroshi [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aramaki-Aza-Aoba, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Fujiwara, Masazumi [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Cogdell, Richard J. [Glasgow Biomedical Research Center, University of Glasgow, 120 University Place, Glasgow G12 8TA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Hashimoto, Hideki [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); JST/CREST, 4-1-8 Hon-chou, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Yoshizawa, Masayuki [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aramaki-Aza-Aoba, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); JST/CREST, 4-1-8 Hon-chou, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2010-07-19

    Femtosecond one- and two-photon pump-probe dispersive spectroscopic measurements have been applied to the investigation of the vibrational relaxation kinetics of the dark S{sub 1} (2{sup 1}A{sub g}{sup -}) state in {beta}-carotene, combining a higher sensitive detection system with tunable visible and infrared excitation pulses. The two-photon excitation measurements enable the preferential detection of the dark S{sub 1} state. The tunable infrared excitation pulses allowed selective excitation to a different vibrational level of S{sub 1}. The S{sub 1} dynamics at early delay times depend strongly on excitation energy. A dependence of the initial S{sub 1} dynamics on excitation energy is discussed in term of the vibrational relaxation of S{sub 1}.

  19. CF3 Rotation in 3-(Trifluoromethyl)phenanthrene: Solid State 19F and 1H NMR relaxation and Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Peter A; Rosenberg, Jessie; Nordstrom, Kerstin; Mallory, Clelia W; Mallory, Frank B

    2006-03-23

    We have observed and modeled the 1H and 19F solid-state nuclear spin relaxation process in polycrystalline 3-(trifluoromethyl)phenanthrene. The relaxation rates for the two spin species were observed from 85 to 300 K at the low NMR frequencies of omega/2pi = 22.5 and 53.0 MHz where CF3 rotation, characterized by a mean time tau between hops, is the only motion on the NMR time scale. All motional time scales (omegatau 1) are observed. The 1H spins are immobile on the NMR time scale but are coupled to the 19F spins via the unlike-spin dipole-dipole interaction. The temperature dependence of the observed relaxation rates (the relaxation is biexponential) shows considerable structure and a thorough analysis of Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield theory for this coupled spin system is provided. The activation energy for CF3 rotation is 11.5 +/- 0.7 kJ/mol, in excellent agreement with the calculation in a 13-molecule cluster provided in the companion paper where the crystal structure is reported and detailed ab initio electronic structure calculations are performed [Wang, X.; Mallory F. B.; Mallory, C. W; Beckmann, P. A.; Rheingold, A. L.; Francl, M. M J. Phys. Chem. A 2006, 110, 3954].

  20. Beltrami state in black-hole accretion disk: A magnetofluid approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Chinmoy; Das, Rupam; Stark, David J; Mahajan, S M

    2015-12-01

    Using the magnetofluid unification framework, we show that the accretion disk plasma (embedded in the background geometry of a black hole) can relax to a class of states known as the Beltrami-Bernoulli (BB) equilibria. Modeling the disk plasma as a Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) system, we find that the space-time curvature can significantly alter the magnetic (velocity) decay rates as we move away from the compact object; the velocity profiles in BB states, for example, deviate substantially from the predicted corresponding geodesic velocity profiles. These departures imply a rich interplay of plasma dynamics and general relativity revealed by examining the corresponding Bernoulli condition representing "homogeneity" of total energy. The relaxed states have their origin in the constraints provided by the two helicity invariants of Hall MHD. These helicities conspire to introduce an oscillatory length scale into the system that is strongly influenced by relativistic and thermal effects.

  1. Beltrami state in black-hole accretion disk: A magnetofluid approach

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharjee, Chinmoy; Stark, David J; Mahajan, S M

    2015-01-01

    Using the magnetofluid unification framework, we show that the accretion disk plasma (embedded in the background geometry of a blackhole) can relax to a class of states known as the Beltrami-Bernoulli (BB) equilibria. Modeling the disk plasma as a Hall MHD system, we find that the space-time curvature can significantly alter the magnetic/velocity decay rate as we move away from the compact object; the velocity profiles in BB states, for example, deviate substantially from the predicted corresponding geodesic velocity profiles. These departures imply a rich interplay of plasma dynamics and general relativity revealed by examining the corresponding Bernoulli condition representing "homogeneity" of total energy. The relaxed states have their origin in the constraints provided by the two helicity invariants of Hall MHD. These helicities conspire to introduce a new oscillatory length scale into the system that is strongly influenced by relativistic and thermal effects.

  2. Increasing the effective energy barrier promoted by the change of a counteranion in a Zn-Dy-Zn SMM: slow relaxation via the second excited state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzabal, I; Ruiz, J; Ruiz, E; Aravena, D; Seco, J M; Colacio, E

    2015-08-11

    The trinuclear complex [ZnCl(μ-L)Dy(μ-L)ClZn]PF6 exhibits a single-molecule magnetic behaviour under zero field with a relatively large effective energy barrier of 186 cm(-1). Ab initio calculations reveal that the relaxation of the magnetization is symmetry-driven (the Dy(III) ion possesses a C2 symmetry) and occurs via the second excited state.

  3. Dielectric controlled excited state relaxation pathways of a representative push-pull stilbene: a mechanistic study using femtosecond fluorescence up-conversion technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Shahnawaz; Sen, Pratik

    2013-02-28

    Femtosecond fluorescence up-conversion technique was employed to reinvestigate the intriguing dependence of fluorescence quantum yield of trans-4-dimethylamino-4(')-nitrostilbene (DNS) on dielectric properties of the media. In polar solvents, such as methanol and acetonitrile, the two time components of the fluorescence transients were assigned to intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) dynamics and to the depletion of the ICT state to the ground state via internal conversion along the torsional coordinate of nitro moiety. The viscosity independence of the first time component indicates the absence of any torsional coordinate in the charge transfer process. In slightly polar solvent (carbon tetrachloride) the fluorescence transients show a triple exponential behavior. The first time component was assigned to the formation of the ICT state on a 2 ps time scale. Second time component was assigned to the relaxation of the ICT state via two torsion controlled channels. First channel involves the torsional motion about the central double bond leading to the trans-cis isomerization via a conical intersection or avoided crossing. The other channel contributing to the depopulation of ICT state involves the torsional coordinates of dimethylanilino and∕or nitrophenyl moieties and leads to the formation of a conformationally relaxed state, which subsequently relaxes back to the ground state radiatively, and is responsible for the high fluorescence quantum yield of DNS in slightly polar solvents such as carbon tetrachloride, toluene, etc. The excited singlet state which is having a dominant π-π∗ character may also decay via intersystem crossing to the n-π∗ triplet manifold and thus accounts for the observed triplet yield of the molecule in slightly polar solvents.

  4. Simulated annealing for three-dimensional low-beta reduced MHD equilibria in cylindrical geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Furukawa, M

    2016-01-01

    Simulated annealing (SA) is applied for three-dimensional (3D) equilibrium calculation of ideal, low-beta reduced MHD in cylindrical geometry. The SA is based on the theory of Hamiltonian mechanics. The dynamical equation of the original system, low-beta reduced MHD in this study, is modified so that the energy changes monotonically while preserving the Casimir invariants in the artificial dynamics. An equilibrium of the system is given by an extremum of the energy, therefore SA can be used as a method for calculating ideal MHD equilibrium. Previous studies demonstrated that the SA succeeds to lead to various MHD equilibria in two dimensional rectangular domain. In this paper, the theory is applied to 3D equilibrium of ideal, low-beta reduced MHD. An example of equilibrium with magnetic islands, obtained as a lower energy state, is shown. Several versions of the artificial dynamics are developed that can effect smoothing.

  5. Solid State NMR Study of Polystyrene Nanolatex Particles(I) 13C Spin-Lattice Relaxation Time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    13C spin-lattice relaxtion times for polystyrene nanolatex particles have been investigated. It was found that the dramatic increase at 80℃ annealing temperature is well below the Tg temperature of bulk polystyrene, the increase of relaxation time of aromatic carbons is larger than that of for aliphatic carbons at transition annealing temperature.

  6. High-Resolution Audio with Inaudible High-Frequency Components Induces a Relaxed Attentional State without Conscious Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuribayashi, Ryuma; Nittono, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    sound sources in which such components are artificially cut off, suggesting that high-resolution audio with inaudible high-frequency components induces a relaxed attentional state without conscious awareness. PMID:28203213

  7. High-Resolution Audio with Inaudible High-Frequency Components Induces a Relaxed Attentional State without Conscious Awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuribayashi, Ryuma; Nittono, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    sources in which such components are artificially cut off, suggesting that high-resolution audio with inaudible high-frequency components induces a relaxed attentional state without conscious awareness.

  8. Measurement of carbonyl chemical shifts of excited protein states by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy: comparison between uniformly and selectively {sup 13}C labeled samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundstroem, Patrik; Hansen, D. Flemming; Kay, Lewis E. [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Genetics (Canada)], E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca

    2008-09-15

    Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful method for quantifying chemical shifts of excited protein states. For many applications of the technique that involve the measurement of relaxation rates of carbon magnetization it is necessary to prepare samples with isolated {sup 13}C spins so that experiments do not suffer from magnetization transfer between coupled carbon spins that would otherwise occur during the CPMG pulse train. In the case of {sup 13}CO experiments however the large separation between {sup 13}CO and {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts offers hope that robust {sup 13}CO dispersion profiles can be recorded on uniformly {sup 13}C labeled samples, leading to the extraction of accurate {sup 13}CO chemical shifts of the invisible, excited state. Here we compare such chemical shifts recorded on samples that are selectively labeled, prepared using [1-{sup 13}C]-pyruvate and NaH{sup 13}CO{sub 3,} or uniformly labeled, generated from {sup 13}C-glucose. Very similar {sup 13}CO chemical shifts are obtained from analysis of CPMG experiments recorded on both samples, and comparison with chemical shifts measured using a second approach establishes that the shifts measured from relaxation dispersion are very accurate.

  9. Optical Nuclear Polarization in the Excited State Through Cross-Relaxation and Its Use in the Study of the Carbon-13 Hyperfine Coupling in the Lowest Triplet State of 1-13C-p-Benzoquinone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lichtenbelt, Jan H.; Fremeijer, Jan G.F.M.; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    1976-01-01

    In this paper the phenomenon of optical nuclear polarization in the excited state through cross-relaxation is described. It is shown that when the populating and depopulating rates of the triplet spin sublevels are known the absolute nuclear polarizations can be calculated and that optical detection

  10. MHD control in burning plasmas MHD control in burning plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donné, Tony; Liang, Yunfeng

    2012-07-01

    Fusion physics focuses on the complex behaviour of hot plasmas confined by magnetic fields with the ultimate aim to develop a fusion power plant. In the future generation of tokamaks like ITER, the power generated by the fusion reactions substantially exceeds the external input power (Pfusion}/Pin >= 10). When this occurs one speaks of a burning plasma. Twenty per cent of the generated fusion power in a burning plasma is carried by the charged alpha particles, which transfer their energy to the ambient plasma in collisions, a process called thermalization. A new phenomenon in burning plasmas is that the alpha particles, which form a minority but carry a large fraction of the plasma kinetic energy, can collectively drive certain types of magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) modes, while they can suppress other MHD modes. Both types of MHD modes can have desirable effects on the plasma, as well as be detrimental to the plasma. For example, the so-called sawtooth instability, on the one hand, is largely responsible for the transport of the thermalized alpha particles out of the core, but, on the other hand, may result in the loss of the energetic alphas before they have fully thermalized. A further undesirable effect of the sawtooth instability is that it may trigger other MHD modes such as neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs). These NTMs, in turn, are detrimental to the plasma confinement and in some cases may even lead to disruptive termination of the plasma. At the edge of the plasma, finally, so-called edge localized modes or ELMs occur, which result in extremely high transient heat and particle loads on the plasma-facing components of a reactor. In order to balance the desired and detrimental effects of these modes, active feedback control is required. An additional complication occurs in a burning plasma as the external heating power, which is nowadays generally used for plasma control, is small compared to the heating power of the alpha particles. The scientific challenge

  11. A helically distorted MHD flux rope model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, Michael L.; Montgomery, David

    1990-01-01

    A flux rope model is proposed which has a variable degree of helical distortion from axisymmetry. The basis for this suggestion is a series of numerical and analytical investigations of magnetohydrodynamic states which result when an axial electric current is directed down on dc magnetic field. The helically distorted states involve a flow velocity and seem to be favored because of their lower rate of energy dissipation. Emphasis is on the magnetometer and particle energy analyzer traces that might be characteristic of such flux ropes. It is shown that even a fractionally small helical distortion may considerably alter the traces in minimum-variance coordinates. In short, what may be fairly common MHD processes can render a flux rope almost unrecognizable under standard diagnostics, even if the departures from axisymmetry are not great.

  12. Coronal heating by the partial relaxation of twisted loops

    CERN Document Server

    Bareford, Michael; Browning, Philippa

    2012-01-01

    Context: Relaxation theory offers a straightforward method for estimating the energy that is released when a magnetic field becomes unstable, as a result of continual convective driving. Aims: We present new results obtained from nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of idealised coronal loops. The purpose of this work is to determine whether or not the simulation results agree with Taylor relaxation, which will require a modified version of relaxation theory applicable to unbounded field configurations. Methods: A three-dimensional (3D) MHD Lagrangian-remap code is used to simulate the evolution of a line-tied cylindrical coronal loop model. This model comprises three concentric layers surrounded by a potential envelope; hence, being twisted locally, each loop configuration is distinguished by a piecewise-constant current profile. Initially, all configurations carry zero-net-current fields and are in ideally unstable equilibrium. The simulation results are compared with the predictions of helicity ...

  13. The dependence of the ultrafast relaxation kinetics of the S2 and S1 states in β-carotene homologs and lycopene on conjugation length studied by femtosecond time-resolved absorption and Kerr-gate fluorescence spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosumi, Daisuke; Fujiwara, Masazumi; Fujii, Ritsuko; Cogdell, Richard J.; Hashimoto, Hideki; Yoshizawa, Masayuki

    2009-06-01

    The ultrafast relaxation kinetics of all-trans-β-carotene homologs with varying numbers of conjugated double bonds n(n =7-15) and lycopene (n =11) has been investigated using femtosecond time-resolved absorption and Kerr-gate fluorescence spectroscopies, both carried out under identical excitation conditions. The nonradiative relaxation rates of the optically allowed S2(1Bu+1) state were precisely determined by the time-resolved fluorescence. The kinetics of the optically forbidden S1(2Ag-1) state were observed by the time-resolved absorption measurements. The dependence of the S1 relaxation rates upon the conjugation length is adequately described by application of the energy gap law. In contrast to this, the nonradiative relaxation rates of S2 have a minimum at n =9 and show a reverse energy gap law dependence for values of n above 11. This anomalous behavior of the S2 relaxation rates can be explained by the presence of an intermediate state (here called the Sx state) located between the S2 and S1 states at large values of n (such as n =11). The presence of such an intermediate state would then result in the following sequential relaxation pathway S2→Sx→S1→S0. A model based on conical intersections between the potential energy curves of these excited singlet states can readily explain the measured relationships between the decay rates and the energy gaps.

  14. Integral Constraints and MHD Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, T. H.

    2003-10-01

    Determining stability of a plasma in MHD equilibrium, energetically isolated by a conducting wall, requires an assumption on what governs the dynamics of the plasma. One example is the assumption that the plasma obeys ideal MHD, leading to the well known ``δ W" criteria [I. Bernstein, et al., Proc. Roy. Soc. London A244, 17 (1958)]. A radically different approach was used by Taylor [J.B. Taylor, Rev. Mod. Phys. 58, 741 (1986)] in assuming that the dynamics of the plasma is restricted only by the requirement that helicity, an integral constant associated with the plasma, is conserved. The relevancy of Taylor's assumption is supported by the agreement between resulting theoretical results and experimental observations. Another integral constraint involves the canonical angular momentum of the plasma particles. One consequence of using this constraint is that tokamak plasmas have no poloidal current in agreement with some current hole tokamak observations [T.H. Jensen, Phys. Lett. A 305, 183 (2002)].

  15. Shunting ratios for MHD flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birzvalk, Yu.

    1978-01-01

    The shunting ratio and the local shunting ratio, pertaining to currents induced by a magnetic field in a flow channel, are properly defined and systematically reviewed on the basis of the Lagrange criterion. Their definition is based on the energy balance and related to dimensionless parameters characterizing an MHD flow, these parameters evolving from the Hartmann number and the hydrodynamic Reynolds number as well as the magnetic Reynolds number, and the Lundquist number. These shunting ratios, of current density in the core of a stream (uniform) or equivalent mean current density to the short-circuit (maximum) current density, are given here for a slot channel with nonconducting or conducting walls, for a conduction channel with heavy side rails, and for an MHD-flow around bodies. 5 references, 1 figure.

  16. The effect of body-mind relaxation meditation induction on major depressive disorder: A resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fangfang; Lv, Xueyu; Fang, Jiliang; Yu, Shan; Sui, Jing; Fan, Lingzhong; Li, Tao; Hong, Yang; Wang, XiaoLing; Wang, Weidong; Jiang, Tianzi

    2015-09-01

    Meditation has been increasingly evaluated as an important complementary therapeutic tool for the treatment of depression. The present study employed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) to examine the effect of body-mind relaxation meditation induction (BMRMI) on the brain activity of depressed patients and to investigate possible mechanisms of action for this complex intervention. 21 major depressive disorder patients (MDDs) and 24 age and gender-matched healthy controls (HCs) received rs-fMRI scans at baseline and after listening to a selection of audio designed to induce body-mind relaxation meditation. The rs-fMRI data were analyzed using Matlab toolbox to obtain the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) of the BOLD signal for the whole brain. A mixed-design repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed on the whole brain to find which brain regions were affected by the BMRMI. An additional functional connectivity analysis was used to identify any atypical connection patterns after the BMRMI. After the BMRMI experience, both the MDDs and HCs showed decreased ALFF values in the bilateral frontal pole (BA10). Additionally, increased functional connectivity from the right dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) to the left dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) and the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) was identified only in the MDDs after the BMRMI. In order to exclude the impact of other events on the participants׳ brain activity, the Hamilton Rating Scales for Depression (HDRS) was not measured after the body-mind relaxation induction. Our findings support the hypothesis that body-mind relaxation meditation induction may regulate the activities of the prefrontal cortex and thus may have the potential to help patients construct reappraisal strategies that can modulate the brain activity in multiple emotion-processing systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Non-equilibrium reaction and relaxation dynamics in a strongly interacting explicit solvent: F + CD{sub 3}CN treated with a parallel multi-state EVB model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glowacki, David R., E-mail: drglowacki@gmail.com [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Department of Computer Science, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1UB (United Kingdom); PULSE Institute and Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Orr-Ewing, Andrew J. [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Harvey, Jeremy N. [Department of Chemistry, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200F, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

    2015-07-28

    We describe a parallelized linear-scaling computational framework developed to implement arbitrarily large multi-state empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) calculations within CHARMM and TINKER. Forces are obtained using the Hellmann-Feynman relationship, giving continuous gradients, and good energy conservation. Utilizing multi-dimensional Gaussian coupling elements fit to explicitly correlated coupled cluster theory, we built a 64-state MS-EVB model designed to study the F + CD{sub 3}CN → DF + CD{sub 2}CN reaction in CD{sub 3}CN solvent (recently reported in Dunning et al. [Science 347(6221), 530 (2015)]). This approach allows us to build a reactive potential energy surface whose balanced accuracy and efficiency considerably surpass what we could achieve otherwise. We ran molecular dynamics simulations to examine a range of observables which follow in the wake of the reactive event: energy deposition in the nascent reaction products, vibrational relaxation rates of excited DF in CD{sub 3}CN solvent, equilibrium power spectra of DF in CD{sub 3}CN, and time dependent spectral shifts associated with relaxation of the nascent DF. Many of our results are in good agreement with time-resolved experimental observations, providing evidence for the accuracy of our MS-EVB framework in treating both the solute and solute/solvent interactions. The simulations provide additional insight into the dynamics at sub-picosecond time scales that are difficult to resolve experimentally. In particular, the simulations show that (immediately following deuterium abstraction) the nascent DF finds itself in a non-equilibrium regime in two different respects: (1) it is highly vibrationally excited, with ∼23 kcal mol{sup −1} localized in the stretch and (2) its post-reaction solvation environment, in which it is not yet hydrogen-bonded to CD{sub 3}CN solvent molecules, is intermediate between the non-interacting gas-phase limit and the solution-phase equilibrium limit. Vibrational

  18. MHD stability limits in the TCV Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimerdes, H. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2001-07-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities can limit the performance and degrade the confinement of tokamak plasmas. The Tokamak a Configuration Variable (TCV), unique for its capability to produce a variety of poloidal plasma shapes, has been used to analyse various instabilities and compare their behaviour with theoretical predictions. These instabilities are perturbations of the magnetic field, which usually extend to the plasma edge where they can be detected with magnetic pick-up coils as magnetic fluctuations. A spatially dense set of magnetic probes, installed inside the TCV vacuum vessel, allows for a fast observation of these fluctuations. The structure and temporal evolution of coherent modes is extracted using several numerical methods. In addition to the setup of the magnetic diagnostic and the implementation of analysis methods, the subject matter of this thesis focuses on four instabilities, which impose local and global stability limits. All of these instabilities are relevant for the operation of a fusion reactor and a profound understanding of their behaviour is required in order to optimise the performance of such a reactor. Sawteeth, which are central relaxation oscillations common to most standard tokamak scenarios, have a significant effect on central plasma parameters. In TCV, systematic scans of the plasma shape have revealed a strong dependence of their behaviour on elongation {kappa} and triangularity {delta}, with high {kappa}, and low {delta} leading to shorter sawteeth with smaller crashes. This shape dependence is increased by applying central electron cyclotron heating. The response to additional heating power is determined by the role of ideal or resistive MHD in triggering the sawtooth crash. For plasma shapes where additional heating and consequently, a faster increase of the central pressure shortens the sawteeth, the low experimental limit of the pressure gradient within the q = 1 surface is consistent with ideal MHD predictions. The

  19. Relaxation processes from charge-transfer excited states of organic radical 1,3,5-trithia-2,4,6-triazapentalenyl crystals studied by ultrafast luminescence spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Youtarou; Suemoto, Tohru; Oguri, Seiji; Takeda, Jun

    2006-01-01

    The excited state dynamics of 1,3,5-trithia-2,4,6-triazapentalenyl(TTTA) was investigated by using femtosecond luminescence spectroscopy. The luminescence was measured in low and high temperature phases of TTTA between 1.42 and 1.2 eV. Only in the low temperature phase, we observed a broad luminescence band with a decay time constant of 1.6 ps in all energy range. This decay time constant suggests the existence of a large nonradiative relaxation path in the low temperature phase. Fast depolar...

  20. Initial Studies of Validation of MHD Models for MST Reversed Field Pinch Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, C. M.; Almagri, A. F.; Craig, D.; McCollam, K. J.; Reusch, J. A.; Sauppe, J. P.; Sovinec, C. R.; Triana, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative validation of visco-resistive MHD models for RFP plasmas takes advantage of MST's advanced diagnostics. These plasmas are largely governed by MHD relaxation activity, so that a broad range of validation metrics can be evaluated. Previous nonlinear simulations using the visco-resistive MHD code DEBS at Lundquist number S = 4 ×106 produced equilibrium relaxation cycles in qualitative agreement with experiment, but magnetic fluctuation amplitudes b~ were at least twice as large as in experiment. The extended-MHD code NIMROD previously suggested that a two-fluid model may be necessary to produce b~ in agreement with experiment. For best comparisons with DEBS and to keep computational expense tractable, NIMROD is run in single-fluid mode at low S. These simulations are complemented by DEBS at higher S in cylindrical geometry, which will be used to examine b~ as a function of S. Experimental measurements are used with results from these simulations to evaluate validation metrics. Convergence tests of previous high S DEBS simulations are also discussed, along with benchmarking of DEBS and NIMROD with the SPECYL and PIXIE3D codes. Work supported by U.S. DOE and NSF.

  1. MHD Shock Conditions for Accreting Plasma onto Kerr Black Holes - I

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Masaaki; Rilett, Darrell; Fukumura, Keigo; Tsuruta, Sachiko

    2002-01-01

    We extend the work by Appl and Camenzind (1988) for special relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) jets, to fully general relativistic studies of the standing shock formation for accreting MHD plasma in a rotating, stationary and axisymmetric black hole magnetosphere. All the postshock physical quantities are expressed in terms of the relativistic compression ratio, which can be obtained in terms of preshock quantities. Then, the downstream state of a shocked plasma is determined by the upstr...

  2. Quantifying two-bond 1HN-13CO and one-bond 1H(alpha)-13C(alpha) dipolar couplings of invisible protein states by spin-state selective relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, D Flemming; Vallurupalli, Pramodh; Kay, Lewis E

    2008-07-02

    Relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy has become a valuable probe of millisecond dynamic processes in biomolecules that exchange between a ground (observable) state and one or more excited (invisible) conformers, in part because chemical shifts of the excited state(s) can be obtained that provide insight into the conformations that are sampled. Here we present a pair of experiments that provide additional structural information in the form of residual dipolar couplings of the excited state. The new experiments record (1)H spin-state selective (13)CO and (13)C(alpha) dispersion profiles under conditions of partial alignment in a magnetic field from which two-bond (1)HN-(13)CO and one-bond (1)H(alpha)-(13)C(alpha) residual dipolar couplings of the invisible conformer can be extracted. These new dipolar couplings complement orientational restraints that are provided through measurement of (1)HN-(15)N residual dipolar couplings and changes in (13)CO chemical shifts upon alignment that have been measured previously for the excited-state since the interactions probed here are not collinear with those previously investigated. An application to a protein-ligand binding reaction is presented, and the accuracies of the extracted excited-state dipolar couplings are established. A combination of residual dipolar couplings and chemical shifts as measured by relaxation dispersion will facilitate a quantitative description of excited protein states.

  3. Seismic Halos Around Active Regions: An MHD Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hanasoge, Shravan M

    2007-01-01

    Comprehending the manner in which magnetic fields affect propagating waves is a first step toward the helioseismic construction of accurate models of active region sub-surface structure and dynamics. Here, we present a numerical method to compute the linear interaction of waves with magnetic fields embedded in a solar-like stratified background. The ideal Magneto-Hydrodynamic (MHD) equations are solved in a 3-dimensional box that straddles the solar photosphere, extending from 35 Mm within to 1.2 Mm into the atmosphere. One of the challenges in performing these simulations involves generating a Magneto-Hydro-Static (MHS) state wherein the stratification assumes horizontal inhomogeneity in addition to the strong vertical stratification associated with the near-surface layers. Keeping in mind that the aim of this effort is to understand and characterize linear MHD interactions, we discuss a means of computing statically consistent background states. Results from a simulation of waves interacting with a flux tub...

  4. Ligand manipulation of charge transfer excited state relaxation and spin crossover in [Fe(2,2′-bipyridine)2(CN)2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjær, Kasper S.; Zhang, Wenkai; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Bergmann, Uwe; Chollet, Matthieu; Hadt, Ryan G.; Hartsock, Robert W.; Harlang, Tobias; Kroll, Thomas; Kubiček, Katharina; Lemke, Henrik T.; Liang, Huiyang W.; Liu, Yizhu; Nielsen, Martin M.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Solomon, Edward I.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; van Driel, Tim B.; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Zhu, Diling; Persson, Petter; Wärnmark, Kenneth; Sundström, Villy; Gaffney, Kelly J.

    2017-01-01

    We have used femtosecond resolution UV-visible and Kβ x-ray emission spectroscopy to characterize the electronic excited state dynamics of [Fe(bpy)2(CN)2], where bpy=2,2′-bipyridine, initiated by metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excitation. The excited-state absorption in the transient UV-visible spectra, associated with the 2,2′-bipyridine radical anion, provides a robust marker for the MLCT excited state, while the transient Kβ x-ray emission spectra provide a clear measure of intermediate and high spin metal-centered excited states. From these measurements, we conclude that the MLCT state of [Fe(bpy)2(CN)2] undergoes ultrafast spin crossover to a metal-centered quintet excited state through a short lived metal-centered triplet transient species. These measurements of [Fe(bpy)2(CN)2] complement prior measurement performed on [Fe(bpy)3]2+ and [Fe(bpy)(CN)4]2− in dimethylsulfoxide solution and help complete the chemical series [Fe(bpy)N(CN)6–2N]2N-4, where N = 1–3. The measurements confirm that simple ligand modifications can significantly change the relaxation pathways and excited state lifetimes and support the further investigation of light harvesting and photocatalytic applications of 3d transition metal complexes. PMID:28653021

  5. MHD Driving of Relativistic Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arieh Königl

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Paulatinamente se ha ido reconociendo que los campos magnéticos juegan un papel dominante en la producción y colimación de chorros astrofísicos. Demostramos aquí, usando soluciones semianalíticas exactas para las ecuaciones de MHD ideal en relatividad especial, que un disco de acreción altamente magnetizado (con un campo magnético principalmente poloidal o azimutal alrededor de un agujero negro es capaz de acelerar un flujo de protones y electrones a los factores de Lorentz y energías cinéticas asociadas a fuentes de destellos de rayos gama y nucleos activos de galaxias. También se discuten las contribuciones a la aceleración provenientes de efectos térmicos (por presión de radiación y pares electrón-positrón y de MHD no ideal. Notamos que la aceleración por MHD se caracteriza por ser extendida espacialmente, y esta propiedad se manifesta más claramente en flujos relativistas. Las indicaciones observacionales de que la aceleración de movimientos superlumínicos en chorros de radio ocurre sobre escalas mucho más grandes que las del agujero negro propiamente, apoyan la idea de que la producción de chorros es principalmente un fenómeno magnético. Presentamos resultados preliminares de un modelo global que puede utilizarse para probar esta interpretación.

  6. A three dimensional MHD model of the earth's magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C. C.; Walker, R. J.; Dawson, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a global MHD calculation of the steady state solar wind interaction with a dipole magnetic field are presented. The computer code used, being much faster than previous codes, makes it possible to increase the number of grid points in the system by an order of magnitude. The resulting model qualitatively reproduces many of the observed features of the quiet time magnetosphere including the bow shock, magnetopause, and plasma sheet.

  7. Global MHD model of the earth's magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    A global MHD model of the earth's magnetosphere is defined. An introduction to numerical methods for solving the MHD equations is given with emphasis on the shock-capturing technique. Finally, results concerning the shape of the magnetosphere and the plasma flows inside the magnetosphere are presented.

  8. MHD Turbulence, Turbulent Dynamo and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Beresnyak, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    MHD Turbulence is common in many space physics and astrophysics environments. We first discuss the properties of incompressible MHD turbulence. A well-conductive fluid amplifies initial magnetic fields in a process called small-scale dynamo. Below equipartition scale for kinetic and magnetic energies the spectrum is steep (Kolmogorov -5/3) and is represented by critically balanced strong MHD turbulence. In this paper we report the basic reasoning behind universal nonlinear small-scale dynamo and the inertial range of MHD turbulence. We measured the efficiency of the small-scale dynamo $C_E=0.05$, Kolmogorov constant $C_K=4.2$ and anisotropy constant $C_A=0.63$ for MHD turbulence in high-resolution direct numerical simulations. We also discuss so-called imbalanced or cross-helical MHD turbulence which is relevant for in many objects, most prominently in the solar wind. We show that properties of incompressible MHD turbulence are similar to the properties of Alfv\\'enic part of MHD cascade in compressible turbul...

  9. Feasibility of MHD submarine propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doss, E.D. (ed.) (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Sikes, W.C. (ed.) (Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., VA (United States))

    1992-09-01

    This report describes the work performed during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the collaborative research program established between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company (NNS). Phase I of the program focused on the development of computer models for Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion. Phase 2 focused on the experimental validation of the thruster performance models and the identification, through testing, of any phenomena which may impact the attractiveness of this propulsion system for shipboard applications. The report discusses in detail the work performed in Phase 2 of the program. In Phase 2, a two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented. The test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to computer model predictions. In general, the results of the tests and their comparison with the predictions indicate that thephenomena affecting the performance of MHD seawater thrusters are well understood and can be accurately predicted with the developed thruster computer models.

  10. Electron MHD: dynamics and turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2013-01-01

    (Abridged) We consider dynamics and turbulent interaction of whistler modes within the framework of inertialess electron MHD (EMHD). We argue there is no energy principle in EMHD: any stationary closed configuration is neutrally stable. We consider the turbulent cascade of whistler modes. We show that (i) harmonic whistlers are exact non-linear solutions; (ii) co-linear whistlers do not interact (including counter-propagating); (iii) waves with the same value of the wave vector, $k_1=k_2$, do not interact; (iv) whistler modes have a dispersion that allows a three-wave decay, including into a zero frequency mode; (v) the three-wave interaction effectively couples modes with highly different wave numbers and propagation angles. In addition, linear interaction of a whistler with a single zero-mode can lead to spatially divergent structures via parametric instability. All these properties are drastically different from MHD, so that the qualitative properties of the Alfven turbulence cannot be transferred to the E...

  11. ¹³C solid-state NMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in solid drug formulations Part II: CP kinetics and relaxation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Zielińska-Pisklak, Monika; Szeleszczuk, Łukasz; Wawer, Iwona

    2016-04-15

    Excipients used in the solid drug formulations differ in their NMR relaxation and (13)C cross-polarization (CP) kinetics parameters. Therefore, experimental parameters like contact time of cross-polarization and repetition time have a major impact on the registered solid state NMR spectra and in consequence on the results of the NMR analysis. In this work the CP kinetics and relaxation of the most common pharmaceutical excipients: anhydrous α-lactose, α-lactose monohydrate, mannitol, sucrose, sorbitol, sodium starch glycolate type A and B, starch of different origin, microcrystalline cellulose, hypromellose, ethylcellulose, methylcellulose, hydroxyethylcellulose, sodium alginate, magnesium stearate, sodium laurilsulfate and Kollidon(®) were analyzed. The studied excipients differ significantly in their optimum repetition time (from 5 s to 1200 s) and T(1ρ)(I) parameters (from 2 ms to 73 ms). The practical use of those differences in the excipients composition analysis was demonstrated on the example of commercially available tablets containing indapamide as an API. The information presented in this article will help to choose the correct acquisition parameters and also will save the time and effort needed for their optimization in the NMR analysis of the solid drug formulations.

  12. Excited State Studies of Polyacenes Using the All-Order Constricted Variational Density Functional Theory with Orbital Relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senn, Florian; Krykunov, Mykhaylo

    2015-10-22

    For the polyacenes series from naphthalene to hexacene, we present the vertical singlet excitation energies 1 (1)La and 1 (1)Lb, as well as the first triplet excitation energies obtained by the all-order constricted variational density functional theory with orbital relaxation (R-CV(∞)-DFT). R-CV(∞)-DFT is a further development of variational density functional theory (CV(∞)-DFT), which has already been successfully applied for the calculation of the vertical singlet excitation energies (1)La and (1)Lb for polyacenes,15 and we show that one obtains consistent excitation energies using the local density approximation as a functional for singlet as well as for triplet excitations when going beyond the linear response theory. Furthermore, we apply self-consistent field density functional theory (ΔSCF-DFT) and compare the obtained excitation energies for the first triplet excitations T1, where, due to the character of the transition, ΔSCF-DFT and R-CV(∞)-DFT become numerically equivalent, and for the singlet excitations 1 (1)La and 1 (1)Lb, where the two methods differ.

  13. Negative magnetic relaxation in superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnoperov E.P.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It was observed that the trapped magnetic moment of HTS tablets or annuli increases in time (negative relaxation if they are not completely magnetized by a pulsed magnetic field. It is shown, in the framework of the Bean critical-state model, that the radial temperature gradient appearing in tablets or annuli during a pulsed field magnetization can explain the negative magnetic relaxation in the superconductor.

  14. Synchrotron radiation of self-collimating relativistic MHD jets

    CERN Document Server

    Porth, Oliver; Meliani, Zakaria; Vaidya, Bhargav

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to derive signatures of synchrotron radiation from state-of-the-art simulation models of collimating relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) jets featuring a large-scale helical magnetic field. We perform axisymmetric special relativistic MHD simulations of the jet acceleration region using the PLUTO code. The computational domain extends from the slow magnetosonic launching surface of the disk up to 6000^2 Schwarzschild radii allowing to reach highly relativistic Lorentz factors. The Poynting dominated disk wind develops into a jet with Lorentz factors of 8 and is collimated to 1 degree. In addition to the disk jet, we evolve a thermally driven spine jet, emanating from a hypothetical black hole corona. Solving the linearly polarized synchrotron radiation transport within the jet, we derive VLBI radio and (sub-) mm diagnostics such as core shift, polarization structure, intensity maps, spectra and Faraday rotation measure (RM), directly from the Stokes parameters. We also investigate...

  15. Kinetic Actviation Relaxation Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Béland, Laurent Karim; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-01-01

    We present a detailed description of the kinetic Activation-Relaxation Technique (k-ART), an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm with on-the-fly event search. Combining a topological classification for local environments and event generation with ART nouveau, an efficient unbiased sampling method for finding transition states, k-ART can be applied to complex materials with atoms in off-lattice positions or with elastic deformations that cannot be handled with standard KMC approaches. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, we demonstrate the general character of k-ART by applying the algorithm to three challenging systems: self-defect annihilation in c-Si, self-interstitial diffusion in Fe and structural relaxation in amorphous silicon.

  16. Rovibrational relaxation in collisions between H{sub 2} molecules: I. Transitions induced by ground state para-H{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flower, D.R. [Physics Department, The University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Roueff, E. [URA 173, associee au CNRS et a l' Universite Paris 7, et DAEC, Observatoire de Paris, F-92195 Meudon Principal Cedex (France)

    1998-07-14

    We present the results of quantal calculations of cross sections and rate coefficients for rovibrational transitions in ortho- and para-H{sub 2}, induced by collisions with ground state para-H{sub 2}. Rovibrational levels up to ({nu}, J)=(3,8) were included in the calculations, and rate coefficients are available for temperatures 100 {<=} T {<=} 6000 K. Comparison is made with previous calculations and with measurements of the rate coefficient for vibrational relaxation {nu}=1{yields}0. Agreement is found to be good at both high and low temperatures, but the measurements exceed the calculations at intermediate temperatures. Large discrepancies are found with previous calculations, which employed a semiclassical method. (author)

  17. Relaxation of the electronic states at a thin-layer YBa2Cu 3O7/PrBa2Cu3O7 interface

    KAUST Repository

    Gómez, Javier Alexandra M

    2010-11-01

    We discuss in detail spin-polarized electronic structure calculations for the 1 × 1 YBa2Cu3O7/PrBa 2Cu3O7 superlattice. Our results are based on the full-potential linear augmented plane wave method and the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation functional. The on-site Coulomb interaction affecting the correlated Cu 3d and Pr 4f electrons is taken into consideration. At first glance the YBa2Cu3O 7/PrBa2Cu3O7 interface appears to be inert, i.e., the electronic states do not show a clear sign of interaction between the two component materials. Nonetheless, a total energy analysis points to a significant modification of the magnetic coupling in the vicinity of the interface due to the relaxation of the electronic structure. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Pharmaceutical Applications of Relaxation Filter-Selective Signal Excitation Methods for ¹⁹F Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Case Study With Atorvastatin in Dosage Formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Mamiko Nasu; Nemoto, Takayuki; Mimura, Hisashi

    2016-03-01

    We recently developed several new relaxation filter-selective signal excitation (RFS) methods for (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) that allow (13)C signal extraction of the target components from pharmaceuticals. These methods were successful in not only qualification but also quantitation over the wide range of 5% to 100%. Here, we aimed to improve the sensitivity of these methods and initially applied them to (19)F solid-state NMR, on the basis that the fluorine atom is one of the most sensitive NMR-active nuclei. For testing, we selected atorvastatin calcium (ATC), an antilipid BCS class II drug that inhibits 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase and is marketed in crystalline and amorphous forms. Tablets were obtained from 2 generic drug suppliers, and the ATC content occurred mainly as an amorphous form. Using the RFS method with (19)F solid-state NMR, we succeeded in qualifying trace amounts (less than 0.5% w/w level) of crystalline phase (Form I) of ATC in the tablets. RFS methods with (19)F solid-state NMR are practical and time efficient and can contribute not only to the study of pharmaceutical drugs, including those with small amounts of a highly potent active ingredient within a formulated product, but also to the study of fluoropolymers in material sciences. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A CLASS OF TWO-STEP TVD MACCORMACK TYPE NUMERICAL SCHEME FOR MHD EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Xueshang; WEI Fengsi; ZHONG Dingkun

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a new numerical scheme of Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) MacCormack type for MagnetoHydroDynamic (MHD) equations is proposed by taking into account of the characteristics such as convergence, stability, resolution. This new scheme is established by solving the MHD equations with a TVD modified MacCormack scheme for the purpose of developing a scheme of quick convergence as well as of TVD property. To show the validation, simplicity and practicability of the scheme for modelling MHD problems, a self-similar Cauchy problem with the discontinuous initial data consisting of constant states, and the collision of two fast MHD shocks, and two-dimensional Orszag and Tang's MHD vortex problem are discussed with the numerical results conforming to the existing results obtained by the Roe type TVD, the high-order Godunov scheme,and Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (WENO) scheme. The numerical tests show that this two-step TVD MacCormack numerical scheme for MHD system is of robust operation in the presence of very strong waves, thin shock fronts, thin contact and slip surface discontinuities.

  20. Alfven Wave Tomography for Cold MHD Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I.Y. Dodin; N.J. Fisch

    2001-09-07

    Alfven waves propagation in slightly nonuniform cold plasmas is studied by means of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) nonlinear equations. The evolution of the MHD spectrum is shown to be governed by a matrix linear differential equation with constant coefficients determined by the spectrum of quasi-static plasma density perturbations. The Alfven waves are shown not to affect the plasma density inhomogeneities, as they scatter off of them. The application of the MHD spectrum evolution equation to the inverse scattering problem allows tomographic measurements of the plasma density profile by scanning the plasma volume with Alfven radiation.

  1. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-07-01

    This seventeenth quarterly technical progress report of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project presents the accomplishments during the period August 1, 1991 to October 31, 1991. Manufacturing of the prototypical combustor pressure shell has been completed including leak, proof, and assembly fit checking. Manufacturing of forty-five cooling panels was also completed including leak, proof, and flow testing. All precombustor internal components (combustion can baffle and swirl box) were received and checked, and integration of the components was initiated. A decision was made regarding the primary and backup designs for the 1A4 channel. The assembly of the channel related prototypical hardware continued. The cathode wall electrical wiring is now complete. The mechanical design of the diffuser has been completed.

  2. Cosmological AMR MHD with Enzo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Hao [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Shengtai [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we present EnzoMHD, the extension of the cosmological code Enzoto include magnetic fields. We use the hyperbolic solver of Li et al. (2008) for the computation of interface fluxes. We use constrained transport methods of Balsara & Spicer (1999) and Gardiner & Stone (2005) to advance the induction equation, the reconstruction technique of Balsara (2001) to extend the Adaptive Mesh Refinement of Berger & Colella (1989) already used in Enzo, though formulated in a slightly different way for ease of implementation. This combination of methods preserves the divergence of the magnetic field to machine precision. We use operator splitting to include gravity and cosmological expansion. We then present a series of cosmological and non cosmologjcal tests problems to demonstrate the quality of solution resulting from this combination of solvers.

  3. Multi-pathway excited state relaxation of adenine oligomers in aqueous solution: a joint theoretical and experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyasz, Akos; Gustavsson, Thomas; Onidas, Delphine; Changenet-Barret, Pascale; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Improta, Roberto

    2013-03-11

    The singlet excited states of adenine oligomers, model systems widely used for the understanding of the interaction of ultraviolet radiation with DNA, are investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and time-dependent (TD) DFT calculations. Fluorescence decays, fluorescence anisotropy decays, and time-resolved fluorescence spectra are recorded from the femtosecond to the nanosecond timescales for single strand (dA)20 in aqueous solution. These experimental observations and, in particular, the comparison of the fluorescence behavior upon UVC and UVA excitation allow the identification of various types of electronic transitions with different energy and polarization. Calculations performed for up to five stacked 9-methyladenines, taking into account the solvent, show that different excited states are responsible for the absorption in the UVC and UVA spectral domains. Independently of the number of bases, bright excitons may evolve toward two types of excited dimers having π-π* or charge-transfer character, each one distinguished by its own geometry and spectroscopic signature. According to the picture arising from the joint experimental and theoretical investigation, UVC-induced fluorescence contains contribution from 1) exciton states with a different degree of localization, decaying within a few ps, 2) "neutral" excited dimers decaying on the sub-nanosecond timescale, being the dominant species, and 3) charge-transfer states decaying on the nanosecond timescale. The majority of the photons emitted upon UVA excitation are related to charge-transfer states.

  4. Characteristics of laminar MHD fluid hammer in pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Z.Y.; Liu, Y.J., E-mail: yajun@scut.edu.cn

    2016-01-01

    As gradually wide applications of MHD fluid, transportation as well as control with pumps and valves is unavoidable, which induces MHD fluid hammer. The paper attempts to combine MHD effect and fluid hammer effect and to investigate the characteristics of laminar MHD fluid hammer. A non-dimensional fluid hammer model, based on Navier–Stocks equations, coupling with Lorentz force is numerically solved in a reservoir–pipe–valve system with uniform external magnetic field. The MHD effect is represented by the interaction number which associates with the conductivity of the MHD fluid as well as the external magnetic field and can be interpreted as the ratio of Lorentz force to Joukowsky force. The transient numerical results of pressure head, average velocity, wall shear stress, velocity profiles and shear stress profiles are provided. The additional MHD effect hinders fluid motion, weakens wave front and homogenizes velocity profiles, contributing to obvious attenuation of oscillation, strengthened line packing and weakened Richardson annular effect. Studying the characteristics of MHD laminar fluid hammer theoretically supplements the gap of knowledge of rapid-transient MHD flow and technically provides beneficial information for MHD pipeline system designers to better devise MHD systems. - Highlights: • Characteristics of laminar MHD fluid hammer are discussed by simulation. • MHD effect has significant influence on attenuation of wave. • MHD effect strengthens line packing. • MHD effect inhibits Richardson annular effect.

  5. Hot self-similar relativistic MHD flows

    CERN Document Server

    Zakamska, Nadia L; Blandford, Roger D

    2008-01-01

    We consider axisymmetric relativistic jets with a toroidal magnetic field and an ultrarelativistic equation of state, with the goal of studying the lateral structure of jets whose pressure is matched to the pressure of the medium through which they propagate. We find all self-similar steady-state solutions of the relativistic MHD equations for this setup. One of the solutions is the case of a parabolic jet being accelerated by the pressure gradient as it propagates through a medium with pressure declining as p(z)\\propto z^{-2}. As the jet material expands due to internal pressure gradients, it runs into the ambient medium resulting in a pile-up of material along the jet boundary, while the magnetic field acts to produce a magnetic pinch along the axis of the jet. Such jets can be in a lateral pressure equilibrium only if their opening angle \\theta_j at distance z is smaller than about 1/\\gamma, where \\gamma is the characteristic bulk Lorentz-factor at this distance; otherwise, different parts of the jet canno...

  6. Forced Reconnection in the Near Magnetotail: Onset and Energy Conversion in PIC and MHD Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birn, J.; Hesse, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) together with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Q1 simulations of magnetotail dynamics, we investigate the evolution toward onset of reconnection and the subsequent energy transfer and conversion. In either case, reconnection onset is preceded by a driven phase, during which magnetic flux is added to the tail at the high-latitude boundaries, followed by a relaxation phase, during which the configuration continues to respond to the driving. The boundary deformation leads to the formation of thin embedded current sheets, which are bifurcated in the near tail, converging to a single sheet farther out in the MHD simulations. The thin current sheets in the PIC simulation are carried by electrons and are associated with a strong perpendicular electrostatic field, which may provide a connection to parallel potentials and auroral arcs and an ionospheric signal even prior to the onset of reconnection. The PIC simulation very well satisfies integral entropy conservation (intrinsic to ideal MHD) during this phase, supporting ideal ballooning stability. Eventually, the current intensification leads to the onset of reconnection, the formation and ejection of a plasmoid, and a collapse of the inner tail. The earthward flow shows the characteristics of a dipolarization front: enhancement of Bz, associated with a thin vertical electron current sheet in the PIC simulation. Both MHD and PIC simulations show a dominance of energy conversion from incoming Poynting flux to outgoing enthalpy flux, resulting in heating of the inner tail. Localized Joule dissipation plays only a minor role.

  7. Open Boundary Conditions for Dissipative MHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, E T

    2011-11-10

    In modeling magnetic confinement, astrophysics, and plasma propulsion, representing the entire physical domain is often difficult or impossible, and artificial, or 'open' boundaries are appropriate. A novel open boundary condition (BC) for dissipative MHD, called Lacuna-based open BC (LOBC), is presented. LOBC, based on the idea of lacuna-based truncation originally presented by V.S. Ryaben'kii and S.V. Tsynkov, provide truncation with low numerical noise and minimal reflections. For hyperbolic systems, characteristic-based BC (CBC) exist for separating the solution into outgoing and incoming parts. In the hyperbolic-parabolic dissipative MHD system, such separation is not possible, and CBC are numerically unstable. LOBC are applied in dissipative MHD test problems including a translating FRC, and coaxial-electrode plasma acceleration. Solution quality is compared to solutions using CBC and zero-normal derivative BC. LOBC are a promising new open BC option for dissipative MHD.

  8. Resistive MHD jet simulations with large resistivity

    CERN Document Server

    Cemeljic, Miljenko; Vlahakis, Nektarios; Tsinganos, Kanaris

    2009-01-01

    Axisymmetric resistive MHD simulations for radially self-similar initial conditions are performed, using the NIRVANA code. The magnetic diffusivity could occur in outflows above an accretion disk, being transferred from the underlying disk into the disk corona by MHD turbulence (anomalous turbulent diffusivity), or as a result of ambipolar diffusion in partially ionized flows. We introduce, in addition to the classical magnetic Reynolds number Rm, which measures the importance of resistive effects in the induction equation, a new number Rb, which measures the importance of the resistive effects in the energy equation. We find two distinct regimes of solutions in our simulations. One is the low-resistivity regime, in which results do not differ much from ideal-MHD solutions. In the high-resistivity regime, results seem to show some periodicity in time-evolution, and depart significantly from the ideal-MHD case. Whether this departure is caused by numerical or physical reasons is of considerable interest for nu...

  9. MHD seed recovery and regeneration, Phase II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    This final report summarizes the work performed by the Space and Technology Division of the TRW Space and Electronics Group for the U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center for the Econoseed process. This process involves the economical recovery and regeneration of potassium seed used in the MHD channel. The contract period of performance extended from 1987 through 1994 and was divided into two phases. The Phase II test results are the subject of this Final Report. However, the Phase I test results are presented in summary form in Section 2.3 of this Final Report. The Econoseed process involves the treatment of the potassium sulfate in spent MHD seed with an aqueous calcium formate solution in a continuously stirred reactor system to solubilize, as potassium formate, the potassium content of the seed and to precipitate and recover the sulfate as calcium sulfate. The slurry product from this reaction is centrifuged to separate the calcium sulfate and insoluble seed constituents from the potassium formate solution. The dilute solids-free potassium formate solution is then concentrated in an evaporator. The concentrated potassium formate product is a liquid which can be recycled as a spray into the MHD channel. Calcium formate is the seed regenerant used in the Econoseed process. Since calcium formate is produced in the United States in relatively small quantities, a new route to the continuous production of large quantities of calcium formate needed to support an MHD power industry was investigated. This route involves the reaction of carbon monoxide gas with lime solids in an aqueous medium.

  10. Magnetic Moments and Ordered States in Pyrochlore Iridates Nd2Ir2O7 and Sm2Ir2O7 Studied by Muon-Spin Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asih, Retno; Adam, Noraina; Sakinah Mohd-Tajudin, Saidah; Puspita Sari, Dita; Matsuhira, Kazuyuki; Guo, Hanjie; Wakeshima, Makoto; Hinatsu, Yukio; Nakano, Takehito; Nozue, Yasuo; Sulaiman, Shukri; Ismail Mohamed-Ibrahim, Mohamad; Biswas, Pabitra Kumar; Watanabe, Isao

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic-ordered states of the pyrochlore iridates Nd2Ir2O7 (Nd227) and Sm2Ir2O7 (Sm227), showing metal-insulator transitions at 33 and 117 K, respectively, were studied by both the muon-spin-relaxation (μSR) method and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. A long-range magnetic ordering of Ir moments appeared in conjunction with the metal insulator transition, and additional long-range-ordered states of Nd/Sm moments were confirmed at temperatures below about 10 K. We found that the all-in all-out spin structure most convincingly explained the present μSR results of both Nd227 and Sm227. Observed internal fields were compared with values derived from DFT calculations. The lower limits of the sizes of magnetic moments were estimated to be 0.12 μB and 0.2 μB for Ir and Nd moments in Nd227, and 0.3 μB and 0.1 μB for Ir and Sm moments in Sm227, respectively. Further analysis indicated that the spin coupling between Ir and Nd/Sm moments was ferromagnetic for Nd227 and antiferromagnetic for Sm227.

  11. 准静态颗粒介质的弹性势能弛豫分析∗%Analysis of elastic energy relaxation pro cess for granular materials at quasi-static state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金鑫鑫; 金峰; 刘宁; 孙其诚

    2016-01-01

    The granular system has complicated force chain network and multiple relaxation mechanisms. The different relaxation mechanisms have largely effects on others. The force chains divide the whole system into many soft zones which dominate the main dissipation process. The system evolves into lower potential energy state gradually and forms directional arrangement under an external load. During the evolution, the complex relaxation behaviors such as transport and migrant processes, make it difficult to distinguish different dissipated mechanisms. Each single physical mechanism stripping from multiple mechanisms should be studied in depth. While among all the mechanisms, the structure evolution plays a crucial role and needs to be paid more attention to. From the view of potential energy, the detailed energy transformation is illustrated. The granular system is often at a metastable state. When the external disturbance is large enough, the system would step over the energy barrier to a new state. The height of energy barrier is related to the packing structure and grain property. In energy landscape, there exist many energy valleys which correspond to different metastable states. The grain rearrangement and structure reorganization are two main evolution processes at a quasi-static state. The former brings about major potential energy change because of friction and forms certain contact relations. While the latter evolves on the basis of the skeleton formed by grain rearrangement and reaches lower energy state. The conversion among different energy valleys can be used to explain stress relaxation process. In a complex granular system, the choosing of appropriate internal state variables becomes important, which can reflect specific relaxation process and internal characteristics. The energy fluctuation in the system has a huge influence on dissipation process and macroscopic response and is an effective internal variable to have an insight into the structure evolution

  12. Excitation and relaxation of metastable atomic states in an active medium of a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokhan, P A; Zakrevskii, D E; Lavrukhin, M A [A.V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Lyabin, N A; Chursin, A D [Research and production corporation ' Istok' , Fryazino, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-28

    The influence of a pre-pulse population of copper atom metastable states and their sub-population at a current pulse edge on the copper vapour laser pulse energy is studied under optimal temperature conditions. Experiments have been performed with active elements of a commercial laser having an internal diameter of a discharge channel of 14 and 20 mm. It is found that at a pulse repetition frequency of 12 – 14 kHz, corresponding to a maximal output power, the reduction of the energy due to a residual population of metastable states is by an order of magnitude less than due to their sub-population at a current pulse edge. The modelling based on the experimental results obtained has shown that in the case of an active element with an internal diameter of 14 mm, a decrease in the pulse leading edge from ∼25 ns to 0.6 ns does not reduce the laser pulse energy up to the repetition frequency of ∼50 kHz at an average output power of 70 W m{sup -1} and efficiency of ∼11%. (lasers)

  13. Structure and excited state relaxation dynamics in nanoscale self-assembled arrays: multiporphyrin complexes, porphyrin-quantum dot composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenkevich, E. I.; von Borczyskowski, C.

    2005-06-01

    Self-assembled nanoscale arrays of controllable geometry and composition (up to 8 tetrapyrroles) have been formed via non-covalent binding interactions of the meso-phenyl bridged Zn-octaethylporphyrin chemical dimers or trimers with di- /tetrapyridyl substituted porphyrin extra-ligands. In these complexes using steady-state and time-resolved (ps fluorescence and fs pump-probe) measurements pathways and efficiencies of the energy transfer photoinduced charge separation as well as exchange d-π effects have been studied in solutions of variable polarity at 77-293 K. The same principles of aggregation via the key-hole scheme "Zn-pyridyl" have been used also for the surface passivation of pyridylsubstituted tetrapyrroles on the coreshell semiconductor CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QD) showing quantum confinement effects. Picosecond time-resolved and steady-state data reveal that CdSe/ZnS QD emission is multiexponential and the efficiency of its quenching by attached porphyrins (due to energy transfer and photoinduced charge separation) depends strongly on the number of anchoring groups their arrangement in the porphyrin molecule as well as on QD size and number of ZnS monolayers. The analysis of spectroscopic and kinetic findings reveals that on average only ~l/5 porphyrin molecules are assembled on the QD and a limited number of "vacancies" accessible for porphyrin attachment is available on the QD surface.

  14. Relaxation mechanism of β-carotene from S2 (1Bu(+)) state to S1 (2Ag(-)) state: femtosecond time-resolved near-IR absorption and stimulated resonance Raman studies in 900-1550 nm region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaya, Tomohisa; Iwata, Koichi

    2014-06-12

    Carotenoids have two major low-lying excited states, the second lowest (S2 (1Bu(+))) and the lowest (S1 (2Ag(-))) excited singlet states, both of which are suggested to be involved in the energy transfer processes in light-harvesting complexes. Studying vibrational dynamics of S2 carotenoids requires ultrafast time-resolved near-IR Raman spectroscopy, although it has much less sensitivity than visible Raman spectroscopy. In this study, the relaxation mechanism of β-carotene from the S2 state to the S1 state is investigated by femtosecond time-resolved multiplex near-IR absorption and stimulated Raman spectroscopy. The energy gap between the S2 and S1 states is estimated to be 6780 cm(-1) from near-IR transient absorption spectra. The near-IR stimulated Raman spectrum of S2 β-carotene show three bands at 1580, 1240, and 1050 cm(-1). When excess energy of 4000 cm(-1) is added, the S1 C═C stretch band shows a large upshift with a time constant of 0.2 ps. The fast upshift is explained by a model that excess energy generated by internal conversion from the S2 state to the S1 state is selectively accepted by one of the vibronic levels of the S1 state and is redistributed among all the vibrational modes.

  15. THE TISSUE HYDRATION STATE IN UW-PRESERVED HUMAN DONOR LIVERS - A CLINICAL-STUDY OF THE RELATION BETWEEN PROTON MAGNETIC-RESONANCE RELAXATION-TIMES, DONOR CONDITION, PRESERVATION PROCEDURE, AND EARLY GRAFT FUNCTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOLF, RFE; DENBUTTER, G; KAMMAN, RL; DEKETH, HP; SLUTTER, WJ; SLOOFF, MJH

    1994-01-01

    To determine the relation between tissue hydration state-as indicated by tissue proton magnetic resonance relaxation times-in UW-preserved human donor livers and viability parameters of the donor and early graft function, ''ex vivo'' magnetic resonance relaxometry was performed with a clinical MR im

  16. THE TISSUE HYDRATION STATE IN UW-PRESERVED HUMAN DONOR LIVERS - A CLINICAL-STUDY OF THE RELATION BETWEEN PROTON MAGNETIC-RESONANCE RELAXATION-TIMES, DONOR CONDITION, PRESERVATION PROCEDURE, AND EARLY GRAFT FUNCTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOLF, RFE; DENBUTTER, G; KAMMAN, RL; DEKETH, HP; SLUTTER, WJ; SLOOFF, MJH

    1994-01-01

    To determine the relation between tissue hydration state-as indicated by tissue proton magnetic resonance relaxation times-in UW-preserved human donor livers and viability parameters of the donor and early graft function, ''ex vivo'' magnetic resonance relaxometry was performed with a clinical MR

  17. Theory of Metastable State Relaxation for Non-Critical Binary Systems with Non-Conserved Order Parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmailov, Alexander; Myerson, Allan S.

    1993-01-01

    A new mathematical ansatz for a solution of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau non-linear partial differential equation is developed for non-critical systems such as non-critical binary solutions (solute + solvent) described by the non-conserved scalar order parameter. It is demonstrated that in such systems metastability initiates heterogeneous solute redistribution which results in formation of the non-equilibrium singly-periodic spatial solute structure. It is found how the time-dependent period of this structure evolves in time. In addition, the critical radius r(sub c) for solute embryo of the new solute rich phase together with the metastable state lifetime t(sub c) are determined analytically and analyzed.

  18. Relaxation of Magnetic Nanoparticle Chain without Applied Field*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Liang-Ming

    2011-01-01

    The relaxation ofa one-dimensional magnetic nanoparticle linear chain with lattice constant a is investigated in absence of applied field. There is an equilibrium state (or steady state) where all magnetic moments of particles lie along the chain (x-axis), back to which the magnetic nanoparticle chain at other state will relax. It is found that the relaxation time Tx is determined by Tx = 10β × a3. This relaxation is compared with that of single magnetic nanoparticle system.

  19. Non-linear MHD modeling of edge localized mode cycles and mitigation by resonant magnetic perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orain, François; Bécoulet, M.; Morales, J.; Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Hoelzl, M.; Garbet, X.; Pamela, S.; Nardon, E.; Passeron, C.; Latu, G.; Fil, A.; Cahyna, P.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of a multi-edge localized mode (ELM) cycle as well as the ELM mitigation by resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) are modeled in realistic tokamak X-point geometry with the non-linear reduced MHD code JOREK. The diamagnetic rotation is found to be a key parameter enabling us to reproduce the cyclical dynamics of the plasma relaxations and to model the near-symmetric ELM power deposition on the inner and outer divertor target plates consistently with experimental measurements. Moreover, the non-linear coupling of the RMPs with unstable modes are found to modify the edge magnetic topology and induce a continuous MHD activity in place of a large ELM crash, resulting in the mitigation of the ELMs. At larger diamagnetic rotation, a bifurcation from unmitigated ELMs—at low RMP current—towards fully suppressed ELMs—at large RMP current—is obtained.

  20. MHD equilibria with diamagnetic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessarotto, M.; Zorat, R.; Johnson, J. L.; White, R. B.

    1997-11-01

    An outstanding issue in magnetic confinement is the establishment of MHD equilibria with enhanced flow shear profiles for which turbulence (and transport) may be locally effectively suppressed or at least substantially reduced with respect to standard weak turbulence models. Strong flows develop in the presence of equilibrium E× B-drifts produced by a strong radial electric field, as well as due to diamagnetic contributions produced by steep equilibrium radial profiles of number density, temperature and the flow velocity itself. In the framework of a kinetic description, this generally requires the construction of guiding-center variables correct to second order in the relevant expansion parameter. For this purpose, the Lagrangian approach developed recently by Tessarotto et al. [1] is adopted. In this paper the conditions of existence of such equilibria are analyzed and their basic physical properties are investigated in detail. 1 - M. Pozzo, M. Tessarotto and R. Zorat, in Theory of fusion Plasmas, E.Sindoni et al. eds. (Societá Italiana di Fisica, Editrice Compositori, Bologna, 1996), p.295.

  1. MHD Jets in inhomogeneous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. O´Sullivan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos simulaciones de la propagaci on de jets moleculares no-adiab aticos en un medio ambiente inhomog eneo. Los jets tienen condiciones descritos por un modelo de jet MHD en el cual la forma de las l neas magn eticas se prescribe cerca de la fuente. Per les de densidad ambiental fueron elegidos para representar la zona de transici on entre las regiones exteriores de una nube molecular y el medio interestelar. Escalamos las tasas de enfriamiento at omico y molecular a niveles apropriados para resolver todas las escalas espaciales apropriadas. Con la inclusi on de variabilidad de la fuente, las simulaciones reproducen varias caracter sticas observacionales de jets moleculares, entre ellas las cavidades moleculares. Adicionalmente, encontramos similitudes entre teor a y observaci on para la fracci on de ionizaci on a lo largo del jet. Encontramos que la extensi on lateral de las super cies de trabajo internas son sensibles al medio ambiente. Tambi en presentamos resultados preliminares para un m etodo de calcular mapas de emisi on en l neas usando solamente variables fundamentales de estado que parecen reproducir la emisi on lamentosa de Balmer en frentes de choque.

  2. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    This fourteenth quarterly technical progress report of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project presents the accomplishments during the period November 1, 1990 to January 31, 1991. Testing of the High Pressure Cooling Subsystem electrical isolator was completed. The PEEK material successfully passed the high temperature, high pressure duration tests (50 hours). The Combustion Subsystem drawings were CADAM released. The procurement process is in progress. An equipment specification and RFP were prepared for the new Low Pressure Cooling System (LPCS) and released for quotation. Work has been conducted on confirmation tests leading to final gas-side designs and studies to assist in channel fabrication.The final cathode gas-side design and the proposed gas-side designs of the anode and sidewall are presented. Anode confirmation tests and related analyses of anode wear mechanisms used in the selection of the proposed anode design are presented. Sidewall confirmation tests, which were used to select the proposed gas-side design, were conducted. The design for the full scale CDIF system was completed. A test program was initiated to investigate the practicality of using Avco current controls for current consolidation in the power takeoff (PTO) regions and to determine the cause of past current consolidation failures. Another important activity was the installation of 1A4-style coupons in the 1A1 channel. A description of the coupons and their location with 1A1 channel is presented herein.

  3. Dynamical theory of spin relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Timothy R.; Bain, Alex D.

    2013-02-01

    The dynamics of a spin system is usually calculated using the density matrix. However, the usual formulation in terms of the density matrix predicts that the signal will decay to zero, and does not address the issue of individual spin dynamics. Using stochastic calculus, we develop a dynamical theory of spin relaxation, the origins of which lie in the component spin fluctuations. This entails consideration of random pure states for individual protons, and how these pure states are correctly combined when the density matrix is formulated. Both the lattice and the spins are treated quantum mechanically. Such treatment incorporates both the processes of spin-spin and (finite temperature) spin-lattice relaxation. Our results reveal the intimate connections between spin noise and conventional spin relaxation.

  4. Diagnostic development and support of MHD test facilities. Final progress report, March 1980--March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at Mississippi State University (MSU), under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC02-80ET-15601, Diagnostic Development and Support of MHD Test Facilities, developed diagnostic instruments for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power train data acquisition and for support of MHD component development test facilities. Microprocessor-controlled optical instruments, initially developed for Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery (HRSR) support, were refined, and new systems to measure temperatures and gas-seed-slag stream characteristics were developed. To further data acquisition and analysis capabilities, the diagnostic systems were interfaced with DIAL`s computers. Technical support was provided for the diagnostic needs of the national MHD research effort. DIAL personnel also cooperated with government agencies and private industries to improve the transformation of research and development results into processes, products and services applicable to their needs. The initial contract, Testing and Evaluation of Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery, established a data base on heat transfer, slagging effects on heat transfer surfaces, metal durability, secondary combustor performance, secondary combustor design requirements, and other information pertinent to the design of HR/SR components at the Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF). To accomplish these objectives, a combustion test stand was constructed that simulated MHD environments, and mathematical models were developed and evaluated for the heat transfer in hot-wall test sections. Two transitions occurred during the span of this contract. In May 1983, the objectives and title of the contract changed from Testing and Evaluation of Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery to Diagnostic Development and Support of MHD Test Facilities. In July 1988, the research laboratory`s name changed from the MHD Energy Center to the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory.

  5. 铯分子亚稳电子态中高位振动态的产生和弛豫%Formation and relaxation of Cs2(13Πu)metastable state in high vibrational levels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程玉锋; 栾楠; 蔡勤; 张利平; 戴康; 王倩; 沈异凡

    2011-01-01

    研究了Cs2[13Πu(v)]和Cs原子间的振动能量转移.利用激光感生荧光(LIF)探测Cs2[13Πu(v)]的弛豫过程,由时间分辨LIF的对数描绘得到振动态的有效寿命,从不同Cs原子密度下的有效寿命利用Stern-Volmer公式得到振动能级的弛豫率,速率系数随v的增加而增大.从相邻二振动能级的布居密度之比得到振动弛豫速率常数kv,v-1.在高位振动态的传能过程中,多量子弛豫(Δv>1)是重要的.%We have investigated the vibrational energy transfer rate constants between CS2[l3IIu(v)]and Cs atoms. Laser induced fluorescence(LIF)was used to detect collisionally relaxed Gs2[13IIu(v)] .The semilog plots of the time - resolved LIF at different dendities of Cs had been obtained.The slopes yielded the effective lifetimes. From such data several Stem - Volmer plots can be constructed and the relaxation rate constants can be extracted for the sum of all process that give rise to the delay of the prepared vibrational state. The vibrational relaxation rate is increasing with vibrational quantum number. The ratios of the populations of the neighboring states were measured. The state (v) to state (v- 1)vibrational relaxation rate constants kv,v_1 were obtained. Multiquantum relaxation (△v> 1) was found to be important at high vibrational states.

  6. Dipole Alignment in Rotating MHD Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.; Fu, Terry; Morin, Lee

    2012-01-01

    We present numerical results from long-term CPU and GPU simulations of rotating, homogeneous, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, and discuss their connection to the spherically bounded case. We compare our numerical results with a statistical theory of geodynamo action that has evolved from the absolute equilibrium ensemble theory of ideal MHD turbulence, which is based on the ideal MHD invariants are energy, cross helicity and magnetic helicity. However, for rotating MHD turbulence, the cross helicity is no longer an exact invariant, although rms cross helicity becomes quasistationary during an ideal MHD simulation. This and the anisotropy imposed by rotation suggests an ansatz in which an effective, nonzero value of cross helicity is assigned to axisymmetric modes and zero cross helicity to non-axisymmetric modes. This hybrid statistics predicts a large-scale quasistationary magnetic field due to broken ergodicity , as well as dipole vector alignment with the rotation axis, both of which are observed numerically. We find that only a relatively small value of effective cross helicity leads to the prediction of a dipole moment vector that is closely aligned (less than 10 degrees) with the rotation axis. We also discuss the effect of initial conditions, dissipation and grid size on the numerical simulations and statistical theory.

  7. Effects of Mind Sound Resonance Technique (Yogic Relaxation) on Psychological States, Sleep Quality, and Cognitive Functions in Female Teachers: A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Manas; Metri, Kashinath G; Raghuram, Nagaratna; Hongasandra, Nagendra R

    2017-01-01

    Context • Several studies have revealed a high rate of physical and psychological problems from stress among schoolteachers. Yoga is one of the mind-body interventions known to alleviate stress and effects. The mind sound resonance technique (MSRT), a yoga-based, mindfulness relaxation is recognized as having a positive influence on physical and psychological health. Objectives • The study intended to examine the effects of an MSRT intervention for 1 mo on perceived stress, quality of sleep, cognitive function, state and trait anxiety, psychological distress, and fatigue among female teachers. Design • The study was a randomized, controlled trial. Setting • The study occurred at 2 primary schools in Bangalore City, India. Participants • Sixty female teachers, aged between 30 and 55 y, from the 2 schools were enrolled in the study. Intervention • The participants were randomly divided into an MSRT group (n = 30) and a control group (n = 30). Participants in the MSRT group participated in MSRT for 30 min/d, 5 d/wk, for the duration of 1 mo. The participants in the control group followed their normal daily routines. Outcome measures • Perceived stress, sleep quality, cognitive function, anxiety, psychological distress, fatigue, and self-esteem were assessed using standardized assessment tools at baseline and after 1 mo of the intervention. Results • In the MSRT group, a significant reduction occurred for 5 variables: (1) 47.01% for perceived stress (P function, but the change was not significant (P = .111). On the other hand, the control group showed significant increases in 5 variables: (1) 55.56% for perceived stress (P function (P = .002). A comparison between the 2 groups showed significant differences in 7 variables: (1) perceived stress (P function (P = .083). Conclusions • In the current study, the practice of MSRT facilitated a reduction in the levels of stress, anxiety, fatigue, and psychological distress. The relaxation technique also

  8. The flux tube paradigm and its role in MHD turbulence in the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Greco, A.; Servidio, S.; Wan, M.; Osman, K.; Ruffolo, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Descriptions of magnetic field and plasma structures in terms of flux tubes, plasmoids and other bundles of magnetic field lines are familiar in the vocabulary of observational and theoretical space physics. "Spaghetti models" and flux ropes are well known examples. Flux tubes and families of field lines can also be defined in a medium that admits magnetic fluctuations, including strong MHD turbulence, but their behavior can become complicated. In 3D fluctuations the smooth flux tube description itself becomes in some sense unstable, as nearby field lines diverge and flux surfaces shred. This lends complexity to the structure of flux tubes, and can give rise to temporarily trapped field lines and charged test particle trajectories, with immediate implications for transport, e.g., of solar energetic particles. The properties of the turbulent magnetic field can also be strongly influenced by the dynamics of turbulence. Large scale self organizing behavior, or inverse cascade, can enhance very long wavelength structure, favoring Bohm scaling of diffusion coefficients. Meanwhile smaller scale flux tube structures are integral features of the inertial range of turbulence, giving rise to a cellularization of the plasma due to rapid dynamical relaxation processes. These drive the turbulent system locally towards low-acceleration states, including Alfvenic, Beltrami and force-free states. Cell boundaries are natural positions for formation of near discontinuous boundaries, where dynamical activity can be enhanced. A primary example is appearance of numerous discontinuities and active reconnection sites in turbulence, which appear to support a wide distribution of reconnection rates associated with coherent current structures. These discontinuities are also potential sites of enhanced heating, as expected in Kolmogorov's Refined Similarity Hypothesis. All of these features are related to self organization, cascade and intermittency of the turbulence. Examples of these

  9. [Brain activity during different stages of the relaxation process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    gorev, A S; Kovaleva, A V; Panova, E N; Gorbacheva, A K

    2012-01-01

    A group of adults participated in experiment in which they were asked to reach relaxed state by using relaxation techniques (active relaxation) and to maintain this state without any technique (passive relaxation). Some changes of EEG-characteristics during relaxation were analyzed. This experiment includes four situations (different functional states): baselinel, active relaxation, passive relaxation, baseline2. EEG was recorded from 10 cortical leads: O1, O2, TPO (left and right), P3, P4, C3, C4, F3 and F4. A comparative EEG analysis was done for 10 frequency bands from 5 to 40 Hz. In each experimental situation we revealed general trends for EEG parameters and also some specific changes in EEG, which characterized brain organization during passive and active relaxed states.

  10. Noise-induced modulation of the relaxation kinetics around a non-equilibrium steady state of non-linear chemical reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Rajesh; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; González-Segredo, Nélido

    2011-01-28

    Stochastic effects from correlated noise non-trivially modulate the kinetics of non-linear chemical reaction networks. This is especially important in systems where reactions are confined to small volumes and reactants are delivered in bursts. We characterise how the two noise sources confinement and burst modulate the relaxation kinetics of a non-linear reaction network around a non-equilibrium steady state. We find that the lifetimes of species change with burst input and confinement. Confinement increases the lifetimes of all species that are involved in any non-linear reaction as a reactant. Burst monotonically increases or decreases lifetimes. Competition between burst-induced and confinement-induced modulation may hence lead to a non-monotonic modulation. We quantify lifetime as the integral of the time autocorrelation function (ACF) of concentration fluctuations around a non-equilibrium steady state of the reaction network. Furthermore, we look at the first and second derivatives of the ACF, each of which is affected in opposite ways by burst and confinement. This allows discriminating between these two noise sources. We analytically derive the ACF from the linear Fokker-Planck approximation of the chemical master equation in order to establish a baseline for the burst-induced modulation at low confinement. Effects of higher confinement are then studied using a partial-propensity stochastic simulation algorithm. The results presented here may help understand the mechanisms that deviate stochastic kinetics from its deterministic counterpart. In addition, they may be instrumental when using fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) or fluorescence-correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to measure confinement and burst in systems with known reaction rates, or, alternatively, to correct for the effects of confinement and burst when experimentally measuring reaction rates.

  11. Structural relaxation and thermal conductivity of high-pressure formed, high-density di-n-butyl phthalate glass and pressure induced departures from equilibrium state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, G. P.; Andersson, Ove

    2017-06-01

    We report a study of structural relaxation of high-density glasses of di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) by measuring thermal conductivity, κ, under conditions of pressure and temperature (p,T) designed to modify both the vibrational and configurational states of a glass. Various high-density glassy states of DBP were formed by (i) cooling the liquid under a fixed high p and partially depressurizing the glass, (ii) isothermal annealing of the depressurized glass, and (iii) pressurizing the glass formed by cooling the liquid under low p. At a given low p, κ of the glass formed by cooling under high p is higher than that of the glass formed by cooling under low p, and the difference increases as glass formation p is increased. κ of the glass formed under 1 GPa is ˜20% higher at ambient p than κ of the glass formed at ambient p. On heating at low p, κ decreases until the glass to liquid transition range is reached. This is the opposite of the increase in κ observed when a glass formed under a certain p is heated under the same p. At a given high p, κ of the low-density glass formed by cooling at low p is lower than that of the high-density glass formed by cooling at that high p. On heating at high p, κ increases until the glass to liquid transition range is reached. The effects observed are due to a thermally assisted approach toward equilibrium at p different from the glass formation p. In all cases, the density, enthalpy, and entropy would change until the glasses become metastable liquids at a fixed p, thus qualitatively relating κ to variation in these properties.

  12. Relaxation Techniques for Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z Relaxation Techniques for Health Share: On This Page What’s the ... Bottom Line? How much do we know about relaxation techniques? A substantial amount of research has been done ...

  13. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project. Sixteenth quarterly technical progress report, May 1991--July 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) Project represents the culmination of the proof-of-concept (POC) development stage in the US Department of Energy (DOE) program to advance MHD technology to early commercial development stage utility power applications. The project is a joint effort, combining the skills of three topping cycle component developers: TRW, Avco/TDS, and Westinghouse. TRW, the prime contractor and system integrator, is responsible for the 50 thermal megawatt (50 MW{sub t}) slagging coal combustion subsystem. Avco/TDS is responsible for the MHD channel subsystem (nozzle, channel, diffuser, and power conditioning circuits), and Westinghouse is responsible for the current consolidation subsystem. The ITC Project will advance the state-of-the-art in MHD power systems with the design, construction, and integrated testing of 50 MW{sub t} power train components which are prototypical of the equipment that will be used in an early commercial scale MHD utility retrofit. Long duration testing of the integrated power train at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) in Butte, Montana will be performed, so that by the early 1990`s, an engineering data base on the reliability, availability, maintainability and performance of the system will be available to allow scaleup of the prototypical designs to the next development level. This Sixteenth Quarterly Technical Progress Report covers the period May 1, 1991 to July 31, 1991.

  14. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project. Sixteenth quarterly technical progress report, May 1991--July 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) Project represents the culmination of the proof-of-concept (POC) development stage in the US Department of Energy (DOE) program to advance MHD technology to early commercial development stage utility power applications. The project is a joint effort, combining the skills of three topping cycle component developers: TRW, Avco/TDS, and Westinghouse. TRW, the prime contractor and system integrator, is responsible for the 50 thermal megawatt (50 MW{sub t}) slagging coal combustion subsystem. Avco/TDS is responsible for the MHD channel subsystem (nozzle, channel, diffuser, and power conditioning circuits), and Westinghouse is responsible for the current consolidation subsystem. The ITC Project will advance the state-of-the-art in MHD power systems with the design, construction, and integrated testing of 50 MW{sub t} power train components which are prototypical of the equipment that will be used in an early commercial scale MHD utility retrofit. Long duration testing of the integrated power train at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) in Butte, Montana will be performed, so that by the early 1990`s, an engineering data base on the reliability, availability, maintainability and performance of the system will be available to allow scaleup of the prototypical designs to the next development level. This Sixteenth Quarterly Technical Progress Report covers the period May 1, 1991 to July 31, 1991.

  15. Relaxation of liquid bridge after droplets coalescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangen Zheng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the relaxation of liquid bridge after the coalescence of two sessile droplets resting on an organic glass substrate both experimentally and theoretically. The liquid bridge is found to relax to its equilibrium shape via two distinct approaches: damped oscillation relaxation and underdamped relaxation. When the viscosity is low, damped oscillation shows up, in this approach, the liquid bridge undergoes a damped oscillation process until it reaches its stable shape. However, if the viscous effects become significant, underdamped relaxation occurs. In this case, the liquid bridge relaxes to its equilibrium state in a non-periodic decay mode. In depth analysis indicates that the damping rate and oscillation period of damped oscillation are related to an inertial-capillary time scale τc. These experimental results are also testified by our numerical simulations with COMSOL Multiphysics.

  16. Radiation-driven MHD systems for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. H.; Jalufka, N. W.

    High-power radiation such as concentrated solar or high-power laser radiation is considered as a driver for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) systems which could be developed for efficient power generation and propulsion in space. Eight different systems are conceivable since the MHD systems can be classified in two: plasma and liquid-metal MHD's. Each of these systems is reviewed and solar- (or laser-) driven MHD thrusters are proposed.

  17. The mathematical theory of reduced MHD models for fusion plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Guillard, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    The derivation of reduced MHD models for fusion plasma is here formulated as a special instance of the general theory of singular limit of hyperbolic system of PDEs with large operator. This formulation allows to use the general results of this theory and to prove rigorously that reduced MHD models are valid approximations of the full MHD equations. In particular, it is proven that the solutions of the full MHD system converge to the solutions of an appropriate reduced model.

  18. Simulation of wave interactions with MHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batchelor, D; Bernholdt, D; Berry, L; Elwasif, W; Jaeger, E; Keyes, D; Klasky, S [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37331 (United States); Alba, C; Choi, M [General Atomics, San Diego, CA 92186 (United States); Bateman, G [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Bonoli, P [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MTT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Bramley, R [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Breslau, J; Chance, M; Chen, J; Fu, G; Jardin, S [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Harvey, R [CompX, Del Mar, CA 92014 (United States); Jenkins, T [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Kruger, S [Tech-X, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)], E-mail: batchelordb@ornl.gov (and others)

    2008-07-15

    The broad scientific objectives of the SWIM (Simulation 01 Wave Interaction with MHD) project are twofold: (1) improve our understanding of interactions that both radio frequency (RF) wave and particle sources have on extended-MHD phenomena, and to substantially improve our capability for predicting and optimizing the performance of burning plasmas in devices such as ITER: and (2) develop an integrated computational system for treating multiphysics phenomena with the required flexibility and extensibility to serve as a prototype for the Fusion Simulation Project. The Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) has been implemented. Presented here are initial physics results on RP effects on MHD instabilities in tokamaks as well as simulation results for tokamak discharge evolution using the IPS.

  19. Simulation of wave interactions with MHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batchelor, Donald B [ORNL; Abla, G [General Atomics, San Diego; Bateman, Glenn [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Bernholdt, David E [ORNL; Berry, Lee A [ORNL; Bonoli, P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Bramley, R [Indiana University; Breslau, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Chance, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Chen, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Choi, M. [General Atomics; Elwasif, Wael R [ORNL; Fu, GuoYong [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Harvey, R. W. [CompX, Del Mar, CA; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick [ORNL; Jardin, S. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Jenkins, T [University of Wisconsin; Keyes, David E [Columbia University; Klasky, Scott A [ORNL; Kruger, Scott [Tech-X Corporation; Ku, Long-Poe [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Lynch, Vickie E [ORNL; McCune, Douglas [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Ramos, J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Schissel, D. [General Atomics; Schnack, [University of Wisconsin; Wright, J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

    2008-07-01

    The broad scientific objectives of the SWIM (Simulation of Wave Interaction with MHD) project are twofold: (1) improve our understanding of interactions that both radio frequency (RF) wave and particle sources have on extended-MHD phenomena, and to substantially improve our capability for predicting and optimizing the performance of burning plasmas in devices such as ITER: and (2) develop an integrated computational system for treating multiphysics phenomena with the required flexibility and extensibility to serve as a prototype for the Fusion Simulation Project. The Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) has been implemented. Presented here are initial physics results on RF effects on MHD instabilities in tokamaks as well as simulation results for tokamak discharge evolution using the IPS.

  20. The Comparison of Two Types of Relaxation Techniques on Postoperative State Anxiety in Candidates for The Mastectomy Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa Yekta, Zohreh; Sadeghian, Fatemeh; Taghavi Larijani, Taraneh; Mehran, Abbas

    2017-01-01

    Anxiety among patients after surgery can affect their physiological and psychological well-being. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the effects of Benson's relaxation and rhythmic breathing techniques on postoperative anxiety in candidates for the mastectomy surgery. This randomized controlled clinical trial study was conducted with ninety patients in 2013. The patients were hospitalized for the mastectomy surgery in three surgical wards in a teaching hospital, Tehran, Iran. They were randomly assigned into three groups: Benson's relaxation including the cognitive relaxation technique type, rhythmic breathing including the somatic relaxation technique type and control groups. According to the Davidson and Schwartz multi-process theory, the Benson's relaxation and the rhythmic breathing techniques have cognitive and somatic effects, respectively. One day before the surgery, the patients in the intervention groups were trained regarding relaxation and breathing techniques and were asked to perform the techniques under the supervision of the researcher in the night before the surgery. The cognitive somatic anxiety questionnaire was used to measure anxiety before the intervention and half an hour after recovery of consciousness after the surgery. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used for data analysis via the SPSS v.21 software. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of demographic characteristics. The application of both techniques reduced the level of patients' anxiety after the surgery. The patients in the Benson's relaxation technique group reported only the relief of somatic anxiety. However, the breathing technique patients reported a reduction in both cognitive and somatic anxiety. The Benson's relaxation and rhythmic breathing techniques can reduce postoperative anxiety in patients after the mastectomy surgery. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2014042017350N1.

  1. The Comparison of Two Types of Relaxation Techniques on Postoperative State Anxiety in Candidates for The Mastectomy Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Parsa Yekta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anxiety among patients after surgery can affect their physiological and psychological well-being. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the effects of Benson’s relaxation and rhythmic breathing techniques on postoperative anxiety in candidates for the mastectomy surgery. Methods: This randomized controlled clinical trial study was conducted with ninety patients in 2013. The patients were hospitalized for the mastectomy surgery in three surgical wards in a teaching hospital, Tehran, Iran. They were randomly assigned into three groups: Benson’s relaxation including the cognitive relaxation technique type, rhythmic breathing including the somatic relaxation technique type and control groups. According to the Davidson and Schwartz multi-process theory, the Benson’s relaxation and the rhythmic breathing techniques have cognitive and somatic effects, respectively. One day before the surgery, the patients in the intervention groups were trained regarding relaxation and breathing techniques and were asked to perform the techniques under the supervision of the researcher in the night before the surgery. The cognitive somatic anxiety questionnaire was used to measure anxiety before the intervention and half an hour after recovery of consciousness after the surgery. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used for data analysis via the SPSS v.21 software. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of demographic characteristics. The application of both techniques reduced the level of patients’ anxiety after the surgery. The patients in the Benson’s relaxation technique group reported only the relief of somatic anxiety. However, the breathing technique patients reported a reduction in both cognitive and somatic anxiety. Conclusion: The Benson’s relaxation and rhythmic breathing techniques can reduce postoperative anxiety in patients after the mastectomy surgery.

  2. Review and assessments of potential environmental, health and safety impacts of MHD technology. Final draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to develop an environmental, health and safety (EH and S) assessment and begin a site - specific assessment of these and socio - economic impacts for the magnetohydrodynamics program of the United States Department of Energy. This assessment includes detailed scientific and technical information on the specific EH and S issues mentioned in the MHD Environmental Development Plan. A review of current literature on impact-related subjects is also included. This document addresses the coal-fired, open-cycle MHD technology and reviews and assesses potential EH and S impacts resulting from operation of commercially-installed technology.

  3. Latent Period of Relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, M; Irisawa, H

    1961-10-27

    The latent period of relaxation of molluscan myocardium due to anodal current is much longer than that of contraction. Although the rate and the grade of relaxation are intimately related to both the stimulus condition and the muscle tension, the latent period of relaxation remains constant, except when the temperature of the bathing fluid is changed.

  4. MHD and heat transfer benchmark problems for liquid metal flow in rectangular ducts. Final paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidorenkov, S.I. [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Inst. of Electrophysical Apparatus, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Hua, T.Q. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Araseki, Hideo [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-07-01

    Liquid metal cooling systems of a self-cooled blanket in a tokamak reactor will likely include channels of rectangular cross section where liquid metal is circulated in the presence of strong magnetic fields. MHD pressure drop, velocity distribution and heat transfer characteristics are important issues in the engineering design considerations. Computer codes for the reliable solution of three-dimensional MHD flow problems are needed for fusion relevant conditions. This paper describes four benchmark problems to validate magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and heat transfer computer codes. The problems include rectangular duct geometry with uniform and nonuniform magnetic fields, with and without surface heat flux, and various rectangular cross sections. Two of the problems are based on experiments. Participants in this benchmarking activity come from three countries: The Russian Federation, The United States, and Japan. The solution methods to the problems are described. Results from the different computer codes are presented and compared.

  5. Euler potentials for the MHD Kamchatnov-Hopf soliton solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Semenov, VS; Korovinski, DB; Biernat, HK

    2002-01-01

    In the MHD description of plasma phenomena the concept of magnetic helicity turns out to be very useful. We present here an example of introducing Euler potentials into a topological MHD soliton which has non-trivial helicity. The MHD soliton solution (Kamchatnov, 1982) is based on the Hopf invarian

  6. Safety and reliability in superconducting MHD magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laverick, C.; Powell, J.; Hsieh, S.; Reich, M.; Botts, T.; Prodell, A.

    1979-07-01

    This compilation adapts studies on safety and reliability in fusion magnets to similar problems in superconducting MHD magnets. MHD base load magnet requirements have been identified from recent Francis Bitter National Laboratory reports and that of other contracts. Information relevant to this subject in recent base load magnet design reports for AVCO - Everett Research Laboratories and Magnetic Corporation of America is included together with some viewpoints from a BNL workshop on structural analysis needed for superconducting coils in magnetic fusion energy. A summary of design codes used in large bubble chamber magnet design is also included.

  7. Explosively-driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agee, F.J.; Lehr, F.M. [Phillips Lab., Kirtland AFB, NM (United States); Vigil, M.; Kaye, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gaudet, J.; Shiffler, D. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Plasma jet generators have been designed and tested which used an explosive driver and shocktube with a rectangular cross section that optimize the flow velocity and electrical conductivity. The latest in a series of designs has been tested using a reactive load to diagnose the electrical properties of the MHD generator/electromagnet combination. The results of these tests indicate that the plasma jet/MHD generator design does generate a flow velocity greater than 25 km/s and produces several gigawatts of pulsed power in a very small package size. A larger, new generator design is also presented.

  8. Resistive Reduced MHD Modeling of Multi-Edge-Localized-Mode Cycles in Tokamak X -Point Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orain, F.; Bécoulet, M.; Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Hoelzl, M.; Morales, J.; Garbet, X.; Nardon, E.; Pamela, S.; Passeron, C.; Latu, G.; Fil, A.; Cahyna, P.

    2015-01-01

    The full dynamics of a multi-edge-localized-mode (ELM) cycle is modeled for the first time in realistic tokamak X -point geometry with the nonlinear reduced MHD code jorek. The diamagnetic rotation is found to be instrumental to stabilize the plasma after an ELM crash and to model the cyclic reconstruction and collapse of the plasma pressure profile. ELM relaxations are cyclically initiated each time the pedestal gradient crosses a triggering threshold. Diamagnetic drifts are also found to yield a near-symmetric ELM power deposition on the inner and outer divertor target plates, consistent with experimental measurements.

  9. Relaxation properties in classical diamagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carati, A.; Benfenati, F.; Galgani, L.

    2011-06-01

    It is an old result of Bohr that, according to classical statistical mechanics, at equilibrium a system of electrons in a static magnetic field presents no magnetization. Thus a magnetization can occur only in an out of equilibrium state, such as that produced through the Foucault currents when a magnetic field is switched on. It was suggested by Bohr that, after the establishment of such a nonequilibrium state, the system of electrons would quickly relax back to equilibrium. In the present paper, we study numerically the relaxation to equilibrium in a modified Bohr model, which is mathematically equivalent to a billiard with obstacles, immersed in a magnetic field that is adiabatically switched on. We show that it is not guaranteed that equilibrium is attained within the typical time scales of microscopic dynamics. Depending on the values of the parameters, one has a relaxation either to equilibrium or to a diamagnetic (presumably metastable) state. The analogy with the relaxation properties in the Fermi Pasta Ulam problem is also pointed out.

  10. SYNTHETIC SYNCHROTRON EMISSION MAPS FROM MHD MODELS FOR THE JET OF M87

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gracia, J.; Vlahakis, N.; Agudo, I.; Tsinganos, K.; Bogovalov, S. V.

    2009-01-01

    We present self-consistent global steady state MHD models and synthetic optically thin synchrotron emission maps for the jet of M87. The model consists of two distinct zones: an inner relativistic outflow, which we identify with the observed jet, and an outer cold disk wind. While the former does no

  11. SYNTHETIC SYNCHROTRON EMISSION MAPS FROM MHD MODELS FOR THE JET OF M87

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gracia, J.; Vlahakis, N.; Agudo, I.; Tsinganos, K.; Bogovalov, S. V.

    2009-01-01

    We present self-consistent global steady state MHD models and synthetic optically thin synchrotron emission maps for the jet of M87. The model consists of two distinct zones: an inner relativistic outflow, which we identify with the observed jet, and an outer cold disk wind. While the former does no

  12. Role of a continuous MHD dynamo in the formation of 3D equilibria in fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesan, P.; Bonfiglio, D.; Cianciosa, M.; Luce, T. C.; Taylor, N. Z.; Terranova, D.; Turco, F.; Wilcox, R. S.; Wingen, A.; Cappello, S.; Chrystal, C.; Escande, D. F.; Holcomb, C. T.; Marrelli, L.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Piron, L.; Predebon, I.; Zaniol, B.; DIII-D, The; RFX-Mod Teams

    2017-07-01

    Stationary 3D equilibria can form in fusion plasmas via saturation of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities or stimulated by external 3D fields. In these cases the current profile is anomalously broad due to magnetic flux pumping produced by the MHD modes. Flux pumping plays an important role in hybrid tokamak plasmas, maintaining the minimum safety factor above unity and thus removing sawteeth. It also enables steady-state hybrid operation, by redistributing non-inductive current driven near the center by electron cyclotron waves. A validated flux pumping model is not yet available, but it would be necessary to extrapolate hybrid operation to future devices. In this work flux pumping physics is investigated for helical core equilibria stimulated by external 3D fields in DIII-D hybrid plasmas. We show that flux pumping can be produced in a continuous way by an MHD dynamo emf. The same effect maintains helical equilibria in reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas. The effective MHD dynamo loop voltage is calculated for experimental 3D equilibrium reconstructions, by balancing Ohm’s law over helical flux surfaces, and is consistent with the expected current redistribution. Similar results are also obtained with more sophisticated nonlinear MHD simulations. The same modelling approach is applied to helical RFP states forming spontaneously in RFX-mod as the plasma current is raised above 0.8-1 MA. This comparison allows to identify the underlying physics common to tokamak and RFP: a helical core displacement modulates parallel current density along flux tubes, which requires a helical electrostatic potential to build up, giving rise to a helical MHD dynamo flow.

  13. Some questions of variable operational modes of an MHD generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belikov, V.V.; Breyev, V.V.; Gubarev, A.V.; Zotov, A.V.

    1979-01-01

    A Faraday MHD generator with solid electrodes is analyzed for the case of a variable load and three circuit configurations: series, parallel and independent excitation of the generator. The equivalent circuits are drawn along with the current-voltage and load characteristics (power and voltage at the load terminals as a function of generator current) for the series and parallel excitation cases. With independent excitation, the current-voltage characteristic is linear since the magnetic field induction in the generator channel at small magnetic Reynolds numbers does not depend on the generator current. The influence of the counterpressure at the channel outlet in a supersonic MHD generator is discussed in qualitative terms. Two modes are defined: when the pressure in the receiver following the channel is less than a certain value below the critical cross-section of the supersonic nozzle ahead of the channel (normal flow); and when the receiver pressure exceeds this specified value (anomalous flow), which leads to density jumps in the supersonic nozzle and subsonic flow in the interaction region. These concepts are employed in a discussion of the stability of steady-state flow and transient modes. Analytical expressions are derived for the excitation current and the load current in an MHD generator with a parallel configuration of the excitation winding, and these are plotted as a function of time. Transient operational modes of the generator with a series winding configuration of the magnet system are also shown, with the current plotted as a function of time. Expressions are derived for characteristic parameters which specify stable operational modes.

  14. Fully Parallel MHD Stability Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svidzinski, Vladimir; Galkin, Sergei; Kim, Jin-Soo; Liu, Yueqiang

    2015-11-01

    Progress on full parallelization of the plasma stability code MARS will be reported. MARS calculates eigenmodes in 2D axisymmetric toroidal equilibria in MHD-kinetic plasma models. It is a powerful tool for studying MHD and MHD-kinetic instabilities and it is widely used by fusion community. Parallel version of MARS is intended for simulations on local parallel clusters. It will be an efficient tool for simulation of MHD instabilities with low, intermediate and high toroidal mode numbers within both fluid and kinetic plasma models, already implemented in MARS. Parallelization of the code includes parallelization of the construction of the matrix for the eigenvalue problem and parallelization of the inverse iterations algorithm, implemented in MARS for the solution of the formulated eigenvalue problem. Construction of the matrix is parallelized by distributing the load among processors assigned to different magnetic surfaces. Parallelization of the solution of the eigenvalue problem is made by repeating steps of the present MARS algorithm using parallel libraries and procedures. Results of MARS parallelization and of the development of a new fix boundary equilibrium code adapted for MARS input will be reported. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  15. Application of ADER Scheme in MHD Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yanyan; FENG Xueshang; JIANG Chaowei; ZHOU Yufen

    2012-01-01

    The Arbitrary accuracy Derivatives Riemann problem method(ADER) scheme is a new high order numerical scheme based on the concept of finite volume integration,and it is very easy to be extended up to any order of space and time accuracy by using a Taylor time expansion at the cell interface position.So far the approach has been applied successfully to flow mechanics problems.Our objective here is to carry out the extension of multidimensional ADER schemes to multidimensional MHD systems of conservation laws by calculating several MHD problems in one and two dimensions: (ⅰ) Brio-Wu shock tube problem,(ⅱ) Dai-Woodward shock tube problem,(ⅲ) Orszag-Tang MHD vortex problem.The numerical results prove that the ADER scheme possesses the ability to solve MHD problem,remains high order accuracy both in space and time,keeps precise in capturing the shock.Meanwhile,the compared tests show that the ADER scheme can restrain the oscillation and obtain the high order non-oscillatory result.

  16. Hodograph method in MHD orthogonal fluid flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Nguyen

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Equations for steady plane MHD orthogonal flows of a viscous incompressible fluid of finite electrical conductivity are recast in the hodograph plane by using the Legendre transform function of the streamfunction. Three examples are studied to illustrate the developed theory. Solutions and geometries for these examples are determined.

  17. Principal characteristics of SFC type MHD generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayukawa, Naoyuki; Oikawa, Shun-ichi; Aoki, Yoshiaki; Seidou, Tadashi; Okinaka, Noriyuki

    1988-02-01

    This paper describes the experimental and analytical results obtained for an MHD channel with a two dimensionally shaped magnetic field configuration called 'the SFC-type'. The power generating performance was examined under various load conditions and B-field intensities with a 2 MWt shock tunnel MHD facility. It is demonstrated that the power output performance and the enthalpy extraction scaling law of the conventional uniform B-field MHD generator (UFC-type) were significantly improved by the SFC-design of the spatial distribution of the magnetic field. The arcing processes were also examined by a high speed camera and the post-test observation of arc spot traces on electrodes. Further, the characteristic frequencies of each of the so-called micro and constricted arcs were clarified by spectral analyses. The critical current densities, which define the transient conditions of each from the diffuse-to micro arc, and from the micro-to constricted arc modes could be clearly obtained by the present spectral analysis method. We also investigated the three-dimensional behavior under strong magnetic field based on the coupled electrical and hydrodynamical equations for both of the middle scale SFC-and UFC-type generators. Finally, it is concluded from the above mentioned various aspects that the shaped 2-D magnetic field design will offer a most useful means for the realization of a compact, high efficiency and a long duration open-cycle MHD generator.

  18. Pseudo-reconnection in MHD numerical simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A class of pseudo-reconnections caused by a shifted mesh in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations is reported. In terms of this mesh system, some non-physical results may be obtained in certain circumstances, e.g. magnetic reconnection occurs without resistivity. After comparison, another kind of mesh is strongly recommended.

  19. MHD equilibrium and stability in heliotron plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichiguchi, Katsuji [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    Recent topics in the theoretical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) analysis in the heliotron configuration are overviewed. Particularly, properties of three-dimensional equilibria, stability boundary of the interchange mode, effects of the net toroidal current including the bootstrap current and the ballooning mode stability are focused. (author)

  20. 还原型谷胱甘肽对使用静脉铁治疗肾性贫血的MHD患者微炎症状态的影响%Effects of Reduced Glutathione on Micro-inflammatory State in Patients with MHD of Intravenous Iron Supplement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱振宇; 崔晓梅; 张红英

    2012-01-01

    目的:观察还原型谷胱甘肽对使用静脉铁治疗肾性贫血的维持性血液透析(MHD)患者微炎症状态的影响.方法:选择2009-2011年于我院就诊的MHD患者60例,采用前瞻性、随机对照研究,随机分为口服补铁组(Ⅰ组,20例)、静脉补铁组(Ⅱ组,20例)、静脉补铁+还原型谷胱甘肽组(Ⅲ组,20例),观察各组用药前后血红蛋白浓度(Hb)、红细胞压积(Hct)、血清铁、血清铁蛋白(SF)等疗效指标以及血清中丙二醛、过氧化物歧化酶等氧化指标,以及血清C反应蛋白、白介素6、肿瘤坏死因子α等炎症指标的变化,并监测不良反应.结果:用药8周后,3组患者的Hb、Hct、SF水平较用药前均有显著升高(P<0.01),且Ⅱ组较Ⅰ组升高更显著(P<0.05),Ⅲ组较Ⅱ组升高更显著(P<0.01).应用铁剂后Ⅰ、Ⅱ组的氧化应激和炎症指标均较治疗前显著升高(P<0.05),但Ⅲ组升高不明显(P>0.05),用药后3组组间比较有显著性差异(P<0.01).结论:静脉补铁较口服补铁可有效改善MDH患者贫血及缺铁,但在一定程度上增加了体内的氧化应激和微炎症反应,使用还原型谷胱甘肽能有效改善使用静脉铁注射的MHD患者的氧化应激和微炎症状态.%OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of reduced glutathione on micro-inflammatory state in patients with maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) of intravenous iron supplement. METHODS: 60 MHD patients visiting our hospital were involved in retrospective randomized controlled trial and were randomized into 3 groups, i.e. oral iron supplement group (group Ⅰ , 20 cases) and intravenous iron supplement (group Ⅱ , 20 cases) and intravenous iron supplement + (group Ⅲ, 20 cases). The hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, hematocrit (Hct), serum iron, serum ferritin (SF), and other indicators as well as serum malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, and the levels of C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α in plasma were

  1. 3D simulations of disc-winds extending radially self-similar MHD models

    CERN Document Server

    Stute, Matthias; Vlahakis, Nektarios; Tsinganos, Kanaris; Mignone, Andrea; Massaglia, Silvano

    2014-01-01

    Disc-winds originating from the inner parts of accretion discs are considered as the basic component of magnetically collimated outflows. The only available analytical MHD solutions to describe disc-driven jets are those characterized by the symmetry of radial self-similarity. However, radially self-similar MHD jet models, in general, have three geometrical shortcomings, (i) a singularity at the jet axis, (ii) the necessary assumption of axisymmetry, and (iii) the non-existence of an intrinsic radial scale, i.e. the jets formally extend to radial infinity. Hence, numerical simulations are necessary to extend the analytical solutions towards the axis, by solving the full three-dimensional equations of MHD and impose a termination radius at finite radial distance. We focus here on studying the effects of relaxing the (ii) assumption of axisymmetry, i.e. of performing full 3D numerical simulations of a disc-wind crossing all magnetohydrodynamic critical surfaces. We compare the results of these runs with previou...

  2. Laser-Plasma Modeling Using PERSEUS Extended-MHD Simulation Code for HED Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Nathaniel; Seyler, Charles

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the use of the PERSEUS extended-MHD simulation code for high-energy-density (HED) plasmas in modeling laser-plasma interactions in relativistic and nonrelativistic regimes. By formulating the fluid equations as a relaxation system in which the current is semi-implicitly time-advanced using the Generalized Ohm's Law, PERSEUS enables modeling of two-fluid phenomena in dense plasmas without the need to resolve the smallest electron length and time scales. For relativistic and nonrelativistic laser-target interactions, we have validated a cycle-averaged absorption (CAA) laser driver model against the direct approach of driving the electromagnetic fields. The CAA model refers to driving the radiation energy and flux rather than the fields, and using hyperbolic radiative transport, coupled to the plasma equations via energy source terms, to model absorption and propagation of the radiation. CAA has the advantage of not requiring adequate grid resolution of each laser wavelength, so that the system can span many wavelengths without requiring prohibitive CPU time. For several laser-target problems, we compare existing MHD results to extended-MHD results generated using PERSEUS with the CAA model, and examine effects arising from Hall physics. This work is supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration stewardship sciences academic program under Department of Energy cooperative agreements DE-FOA-0001153 and DE-NA0001836.

  3. Collisionless magnetic reconnection under anisotropic MHD approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Kota; Hoshino, Masahiro

    We study the formation of slow-mode shocks in collisionless magnetic reconnection by using one- and two-dimensional collisionless magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) simulations based on the double adiabatic approximation, which is an important step to bridge the gap between the Petschek-type MHD reconnection model accompanied by a pair of slow shocks and the observational evidence of the rare occasion of in-situ slow shock observation. According to our results, a pair of slow shocks does form in the reconnection layer. The resultant shock waves, however, are quite weak compared with those in an isotropic MHD from the point of view of the plasma compression and the amount of the magnetic energy released across the shock. Once the slow shock forms, the downstream plasma are heated in highly anisotropic manner and a firehose-sense (P_{||}>P_{⊥}) pressure anisotropy arises. The maximum anisotropy is limited by the marginal firehose criterion, 1-(P_{||}-P_{⊥})/B(2) =0. In spite of the weakness of the shocks, the resultant reconnection rate is kept at the same level compared with that in the corresponding ordinary MHD simulations. It is also revealed that the sequential order of propagation of the slow shock and the rotational discontinuity, which appears when the guide field component exists, changes depending on the magnitude of the guide field. Especially, when no guide field exists, the rotational discontinuity degenerates with the contact discontinuity remaining at the position of the initial current sheet, while with the slow shock in the isotropic MHD. Our result implies that the slow shock does not necessarily play an important role in the energy conversion in the reconnection system and is consistent with the satellite observation in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  4. Relaxation time in disordered molecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Rodrigo P. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis-SC (Brazil); Freire, José A., E-mail: jfreire@fisica.ufpr.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, 81531-990 Curitiba-PR (Brazil)

    2015-05-28

    Relaxation time is the typical time it takes for a closed physical system to attain thermal equilibrium. The equilibrium is brought about by the action of a thermal reservoir inducing changes in the system micro-states. The relaxation time is intuitively expected to increase with system disorder. We derive a simple analytical expression for this dependence in the context of electronic equilibration in an amorphous molecular system model. We find that the disorder dramatically enhances the relaxation time but does not affect its independence of the nature of the initial state.

  5. MHD Simulation of the Inner-Heliospheric Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Wiengarten, T; Fichtner, H; Cameron, R; Jiang, J; Kissmann, R; Scherer, K; 10.1029/2012JA018089

    2013-01-01

    Maps of the radial magnetic field at a heliocentric distance of ten solar radii are used as boundary conditions in the MHD code CRONOS to simulate a 3D inner-heliospheric solar wind emanating from the rotating Sun out to 1 AU. The input data for the magnetic field are the result of solar surface flux transport modelling using observational data of sunspot groups coupled with a current sheet source surface model. Amongst several advancements, this allows for higher angular resolution than that of comparable observational data from synoptic magnetograms. The required initial conditions for the other MHD quantities are obtained following an empirical approach using an inverse relation between flux tube expansion and radial solar wind speed. The computations are performed for representative solar minimum and maximum conditions, and the corresponding state of the solar wind up to the Earths orbit is obtained. After a successful comparison of the latter with observational data, they can be used to drive outer-helio...

  6. Differential field equations for the MHD waves and wave equation of Alfven; Las ecuaciones diferenciales de campo para las ondas MHD y la ecuacion de onda de Alfven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fierros Palacios, Angel [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    2001-02-01

    In this work the complete set of differential field equations which describes the dynamic state of a continuos conducting media which flow in presence of a perturbed magnetic field is obtained. Then, the thermic equation of state, the wave equation and the conservation law of energy for the Alfven MHD waves are obtained. [Spanish] Es este trabajo se obtiene el conjunto completo de ecuaciones diferenciales de campo que describen el estado dinamico de un medio continuo conductor que se mueve en presencia de un campo magnetico externo perturbado. Asi, se obtiene la ecuacion termica de estado, la ecuacion de onda y la ley de la conservacion de la energia para las ondas de Alfven de la MHD.

  7. Stress Relaxation in Entangled Polymer Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Ji-Xuan; Svaneborg, Carsten; Everaers, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    We present an extensive set of simulation results for the stress relaxation in equilibrium and step-strained bead-spring polymer melts. The data allow us to explore the chain dynamics and the shear relaxation modulus, G(t), into the plateau regime for chains with Z=40 entanglements and into the t......We present an extensive set of simulation results for the stress relaxation in equilibrium and step-strained bead-spring polymer melts. The data allow us to explore the chain dynamics and the shear relaxation modulus, G(t), into the plateau regime for chains with Z=40 entanglements...... and into the terminal relaxation regime for Z=10. Using the known (Rouse) mobility of unentangled chains and the melt entanglement length determined via the primitive path analysis of the microscopic topological state of our systems, we have performed parameter-free tests of several different tube models. We find...

  8. Dielectric relaxation of samarium aluminate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakhya, Anup Pradhan; Dutta, Alo; Sinha, T.P. [Bose Institute, Department of Physics, Kolkata (India)

    2014-03-15

    A ceramic SmAlO{sub 3} (SAO) sample is synthesized by the solid-state reaction technique. The Rietveld refinement of the X-ray diffraction pattern has been done to find the crystal symmetry of the sample at room temperature. An impedance spectroscopy study of the sample has been performed in the frequency range from 50 Hz to 1 MHz and in the temperature range from 313 K to 573 K. Dielectric relaxation peaks are observed in the imaginary parts of the spectra. The Cole-Cole model is used to analyze the dielectric relaxation mechanism in SAO. The temperature-dependent relaxation times are found to obey the Arrhenius law having an activation energy of 0.29 eV, which indicates that polaron hopping is responsible for conduction or dielectric relaxation in this material. The complex impedance plane plot of the sample indicates the presence of both grain and grain-boundary effects and is analyzed by an electrical equivalent circuit consisting of a resistance and a constant-phase element. The frequency-dependent conductivity spectra follow a double-power law due to the presence of two plateaus. (orig.)

  9. Gas Core Reactor Numerical Simulation Using a Coupled MHD-MCNP Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazeminezhad, F.; Anghaie, S.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis is provided in this report of using two head-on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks to achieve supercritical nuclear fission in an axially elongated cylinder filled with UF4 gas as an energy source for deep space missions. The motivation for each aspect of the design is explained and supported by theory and numerical simulations. A subsequent report will provide detail on relevant experimental work to validate the concept. Here the focus is on the theory of and simulations for the proposed gas core reactor conceptual design from the onset of shock generations to the supercritical state achieved when the shocks collide. The MHD model is coupled to a standard nuclear code (MCNP) to observe the neutron flux and fission power attributed to the supercritical state brought about by the shock collisions. Throughout the modeling, realistic parameters are used for the initial ambient gaseous state and currents to ensure a resulting supercritical state upon shock collisions.

  10. VisAn MHD: a toolbox in Matlab for MHD computer model data visualisation and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Daum

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Among the many challenges facing modern space physics today is the need for a visualisation and analysis package which can examine the results from the diversity of numerical and empirical computer models as well as observational data. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD models represent the latest numerical models of the complex Earth's space environment and have the unique ability to span the enormous distances present in the magnetosphere from several hundred kilometres to several thousand kilometres above the Earth surface. This feature enables scientist to study complex structures of processes where otherwise only point measurements from satellites or ground-based instruments are available. Only by combining these observational data and the MHD simulations it is possible to enlarge the scope of the point-to-point observations and to fill the gaps left by measurements in order to get a full 3-D representation of the processes in our geospace environment. In this paper we introduce the VisAn MHD toolbox for Matlab as a tool for the visualisation and analysis of observational data and MHD simulations. We have created an easy to use tool which is capable of highly sophisticated visualisations and data analysis of the results from a diverse set of MHD models in combination with in situ measurements from satellites and ground-based instruments. The toolbox is being released under an open-source licensing agreement to facilitate and encourage community use and contribution.

  11. MHD Shallow Water Waves: Linear Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Heng, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    We present a linear analysis of inviscid, incompressible, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shallow water systems. In spherical geometry, a generic property of such systems is the existence of five wave modes. Three of them (two magneto-Poincare modes and one magneto-Rossby mode) are previously known. The other two wave modes are strongly influenced by the magnetic field and rotation, and have substantially lower angular frequencies; as such, we term them "magnetostrophic modes". We obtain analytical functions for the velocity, height and magnetic field perturbations in the limit that the magnitude of the MHD analogue of Lamb's parameter is large. On a sphere, the magnetostrophic modes reside near the poles, while the other modes are equatorially confined. Magnetostrophic modes may be an ingredient in explaining the frequency drifts observed in Type I X-ray bursts from neutron stars.

  12. MHD Equilibria and Triggers for Prominence Eruption

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yuhong

    2015-01-01

    Magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the emergence of twisted magnetic flux tubes from the solar interior into the corona are discussed to illustrate how twisted and sheared coronal magnetic structures (with free magnetic energy), capable of driving filament eruptions, can form in the corona in emerging active regions. Several basic mechanisms that can disrupt the quasi-equilibrium coronal structures and trigger the release of the stored free magnetic energy are discussed. These include both ideal processes such as the onset of the helical kink instability and the torus instability of a twisted coronal flux rope structure and the non-ideal process of the onset of fast magnetic reconnections in current sheets. Representative MHD simulations of the non-linear evolution involving these mechanisms are presented.

  13. Cosmic ray transport in MHD turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Huirong

    2007-01-01

    Numerical simulations shed light onto earlier not trackable problem of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. They allowed to test the predictions of different models and choose the correct ones. Inevitably, this progress calls for revisions in the picture of cosmic ray (CR) transport. It also shed light on the problems with the present day numerical modeling of CR. In this paper we focus on the analytical way of describing CR propagation and scattering, which should be used in synergy with the numerical studies. In particular, we use recently established scaling laws for MHD modes to obtain the transport properties for CRs. We include nonlinear effects arising from large scale trapping, to remove the 90 degree divergence. We determine how the efficiency of the scattering and CR mean free path depend on the characteristics of ionized media, e.g. plasma $\\beta$, Coulomb collisional mean free path. Implications for particle transport in interstellar medium and solar corona are discussed. We also examine the perp...

  14. Type I Planetary Migration with MHD Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Laughlin, G; Adams, F; Laughlin, Gregory; Steinacker, Adriane; Adams, Fred

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines how type I planet migration is affected by the presence of turbulent density fluctuations in the circumstellar disk. For type I migration, the planet does not clear a gap in the disk and its secular motion is driven by torques generated by the wakes it creates in the surrounding disk fluid. MHD turbulence creates additional density perturbations that gravitationally interact with the planet and can dominate the torques produced by the migration mechanism itself. This paper shows that conventional type I migration can be readily overwhelmed by turbulent perturbations and hence the usual description of type I migration should be modified in locations where the magnetorotational instability is active. In general, the migrating planet does not follow a smooth inward trned, but rather exhibits a random walk through phase space. Our main conclusion is that MHD turbulence will alter the time scales for type I planet migration and -- because of chaos -- requires the time scales to be described by ...

  15. MHD simulations on an unstructured mesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, H.R. [New York Univ., NY (United States); Park, W.; Belova, E.; Fu, G.Y. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Longcope, D.W. [Univ. of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States); Sugiyama, L.E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Two reasons for using an unstructured computational mesh are adaptivity, and alignment with arbitrarily shaped boundaries. Two codes which use finite element discretization on an unstructured mesh are described. FEM3D solves 2D and 3D RMHD using an adaptive grid. MH3D++, which incorporates methods of FEM3D into the MH3D generalized MHD code, can be used with shaped boundaries, which might be 3D.

  16. Statistical Theory of the Ideal MHD Geodynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, J. V.

    2012-01-01

    A statistical theory of geodynamo action is developed, using a mathematical model of the geodynamo as a rotating outer core containing an ideal (i.e., no dissipation), incompressible, turbulent, convecting magnetofluid. On the concentric inner and outer spherical bounding surfaces the normal components of the velocity, magnetic field, vorticity and electric current are zero, as is the temperature fluctuation. This allows the use of a set of Galerkin expansion functions that are common to both velocity and magnetic field, as well as vorticity, current and the temperature fluctuation. The resulting dynamical system, based on the Boussinesq form of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, represents MHD turbulence in a spherical domain. These basic equations (minus the temperature equation) and boundary conditions have been used previously in numerical simulations of forced, decaying MHD turbulence inside a sphere [1,2]. Here, the ideal case is studied through statistical analysis and leads to a prediction that an ideal coherent structure will be found in the form of a large-scale quasistationary magnetic field that results from broken ergodicity, an effect that has been previously studied both analytically and numerically for homogeneous MHD turbulence [3,4]. The axial dipole component becomes prominent when there is a relatively large magnetic helicity (proportional to the global correlation of magnetic vector potential and magnetic field) and a stationary, nonzero cross helicity (proportional to the global correlation of velocity and magnetic field). The expected angle of the dipole moment vector with respect to the rotation axis is found to decrease to a minimum as the average cross helicity increases for a fixed value of magnetic helicity and then to increase again when average cross helicity approaches its maximum possible value. Only a relatively small value of cross helicity is needed to produce a dipole moment vector that is aligned at approx.10deg with the

  17. MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    This fifth semi-annual status report of the MHD Technology Transfer, Integration, and Review Committee (TTIRC) summarizes activities of the TTIRC during the period April 1990 through September 1990. It includes summaries and minutes of committee meetings, progress summaries of ongoing Proof-of-Concept (POC) contracts, discussions pertaining to technical integration issues in the POC program, and planned activities for the next six months.

  18. Design Study: Rocket Based MHD Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This report addresses the technical feasibility and design of a rocket based MHD generator using a sub-scale LOx/RP rocket motor. The design study was constrained by assuming the generator must function within the performance and structural limits of an existing magnet and by assuming realistic limits on (1) the axial electric field, (2) the Hall parameter, (3) current density, and (4) heat flux (given the criteria of heat sink operation). The major results of the work are summarized as follows: (1) A Faraday type of generator with rectangular cross section is designed to operate with a combustor pressure of 300 psi. Based on a magnetic field strength of 1.5 Tesla, the electrical power output from this generator is estimated to be 54.2 KW with potassium seed (weight fraction 3.74%) and 92 KW with cesium seed (weight fraction 9.66%). The former corresponds to a enthalpy extraction ratio of 2.36% while that for the latter is 4.16%; (2) A conceptual design of the Faraday MHD channel is proposed, based on a maximum operating time of 10 to 15 seconds. This concept utilizes a phenolic back wall for inserting the electrodes and inter-electrode insulators. Copper electrode and aluminum oxide insulator are suggested for this channel; and (3) A testing configuration for the sub-scale rocket based MHD system is proposed. An estimate of performance of an ideal rocket based MHD accelerator is performed. With a current density constraint of 5 Amps/cm(exp 2) and a conductivity of 30 Siemens/m, the push power density can be 250, 431, and 750 MW/m(sup 3) when the induced voltage uB have values of 5, 10, and 15 KV/m, respectively.

  19. Relaxation of a 1-D gravitational system

    CERN Document Server

    Valageas, P

    2006-01-01

    We study the relaxation towards thermodynamical equilibrium of a 1-D gravitational system. This OSC model shows a series of critical energies $E_{cn}$ where new equilibria appear and we focus on the homogeneous ($n=0$), one-peak ($n=\\pm 1$) and two-peak ($n=2$) states. Using numerical simulations we investigate the relaxation to the stable equilibrium $n=\\pm 1$ of this $N-$body system starting from initial conditions defined by equilibria $n=0$ and $n=2$. We find that in a fashion similar to other long-range systems the relaxation involves a fast violent relaxation phase followed by a slow collisional phase as the system goes through a series of quasi-stationary states. Moreover, in cases where this slow second stage leads to a dynamically unstable configuration (two peaks with a high mass ratio) it is followed by a new sequence ``violent relaxation/slow collisional relaxation''. We obtain an analytical estimate of the relaxation time $t_{2\\to \\pm 1}$ through the mean escape time of a particle from its potent...

  20. Inductive ionospheric solver for magnetospheric MHD simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Vanhamäki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new scheme for solving the ionospheric boundary conditions required in magnetospheric MHD simulations. In contrast to the electrostatic ionospheric solvers currently in use, the new solver takes ionospheric induction into account by solving Faraday's law simultaneously with Ohm's law and current continuity. From the viewpoint of an MHD simulation, the new inductive solver is similar to the electrostatic solvers, as the same input data is used (field-aligned current [FAC] and ionospheric conductances and similar output is produced (ionospheric electric field. The inductive solver is tested using realistic, databased models of an omega-band and westward traveling surge. Although the tests were performed with local models and MHD simulations require a global ionospheric solution, we may nevertheless conclude that the new solution scheme is feasible also in practice. In the test cases the difference between static and electrodynamic solutions is up to ~10 V km−1 in certain locations, or up to 20-40% of the total electric field. This is in agreement with previous estimates. It should also be noted that if FAC is replaced by the ground magnetic field (or ionospheric equivalent current in the input data set, exactly the same formalism can be used to construct an inductive version of the KRM method originally developed by Kamide et al. (1981.

  1. The Statistical Mechanics of Ideal MHD Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2003-01-01

    Turbulence is a universal, nonlinear phenomenon found in all energetic fluid and plasma motion. In particular. understanding magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and incorporating its effects in the computation and prediction of the flow of ionized gases in space, for example, are great challenges that must be met if such computations and predictions are to be meaningful. Although a general solution to the "problem of turbulence" does not exist in closed form, numerical integrations allow us to explore the phase space of solutions for both ideal and dissipative flows. For homogeneous, incompressible turbulence, Fourier methods are appropriate, and phase space is defined by the Fourier coefficients of the physical fields. In the case of ideal MHD flows, a fairly robust statistical mechanics has been developed, in which the symmetry and ergodic properties of phase space is understood. A discussion of these properties will illuminate our principal discovery: Coherent structure and randomness co-exist in ideal MHD turbulence. For dissipative flows, as opposed to ideal flows, progress beyond the dimensional analysis of Kolmogorov has been difficult. Here, some possible future directions that draw on the ideal results will also be discussed. Our conclusion will be that while ideal turbulence is now well understood, real turbulence still presents great challenges.

  2. MHD thrust vectoring of a rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labaune, Julien; Packan, Denis; Tholin, Fabien; Chemartin, Laurent; Stillace, Thierry; Masson, Frederic

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the possibility to use MagnetoHydroDynamics (MHD) to vectorize the thrust of a solid propellant rocket engine exhaust is investigated. Using a magnetic field for vectoring offers a mass gain and a reusability advantage compared to standard gimbaled, elastomer-joint systems. Analytical and numerical models were used to evaluate the flow deviation with a 1 Tesla magnetic field inside the nozzle. The fluid flow in the resistive MHD approximation is calculated using the KRONOS code from ONERA, coupling the hypersonic CFD platform CEDRE and the electrical code SATURNE from EDF. A critical parameter of these simulations is the electrical conductivity, which was evaluated using a set of equilibrium calculations with 25 species. Two models were used: local thermodynamic equilibrium and frozen flow. In both cases, chlorine captures a large fraction of free electrons, limiting the electrical conductivity to a value inadequate for thrust vectoring applications. However, when using chlorine-free propergols with 1% in mass of alkali, an MHD thrust vectoring of several degrees was obtained.

  3. Inductive ionospheric solver for magnetospheric MHD simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhamäki, H.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new scheme for solving the ionospheric boundary conditions required in magnetospheric MHD simulations. In contrast to the electrostatic ionospheric solvers currently in use, the new solver takes ionospheric induction into account by solving Faraday's law simultaneously with Ohm's law and current continuity. From the viewpoint of an MHD simulation, the new inductive solver is similar to the electrostatic solvers, as the same input data is used (field-aligned current [FAC] and ionospheric conductances) and similar output is produced (ionospheric electric field). The inductive solver is tested using realistic, databased models of an omega-band and westward traveling surge. Although the tests were performed with local models and MHD simulations require a global ionospheric solution, we may nevertheless conclude that the new solution scheme is feasible also in practice. In the test cases the difference between static and electrodynamic solutions is up to ~10 V km-1 in certain locations, or up to 20-40% of the total electric field. This is in agreement with previous estimates. It should also be noted that if FAC is replaced by the ground magnetic field (or ionospheric equivalent current) in the input data set, exactly the same formalism can be used to construct an inductive version of the KRM method originally developed by Kamide et al. (1981).

  4. The CHEASE code for toroidal MHD equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luetjens, H. [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Centre de Physique Theorique; Bondeson, A. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Inst. for Electromagnetic Field Theory and Plasma Physics; Sauter, O. [ITER-San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1996-03-01

    CHEASE solves the Grad-Shafranov equation for the MHD equilibrium of a Tokamak-like plasma with pressure and current profiles specified by analytic forms or sets of data points. Equilibria marginally stable to ballooning modes or with a prescribed fraction of bootstrap current can be computed. The code provides a mapping to magnetic flux coordinates, suitable for MHD stability calculations or global wave propagation studies. The code computes equilibrium quantities for the stability codes ERATO, MARS, PEST, NOVA-W and XTOR and for the global wave propagation codes LION and PENN. The two-dimensional MHD equilibrium (Grad-Shafranov) equation is solved in variational form. The discretization uses bicubic Hermite finite elements with continuous first order derivates for the poloidal flux function {Psi}. The nonlinearity of the problem is handled by Picard iteration. The mapping to flux coordinates is carried out with a method which conserves the accuracy of the cubic finite elements. The code uses routines from the CRAY libsci.a program library. However, all these routines are included in the CHEASE package itself. If CHEASE computes equilibrium quantities for MARS with fast Fourier transforms, the NAG library is required. CHEASE is written in standard FORTRAN-77, except for the use of the input facility NAMELIST. CHEASE uses variable names with up to 8 characters, and therefore violates the ANSI standard. CHEASE transfers plot quantities through an external disk file to a plot program named PCHEASE using the UNIRAS or the NCAR plot package. (author) figs., tabs., 34 refs.

  5. Stress Relaxation in Entangled Polymer Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Ji-Xuan; Svaneborg, Carsten; Everaers, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    and into the terminal relaxation regime for Z=10. Using the known (Rouse) mobility of unentangled chains and the melt entanglement length determined via the primitive path analysis of the microscopic topological state of our systems, we have performed parameter-free tests of several different tube models. We find......We present an extensive set of simulation results for the stress relaxation in equilibrium and step-strained bead-spring polymer melts. The data allow us to explore the chain dynamics and the shear relaxation modulus, G(t), into the plateau regime for chains with Z=40 entanglements...

  6. Spin relaxation in nanowires by hyperfine coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echeverria-Arrondo, C. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Universidad del Pais Vasco UPV/EHU, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Sherman, E.Ya. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Universidad del Pais Vasco UPV/EHU, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); IKERBASQUE Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao, Bizkaia (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    Hyperfine interactions establish limits on spin dynamics and relaxation rates in ensembles of semiconductor quantum dots. It is the confinement of electrons which determines nonzero hyperfine coupling and leads to the spin relaxation. As a result, in nanowires one would expect the vanishing of this effect due to extended electron states. However, even for relatively clean wires, disorder plays a crucial role and makes electron localization sufficient to cause spin relaxation on the time scale of the order of 10 ns. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Compact vs. Exponential-Size LP Relaxations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, R.D.; Lancia, G.

    2000-09-01

    In this paper we introduce by means of examples a new technique for formulating compact (i.e. polynomial-size) LP relaxations in place of exponential-size models requiring separation algorithms. In the same vein as a celebrated theorem by Groetschel, Lovasz and Schrijver, we state the equivalence of compact separation and compact optimization. Among the examples used to illustrate our technique, we introduce a new formulation for the Traveling Salesman Problem, whose relaxation we show equivalent to the subtour elimination relaxation.

  8. The Acceleration Mechanism of Resistive MHD Jets Launched from Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kuwabara, T; Kudoh, T; Matsumoto, R

    2004-01-01

    We analyzed the results of non-linear resistive magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations of jet formation to study the acceleration mechanism of axisymmetric, resistive MHD jets. The initial state is a constant angular momentum, polytropic torus threaded by weak uniform vertical magnetic fields. The time evolution of the torus is simulated by applying the CIP-MOCCT scheme extended for resistive MHD equations. We carried out simulations up to 50 rotation period at the innermost radius of the disk created by accretion from the torus. The acceleration forces and the characteristics of resistive jets were studied by computing forces acting on Lagrangian test particles. Since the angle between the rotation axis of the disk and magnetic field lines is smaller in resistive models than in ideal MHD models, magnetocentrifugal acceleration is smaller. The effective potential along a magnetic field line has maximum around $z \\sim 0.5r_0$ in resistive models, where $r_0$ is the radius where the density of the initial toru...

  9. Surface hopping investigation of the relaxation dynamics in radical cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assmann, Mariana; Matsika, Spiridoula, E-mail: smatsika@temple.edu [Department of Chemistry, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122 (United States); Weinacht, Thomas [Department of Physics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States)

    2016-01-21

    Ionization processes can lead to the formation of radical cations with population in several ionic states. In this study, we examine the dynamics of three radical cations starting from an excited ionic state using trajectory surface hopping dynamics in combination with multiconfigurational electronic structure methods. The efficiency of relaxation to the ground state is examined in an effort to understand better whether fragmentation of cations is likely to occur directly on excited states or after relaxation to the ground state. The results on cyclohexadiene, hexatriene, and uracil indicate that relaxation to the ground ionic state is very fast in these systems, while fragmentation before relaxation is rare. Ultrafast relaxation is facilitated by the close proximity of electronic states and the presence of two- and three-state conical intersections. Examining the properties of the systems in the Franck-Condon region can give some insight into the subsequent dynamics.

  10. Vibrational energy relaxation in liquid oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, K. F.; Egorov, S. A.; Skinner, J. L.

    1998-09-01

    We consider theoretically the relaxation from the first excited vibrational state to the ground state of oxygen molecules in neat liquid oxygen. The relaxation rate constant is related in the usual way to the Fourier transform of a certain quantum mechanical force-force time-correlation function. A result from Egelstaff allows one instead to relate the rate constant (approximately) to the Fourier transform of a classical force-force time-correlation function. This Fourier transform is then evaluated approximately by calculating three equilibrium averages from a classical molecular dynamics simulation. Our results for the relaxation times (at two different temperatures) are within a factor of 5 of the experimental relaxation times, which are in the ms range.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting with short relaxation intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amthor, Thomas; Doneva, Mariya; Koken, Peter; Sommer, Karsten; Meineke, Jakob; Börnert, Peter

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate a technique for improving the performance of Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (MRF) in repetitive sampling schemes, in particular for 3D MRF acquisition, by shortening relaxation intervals between MRF pulse train repetitions. A calculation method for MRF dictionaries adapted to short relaxation intervals and non-relaxed initial spin states is presented, based on the concept of stationary fingerprints. The method is applicable to many different k-space sampling schemes in 2D and 3D. For accuracy analysis, T1 and T2 values of a phantom are determined by single-slice Cartesian MRF for different relaxation intervals and are compared with quantitative reference measurements. The relevance of slice profile effects is also investigated in this case. To further illustrate the capabilities of the method, an application to in-vivo spiral 3D MRF measurements is demonstrated. The proposed computation method enables accurate parameter estimation even for the shortest relaxation intervals, as investigated for different sampling patterns in 2D and 3D. In 2D Cartesian measurements, we achieved a scan acceleration of more than a factor of two, while maintaining acceptable accuracy: The largest T1 values of a sample set deviated from their reference values by 0.3% (longest relaxation interval) and 2.4% (shortest relaxation interval). The largest T2 values showed systematic deviations of up to 10% for all relaxation intervals, which is discussed. The influence of slice profile effects for multislice acquisition is shown to become increasingly relevant for short relaxation intervals. In 3D spiral measurements, a scan time reduction of 36% was achieved, maintaining the quality of in-vivo T1 and T2 maps. Reducing the relaxation interval between MRF sequence repetitions using stationary fingerprint dictionaries is a feasible method to improve the scan efficiency of MRF sequences. The method enables fast implementations of 3D spatially resolved

  12. Spectrum of multi-region-relaxed magnetohydrodynamic modes in topologically toroidal geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Dewar, Robert L; Tuen,; Hole, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    A general formulation of the problem of calculating the spectrum of stable and unstable eigenmodes of linearized perturbations about a magnetically confined toroidal plasma is presented. The analysis is based on a new hydromagnetic dynamical model, Multi-region Relaxed Magnetohydrodynamics (MRxMHD), which models the plasma-magnetic field system as consisting of multiple regions, containing compressible Euler fluid and Taylor-relaxed magnetic field, separated by flexible ideal-MHD current sheets. This is illustrated using a first-principles analysis of a two-region slab geometry, with periodic boundary conditions to model the outer regions of typical tokamak or reversed-field pinch plasmas. The lowest and second-lowest eigenvalues in plasmas unstable to tearing and kink-tearing modes are calculated. Very near marginal stability the lowest mode obtained using the incompressible approximation to the kinetic energy normalization of the present study is shown to correspond to the eigenvalues found in previous stud...

  13. Evolutionary Conditions in the Dissipative MHD System Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    The evolutionary conditions for the dissipative continuous magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks are studied. We modify Hada's approach in the stability analysis of the MHD shock waves. The matching conditions between perturbed shock structure and asymptotic wave modes shows that all types of the MHD shocks, including the intermediate shocks, are evolutionary and perturbed solutions are uniquely defined. We also adopt our formalism to the MHD shocks in the system with resistivity without viscosity, which is often used in numerical simulation, and show that all types of shocks that are found in the system satisfy the evolutionary condition and perturbed solutions are uniquely defined. These results suggest that the intermediate shocks may appear in reality.

  14. Kinetic activation-relaxation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Brommer, Peter; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed description of the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm with on-the-fly event search. Combining a topological classification for local environments and event generation with ART nouveau, an efficient unbiased sampling method for finding transition states, k-ART can be applied to complex materials with atoms in off-lattice positions or with elastic deformations that cannot be handled with standard KMC approaches. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, we demonstrate the general character of k-ART by applying the algorithm to three challenging systems: self-defect annihilation in c-Si (crystalline silicon), self-interstitial diffusion in Fe, and structural relaxation in a-Si (amorphous silicon).

  15. Kinetic activation-relaxation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Brommer, Peter; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed description of the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm with on-the-fly event search. Combining a topological classification for local environments and event generation with ART nouveau, an efficient unbiased sampling method for finding transition states, k-ART can be applied to complex materials with atoms in off-lattice positions or with elastic deformations that cannot be handled with standard KMC approaches. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, we demonstrate the general character of k-ART by applying the algorithm to three challenging systems: self-defect annihilation in c-Si (crystalline silicon), self-interstitial diffusion in Fe, and structural relaxation in a-Si (amorphous silicon).

  16. Non-Radial Oscillations in an Axisymmetric MHD Incompressible Fluid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. Satya Narayanan

    2000-09-01

    It is well known from Helioseismology that the Sun exhibits oscillations on a global scale, most of which are non-radial in nature. These oscillations help us to get a clear picture of the internal structure of the Sun as has been demonstrated by the theoretical and observational (such as GONG) studies. In this study we formulate the linearised equations of motion for non-radial oscillations by perturbing the MHD equilibrium solution for an axisymmetric incompressible fluid. The fluid motion and the magnetic field are expressed as scalars , , and , respectively. In deriving the exact solution for the equilibrium state, we neglect the contribution due to meridional circulation. The perturbed quantities *, *, *, * are written in terms of orthogonal polynomials. A special case of the above formulation and its stability is discussed.

  17. Heat and mass transfer for natural convection MHD flow over a permeable moving vertical plate with convective boundary condition in the presence of viscous dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shateyi, Stanford

    2017-07-01

    The spectral relaxation method is employed to examine natural convective heat and mass transfer, MHD flow over a permeable moving vertical plate with convective boundary condition in the presence of viscous dissipation, thermal radiation and chemical reaction. The governing partial differential equations were transformed into a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using a similarity approach. The pertinent results are then displayed in tabular form and graphically.

  18. Indentation load relaxation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannula, S.P.; Stone, D.; Li, C.Y. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (USA))

    Most of the models that are used to describe the nonelastic behavior of materials utilize stress-strain rate relations which can be obtained by a load relaxation test. The conventional load relaxation test, however, cannot be performed if the volume of the material to be tested is very small. For such applications the indentation type of test offers an attractive means of obtaining data necessary for materials characterization. In this work the feasibility of the indentation load relaxation test is studied. Experimental techniques are described together with results on Al, Cu and 316 SS. These results are compared to those of conventional uniaxial load relaxation tests, and the conversion of the load-indentation rate data into the stress-strain rate data is discussed.

  19. Relaxation techniques for stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problems such as high blood pressure, stomachaches, headaches, anxiety, and depression. Using relaxation techniques can help you feel calm. These exercises can also help you manage stress and ease the effects of stress on your body.

  20. Analytical model of unsteady-state convective heat transfer between the heat carrier and the finite sizes plate adjusted for the thermal relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makarushkin Danila

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A hyperbolic boundary value problem of the thermal conduction of a two-dimensional plate with the third kind boundary conditions is formulated. The transient thermal process in the plate is due to the temperature changes of the external medium over time and along the plate length, and also by a multiple step change of the plate surface heat transfer coefficient throughout the transient process. An analytical solution with improved convergence adjusted for thermal relaxation and thermal damping is obtained for the temperature field in the plate.

  1. Helioseismology, Asteroseismology, and MHD Connections

    CERN Document Server

    Gizon, Laurent; Leibacher, John

    2009-01-01

    This volume presents a timely snapshot of the state of helio- and asteroseismology in the era when the SOHO/MDI instrument is about to be replaced by SDO/HMI and the CoRoT space mission is yielding its first long-duration light curves of thousands of stars. The articles and topics in this book are inspired by two seminal conferences, HELAS II and SOHO19/GONG 2007, but contributions from other experts have been commissioned as well. For example, three key papers were invited to describe the current status of asteroseismology, global helioseismology, and local helioseismology. These papers provide a framework for the other contributions and together they form a complete description of our understanding of pressure waves in the Sun and other stars. This volume is aimed at solar physicists and astronomers specializing in helio- and asteroseismology.

  2. Understanding Accretion Disks through Three Dimensional Radiation MHD Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan-Fei

    I study the structures and thermal properties of black hole accretion disks in the radiation pressure dominated regime. Angular momentum transfer in the disk is provided by the turbulence generated by the magneto-rotational instability (MRI), which is calculated self-consistently with a recently developed 3D radiation magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) code based on Athena. This code, developed by my collaborators and myself, couples both the radiation momentum and energy source terms with the ideal MHD equations by modifying the standard Godunov method to handle the stiff radiation source terms. We solve the two momentum equations of the radiation transfer equations with a variable Eddington tensor (VET), which is calculated with a time independent short characteristic module. This code is well tested and accurate in both optically thin and optically thick regimes. It is also accurate for both radiation pressure and gas pressure dominated flows. With this code, I find that when photon viscosity becomes significant, the ratio between Maxwell stress and Reynolds stress from the MRI turbulence can increase significantly with radiation pressure. The thermal instability of the radiation pressure dominated disk is then studied with vertically stratified shearing box simulations. Unlike the previous results claiming that the radiation pressure dominated disk with MRI turbulence can reach a steady state without showing any unstable behavior, I find that the radiation pressure dominated disks always either collapse or expand until we have to stop the simulations. During the thermal runaway, the heating and cooling rates from the simulations are consistent with the general criterion of thermal instability. However, details of the thermal runaway are different from the predictions of the standard alpha disk model, as many assumptions in that model are not satisfied in the simulations. We also identify the key reasons why previous simulations do not find the instability. The thermal

  3. MHD Shock Conditions for Accreting Plasma onto Kerr Black Holes - I

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, M; Fukumura, K; Tsuruta, S; Takahashi, Masaaki; Rilett, Darrell; Fukumura, Keigo; Tsuruta, Sachiko

    2002-01-01

    We extend the work by Appl and Camenzind (1988) for special relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) jets, to fully general relativistic studies of the standing shock formation for accreting MHD plasma in a rotating, stationary and axisymmetric black hole magnetosphere. All the postshock physical quantities are expressed in terms of the relativistic compression ratio, which can be obtained in terms of preshock quantities. Then, the downstream state of a shocked plasma is determined by the upstream state of the accreting plasma. In this paper sample solutions are presented for slow magnetosonic shocks for accreting flows in the equatorial plane. We find that some properties of the slow magnetosonic shock for the rotating magnetosphere can behave like a fast magnetosonic shock. In fact, it is confirmed that in the limit of weak gravity for the upstream non-rotating accretion plasma where the magnetic field lines are leading and rotating, our results are very similar to the fast magnetosonic shock solution by Appl...

  4. NONLINEAR MHD WAVES IN A PROMINENCE FOOT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ofman, L. [Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Knizhnik, K.; Kucera, T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Schmieder, B. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Univ. Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cit, 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France)

    2015-11-10

    We study nonlinear waves in a prominence foot using a 2.5D MHD model motivated by recent high-resolution observations with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope in Ca ii emission of a prominence on 2012 October 10 showing highly dynamic small-scale motions in the prominence material. Observations of Hα intensities and of Doppler shifts show similar propagating fluctuations. However, the optically thick nature of the emission lines inhibits a unique quantitative interpretation in terms of density. Nevertheless, we find evidence of nonlinear wave activity in the prominence foot by examining the relative magnitude of the fluctuation intensity (δI/I ∼ δn/n). The waves are evident as significant density fluctuations that vary with height and apparently travel upward from the chromosphere into the prominence material with quasi-periodic fluctuations with a typical period in the range of 5–11 minutes and wavelengths <2000 km. Recent Doppler shift observations show the transverse displacement of the propagating waves. The magnetic field was measured with the THEMIS instrument and was found to be 5–14 G. For the typical prominence density the corresponding fast magnetosonic speed is ∼20 km s{sup −1}, in qualitative agreement with the propagation speed of the detected waves. The 2.5D MHD numerical model is constrained with the typical parameters of the prominence waves seen in observations. Our numerical results reproduce the nonlinear fast magnetosonic waves and provide strong support for the presence of these waves in the prominence foot. We also explore gravitational MHD oscillations of the heavy prominence foot material supported by dipped magnetic field structure.

  5. An advanced implicit solver for MHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udrea, Bogdan

    A new implicit algorithm has been developed for the solution of the time-dependent, viscous and resistive single fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. The algorithm is based on an approximate Riemann solver for the hyperbolic fluxes and central differencing applied on a staggered grid for the parabolic fluxes. The algorithm employs a locally aligned coordinate system that allows the solution to the Riemann problems to be solved in a natural direction, normal to cell interfaces. The result is an original scheme that is robust and reduces the complexity of the flux formulas. The evaluation of the parabolic fluxes is also implemented using a locally aligned coordinate system, this time on the staggered grid. The implicit formulation employed by WARP3 is a two level scheme that was applied for the first time to the single fluid MHD model. The flux Jacobians that appear in the implicit scheme are evaluated numerically. The linear system that results from the implicit discretization is solved using a robust symmetric Gauss-Seidel method. The code has an explicit mode capability so that implementation and test of new algorithms or new physics can be performed in this simpler mode. Last but not least the code was designed and written to run on parallel computers so that complex, high resolution runs can be per formed in hours rather than days. The code has been benchmarked against analytical and experimental gas dynamics and MHD results. The benchmarks consisted of one-dimensional Riemann problems and diffusion dominated problems, two-dimensional supersonic flow over a wedge, axisymmetric magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster simulation and three-dimensional supersonic flow over intersecting wedges and spheromak stability simulation. The code has been proven to be robust and the results of the simulations showed excellent agreement with analytical and experimental results. Parallel performance studies showed that the code performs as expected when run on parallel

  6. Annular MHD Physics for Turbojet Energy Bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    The use of annular Hall type MHD generator/accelerator ducts for turbojet energy bypass is evaluated assuming weakly ionized flows obtained from pulsed nanosecond discharges. The equations for a 1-D, axisymmetric MHD generator/accelerator are derived and numerically integrated to determine the generator/accelerator performance characteristics. The concept offers a shockless means of interacting with high speed inlet flows and potentially offers variable inlet geometry performance without the complexity of moving parts simply by varying the generator loading parameter. The cycle analysis conducted iteratively with a spike inlet and turbojet flying at M = 7 at 30 km altitude is estimated to have a positive thrust per unit mass flow of 185 N-s/kg. The turbojet allowable combustor temperature is set at an aggressive 2200 deg K. The annular MHD Hall generator/accelerator is L = 3 m in length with a B(sub r) = 5 Tesla magnetic field and a conductivity of sigma = 5 mho/m for the generator and sigma= 1.0 mho/m for the accelerator. The calculated isentropic efficiency for the generator is eta(sub sg) = 84 percent at an enthalpy extraction ratio, eta(sub Ng) = 0.63. The calculated isentropic efficiency for the accelerator is eta(sub sa) = 81 percent at an enthalpy addition ratio, eta(sub Na) = 0.62. An assessment of the ionization fraction necessary to achieve a conductivity of sigma = 1.0 mho/m is n(sub e)/n = 1.90 X 10(exp -6), and for sigma = 5.0 mho/m is n(sub e)/n = 9.52 X 10(exp -6).

  7. Spin relaxation in metallic ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, L.

    2011-02-01

    The Elliott theory of spin relaxation in metals and semiconductors is extended to metallic ferromagnets. Our treatment is based on the two-current model of Fert, Campbell, and Jaoul. The d→s electron-scattering process involved in spin relaxation is the inverse of the s→d process responsible for the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). As a result, spin-relaxation rate 1/τsr and AMR Δρ are given by similar formulas, and are in a constant ratio if scattering is by solute atoms. Our treatment applies to nickel- and cobalt-based alloys which do not have spin-up 3d states at the Fermi level. This category includes many of the technologically important magnetic materials. And we show how to modify the theory to apply it to bcc iron-based alloys. We also treat the case of Permalloy Ni80Fe20 at finite temperature or in thin-film form, where several kinds of scatterers exist. Predicted values of 1/τsr and Δρ are plotted versus resistivity of the sample. These predictions are compared to values of 1/τsr and Δρ derived from ferromagnetic-resonance and AMR experiments in Permalloy.

  8. Arresting relaxation in Pickering Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Tim; Burke, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Pickering emulsions consist of droplets of one fluid dispersed in a host fluid and stabilized by colloidal particles absorbed at the fluid-fluid interface. Everyday materials such as crude oil and food products like salad dressing are examples of these materials. Particles can stabilize non spherical droplet shapes in these emulsions through the following sequence: first, an isolated droplet is deformed, e.g. by an electric field, increasing the surface area above the equilibrium value; additional particles are then adsorbed to the interface reducing the surface tension. The droplet is then allowed to relax toward a sphere. If more particles were adsorbed than can be accommodated by the surface area of the spherical ground state, relaxation of the droplet is arrested at some non-spherical shape. Because the energetic cost of removing adsorbed colloids exceeds the interfacial driving force, these configurations can remain stable over long timescales. In this presentation, we present a computational study of the ordering present in anisotropic droplets produced through the mechanism of arrested relaxation and discuss the interplay between the geometry of the droplet, the dynamical process that produced it, and the structure of the defects observed.

  9. Precession Relaxation of Viscoelastic Oblate Rotators

    CERN Document Server

    Frouard, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Various perturbations (collisions, close encounters, YORP) destabilise the rotation of a small body, leaving it in a non-principal spin state. Then the body experiences alternating stresses generated by the inertial forces. The ensuing inelastic dissipation reduces the kinetic energy, without influencing the angular momentum. This yields nutation relaxation, i.e., evolution of the spin towards rotation about the maximal-inertia axis. Knowledge of the timescales needed to damp the nutation is crucial in studies of small bodies' dynamics. In the past, nutation relaxation has been described by an empirical quality factor introduced to parameterise the dissipation rate and to evade the discussion of the actual rheological parameters and their role in dissipation. This approach is unable to describe the dependence of the relaxation rate upon the nutation angle, because we do not know the quality factor's dependence on the frequency (which is a function of the nutation angle). This leaves open the question of relax...

  10. MHD Simulations of the Plasma Flow in the Magnetic Nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T. E. R.; Keidar, M.; Sankaran, K.; olzin, K. A.

    2013-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of plasma through a magnetic nozzle is simulated by solving the governing equations for the plasma flow in the presence of an static magnetic field representing the applied nozzle. This work will numerically investigate the flow and behavior of the plasma as the inlet plasma conditions and magnetic nozzle field strength are varied. The MHD simulations are useful for addressing issues such as plasma detachment and to can be used to gain insight into the physical processes present in plasma flows found in thrusters that use magnetic nozzles. In the model, the MHD equations for a plasma, with separate temperatures calculated for the electrons and ions, are integrated over a finite cell volume with flux through each face computed for each of the conserved variables (mass, momentum, magnetic flux, energy) [1]. Stokes theorem is used to convert the area integrals over the faces of each cell into line integrals around the boundaries of each face. The state of the plasma is described using models of the ionization level, ratio of specific heats, thermal conductivity, and plasma resistivity. Anisotropies in current conduction due to Hall effect are included, and the system is closed using a real-gas equation of state to describe the relationship between the plasma density, temperature, and pressure.A separate magnetostatic solver is used to calculate the applied magnetic field, which is assumed constant for these calculations. The total magnetic field is obtained through superposition of the solution for the applied magnetic field and the self-consistently computed induced magnetic fields that arise as the flowing plasma reacts to the presence of the applied field. A solution for the applied magnetic field is represented in Fig. 1 (from Ref. [2]), exhibiting the classic converging-diverging field pattern. Previous research was able to demonstrate effects such as back-emf at a super-Alfvenic flow, which significantly alters the shape of the

  11. Magnetic stresses in ideal MHD plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, V.O.

    1995-01-01

    and it is shown that the resulting magnetic forces on a finite volume element can be obtained by integrating the magnetic stresses over the surface of the element. The concept is used to rederive and discuss the equilibrium conditions for axisymmetric toroidal plasmas, including the virial theorem......The concept of magnetic stresses in ideal MHD plasma theory is reviewed and revisited with the aim of demonstrating its advantages as a basis for calculating and understanding plasma equilibria. Expressions are derived for the various stresses that transmit forces in a magnetized plasma...

  12. Modeling magnetized neutron stars using resistive MHD

    CERN Document Server

    Palenzuela, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    This work presents an implementation of the resistive MHD equations for a generic algebraic Ohm's law which includes the effects of finite resistivity within full General Relativity. The implementation naturally accounts for magnetic-field-induced anisotropies and, by adopting a phenomenological current, is able to accurately describe electromagnetic fields in the star and in its magnetosphere. We illustrate the application of this approach in interesting systems with astrophysical implications; the aligned rotator solution and the collapse of a magnetized rotating neutron star to a black hole.

  13. Local potential analysis of MHD instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, K. K.; Wilson, S. J.

    1985-02-01

    The use of the local potential method for studying instabilities of MHD fluids is examined. The mathematical method is similar to that developed by the authors for studying the time-dependent radiative transfer problem and the radiative stability of interstellar masers. The scheme is based on the universal evolution criterion proposed by Glansdorff and Prigogine (1964) as demonstrated by Hays (1965) for the heat equation and Schechter and Himmelblau (1965) for the Benard problem in hydrodynamics. The scheme for securing stability criteria is demonstrated for two particular cases.

  14. MHD Equations with Regularity in One Direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zujin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the 3D MHD equations and prove that if one directional derivative of the fluid velocity, say, ∂3u∈Lp0, T;LqR3, with 2/p + 3/q = γ ∈ [1,3/2, 3/γ ≤ q ≤ 1/(γ - 1, then the solution is in fact smooth.  This improves previous results greatly.

  15. MHD squeezing flow between two infinite plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umar Khan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Magneto hydrodynamic (MHD squeezing flow of a viscous fluid has been discussed. Conservation laws combined with similarity transformations have been used to formulate the flow mathematically that leads to a highly nonlinear ordinary differential equation. Analytical solution to the resulting differential equation is determined by employing Variation of Parameters Method (VPM. Runge–Kutta order-4 method is also used to solve the same problem for the sake of comparison. It is found that solution using VPM reduces the computational work yet maintains a very high level of accuracy. The influence of different parameters is also discussed and demonstrated graphically.

  16. Relativistic MHD with Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, M; Liebling, S L; Neilsen, D; Anderson, Matthew; Hirschmann, Eric; Liebling, Steven L.; Neilsen, David

    2006-01-01

    We solve the relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations using a finite difference Convex ENO method (CENO) in 3+1 dimensions within a distributed parallel adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) infrastructure. In flat space we examine a Balsara blast wave problem along with a spherical blast wave and a relativistic rotor test both with unigrid and AMR simulations. The AMR simulations substantially improve performance while reproducing the resolution equivalent unigrid simulation results. We also investigate the impact of hyperbolic divergence cleaning for the spherical blast wave and relativistic rotor. We include unigrid and mesh refinement parallel performance measurements for the spherical blast wave.

  17. 3D MHD Simulations of Tokamak Disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Simon; Stuber, James

    2014-10-01

    Two disruption scenarios are modeled numerically by use of the CORSICA 2D equilibrium and NIMROD 3D MHD codes. The work follows the simulations of pressure-driven modes in DIII-D and VDEs in ITER. The aim of the work is to provide starting points for simulation of tokamak disruption mitigation techniques currently in the CDR phase for ITER. Pressure-driven instability growth rates previously observed in simulations of DIIID are verified; Halo and Hiro currents produced during vertical displacements are observed in simulations of ITER with implementation of resistive walls in NIMROD. We discuss plans to exercise new code capabilities and validation.

  18. Evaluation of feedback in conductive MHD devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinberg, G.K.

    1977-01-01

    A method is recommended for computing feedback and the self-energizing threshold of conducting MHD devices. Circuits of equivalent magnetizing currents are used for this purpose in addition to equivalent electrical circuits. This kind of an approach makes it possible to reflect the influence of R/sub m/ on the operation of the device. Dimensionless functions were found which determine the critical value of the Reynolds magnetic number. The computations demonstrated that the redistribution of the magnetic field in the machine's operating zone under the influence of an induced field must be considered.

  19. Stationary MHD equilibria describing azimuthal rotations in symmetric plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Sidney T.; Viana, Ricardo L.

    2016-12-01

    We consider the stationary magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) equilibrium equation for an axisymmetric plasma undergoing azimuthal rotations. The case of cylindrical symmetry is treated, and we present two semi-analytical solutions for the stationary MHD equilibrium equations, from which a number of physical properties of the magnetically confined plasma are derived.

  20. Superconducting magnet system for an experimental disk MHD facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoopers, H.G.; Kate, ten H.H.J.; Klundert, van de L.J.M.

    1991-01-01

    A predesign of a split-pair magnet for a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) facility for testing a 10-MW open-cycle disk or a 5-MW closed-cycle disk generator is presented. The magnet system consists of a NbTi and a Nb 3Sn section, which provide a magnetic field of 9 T in the active area of the MHD channel.

  1. The Calculus of Variations and the Ideal MHD Energy Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnack, Dalton D.

    In Lecture 22, we showed that the ideal MHD force operator is self-adjoint and suggested that this allowed a formulation in which the stability of a system could be determined without solving a differential equation. Going further requires a little background in the calculus of variations. In the lecture we begin this discussion,1 and formulate the ideal MHD energy principle.

  2. On the well-posedness of a linearized plasma-vacuum interface problem in ideal compressible MHD

    CERN Document Server

    Trakhinin, Yuri

    2010-01-01

    We study the initial-boundary value problem resulting from the linearization of the plasma-vacuum interface problem in ideal compressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). We suppose that the plasma and the vacuum regions are unbounded domains and the plasma density does not go to zero continuously, but jumps. For the basic state upon which we perform linearization we find two cases of well-posedness of the "frozen" coefficient problem: the "gas dynamical" case and the "purely MHD" case. In the "gas dynamical" case we assume that the jump of the normal derivative of the total pressure is always negative. In the "purely MHD" case this condition can be violated but the plasma and the vacuum magnetic fields are assumed to be non-zero and non-parallel to each other everywhere on the interface. For this case we prove a basic a priori estimate in the anisotropic weighted Sobolev space $H^1_*$ for the variable coefficient problem.

  3. Resistive reduced MHD modeling of multi-edge-localized-mode cycles in Tokamak X-point plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orain, F; Bécoulet, M; Huijsmans, G T A; Dif-Pradalier, G; Hoelzl, M; Morales, J; Garbet, X; Nardon, E; Pamela, S; Passeron, C; Latu, G; Fil, A; Cahyna, P

    2015-01-23

    The full dynamics of a multi-edge-localized-mode (ELM) cycle is modeled for the first time in realistic tokamak X-point geometry with the nonlinear reduced MHD code jorek. The diamagnetic rotation is found to be instrumental to stabilize the plasma after an ELM crash and to model the cyclic reconstruction and collapse of the plasma pressure profile. ELM relaxations are cyclically initiated each time the pedestal gradient crosses a triggering threshold. Diamagnetic drifts are also found to yield a near-symmetric ELM power deposition on the inner and outer divertor target plates, consistent with experimental measurements.

  4. CPMG relaxation dispersion NMR experiments measuring glycine {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts in the 'invisible' excited states of proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallurupalli, Pramodh; Hansen, D. Flemming; Lundstroem, Patrik; Kay, Lewis E. [University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry (Canada)], E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca

    2009-09-15

    Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion NMR experiments are extremely powerful for characterizing millisecond time-scale conformational exchange processes in biomolecules. A large number of such CPMG experiments have now emerged for measuring protein backbone chemical shifts of sparsely populated (>0.5%), excited state conformers that cannot be directly detected in NMR spectra and that are invisible to most other biophysical methods as well. A notable deficiency is, however, the absence of CPMG experiments for measurement of {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts of glycine residues in the excited state that reflects the fact that in this case the {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}, {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} spins form a three-spin system that is more complex than the AX {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}-{sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} spin systems in the other amino acids. Here pulse sequences for recording {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} CPMG relaxation dispersion profiles derived from glycine residues are presented that provide information from which {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}, {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts can be obtained. The utility of these experiments is demonstrated by an application to a mutant of T4 lysozyme that undergoes a millisecond time-scale exchange process facilitating the binding of hydrophobic ligands to an internal cavity in the protein.

  5. Solid state {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation and isolated-molecule and cluster electronic structure calculations in organic molecular solids: The relationship between structure and methyl group and t-butyl group rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xianlong, E-mail: WangXianlong@uestc.edu.cn, E-mail: pbeckman@brynmawr.edu [Key Laboratory for NeuroInformation of Ministry of Education, School of Life Science and Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, 4 North Jianshe Rd., 2nd Section, Chengdu 610054 (China); Mallory, Frank B. [Department of Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 101 North Merion Ave., Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 19010-2899 (United States); Mallory, Clelia W. [Department of Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 101 North Merion Ave., Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 19010-2899 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6323 (United States); Odhner, Hosanna R.; Beckmann, Peter A., E-mail: WangXianlong@uestc.edu.cn, E-mail: pbeckman@brynmawr.edu [Department of Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 101 North Merion Ave., Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 19010-2899 (United States)

    2014-05-21

    We report ab initio density functional theory electronic structure calculations of rotational barriers for t-butyl groups and their constituent methyl groups both in the isolated molecules and in central molecules in clusters built from the X-ray structure in four t-butyl aromatic compounds. The X-ray structures have been reported previously. We also report and interpret the temperature dependence of the solid state {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spin-lattice relaxation rate at 8.50, 22.5, and 53.0 MHz in one of the four compounds. Such experiments for the other three have been reported previously. We compare the computed barriers for methyl group and t-butyl group rotation in a central target molecule in the cluster with the activation energies determined from fitting the {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation data. We formulate a dynamical model for the superposition of t-butyl group rotation and the rotation of the t-butyl group's constituent methyl groups. The four compounds are 2,7-di-t-butylpyrene, 1,4-di-t-butylbenzene, 2,6-di-t-butylnaphthalene, and 3-t-butylchrysene. We comment on the unusual ground state orientation of the t-butyl groups in the crystal of the pyrene and we comment on the unusually high rotational barrier of these t-butyl groups.

  6. Neutrino oscillations in MHD supernova explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawagoe, S; Kotake, K [Division of Theoretical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan); Takiwaki, T, E-mail: shio.k@nao.ac.j [Center for Computational Astrophysics, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the neutrino oscillations numerically in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) explosion models to see how asphericity has impacts on neutrino spectra. Magneto-driven explosions are one of the most attracting scenarios for producing large scale departures from spherical symmetric geometry, that are reported by many observational data. We find that the event rates at Super-Kamiokande (SK) seen from the polar direction (e.g., the rotational axis of the supernovae) decrease when the shock wave is propagating through H-resonance. In addition, we find that L-resonance in this situation becomes non-adiabatic, and the effect of L-resonance appears in the neutrino signal, because the MHD shock can propagate to the stellar surface without shock-stall after core bounce, and the shock reaches the L-resonance at earlier stage than the conventional spherical supernova explosion models. Our results suggest that we may obtain the observational signatures of the two resonances in SK for Galactic supernova.

  7. Operational analysis of open-cycle MHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, T. E.; McCutchan, D. A.

    1980-07-01

    Open cycle magnetohydrodynamic (OCMHD) conceptual power plant designs are studied in the context of a utility system to form a better basis for understanding their design, design requirements, and market possibilities. Based on assumed or projected plant costs and performance characteristics, assumed economics and escalation factors, and one coal supply and delivery scenario, overall and regional OCMHD utility market possibilities are reviewed. Additionally, for one hypothetical utility system a generation expansion plan is developed that includes OCMHD as a baseload power generating station. The impact on generation system economics and operation of alternating selected MHD plant cost and performance characteristics is reviewed. Baseload plant availability is shown as an important plant design consideration, and a general methodology and data base is developed to assess the impact on design and cost of various reliability decisions. An overall plant availability goal is set and the required availabilities of various MHD high technology components are derived to meet the plant goal. The approach is then extended to projecting channel life goals for various plant design configurations and assumptions.

  8. Idiosyncratic reality claims, relaxation dispositions, and ABC relaxation theory: happiness, literal christianity, miraculous powers, metaphysics, and the paranormal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jonathan C; Karmin, Aaron D

    2002-12-01

    This study examined idiosyncratic reality claims, that is, irrational or paranormal beliefs often claimed to enhance relaxation and happiness and reduce stress. The Smith Idiosyncratic Reality Claims Inventory and the Smith Relaxation Dispositions Inventory (which measures relaxation and stress dispositions, or enduring states of mind frequently associated with relaxation or stress) were given to 310 junior college student volunteers. Principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation identified five idiosyncratic reality claim factors: belief in Literal Christianity; Magic; Space Aliens: After Death experiences; and Miraculous Powers of Meditation, Prayer, and Belief. No factor correlated with increased relaxation dispositions Peace, Energy, or Joy, or reduced dispositional somatic stress, worry, or negative emotion on the Smith Relaxation Dispositions Inventory. It was concluded that idiosyncratic reality claims may not be associated with reported relaxation, happiness, or stress. In contrast, previous research strongly supported self-affirming beliefs with few paranormal assumptions display such an association.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamics dynamical relaxation of coronal magnetic fields. IV. 3D tilted nulls

    CERN Document Server

    Fuentes-Fernandez, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we study current accumulations in 3D "tilted" nulls formed by a folding of the spine and fan. A non-zero component of current parallel to the fan is required such that the null's fan plane and spine are not perpendicular. Our aims are to provide valid magnetohydrostatic equilibria and to describe the current accumulations in various cases involving finite plasma pressure.To create our equilibrium current structures we use a full, non-resistive, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code so that no reconnection is allowed. A series of experiments are performed in which a perturbed 3D tilted null relaxes towards an equilibrium via real, viscous damping forces. Changes to the initial plasma pressure and to magnetic parameters are investigated systematically.An initially tilted fan is associated with a non-zero Lorentz force that drives the fan and spine to collapse towards each other, in a similar manner to the collapse of a 2D X-point. In the final equilibrium state for an initially radial null with only the ...

  10. Magnetohydrodynamics dynamical relaxation of coronal magnetic fields. III. 3D spiral nulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Fernández, J.; Parnell, C. E.

    2012-08-01

    Context. The majority of studies on stressed 3D magnetic null points consider magnetic reconnection driven by an external perturbation, but the formation of a genuine current sheet equilibrium remains poorly understood. This problem has been considered more extensively in two dimensions, but lacks a generalization into 3D fields. Aims: 3D magnetic nulls are more complex than 2D nulls and the field can take a greater range of magnetic geometries local to the null. Here, we focus on one type and consider the dynamical non-resistive relaxation of 3D spiral nulls with initial spine-aligned current. We aim to provide a valid magnetohydrostatic equilibrium, and describe the electric current accumulations in various cases, involving a finite plasma pressure. Methods: A full MHD code was used, with the resistivity set to zero so that reconnection is not allowed, to run a series of experiments in which a perturbed spiral 3D null point was allowed to relax towards an equilibrium via real, viscous damping forces. Changes to the initial plasma pressure and other magnetic parameters were systematically investigated. Results: For the axisymmetric case, the evolution of the field and the plasma is such that it concentrates the current density into two cone-shaped regions along the spine, thus concentrating the twist of the magnetic field around the spine, leaving a radial configuration in the fan plane. The plasma pressure redistributes to maintain the current density accumulations. However, it is found that changes in the initial plasma pressure do not significantly modify the final state. In the cases where the initial magnetic field is not axisymmetric, an infinite-time singularity of current perpendicular to the fan is found at the location of the null.

  11. Molecular Relaxation in Liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Bagchi, Biman

    2012-01-01

    This book brings together many different relaxation phenomena in liquids under a common umbrella and provides a unified view of apparently diverse phenomena. It aligns recent experimental results obtained with modern techniques with recent theoretical developments. Such close interaction between experiment and theory in this area goes back to the works of Einstein, Smoluchowski, Kramers' and de Gennes. Development of ultrafast laser spectroscopy recently allowed study of various relaxation processes directly in the time domain, with time scales going down to picosecond (ps) and femtosecond (fs

  12. Linear Two-Dimensional MHD of Accretion Disks: Crystalline structure and Nernst coefficient

    CERN Document Server

    Montani, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    We analyse the two-dimensional MHD configurations characterising the steady state of the accretion disk on a highly magnetised neutron star. The model we describe has a local character and represents the extension of the crystalline structure outlined in Coppi (2005), dealing with a local model too, when a specific accretion rate is taken into account. We limit our attention to the linearised MHD formulation of the electromagnetic back-reaction characterising the equilibrium, by fixing the structure of the radial, vertical and azimuthal profiles. Since we deal with toroidal currents only, the consistency of the model is ensured by the presence of a small collisional effect, phenomenologically described by a non-zero constant Nernst coefficient (thermal power of the plasma). Such an effect provides a proper balance of the electron force equation via non zero temperature gradients, related directly to the radial and vertical velocity components. We show that the obtained profile has the typical oscillating feat...

  13. Extension of the MURaM radiative MHD code for coronal simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Rempel, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    We present a new version of the MURaM radiative MHD code that allows for simulations spanning from the upper convection zone into the solar corona. We implemented the relevant coronal physics in terms of optically thin radiative loss, field aligned heat conduction and an equilibrium ionization equation of state. We artificially limit the coronal Alfv{\\'e}n and heat conduction speeds to computationally manageable values using an approximation to semi-relativistic MHD with an artificially reduced speed of light (Boris correction). We present example solutions ranging from quiet to active Sun in order to verify the validity of our approach. We quantify the role of numerical diffusivity for the effective coronal heating. We find that the (numerical) magnetic Prandtl number determines the ratio of resistive to viscous heating and that owing to the very large magnetic Prandtl number of the solar corona, heating is expected to happen predominantly through viscous dissipation. We find that reasonable solutions can be...

  14. MHD simulations of three-dimensional Resistive Reconnection in a cylindrical plasma column

    CERN Document Server

    Striani, Edoardo; Vaidya, Bhargav; Bodo, Gianluigi; Ferrari, Attilio

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a plasma phenomenon where a topological rearrangement of magnetic field lines with opposite polarity results in dissipation of magnetic energy into heat, kinetic energy and particle acceleration. Such a phenomenon is considered as an efficient mechanism for energy release in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. An important question is how to make the process fast enough to account for observed explosive energy releases. The classical model for steady state magnetic reconnection predicts reconnection times scaling as $S^{1/2}$ (where $S$ is the Lundquist number) and yields times scales several order of magnitude larger than the observed ones. Earlier two-dimensional MHD simulations showed that for large Lundquist number the reconnection time becomes independent of $S$ ("fast reconnection" regime) due to the presence of the secondary tearing instability that takes place for $S \\gtrsim 1 \\times 10^4$. We report on our 3D MHD simulations of magnetic reconnection in a magnetically confin...

  15. Linear Simulations of the Cylindrical Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability in Hydrodynamics and MHD

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Song

    2013-05-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability occurs when density-stratified interfaces are impulsively accelerated, typically by a shock wave. We present a numerical method to simulate the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in cylindrical geometry. The ideal MHD equations are linearized about a time-dependent base state to yield linear partial differential equations governing the perturbed quantities. Convergence tests demonstrate that second order accuracy is achieved for smooth flows, and the order of accuracy is between first and second order for flows with discontinuities. Numerical results are presented for cases of interfaces with positive Atwood number and purely azimuthal perturbations. In hydrodynamics, the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability growth of perturbations is followed by a Rayleigh-Taylor growth phase. In MHD, numerical results indicate that the perturbations can be suppressed for sufficiently large perturbation wavenumbers and magnetic fields.

  16. Ring-shaped discharge structures in a closed cycle MHD disk generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, H.; Kabashima, S.

    1987-06-01

    Numerical simulations are carried out to study plasma properties in a nonequilibrium disk-type MHD generator. The analysis is based on a two-dimensional time-dependent MHD equation, and is performed in the r-z plane. From the r-z analysis, the current distributions in the boundary layer, electrode regions are obtained, as well as the channel main flow region. The two-state nature of plasma, i.e., the formation of streamers and their dynamical behavior in the channel is confirmed. The dependence of the streamer properties on the magnetic field strength and load resistance is examined. The calculations suggest the existence of an eddy current in the boundary layer for the high-loading parameter. Some enhanced eddy currents in the nozzle region and the intensive eddy current at the upper-stream edge of the cathode are obtained for some plasma parameters. 19 references.

  17. MHD simulation of the evolution of the solar corona around August 1st 2010 using the HMI solar magnetic field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, K.; Hmi Team

    2010-12-01

    We will report results of the MHD simulation of the solar corona and solar wind using the HMI magnetic field data, especially focusing on a simulated eruption of a coronal streamer that reasonably corresponds to a large-scale coronal eruption event observed on August 1, 2010. The pre-event coronal situation is prepared through the time-relaxation MHD simulation using the synoptic map data of the solar surface magnetic field for a period of the Carrington Rotation 2098. Then, the global magnetic field evolutions from CR 2098 to 2099 are introduced in the simulation by means of a boundary model we recently developed, which enable to trace the sub-Alfvenic MHD responses of the corona numerically. The simulated coronal features include the formation of the two twisted coronal magnetic field structures along the magnetically inversion lines at the lowermost corona (coinciding the two observed filaments at west-north part of the solar disk) and the large-scale outward motions and decay of the closed-field streamer above the two twisted-field regions. Our MHD simulation model did not include the triggering event directly, and our simulations were done in somewhat low resolution in space. However, the reasonable success in reproducing coronal features relating a specific event in a well-known manner (using the synoptic map format data and the MHD simulation model) shows that the new dataset from HMI will be useful for the models, such as the MHD and the potential field models, as the previous dataset by SOHO/MDI.

  18. Relativistic modeling capabilities in PERSEUS extended MHD simulation code for HED plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlin, Nathaniel D., E-mail: nh322@cornell.edu [438 Rhodes Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853 (United States); Seyler, Charles E., E-mail: ces7@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    We discuss the incorporation of relativistic modeling capabilities into the PERSEUS extended MHD simulation code for high-energy-density (HED) plasmas, and present the latest hybrid X-pinch simulation results. The use of fully relativistic equations enables the model to remain self-consistent in simulations of such relativistic phenomena as X-pinches and laser-plasma interactions. By suitable formulation of the relativistic generalized Ohm’s law as an evolution equation, we have reduced the recovery of primitive variables, a major technical challenge in relativistic codes, to a straightforward algebraic computation. Our code recovers expected results in the non-relativistic limit, and reveals new physics in the modeling of electron beam acceleration following an X-pinch. Through the use of a relaxation scheme, relativistic PERSEUS is able to handle nine orders of magnitude in density variation, making it the first fluid code, to our knowledge, that can simulate relativistic HED plasmas.

  19. Intraband Relaxation and Its Influences on Quantum Dot Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Sheng-Ling; HUANG Yong-Zhen; YU Li-Juan

    2005-01-01

    @@ A comprehensive two-level numerical model is developed to describe carrier distribution in a quantum-dot laser. Light-emission spectra with different intraband relaxation rates (2ps, 7.5ps and 20ps) are calculated and analysed to investigate the influence of relaxation rates on performance of the quantum-dot laser. The results indicate that fast intraband relaxation favours not only the ground state single mode operation but also the higher injection efficiency.

  20. High-Order Finite Difference GLM-MHD Schemes for Cell-Centered MHD

    CERN Document Server

    Mignone, A; Bodo, G

    2010-01-01

    We present and compare third- as well as fifth-order accurate finite difference schemes for the numerical solution of the compressible ideal MHD equations in multiple spatial dimensions. The selected methods lean on four different reconstruction techniques based on recently improved versions of the weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes, monotonicity preserving (MP) schemes as well as slope-limited polynomial reconstruction. The proposed numerical methods are highly accurate in smooth regions of the flow, avoid loss of accuracy in proximity of smooth extrema and provide sharp non-oscillatory transitions at discontinuities. We suggest a numerical formulation based on a cell-centered approach where all of the primary flow variables are discretized at the zone center. The divergence-free condition is enforced by augmenting the MHD equations with a generalized Lagrange multiplier yielding a mixed hyperbolic/parabolic correction, as in Dedner et al. (J. Comput. Phys. 175 (2002) 645-673). The resulting...

  1. Global and Kinetic MHD Simulation by the Gpic-MHD Code

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroshi NAITOU; Yusuke YAMADA; Kenji KAJIWARA; Wei-li LEE; Shinji TOKUDA; Masatoshi YAGI

    2011-01-01

    In order to implement large-scale and high-beta tokamak simulation, a new algorithm of the electromagnetic gyrokinetic PIC (particle-in-cell) code was proposed and installed on the Gpic-MHD code [Gyrokinetic PIC code for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation]. In the new algorithm, the vorticity equation and the generalized Ohm's law along the magnetic field are derived from the basic equations of the gyrokinetic Vlasov, Poisson, and Ampere system and are used to describe the spatio-temporal evolution of the field quantities of the electrostatic potential φ and the longitudinal component of the vector potential Az. The basic algorithm is equivalent to solving the reduced-MHD-type equations with kinetic corrections, in which MHD physics related to Alfven modes are well described. The estimation of perturbed electron pressure from particle dynamics is dominant, while the effects of other moments are negligible. Another advantage of the algorithm is that the longitudinal induced electric field, ETz = -δAz/δt, is explicitly estimated by the generalized Ohm's law and used in the equations of motion. Furthermore, the particle velocities along the magnetic field are used (vz-formulation) instead of generalized momentums (pz-formulation), hence there is no problem of 'cancellation', which would otherwise appear when Az is estimated from the Ampere's law in the pz-formulation. The successful simulation of the collisionless internal kink mode by the new Gpic-MHD with realistic values of the large-scale and high-beta tokamaks revealed the usefulness of the new algorithm.

  2. Cattaneo-Christov Heat Flux Model for MHD Three-Dimensional Flow of Maxwell Fluid over a Stretching Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubab, Khansa; Mustafa, M

    2016-01-01

    This letter investigates the MHD three-dimensional flow of upper-convected Maxwell (UCM) fluid over a bi-directional stretching surface by considering the Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model. This model has tendency to capture the characteristics of thermal relaxation time. The governing partial differential equations even after employing the boundary layer approximations are non linear. Accurate analytic solutions for velocity and temperature distributions are computed through well-known homotopy analysis method (HAM). It is noticed that velocity decreases and temperature rises when stronger magnetic field strength is accounted. Penetration depth of temperature is a decreasing function of thermal relaxation time. The analysis for classical Fourier heat conduction law can be obtained as a special case of the present work. To our knowledge, the Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model law for three-dimensional viscoelastic flow problem is just introduced here.

  3. Cattaneo-Christov Heat Flux Model for MHD Three-Dimensional Flow of Maxwell Fluid over a Stretching Sheet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khansa Rubab

    Full Text Available This letter investigates the MHD three-dimensional flow of upper-convected Maxwell (UCM fluid over a bi-directional stretching surface by considering the Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model. This model has tendency to capture the characteristics of thermal relaxation time. The governing partial differential equations even after employing the boundary layer approximations are non linear. Accurate analytic solutions for velocity and temperature distributions are computed through well-known homotopy analysis method (HAM. It is noticed that velocity decreases and temperature rises when stronger magnetic field strength is accounted. Penetration depth of temperature is a decreasing function of thermal relaxation time. The analysis for classical Fourier heat conduction law can be obtained as a special case of the present work. To our knowledge, the Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model law for three-dimensional viscoelastic flow problem is just introduced here.

  4. Heat and mass transfer analysis of unsteady MHD nanofluid flow through a channel with moving porous walls and medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zubair Akbar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the numerical study of heat and mass transfer analysis in a viscous unsteady MHD nanofluid flow through a channel with porous walls and medium in the presence of metallic nanoparticles. The two cases for effective thermal conductivity are discussed in the analysis through H-C model. The impacts of the governing parameters on the flow, heat and mass transfer aspects of the issue are talked about. Under the patronage of small values of permeable Reynolds number and relaxation/contraction parameter, we locate that, when wall contraction is together with suction, flow turning is encouraged close to the wall where the boundary layer is shaped. On the other hand, when the wall relaxation is coupled with injection, the flow adjacent to the porous walls decreased. The outcome of the exploration may be beneficial for applications of biotechnology. Numerical solutions for the velocity, heat and mass transfer rate at the boundary are obtained and analyzed.

  5. Analogue Kerr-like geometries in a MHD inflow

    CERN Document Server

    Noda, Sousuke; Takahashi, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    We present a model of the analogue black hole in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow. For a two dimensional axisymmetric stationary trans-magnetosonic inflow with a sink, using the dispersion relation of the MHD waves, we introduce the effective geometries for magnetoacoustic waves propagating in the MHD flow. Investigating the properties of the effective potentials for magnetoacoustic rays, we find that the effective geometries can be classified into five types which include analogue spacetimes of the Kerr black hole, ultra spinning stars with ergoregions and spinning stars without ergoregions. We address the effects of the magnetic pressure and the magnetic tension on each magnetoacoustic geometries.

  6. Nonlinear evolution of parallel propagating Alfven waves: Vlasov - MHD simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Nariyuki, Y; Kumashiro, T; Hada, T

    2009-01-01

    Nonlinear evolution of circularly polarized Alfv\\'en waves are discussed by using the recently developed Vlasov-MHD code, which is a generalized Landau-fluid model. The numerical results indicate that as far as the nonlinearity in the system is not so large, the Vlasov-MHD model can validly solve time evolution of the Alfv\\'enic turbulence both in the linear and nonlinear stages. The present Vlasov-MHD model is proper to discuss the solar coronal heating and solar wind acceleration by Alfve\\'n waves propagating from the photosphere.

  7. Finite Larmor radius influence on MHD solitary waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mjølhus

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available MHD solitons are studied in a model where the usual Hall-MHD model is extended to include the finite Larmor radius (FLR corrections to the pressure tensor. The resulting 4-dimensional set of differential equations is treated numerically. In this extended model, the point at infinity can be of several types. Necessary for the existence of localized solutions is that it is either a saddle-saddle, a saddle-center, or, possibly, a focus-focus. In cases of saddle-center, numerical solutions for localized travelling structures have been obtained, and compared with corresponding results from the Hall-MHD model.

  8. Observational Tests of Recent MHD Turbulence Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sanjoy

    2001-06-01

    This grant seeks to analyze the Heliospheric Missions data to test current theories on the angular dependence (with respect to mean magnetic field direction) of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the solar wind. Solar wind turbulence may be composed of two or more dynamically independent components. Such components include magnetic pressure-balanced structures, velocity shears, quasi-2D turbulence, and slab (Alfven) waves. We use a method, developed during the first two years of this grant, for extracting the individual reduced spectra of up to three separate turbulence components from a single spacecraft time series. The method has been used on ISEE-3 data, Pioneer Venus Orbiter, Ulysses, and Voyager data samples. The correlation of fluctuations as a function of angle between flow direction and magnetic-field direction is the focus of study during the third year.

  9. MHD Turbulence in Accretion Disk Boundary Layers

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Chi-kwan

    2012-01-01

    The physical modeling of the accretion disk boundary layer, the region where the disk meets the surface of the accreting star, usually relies on the assumption that angular momentum transport is opposite to the radial angular frequency gradient of the disk. The standard model for turbulent shear viscosity, widely adopted in astrophysics, satisfies this assumption by construction. However, this behavior is not supported by numerical simulations of turbulent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accretion disks, which show that angular momentum transport driven by the magnetorotational instability is inefficient in this inner disk region. I will discuss the results of a recent study on the generation of hydromagnetic stresses and energy density in the boundary layer around a weakly magnetized star. Our findings suggest that although magnetic energy density can be significantly amplified in this region, angular momentum transport is rather inefficient. This seems consistent with the results obtained in numerical simulations...

  10. Drag reduction in turbulent MHD pipe flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, P.

    1996-01-01

    This is a preliminary study devoted to verifying whether or not direct simulations of turbulent Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) flows in liquid metals reproduce experimental observations of drag reduction. Two different cases have been simulated by a finite difference scheme which is second order accurate in space and time. In the first case, an external azimuthal magnetic field is imposed. In this case, the magnetic field acts on the mean axial velocity and complete laminarization of the flow at N(sub a) = 30 has been achieved. In the second case, an axial magnetic field is imposed which affects only fluctuating velocities, and thus the action is less efficient. This second case is more practical, but comparison between numerical and experimental results is only qualitative.

  11. The Biermann Catastrophe in Numerical MHD

    CERN Document Server

    Graziani, Carlo; Lee, Dongwook; Lamb, Donald Q; Weide, Klaus; Fatenejad, Milad; Miller, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    The Biermann Battery effect is a popular mechanism for generating magnetic fields in initially unmagnetized plasmas, and is frequently invoked in cosmic magnetogenesis and studied in High-Energy Density laboratory physics experiments. Generation of magnetic fields by the Biermann effect due to mis-aligned density and temperature gradients in smooth flow _behind_ shocks is well known. We show that a magnetic field is also generated _within_ shocks as a result of the electron-ion charge separation that they induce. A straightforward implementation of the Biermann effect in MHD codes does not capture this physical process, and worse, produces unphysical magnetic fields at shocks whose value does not converge with resolution. We show that this breakdown of convergence is due to naive discretization. We show that a careful consideration of the kinetic picture of ion viscous shocks leads to a formulation of the Biermann effect in terms of the electron temperature -- which is continuous across shocks -- that gives r...

  12. MHD power generation with fully ionized seed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamasaki, H.; Shioda, S.

    1977-01-01

    Recovery of power density in the regime of fully ionized seed has been demonstrated experimentally using an MHD disk generator with the effective Hall parameter up to 5.0 when the seed was fully ionized. The experiments were conducted with a shock-heated and potassium-seeded argon plasma under the following conditions: stagnation gas pressure = 0.92 atm, stagnation gas temperature = 2750 K, flow Mach number = 2.5, and seed fraction = 1.4 x 10/sup -5/. Measurements of electron-number density and spectroscopic observations of both potassium and argon lines confirmed that the recovery of power output was due to the reduction of ionization instability. This fact indicates that the successful operation of a disk generator utilizing nonequilibrium ionization seems to be possible and that the suppression of ionization instability can also provide higher adiabatic efficiency. Furthermore, the lower seed fraction offers technological advantages related to seed problems.

  13. 3-D nonlinear evolution of MHD instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateman, G.; Hicks, H. R.; Wooten, J. W.

    1977-03-01

    The nonlinear evolution of ideal MHD internal instabilities is investigated in straight cylindrical geometry by means of a 3-D initial-value computer code. These instabilities are characterized by pairs of velocity vortex cells rolling off each other and helically twisted down the plasma column. The cells persist until the poloidal velocity saturates at a few tenths of the Alfven velocity. The nonlinear phase is characterized by convection around these essentially fixed vortex cells. For example, the initially centrally peaked temperature profile is convected out and around to form an annulus of high temperature surrounding a small region of lower temperature. Weak, centrally localized instabilities do not alter the edge of the plasma. Strong, large-scale instabilities, resulting from a stronger longitudinal equilibrium current, drive the plasma against the wall. After three examples of instability are analyzed in detail, the numerical methods and their verification are discussed.

  14. Global MHD Models of the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, S. T.; Rose, Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the solar corona are computationally intensive, numerically complex simulations that have produced important new results over the past few years. After a brief overview of how these models usually work, I will address three topics: (1) How these models are now routinely used to predict the morphology of the corona and analyze Earth and space-based remote observations of the Sun; (2) The direct application of these models to the analysis of physical processes in the corona and chromosphere and to the interpretation of in situ solar wind observations; and (3) The use of results from global models to validate the approximations used to make detailed studies of physical processes in the corona that are not otherwise possible using the global models themselves.

  15. The Biermann catastrophe of numerical MHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziani, C.; Tzeferacos, P.; Lee, D.; Lamb, D. Q.; Weide, K.; Fatenejad, M.; Miller, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Biermann Battery effect is frequently invoked in cosmic magnetogenesis and studied in High-Energy Density laboratory physics experiments. Unfortunately, direct implementation of the Biermann effect in MHD codes is known to produce unphysical magnetic fields at shocks whose value does not converge with resolution. We show that this convergence breakdown is due to naive discretization, which fails to account for the fact that discretized irrotational vector fields have spurious solenoidal components that grow without bound near a discontinuity. We show that careful consideration of the kinetics of ion viscous shocks leads to a formulation of the Biermann effect that gives rise to a convergent algorithm. We note a novel physical effect a resistive magnetic precursor in which Biermann-generated field in the shock “leaks” resistively upstream. The effect appears to be potentially observable in experiments at laser facilities.

  16. Activation of MHD reconnection on ideal timescales

    CERN Document Server

    Landi, S; Del Zanna, L; Tenerani, A; Pucci, F

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection in laboratory, space and astrophysical plasmas is often invoked to explain explosive energy release and particle acceleration. However, the timescales involved in classical models within the macroscopic MHD regime are far too slow to match the observations. Here we revisit the tearing instability by performing visco-resistive two-dimensional numerical simulations of the evolution of thin current sheets, for a variety of initial configurations and of values of the Lunquist number $S$, up to $10^7$. Results confirm that when the critical aspect ratio of $S^{1/3}$ is reached in the reconnecting current sheets, the instability proceeds on ideal (Alfv\\'enic) macroscopic timescales, as required to explain observations. Moreover, the same scaling is seen to apply also to the local, secondary reconnection events triggered during the nonlinear phase of the tearing instability, thus accelerating the cascading process to increasingly smaller spatial and temporal scales. The process appears to be ro...

  17. Resonant interactions of perturbations in MHD flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagalakov, A.M.; Shtern, V.N.

    1977-01-17

    The nonlinear theory of hydrodynamic stability differentiates three types of interactions: deformation of the initial velocity profile by Reynolds stress pulsations, multiplication of harmonics, and the resonant interaction of harmonics with dissimilar wave numbers and frequencies. This article analyzes an approach considering the first and third of these non-linear mechanisms, producing an acceptable approximation of the averaged characteristics of a developing pulsation movement, particularly the averaged turbulent velocity profile. The approach consists in analysis of triharmonic oscillations, the parameters of which satisfy the resonant relationships. A model of a triharmonic pulsation mode is studied which is applicable to MHD flows. It is shown in particular how a magnetic field transverse to the flow plane suppresses the resonant interaction of three-dimensional perturbations. This agrees with experimental studies on two-dimensional turbulence conducted earlier. 11 references, 3 figures.

  18. Time-dependent simulation of oblique MHD cosmic-ray shocks using the two-fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Adam; Jones, T. W.; Ryu, Dongsu

    1995-01-01

    Using a new, second-order accurate numerical method we present dynamical simulations of oblique MHD cosmic-ray (CR)-modified plane shock evolution. Most of the calculations are done with a two-fluid model for diffusive shock acceleration, but we provide also comparisons between a typical shock computed that way against calculations carried out using the more complete, momentum-dependent, diffusion-advection equation. We also illustrate a test showing that these simulations evolve to dynamical equilibria consistent with previously published steady state analytic calculations for such shocks. In order to improve understanding of the dynamical role of magnetic fields in shocks modified by CR pressure we have explored for time asymptotic states the parameter space of upstream fast mode Mach number, M(sub f), and plasma beta. We compile the results into maps of dynamical steady state CR acceleration efficiency, epsilon(sub c). We have run simulations using constant, and nonisotropic, obliquity (and hence spatially) dependent forms of the diffusion coefficient kappa. Comparison of the results shows that while the final steady states achieved are the same in each case, the history of CR-MHD shocks can be strongly modified by variations in kappa and, therefore, in the acceleration timescale. Also, the coupling of CR and MHD in low beta, oblique shocks substantially influences the transient density spike that forms in strongly CR-modified shocks. We find that inside the density spike a MHD slow mode wave can be generated that eventually steepens into a shock. A strong layer develops within the density spike, driven by MHD stresses. We conjecture that currents in the shear layer could, in nonplanar flows, results in enhanced particle accretion through drift acceleration.

  19. Magnetorotational Instability of Dissipative MHD Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HERRON, ISOM H

    2010-07-10

    Executive summary Two important general problems of interest in plasma physics that may be addressed successfully by Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are: (1) Find magnetic field configurations capable of confining a plasma in equilibrium. (2) Study the stability properties of each such an equilibrium. It is often found that the length scale of many instabilities and waves that are able to grow or propagate in a system, are comparable with plasma size, such as in magnetically confined thermonuclear plasmas or in astrophysical accretion disks. Thus MHD is able to provide a good description of such large-scale disturbances. The Magnetorotational instability (MRI) is one particular instance of a potential instability. The project involved theoretical work on fundamental aspects of plasma physics. Researchers at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) began to perform a series of liquid metal Couette flow experiments between rotating cylinders. Their purpose was to produce MRI, which they had predicted theoretically 2002, but was only observed in the laboratory since this project began. The personnel on the project consisted of three persons: (1) The PI, who was partially supported on the budget during each of four summers 2005-2008. (2) Two graduate research assistants, who worked consecutively on the project throughout the years 2005-2009. As a result, the first student, Fritzner Soliman, obtained an M.S. degree in 2006; the second student, Pablo Suarez obtained the Ph.D. degree in 2009. The work was in collaboration with scientists in Princeton, periodic trips were made by the PI as part of the project. There were 4 peer-reviewed publications and one book produced.

  20. Global MHD simulations of Neptune's magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejnertsen, L.; Eastwood, J. P.; Chittenden, J. P.; Masters, A.

    2016-08-01

    A global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation has been performed in order to investigate the outer boundaries of Neptune's magnetosphere at the time of Voyager 2's flyby in 1989 and to better understand the dynamics of magnetospheres formed by highly inclined planetary dipoles. Using the MHD code Gorgon, we have implemented a precessing dipole to mimic Neptune's tilted magnetic field and rotation axes. By using the solar wind parameters measured by Voyager 2, the simulation is verified by finding good agreement with Voyager 2 magnetometer observations. Overall, there is a large-scale reconfiguration of magnetic topology and plasma distribution. During the "pole-on" magnetospheric configuration, there only exists one tail current sheet, contained between a rarefied lobe region which extends outward from the dayside cusp, and a lobe region attached to the nightside cusp. It is found that the tail current always closes to the magnetopause current system, rather than closing in on itself, as suggested by other models. The bow shock position and shape is found to be dependent on Neptune's daily rotation, with maximum standoff being during the pole-on case. Reconnection is found on the magnetopause but is highly modulated by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and time of day, turning "off" and "on" when the magnetic shear between the IMF and planetary fields is large enough. The simulation shows that the most likely location for reconnection to occur during Voyager 2's flyby was far from the spacecraft trajectory, which may explain the relative lack of associated signatures in the observations.

  1. A Two-Fluid, MHD Coronal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, S. T.; Wang, A.-H.; Wu, S. T.; Poletto, G.; McComas, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    We describe first results from a numerical two-fluid MHD model of the global structure of the solar Corona. The model is two-fluid in the sense that it accounts for the collisional energy exchange between protons and electrons. As in our single-fluid model, volumetric heat and Momentum sources are required to produce high speed wind from Corona] holes, low speed wind above streamers, and mass fluxes similar to the empirical solar wind. By specifying different proton and electron heating functions we obtain a high proton temperature in the coronal hole and a relatively low proton temperature above the streamer (in comparison with the electron temperature). This is consistent with inferences from SOHO/UltraViolet Coronagraph Spectrometer instrument (UVCS), and with the Ulysses/Solar Wind Observations Over the Poles of the Sun instrument (SWOOPS) proton and electron temperature measurements which we show from the fast latitude scan. The density in the coronal hole between 2 and 5 solar radii (2 and 5 R(sub S)) is similar to the density reported from SPARTAN 201.-01 measurements by Fisher and Guhathakurta [19941. The proton mass flux scaled to 1 AU is 2.4 x 10(exp 8)/sq cm s, which is consistent with Ulysses observations. Inside the closed field region, the density is sufficiently high so that the simulation gives equal proton and electron temperatures due to the high collision rate. In open field regions (in the coronal hole and above the streamer) the proton and electron temperatures differ by varying amounts. In the streamer the temperature and density are similar to those reported empirically by Li et al. [1998], and the plasma beta is larger than unity everywhere above approx. 1.5 R(sub S), as it is in all other MHD coronal streamer models [e.g., Steinolfson et al., 1982; also G. A. Gary and D. Alexander, Constructing the coronal magnetic field, submitted to Solar Physics, 1998].

  2. Ligand manipulation of charge transfer excited state relaxation and spin crossover in [Fe(2,2′-bipyridine)2(CN)2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Kasper Skov; Zhang, Wenkai; Alonso-Mori, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    We have used femtosecond resolution UV-visible and Kβ x-ray emission spectroscopy to characterize the electronic excited state dynamics of [Fe(bpy)2(CN)2], where bpy=2,2′-bipyridine, initiated by metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excitation. The excited-state absorption in the transient UV-visible...

  3. Relaxation of polarized nuclei in superconducting rhodium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knuuttila, T.A.; Tuoriniemi, J.T.; Lefmann, K.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates were measured in normal and superconducting (sc) rhodium with nuclear polarizations up to p = 0.55. This was sufficient to influence the sc state of Rh, whose T, and B-c, are exceptionally low. Because B-c

  4. Stability of ideal MHD configurations. I. Realizing the generality of the G operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppens, R.; Demaerel, T.

    2016-12-01

    A field theoretical approach, applied to the time-reversible system described by the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, exposes the full generality of MHD spectral theory. MHD spectral theory, which classified waves and instabilities of static or stationary, usually axisymmetric or translationally symmetric configurations, actually governs the stability of flowing, (self-)gravitating, single fluid descriptions of nonlinear, time-dependent idealized plasmas, and this at any time during their nonlinear evolution. At the core of this theory is a self-adjoint operator G , discovered by Frieman and Rotenberg [Rev. Mod. Phys. 32, 898 (1960)] in its application to stationary (i.e., time-independent) plasma states. This Frieman-Rotenberg operator dictates the acceleration identified by a Lagrangian displacement field ξ , which connects two ideal MHD states in four-dimensional space-time that share initial conditions for density, entropy, and magnetic field. The governing equation reads /d 2 ξ d t 2 = G [ ξ ] , as first noted by Cotsaftis and Newcomb [Nucl. Fusion, Suppl. Part 2, 447 and 451 (1962)]. The time derivatives at left are to be taken in the Lagrangian way, i.e., moving with the flow v. Physically realizable displacements must have finite energy, corresponding to being square integrable in the Hilbert space of displacements equipped with an inner product rule, for which the G operator is self-adjoint. The acceleration in the left-hand side features the Doppler-Coriolis operator v . ∇ , which is known to become an antisymmetric operator when restricting attention to stationary equilibria. Here, we present all derivations needed to get to these insights and connect results throughout the literature. A first illustration elucidates what can happen when self-gravity is incorporated and presents aspects that have been overlooked even in simple uniform media. Ideal MHD flows, as well as Euler flows, have essentially 6 + 1 wave types, where the 6 wave modes

  5. Physical Model Development and Benchmarking for MHD Flows in Blanket Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakanth Munipalli; P.-Y.Huang; C.Chandler; C.Rowell; M.-J.Ni; N.Morley; S.Smolentsev; M.Abdou

    2008-06-05

    An advanced simulation environment to model incompressible MHD flows relevant to blanket conditions in fusion reactors has been developed at HyPerComp in research collaboration with TEXCEL. The goals of this phase-II project are two-fold: The first is the incorporation of crucial physical phenomena such as induced magnetic field modeling, and extending the capabilities beyond fluid flow prediction to model heat transfer with natural convection and mass transfer including tritium transport and permeation. The second is the design of a sequence of benchmark tests to establish code competence for several classes of physical phenomena in isolation as well as in select (termed here as “canonical”,) combinations. No previous attempts to develop such a comprehensive MHD modeling capability exist in the literature, and this study represents essentially uncharted territory. During the course of this Phase-II project, a significant breakthrough was achieved in modeling liquid metal flows at high Hartmann numbers. We developed a unique mathematical technique to accurately compute the fluid flow in complex geometries at extremely high Hartmann numbers (10,000 and greater), thus extending the state of the art of liquid metal MHD modeling relevant to fusion reactors at the present time. These developments have been published in noted international journals. A sequence of theoretical and experimental results was used to verify and validate the results obtained. The code was applied to a complete DCLL module simulation study with promising results.

  6. You’re Cut Off: HD and MHD Simulations of Truncated Accretion Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, J. Drew; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2017-01-01

    Truncated accretion disks are commonly invoked to explain the spectro-temporal variability from accreting black holes in both small systems, i.e. state transitions in galactic black hole binaries (GBHBs), and large systems, i.e. low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs). In the canonical truncated disk model of moderately low accretion rate systems, gas in the inner region of the accretion disk occupies a hot, radiatively inefficient phase, which leads to a geometrically thick disk, while the gas in the outer region occupies a cooler, radiatively efficient phase that resides in the standard geometrically thin disk. Observationally, there is strong empirical evidence to support this phenomenological model, but a detailed understanding of the disk behavior is lacking. We present well-resolved hydrodynamic (HD) and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical models that use a toy cooling prescription to produce the first sustained truncated accretion disks. Using these simulations, we study the dynamics, angular momentum transport, and energetics of a truncated disk in the two different regimes. We compare the behaviors of the HD and MHD disks and emphasize the need to incorporate a full MHD treatment in any discussion of truncated accretion disk evolution.

  7. Preliminary Experimental Investigation on MHD Power Generation Using Seeded Supersonic Argon Flow as Working Fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yiwen; LI Yinghong; LU Haoyu; ZHU Tao; ZHANG Bailing; CHEN Feng; ZHAO Xiaohu

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a preliminary experimental investigation on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generation using seeded supersonic argon flow as working fluid.Helium and argon are used as driver and driven gas respectively in a shock tunnel.Equilibrium contact surface operating mode is used to obtain high temperature gas,and the conductivity is obtained by adding seed K2CO3 powder into the driven section.Under the conditions of nozzle inlet total pressure being 0.32 MPa,total temperature 6 504 K,magnetic field density about 0.5 T and nozzle outlet velocity 1 959 m/s,induction voltage and short-circuit current of the segmentation MHD power generation channel are measured,and the experimental results agree with theoretical calculations; the average conductivity is about 20 S/m calculated from characteristics of voltage and current.When load factor is 0.5,the maximum power density of the MHD power generation channel reaches 4.797 1 MW/m3,and the maximum enthalpy extraction rate is 0.34%.Finally,the principle and method of indirect testing for gas state parameters are derived and analyzed.

  8. Intervention effects of relaxation therapy on depressive state of patients with class angina%放松疗法对类心绞痛患者抑郁状态的干预

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚倩; 彭顺蓉; 夏丽娜

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the intervention effect of relaxation therapy on the depressive state of patients with class angina. Methods 107 patients with class angina with the scores of self-rating depressive scale( SDS ) > 50 points from June 2008 to January 2012 were randomly divided into intervention group and control group. The intervention group received the nursing with relaxation therapy,and the control group received the conventional nursing. Comparison of the changes of SDS scores and physical signs after the treatment were made between the two groups. Results In the third to fourth week after the treatment, the SDS score of the intervention group significantly decreased compared with that of the control group( P < 0. 05 ), and the systolic pressure of the patients in intervention group also significantly decreased( P < 0. 01 ). Conclusion The relaxation therapy is conducive to the improvement of depressive state and the control of physical signs of patients with class angina.%目的 探讨放松疗法对类心绞痛患者抑郁状态的干预效果.方法 将2008年6月~2012年1月抑郁自评量表(SDS)评分>50分的114例类心绞痛患者随机分为干预组和对照组,干预组采用放松疗法进行护理,对照组采用常规护理,比较两组治疗后的SDS评分及体征指标变化.结果 放松疗法干预到第3~4 w时,干预组的SDS评分与对照组相比明显降低(P<0.05),收缩压也明显下降(P<0.01).结论 放松疗法对于类心绞痛患者抑郁状态的改善和体征的控制有积极的作用.

  9. Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... products. If you have a bad reaction to hair dyes and relaxers, you should: Stop using the ...

  10. Noninteracting control of nonlinear systems based on relaxed control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jayawardhana, B.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we propose methodology to solve noninteracting control problem for general nonlinear systems based on the relaxed control technique proposed by Artstein. For a class of nonlinear systems which cannot be stabilized by smooth feedback, a state-feedback relaxed control can be designed to

  11. Local conservative regularizations of compressible MHD and neutral flows

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnaswami, Govind S; Thyagaraja, Anantanarayanan

    2016-01-01

    Ideal systems like MHD and Euler flow may develop singularities in vorticity (w = curl v). Viscosity and resistivity provide dissipative regularizations of the singularities. In this paper we propose a minimal, local, conservative, nonlinear, dispersive regularization of compressible flow and ideal MHD, in analogy with the KdV regularization of the 1D kinematic wave equation. This work extends and significantly generalizes earlier work on incompressible Euler and ideal MHD. It involves a micro-scale cutoff length lambda which is a function of density, unlike in the incompressible case. In MHD, it can be taken to be of order the electron collisionless skin depth c/omega_pe. Our regularization preserves the symmetries of the original systems, and with appropriate boundary conditions, leads to associated conservation laws. Energy and enstrophy are subject to a priori bounds determined by initial data in contrast to the unregularized systems. A Hamiltonian and Poisson bracket formulation is developed and applied ...

  12. Generalized similarity method in unsteady two-dimensional MHD ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology. Vol. 1, No. ... Controlling of crystallization processes in metallurgy and influence of magnetic field on discrete chemical systems bring. MHD and heat ...... Nomenclature. B. [T].

  13. Laser-powered MHD generators for space application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1986-10-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy conversion systems of the pulsed laser-supported detonation (LSD) wave, plasma MHD, and liquid-metal MHD (LMMHD) types are assessed for their potential as space-based laser-to-electrical power converters. These systems offer several advantages as energy converters relative to the present chemical, nuclear, and solar devices, including high conversion efficiency, simple design, high-temperature operation, high power density, and high reliability. Of these systems, the Brayton cycle liquid-metal MHD system appears to be the most attractive. The LMMHD technology base is well established for terrestrial applications, particularly with regard to the generator, mixer, and other system components. However, further research is required to extend this technology base to space applications and to establish the technology required to couple the laser energy into the system most efficiently. Continued research on each of the three system types is recommended.

  14. Unsteady MHD free convective flow past a vertical porous plate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2000 Mathematics subject classification: 76 W 05. Keywords: Free ... the design of MHD generators and accelerators, underground water energy storage system etc. ... In many works on plasma physics, the Hall effect is disregarded. But if the.

  15. Cross-relaxation in multiple pulse NQR spin-locking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltjukov, P. A.; Kibrik, G. E. [Perm State University, Physics Department (Russian Federation); Furman, G. B., E-mail: gregoryf@bgu.ac.il; Goren, S. D. [Ben Gurion University, Physics Department (Israel)

    2008-01-15

    The experimental and theoretical NQR multiple-pulse spin locking study of cross-relaxation process in solids containing nuclei of two different sorts I > 1/2 and S = 1/2 coupled by the dipole-dipole interactions and influenced by an external magnetic field. Two coupled equations for the inverse spin temperatures of the both spin systems describing the mutual spin lattice relaxation and the cross-relaxation were obtained using the method of the nonequilibrium state operator. It is shown that the relaxation process is realized with non-exponential time dependence describing by a sum of two exponents. The cross relaxation time is calculated as a function of the multiple-pulse field parameters which agree with the experimental data. The calculated magnetization cross relaxation time vs the strength of the applied magnetic field agrees well with the obtained experimental data.

  16. A study of relaxation mechanisms in the A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} state of nitric oxide by time resolved double resonant polarization spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampanoni-Panariello, A.; Bombach, R.; Hemmerling, B.; Hubschmid, W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Double resonant polarization labeling spectroscopy is applied to detect nitric oxide in flames and to characterize rotational energy transfer and orientation changing collisions in its first excited electronic state. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  17. Synthetic aperture radar autofocus via semidefinite relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuang-Hung; Wiesel, Ami; Munson, David C

    2013-06-01

    The autofocus problem in synthetic aperture radar imaging amounts to estimating unknown phase errors caused by unknown platform or target motion. At the heart of three state-of-the-art autofocus algorithms, namely, phase gradient autofocus, multichannel autofocus (MCA), and Fourier-domain multichannel autofocus (FMCA), is the solution of a constant modulus quadratic program (CMQP). Currently, these algorithms solve a CMQP by using an eigenvalue relaxation approach. We propose an alternative relaxation approach based on semidefinite programming, which has recently attracted considerable attention in other signal processing problems. Experimental results show that our proposed methods provide promising performance improvements for MCA and FMCA through an increase in computational complexity.

  18. Passive stabilization in a linear MHD stability code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, A.M.M.

    1980-03-01

    Utilizing a Galerkin procedure to calculate the vacuum contribution to the ideal MHD Lagrangian, the implementation of realistic boundary conditions are described in a linear stability code. The procedure permits calculation of the effect of arbitrary conducting structure on ideal MHD instabilities, as opposed to the prior use of an encircling shell. The passive stabilization of conducting coils on the tokamak vertical instability is calculated within the PEST code and gives excellent agreement with 2-D time dependent simulations of PDX.

  19. Extraction of MHD Signal Based on Wavelet Transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵晴初; 赵彤; 李旻; 黄胜华; 徐佩霞

    2002-01-01

    Mirnov signals mixed with interferences are a kind of non-stationary signal. It can not obtain satisfactory effects to extract MHD signals from mirnov signals by Fourier Transform. This paper suggests that the wavelet transform can be used to treat mirnov signals. Theoretical analysis and experimental result have indicated that using the time-frequency analysis characteristics of the wavelet transform to filter mirnov signals can remove effectively interferences and extract useful MHD signals.

  20. Nonlinear fractional relaxation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Tofighi

    2012-04-01

    We define a nonlinear model for fractional relaxation phenomena. We use -expansion method to analyse this model. By studying the fundamental solutions of this model we find that when → 0 the model exhibits a fast decay rate and when → ∞ the model exhibits a power-law decay. By analysing the frequency response we find a logarithmic enhancement for the relative ratio of susceptibility.

  1. Pulse Detonation Rocket MHD Power Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A pulse detonation research engine (MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) Model PDRE (Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine) G-2) has been developed for the purpose of examining integrated propulsion and magnetohydrodynamic power generation applications. The engine is based on a rectangular cross-section tube coupled to a converging-diverging nozzle, which is in turn attached to a segmented Faraday channel. As part of the shakedown testing activity, the pressure wave was interrogated along the length of the engine while running on hydrogen/oxygen propellants. Rapid transition to detonation wave propagation was insured through the use of a short Schelkin spiral near the head of the engine. The measured detonation wave velocities were in excess of 2500 m/s in agreement with the theoretical C-J velocity. The engine was first tested in a straight tube configuration without a nozzle, and the time resolved thrust was measured simultaneously with the head-end pressure. Similar measurements were made with the converging-diverging nozzle attached. The time correlation of the thrust and head-end pressure data was found to be excellent. The major purpose of the converging-diverging nozzle was to configure the engine for driving an MHD generator for the direct production of electrical power. Additional tests were therefore necessary in which seed (cesium-hydroxide dissolved in methanol) was directly injected into the engine as a spray. The exhaust plume was then interrogated with a microwave interferometer in an attempt to characterize the plasma conditions, and emission spectroscopy measurements were also acquired. Data reduction efforts indicate that the plasma exhaust is very highly ionized, although there is some uncertainty at this time as to the relative abundance of negative OH ions. The emission spectroscopy data provided some indication of the species in the exhaust as well as a measurement of temperature. A 24-electrode-pair segmented Faraday channel and 0.6 Tesla permanent

  2. Pulse Detonation Rocket MHD Power Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A pulse detonation research engine (MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) Model PDRE (Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine) G-2) has been developed for the purpose of examining integrated propulsion and magnetohydrodynamic power generation applications. The engine is based on a rectangular cross-section tube coupled to a converging-diverging nozzle, which is in turn attached to a segmented Faraday channel. As part of the shakedown testing activity, the pressure wave was interrogated along the length of the engine while running on hydrogen/oxygen propellants. Rapid transition to detonation wave propagation was insured through the use of a short Schelkin spiral near the head of the engine. The measured detonation wave velocities were in excess of 2500 m/s in agreement with the theoretical C-J velocity. The engine was first tested in a straight tube configuration without a nozzle, and the time resolved thrust was measured simultaneously with the head-end pressure. Similar measurements were made with the converging-diverging nozzle attached. The time correlation of the thrust and head-end pressure data was found to be excellent. The major purpose of the converging-diverging nozzle was to configure the engine for driving an MHD generator for the direct production of electrical power. Additional tests were therefore necessary in which seed (cesium-hydroxide dissolved in methanol) was directly injected into the engine as a spray. The exhaust plume was then interrogated with a microwave interferometer in an attempt to characterize the plasma conditions, and emission spectroscopy measurements were also acquired. Data reduction efforts indicate that the plasma exhaust is very highly ionized, although there is some uncertainty at this time as to the relative abundance of negative OH ions. The emission spectroscopy data provided some indication of the species in the exhaust as well as a measurement of temperature. A 24-electrode-pair segmented Faraday channel and 0.6 Tesla permanent

  3. Structure determination of uniformly {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeled protein using qualitative distance restraints from MAS solid-state {sup 13}C-NMR observed paramagnetic relaxation enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamaki, Hajime [Hokkaido University, Graduate School of Life Science (Japan); Egawa, Ayako [Osaka University, Institute for Protein Research (Japan); Kido, Kouki [Hokkaido University, Graduate School of Life Science (Japan); Kameda, Tomoshi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Biotechnology Research Institute for Drug Discovery (Japan); Kamiya, Masakatsu; Kikukawa, Takashi; Aizawa, Tomoyasu [Hokkaido University, Faculty of Advanced Life Science (Japan); Fujiwara, Toshimichi [Osaka University, Institute for Protein Research (Japan); Demura, Makoto, E-mail: demura@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Hokkaido University, Faculty of Advanced Life Science (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful method for structure determination of insoluble biomolecules. However, structure determination by MAS solid-state NMR remains challenging because it is difficult to obtain a sufficient amount of distance restraints owing to spectral complexity. Collection of distance restraints from paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) is a promising approach to alleviate this barrier. However, the precision of distance restraints provided by PRE is limited in solid-state NMR because of incomplete averaged interactions and intermolecular PREs. In this report, the backbone structure of the B1 domain of streptococcal protein G (GB1) has been successfully determined by combining the CS-Rosetta protocol and qualitative PRE restraints. The derived structure has a Cα RMSD of 1.49 Å relative to the X-ray structure. It is noteworthy that our protocol can determine the correct structure from only three cysteine-EDTA-Mn{sup 2+} mutants because this number of PRE sites is insufficient when using a conventional structure calculation method based on restrained molecular dynamics and simulated annealing. This study shows that qualitative PRE restraints can be employed effectively for protein structure determination from a limited conformational sampling space using a protein fragment library.

  4. EVIDENCE OF ACTIVE MHD INSTABILITY IN EULAG-MHD SIMULATIONS OF SOLAR CONVECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, Nicolas; Strugarek, Antoine; Charbonneau, Paul, E-mail: nicolas.laws@gmail.ca, E-mail: strugarek@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: paulchar@astro.umontreal.ca [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128 Succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, Qc H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2015-11-10

    We investigate the possible development of magnetohydrodynamical instabilities in the EULAG-MHD “millennium simulation” of Passos and Charbonneau. This simulation sustains a large-scale magnetic cycle characterized by solar-like polarity reversals taking place on a regular multidecadal cadence, and in which zonally oriented bands of strong magnetic fields accumulate below the convective layers, in response to turbulent pumping from above in successive magnetic half-cycles. Key aspects of this simulation include low numerical dissipation and a strongly sub-adiabatic fluid layer underlying the convectively unstable layers corresponding to the modeled solar convection zone. These properties are conducive to the growth and development of two-dimensional instabilities that are otherwise suppressed by stronger dissipation. We find evidence for the action of a non-axisymmetric magnetoshear instability operating in the upper portions of the stably stratified fluid layers. We also investigate the possibility that the Tayler instability may be contributing to the destabilization of the large-scale axisymmetric magnetic component at high latitudes. On the basis of our analyses, we propose a global dynamo scenario whereby the magnetic cycle is driven primarily by turbulent dynamo action in the convecting layers, but MHD instabilities accelerate the dissipation of the magnetic field pumped down into the overshoot and stable layers, thus perhaps significantly influencing the magnetic cycle period. Support for this scenario is found in the distinct global dynamo behaviors observed in an otherwise identical EULAG-MHD simulations, using a different degree of sub-adiabaticity in the stable fluid layers underlying the convection zone.

  5. Coronal Heating and Acceleration of the High/Low-Speed Solar Wind by Fast/Slow MHD Shock Trains

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, T K

    2004-01-01

    We investigate coronal heating and acceleration of the high- and low-speed solar wind in the open field region by dissipation of fast and slow magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) waves through MHD shocks. Linearly polarized \\Alfven (fast MHD) waves and acoustic (slow MHD) waves travelling upwardly along with a magnetic field line eventually form fast switch-on shock trains and hydrodynamical shock trains (N-waves) respectively to heat and accelerate the plasma. We determine one dimensional structure of the corona from the bottom of the transition region (TR) to 1AU under the steady-state condition by solving evolutionary equations for the shock amplitudes simultaneously with the momentum and proton/electron energy equations. Our model reproduces the overall trend of the high-speed wind from the polar holes and the low-speed wind from the mid- to low-latitude streamer except the observed hot corona in the streamer. The heating from the slow waves is effective in the low corona to increase the density there, and plays ...

  6. Wall functions for numerical modeling of laminar MHD flows

    CERN Document Server

    Widlund, O

    2003-01-01

    general wall function treatment is presented for the numerical modeling of laminar magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows. The wall function expressions are derived analytically from the steady-state momentum and electric potential equations, making use only of local variables of the numerical solution. No assumptions are made regarding the orientation of the magnetic field relative to the wall, nor of the magnitude of the Hartmann number, or the wall conductivity. The wall functions are used for defining implicit boundary conditions for velocity and electric potential, and for computing mass flow and electrical currents in near wall-cells. The wall function treatment was validated in a finite volume formulation, and compared with an analytic solution for a fully developed channel flow in a transverse magnetic field. For the case with insulating walls, a uniform 20 x 20 grid, and Hartmann numbers Ha = [10,30,100], the accuracy of pressure drop and wall shear stress predictions was [1.1%,1.6%,0.5%], respectively. Com...

  7. Magnetosheath Turbulence at MHD Scales: A Statistical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shiyong; Sahraoui, Fouad; Hadid, Lina; Yuan, Zhigang

    2015-04-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in space plasmas, such as terrestrial magnetotail and magnetosheath, solar wind, or the interstellar medium. In the solar wind, it is well established that at MHD scales, the magnetic energy spectra generally follow the so-called Kolmogorov's spectrum f-5/3. In the magnetosheath, Alexandrova et al. [2006] observed a Kolmogorov-like inertial range in the frequency range f < fci. In this study, we used three years data from the Cluster mission to statistically investigate the existence of the Kolmogorov inertial range in the whole magnetosheath, including flanks and subsolar regions. Statistical results show that most spectra are shallower than the Kolmogorov one, and have a scaling ~ f-1recalling the energy containing scales of solarwind turbulence. These spectra were found to be populated by uncorrelated fluctuations. The Kolmogorov scaling is observed only away from the bock shock and in the flanks region. These results suggest that random-like fluctuations are generated behind the shock, which reach a fully developed turbulence state only after some time corresponding to their propagation (or advection) away from the shock. At kinetic scales no dependence of the turbulence scaling on the location in the magnetosheath was found.

  8. Use of a Nonequilibrium MHD Generator for Conversion of SNTP Nuclear Thermal Rocket Exhaust to DC Electric Power for a Multimegawatt Nuclear Electric Propulsion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Charles J.

    1994-07-01

    This paper explores a method by which the energy of a high speed flowing gas can efficiently be converted into DC electric power by a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator. A nonequilibrium state may be created in the working fluid during the ionization process using an arc discharge. This nonequilibrium state may possibly be sustained in the fluid using the waste heat byproduct of the natural operation of the generator, if certain characteristics of the fluid/MHD system are maintained. The improved efficiency of the resulting nonequilibrium MHD generator not only allows the system to deliver increased power to the load, but reduces the amount of energy to be expelled from the closed fluid cycle by a radiator.

  9. MHD Disc Winds and Linewidth Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Chajet, Laura S

    2013-01-01

    We study AGN emission line profiles combining an improved version of the accretion disc-wind model of Murray & Chiang with the magneto-hydrodynamic model of Emmering et al. We show how the shape, broadening and shift of the C IV line depend not only on the viewing angle to the object but also on the wind launching angle, especially for small launching angles. We have compared the dispersions in our model C IV linewidth distributions to observational upper limit on that dispersion, considering both smooth and clumpy torus models. As the torus half-opening angle (measured from the polar axis) increases above about 18? degrees, increasingly larger wind launching angles are required to match the observational constraints. Above a half-opening angle of about 47? degrees, no wind launch angle (within the maximum allowed by the MHD solutions) can match the observations. Considering a model that replaces the torus by a warped disc yields the same constraints obtained with the two other models.

  10. Analysis of Linear MHD Power Generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witalis, E.A.

    1965-02-15

    The finite electrode size effects on the performance of an infinitely long MHD power generation duct are calculated by means of conformal mapping. The general conformal transformation is deduced and applied in a graphic way. The analysis includes variations in the segmentation degree, the Hall parameter of the gas and the electrode/insulator length ratio as well as the influence of the external circuitry and loading. A general criterion for a minimum of the generator internal resistance is given. The same criterion gives the conditions for the occurrence of internal current leakage between adjacent electrodes. It is also shown that the highest power output at a prescribed efficiency is always obtained when the current is made to flow between exactly opposed electrodes. Curves are presented showing the power-efficiency relations and other generator properties as depending on the segmentation degree and the Hall parameter in the cases of axial and transverse power extraction. The implications of limiting the current to flow between a finite number of identical electrodes are introduced and combined with the condition for current flow between opposed electrodes. The characteristics of generators with one or a few external loads can then be determined completely and examples are given in a table. It is shown that the performance of such generators must not necessarily be inferior to that of segmented generators with many independent loads. However, the problems of channel end losses and off-design loading have not been taken into consideration.

  11. Simulation of MHD collimation from differential rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Christopher

    2005-10-01

    Recent observations indicate that astrophysical outflows from active galactic nuclei are permeated with helical magnetic fields[1]. The most promising theory for the formation of the magnetic configurations in these magnetically driven jets is the coiling of an initial seed field by the differential rotation of the accretion disk surrounding the central object. We have begun simulations that are relevant to these Poynting jets using the NIMROD code[2]. To simulate dynamics on length scales that are significantly larger than the accretion disk, the non-relativistic MHD equations are evolved on a hemispherical logarithmic mesh. The accretion disk is treated as a condition on the lower boundary by applying a Keplerian velocity to the azimuthal component of the fluid velocity and a prescribed flux of mass through the boundary. The magnetic field configuration is initialized to a dipole like field. Formation of a jet outflow is observed later in time. The initial field is coiled up and collimated, driving a large current density on the axis of symmetry. Slipping of magnetic field lines due to non-ideal effects has been investigated. 1. Asada K. et. al., Pub. of the Astr. Soc. of Japan, 54, L39-L43, 2002 2. Sovinec C. et. al., J. Comp. Phys., 195, 355-386, 2004

  12. Nonlinear MHD waves in a Prominence Foot

    CERN Document Server

    Ofman, Leon; Kucera, Therese; Schmieder, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    We study nonlinear waves in a prominence foot using 2.5D MHD model motivated by recent high-resolution observations with Hinode/SOT in Ca~II emission of a prominence on October 10, 2012 showing highly dynamic small-scale motions in the prominence material. Observations of H$\\alpha$ intensities and of Doppler shifts show similar propagating fluctuations. However the optically thick nature of the emission lines inhibits unique quantitative interpretation in terms of density. Nevertheless, we find evidence of nonlinear wave activity in the prominence foot by examining the relative magnitude of the fluctuation intensity ($\\delta I/I\\sim \\delta n/n$). The waves are evident as significant density fluctuations that vary with height, and apparently travel upward from the chromosphere into the prominence material with quasi-periodic fluctuations with typical period in the range of 5-11 minutes, and wavelengths $\\sim <$2000 km. Recent Doppler shift observations show the transverse displacement of the propagating wav...

  13. Activation of MHD reconnection on ideal timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, S.; Papini, E.; Del Zanna, L.; Tenerani, A.; Pucci, F.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection in laboratory, space and astrophysical plasmas is often invoked to explain explosive energy release and particle acceleration. However, the timescales involved in classical models within the macroscopic MHD regime are far too slow to match the observations. Here we revisit the tearing instability by performing visco-resistive two-dimensional numerical simulations of the evolution of thin current sheets, for a variety of initial configurations and of values of the Lunquist number S, up to 107. Results confirm that when the critical aspect ratio of S 1/3 is reached in the reconnecting current sheets, the instability proceeds on ideal (Alfvénic) macroscopic timescales, as required to explain observations. Moreover, the same scaling is seen to apply also to the local, secondary reconnection events triggered during the nonlinear phase of the tearing instability, thus accelerating the cascading process to increasingly smaller spatial and temporal scales. The process appears to be robust, as the predicted scaling is measured both in inviscid simulations and when using a Prandtl number P  =  1 in the viscous regime.

  14. Corrosion and arc erosion in MHD channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, R.J. (Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Pollina, R.J. (Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States))

    1992-08-01

    The problems connected with gas side corrosion for the design of the lA4 (POC) channel hardware are explored and results of gas side wear rate tests in the Textron Mark VII facility are presented. It is shown that the proposed designs meet a 2000 hour lifetime criterion based upon these materials tests. Improvement in cathode lifetime is demonstrated with lower voltage intercathode gaps. The corrosion of these materials is discussed and it is shown how lifetimes are dependent upon gap voltage and average metal temperature. The importance of uniformity of slagging to the durability of the anode wall is demonstrated. The wear mechanism of the anodes in the MHD channel is analyzed. In addition to gas-side corrosion, the results of specific water corrosion tests of sidewall materials are discussed. All of the tests reported here were carried out to confirm the gas-side performance and the manufacturability of anode and sidewall designs and to address questions posed about the durability of tungsten-copper on the waterside. the results of water corrosion tests of the tungsten copper alloy sidewall material are presented to show that with proper control of waterside pH and, if necessary, dissolved oxygen, one can obtain reliable performance with no degradation of heat transfer with this material. The final choice of materials was determined primarily by the outcome of these tests and also by the question of the manufacturability of the prospective designs.

  15. Effect of Progressive Muscle Relaxation on the Adverse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    less in subjects practicing relaxation exercises, as compared to subjects only on ... be associated with mood and eating disorders. ... mental state, reduce anticipatory anxiety, reduce anxiety as .... A higher degree and longer duration.

  16. Feasibility of MHD submarine propulsion. Phase II, MHD propulsion: Testing in a two Tesla test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doss, E.D. [ed.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sikes, W.C. [ed.] [Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., VA (United States)

    1992-09-01

    This report describes the work performed during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the collaborative research program established between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company (NNS). Phase I of the program focused on the development of computer models for Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion. Phase 2 focused on the experimental validation of the thruster performance models and the identification, through testing, of any phenomena which may impact the attractiveness of this propulsion system for shipboard applications. The report discusses in detail the work performed in Phase 2 of the program. In Phase 2, a two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented. The test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to computer model predictions. In general, the results of the tests and their comparison with the predictions indicate that thephenomena affecting the performance of MHD seawater thrusters are well understood and can be accurately predicted with the developed thruster computer models.

  17. An ab initio potential energy surface for the formic acid dimer: zero-point energy, selected anharmonic fundamental energies, and ground-state tunneling splitting calculated in relaxed 1-4-mode subspaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Chen; Bowman, Joel M

    2016-09-14

    We report a full-dimensional, permutationally invariant potential energy surface (PES) for the cyclic formic acid dimer. This PES is a least-squares fit to 13475 CCSD(T)-F12a/haTZ (VTZ for H and aVTZ for C and O) energies. The energy-weighted, root-mean-square fitting error is 11 cm(-1) and the barrier for the double-proton transfer on the PES is 2848 cm(-1), in good agreement with the directly-calculated ab initio value of 2853 cm(-1). The zero-point vibrational energy of 15 337 ± 7 cm(-1) is obtained from diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. Energies of fundamentals of fifteen modes are calculated using the vibrational self-consistent field and virtual-state configuration interaction method. The ground-state tunneling splitting is computed using a reduced-dimensional Hamiltonian with relaxed potentials. The highest-level, four-mode coupled calculation gives a tunneling splitting of 0.037 cm(-1), which is roughly twice the experimental value. The tunneling splittings of (DCOOH)2 and (DCOOD)2 from one to three mode calculations are, as expected, smaller than that for (HCOOH)2 and consistent with experiment.

  18. Charge carrier resolved relaxation of the first excitonic state in CdSe quantum dots probed with near-infrared transient absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Eric A; Morris-Cohen, Adam J; Knowles, Kathryn E; Weiss, Emily A

    2010-11-18

    This manuscript describes a global regression analysis of near-infrared (NIR, 900-1300 nm) transient absorptions (TA) of colloidal CdSe quantum dots (QDs) photoexcited to their first (1S(e)1S(3/2)) excitonic state. Near-IR TA spectroscopy facilitates charge carrier-resolved analysis of excitonic decay of QDs because signals in the NIR are due exclusively to absorptions of photoexcited electrons and holes, as probe energies in this region are not high enough to induce absorptions across the optical bandgap that crowd the visible TA spectra. The response of each observed component of the excitonic decay to the presence of a hole-trapping ligand (1-octanethiol) and an electron-accepting ligand (1,4-benzoquinone), and comparison of time constants to those for recovery of the ground state bleaching feature in the visible TA spectrum, allow for the assignment of the components to (i) a 1.6 ps hole trapping process, (ii) 19 ps and 274 ps surface-mediated electron trapping processes, and (iii) a ∼5 ns recombination of untrapped electrons.

  19. Relaxation of a qubit measured by a driven Duffing oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Serban, I; Wilhelm, F K

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the relaxation of a superconducting qubit for the case when its detector, the Josephson bifurcation amplifier, remains latched in one of its two (meta)stable states of forced vibrations. The qubit relaxation rates are different in different states. They can display strong dependence on the qubit frequency and resonant enhancement, which is due to {\\em quasienergy resonances}. Coupling to the driven oscillator changes the effective temperature of the qubit.

  20. Vibrational relaxation of guest and host in mixed molecular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jeffrey R.; Chronister, Eric L.; Chang, Ta-Chau; Kim, Hackjin; Postlewaite, Jay C.; Dlott, Dana D.

    1988-02-01

    Vibrational relaxation (VR) of dilute impurity molecules (naphthalene, anthracene) in crystalline host matrices (durene, naphthalene) is studied with the ps photon echo technique. The results obtained by echoes on vibrations in the electronically excited state are compared to previous ps time delayed coherent Raman studies of ground state vibrations of the pure host matrix. The relaxation channels for guest and host, and the effects of molecular and crystal structure on VR rates are determined.

  1. Grueneisen relaxation photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lidai; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature-dependent property of the Grueneisen parameter has been employed in photoacoustic imaging mainly to measure tissue temperature. Here we explore this property using a different approach and develop Grueneisen-relaxation photoacoustic microscopy (GR-PAM), a technique that images non-radiative absorption with confocal optical resolution. GR-PAM sequentially delivers two identical laser pulses with a micro-second-scale time delay. The first laser pulse generates a photoacoustic signal and thermally tags the in-focus absorbers. Owing to the temperature dependence of the Grueneisen parameter, when the second laser pulse excites the tagged absorbers within the thermal relaxation time, a photoacoustic signal stronger than the first one is produced. GR-PAM detects the amplitude difference between the two co-located photoacoustic signals, confocally imaging the non-radiative absorption. We greatly improved axial resolution from 45 µm to 2.3 µm and at the same time slightly improved lateral resolution from 0.63 µm to 0.41 µm. In addition, the optical sectioning capability facilitates the measurement of the absolute absorption coefficient without fluence calibration. PMID:25379919

  2. Collisionless relaxation in beam-plasma systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backhaus, Ekaterina Yu. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This thesis reports the results from the theoretical investigations, both numerical and analytical, of collisionless relaxation phenomena in beam-plasma systems. Many results of this work can also be applied to other lossless systems of plasma physics, beam physics and astrophysics. Different aspects of the physics of collisionless relaxation and its modeling are addressed. A new theoretical framework, named Coupled Moment Equations (CME), is derived and used in numerical and analytical studies of the relaxation of second order moments such as beam size and emittance oscillations. This technique extends the well-known envelope equation formalism, and it can be applied to general systems with nonlinear forces. It is based on a systematic moment expansion of the Vlasov equation. In contrast to the envelope equation, which is derived assuming constant rms beam emittance, the CME model allows the emittance to vary through coupling to higher order moments. The CME model is implemented in slab geometry in the absence of return currents. The CME simulation yields rms beam sizes, velocity spreads and emittances that are in good agreement with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations for a wide range of system parameters. The mechanism of relaxation is also considered within the framework of the CME system. It is discovered that the rapid relaxation or beam size oscillations can be attributed to a resonant coupling between different modes of the system. A simple analytical estimate of the relaxation time is developed. The final state of the system reached after the relaxation is complete is investigated. New and accurate analytical results for the second order moments in the phase-mixed state are obtained. Unlike previous results, these connect the final values of the second order moments with the initial beam mismatch. These analytical estimates are in good agreement with the CME model and PIC simulations. Predictions for the final density and temperature are developed that show

  3. Linear and Nonlinear MHD Wave Processes in Plasmas. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tataronis, J. A.

    2004-06-01

    This program treats theoretically low frequency linear and nonlinear wave processes in magnetized plasmas. A primary objective has been to evaluate the effectiveness of MHD waves to heat plasma and drive current in toroidal configurations. The research covers the following topics: (1) the existence and properties of the MHD continua in plasma equilibria without spatial symmetry; (2) low frequency nonresonant current drive and nonlinear Alfven wave effects; and (3) nonlinear electron acceleration by rf and random plasma waves. Results have contributed to the fundamental knowledge base of MHD activity in symmetric and asymmetric toroidal plasmas. Among the accomplishments of this research effort, the following are highlighted: Identification of the MHD continuum mode singularities in toroidal geometry. Derivation of a third order ordinary differential equation that governs nonlinear current drive in the singular layers of the Alfvkn continuum modes in axisymmetric toroidal geometry. Bounded solutions of this ODE implies a net average current parallel to the toroidal equilibrium magnetic field. Discovery of a new unstable continuum of the linearized MHD equation in axially periodic circular plasma cylinders with shear and incompressibility. This continuum, which we named “accumulation continuum” and which is related to ballooning modes, arises as discrete unstable eigenfrequency accumulate on the imaginary frequency axis in the limit of large mode numbers. Development of techniques to control nonlinear electron acceleration through the action of multiple coherent and random plasmas waves. Two important elements of this program aye student participation and student training in plasma theory.

  4. Dynamo action in dissipative, forced, rotating MHD turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is an inherent feature of large-scale, energetic astrophysical and geophysical magnetofluids. In general, these are rotating and are energized through buoyancy and shear, while viscosity and resistivity provide a means of dissipation of kinetic and magnetic energy. Studies of unforced, rotating, ideal (i.e., non-dissipative) MHD turbulence have produced interesting results, but it is important to determine how these results are affected by dissipation and forcing. Here, we extend our previous work and examine dissipative, forced, and rotating MHD turbulence. Incompressibility is assumed, and finite Fourier series represent turbulent velocity and magnetic field on a 643 grid. Forcing occurs at an intermediate wave number by a method that keeps total energy relatively constant and allows for injection of kinetic and magnetic helicity. We find that 3-D energy spectra are asymmetric when forcing is present. We also find that dynamo action occurs when forcing has either kinetic or magnetic helicity, with magnetic helicity injection being more important. In forced, dissipative MHD turbulence, the dynamo manifests itself as a large-scale coherent structure that is similar to that seen in the ideal case. These results imply that MHD turbulence, per se, may play a fundamental role in the creation and maintenance of large-scale (i.e., dipolar) stellar and planetary magnetic fields.

  5. Exact Solutions for an MHD Generalized Burgers fluid: Stokes' Second Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Masood; Anjum, Asia

    2013-01-01

    This paper offers the exact analytical solutions for the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of an incompressible generalized Burgers fluid corresponding to the second problem of Stokes in the presence of the transverse magnetic field. Modified Darcy's law has been taken into account. The expression for the velocity field and associated tangential stress, presented as a sum of the steady-state and transient solutions, are obtained by means of the integral transforms. Moreover, several figures are plotted to investigate the effects of various emerging parameters on the velocity field. The obtained results show that the magnitude of the velocity and boundary layer thickness significantly reduce in the presence of magnetic field.

  6. Linear stability of ideal MHD configurations. II. Results for stationary equilibrium configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaerel, T.; Keppens, R.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we continue exploring the consequences of the general equation of motion (EOM) governing all Lagrangian perturbations ξ about a time-dependent, ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) configuration, which includes self-gravity, external gravity, pressure gradients, compressibility, inertial effects, and anisotropic Lorentz force. We here address the specific case of MHD stability for 3D stationary equilibria, where the perturbed EOM features a symmetric operator F and an antisymmetric Doppler-Coriolis operator v . ∇ . For this case, we state and prove the general properties for the solutions ξ of the governing dynamical system. For axisymmetric perturbations about axisymmetric equilibria with purely toroidal, or purely poloidal magnetic fields, specific stability theorems can be formulated. We derive a useful integral expression for the quadratic quantity given by the inner product ⟨ ξ , F [ ξ ] ⟩ . For deriving stability statements on MHD states where self-gravity is involved as well, we provide an upper bound on the perturbed self-gravitational energy associated with the displacement ξ . The resulting expression elucidates the role of potentially stabilizing versus destabilizing contributions and shows the role of gravity, entropy gradients, velocity shear, currents, Lorentz forces, inertia, and pressure gradients in offering many routes to unstable behavior in flowing gases and plasmas. These have historically mostly been studied for static v = 0 configurations, looking at stability of exactly force-balanced states, or by assuming stationarity similar to our approach here (i.e., ∂ t ≡ 0 for the state we perturb), but typically in combination with some reduced dimensionality on the configuration of interest (translational or axisymmetry). We show that in these limits, we find and generalize expressions well-known from, e.g., the study of ideal MHD stability of tokamak plasmas or from Schwarzschild's criteria controlling convection in

  7. Thermoelectric MHD non-Newtonian fluid with fractional derivative heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezzat, Magdy A., E-mail: maezzat2000@yahoo.co [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Education, Alexandria University, Alexandria (Egypt)

    2010-10-01

    In this work, a new mathematical model of thermoelectric MHD theory has been constructed in the context of a new consideration of heat conduction with fractional order. This model is applied to Stokes' first problem for a viscoelastic fluid with heat sources. Laplace transforms and state-space techniques will be used to obtain the general solution for any set of boundary conditions. According to the numerical results and its graphs, conclusion about the new theory has been constructed. Some comparisons have been shown in figures to estimate the effects of the fractional order parameter on all the studied fields.

  8. Correlating the excited state relaxation dynamics as measured by photoluminescence and transient absorption with the photocatalytic activity of Au@TiO2 core-shell nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Robert J; Joo, Ji-Bong; Zaera, Francisco; Yin, Yadong; Bardeen, Christopher J

    2013-02-07

    The spectroscopic and photocatalytic properties of a series of Au@TiO(2) core-shell nanostructures are characterized. The crystallinity of the TiO(2) shells was varied by changing the etching and calcination conditions. Measurements of the photoluminescence, transient absorption, and H(2) production rate permit us to look for correlations between the spectroscopic and catalytic behaviors. We found that there is a strong effect of crystallinity on the H(2) production rate and also the stretched exponential lifetime of the photoluminescence created by short-wavelength (266 and 300 nm) photoexcitation. As the TiO(2) crystallinity is increased, the photoluminescence lifetime increases from 22 to 140 ps in a 1 ns detection window, while the H(2) production rate increases by a factor of ~4. There is no discernible effect of crystallinity on the photoluminescence dynamics excited at 350 or 430 nm, or on the electronic dynamics measured by femtosecond transient absorption after excitation at 300 nm. We hypothesize that high-energy photons create reactive and emissive charge-separated states in parallel, and that both species are subject to similar electron-hole recombination processes that depend on sample crystallinity. Based on our observations, it can be concluded that the photoluminescence dynamics may be used to evaluate the potential performance of this class of photocatalysts.

  9. EFFECTS OF RELAXATION THERAPY IN MANAGEMENT OF MUSCULAR CONTRACTION HEADACHE IN EXECUTIVES

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, Manju

    1983-01-01

    SUMMARY Five executives suffering from muscular contractions (tension) headache were treated by deep muscular relaxation therapy. Individual sessions were supplemented by practice of relaxation at home, brief relaxation, and cue relaxation during office hours. The effect of therapy, was assessed, by comparing the baseline, pretreatment individual assessment of their behavioral state and self report, with the similar assessment done during and after the successful completion of therapy. The ad...

  10. Magnetoviscosity and relaxation in ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felderhof

    2000-09-01

    The increase in viscosity of a ferrofluid due to an applied magnetic field is discussed on the basis of a phenomenological relaxation equation for the magnetization. The relaxation equation was derived earlier from irreversible thermodynamics, and differs from that postulated by Shliomis. The two relaxation equations lead to a different dependence of viscosity on magnetic field, unless the relaxation rates are related in a specific field-dependent way. Both planar Couette flow and Poiseuille pipe flow in parallel and perpendicular magnetic field are discussed. The entropy production for these situations is calculated and related to the magnetoviscosity.

  11. [Death in a relaxation tank].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Wolf; Simon, Karl-Heinz; Bohnert, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Complete relaxation can be achieved by floating in a darkened, sound-proof relaxation tank filled with salinated water kept at body temperature. Under these conditions, meditation exercises up to self-hypnosis may lead to deep relaxation with physical and mental revitalization. A user manipulated his tank, presumably to completely cut off all optical and acoustic stimuli and accidentally also covered the ventilation hole. The man was found dead in his relaxation tank. The findings suggested lack of oxygen as the cause of death.

  12. Standing Slow MHD Waves in Radiatively Cooling Coronal Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Ghafri, Khalil Salim

    2015-01-01

    The standing slow magneto-acoustic oscillations in cooling coronal loops are investigated. There are two damping mechanisms which are considered to generate the standing acoustic modes in coronal magnetic loops namely thermal conduction and radiation. The background temperature is assumed to change temporally due to optically thin radiation. In particular, the background plasma is assumed to be radiatively cooling. The effects of cooling on longitudinal slow MHD modes is analytically evaluated by choosing a simple form of radiative function that ensures the temperature evolution of the background plasma due to radiation coincides with the observed cooling profile of coronal loops. The assumption of low-beta plasma leads to neglect the magnetic field perturbation and eventually reduces the MHD equations to a 1D system modelling longitudinal MHD oscillations in a cooling coronal loop. The cooling is assumed to occur on a characteristic time scale much larger than the oscillation period that subsequently enables...

  13. Machine modification for active MHD control in RFX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonato, P. E-mail: sonato@igi.pd.cnr.it; Chitarin, G.; Zaccaria, P.; Gnesotto, F.; Ortolani, S.; Buffa, A.; Bagatin, M.; Baker, W.R.; Dal Bello, S.; Fiorentin, P.; Grando, L.; Marchiori, G.; Marcuzzi, D.; Masiello, A.; Peruzzo, S.; Pomaro, N.; Serianni, G

    2003-09-01

    Recent studies on RFP and Tokamak devices call for an active control of the MHD and resistive wall modes to induce plasma mode rotation and to prevent mode phase locking. The results obtained on RFX, where slow rotation of phase locked modes has been induced, support the possibility of extending active MHD mode control through a substantial modification of the device. A new first wall with an integrated system of electric and magnetic transducers has been realised. A close fitting 3 mm thick Cu shell replaces the 65 mm Al shell. A toroidal support structure (TSS) made of stainless steel replaces the shell in supporting all the forces acting on the torus. A system of 192 saddle coils is provided to actively control the MHD modes. This system completely surrounds the toroidal surface and allows the generation of harmonic fields with m=0 and m=1 poloidal wave number and with a toroidal spectrum up to n=24.

  14. Using Coronal Hole Maps to Constrain MHD Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Ronald M.; Downs, Cooper; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran

    2017-08-01

    In this presentation, we explore the use of coronal hole maps (CHMs) as a constraint for thermodynamic MHD models of the solar corona. Using our EUV2CHM software suite (predsci.com/chd), we construct CHMs from SDO/AIA 193Å and STEREO-A/EUVI 195Å images for multiple Carrington rotations leading up to the August 21st, 2017 total solar eclipse. We then contruct synoptic CHMs from synthetic EUV images generated from global thermodynamic MHD simulations of the corona for each rotation. Comparisons of apparent coronal hole boundaries and estimates of the net open flux are used to benchmark and constrain our MHD model leading up to the eclipse. Specifically, the comparisons are used to find optimal parameterizations of our wave turbulence dissipation (WTD) coronal heating model.

  15. Recent observations of MHD fluctuations in the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bavassano

    Full Text Available A short review of recent observations of solar wind fluctuations in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD range of scales is presented. In recent years, the use of high time-resolution data on an extended interval of heliocentric distance has allowed significant advances in our knowledge of MHD fluctuations. We first focus on the origin and evolution of the Alfvénic-type fluctuations. The role of interplanetary sources and the influence of interactions with structures convected by the solar wind are examined. Then compressive fluctuations are investigated, with special attention being given to their nature and origin. Observations are discussed in the light of recent theories and models. Finally, predictions for MHD turbulence in polar regions of the heliosphere are highlighted.

  16. A Parametric Study of Extended-MHD Drift Tearing

    CERN Document Server

    King, Jacob R

    2014-01-01

    The linear drift-tearing mode is analyzed for different regimes of the plasma-$\\beta$, ion-skin-depth parameter space with an unreduced, extended-MHD model. New dispersion relations are found at moderate plasma $\\beta$ and previous drift-tearing results are classified as applicable at small plasma $\\beta$. The drift stabilization of the mode in the regimes varies from non-existent/weak to complete. As the diamagnetic-drift frequency is proportional to the plasma $\\beta$, verification exercises with unreduced, extended-MHD models in the small plasma-$\\beta$ regimes are impractical. The new dispersion relations in the moderate plasma-$\\beta$ regimes are used to verify the extended-MHD implementation of the NIMROD code [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)]. Given the small boundary-layer skin depth, discussion of the validity of the first-order finite-Larmour-radius model is presented.

  17. Using Faraday Rotation to Probe MHD Instabilities in Intracluster Media

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanovic, Tamara; Massey, Richard

    2010-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that conduction-driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities may operate at all radii within an intracluster medium (ICM), and profoundly affect the structure of a cluster's magnetic field. Where MHD instabilities dominate the dynamics of an ICM, they will re-orient magnetic field lines perpendicular to the temperature gradient inside a cooling core, or parallel to the temperature gradient outside it. This characteristic structure of magnetic field could be probed by measurements of polarized radio emission from background sources. Motivated by this possibility we have constructed 3-d models of a magnetized cooling core cluster and calculated Faraday rotation measure (RM) maps in the plane of the sky under realistic observing conditions. We compare a scenario in which magnetic field geometry is characterized by conduction driven MHD instabilities to that where it is determined by the turbulent motions. We find that future high-sensitivity spectro-polarimetric measurements of R...

  18. MHD discontinuities in solar flares: continuous transitions and plasma heating

    CERN Document Server

    Ledentsov, L S

    2015-01-01

    The boundary conditions for the ideal MHD equations on a plane dis- continuity surface are investigated. It is shown that, for a given mass flux through a discontinuity, its type depends only on the relation between inclina- tion angles of a magnetic field. Moreover, the conservation laws on a surface of discontinuity allow changing a discontinuity type with gradual (continu- ous) changes in the conditions of plasma flow. Then there are the so-called transition solutions that satisfy simultaneously two types of discontinuities. We obtain all transition solutions on the basis of the complete system of boundary conditions for the MHD equations. We also found the expression describing a jump of internal energy of the plasma flowing through the dis- continuity. Firstly, this allows constructing a generalized scheme of possible continuous transitions between MHD discontinuities. Secondly, it enables the examination of the dependence of plasma heating by plasma density and configuration of the magnetic field near t...

  19. MHD Flows in Compact Astrophysical Objects Accretion, Winds and Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Beskin, Vasily S

    2010-01-01

    Accretion flows, winds and jets of compact astrophysical objects and stars are generally described within the framework of hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) flows. Analytical analysis of the problem provides profound physical insights, which are essential for interpreting and understanding the results of numerical simulations. Providing such a physical understanding of MHD Flows in Compact Astrophysical Objects is the main goal of this book, which is an updated translation of a successful Russian graduate textbook. The book provides the first detailed introduction into the method of the Grad-Shafranov equation, describing analytically the very broad class of hydrodynamical and MHD flows. It starts with the classical examples of hydrodynamical accretion onto relativistic and nonrelativistic objects. The force-free limit of the Grad-Shafranov equation allows us to analyze in detail the physics of the magnetospheres of radio pulsars and black holes, including the Blandford-Znajek process of energy e...

  20. Course 1: Accretion and Ejection-Related MHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyvaerts, Jean

    This lecture is an introduction to MHD. Relevant equations, both in the classical and special-relativistic regimes are derived. The magnetic field evolution is considered both in the perfect-MHD limit and when weak resistivity is present, giving rise to reconnection flows. A short section gives a flavour of dynamo theory. Examples of simple stationnary flows and equilibria are then presented. Stationnary, axisymmetric, rotating perfect-MHD winds and jets are discussed in some more detail. Their asymptotic structure is described. The last sections deal with small motions about an equilibrium and stability. These issues are illustrated by a few classical examples. The last section discusses linear aspects of the magneto-rotationnal instability.

  1. Lectures in magnetohydrodynamics. With an appendix on extended MHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnack, Dalton D. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. Physics

    2009-07-01

    This concise and self-contained primer is based on class-tested notes for an advanced graduate course in MHD. The broad areas chosen for presentation are the derivation and properties of the fundamental equations, equilibrium, waves and instabilities, self-organization, turbulence, and dynamos. The latter topics require the inclusion of the effects of resistivity and nonlinearity. Together, these span the range of MHD issues that have proven to be important for understanding magnetically confined plasmas as well as in some space and astrophysical applications. The combined length and style of the thirty-eight lectures are appropriate for complete presentation in a single semester. An extensive appendix on extended MHD is included as further reading. (orig.)

  2. MHD Flow of a Non-Newtonian Power Law Fluid over a Vertical Stretching Sheet with the Convective Boundary Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azeem SHAHZAD

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we study the power law model of steady state, viscous, incompressible MHD flow over a vertically stretching sheet. Furthermore, heat transfer is also addressed by using the convective boundary conditions. The coupled partial differential equations are transformed into ordinary differential equations (ODEs using similarity transformations. The transformed highly non-linear ODEs are solved by using the Homotopy Analysis Method (HAM. The influence of different parameters on the velocity and temperature fields are analyzed and discussed.

  3. Structural relaxation in viscous metallic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, A. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (BFRL), Gaithersburg, MD (United States)]|[Technische Univ. Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany); Wuttke, J.; Petry, W. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany); Schober, H. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France); Randl, O.G. [Manufacture Michelin, Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    1999-11-01

    Recently, metallic alloys have been found that exhibit extremely large viscosities in the liquid state. These liquids can be quenched into bulk metallic glasses at relatively modest cooling rates. In contrast to simple metals the structural relaxation of these systems show a two step decay in the liquid state. This behaviour has long been known for molecular or ionic glass formers in their under-cooled liquid state. Applying an analysis previously used for the glass formers (mode-coupling theory) a full quantitative description of the neutron data is obtained for these metallic liquids. (authors) 3 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Relaxing Behavioural Inheritance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Amálio

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Object-oriented (OO inheritance allows the definition of families of classes in a hierarchical way. In behavioural inheritance, a strong version, it should be possible to substitute an object of a subclass for an object of its superclass without any observable effect on the system. Behavioural inheritance is related to formal refinement, but, as observed in the literature, the refinement constraints are too restrictive, ruling out many useful OO subclassings. This paper studies behavioural inheritance in the context of ZOO, an object-oriented style for Z. To overcome refinement's restrictions, this paper proposes relaxations to the behavioural inheritance refinement rules. The work is presented for Z, but the results are applicable to any OO language that supports design-by-contract.

  5. Dynamics of nonlinear resonant slow MHD waves in twisted flux tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Erdélyi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear resonant magnetohydrodynamic (MHD waves are studied in weakly dissipative isotropic plasmas in cylindrical geometry. This geometry is suitable and is needed when one intends to study resonant MHD waves in magnetic flux tubes (e.g. for sunspots, coronal loops, solar plumes, solar wind, the magnetosphere, etc. The resonant behaviour of slow MHD waves is confined in a narrow dissipative layer. Using the method of simplified matched asymptotic expansions inside and outside of the narrow dissipative layer, we generalise the so-called connection formulae obtained in linear MHD for the Eulerian perturbation of the total pressure and for the normal component of the velocity. These connection formulae for resonant MHD waves across the dissipative layer play a similar role as the well-known Rankine-Hugoniot relations connecting solutions at both sides of MHD shock waves. The key results are the nonlinear connection formulae found in dissipative cylindrical MHD which are an important extension of their counterparts obtained in linear ideal MHD (Sakurai et al., 1991, linear dissipative MHD (Goossens et al., 1995; Erdélyi, 1997 and in nonlinear dissipative MHD derived in slab geometry (Ruderman et al., 1997. These generalised connection formulae enable us to connect solutions obtained at both sides of the dissipative layer without solving the MHD equations in the dissipative layer possibly saving a considerable amount of CPU-time when solving the full nonlinear resonant MHD problem.

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modelling of solar active phenomena via numerical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.

    1988-01-01

    Numerical ideal MHD models for the study of solar active phenomena are summarized. Particular attention is given to the following physical phenomena: (1) local heating of a coronal loop in an isothermal and stratified atmosphere, and (2) the coronal dynamic responses due to magnetic field movement. The results suggest that local heating of a magnetic loop will lead to the enhancement of the density of the neighboring loops through MHD wave compression. It is noted that field lines can be pinched off and may form a self-contained magnetized plasma blob that may move outward into interplanetary space.

  7. Advances in Simulation of Wave Interactions with Extended MHD Phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batchelor, Donald B [ORNL; D' Azevedo, Eduardo [ORNL; Bateman, Glenn [ORNL; Bernholdt, David E [ORNL; Bonoli, P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Bramley, Randall B [ORNL; Breslau, Joshua [ORNL; Elwasif, Wael R [ORNL; Foley, S. [Indiana University; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick [ORNL; Jardin, S. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Klasky, Scott A [ORNL; Kruger, Scott E [ORNL; Ku, Long-Poe [ORNL; McCune, Douglas [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Ramos, J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Schissel, David P [ORNL; Schnack, Dalton D [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) provides a framework within which some of the most advanced, massively-parallel fusion modeling codes can be interoperated to provide a detailed picture of the multi-physics processes involved in fusion experiments. The presentation will cover four topics: (1) recent improvements to the IPS, (2) application of the IPS for very high resolution simulations of ITER scenarios, (3) studies of resistive and ideal MHD stability in tokamak discharges using IPS facilities, and (4) the application of RF power in the electron cyclotron range of frequencies to control slowly growing MHD modes in tokamaks and initial evaluations of optimized location for RF power deposition.

  8. Advances in Simulation of Wave Interaction with Extended MHD Phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batchelor, Donald B [ORNL; Abla, Gheni [ORNL; D' Azevedo, Ed F [ORNL; Bateman, Glenn [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Bernholdt, David E [ORNL; Berry, Lee A [ORNL; Bonoli, P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Bramley, R [Indiana University; Breslau, Joshua [ORNL; Chance, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Chen, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Choi, M. [General Atomics; Elwasif, Wael R [ORNL; Foley, S. [Indiana University; Fu, GuoYong [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Harvey, R. W. [CompX, Del Mar, CA; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick [ORNL; Jardin, S. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Jenkins, T [University of Wisconsin; Keyes, David E [Columbia University; Klasky, Scott A [ORNL; Kruger, Scott [Tech-X Corporation; Ku, Long-Poe [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Lynch, Vickie E [ORNL; McCune, Douglas [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Ramos, J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Schissel, D. [General Atomics; Schnack, [University of Wisconsin; Wright, J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

    2009-01-01

    The Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) provides a framework within which some of the most advanced, massively-parallel fusion modeling codes can be interoperated to provide a detailed picture of the multi-physics processes involved in fusion experiments. The presentation will cover four topics: 1) recent improvements to the IPS, 2) application of the IPS for very high resolution simulations of ITER scenarios, 3) studies of resistive and ideal MHD stability in tokamk discharges using IPS facilities, and 4) the application of RF power in the electron cyclotron range of frequencies to control slowly growing MHD modes in tokamaks and initial evaluations of optimized location for RF power deposition.

  9. Advances in simulation of wave interactions with extended MHD phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batchelor, D; D' Azevedo, E; Bernholdt, D E; Berry, L; Elwasif, W; Jaeger, E [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Abla, G; Choi, M [General Atomics (United States); Bateman, G [Lehigh University (United States); Bonoli, P [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Bramley, R; Foley, S [Indiana University (United States); Breslau, J; Chance, M; Chen, J; Fu, G; Jardin, S [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (United States); Harvey, R [CompX International (United States); Jenkins, T [University of Wisconsin (United States); Keyes, D, E-mail: batchelordb@ornl.go [Columbia University (United States)

    2009-07-01

    The Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) provides a framework within which some of the most advanced, massively-parallel fusion modeling codes can be interoperated to provide a detailed picture of the multi-physics processes involved in fusion experiments. The presentation will cover four topics: 1) recent improvements to the IPS, 2) application of the IPS for very high resolution simulations of ITER scenarios, 3) studies of resistive and ideal MHD stability in tokamk discharges using IPS facilities, and 4) the application of RF power in the electron cyclotron range of frequencies to control slowly growing MHD modes in tokamaks and initial evaluations of optimized location for RF power deposition.

  10. MHD Waves and Coronal Seismology: an overview of recent results

    CERN Document Server

    De Moortel, Ineke

    2012-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed that MHD waves and oscillations are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere, with a wide range of periods. We give a brief review of some aspects of MHD waves and coronal seismology which have recently been the focus of intense debate or are newly emerging. In particular, we focus on four topics: (i) the current controversy surrounding propagating intensity perturbations along coronal loops, (ii) the interpretation of propagating transverse loop oscillations, (iii) the ongoing search for coronal (torsional) Alfven waves and (iv) the rapidly developing topic of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) in solar flares.

  11. Nonlinear Terms of MHD Equations for Homogeneous Magnetized Shear Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrov, Z D; Hristov, T S; Mishonov, T M

    2011-01-01

    We have derived the full set of MHD equations for incompressible shear flow of a magnetized fluid and considered their solution in the wave-vector space. The linearized equations give the famous amplification of slow magnetosonic waves and describe the magnetorotational instability. The nonlinear terms in our analysis are responsible for the creation of turbulence and self-sustained spectral density of the MHD (Alfven and pseudo-Alfven) waves. Perspectives for numerical simulations of weak turbulence and calculation of the effective viscosity of accretion disks are shortly discussed in k-space.

  12. Superconducting magnet system for an experimental disk MHD facility

    OpenAIRE

    Knoopers, H.G.; Kate, ten, H.H.J.; Klundert, van de, L.J.M.

    1991-01-01

    A predesign of a split-pair magnet for a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) facility for testing a 10-MW open-cycle disk or a 5-MW closed-cycle disk generator is presented. The magnet system consists of a NbTi and a Nb 3Sn section, which provide a magnetic field of 9 T in the active area of the MHD channel. The optimization process, which is based on minimum conductor costs is discussed, and the proposed conductor design is described. Basic solutions for the construction of the magnet, the cryostat an...

  13. Relativistic MHD and excision: formulation and initial tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilsen, David; Hirschmann, Eric W; Millward, R Steven [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2006-08-21

    A new algorithm for solving the general relativistic MHD equations is described in this paper. We design our scheme to incorporate black hole excision with smooth boundaries, and to simplify solving the combined Einstein and MHD equations with AMR. The fluid equations are solved using a finite difference convex ENO method. Excision is implemented using overlapping grids. Elliptic and hyperbolic divergence cleaning techniques allow for maximum flexibility in choosing coordinate systems, and we compare both methods for a standard problem. Numerical results of standard test problems are presented in two-dimensional flat space using excision, overlapping grids and elliptic and hyperbolic divergence cleaning.

  14. Relativistic MHD and black hole excision: Formulation and initial tests

    CERN Document Server

    Neilsen, D; Millward, R S; Hirschmann, Eric W; Neilsen, David

    2006-01-01

    A new algorithm for solving the general relativistic MHD equations is described in this paper. We design our scheme to incorporate black hole excision with smooth boundaries, and to simplify solving the combined Einstein and MHD equations with AMR. The fluid equations are solved using a finite difference Convex ENO method. Excision is implemented using overlapping grids. Elliptic and hyperbolic divergence cleaning techniques allow for maximum flexibility in choosing coordinate systems, and we compare both methods for a standard problem. Numerical results of standard test problems are presented in two-dimensional flat space using excision, overlapping grids, and elliptic and hyperbolic divergence cleaning.

  15. Extended MHD Effects in High Energy Density Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyler, Charles

    2016-10-01

    The MHD model is the workhorse for computational modeling of HEDP experiments. Plasma models are inheritably limited in scope, but MHD is expected to be a very good model for studying plasmas at the high densities attained in HEDP experiments. There are, however, important ways in which MHD fails to adequately describe the results, most notably due to the omission of the Hall term in the Ohm's law (a form of extended MHD or XMHD). This talk will discuss these failings by directly comparing simulations of MHD and XMHD for particularly relevant cases. The methodology is to simulate HEDP experiments using a Hall-MHD (HMHD) code based on a highly accurate and robust Discontinuous Galerkin method, and by comparison of HMHD to MHD draw conclusions about the impact of the Hall term. We focus on simulating two experimental pulsed power machines under various scenarios. We examine the MagLIF experiment on the Z-machine at Sandia National Laboratories and liner experiments on the COBRA machine at Cornell. For the MagLIF experiment we find that power flow in the feed leads to low density plasma ablation into the region surrounding the liner. The inflow of this plasma compresses axial magnetic flux onto the liner. In MHD this axial flux tends to resistively decay, whereas in HMHD a force-free current layer sustains the axial flux on the liner leading to a larger ratio of axial to azimuthal flux. During the liner compression the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability leads to helical perturbations due to minimization of field line bending. Simulations of a cylindrical liner using the COBRA machine parameters can under certain conditions exhibit amplification of an axial field due to a force-free low-density current layer separated by some distance from the liner. This results in a configuration in which there is predominately axial field on the liner inside the current layer and azimuthal field outside the layer. We are currently attempting to experimentally verify the simulation

  16. The superconducting MHD-propelled ship YAMATO-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasakawa, Yohei; Takezawa, Setsuo; Sugawara, Yoshinori; Kyotani, Yoshihiro

    1995-04-01

    In 1985 the Ship & Ocean Foundation (SOF) created a committee under the chairmanship of Mr. Yohei Sasakawa, Former President of the Ship & Ocean Foundation, and began researches into superconducting magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) ship propulsion. In 1989 SOF set to construction of a experimental ship on the basis of theoretical and experimental researches pursued until then. The experimental ship named YAMATO-1 became the world's first superconducting MHD-propelled ship on her trial runs in June 1992. This paper describes the outline of the YAMATO-1 and sea trial test results.

  17. Probing relaxation times in graphene quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Christian; Neumann, Christoph; Kazarski, Sebastian; Fringes, Stefan; Engels, Stephan; Haupt, Federica; Müller, André; Stampfer, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Graphene quantum dots are attractive candidates for solid-state quantum bits. In fact, the predicted weak spin-orbit and hyperfine interaction promise spin qubits with long coherence times. Graphene quantum dots have been extensively investigated with respect to their excitation spectrum, spin-filling sequence and electron-hole crossover. However, their relaxation dynamics remain largely unexplored. This is mainly due to challenges in device fabrication, in particular concerning the control of carrier confinement and the tunability of the tunnelling barriers, both crucial to experimentally investigate decoherence times. Here we report pulsed-gate transient current spectroscopy and relaxation time measurements of excited states in graphene quantum dots. This is achieved by an advanced device design that allows to individually tune the tunnelling barriers down to the low megahertz regime, while monitoring their asymmetry. Measuring transient currents through electronic excited states, we estimate a lower bound for charge relaxation times on the order of 60–100 ns. PMID:23612294

  18. Solid-Solid Phase Transitions and tert-Butyl and Methyl Group Rotation in an Organic Solid: X-ray Diffractometry, Differential Scanning Calorimetry, and Solid-State (1)H Nuclear Spin Relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Peter A; McGhie, Andrew R; Rheingold, Arnold L; Sloan, Gilbert J; Szewczyk, Steven T

    2017-08-24

    Using solid-state (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-lattice relaxation experiments, we have investigated the effects of several solid-solid phase transitions on tert-butyl and methyl group rotation in solid 1,3,5-tri-tert-butylbenzene. The goal is to relate the dynamics of the tert-butyl groups and their constituent methyl groups to properties of the solid determined using single-crystal X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). On cooling, the DSC experiments see a first-order, solid-solid phase transition at either 268 or 155 K (but not both) depending on thermal history. The 155 K transition (on cooling) is identified by single-crystal X-ray diffraction to be one from a monoclinic phase (above 155 K), where the tert-butyl groups are disordered (that is, with a rotational 6-fold intermolecular potential dominating), to a triclinic phase (below 155 K), where the tert-butyl groups are ordered (that is, with a rotational 3-fold intermolecular potential dominating). This transition shows very different DSC scans when both a 4.7 mg polycrystalline sample and a 19 mg powder sample are used. The (1)H spin-lattice relaxation experiments with a much larger 0.7 g sample are very complicated and, depending on thermal history, can show hysteresis effects over many hours and over very large temperature ranges. In the high-temperature monoclinic phase, the tert-butyl groups rotate with NMR activation energies (closely related to rotational barriers) in the 17-23 kJ mol(-1) range, and the constituent methyl groups rotate with NMR activation energies in the 7-12 kJ mol(-1) range. In the low-temperature triclinic phase, the rotations of the tert-butyl groups and their methyl groups in the aromatic plane are quenched (on the NMR time scale). The two out-of-plane methyl groups in the tert-butyl groups are rotating with activation energies in the 5-11 kJ mol(-1) range.

  19. Resonant behavior of MHD waves on magnetic flux tubes. IV - Total resonant absorption and MHD radiating eigenmodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Marcel; Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1993-01-01

    Resonant absorption of MHD waves on a nonuniform flux tube is investigated as a driven problem for a 1D cylindrical equilibrium. The variation of the fractional absorption is studied as a function of the frequency and its relation to the eigenvalue problem of the MHD radiating eigenmodes of the nonuniform flux tube is established. The optimal frequencies producing maximal fractional absorption are determined and the condition for total absorption is obtained. This condition defines an impedance matching and is fulfilled for an equilibrium that is fine tuned with respect to the incoming wave. The variation of the spatial wave solutions with respect to the frequency is explained as due to the variation of the real and imaginary parts of the dispersion relation of the MHD radiating eigenmodes with respect to the real driving frequency.

  20. Magnetic relaxation in anisotropic magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1971-01-01

    The line shape and the kinematic and thermodynamic slowing down of the critical and paramagnetic relaxation in axially anisotropic materials are discussed. Kinematic slowing down occurs only in the longitudinal relaxation function. The thermodynamic slowing down occurs in either the transverse or...

  1. Effect of temperature on excited state relaxation dynamics and up-conversion phenomena in La{sub 3}Ga{sub 5.5}Ta{sub 0.5}O{sub 14}:Er{sup 3+} single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisiecki, Radosław, E-mail: R.Lisiecki@int.pan.wroc.pl [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Okolna 2, 50-422 Wrocław (Poland); Ryba-Romanowski, Witold; Komar, Jarosław [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Okolna 2, 50-422 Wrocław (Poland); Berkowski, Marek [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • LGT:Er single crystals obtained by Czochralski method. • Analysis of absorption and emission spectra as well as decay curves of luminescence. • Influence of the temperature on the LGT:Er spectroscopic properties. • Spectroscopic evaluation of the LGT:Er potential laser qualities. - Abstract: The La{sub 3}Ga{sub 5.5}Ta{sub 0.5}O{sub 14} (LGT) single crystals nominally doped with 5 at.% and 1 at.% of Er{sup 3+} were grown by the Czochralski method in an atmosphere of nitrogen containing small amount of oxygen. Examination of the grown crystals employing a coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICP ES) revealed that actual concentrations of Er{sup 3+} ions amount to 3.8 at.% and 0.27 at.%, respectively. Absorption and emission spectra as well as relaxation of excited states of Er{sup 3+} ions in the LGT host were investigated as a function of temperature in the 300–700 K temperature region. The main attention was focused on spectroscopic properties of the LGT:Er crystal that are relevant to a potential laser operation associated with the {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} → {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transition of Er{sup 3+} near 1.6 μm and to up-conversion of infrared radiation into green luminescence originated in the {sup 2}H{sub 11/2}, {sup 4}S{sub 3/2} levels. It was found that the increase of temperature affects weakly spectral features of inhomogeneously broadened absorption bands related to the {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} → {sup 4}I{sub 11/2} and {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} → {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} transitions. Observed decrease of the {sup 4}I{sub 11/2} lifetime is consistent with calculated dependence assuming the contribution of multiphonon relaxation process that involves emission of 5 phonons with energy of 660 cm{sup −1}. Decrease of lifetime for the {sup 2}H{sub 11/2}, {sup 4}S{sub 3/2} group of levels with increasing temperature, calculated assuming thermalization effects and the contribution of multiphonon relaxation, is slightly slower than experimental dependence

  2. Hall MHD Equilibrium of Accelerated Compact Toroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, S. J.; Hwang, D. Q.; Horton, R. D.; Evans, R. W.; Brockington, S. J.

    2007-11-01

    We examine the structure and dynamics of the compact toroid's magnetic field. The compact toroid is dramatically accelerated by a large rail-gun Lorentz force density equal to j xB. We use magnetic data from the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment to answer the question of exactly where in the system j xB has nonzero values, and to what extent we can apply the standard model of force-free equilibrium. In particular we present a method of analysis of the magnetic field probe signals that allows direct comparison to the predictions of the Woltjer-Taylor force-free model and Turner's generalization of magnetic relaxation in the presence of a non-zero Hall term and fluid vorticity.

  3. Load Relaxation of Olivine Single Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, R. F.; Stone, D. S.; Plookphol, T.

    2016-12-01

    Single crystals of ferromagnesian olivine (San Carlos, AZ, peridot; Fo90-92) have been deformed in both uniaxial creep and load relaxation under conditions of ambient pressure, T = 1500ºC and pO2 = 10-10 atm; creep stresses were in the range 40 ≤ σ1 (MPa) ≤ 220. The crystals were oriented such that the applied stress was parallel to [011]c, which promotes single slip on the slowest slip system in olivine, (010)[001]. The creep rates at steady state match well the results of earlier investigators, as does the stress sensitivity (a power-law exponent of n = 3.6). Dislocation microstructures, including spatial distribution of low-angle (subgrain) boundaries, additionally confirm previous investigations. Inverted primary creep (an accelerating strain rate with an increase in stress) was observed. Load-relaxation, however, produced a singular response—a single hardness curve—regardless of the magnitude of creep stress or total accumulated strain preceding relaxation. The log-stress v. log-strain rate data from load-relaxation and creep experiments overlap to within experimental error. The load-relaxation behavior is distinctly different that that described for other crystalline solids, where the flow stress is affected strongly by work hardening such that a family of distinct hardness curves is generated, which are related by a scaling function. The response of olivine for the conditions studied, thus, indicates flow that is rate-limited by dislocation glide, reflecting specifically a high intrinsic lattice resistance (Peierls stress).

  4. Mechanical Relaxation of Metallic Glasses: An Overview of Experimental Data and Theoretical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoren Liu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Relaxation phenomena in glasses are a subject of utmost interest, as they are deeply connected with their structure and dynamics. From a theoretical point of view, mechanical relaxation allows one to get insight into the different atomic-scale processes taking place in the glassy state. Focusing on their possible applications, relaxation behavior influences the mechanical properties of metallic glasses. This paper reviews the present knowledge on mechanical relaxation of metallic glasses. The features of primary and secondary relaxations are reviewed. Experimental data in the time and frequency domain is presented, as well as the different models used to describe the measured relaxation spectra. Extended attention is paid to dynamic mechanical analysis, as it is the most important technique allowing one to access the mechanical relaxation behavior. Finally, the relevance of the relaxation behavior in the mechanical properties of metallic glasses is discussed.

  5. Anomalous divergence of a relaxation time in discontinuous shear thickening suspensions

    CERN Document Server

    Maharjan, Rijan

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the transient relaxation of a Discontinuous Shear Thickening (DST) suspension of cornstarch in water. Starting from a steady shear in a parallel plate rheometer, we stopped the top plate rotation and measured the transient stress relaxation. We found that at low effective packing fraction $\\phi_{eff}$, the suspensions exhibited a relaxation behavior consistent with a rheometric fluid in which the relaxation is determined by the steady-state viscosity. However, for larger $\\phi_{eff}$, we find up to two exponential relaxation regimes, which both become distinct from the rheometric model. The discrepancy between the measured relaxation times and the rheometric prediction was found to be as large as 4 orders of magnitude and diverges in the limit as $\\phi_{eff} \\rightarrow \\phi_c$, corresponding to the liquid solid transition, as the measured relaxation times diverge to infinity while the rheometric prediction approaches 0. In this limit, the measured relaxation time scales are on the order of $\\...

  6. Tokamak magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium states with axisymmetric boundary and a 3D helical core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, W A; Graves, J P; Pochelon, A; Sauter, O; Villard, L

    2010-07-16

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium states with imposed axisymmetric boundary are computed in which a spontaneous bifurcation develops to produce an internal three-dimensional (3D) configuration with a helical structure in addition to the standard axisymmetric system. Equilibrium states with similar MHD energy levels are shown to develop very different geometric structures. The helical equilibrium states resemble saturated internal kink mode structures.

  7. Relaxation dynamics of amorphous dibucaine using dielectric studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahra, M.; Jumailath, K.; Thayyil, M. Shahin; Capaccioli, S.

    2015-06-01

    Using broadband dielectric spectroscopy the molecular mobility of dibucaine is investigated in the supercooled liquid and gassy states, over a wide temperature range for some test frequencies. Above the glass transition temperature Tg, the presence of structural α- relaxation peak was observed due to the cooperative motions of the molecule and upon cooling frozen kinetically to form the glass. The secondary relaxation process was perceivable below Tg due to localized motions. The peak loss frequency of α-relaxation process shows non-Arrhenius behavior and obeys Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation over the measured temperature range whereas the β- process shows Arrhenius behavior.

  8. A novel code for numerical 3-D MHD studies of CME expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kleimann

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A recent third-order, essentially non-oscillatory central scheme to advance the equations of single-fluid magnetohydrodynamics (MHD in time has been implemented into a new numerical code. This code operates on a 3-D Cartesian, non-staggered grid, and is able to handle shock-like gradients without producing spurious oscillations.

    To demonstrate the suitability of our code for the simulation of coronal mass ejections (CMEs and similar heliospheric transients, we present selected results from test cases and perform studies of the solar wind expansion during phases of minimum solar activity. We can demonstrate convergence of the system into a stable Parker-like steady state for both hydrodynamic and MHD winds. The model is subsequently applied to expansion studies of CME-like plasma bubbles, and their evolution is monitored until a stationary state similar to the initial one is achieved. In spite of the model's (current simplicity, we can confirm the CME's nearly self-similar evolution close to the Sun, thus highlighting the importance of detailed modelling especially at small heliospheric radii.

    Additionally, alternative methods to implement boundary conditions at the coronal base, as well as strategies to ensure a solenoidal magnetic field, are discussed and evaluated.

  9. Multiwavelength polarimetry and integrated MHD+Polarized Radiation simulation reveal the blazar flaring mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haocheng; Li, Hui; Taylor, Gregory B.

    2017-08-01

    In addition to multiwavelength variability, blazar polarization signatures are highly variable. Optical polarimetry has shown two distinct features: first, in both quiescent and flaring states, blazar polarization degree generally stays around 10% to 30%; second, after major polarization variations, such as polarization angle swings, the polarization degree quickly restores to its initial state. We have performed integrated relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) + radiation and polarization simulations of the blazar emission region. Our approach evolves the magnetic fields and flows using the first principles, so we can calculate the spatial and temporal dependent polarization signatures and compare them with observations.Our results show that the above two observational trends indicate the blazar flaring region should be strongly magnetized with the magnetic energy density higher than the plasma rest mass energy density. In such an environment, the 3D kink instability may trigger magnetic reconnection to accelerate particles and give rise to flares. In view of future high-energy polarimetry, this integrated MHD+polarization simulation technique will deliver new constraints on jet’s physical conditions and particle acceleration mechanisms.

  10. Global MHD modeling of resonant ULF waves: Simulations with and without a plasmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudepierre, S. G.; Toffoletto, F. R.; Wiltberger, M.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the plasmaspheric influence on the resonant mode coupling of magnetospheric ultralow frequency (ULF) waves using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. We present results from two different versions of the model, both driven by the same solar wind conditions: one version that contains a plasmasphere (the LFM coupled to the Rice Convection Model, where the Gallagher plasmasphere model is also included) and another that does not (the stand-alone LFM). We find that the inclusion of a cold, dense plasmasphere has a significant impact on the nature of the simulated ULF waves. For example, the inclusion of a plasmasphere leads to a deeper (more earthward) penetration of the compressional (azimuthal) electric field fluctuations, due to a shift in the location of the wave turning points. Consequently, the locations where the compressional electric field oscillations resonantly couple their energy into local toroidal mode field line resonances also shift earthward. We also find, in both simulations, that higher-frequency compressional (azimuthal) electric field oscillations penetrate deeper than lower frequency oscillations. In addition, the compressional wave mode structure in the simulations is consistent with a radial standing wave oscillation pattern, characteristic of a resonant waveguide. The incorporation of a plasmasphere into the LFM global MHD model represents an advance in the state of the art in regard to ULF wave modeling with such simulations. We offer a brief discussion of the implications for radiation belt modeling techniques that use the electric and magnetic field outputs from global MHD simulations to drive particle dynamics.

  11. Global MHD modeling of resonant ULF waves: Simulations with and without a plasmasphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudepierre, S G; Toffoletto, F R; Wiltberger, M

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the plasmaspheric influence on the resonant mode coupling of magnetospheric ultralow frequency (ULF) waves using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. We present results from two different versions of the model, both driven by the same solar wind conditions: one version that contains a plasmasphere (the LFM coupled to the Rice Convection Model, where the Gallagher plasmasphere model is also included) and another that does not (the stand-alone LFM). We find that the inclusion of a cold, dense plasmasphere has a significant impact on the nature of the simulated ULF waves. For example, the inclusion of a plasmasphere leads to a deeper (more earthward) penetration of the compressional (azimuthal) electric field fluctuations, due to a shift in the location of the wave turning points. Consequently, the locations where the compressional electric field oscillations resonantly couple their energy into local toroidal mode field line resonances also shift earthward. We also find, in both simulations, that higher-frequency compressional (azimuthal) electric field oscillations penetrate deeper than lower frequency oscillations. In addition, the compressional wave mode structure in the simulations is consistent with a radial standing wave oscillation pattern, characteristic of a resonant waveguide. The incorporation of a plasmasphere into the LFM global MHD model represents an advance in the state of the art in regard to ULF wave modeling with such simulations. We offer a brief discussion of the implications for radiation belt modeling techniques that use the electric and magnetic field outputs from global MHD simulations to drive particle dynamics.

  12. Linear MHD Wave Propagation in Time-Dependent Flux Tube. III. Leaky Waves in Zero-Beta Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, A.; Erdélyi, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we evaluate the time-dependent wave properties and the damping rate of propagating fast magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) waves when energy leakage into a magnetised atmosphere is considered. By considering a cold plasma, initial investigations into the evolution of MHD wave damping through this energy leakage will take place. The time-dependent governing equations have been derived previously in Williamson and Erdélyi (2014a, Solar Phys. 289, 899 - 909) and are now solved when the assumption of evanescent wave propagation in the outside of the waveguide is relaxed. The dispersion relation for leaky waves applicable to a straight magnetic field is determined in both an arbitrary tube and a thin-tube approximation. By analytically solving the dispersion relation in the thin-tube approximation, the explicit expressions for the temporal evolution of the dynamic frequency and wavenumber are determined. The damping rate is, then, obtained from the dispersion relation and is shown to decrease as the density ratio increases. By comparing the decrease in damping rate to the increase in damping for a stationary system, as shown, we aim to point out that energy leakage may not be as efficient a damping mechanism as previously thought.

  13. First Passage Times, Lifetimes, and Relaxation Times of Unfolded Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wei; Sengupta, Anirvan M.; Levy, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of proteins in the unfolded state can be quantified in computer simulations by calculating a spectrum of relaxation times which describes the time scales over which the population fluctuations decay to equilibrium. If the unfolded state space is discretized we can evaluate the relaxation time of each state. We derive a simple relation that shows the mean first passage time to any state is equal to the relaxation time of that state divided by the equilibrium population. This explains why mean first passage times from state to state within the unfolded ensemble can be very long but the energy landscape can still be smooth (minimally frustrated). In fact, when the folding kinetics is two-state, all of the unfolded state relaxation times within the unfolded free energy basin are faster than the folding time. This result supports the well-established funnel energy landscape picture and resolves an apparent contradiction between this model and the recently proposed kinetic hub model of protein folding. We validate these concepts by analyzing a Markov State Model of the kinetics in the unfolded state and folding of the mini-protein NTL9 constructed from a 2.9 millisecond simulation provided by D. E. Shaw Research. PMID:26252709

  14. Numerical Calculation of the Output Power of a MHD Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian CARABINEANU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Using Lazăr Dragoş’s analytic solution for the electric potential we perform some numerical calculations in order to find the characteristics of a Faraday magnetohydrodymamics (MHD power generator (total power, useful power and Joule dissipation power.

  15. A high current density DC magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) micropump

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homsy, Alexandra; Koster, Sander; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Berg, van den Albert; Lucklum, F.; Verpoorte, E.; Rooij, de Nico F.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the working principle of a DC magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) micropump that can be operated at high DC current densities (J) in 75-µm-deep microfluidic channels without introducing gas bubbles into the pumping channel. The main design feature for current generation is a micromachined

  16. A high current density DC magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) micropump

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homsy, A; Koster, Sander; Eijkel, JCT; van den Berg, A; Lucklum, F; Verpoorte, E; de Rooij, NF

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the working principle of a DC magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) micropump that can be operated at high DC current densities (J) in 75-mu m-deep microfluidic channels without introducing gas bubbles into the pumping channel. The main design feature for current generation is a micromachin

  17. Standing Slow MHD Waves in Radiatively Cooling Coronal Loops

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K. S. Al-Ghafri

    2015-06-01

    The standing slow magneto-acoustic oscillations in cooling coronal loops are investigated. There are two damping mechanisms which are considered to generate the standing acoustic modes in coronal magnetic loops, namely, thermal conduction and radiation. The background temperature is assumed to change temporally due to optically thin radiation. In particular, the background plasma is assumed to be radiatively cooling. The effects of cooling on longitudinal slow MHD modes is analytically evaluated by choosing a simple form of radiative function, that ensures the temperature evolution of the background plasma due to radiation, coincides with the observed cooling profile of coronal loops. The assumption of low-beta plasma leads to neglecting the magnetic field perturbation and, eventually, reduces the MHD equations to a 1D system modelling longitudinal MHD oscillations in a cooling coronal loop. The cooling is assumed to occur on a characteristic time scale, much larger than the oscillation period that subsequently enables using the WKB theory to study the properties of standing wave. The governing equation describing the time-dependent amplitude of waves is obtained and solved analytically. The analytically derived solutions are numerically evaluated to give further insight into the evolution of the standing acoustic waves. We find that the plasma cooling gives rise to a decrease in the amplitude of oscillations. In spite of the reduction in damping rate caused by rising the cooling, the damping scenario of slow standing MHD waves strongly increases in hot coronal loops.

  18. MHD Energy Bypass Scramjet Performance with Real Gas Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chul; Mehta, Unmeel B.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2000-01-01

    The theoretical performance of a scramjet propulsion system incorporating an magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) energy bypass scheme is calculated. The one-dimensional analysis developed earlier, in which the theoretical performance is calculated neglecting skin friction and using a sudden-freezing approximation for the nozzle flow, is modified to incorporate the method of Van Driest for turbulent skin friction and a finite-rate chemistry calculation in the nozzle. Unlike in the earlier design, in which four ramp compressions occurred in the pitch plane, in the present design the first two ramp compressions occur in the pitch plane and the next two compressions occur in the yaw plane. The results for the simplified design of a spaceliner show that (1) the present design produces higher specific impulses than the earlier design, (2) skin friction substantially reduces thrust and specific impulse, and (3) the specific impulse of the MHD-bypass system is still better than the non-MHD system and typical rocket over a narrow region of flight speeds and design parameters. Results suggest that the energy management with MHD principles offers the possibility of improving the performance of the scramjet. The technical issues needing further studies are identified.

  19. CASTOR: Normal-mode analysis of resistive MHD plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerner, W.; Goedbloed, J. P.; Huysmans, G. T. A.; Poedts, S.; Schwarz, E.

    1998-01-01

    The CASTOR (complex Alfven spectrum of toroidal plasmas) code computes the entire spectrum of normal-modes in resistive MHD for general tokamak configurations. The applied Galerkin method, in conjunction with a Fourier finite-element discretisation, leads to a large scale eigenvalue problem A (x)

  20. Modified NASA-Lewis Chemical Equilibrium Code for MHD applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacks, R. A.; Geyer, H. K.; Grammel, S. J.; Doss, E. D.

    1979-12-01

    A substantially modified version of the NASA-Lewis Chemical Equilibrium Code has recently been developed. The modifications were designed to extend the power and convenience of the Code as a tool for performing combustor analysis for MHD systems studies. This report describes the effect of the programming details from a user point of view, but does not describe the Code in detail.

  1. MHD discontinuities in solar flares: continuous transitions and plasma heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledentsov, Leonid; Somov, Boris

    The conservation laws on a surface of discontinuity in the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) allow changing a discontinuity type with gradual (continuous) changes in conditions of plasma. Then there are the so-called transition solutions that satisfy simultaneously two types of discontinuities. We obtain all transition solutions on the basis of a complete system of boundary conditions for the MHD equations. We also found an expression describing a jump of internal energy of the plasma flowing through the discontinuity. It allows, firstly, to construct a generalized scheme of possible transitions between MHD discontinuities, and secondly, to examine the dependence of plasma heating by plasma density and configuration of the magnetic field near the surface of the discontinuity (i.e., by the type of the MHD discontinuity). The problem of the heating of "superhot" plasma (with the electron temperature is greater than 10 keV) in solar flares are discussed. It is shown that the best conditions for heating are carried out in the vicinity of the reconnecting current layer near the areas of reverse currents. Bibl.: B.V.Somov. Plasma Astrophysics, Part II: Reconnection and Flares, Second Edition. (New York: Springer SBM, 2013).

  2. General Description of Ideal Tokamak MHD Instability Ⅱ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石秉仁

    2002-01-01

    In this subsequent study on general description of ideal tokamak MHD instability,the part Ⅱ, by using a coordinate with rectified magnetic field lines, the eigenmode equationsdescribing the low-mode-number toroidal Alfven modes (TAE and EAE) are derived through afurther expansion of the shear Alfven equation of motion.

  3. 3D MHD Models of Active Region Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, Leon

    2004-01-01

    Present imaging and spectroscopic observations of active region loops allow to determine many physical parameters of the coronal loops, such as the density, temperature, velocity of flows in loops, and the magnetic field. However, due to projection effects many of these parameters remain ambiguous. Three dimensional imaging in EUV by the STEREO spacecraft will help to resolve the projection ambiguities, and the observations could be used to setup 3D MHD models of active region loops to study the dynamics and stability of active regions. Here the results of 3D MHD models of active region loops are presented, and the progress towards more realistic 3D MHD models of active regions. In particular the effects of impulsive events on the excitation of active region loop oscillations, and the generation, propagations and reflection of EIT waves are shown. It is shown how 3D MHD models together with 3D EUV observations can be used as a diagnostic tool for active region loop physical parameters, and to advance the science of the sources of solar coronal activity.

  4. Motion stability of a suspended particle in a MHD flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shvarts, I.A.

    1977-07-01

    An examination is made of the motion instability of a suspended particle in a plane-parallel laminar flow with a velocity profile U(y,A) where A is certain parameter. An expression was obtained for the critical Reynolds number Re = ..cap alpha../delta/U/delta y/:the coefficient ..cap alpha.. is associated with dimensions and form of the particle. The results of the common theory are used for studying the motion instability of suspended spherical particle in Couette--Hartmann MHD flows. At large Hartmann numbers Re*/Ha was shown to be constant. This agrees well with experimental data on the hydrodynamic stability of the MHD flow itself. A definite correlation also takes place between Re/sub kr/(Ha) of a MHD flow and the Reynolds numbers that determine the stability of suspended particles when the Hartmann numbers are small. Thus, in a number of cases it is possible to examine the hydrodynamic stability of a MHD flow by the motion stability of solid particles introduced into the flow. 8 references, 2 illustrations.

  5. TAE modes and MHD activity in TFTR DT plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrickson, E.; Batha, S.; Bell, M.

    1995-03-01

    The high power deuterium and tritium experiments on TFTR have produced fusion a parameters similar to those expected on ITER. The achieved {beta}{sub {alpha}}/{beta} and the R{triangledown}{beta}{sub {alpha}} in TFRR D-T shots are 1/2 to 1/3 those predicted in the ITER EDA. Studies of the initial TFTR D-T plasmas find no evidence that the presence of the fast fusion {alpha} population has affected the stability of MHD, with the possible exception of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE`s). The initial TFTR DT plasmas had MHD activity similar to that commonly seen in deuterium plasmas. Operation of TFTR at plasma currents of 2.0--2.5 MA has greatly reduced the deleterious effects of MHD commonly observed at lower currents. Even at these higher currents, the performance of TFTR is limited by {beta}-limit disruptions. The effects of MHD on D-T fusion {alpha}`s was similar to effects observed on other fusion products in D only plasmas.

  6. Ideal relaxation of the Hopf fibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiet, Christopher Berg; Candelaresi, Simon; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2017-07-01

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamics relaxation is the topology-conserving reconfiguration of a magnetic field into a lower energy state where the net force is zero. This is achieved by modeling the plasma as perfectly conducting viscous fluid. It is an important tool for investigating plasma equilibria and is often used to study the magnetic configurations in fusion devices and astrophysical plasmas. We study the equilibrium reached by a localized magnetic field through the topology conserving relaxation of a magnetic field based on the Hopf fibration in which magnetic field lines are closed circles that are all linked with one another. Magnetic fields with this topology have recently been shown to occur in non-ideal numerical simulations. Our results show that any localized field can only attain equilibrium if there is a finite external pressure, and that for such a field a Taylor state is unattainable. We find an equilibrium plasma configuration that is characterized by a lowered pressure in a toroidal region, with field lines lying on surfaces of constant pressure. Therefore, the field is in a Grad-Shafranov equilibrium. Localized helical magnetic fields are found when plasma is ejected from astrophysical bodies and subsequently relaxes against the background plasma, as well as on earth in plasmoids generated by, e.g., a Marshall gun. This work shows under which conditions an equilibrium can be reached and identifies a toroidal depression as the characteristic feature of such a configuration.

  7. Heteronuclear transverse and longitudinal relaxation in AX4 spin systems: Application to 15N relaxations in 15NH4 +

    OpenAIRE

    Werbeck, Nicolas D; Hansen, D. Flemming

    2014-01-01

    The equations that describe the time-evolution of transverse and longitudinal 15N magnetisations in tetrahedral ammonium ions, 15NH4 +, are derived from the Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield density operator relaxation theory. It is assumed that the relaxation of the spin-states is dominated by (1) the intra-molecular 15N–1H and 1H–1H dipole–dipole interactions and (2) interactions of the ammonium protons with remote spins, which also include the contribution to the relaxations that arise from the exc...

  8. Dipolar relaxation of cold sodium atoms in a magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Zygelman, B

    2002-01-01

    A quantum mechanical close coupling theory of spin relaxation in the stretched hyperfine level of sodium is presented. We calculate the dipolar relaxation rate of magnetically trapped cold sodium atoms in the magnetic field. The influence of shape resonances and the anisotropy of the dipolar interaction on the collision dynamics are explored. We examine the sensitivity of the calculated cross sections on the choice of asymptotic atomic state basis.

  9. Unsteady MHD free convective Couette flow between vertical porous plates with thermal radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basant K. Jha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the unsteady MHD free convective Couette flow of viscous incompressible electrically conducting fluid between two infinite vertical porous plates in the presence of transverse magnetic field and thermal radiation. Solutions for time dependent energy and momentum equations are obtained by the implicit finite difference method. To check the accuracy of the numerical solutions, steady state solutions for energy and momentum equations are obtained by using the perturbation method. The effect of various parameters controlling the physical situation is discussed with the aid of line graphs. Significant results from this study are that both velocity and temperature increase with the increase in thermal radiation parameter and time. A series of numerical experiments show that steady state velocity and temperature occur when the dimensionless time approaches the values of Prandtl number of the fluid. During the course of numerical computation, an excellent agreement was found between unsteady and steady state solutions at large value of time.

  10. Critical contributions in MHD power generation. Quarterly technical progress report, December 1, 1977-February 28, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis, J.F.

    1978-03-01

    Research and development in open-cycle coal-fired MHD power generation is described. The scope and objectives of the MIT program are: (1) establish chemical, thermal, and electrical data to guide materials selection, develop improved detail designs, and support performance analyses of MHD electrode modules and insulator materials; (2) parametrically investigate selected electrode properties of critical design importance in chemical, thermal, and electrical environments simulating a coal-fired MHD generator; (3) develop combustion data pertinent to the design of MHD combustors; (4) establish techniques for the analysis and understanding of critical MHD phenomena which have an important bearing on MHD generator performance; such phenomena include inter-electrode breakdown, time-dependent behavior, effective plasma properties and plasma inhomogeneities; (5) establish the operating characteristics of an MHD disk generator; (6) continue work on computer techniques for modeling and for design and cost analysis of MHD components and the overall system; (7) integrate the engineering data and design criteria, as applicable, which are developed in the listed tasks into a model of the MHD channel; (8) participate in the US/USSR Cooperative Program in MHD Power Generation; and (9) participate in technical support of the DOE MHD Project Office. Progress in each of these areas is reported. (WHK)

  11. Variability in the relaxation behavior of glass: Impact of thermal history fluctuations and fragility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qiuju; Mauro, John C.

    2017-02-01

    Glasses are nonequilibrium materials that continuously relax toward the metastable supercooled liquid state. As such, the properties of a glass depend on both its composition and thermal history. When an initially cooled glass is subjected to additional thermal cycles, relaxation during the heat treatment is accelerated, leading to changes in the macroscopic properties of the glass. This relaxation behavior is intrinsic to the glassy state and of critical interest to the high-tech glass industry. In many practical cases, the magnitude of the relaxation is less important than the variability of the relaxation effects due to slight variations in the thermal history experienced by the glass. These fluctuations in thermal history can occur either during the initial glass formation or during the subsequent heat treatment cycle(s). Here we calculate the variation in relaxation behavior using a detailed enthalpy landscape model, showing that the relaxation variability can be reduced dramatically by increasing the fragility of the system.

  12. Electron-vibration relaxation in oxygen plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporta, V.; Heritier, K. L.; Panesi, M.

    2016-06-01

    An ideal chemical reactor model is used to study the vibrational relaxation of oxygen molecules in their ground electronic state, X3Σg-, in presence of free electrons. The model accounts for vibrational non-equilibrium between the translational energy mode of the gas and the vibrational energy mode of individual molecules. The vibrational levels of the molecules are treated as separate species, allowing for non-Boltzmann distributions of their population. The electron and vibrational temperatures are varied in the range [0-20,000] K. Numerical results show a fast energy transfer between oxygen molecules and free electron, which causes strong deviation of the vibrational distribution function from Boltzmann distribution, both in heating and cooling conditions. Comparison with Landau-Teller model is considered showing a good agreement for electron temperature range [2000-12,000] K. Finally analytical fit of the vibrational relaxation time is given.

  13. Braided magnetic fields: equilibria, relaxation and heating

    CERN Document Server

    Pontin, D I; Russell, A J B; Hornig, G

    2015-01-01

    We examine the dynamics of magnetic flux tubes containing non-trivial field line braiding (or linkage), using mathematical and computational modelling. The key results obtained from recent modelling efforts are summarised, in the context of testable predictions for the laboratory. We discuss the existence of braided force-free equilibria, and demonstrate that for a field anchored at perfectly-conducting plates, these equilibria exist and contain current sheets whose thickness scales inversely with the braid complexity - as measured for example by the topological entropy. By contrast, for a periodic domain braided exact equilibria typically do not exist, while approximate equilibria contain thin current sheets. In the presence of resistivity, reconnection is triggered at the current sheets and a turbulent relaxation ensues. We discuss the properties of this relaxation, and in particular the existence of constraints that may mean that the final state is not the linear force-free field predicted by Taylor's hypo...

  14. High fidelity modeling of thermal relaxation and dissociation of oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrienko, Daniil A., E-mail: daniila@umich.edu; Boyd, Iain D. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, 1320 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48108 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    A master equation study of vibrational relaxation and dissociation of oxygen is conducted using state-specific O{sub 2}–O transition rates, generated by extensive trajectory simulations. Both O{sub 2}–O and O{sub 2}–O{sub 2} collisions are concurrently simulated in the evolving nonequilibrium gas system under constant heat bath conditions. The forced harmonic oscillator model is incorporated to simulate the state-to-state relaxation of oxygen in O{sub 2}–O{sub 2} collisions. The system of master equations is solved to simulate heating and cooling flows. The present study demonstrates the importance of atom-diatom collisions due to the extremely efficient energy randomization in the intermediate O{sub 3} complex. It is shown that the presence of atomic oxygen has a significant impact on vibrational relaxation time at temperatures observed in hypersonic flow. The population of highly-excited O{sub 2} vibrational states is affected by the amount of atomic oxygen when modeling the relaxation under constant heat bath conditions. A model of coupled state-to-state vibrational relaxation and dissociation of oxygen is also discussed.

  15. Effects of water molecules of Ar-Cs MHD disk generator operated with strong MHD interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, M.; Kosugi, A.; Inui, Y.; Kabashima, S.

    1998-07-01

    Effects of water molecule impurity are studied on performance of a disk type MHD generator operated with Ar-Cs weakly ionized plasma. To reveal phenomena for a wide range of operation conditions, time-dependent one-dimensional analyses are carried out, where an up-wind, second order Chakravarthy TVD scheme is applied for the gasdynamics, while a Galerkin FEM is used for the electrodynamics. A simplified model is used for the water molecule impurity, where total effects of nonelastic collision between electrons and water molecules are estimated by the collision loss factor of electrons and also the electron momentum-transfer collision frequency is taken into account. The collision loss factor of electrons and the electron momentum-transfer collision frequency are taken from references, and the loss factor is assumed to be 700 independently of the electron temperature. On the Fuji-1 facilities at Tokyo Institute Technology, Japan, series of experiment A4105 were carried out with the Disk F-4 generator. Ar was heated with the heat-exchanger heated by the natural gas-air combustion and the metal cesium was used as the seeding material, while SCM maintained the magnetic field of 4.7 T at the center of disk and the very strong MHD interaction was realized. The thermal input was about 3 MW, the electrical output was about 500 kW with the enthalpy extraction ratio of about 17%. The numerical analyses have shown that the water molecule enhances the ionization instability at the low voltage loading because of insufficient Joule heating for electrons. The generator performance is degraded and the strong MHD interaction between the unstable plasma and the flow field induces slow and fast moving shock waves, leading to the very complicated flow field. The fast and slow moving shocks collide with each other, merge into a sharp shock moving downward, and then the shock front moves back slightly to maintain the pressure balance, collides again with another weak moving shock, and

  16. Performance and flow characteristics of MHD seawater thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doss, E.D.

    1990-01-01

    The main goal of the research is to investigate the effects of strong magnetic fields on the electrical and flow fields inside MHD thrusters. The results of this study is important in the assessment of the feasibility of MHD seawater propulsion for the Navy. To accomplish this goal a three-dimensional fluid flow computer model has been developed and applied to study the concept of MHD seawater propulsion. The effects of strong magnetic fields on the current and electric fields inside the MHD thruster and their interaction with the flow fields, particularly those in the boundary layers, have been investigated. The results of the three-dimensional computations indicate that the velocity profiles are flatter over the sidewalls of the thruster walls in comparison to the velocity profiles over the electrode walls. These nonuniformities in the flow fields give rise to nonuniform distribution of the skin friction along the walls of the thrusters, where higher values are predicted over the sidewalls relative to those over the electrode walls. Also, a parametric study has been performed using the three-dimensional MHD flow model to analyze the performance of continuous electrode seawater thrusters under different operating parameters. The effects of these parameters on the fluid flow characteristics, and on the thruster efficiency have been investigated. Those parameters include the magnetic field (10--20 T), thruster diameter, surface roughness, flow velocity, and the electric load factor. The results show also that the thruster performance improves with the strength of the magnetic field and thruster diameter, and the efficiency decreases with the flow velocity and surface roughness.

  17. Can Black Hole Relax Unitarily?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solodukhin, S. N.

    2005-03-01

    We review the way the BTZ black hole relaxes back to thermal equilibrium after a small perturbation and how it is seen in the boundary (finite volume) CFT. The unitarity requires the relaxation to be quasi-periodic. It is preserved in the CFT but is not obvious in the case of the semiclassical black hole the relaxation of which is driven by complex quasi-normal modes. We discuss two ways of modifying the semiclassical black hole geometry to maintain unitarity: the (fractal) brick wall and the worm-hole modification. In the latter case the entropy comes out correctly as well.

  18. Can Black Hole Relax Unitarily?

    OpenAIRE

    Solodukhin, Sergey N.

    2004-01-01

    We review the way the BTZ black hole relaxes back to thermal equilibrium after a small perturbation and how it is seen in the boundary (finite volume) CFT. The unitarity requires the relaxation to be quasi-periodic. It is preserved in the CFT but is not obvious in the case of the semiclassical black hole the relaxation of which is driven by complex quasi-normal modes. We discuss two ways of modifying the semiclassical black hole geometry to maintain unitarity: the (fractal) brick wall and the...

  19. Can Black Hole Relax Unitarily?

    CERN Document Server

    Solodukhin, S N

    2004-01-01

    We review the way the BTZ black hole relaxes back to thermal equilibrium after a small perturbation and how it is seen in the boundary (finite volume) CFT. The unitarity requires the relaxation to be quasi-periodic. It is preserved in the CFT but is not obvious in the case of the semiclassical black hole the relaxation of which is driven by complex quasi-normal modes. We discuss two ways of modifying the semiclassical black hole geometry to maintain unitarity: the (fractal) brick wall and the worm-hole modification. In the latter case the entropy comes out correctly as well.

  20. Dielectric Relaxation in Dimethyl Sulfoxide/Water Mixtures Studied by Microwave Dielectric Relaxation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zijie; Manias, Evangelos; MacDonald, Digby D.; Lanagan, Michael

    2009-10-01

    Dielectric spectra of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)/water mixtures, over the entire concentration range, have been measured using the transmission line method at frequencies from 45 MHz to 26 GHz and at temperatures of 298-318 K. The relaxation times of the mixtures show a maximum at an intermediate molar fraction of DMSO. The specific structure of mixtures in different concentration regions was determined by the dielectric relaxation dynamics, obtained from the effect of temperature on the relaxation time. A water structure "breaking effect" is observed in dilute aqueous solutions. The average number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule in these mixtures is found to be reduced compared to pure water. The increase in the dielectric relaxation time in DMSO/water mixtures is attributed to the spatial (steric) constraints of DMSO molecules on the hydrogen-bond network, rather than being due to hydrophobic hydration of the methyl groups. The interaction between water and DMSO by hydrogen bonding reaches a maximum at a DMSO molar fraction of 0.33, reflected by the maximum activation enthalpy for dielectric relaxation in this concentration, suggesting the formation of a stoichiometric compound, H2O-DMSO-H2O. In highly concentrated solutions, negative activation entropies are observed, indicating the presence of aggregates of DMSO molecules. A distinct antiparallel arrangement of dipoles is obtained for neat DMSO in the liquid state according to the Kirkwood correlation factor (gK = 0.5), calculated from the static permittivity. The similarity of the dielectric behavior of pure DMSO and DMSO-rich mixtures suggests that dipole-dipole interactions contribute significantly to the rotational relaxation process in these solutions.