WorldWideScience

Sample records for relativistic proton radiative

  1. Modeling the Proton Radiation Belt With Van Allen Probes Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selesnick, R. S.; Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hoxie, V. C.; Li, X.

    2018-01-01

    An empirical model of the proton radiation belt is constructed from data taken during 2013-2017 by the Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescopes on the Van Allen Probes satellites. The model intensity is a function of time, kinetic energy in the range 18-600 MeV, equatorial pitch angle, and L shell of proton guiding centers. Data are selected, on the basis of energy deposits in each of the nine silicon detectors, to reduce background caused by hard proton energy spectra at low L. Instrument response functions are computed by Monte Carlo integration, using simulated proton paths through a simplified structural model, to account for energy loss in shielding material for protons outside the nominal field of view. Overlap of energy channels, their wide angular response, and changing satellite orientation require the model dependencies on all three independent variables be determined simultaneously. This is done by least squares minimization with a customized steepest descent algorithm. Model uncertainty accounts for statistical data error and systematic error in the simulated instrument response. A proton energy spectrum is also computed from data taken during the 8 January 2014 solar event, to illustrate methods for the simpler case of an isotropic and homogeneous model distribution. Radiation belt and solar proton results are compared to intensities computed with a simplified, on-axis response that can provide a good approximation under limited circumstances.

  2. Radiative proton-deuteron capture in a gauge invariant relativistic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korchin, AY; Van Neck, D; Scholten, O; Waroquier, M

    A relativistic model is developed for the description of the process p+dHe-3+gamma*. It is based on the impulse approximation, but is explicitly gauge invariant and Lorentz covariant. The model is applied to radiative proton-deuteron capture and electrodisintegration of He-3 nt intermediate

  3. Proton relativistic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Wilson Roberto Barbosa de

    1995-01-01

    In this dissertation, we present a model for the nucleon, which is composed by three relativistic quarks interacting through a contract force. The nucleon wave-function was obtained from the Faddeev equation in the null-plane. The covariance of the model under kinematical null-plane boots is discussed. The electric proton form-factor, calculated from the Faddeev wave-function, was in agreement with the data for low-momentum transfers and described qualitatively the asymptotic region for momentum transfers around 2 GeV. (author)

  4. Pion Production from Proton Synchrotron Radiation under Strong Magnetic Field in Relativistic Quantum Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruyama Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study pion production from proton synchrotron radiation in the presence of strong magnetic fields by using the exact proton propagator in a strong magnetic field and explicitly including the anomalous magnetic moment. Results in this exact quantum-field approach do not agree with those obtained in the semi-classical approach. Furthermore, we also find that the anomalous magnetic moment of the proton greatly enhances the production rate about by two orders of magnitude, and that the polar angle of an emitted pion is the same as that of an initial proton.

  5. Pion Production from Proton Synchrotron Radiation under Strong Magnetic Field in a Relativistic Quantum Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruyama Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study pion production from proton synchrotron radiation in the presence of strong magnetic fields by using the exact proton propagator in a strong magnetic field and explicitly including the anomalous magnetic moment. Results in this exact quantum approach do not agree with those obtained in the semi-classical approach. Then, we find that the anomalous magnetic moment of the proton greatly enhances the production rate by about two orders magnitude, and that the decay width satisfies a robust scaling law.

  6. Proton relativistic model; Modelo relativistico do proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Wilson Roberto Barbosa de

    1996-12-31

    In this dissertation, we present a model for the nucleon, which is composed by three relativistic quarks interacting through a contract force. The nucleon wave-function was obtained from the Faddeev equation in the null-plane. The covariance of the model under kinematical null-plane boots is discussed. The electric proton form-factor, calculated from the Faddeev wave-function, was in agreement with the data for low-momentum transfers and described qualitatively the asymptotic region for momentum transfers around 2 GeV. (author) 42 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Diffraction radiation from relativistic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Potylitsyn, Alexander Petrovich; Strikhanov, Mikhail Nikolaevich; Tishchenko, Alexey Alexandrovich

    2010-01-01

    This book deals with diffraction radiation, which implies the boundary problems of electromagnetic radiation theory. Diffraction radiation is generated when a charged particle moves in a vacuum near a target edge. Diffraction radiation of non-relativistic particles is widely used to design intense emitters in the cm wavelength range. Diffraction radiation from relativistic charged particles is important for noninvasive beam diagnostics and design of free electron lasers based on Smith-Purcell radiation which is diffraction radiation from periodic structures. Different analytical models of diffraction radiation and results of recent experimental studies are presented in this book. The book may also serve as guide to classical electrodynamics applications in beam physics and electrodynamics. It can be of great use for young researchers to develop skills and for experienced scientists to obtain new results.

  8. Diffraction radiation from relativistic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potylitsyn, Alexander Petrovich; Ryazanov, Mikhail Ivanovich; Strikhanov, Mikhail Nikolaevich; Tishchenko, Alexey Alexandrovich

    2010-01-01

    This book deals with diffraction radiation, which implies the boundary problems of electromagnetic radiation theory. Diffraction radiation is generated when a charged particle moves in a vacuum near a target edge. Diffraction radiation of non-relativistic particles is widely used to design intense emitters in the cm wavelength range. Diffraction radiation from relativistic charged particles is important for noninvasive beam diagnostics and design of free electron lasers based on Smith-Purcell radiation which is diffraction radiation from periodic structures. Different analytical models of diffraction radiation and results of recent experimental studies are presented in this book. The book may also serve as guide to classical electrodynamics applications in beam physics and electrodynamics. It can be of great use for young researchers to develop skills and for experienced scientists to obtain new results. (orig.)

  9. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung in a relativistic covariant model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinus, Gerard Henk

    1998-01-01

    Proton-proton bremsstrahlung is one of the simplest processes involving the half off-shell NN interaction. Since protons are equally-charged particles with the same mass, electric-dipole radiation is suppressed and higher-order effects play an important role. Thus it is possible to get information

  10. Radiation dominated relativistic current sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaroschek, C.H.

    2008-01-01

    Relativistic Current Sheets (RCS) feature plasma instabilities considered as potential key to magnetic energy dissipation and non-thermal particle generation in Poynting flux dominated plasma flows. We show in a series of kinetic plasma simulations that the physical nature of non-linear RCS evolution changes in the presence of incoherent radiation losses: In the ultra-relativistic regime (i.e. magnetization parameter sigma = 104 defined as the ratio of magnetic to plasma rest frame energy density) the combination of non-linear RCS dynamics and synchrotron emission introduces a temperature anisotropy triggering the growth of the Relativistic Tearing Mode (RTM). As direct consequence the RTM prevails over the Relativistic Drift Kink (RDK) Mode as competitive RCS instability. This is in contrast to the previously studied situation of weakly relativistic RCS (sigma ∼ 1) where the RDK is dominant and most of the plasma is thermalized. The simulations witness the typical life cycle of ultra-relativistic RCS evolving from a violent radiation induced collapse towards a radiation quiescent state in rather classical Sweet-Parker topology. Such a transition towards Sweet-Parker configuration in the late non-linear evolution has immediate consequences for the efficiency of magnetic energy dissipation and non-thermal particle generation. Ceasing dissipation rates directly affect our present understanding of non-linear RCS evolution in conventional striped wind scenarios. (author)

  11. A relativistic radiation transfer benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munier, A.

    1988-01-01

    We use the integral form of the radiation transfer equation in an one dimensional slab to determine the time-dependent propagation of the radiation energy, flux and pressure in a collisionless homogeneous medium. First order v/c relativistic terms are included and the solution is given in the fluid frame and the laboratory frame

  12. Radiatively driven relativistic spherical winds under relativistic radiative transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukue, J.

    2018-05-01

    We numerically investigate radiatively driven relativistic spherical winds from the central luminous object with mass M and luminosity L* under Newtonian gravity, special relativity, and relativistic radiative transfer. We solve both the relativistic radiative transfer equation and the relativistic hydrodynamical equations for spherically symmetric flows under the double-iteration processes, to obtain the intensity and velocity fields simultaneously. We found that the momentum-driven winds with scattering are quickly accelerated near the central object to reach the terminal speed. The results of numerical solutions are roughly fitted by a relation of \\dot{m}=0.7(Γ _*-1)\\tau _* β _* β _out^{-2.6}, where \\dot{m} is the mass-loss rate normalized by the critical one, Γ* the central luminosity normalized by the critical one, τ* the typical optical depth, β* the initial flow speed at the central core of radius R*, and βout the terminal speed normalized by the speed of light. This relation is close to the non-relativistic analytical solution, \\dot{m} = 2(Γ _*-1)\\tau _* β _* β _out^{-2}, which can be re-expressed as β _out^2/2 = (Γ _*-1)GM/c^2 R_*. That is, the present solution with small optical depth is similar to that of the radiatively driven free outflow. Furthermore, we found that the normalized luminosity (Eddington parameter) must be larger than unity for the relativistic spherical wind to blow off with intermediate or small optical depth, i.e. Γ _* ≳ \\sqrt{(1+β _out)^3/(1-β _out)}. We briefly investigate and discuss an isothermal wind.

  13. Radiative relativistic shock adiabate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsintsadze, L.N.; Nishikawa, K.

    1997-01-01

    The influences of thermal radiation on the state equation of shock waves, derived in the previous paper [L. N. Tsintsadze, Phys. Plasmas 2, 4462 (1995)], are studied and a series of relations of thermodynamic quantities that hold for shock waves are derived. It is shown that the presence of radiation can strongly change the compressibility of the plasma. It is well known that for polytropic gases the compressibility cannot change more than four times the initial value in the case of nonrelativistic temperatures. The numerical calculations show that there are no such restrictions, when the radiation energy exceeds the kinetic energy of the plasma. The ultrarelativistic temperature range is also covered in our numerical calculations. Also studied are the influences of the radiation on the PT and the TV diagrams. A significant modification due to radiation is found in every case studied. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  14. PROGNOSIS OF GLEs OF RELATIVISTIC SOLAR PROTONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez-Peraza, Jorge; Juárez-Zuñiga, Alan, E-mail: perperaz@geofisica.unam.mx, E-mail: z.alan.z@hotmail.com [Instituto de Geofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, C.U., Coyoacán, 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico)

    2015-04-10

    Ground level enhancements (GLEs) are relativistic solar particles measured at ground level by the worldwide network of cosmic ray detectors. These sporadic events are associated with solar flares and are assumed to be of a quasi-random nature. Studying them gives information about their source and propagation processes, the maximum capacity of the Sun as a particle accelerator engine, the magnetic structure of the medium traversed, etc. Space vehicles, as well as electric transformers and gas pipes at high latitudes may be damaged by this kind of radiation. As a result, their prediction has turned out to be very important, but because of their random occurrence, up to now few efforts toward this goal have been made. The results of these efforts have been limited to possible warnings in real time, just before a GLE occurrence, but no specific dates have been predicted well enough in advance to prevent possible hazards. In this study we show that, in spite of the quasi-stochastic nature of GLEs, it is possible to predict them with relative precision, even for future solar cycles. Additionally, a previous study establishing synchronization among some periodicities of several layers of solar atmosphere argues against the full randomness of the phenomenon of relativistic particle production. Therefore, by means of wavelet spectral analysis combined with fuzzy logic tools, we reproduce previous known GLE events and present results for future events. The next GLE is expected to occur in the first semester of 2016.

  15. Synchrotron radiation from protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutt, S.K.

    1992-12-01

    Synchrotron radiation from protons, though described by the same equations as the radiation from electrons, exhibits a number of interesting features on account of the parameters reached in praxis. In this presentation, we shall point out some of the features relating to (i) normal synchrotron radiation from dipoles in proton machines such as the High Energy Booster and the Superconducting Super Collider; (ii) synchrotron radiation from short dipoles, and its application to light monitors for proton machines, and (iii) synchrotron radiation from undulators in the limit when, the deflection parameter is much smaller than unity. The material for this presentation is taken largely from the work of Hofmann, Coisson, Bossart, and their collaborators, and from a paper by Kim. We shall emphasize the qualitative aspects of synchrotron radiation in the cases mentioned above, making, when possible, simple arguments for estimating the spectral and angular properties of the radiation. Detailed analyses can be found in the literature

  16. Atmospheric nitrous oxide produced by solar protons and relativistic electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, S.S.; Zipf, E.C.

    1981-01-01

    An alternative means of nitric oxide production in the stratosphere to that of direct formation in the upper atmosphere by solar proton (SP) events and by relativistic electron precipitation (REP) events from the Earth's radiation belt, is described. It is suggested that nitrous oxide is produced in the mesosphere and then migrates downward and is converted in the stratosphere to NO by the reaction N 2 O + O( 1 D) → 2 NO. Such a process could amplify the direct NO production by >10%. Mesospheric nitrous oxide mixing ratios increase to values as high as 6 x 10 -7 due to REP- and SP- related production. Lateral transport will reduce these high values but mesospheric mixing ratios of N 2 O in the high latitudes would approach 10 -7 , considerably greater than those expected on the basis of theories which neglect REP- and SP-related production of this species. (U.K.)

  17. The K-shell ionisation of atoms by relativistic protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidovic, D.M.; Moiseiwitsch, B.L.; Norrington, P.H.

    1978-01-01

    The K-shell ionisation of atoms by protons travelling with relativistic velocities is investigated using an extension of the first-order time-dependent perturbation-theory treatment of Moeller (Ann. Phys. Lpz.; 14:531 (1932)), taking Dirac plane waves for the description of the incident and scattered protons and the Darwin approximation for the relativistic wavefunctions of the K-shell atomic electrons and the ejected electron. The differential cross sections and total cross sections are calculated. Results are compared with those of earlier workers. (author)

  18. Theory of relativistic radiation reflection from plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonoskov, Arkady

    2018-01-01

    We consider the reflection of relativistically strong radiation from plasma and identify the physical origin of the electrons' tendency to form a thin sheet, which maintains its localisation throughout its motion. Thereby, we justify the principle of relativistic electronic spring (RES) proposed in [Gonoskov et al., Phys. Rev. E 84, 046403 (2011)]. Using the RES principle, we derive a closed set of differential equations that describe the reflection of radiation with arbitrary variation of polarization and intensity from plasma with an arbitrary density profile for an arbitrary angle of incidence. We confirm with ab initio PIC simulations that the developed theory accurately describes laser-plasma interactions in the regime where the reflection of relativistically strong radiation is accompanied by significant, repeated relocation of plasma electrons. In particular, the theory can be applied for the studies of plasma heating and coherent and incoherent emissions in the RES regime of high-intensity laser-plasma interaction.

  19. Sensitivity of relativistic impulse approximation proton-nucleus elastic scattering calculations on relativistic mean-field parameterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojsik, M.; Gmuca, S.

    1998-01-01

    Relativistic microscopic calculations are presented for proton elastic scattering from 40 Ca at 500 MeV. The underlying target densities are calculated within the framework of the relativistic mean-field theory with several parameter sets commonly in use. The self consistency of the scalar and vector densities (and thus to relativistic mean-field parameters) is investigated. Recently, the relativistic impulse approximation (RIA) has been widely and repeatedly used for the calculations of proton-nucleus scattering at intermediate energies. These calculations have exhibited significant improvements over the nonrelativistic approaches. The relativistic impulse approximation calculations. in particular, provide a dramatically better description of the spin observables, namely the analyzing power, A y , and the spin-rotation function, Q, at least for energies higher than 400 MeV. In the relativistic impulse approximation, the Dirac optical potential is obtained by folding of the local Lorentz-invariant amplitudes with the corresponding nuclear densities. For the spin zero targets the scalar and vector terms give the dominant contributions. Thus the scalar and vector nuclear densities (both, proton and neutron ones) play the dominant role in the relativistic impulse approximation. While the proton vector densities can be obtained by unfolding from the empirically known charge densities, all other densities used rely to a great extent on theoretical models. The various recipes are used to construct the neutron vector densities and the scalar densities for both, neutrons and protons. In this paper we will study the sensitivity of the relativistic impulse approximation results on the various sets of relativistic mean-field parameters currently in use

  20. Relativistic total and differential cross section proton--proton electron--positron pair production calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubinstein, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    Circle Feynman diagrams for a specific permutation of variables along with their corresponding algebraic expressions are presented to evaluate [H] 2 for proton-proton electron-positron pair production. A Monte Carlo integration technique is introduced and is used to set up the multiple integral expression for the total pair production cross section. The technique is first applied to the Compton scattering problem and then to an arbitrary multiple integral. The relativistic total cross section for proton-proton electron-positron pair production was calculated for eight different values of incident proton energy. A variety of differential cross sections were calculated for the above energies. Angular differential cross section distributions are presented for the electron, positron, and proton. Invariant mass differential cross section distributions are done both with and without the presence of [H] 2 . Both WGHT and log 10 (TOTAL) distributions were also obtained. The general behavioral trends of the total and differential cross sections for proton-proton electron-positron pair production are presented. The range of validity for this calculation is from 0 to about 200 MeV

  1. Radiative pion-proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho-Kim, Q.; Lavine, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    The results are presented of a non-relativistic calculation of the π +- proton bremsstrahlung cross section at the pion kinetic energy of 298 MeV for backward photon angles. The pion-nucleon interaction is given by models that are based on the p-wave Chew-Low theory. An interaction current is included in an attempt to make the overall bremsstrahlung amplitude gauge-invariant. The predicted cross sections show little of the expected resonance, and are in fair agreement with the data. The authors have also calculated the cross sections at other kinetic energies, and have studied effects of the off-mass-shell electromagnetic vertex. (Auth.)

  2. Radiatively-suppressed spherical accretion under relativistic radiative transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukue, Jun

    2018-03-01

    We numerically examine radiatively-suppressed relativistic spherical accretion flows on to a central object with mass M under Newtonian gravity and special relativity. We simultaneously solve both the relativistic radiative transfer equation and the relativistic hydrodynamical equations for spherically symmetric flows under the double iteration process in the case of the intermediate optical depth. We find that the accretion flow is suppressed, compared with the freefall case in the nonrelativistic regime. For example, in the case of accretion on to a luminous core with accretion luminosity L*, the freefall velocity v normalized by the speed of light c under the radiative force in the nonrelativistic regime is β (\\hat{r}) = v/c = -√{(1-Γ _*)/(\\hat{r}+1-Γ _*)}, where Γ* (≡ L*/LE, LE being the Eddington luminosity) is the Eddington parameter and \\hat{r} (= r/rS, rS being the Schwarzschild radius) the normalized radius, whereas the infall speed at the central core is ˜0.7β(1), irrespective of the mass-accretion rate. This is due to the relativistic effect; the comoving flux is enhanced by the advective flux. We briefly examine and discuss an isothermal case, where the emission takes place in the entire space.

  3. Particle Acceleration and Radiative Losses at Relativistic Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, P.; Duffy, P.

    A semi-analytic approach to the relativistic transport equation with isotropic diffusion and consistent radiative losses is presented. It is based on the eigenvalue method first introduced in Kirk & Schneider [5]and Heavens & Drury [3]. We demonstrate the pitch-angle dependence of the cut-off in relativistic shocks.

  4. Radiative transitions in mesons within a non relativistic quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnaz, R.; Silvestre-Brac, B.; Gignoux, C.

    2002-01-01

    An exhaustive study of radiative transitions in mesons is performed in a non relativistic quark model. Three different types of mesons wave functions are tested. The effect of some usual approximations is commented. Overall agreement with experimental data is obtained

  5. Proton-proton and deuteron-deuteron correlations in interactions of relativistic helium nuclei with protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galazka-Friedman, J.; Sobczak, T.; Stepaniak, J.; Zielinski, I.P.; Bano, M.; Hlavacova, J.; Martinska, G.; Patocka, J.; Seman, M.; Sandor, L.; Urban, J.

    1993-01-01

    The reactions 4 Hep→pp+X, 3 Hep→pp+X and 4 Hep→ddp have been investigated and the correlation function has been measured for protons and deuterons with small relative momenta. Strong positive correlation has been observed for protons related mainly to the final state interactions in 1 S 0 state. The root mean square radius of the proton source calculated from the correlation function has been found to be equal to (1.7±0.3) fm and (2.1±0.3) fm for 4 He and 3 He respectively. It agrees with the known radii of these nuclei. (orig.)

  6. Precipitation of relativistic electrons of the Van Allen belts into the proton aurora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordanova, Vania K.; Miyoshi, Y.; Sakaguchi, K.; Shiokawa, K.; Evans, D.S.; Albert, Jay; Connors, M

    2008-01-01

    The Van Allen electron belts consist of two regions encircling the earth in which relativistic electrons are trapped in the earth's magnetic field. Populations of relativistic electrons in the Van Allen belts vary greatly with geomagnetic disturbance and they are a major source of damage to space vehicles. In order to know when and by how much these populations of relativistic electrons increase, it is important to elucidate not only the cause of acceleration of relativistic electrons but also the cause of their loss from the Van Allen belts. Here we show the first evidence that left-hand polarized electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) plasma waves can cause the loss of relativistic electrons into the atmosphere, on the basis of results of an excellent set of ground and satellite observations showing coincident precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keV and of relativistic electrons into an isolated proton aurora. The proton aurora was produced by precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keV due to EMIC waves near the plasma pause, which is a manifestation of wave-particle interactions. These observations clarify that ions with energies of tens of keV affect the evolution of relativistic electrons in the Van Allen belts via parasitic resonance with EMIC waves, an effect that was first theoretically predicted in the early 1970's

  7. Calculation of fusion gain in fast ignition with magnetic target by relativistic electrons and protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvazian, A.; Javani, A.

    2010-01-01

    Fast ignition is a new method for inertial confinement fusion in which the compression and ignition steps are separated. In the first stage, fuel is compressed by laser or ion beams. In the second phase, relativistic electrons are generated by pettawat laser in the fuel. Also, in the second phase 5-35 MeV protons can be generated in the fuel. Electrons or protons can penetrate in to the ultra-dense fuel and deposit their energy in the fuel. More recently, cylindrical rather than spherical fuel chambers with magnetic control in the plasma domain have been also considered. This is called magnetized target fusion. Magnetic field has effects on relativistic electrons energy deposition rate in fuel. In this work, fast ignition method in cylindrical fuel chambers is investigated and transportation of the relativistic electrons and protons is calculated using MCNPX and FLUKA codes with 0.25 and 0.5 tesla magnetic field in single and dual hot spot. Furthermore, the transfer rate of relativistic electrons and high energy protons to the fuel and fusion gain are calculated. The results show that the presence of external magnetic field guarantees higher fusion gain, and relativistic electrons are much more appropriate objects for ignition. Magnetized target fusion in dual hot spot can be considered as an appropriate substitution for the current inertial confinement fusion techniques.

  8. Calculation of fusion gain in fast ignition with magnetic target by relativistic electrons and protons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Parvazian

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Fast ignition is a new method for inertial confinement fusion (ICF in which the compression and ignition steps are separated. In the first stage, fuel is compressed by laser or ion beams. In the second phase, relativistic electrons are generated by pettawat laser in the fuel. Also, in the second phase 5-35 MeV protons can be generated in the fuel. Electrons or protons can penetrate in to the ultra-dense fuel and deposit their energy in the fuel . More recently, cylindrical rather than spherical fuel chambers with magnetic control in the plasma domain have been also considered. This is called magnetized target fusion (MTF. Magnetic field has effects on relativistic electrons energy deposition rate in fuel. In this work, fast ignition method in cylindrical fuel chambers is investigated and transportation of the relativistic electrons and protons is calculated using MCNPX and FLUKA codes with 0. 25 and 0. 5 tesla magnetic field in single and dual hot spot. Furthermore, the transfer rate of relativistic electrons and high energy protons to the fuel and fusion gain are calculated. The results show that the presence of external magnetic field guarantees higher fusion gain, and relativistic electrons are much more appropriate objects for ignition. MTF in dual hot spot can be considered as an appropriate substitution for the current ICF techniques.

  9. Biological effects of proton radiation: an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girdhani, S.; Hlatky, L.; Sachs, R.

    2015-01-01

    Proton radiation provides significant dosimetric advantages when compared with gamma radiation due to its superior energy deposition characteristics. Although the physical aspects of proton radiobiology are well understood, biological and clinical endpoints are understudied. The current practice to assume the relative biological effectiveness of low linear energy transfer (LET) protons to be a generic value of about 1.1 relative to photons likely obscures important unrecognised differentials in biological response between these radiation qualities. A deeper understanding of the biological properties induced by proton radiation would have both radiobiological and clinical impact. This article briefly points to some of the literature pertinent to the effects of protons on tissue-level processes that modify disease progression, such as angiogenesis, cell invasion and cancer metastasis. Recent findings hint that proton radiation may, in addition to offering improved radio-therapeutic targeting, be a means to provide a new dimension for increasing therapeutic benefits for patients by manipulating these tissue-level processes. (authors)

  10. Radiatively-driven general relativistic jets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mukesh K. Vyas

    2018-02-10

    Feb 10, 2018 ... relativistic jets and shocks induced by non radial nature of the cross section. Isothermal assumption does not contain the effect of the thermal gradient term which is a significant accelerating agent and is very effec- tive close to the BH. It is also the same region where one needs to consider the effects of ...

  11. Relativistic duality, and relativistic and radiative corrections for heavy-quark systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, B.; Durand, L.

    1982-01-01

    We give a JWKB proof of a relativistic duality relation which relates an appropriate energy average of the physical cross section for e + e - →qq-bar bound states→hadrons to the same energy average of the perturbative cross section for e + e - →qq-bar. We show that the duality relation can be used effectively to estimate relativistic and radiative corrections for bound-quark systems to order α/sub s//sup ts2/. We also present a formula which relates the square of the ''large'' 3 S 1 Salpeter-Bethe-Schwinger wave function for zero space-time separation of the quarks to the square of the nonrelativistic Schroedinger wave function at the origin for an effective potential which reproduces the relativistic spectrum. This formula allows one to use the nonrelativistic wave functions obtained in potential models fitted to the psi and UPSILON spectra to calculate relativistic leptonic widths for qq-bar states via a relativistic version of the van Royen--Weisskopf formula

  12. Elastic proton-deuteron backward scattering: relativistic effects and polarization observables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaptari, L.P.; Semikh, S.S.

    1997-10-01

    The elastic proton-deuteron backward reaction is analyzed within a covariant approach based on the Bethe-Salpeter equation with 000. Lorentz boost and other relativistic effects in the cross section and spin correlation observables, like tensor analyzing power and polarization transfer etc., are investigated in explicit form. Results of numerical calculations for a complete set of polarization observables are presented. (orig.)

  13. Coherent polarization radiation of relativistic electrons in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morokhovskii, V.L.

    2014-01-01

    A brief narration about the history of those heated arguments and discussions around the nature of so-called parametric X-radiation, which were concluded by the recognition of the discovery the phenomenon of coherent polarization bremsstrahlung of relativistic charged particles in crystals. Some important information and comments, which stay over of notice of specialists till now are reported.

  14. Dynamic of non relativistic electrons and protons in the plasmasphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes Junior, O.; Pinto Junior, O.; Gonzalez, W.D.

    1985-01-01

    A study of the dynamics of electrons and protons inside the plasmasphere is presented. These particles are subjected to the geomagnetic field and to plasmaspheric electric fields, given by simple static models, during magnetically quiet and disturbed periods. (author) [pt

  15. Radiation of a relativistic particle falling into a black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymnikova, I.G.

    1980-01-01

    The gravitational and electromagnetic radiation emitted by a relativistic test body falling into a black hole at a velocity that is not small compared with the velocity of light is studied. For ω 3 γ 0 /(GM), the spectra of the electromagnetic and gravitational radiation do not depend on the frequency, but for ω > c 3 γ 0 (GM) they fall off exponentially. The total radiated power is proportional to γ 0 1n γ 0 and γ 3 0 , respectively, for the electromagnetic and gravitational radiation

  16. Radiation protection around high energy proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgois, L.

    1996-01-01

    Proton accelerators are intense radiation sources because of the particle beam itself, secondary radiation and structure activation. So radiation protection is required around these equipment during running time but even during downtime. This article presents some estimated values about structure and air activation and applies the Moyer model to get dose rate behind shielding. (A.C.)

  17. Exact relativistic cylindrical solution of disordered radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca Teixeira, A.F. da; Wolk, I.; Som, M.M.

    1976-05-01

    A source free disordered distribution of electromagnetic radiation is considered in Einstein' theory, and a time independent exact solution with cylindrical symmetry is obtained. The gravitation and pressure effects of the radiation alone are sufficient to give the distribution an equilibrium. A finite maximum concentration is found on the axis of symmetry, and decreases monotonically to zero outwards. Timelike and null geodesics are discussed

  18. Proton-nucleus dynamics at ultra-relativistic energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCubbin, N.A.

    1988-01-01

    Some of the basic properties of proton-nucleus (pA) collisions at ultrarelativistic energies are reviewed. These include total and 'partonic' cross-sections, and the differential cross-sections as functions of rapidity, transverse energy, and particle p T , with particular emphasis in all cases on the A dependence. The aim is to introduce a nuclear physics audience to the main trends and ideas; experts in the field will find nothing very new here. (orig.)

  19. Radiation from systems with relativistic electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ternov, I.M.; Khalilov, V.R.; Bagrov, V.G.; Nikitin, M.M.

    1980-01-01

    Different methods of generation of electromagnetic radiation in the course of electron motion in external electromagnetic fields are considered. Singularities of ''free electron lasers'' (FEL), synchrotronous, ondulator and Compton radiation sources are discussed. The effect of induced radiation of electrons moving in a magnetic field is studied on the basis of the quantum theory methods. The results obtained are compared with the results of the classical theory. The theoretical and experimental results of the main singularities of the ondulator radiation (OR) are presented. It is shown that when the recoil effects are negligible and nonequidistancy of the energy spectrum of an electron in a magnetic field is of an error character, the results for the dose rate calculated by the quantum and classical theory methods completely coincide in the range of great filling numbers. Both in the quantum and classical theories the effects of the induced radiation of electrons moving in external electromagnetic fields (nonstationary in a general case) of a rather general type depend on two main mechanisms, which are nonequidistancy of the energy spectrum and the recoil effect (the quantum theory); appearance of phase and longitudinal electron bunching under the effect of an alternating radiation field (the classical theory). On the basis of the investigations the conclusion is made that OR can be successfully used for measuring the charged particle beam parameters (dispersion of angular spread and the absolute energy), as well as for measuring the amplitude of the magnetic field intensity in a space-periodic system

  20. Radiative cooling of relativistic electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhirong [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Modern high-energy particle accelerators and synchrotron light sources demand smaller and smaller beam emittances in order to achieve higher luminosity or better brightness. For light particles such as electrons and positrons, radiation damping is a natural and effective way to obtain low emittance beams. However, the quantum aspect of radiation introduces random noise into the damped beams, yielding equilibrium emittances which depend upon the design of a specific machine. In this dissertation, the author attempts to make a complete analysis of the process of radiation damping and quantum excitation in various accelerator systems, such as bending magnets, focusing channels and laser fields. Because radiation is formed over a finite time and emitted in quanta of discrete energies, he invokes the quantum mechanical approach whenever the quasiclassical picture of radiation is insufficient. He shows that radiation damping in a focusing system is fundamentally different from that in a bending system. Quantum excitation to the transverse dimensions is absent in a straight, continuous focusing channel, and is exponentially suppressed in a focusing-dominated ring. Thus, the transverse normalized emittances in such systems can in principle be damped to the Compton wavelength of the electron, limited only by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. In addition, he investigates methods of rapid damping such as radiative laser cooling. He proposes a laser-electron storage ring (LESR) where the electron beam in a compact storage ring repetitively interacts with an intense laser pulse stored in an optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction gives rise to rapid cooling of electron beams and can be used to overcome the space charge effects encountered in a medium energy circular machine. Applications to the designs of low emittance damping rings and compact x-ray sources are also explored.

  1. Radiative cooling of relativistic electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Z.

    1998-05-01

    Modern high-energy particle accelerators and synchrotron light sources demand smaller and smaller beam emittances in order to achieve higher luminosity or better brightness. For light particles such as electrons and positrons, radiation damping is a natural and effective way to obtain low emittance beams. However, the quantum aspect of radiation introduces random noise into the damped beams, yielding equilibrium emittances which depend upon the design of a specific machine. In this dissertation, the author attempts to make a complete analysis of the process of radiation damping and quantum excitation in various accelerator systems, such as bending magnets, focusing channels and laser fields. Because radiation is formed over a finite time and emitted in quanta of discrete energies, he invokes the quantum mechanical approach whenever the quasiclassical picture of radiation is insufficient. He shows that radiation damping in a focusing system is fundamentally different from that in a bending system. Quantum excitation to the transverse dimensions is absent in a straight, continuous focusing channel, and is exponentially suppressed in a focusing-dominated ring. Thus, the transverse normalized emittances in such systems can in principle be damped to the Compton wavelength of the electron, limited only by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. In addition, he investigates methods of rapid damping such as radiative laser cooling. He proposes a laser-electron storage ring (LESR) where the electron beam in a compact storage ring repetitively interacts with an intense laser pulse stored in an optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction gives rise to rapid cooling of electron beams and can be used to overcome the space charge effects encountered in a medium energy circular machine. Applications to the designs of low emittance damping rings and compact x-ray sources are also explored

  2. Efficiencies for production of atomic nitrogen and oxygen by relativistic proton impact in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, H. S.; Jackman, C. H.; Green, A. E. S.

    1976-01-01

    Relativistic electron and proton impact cross sections are obtained and represented by analytic forms which span the energy range from threshold to 1 GeV. For ionization processes, the Massey-Mohr continuum generalized oscillator strength surface is parameterized. Parameters are determined by simultaneous fitting to (1) empirical data, (2) the Bethe sum rule, and (3) doubly differential cross sections for ionization. Branching ratios for dissociation and predissociation from important states of N2 and O2 are determined. The efficiency for the production of atomic nitrogen and oxygen by protons with kinetic energy less than 1 GeV is determined using these branching ratio and cross section assignments.

  3. bhlight: GENERAL RELATIVISTIC RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS WITH MONTE CARLO TRANSPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, B. R.; Gammie, C. F.; Dolence, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    We present bhlight, a numerical scheme for solving the equations of general relativistic radiation magnetohydrodynamics using a direct Monte Carlo solution of the frequency-dependent radiative transport equation. bhlight is designed to evolve black hole accretion flows at intermediate accretion rate, in the regime between the classical radiatively efficient disk and the radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF), in which global radiative effects play a sub-dominant but non-negligible role in disk dynamics. We describe the governing equations, numerical method, idiosyncrasies of our implementation, and a suite of test and convergence results. We also describe example applications to radiative Bondi accretion and to a slowly accreting Kerr black hole in axisymmetry

  4. The relativistic foundations of synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaritondo, Giorgio; Rafelski, Johann

    2017-07-01

    Special relativity (SR) determines the properties of synchrotron radiation, but the corresponding mechanisms are frequently misunderstood. Time dilation is often invoked among the causes, whereas its role would violate the principles of SR. Here it is shown that the correct explanation of the synchrotron radiation properties is provided by a combination of the Doppler shift, not dependent on time dilation effects, contrary to a common belief, and of the Lorentz transformation into the particle reference frame of the electromagnetic field of the emission-inducing device, also with no contribution from time dilation. Concluding, the reader is reminded that much, if not all, of our argument has been available since the inception of SR, a research discipline of its own standing.

  5. Scattering of Non-Relativistic Charged Particles by Electromagnetic Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostol, M.

    2017-11-01

    The cross-section is computed for non-relativistic charged particles (like electrons and ions) scattered by electromagnetic radiation confined to a finite region (like the focal region of optical laser beams). The cross-section exhibits maxima at scattering angles given by the energy and momentum conservation in multi-photon absorption or emission processes. For convenience, a potential scattering is included and a comparison is made with the well-known Kroll-Watson scattering formula. The scattering process addressed in this paper is distinct from the process dealt with in previous studies, where the scattering is immersed in the radiation field.

  6. Study of two-proton radioactivity within the relativistic mean-field plus BCS approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, D.; Saxena, G.

    2012-01-01

    Inspired by recent experimental studies of two-proton radioactivity in the light-medium mass region, we have employed relativistic mean-field plus state-dependent BCS approach (RMF+BCS) to study the ground state properties of selected even-Z nuclei in the region 20 ≤ Z ≤ 40. It is found that the effective potential barrier provided by the Coulomb interaction and that due to centrifugal force may cause a long delay in the decay of some of the nuclei even with small negative proton separation energy. This may cause the existence of proton-rich nuclei beyond the proton drip-line. Nuclei 38 Ti, 42 Cr, 45 Fe, 48 Ni, 55 Zn, 60 Ge, 63, 64 Se, 68 Kr, 72 Sr and 76 Zr are found to be the potential candidates for exhibiting two-proton radioactivity in the region 20 ≤ Z ≤ 40. The reliability of these predictions is further strengthened by the agreement of the calculated results for the ground state properties such as binding energy, one- and two-proton separation energy, proton and neutron radii, and deformation with the available experimental data for the entire chain of the isotopes of the nuclei in the region 20 ≤ Z ≤ 40. (author)

  7. Biophysical characterization of a relativistic proton beam for image-guided radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhan; Vanstalle, Marie; La Tessa, Chiara; Jiang, Guo-Liang; Durante, Marco

    2012-07-01

    We measured the physical and radiobiological characteristics of 1 GeV protons for possible applications in stereotactic radiosurgery (image-guided plateau-proton radiosurgery). A proton beam was accelerated at 1 GeV at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, NY) and a target in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) was used. Clonogenic survival was measured after exposures to 1-10 Gy in three mammalian cell lines. Measurements and simulations demonstrate that the lateral scattering of the beam is very small. The lateral dose profile was measured with or without the 20-cm plastic target, showing no significant differences up to 2 cm from the axis A large number of secondary swift protons are produced in the target and this leads to an increase of approximately 40% in the measured dose on the beam axis at 20 cm depth. The relative biological effectiveness at 10% survival level ranged between 1.0 and 1.2 on the beam axis, and was slightly higher off-axis. The very low lateral scattering of relativistic protons and the possibility of using online proton radiography during the treatment make them attractive for image-guided plateau (non-Bragg peak) stereotactic radiosurgery.

  8. Biophysical characterization of a relativistic proton beam for image-guided radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Z.; Vanstalle, M.; La Tessa, C.; Durante, M.; Jiang Guoliang

    2012-01-01

    We measured the physical and radiobiological characteristics of 1 GeV protons for possible applications in stereotactic radiosurgery (image-guided plateau-proton radiosurgery). A proton beam was accelerated at 1 GeV at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, NY) and a target in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) was used. Clonogenic survival was measured after exposures to 1-10 Gy in three mammalian cell lines. Measurements and simulations demonstrate that the lateral scattering of the beam is very small. The lateral dose profile was measured with or without the 20-cm plastic target, showing no significant differences up to 2 cm from the axis A large number of secondary swift protons are produced in the target and this leads to an increase of approximately 40% in the measured dose on the beam axis at 20 cm depth. The relative biological effectiveness at 10% survival level ranged between 1.0 and 1.2 on the beam axis, and was slightly higher off-axis. The very low lateral scattering of relativistic protons and the possibility of using online proton radiography during the treatment make them attractive for image-guided plateau (non-Bragg peak) stereotactic radiosurgery. (author)

  9. Proton-beam radiation therapy dosimetry standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gall, K.P.

    1995-01-01

    Beams of protons have been used for radiation therapy applications for over 40 years. In the last decade the number of facilities treating patients and the total number of patients being treated has begun go grow rapidly. Due to the limited and experimental nature of the early programs, dosimetry protocols tended to be locally defined. With the publication of the AAPM Task Group 20 report open-quotes Protocol for Dosimetry of Heavy Charged Particlesclose quotes and the open-quotes European Code of Practice for Proton-Beam Dosimetryclose quotes the practice of determining dose in proton-beam therapy was somewhat unified. The ICRU has also recently commissioned a report on recommendations for proton-beam dosimetry. There have been three main methods of determining proton dose; the Faraday cup technique, the ionization chamber technique, and the calorimeter technique. For practical reasons the ionization chamber technique has become the most widely used. However, due to large errors in basic parameters (e.g., W-value) is also has a large uncertainty for absolute dose. It has been proposed that the development of water calorimeter absorbed dose standards would reduce the uncertainty in absolute proton dose as well as the relative dose between megavoltage X-ray beams and proton beams. The advantages and disadvantages are discussed

  10. Relativistic corrections to η{sub c}-pair production in high energy proton–proton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martynenko, A.P., E-mail: a.p.martynenko@samsu.ru [Samara State University, Pavlov Street 1, 443011, Samara (Russian Federation); Samara State Aerospace University named after S.P. Korolyov, Moskovskoye Shosse 34, 443086, Samara (Russian Federation); Trunin, A.M., E-mail: amtrnn@gmail.com [Samara State Aerospace University named after S.P. Korolyov, Moskovskoye Shosse 34, 443086, Samara (Russian Federation)

    2013-06-10

    On the basis of perturbative QCD and the relativistic quark model we calculate relativistic corrections to the double η{sub c} meson production in proton–proton interactions at LHC energies. Relativistic terms in the production amplitude connected with the relative motion of heavy quarks and the transformation law of the bound state wave functions to the reference frame of moving charmonia are taken into account. For the gluon and quark propagators entering the amplitude we use a truncated expansion in relative quark momenta up to the second order. Relativistic corrections to the quark bound state wave functions are considered by means of the Breit-like potential. It turns out that the examined effects decrease total non-relativistic cross section more than two times and on 20 percents in the rapidity region of LHCb detector.

  11. Intense synchrotron radiation from a magnetically compressed relativistic electron layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shearer, J.W.; Nowak, D.A.; Garelis, E.; Condit, W.C.

    1975-10-01

    Using a simple model of a relativistic electron layer rotating in an axial magnetic field, energy gain by an increasing magnetic field and energy loss by synchrotron radiation were considered. For a typical example, initial conditions were approximately 8 MeV electron in approximately 14 kG magnetic field, at a layer radius of approximately 20 mm, and final conditions were approximately 4 MG magnetic field approximately 100 MeV electron layer energy at a layer radius of approximately 1.0 mm. In the final state, the intense 1-10 keV synchrotron radiation imposes an electron energy loss time constant of approximately 100 nanoseconds. In order to achieve these conditions in practice, the magnetic field must be compressed by an imploding conducting liner; preferably two flying rings in order to allow the synchrotron radiation to escape through the midplane. The synchrotron radiation loss rate imposes a lower limit to the liner implosion velocity required to achieve a given final electron energy (approximately 1 cm/μsec in the above example). In addition, if the electron ring can be made sufficiently strong (field reversed), the synchrotron radiation would be a unique source of high intensity soft x-radiation

  12. grmonty: A MONTE CARLO CODE FOR RELATIVISTIC RADIATIVE TRANSPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolence, Joshua C.; Gammie, Charles F.; Leung, Po Kin; Moscibrodzka, Monika

    2009-01-01

    We describe a Monte Carlo radiative transport code intended for calculating spectra of hot, optically thin plasmas in full general relativity. The version we describe here is designed to model hot accretion flows in the Kerr metric and therefore incorporates synchrotron emission and absorption, and Compton scattering. The code can be readily generalized, however, to account for other radiative processes and an arbitrary spacetime. We describe a suite of test problems, and demonstrate the expected N -1/2 convergence rate, where N is the number of Monte Carlo samples. Finally, we illustrate the capabilities of the code with a model calculation, a spectrum of the slowly accreting black hole Sgr A* based on data provided by a numerical general relativistic MHD model of the accreting plasma.

  13. ipole: Semianalytic scheme for relativistic polarized radiative transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscibrodzka, Monika; Gammie, Charles F.

    2018-04-01

    ipole is a ray-tracing code for covariant, polarized radiative transport particularly useful for modeling Event Horizon Telescope sources, though may also be used for other relativistic transport problems. The code extends the ibothros scheme for covariant, unpolarized transport using two representations of the polarized radiation field: in the coordinate frame, it parallel transports the coherency tensor, and in the frame of the plasma, it evolves the Stokes parameters under emission, absorption, and Faraday conversion. The transport step is as spacetime- and coordinate- independent as possible; the emission, absorption, and Faraday conversion step is implemented using an analytic solution to the polarized transport equation with constant coefficients. As a result, ipole is stable, efficient, and produces a physically reasonable solution even for a step with high optical depth and Faraday depth.

  14. Examining Relativistic Electron Loss in the Outer Radiation Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J. C.; Onsager, T. G.; O'Brien, P.

    2003-12-01

    Since the discovery of earth's radiation belts researchers have sought to identify the mechanisms that dictate the seemingly erratic relativistic electron flux levels in the outer belt. Contrary to intuition, relativistic electron flux levels do not always increase during geomagnetic storms even though these storms signify enhanced energy input from the solar wind to the magnetosphere [Reeves et al., 2003; O'Brien et al., 2001]. The fickle response of the radiation belt electrons to geomagnetic activity suggests that flux levels are determined by the outcome of a continuous competition between acceleration and loss. Some progress has been made developing and testing acceleration mechanisms but little is known about how relativistic electrons are lost. We examine relativistic electron losses in the outer belt focusing our attention on flux decrease events of the type first described by Onsager et al. [2002]. The study showed a sudden decrease of geosynchronous >2MeV electron flux occurring simultaneously with local stretching of the magnetic field. The decrease was first observed near 15:00 MLT and progressed to all local times after a period of ˜10 hours. Expanding on the work of Onsager et al. [2002], we have identified ˜ 51 such flux decrease events in the GOES and LANL data and present the results of a superposed epoch analysis of solar wind data, geomagnetic activity indicators, and locally measured magnetic field and plasma data. The analysis shows that flux decreases occur after 1-2 days of quiet condition. They begin when either the solar wind dynamic pressure increases or Bz turns southward pushing hot dense plasma earthward to form a partial ring current and stretched magnetic field at dusk. Adiabatic electron motion in response to the stretched magnetic field may explain the initial flux reduction; however, often the flux does not recover with the magnetic field recovery, indicating that true loss from the magnetosphere is occurring. Using Polar and

  15. Relativistic nonlinear electrodynamics the QED vacuum and matter in super-strong radiation fields

    CERN Document Server

    Avetissian, Hamlet K

    2016-01-01

    This revised edition of the author’s classic 2006 text offers a comprehensively updated review of the field of relativistic nonlinear electrodynamics. It explores the interaction of strong and super-strong electromagnetic/laser radiation with the electromagnetic quantum vacuum and diverse types of matter – including free charged particles and antiparticles, acceleration beams, plasma and plasmous media.  The appearance of laser sources of relativistic and ultra-relativistic intensities over the last decade has stimulated investigation of a large class of processes under such super-strong radiation fields. Revisions for this second edition reflect these developments and the book includes new chapters on Bremsstrahlung and nonlinear absorption of superintense radiation in plasmas, the nonlinear interaction of relativistic atoms with intense laser radiation, nonlinear interaction of strong laser radiation with Graphene, and relativistic nonlinear phenomena in solid-plasma targets under supershort laser pul...

  16. Smith-Purcell radiation in the highly relativistic regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, J.E.; Woods, K.J.; Kirk, H.G.

    1995-01-01

    An electron moving over the surface of a diffraction grating will transfer a part of its kinetic energy to radiation via a velocity synchronous coupling with a slow space harmonic component of the field. Since the phase velocity of a slow space harmonic is less than the speed of light, the slow components decay exponentially, or evanesce, with distance above the grating and the evanescence scale is determined by the product of the relative velocity, β, the relative energy, γ, and the wavelength λ. Thus, in the relativistic regime, good electron - grating coupling can be maintained at beam heights that are greater than the emitted wavelength. In order to explore this regime a series of experiments have been carried out with moderately energetic beams and an experiment with the 70-MeV beam at the Accelerator Test Facility is in the planning stage. The work has two basic goals: the first is to explore the characteristics of the spontaneous emission produced by the beam as it moves over the grating, and the second is to evaluate the potential of grating-coupled or Smith-Purcell free electron lasers. The spontaneous emission is of direct interest. It appears on the basis of work to date that the broad spectral distribution produced by a relativistic electron beam moving over a grating is potentially an alternative source for experiments of the type now carried out on synchrotron infrared beam lines. The grating, or a system of gratings, are also a potential alternative to the magnetic undulator and thus another basic approach to free electron laser design. The presentation will include a summary of the design of the experiment which is to be carried out on the 70-MeV A.T.F. beam line and a review of the theory of Smith-Purcell radiation in the high energy limit. Gain calculations and the role of beam quality in establishing performance limits will be discussed

  17. Relativistic protons in the Coma galaxy cluster: first gamma-ray constraints ever on turbulent reacceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, G.; Zimmer, S.; Zandanel, F.

    2017-12-01

    The Fermi-LAT (Large Area Telescope) collaboration recently published deep upper limits to the gamma-ray emission of the Coma cluster, a cluster hosting the prototype of giant radio haloes. In this paper, we extend previous studies and use a formalism that combines particle reacceleration by turbulence and the generation of secondary particles in the intracluster medium to constrain relativistic protons and their role for the origin of the radio halo. We conclude that a pure hadronic origin of the halo is clearly disfavoured as it would require excessively large magnetic fields. However, secondary particles can still generate the observed radio emission if they are reaccelerated. For the first time the deep gamma-ray limits allow us to derive meaningful constraints if the halo is generated during phases of reacceleration of relativistic protons and their secondaries by cluster-scale turbulence. In this paper, we explore a relevant range of parameter space of reacceleration models of secondaries. Within this parameter space, a fraction of model configurations is already ruled out by current gamma-ray limits, including the cases that assume weak magnetic fields in the cluster core, B ≤ 2-3 μG. Interestingly, we also find that the flux predicted by a large fraction of model configurations assuming magnetic fields consistent with Faraday rotation measures (RMs) is not far from the limits. This suggests that a detection of gamma-rays from the cluster might be possible in the near future, provided that the electrons generating the radio halo are secondaries reaccelerated and the magnetic field in the cluster is consistent with that inferred from RM.

  18. IPOLE - semi-analytic scheme for relativistic polarized radiative transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mościbrodzka, M.; Gammie, C. F.

    2018-03-01

    We describe IPOLE, a new public ray-tracing code for covariant, polarized radiative transport. The code extends the IBOTHROS scheme for covariant, unpolarized transport using two representations of the polarized radiation field: In the coordinate frame, it parallel transports the coherency tensor; in the frame of the plasma it evolves the Stokes parameters under emission, absorption, and Faraday conversion. The transport step is implemented to be as spacetime- and coordinate- independent as possible. The emission, absorption, and Faraday conversion step is implemented using an analytic solution to the polarized transport equation with constant coefficients. As a result, IPOLE is stable, efficient, and produces a physically reasonable solution even for a step with high optical depth and Faraday depth. We show that the code matches analytic results in flat space, and that it produces results that converge to those produced by Dexter's GRTRANS polarized transport code on a complicated model problem. We expect IPOLE will mainly find applications in modelling Event Horizon Telescope sources, but it may also be useful in other relativistic transport problems such as modelling for the IXPE mission.

  19. Radiation stability of proton irradiated zirconium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yong; Dickerson, Clayton A.; Allen, Todd R.

    2009-01-01

    The use of zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for the deep burn (DB)-TRISO fuel as a replacement for the silicon carbide coating. The radiation stability of ZrC was studied using 2.6 MeV protons, across the irradiation temperature range from 600 to 900degC and to doses up to 1.75 dpa. The microstructural characterization shows that the irradiated microstructure is comprised of a high density of nanometer-sized dislocation loops, while no irradiation induced amorphization or voids are observed. The lattice expansion induced by point defects is found to increase as the dose increases for the samples irradiated at 600 and 800degC, while for the 900degC irradiation, a slight lattice contraction is observed. The radiation hardening is also quantified using a micro indentation technique for the temperature and doses studies. (author)

  20. Similarity solutions of time-dependent relativistic radiation-hydrodynamical plane-parallel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukue, Jun

    2018-04-01

    Similarity solutions are examined for the frequency-integrated relativistic radiation-hydrodynamical flows, which are described by the comoving quantities. The flows are vertical plane-parallel time-dependent ones with a gray opacity coefficient. For adequate boundary conditions, the flows are accelerated in a somewhat homologous manner, but terminate at some singular locus, which originates from the pathological behavior in relativistic radiation moment equations truncated in finite orders.

  1. Three cases of radiation esophagitis controlled with proton pump inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Ryuji; Saito, Ryuichi; Miyazaki, Toshiyuki [Kumamoto Red Cross Hospital (Japan)

    2002-04-01

    Radiation esophagitis sometimes interrupts the radiation therapy due to swallowing pain and dysplasia. We experienced three cases of radiation-induced esophagitis controlled with proton pump inhibitor (PPI). These cases suggested etiologic relationship radiation esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We should consider PPI as treatment option for radiation esophagitis. (author)

  2. Parameterisation of radiation effects on CVD diamond for proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartjes, F.; Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Karl, C.; Kass, R.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Manfredi, P.F.; Manfredotti, C.; Marshall, R.D.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Palmieri, V.G.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Pirollo, S.; Polesello, P.; Pretzl, K.; Procario, M.; Re, V.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Roff, D.; Rudge, A.; Runolfsson, O.; Russ, J.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Vittone, E.; Wagner, A.; Walsh, A.M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Ziock, H.; Zoeller, M.

    1999-01-01

    The paper reviews measurements of the radiation hardness of CVD diamond for 24 GeV/c proton irradiation at fluences up to 5 * 10 15 protons/cm 2 . The results not only show radiation damage but also an annealing effect that is dominant at levels around 10 15 protons/cm 2 . A model describing both effects is introduced, enabling a prediction of the distribution curve of the charge signal for other levels

  3. Parameterisation of radiation effects on CVD diamond for proton irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartjes, F.; Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Karl, C.; Kass, R.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Manfredi, P.F.; Manfredotti, C.; Marshall, R.D.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Palmieri, V.G.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Pirollo, S.; Polesello, P.; Pretzl, K.; Procario, M.; Re, V.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Roff, D.; Rudge, A.; Runolfsson, O.; Russ, J.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Vittone, E.; Wagner, A.; Walsh, A.M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Ziock, H.; Zoeller, M

    1999-08-01

    The paper reviews measurements of the radiation hardness of CVD diamond for 24 GeV/c proton irradiation at fluences up to 5{sup *}10{sup 15} protons/cm{sup 2}. The results not only show radiation damage but also an annealing effect that is dominant at levels around 10{sup 15} protons/cm{sup 2}. A model describing both effects is introduced, enabling a prediction of the distribution curve of the charge signal for other levels.

  4. Radiative electron capture studied in relativistic heavy-ion atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoehlker, T.; Kozhuharov, C.; Mokler, P.H.; Warczak, A.; Bosch, F.; Geissel, H.; Moshammer, R.; Scheidenberger, C.; Eichler, J.; Shirai, T.; Stachura, Z.; Rymuza, P.

    1994-08-01

    The process of Radiative Electron Capture (REC) in relativistic collisions of high-Z ions with low-Z gaseous and solid targets is studied experimentally and theoretically. The observed X-ray spectra are analysed with respect to photon angular distributions as well as to total K-REC cross sections. The experimental results for angle-differential cross sections are well-reproduced by exact relativistic calculations which yield significant deviations from standard sin 2 θ distributions. Total cross sections for K-REC are shown to follow a simple scaling rule obtained from exact relativistic calculations as well as from a non-relativistic dipole approximation. The agreement between these different theoretical approaches must be regarded as fortuitous, but it lends support to the use of the non-relativistic approach for practical purposes. (orig.)

  5. The Indiana University proton radiation therapy project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, C.; Derenchuk, V.; Cameron, J.; Fasano, M.; Gilmore, J.; Hashemian, R.; Hornback, N.; Low, D.A.; Morphis, J.; Peterson, C.; Rosselot, D.; Sandison, G.; Shen, R.N.; Shidnia, H.

    1993-01-01

    A fixed horizontal beam line at the Indiana University cyclotron facility (IUCF) has been equipped for proton radiation therapy treatment of head, neck, and brain tumors. The complete system will be commissioned and ready to treat patients early in 1993. IUCF can produce external proton beams from 45 to 200 MeV in energy, which corresponds to a maximum range in water of 26 cm. Beam currents over 100 nA are easily attained, allowing dose rates in excess of 200 cGy/min, even for large fields. Beam spreading systems have been tested which provide uniform fields up to 20 cm in diameter. Range modulation is accomplished with a rotating acrylic device, which provides uniform depth dose distributions from 3 to 18 cm in extent. Tests have been conducted on detectors which monitor the beam position and current, and the dose symmetry. This report discusses those devices, as well as the cyclotron characteristics, measured beam properties, safety interlocks, computerized dose delivery/monitoring system, and future plans. (orig.)

  6. Flame detector operable in presence of proton radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, D. J.; Turnage, J. E.; Linford, R. M. F.; Cornish, S. D. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A detector of ultraviolet radiation for operation in a space vehicle which orbits through high intensity radiation areas is described. Two identical ultraviolet sensor tubes are mounted within a shield which limits to acceptable levels the amount of proton radiation reaching the sensor tubes. The shield has an opening which permits ultraviolet radiation to reach one of the sensing tubes. The shield keeps ultraviolet radiation from reaching the other sensor tube, designated the reference tube. The circuitry of the detector subtracts the output of the reference tube from the output of the sensing tube, and any portion of the output of the sensing tube which is due to proton radiation is offset by the output of the reference tube. A delay circuit in the detector prevents false alarms by keeping statistical variations in the proton radiation sensed by the two sensor tubes from developing an output signal.

  7. Spatial characterization of relativistic electron enhancements in the Earth's outer radiation belt during the Van Allen Probes era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, V. A.; Bortnik, J.; Moya, P. S.; Lyons, L. R.; Sibeck, D. G.; Kanekal, S. G.

    2017-12-01

    Using Van Allen Probes Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope (REPT) instrument we have identified 73 relativistic electron enhancement events in the outer radiation belt that occurred at different L values between L = 2.5 and L = 6.0. To determine an enhancement, we have used three different identification methods. We then determine the radial location, MLT location, timing and strength of those enhancements. We discuss the differences of each of the methods and test them to pinpoint the origin and spatial propagation of each enhancement. We have classified the events based on the radial propagation, speed of enhancement and intensity of fluxes and response for energy channels ranging from 1.8 MeV to 6.3 MeV. In addition, we have used OMNI data to study the statistical properties of the solar wind during each event and have classified similarities and differences that might be relevant for each group of enhancements and help us determine the physical process responsible for different types of enhancements. Additionally, we have used >2 MeV electron fluxes at geostationary orbit as measured by the GOES 13 and 15 Energetic Particle Sensor (EPS) instrument to compare our results with the geostationary orbit. Our results suggest that under certain conditions GOES data can be used to predict fluxes at the core of the radiation belt and vice-versa.

  8. Quasilinear simulation of auroral kilometric radiation by a relativistic Fokker-Planck code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Y.

    1991-01-01

    An intense terrestrial radiation called the auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) is believed to be generated by cyclotron maser instability. We study a quasilinear evolution of this instability by means of a two-dimensional relativistic Fokker-Planck code which treats waves and distributions self-consistently, including radiation loss and electron source and sink. We compare the distributions and wave amplitude with spacecraft observations to elucidate physical processes involved. 3 refs., 1 fig

  9. Neutrino radiation-hydrodynamics. General relativistic versus multidimensional supernova simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebendoerfer, Matthias; Fischer, Tobias; Hempel, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Recently, simulations of the collapse of massive stars showed that selected models of the QCD phase transitions to deconfined quarks during the early postbounce phase can trigger the supernova explosion that has been searched for over many years in spherically symmetric supernova models. Using sophisticated general relativistic Boltzmann neutrino transport, it was found that a characteristic neutrino signature is emitted that permits to falsify or identify this scenario in the next Galactic supernova event. On the other hand, more refined observations of past supernovae and progressing theoretical research in different supernova groups demonstrated that the effects of multidimensional fluid instabilities cannot be neglected in global models of the explosions of massive stars. We point to different efforts where neutrino transport and general relativistic effects are combined with multidimensional fluid instabilities in supernovae. With those, it will be possible to explore the gravitational wave emission as a potential second characteristic observable of the presence of quark matter in new-born neutron stars. (author)

  10. The radiation environment of proton accelerators and storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, G.R.

    1976-01-01

    These lecture notes survey the physical processes that give rise to the stray-radiation environment of proton synchrotrons and storage rings, with emphasis on their importance for radiation protection. The origins of the prompt radiation field (which disappears when the accelerator is switched off) are described in some detail: proton-nucleus interactions, extranuclear cascades, muon generation and transport. The effects of induced radioactivity in the accelerator structure and surroundings, notably in iron, concrete, air, and water, are discussed and methods for monitoring hadrons in the radiation environment outside the accelerator are listed. Seventy-six references to the literature are included. (Author)

  11. Radiation environment of proton accelerators and storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, G R

    1976-03-08

    These lecture notes survey the physical processes that give rise to the stray-radiation environment of proton synchrotrons and storage rings, with emphasis on their importance for radiation protection. The origins of the prompt radiation field (which disappears when the accelerator is switched off) are described in some detail: proton-nucleus interactions, extranuclear cascades, muon generation and transport. The effects of induced radioactivity in the accelerator structure and surroundings, notably in iron, concrete, air, and water, are discussed, and methods for monitoring hadrons in the radiation environment outside the accelerator are listed. Seventy-six references to the literature are included.

  12. General relativistic radiative transfer code in rotating black hole space-time: ARTIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Rohta; Umemura, Masayuki

    2017-02-01

    We present a general relativistic radiative transfer code, ARTIST (Authentic Radiative Transfer In Space-Time), that is a perfectly causal scheme to pursue the propagation of radiation with absorption and scattering around a Kerr black hole. The code explicitly solves the invariant radiation intensity along null geodesics in the Kerr-Schild coordinates, and therefore properly includes light bending, Doppler boosting, frame dragging, and gravitational redshifts. The notable aspect of ARTIST is that it conserves the radiative energy with high accuracy, and is not subject to the numerical diffusion, since the transfer is solved on long characteristics along null geodesics. We first solve the wavefront propagation around a Kerr black hole that was originally explored by Hanni. This demonstrates repeated wavefront collisions, light bending, and causal propagation of radiation with the speed of light. We show that the decay rate of the total energy of wavefronts near a black hole is determined solely by the black hole spin in late phases, in agreement with analytic expectations. As a result, the ARTIST turns out to correctly solve the general relativistic radiation fields until late phases as t ˜ 90 M. We also explore the effects of absorption and scattering, and apply this code for a photon wall problem and an orbiting hotspot problem. All the simulations in this study are performed in the equatorial plane around a Kerr black hole. The ARTIST is the first step to realize the general relativistic radiation hydrodynamics.

  13. PROTON RADIATION THERAPY: CLINICAL APPLICATION OPPORTUNITIES AND RESEARCH PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Zabelin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is the review of literature concerning use of proton beam therapy in treatment of oncology. The staticized data on comparison of effi ciency of this method at an eye melanoma are lit. Advantages of proton therapy on the level of local control and depression of frequency of development of the radio induced cataract are refl ected in the provided data. In evident material the technology of preparation and carrying out radiation of an eye is shortly covered with a fascicle of protons. The experience of use of proton therapy of tumors of a skull base got for the last several decades, showed good results. Physical properties of a fascicle of protons allow to achieve the maximum dose conformality, having lowered, thereby, a radial load on the next crucial anatomical structures. The presented material on an oncopediatrics shows insuffi cient knowledge of scientists concerning advantage of a fascicle of protons over modern methods of photon radiation. There are only preliminary clinical results concerning generally of treatment of cranyopharyngiomas. At cancer therapy of a mammary gland, proton therapy showed the best local control of postoperative recurrent tumors, and also depression of a dose load on the contralateral party. The available results of the retrospective analysis of clinical data in the University medical center of Lome Linda, testify to advantages of proton therapy of the localized prostate cancer. The lack of a biochemical recurrence and a local tumoral progression within 5 years after radiation was shown. The data obtained from experience of use of proton radiation therapy with passively scattered fascicle for cancer therapy of a prostate at an early stage showed the admixed results in comparison with modern methods of radiation therapy with the modulated intensity. In treatment of non-small cell cancer of mild advantage of proton therapy aren’t absolutely proved yet. There are data on extreme toxicity of a combination

  14. The virtual enhancements - solar proton event radiation (VESPER) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminalragia-Giamini, Sigiava; Sandberg, Ingmar; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Jiggens, Piers

    2018-02-01

    A new probabilistic model introducing a novel paradigm for the modelling of the solar proton environment at 1 AU is presented. The virtual enhancements - solar proton event radiation model (VESPER) uses the European space agency's solar energetic particle environment modelling (SEPEM) Reference Dataset and produces virtual time-series of proton differential fluxes. In this regard it fundamentally diverges from the approach of existing SPE models that are based on probabilistic descriptions of SPE macroscopic characteristics such as peak flux and cumulative fluence. It is shown that VESPER reproduces well the dataset characteristics it uses, and further comparisons with existing models are made with respect to their results. The production of time-series as the main output of the model opens a straightforward way for the calculation of solar proton radiation effects in terms of time-series and the pairing with effects caused by trapped radiation and galactic cosmic rays.

  15. Proton flux under radiation belts: near-equatorial zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoryan, O.R.; Panasyuk, M.I.; Petrov, A.N.; Kudela, K.

    2005-01-01

    In this work the features of low-energy proton flux increases in near-equatorial region (McIlvein parameter L th the proton flux (with energy from tens keV up to several MeV) increases are registering regularly. However modern proton flux models (for example AP8 model) works at L>1.15 only and does not take into account near-equatorial protons. These fluxes are not too big, but the investigation of this phenomenon is important in scope of atmosphere-ionosphere connections and mechanisms of particles transport in magnetosphere. In according to double charge-exchange model the proton flux in near-equatorial region does not depend on geomagnetic local time (MLT) and longitude. However the Azur satellite data and Kosmos-484, MIR station and Active satellite data revealed the proton flux dependence on longitude. The other feature of near-equatorial proton flux is the dependence on geomagnetic local time revealed in the Sampex satellite experiment and other experiments listed above. In this work the dependences on MLT and longitude are investigated using the Active satellite (30-500 keV) and Sampex satellite (>800 keV). This data confirms that main sources of near-equatorial protons are radiation belts and ring current. The other result is that near-equatorial protons are quasi-trapped. The empirical proton flux dependences on L, B at near-equatorial longitudes are presented. (author)

  16. Radiation reaction for the classical relativistic spinning particle in scalar, tensor and linearized gravitational fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barut, A.O.; Cruz, M.G.

    1992-08-01

    We use the method of analytic continuation of the equation of motion including the self-fields to evaluate the radiation reaction for a classical relativistic spinning point particle in interaction with scalar, tensor and linearized gravitational fields in flat spacetime. In the limit these equations reduce to those of spinless particles. We also show the renormalizability of these theories. (author). 10 refs

  17. On the Stability of L4,5 in the Relativistic R3BP with Radiating ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper discusses the motion of a test particle in the neigh- bourhood of the triangular points L4,5 by considering the less massive primary (secondary) as a source of radiation in the framework of the relativistic restricted three-body problem (R3BP). It is found that the positions and stability of the triangular point ...

  18. Relativistic radiative transfer in a moving stratus irradiated by a luminous flat source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukue, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Relativistic radiative transfer in a geometrically thin stratus (sheet-like gaseous cloud with finite optical depth), which is moving at a relativistic speed around a luminous flat source, such as accretion disks, and is irradiated by the source, is examined under the special relativistic treatment. Incident radiation is aberrated and Doppler-shifted when it is received by the stratus, and emitted radiation is also aberrated and Doppler-shifted when it leaves the stratus. Considering these relativistic effects, we analytically obtain the emergent intensity as well as other radiative quantities in the purely scattering case for both infinite and finite strati. We mainly consider the frequency-integrated case, but also briefly show the frequency-dependent one. We also solve the relativistic radiative transfer equation numerically, and compare the results with the analytical solutions. In the infinite stratus, the mean intensity in the comoving and inertial frames decreases and becomes constant, as the stratus speed increases. The flux in the comoving frame decreases exponentially with the optical depth. The emergent intensity decreases as the speed increases, since the incident photons are redshifted at the bottom-side of the stratus. In the finite stratus, the mean intensity in the comoving and inertial frames quickly increases in the top-side region due to the aberrated photons. The flux in the comoving frame is positive in the range of 0 negative for β ≳ 0.5. The behavior of the emergent intensity is similar to that of the infinite case, although there is an irradiation effect caused by the aberrated photons.

  19. Radiation at planar channeling of relativistic electrons in thick crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baier, V.N.; Katkov, V.M.; Strakhovenko, V.M.

    1983-01-01

    The distribution kinetics with respect to the transverse energy at electron channeling is discussed. The asymptotic expressions for the radiation intensity into a given collimator at electron channeling in thick crystals are derived. An optimal thickness at which the radiation output is maximal is found. The spectral distribution of the radiation intensity is analysed for the case of a single diamond crystal. (author)

  20. Radiation effects on relativistic electrons in strong external fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    The effects of radiation of high energy electron beams are a major issue in almost all types of charged particle accelerators. The objective of this thesis is both the analytical and numerical study of radiation effects. Due to its many applications the study of the self force has become a very active and productive field of research. The main part of this thesis is devoted to the study of radiation effects in laser-based plasma accelerators. Analytical models predict the existence of radiation effects. The investigation of radiation reaction show that in laser-based plasma accelerators, the self force effects lower the energy gain and emittance for moderate energies electron beams and increase the relative energy spread. However, for relatively high energy electron beams, the self radiation and retardation (radiation effects of one electron on the other electron of the system) effects increase the transverse emittance of the beam. The energy gain decreases to even lower value and relative energy spread increases to even higher value due to high radiation losses. The second part of this thesis investigates with radiation reaction in focused laser beams. Radiation effects are very weak even for high energy electrons. The radiation-free acceleration and the simple practical setup make direct acceleration in a focused laser beam very attractive. The results presented in this thesis can be helpful for the optimization of future electron acceleration experiments, in particular in the case of laser-plasma accelerators.

  1. Radiative electron capture studied in relativistic heavy-ion--atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoehlker, T.; Kozhuharov, C.; Mokler, P.H.; Warczak, A.; Bosch, F.; Geissel, H.; Moshammer, R.; Scheidenberger, C.; Eichler, J.; Ichihara, A.; Shirai, T.; Stachura, Z.; Rymuza, P.

    1995-01-01

    The process of radiative electron capture (REC) in relativistic collisions of high-Z ions with low-Z gaseous and solid targets is studied experimentally and theoretically. The observed x-ray spectra are analyzed with respect to photon angular distributions as well as to total K-REC cross sections. The experimental results for angle-differential cross sections are well reproduced by exact relativistic calculations which yield significant deviations from standard sin 2 θ distributions. Total cross sections for K-REC are shown to follow a simple scaling rule obtained from exact relativistic calculations as well as from a nonrelativistic dipole approximation. The agreement between these different theoretical approaches must be regarded as fortuitous, but it lends support to the use of the nonrelativistic approach for practical purposes

  2. Proton radiation therapy for clivus chordoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Yoshihiko; Tsunoda, Takashi; Hyodo, Akio; Nose, Tadao; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Inada, Tetsuo; Maruhashi, Akira; Hayakawa, Yoshinori.

    1993-01-01

    A 57-year-old male with clival chordoma developed severe hoarseness, dysphagia, and dysphonia 1 month after a second removal of the tumor. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a mass 10 cm in diameter in the region of the middle clivus enhanced inhomogeneously by gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid, and a defect in the skull base. There was evidence of compression of the anterior surface of the pons. He received proton irradiation employing a pair of parallel opposed lateral proton beams. The dose aimed at the tumor mass was 75.5 Gy, to the pharyngeal wall less than 38 Gy, and to the anterior portion of the pons less than 30 Gy. Time dose and fractionation factor was calculated at 148. Thirty-one months following treatment, he was free of clinical neurological sequelae. Proton therapy should be considered in treatment planning following initial surgical removal or for inoperable clivus chordoma. (author)

  3. Non-thermal particle acceleration in collisionless relativistic electron-proton reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, G. R.; Uzdensky, D. A.; Begelman, M. C.; Cerutti, B.; Nalewajko, K.

    2018-02-01

    Magnetic reconnection in relativistic collisionless plasmas can accelerate particles and power high-energy emission in various astrophysical systems. Whereas most previous studies focused on relativistic reconnection in pair plasmas, less attention has been paid to electron-ion plasma reconnection, expected in black hole accretion flows and relativistic jets. We report a comprehensive particle-in-cell numerical investigation of reconnection in an electron-ion plasma, spanning a wide range of ambient ion magnetizations σi, from the semirelativistic regime (ultrarelativistic electrons but non-relativistic ions, 10-3 ≪ σi ≪ 1) to the fully relativistic regime (both species are ultrarelativistic, σi ≫ 1). We investigate how the reconnection rate, electron and ion plasma flows, electric and magnetic field structures, electron/ion energy partitioning, and non-thermal particle acceleration depend on σi. Our key findings are: (1) the reconnection rate is about 0.1 of the Alfvénic rate across all regimes; (2) electrons can form concentrated moderately relativistic outflows even in the semirelativistic, small-σi regime; (3) while the released magnetic energy is partitioned equally between electrons and ions in the ultrarelativistic limit, the electron energy fraction declines gradually with decreased σi and asymptotes to about 0.25 in the semirelativistic regime; and (4) reconnection leads to efficient non-thermal electron acceleration with a σi-dependent power-law index, p(σ _i)˜eq const+0.7σ _i^{-1/2}. These findings are important for understanding black hole systems and lend support to semirelativistic reconnection models for powering non-thermal emission in blazar jets, offering a natural explanation for the spectral indices observed in these systems.

  4. A NUMERICAL TREATMENT OF ANISOTROPIC RADIATION FIELDS COUPLED WITH RELATIVISTIC RESISTIVE MAGNETOFLUIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki R. [Center for Computational Astrophysics, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Ohsuga, Ken [Division of Theoretical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2013-08-01

    We develop a numerical scheme for solving fully special relativistic, resistive radiation magnetohydrodynamics. Our code guarantees conservation of total mass, momentum, and energy. The radiation energy density and the radiation flux are consistently updated using the M-1 closure method, which can resolve an anisotropic radiation field, in contrast to the Eddington approximation, as well as the flux-limited diffusion approximation. For the resistive part, we adopt a simple form of Ohm's law. The advection terms are explicitly solved with an approximate Riemann solver, mainly the Harten-Lax-van Leer scheme; the HLLC and HLLD schemes are also solved for some tests. The source terms, which describe the gas-radiation interaction and the magnetic energy dissipation, are implicitly integrated, relaxing the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition even in an optically thick regime or a large magnetic Reynolds number regime. Although we need to invert 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 matrices (for the gas-radiation interaction) and 3 Multiplication-Sign 3 matrices (for the magnetic energy dissipation) at each grid point for implicit integration, they are obtained analytically without preventing massive parallel computing. We show that our code gives reasonable outcomes in numerical tests for ideal magnetohydrodynamics, propagating radiation, and radiation hydrodynamics. We also applied our resistive code to the relativistic Petschek-type magnetic reconnection, revealing the reduction of the reconnection rate via radiation drag.

  5. A NUMERICAL TREATMENT OF ANISOTROPIC RADIATION FIELDS COUPLED WITH RELATIVISTIC RESISTIVE MAGNETOFLUIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki R.; Ohsuga, Ken

    2013-01-01

    We develop a numerical scheme for solving fully special relativistic, resistive radiation magnetohydrodynamics. Our code guarantees conservation of total mass, momentum, and energy. The radiation energy density and the radiation flux are consistently updated using the M-1 closure method, which can resolve an anisotropic radiation field, in contrast to the Eddington approximation, as well as the flux-limited diffusion approximation. For the resistive part, we adopt a simple form of Ohm's law. The advection terms are explicitly solved with an approximate Riemann solver, mainly the Harten-Lax-van Leer scheme; the HLLC and HLLD schemes are also solved for some tests. The source terms, which describe the gas-radiation interaction and the magnetic energy dissipation, are implicitly integrated, relaxing the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition even in an optically thick regime or a large magnetic Reynolds number regime. Although we need to invert 4 × 4 matrices (for the gas-radiation interaction) and 3 × 3 matrices (for the magnetic energy dissipation) at each grid point for implicit integration, they are obtained analytically without preventing massive parallel computing. We show that our code gives reasonable outcomes in numerical tests for ideal magnetohydrodynamics, propagating radiation, and radiation hydrodynamics. We also applied our resistive code to the relativistic Petschek-type magnetic reconnection, revealing the reduction of the reconnection rate via radiation drag

  6. HEROIC: 3D general relativistic radiative post-processor with comptonization for black hole accretion discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Ramesh; Zhu, Yucong; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Saḑowski, Aleksander

    2016-03-01

    We describe Hybrid Evaluator for Radiative Objects Including Comptonization (HEROIC), an upgraded version of the relativistic radiative post-processor code HERO described in a previous paper, but which now Includes Comptonization. HEROIC models Comptonization via the Kompaneets equation, using a quadratic approximation for the source function in a short characteristics radiation solver. It employs a simple form of accelerated lambda iteration to handle regions of high scattering opacity. In addition to solving for the radiation field, HEROIC also solves for the gas temperature by applying the condition of radiative equilibrium. We present benchmarks and tests of the Comptonization module in HEROIC with simple 1D and 3D scattering problems. We also test the ability of the code to handle various relativistic effects using model atmospheres and accretion flows in a black hole space-time. We present two applications of HEROIC to general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics simulations of accretion discs. One application is to a thin accretion disc around a black hole. We find that the gas below the photosphere in the multidimensional HEROIC solution is nearly isothermal, quite different from previous solutions based on 1D plane parallel atmospheres. The second application is to a geometrically thick radiation-dominated accretion disc accreting at 11 times the Eddington rate. Here, the multidimensional HEROIC solution shows that, for observers who are on axis and look down the polar funnel, the isotropic equivalent luminosity could be more than 10 times the Eddington limit, even though the spectrum might still look thermal and show no signs of relativistic beaming.

  7. Radiation belt seed population and its association with the relativistic electron dynamics: A statistical study: Radiation Belt Seed Population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, C. L.; Wang, Y. X.; Ni, B.; Zhang, J.-C.

    2017-01-01

    Using the Van Allen Probes data, we study the radiation belt seed population and it associated with the relativistic electron dynamics during 74 geomagnetic storm events. Based on the flux changes of 1 MeV electrons before and after the storm peak, these storm events are divided into two groups of “non-preconditioned” and “preconditioned”. The statistical study shows that the storm intensity is of significant importance for the distribution of the seed population (336 keV electrons) in the outer radiation belt. However, substorm intensity can also be important to the evolution of the seed population for some geomagnetic storm events. For non-preconditioned storm events, the correlation between the peak fluxes and their L-shell locations of the seed population and relativistic electrons (592 keV, 1.0 MeV, 1.8 MeV, and 2.1 MeV) is consistent with the energy-dependent dynamic processes in the outer radiation belt. For preconditioned storm events, the correlation between the features of the seed population and relativistic electrons is not fully consistent with the energy-dependent processes. It is suggested that the good correlation between the radiation belt seed population and ≤1.0 MeV electrons contributes to the prediction of the evolution of ≤1.0 MeV electrons in the Earth’s outer radiation belt during periods of geomagnetic storms.

  8. Influence of ions on relativistic double layers radiation in astrophysical plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AM Ahadi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available As double layers (DLs are one of the most important acceleration mechanisms in space as well as in laboratory plasmas, they are studied from different points of view. In this paper, the emitted power and energy radiated from charged particles, accelerated in relativistic cosmic DLs are investigated. The effect of the presence of additional ions in a multi-species plasma, as a real example of astrophysical plasma, is also investigated. Considering the acceleration role of DLs, radiations from accelerated charged particles could be seen as a loss mechanism. These radiations are influenced directly by the additional ion species as well as their relative densities.

  9. Exact relativistic solution of disordered radiation with planar symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, A.F. Da F.; Wolk, I.; Som, M.M.

    1977-01-01

    An exact solution of the Einstein equations corresponding to and equilibrium distribution of disordered electromagnetic radiation with planar symmetry is obtained. This equilibrium is due solely to the gravitational and pressure effects inherent to the radiation. The distribution of radiation is found to be maximum and finite at the plane of symmetry, and to decrease monotonically in directions normal to this plane. The solution tends asymptotically to the static plane symmetric vacuum solution obtained by Levi-Civita (Atti. Accad. Naz. Lincei Rc.; 27:240 (1918)). Time-like and null geodesics are discussed. (author)

  10. A NUMERICAL SCHEME FOR SPECIAL RELATIVISTIC RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS BASED ON SOLVING THE TIME-DEPENDENT RADIATIVE TRANSFER EQUATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohsuga, Ken; Takahashi, Hiroyuki R. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2016-02-20

    We develop a numerical scheme for solving the equations of fully special relativistic, radiation magnetohydrodynamics (MHDs), in which the frequency-integrated, time-dependent radiation transfer equation is solved to calculate the specific intensity. The radiation energy density, the radiation flux, and the radiation stress tensor are obtained by the angular quadrature of the intensity. In the present method, conservation of total mass, momentum, and energy of the radiation magnetofluids is guaranteed. We treat not only the isotropic scattering but also the Thomson scattering. The numerical method of MHDs is the same as that of our previous work. The advection terms are explicitly solved, and the source terms, which describe the gas–radiation interaction, are implicitly integrated. Our code is suitable for massive parallel computing. We present that our code shows reasonable results in some numerical tests for propagating radiation and radiation hydrodynamics. Particularly, the correct solution is given even in the optically very thin or moderately thin regimes, and the special relativistic effects are nicely reproduced.

  11. Transmutation of.pub.239 Pu and other nuclides using spallation neutrons produced by relativistic protons reacting with massive U- and Pb-targets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adam, Jindřich; Adloff, J. C.; Balabekyan, A.; Bamblevski, V. P.; Barabanov, M. Y.; Brandt, R.; Bradnova, V.; Chaloun, P.; Debeauvais, M.; Dwivedi, K. K.; Guo, S. L.; Hashemi-Nezhad, R. S.; Hella, K. M.; Kalinnikov, V. G.; Kievets, M. K.; Krivopustov, M. I.; Kulakov, B. A.; Langrock, E. J.; Li, Li.; Lomonosova, E. M.; Modolo, G.; Odoj, R.; Perelygin, V. P.; Pronskikh, V. S.; Solnyshkin, A. A.; Sosnin, A. N.; Stegailov, V. I.; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V. M.; Vater, P.; Wan, J. S.; Westmeier, W.; Zamani-Valasiadou, M.; Zhuk, I. V.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 90, - (2002), s. 441-442 ISSN 0033-8230 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK1048102 Keywords : relativistic protons * transmutation * subcritical nuclear systems * long-lived radiactive waste Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.809, year: 2002

  12. Effect of Vavilov–Cherenkov radiation cone transformation upon entry of a relativistic electron into a substance layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishchin, I. A.; Kubankin, A. S., E-mail: kubankin@bsu.edu.ru; Nikulicheva, T. B.; Al-Omari; Sotnikov, A. V.; Starovoitov, A. S. [Belgorod National Research University (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    Transformation of the Vavilov–Cherenkov radiation cone under grazing interaction of a relativistic electron with a layer of substance is theoretically studied. It is shown that this effect can occur when the electron enters the substance layer.

  13. Fine features of parametric X-ray radiation by relativistic electrons and ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.B. Korotchenko

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In present work within the frame of dynamic theory for parametric X-ray radiation in two-beam approximation we have presented detailed studies on parametric radiation emitted by relativistic both electrons and ions at channeling in crystals that is highly requested at planned experiments. The analysis done has shown that the intensity of radiation at relativistic electron channeling in Si (110 with respect to the conventional parametric radiation intensity has up to 5% uncertainty, while the error of approximate formulas for calculating parametric X-ray radiation maxima does not exceed 1.2%. We have demonstrated that simple expressions for the Fourier components of Si crystal susceptibility χ0 and χgσ could be reduced, as well as the temperature dependence for radiation maxima in Si crystal (diffraction plane (110 within Debye model. Moreover, for any types of channeled ions it is shown that the parametric X-ray radiation intensity is proportional to z2−b(Z,z/z with the function b(Z,z depending on the screening parameter and the ion charge number z=Z−Ze.

  14. Radiation Environment Model of Protons and Heavier Ions at Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Luz Maria Martinez; Garrett, Henry B.; Jun, Insoo

    2015-01-01

    We performed an in depth study of the methods used to review the geometric factors (GF) and sensitivity to charge particles of the Energetic Particle Detector instrument on board the Galileo Spacecraft. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to understand the interactions of electrons and ions (i. e., protons and alphas) with the sensitive regions of the instrument. The DC0 and B0 channels were studied with the intention of using them to update the jovian proton radiation model. The results proved that the B0 is a clean proton chanel without any concerns for contamination by heavier ions and electrons. In contrast, DC0 was found to be contaminated by electrons. Furthermore, we also found out that the B2 channel is a clean alpha particle channel (in other words, no contamination by electrons and/or protons).

  15. Correlation between morphology, water uptake, and proton conductivity in radiation-grafted proton-exchange membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balog, Sandor; Gasser, Urs; Mortensen, Kell

    2010-01-01

    An SANS investigation of hydrated proton exchange membranes is presented. Our membranes were synthesized by radiation-induced grafting of ETFE with styrene in the presence of a crosslinker, followed by sulfonation of the styrene. The contrast variation method was used to understand the relationship...

  16. Radiation shielding for 250 MeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awschalom, M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper is targetted at personnel who have the responsibility of designing the radiation shielding against neutron fluences created when protons interact with matter. Shielding of walls and roofs are discussed, as well as neutron dose leakage through labyrinths. Experimental data on neutron flux attenuation are considered, as well as some calculations using the intranuclear cascade calculations and parameterizations

  17. Monte Carlo closure for moment-based transport schemes in general relativistic radiation hydrodynamic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucart, Francois

    2018-04-01

    General relativistic radiation hydrodynamic simulations are necessary to accurately model a number of astrophysical systems involving black holes and neutron stars. Photon transport plays a crucial role in radiatively dominated accretion discs, while neutrino transport is critical to core-collapse supernovae and to the modelling of electromagnetic transients and nucleosynthesis in neutron star mergers. However, evolving the full Boltzmann equations of radiative transport is extremely expensive. Here, we describe the implementation in the general relativistic SPEC code of a cheaper radiation hydrodynamic method that theoretically converges to a solution of Boltzmann's equation in the limit of infinite numerical resources. The algorithm is based on a grey two-moment scheme, in which we evolve the energy density and momentum density of the radiation. Two-moment schemes require a closure that fills in missing information about the energy spectrum and higher order moments of the radiation. Instead of the approximate analytical closure currently used in core-collapse and merger simulations, we complement the two-moment scheme with a low-accuracy Monte Carlo evolution. The Monte Carlo results can provide any or all of the missing information in the evolution of the moments, as desired by the user. As a first test of our methods, we study a set of idealized problems demonstrating that our algorithm performs significantly better than existing analytical closures. We also discuss the current limitations of our method, in particular open questions regarding the stability of the fully coupled scheme.

  18. Influence of multiple scattering of a relativistic electron in a periodic layered medium on coherent X-ray radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazhevich, S. V.; Kos’kova, T. V.; Noskov, A. V., E-mail: noskovbupk@mail.ru [Belgorod State National Research University (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    A dynamic theory of coherent X-ray radiation generated in a periodic layered medium by a relativistic electron multiply scattered by target atoms has been developed. The expressions describing the spectral–angular characteristics of parametric X-ray radiation and diffracted transition radiation are derived. Numerical calculations based on the derived expressions have been performed.

  19. Non-relativistic limit in a model of radiative flow

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nečasová, Šárka; Ducomet, B.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 2 (2015), s. 117-137 ISSN 0174-4747 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00522S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : radiation hydrodynamics * Navier-Stokes-Fourier system * weak solution Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/anly.2015.35.issue-2/anly-2012-1295/anly-2012-1295.xml

  20. Non-relativistic limit in a model of radiative flow

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nečasová, Šárka; Ducomet, B.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 2 (2015), s. 117-137 ISSN 0174-4747 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00522S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : radiation hydrodynamics * Navier-Stokes-Fourier system * weak solution Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/anly.2015.35.issue-2/anly-2012-1295/anly-2012-1295. xml

  1. Total yield of channeling radiation from relativistic electrons in thin Si and W crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdrashitov, S.V.; Bogdanov, O.V.; Dabagov, S.B.; Pivovarov, Yu.L.; Tukhfatullin, T.A.

    2013-01-01

    Orientation dependences of channeling radiation total yield from relativistic 155–855 MeV electrons at both 〈1 0 0〉 axial and (1 0 0) planar channeling in thin silicon and tungsten crystals are studied by means of computer simulations. The model as well as computer code developed allows getting the quantitative results for orientation dependence of channeling radiation that can be used for crystal alignment in channeling experiments and/or for diagnostics of initial angular divergence of electron beam

  2. Is the GeV-TeV emission of PKS 0447-439 from the proton synchrotron radiation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Quan-Gui; Lu, Fang-Wu; Ma, Ju; Ren, Ji-Yang; Li, Huai-Zhen

    2018-06-01

    We study the multi-wavelength emission features of PKS 0447-439 in the frame of the one-zone homogeneous lepto-hadronic model. In this model, we assumed that the steady power-laws with exponential cut-offs distributions of protons and electrons are injected into the source. The non-linear time-dependent kinematic equations, describing the evolution of protons, electrons and photons, are defined; these equations self-consistently involve synchrotron radiation of protons, photon-photon interaction, synchrotron radiation of electron/positron pairs, inverse Compton scattering and synchrotron self-absorption. The model is applied to reproduce the multi-wavelength spectrum of PKS 0447-439. Our results indicate that the spectral energy distribution (SED) of PKS 0447-439 can be reproduced well by the model. In particular, the GeV-TeV emission is produced by the synchrotron radiation of relativistic protons. The physically plausible solutions require the magnetic strength 10 G≲ B ≲ 100 G. We found that the observed spectrum of PKS 0447-439 can be reproduced well by the model whether z = 0.16 or z = 0.2, and the acceptable upper limit of redshift is z=0.343.

  3. Gamma-Ray Burst Dynamics and Afterglow Radiation from Adaptive Mesh Refinement, Special Relativistic Hydrodynamic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Colle, Fabio; Granot, Jonathan; López-Cámara, Diego; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2012-02-01

    We report on the development of Mezcal-SRHD, a new adaptive mesh refinement, special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) code, developed with the aim of studying the highly relativistic flows in gamma-ray burst sources. The SRHD equations are solved using finite-volume conservative solvers, with second-order interpolation in space and time. The correct implementation of the algorithms is verified by one-dimensional (1D) and multi-dimensional tests. The code is then applied to study the propagation of 1D spherical impulsive blast waves expanding in a stratified medium with ρvpropr -k , bridging between the relativistic and Newtonian phases (which are described by the Blandford-McKee and Sedov-Taylor self-similar solutions, respectively), as well as to a two-dimensional (2D) cylindrically symmetric impulsive jet propagating in a constant density medium. It is shown that the deceleration to nonrelativistic speeds in one dimension occurs on scales significantly larger than the Sedov length. This transition is further delayed with respect to the Sedov length as the degree of stratification of the ambient medium is increased. This result, together with the scaling of position, Lorentz factor, and the shock velocity as a function of time and shock radius, is explained here using a simple analytical model based on energy conservation. The method used for calculating the afterglow radiation by post-processing the results of the simulations is described in detail. The light curves computed using the results of 1D numerical simulations during the relativistic stage correctly reproduce those calculated assuming the self-similar Blandford-McKee solution for the evolution of the flow. The jet dynamics from our 2D simulations and the resulting afterglow light curves, including the jet break, are in good agreement with those presented in previous works. Finally, we show how the details of the dynamics critically depend on properly resolving the structure of the relativistic flow.

  4. GAMMA-RAY BURST DYNAMICS AND AFTERGLOW RADIATION FROM ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT, SPECIAL RELATIVISTIC HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Colle, Fabio; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Granot, Jonathan; López-Cámara, Diego

    2012-01-01

    We report on the development of Mezcal-SRHD, a new adaptive mesh refinement, special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) code, developed with the aim of studying the highly relativistic flows in gamma-ray burst sources. The SRHD equations are solved using finite-volume conservative solvers, with second-order interpolation in space and time. The correct implementation of the algorithms is verified by one-dimensional (1D) and multi-dimensional tests. The code is then applied to study the propagation of 1D spherical impulsive blast waves expanding in a stratified medium with ρ∝r –k , bridging between the relativistic and Newtonian phases (which are described by the Blandford-McKee and Sedov-Taylor self-similar solutions, respectively), as well as to a two-dimensional (2D) cylindrically symmetric impulsive jet propagating in a constant density medium. It is shown that the deceleration to nonrelativistic speeds in one dimension occurs on scales significantly larger than the Sedov length. This transition is further delayed with respect to the Sedov length as the degree of stratification of the ambient medium is increased. This result, together with the scaling of position, Lorentz factor, and the shock velocity as a function of time and shock radius, is explained here using a simple analytical model based on energy conservation. The method used for calculating the afterglow radiation by post-processing the results of the simulations is described in detail. The light curves computed using the results of 1D numerical simulations during the relativistic stage correctly reproduce those calculated assuming the self-similar Blandford-McKee solution for the evolution of the flow. The jet dynamics from our 2D simulations and the resulting afterglow light curves, including the jet break, are in good agreement with those presented in previous works. Finally, we show how the details of the dynamics critically depend on properly resolving the structure of the relativistic flow.

  5. GAMMA-RAY BURST DYNAMICS AND AFTERGLOW RADIATION FROM ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT, SPECIAL RELATIVISTIC HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Colle, Fabio; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico [Astronomy and Astrophysics Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Granot, Jonathan [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Lopez-Camara, Diego [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ap. 70-543, 04510 D.F. (Mexico)

    2012-02-20

    We report on the development of Mezcal-SRHD, a new adaptive mesh refinement, special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) code, developed with the aim of studying the highly relativistic flows in gamma-ray burst sources. The SRHD equations are solved using finite-volume conservative solvers, with second-order interpolation in space and time. The correct implementation of the algorithms is verified by one-dimensional (1D) and multi-dimensional tests. The code is then applied to study the propagation of 1D spherical impulsive blast waves expanding in a stratified medium with {rho}{proportional_to}r{sup -k}, bridging between the relativistic and Newtonian phases (which are described by the Blandford-McKee and Sedov-Taylor self-similar solutions, respectively), as well as to a two-dimensional (2D) cylindrically symmetric impulsive jet propagating in a constant density medium. It is shown that the deceleration to nonrelativistic speeds in one dimension occurs on scales significantly larger than the Sedov length. This transition is further delayed with respect to the Sedov length as the degree of stratification of the ambient medium is increased. This result, together with the scaling of position, Lorentz factor, and the shock velocity as a function of time and shock radius, is explained here using a simple analytical model based on energy conservation. The method used for calculating the afterglow radiation by post-processing the results of the simulations is described in detail. The light curves computed using the results of 1D numerical simulations during the relativistic stage correctly reproduce those calculated assuming the self-similar Blandford-McKee solution for the evolution of the flow. The jet dynamics from our 2D simulations and the resulting afterglow light curves, including the jet break, are in good agreement with those presented in previous works. Finally, we show how the details of the dynamics critically depend on properly resolving the structure of the

  6. Study of the energetic proton production in relativistic heavy ions Ne + nuclei collisions, using Diogene detector. Hadronic matter temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmani, A.

    1988-12-01

    The study of the proton's production differential cross sections, in the collision of relativistic heavy ions, allows to obtain the nuclear-matter temperature and gives information about the nucleons large burst pulses in the nucleus. The chosen thermodynamic model is a generalized approach of the R. Hagedorn model, applied to heavy ions collisions: the nuclear matter is divided in volume elements δV assumed to be in thermal and chemical equilibrium and emitting particles and fragments isotropically, inside their own system. The applied nuclear-matter velocity distribution depended only on the impact parameter and on the relationship between the chemical potential and the temperature. The predictions of this thermodynamic model were compared to the Saturne experimental results, using Diogene detector. The obtained temperature values are similar to those given by D. Hahn and H. Stoker. The proton production cross sections were measured for backward emitting angles. A relationship between the cross sections and the burst pulse distribution in the nuclei was settled [fr

  7. Radiative muon capture on nuclei and protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuelos, G.; Gorringe, T.P.; Henderson, R.; Macdonald, J.A.; Poutissou, J.M.; Azuelos, G.; Depommier, P.; Poutissou, R.; Ahmad, S.; Burnham, A.; Hasinoff, M.D.; Larabee, A.J.; Waltham, C.E.; Wright, D.H.; Armstrong, D.S.; Blecher, M.; Serna-Angel, A.; Bertl, W.; Chen, C.Q.; Zhang, N.S.; McDonald, S.C.; Taylor, G.N.; Robertson, B.C.

    1990-01-01

    A brief review is made of the study of gp, the induced pseudoscalar coupling constant, in radiative muon capture on light nuclei, and of motivations for a measurement on hydrogen, with particular emphasis on recent and ongoing experiments at TRIUMF [fr

  8. Relativistic three-dimensional Lippmann-Schwinger cross sections for space radiation applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werneth, C. M.; Xu, X.; Norman, R. B.; Maung, K. M.

    2017-12-01

    Radiation transport codes require accurate nuclear cross sections to compute particle fluences inside shielding materials. The Tripathi semi-empirical reaction cross section, which includes over 60 parameters tuned to nucleon-nucleus (NA) and nucleus-nucleus (AA) data, has been used in many of the world's best-known transport codes. Although this parameterization fits well to reaction cross section data, the predictive capability of any parameterization is questionable when it is used beyond the range of the data to which it was tuned. Using uncertainty analysis, it is shown that a relativistic three-dimensional Lippmann-Schwinger (LS3D) equation model based on Multiple Scattering Theory (MST) that uses 5 parameterizations-3 fundamental parameterizations to nucleon-nucleon (NN) data and 2 nuclear charge density parameterizations-predicts NA and AA reaction cross sections as well as the Tripathi cross section parameterization for reactions in which the kinetic energy of the projectile in the laboratory frame (TLab) is greater than 220 MeV/n. The relativistic LS3D model has the additional advantage of being able to predict highly accurate total and elastic cross sections. Consequently, it is recommended that the relativistic LS3D model be used for space radiation applications in which TLab > 220MeV /n .

  9. Auroral kilometric radiation - An example of relativistic wave-particle interaction in geoplasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pritchett, P.L.

    1990-01-01

    The earth's auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) is believed to be produced by the electron-cyclotron maser instability. This instability is the result of a wave-particle interaction in which relativistic effects are crucial. An explanation is given as to how these relativistic effects alter the shape of the resonance curve in velocity space and modify the R - X mode wave dispersion near the electron cyclotron frequency compared to the results obtained in the nonrelativistic limit and from cold-plasma theory. The properties of the cyclotron maser instability in a driven system are illustrated using two-dimensional electromagnetic particle simulations which incorporate a continual flow of primary energetic electrons along the magnetic field. 31 refs

  10. Relativistic electrons of the outer radiation belt and methods of their forecast (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potapov A.S.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews studies of the dynamics of relativistic electrons in the geosynchronous region. It lists the physical processes that lead to the acceleration of electrons filling the outer radiation belt. As one of the space weather factors, high-energy electron fluxes pose a serious threat to the operation of satellite equipment in one of the most populated orbital regions. Necessity is emphasized for efforts to develop methods for forecasting the situation in this part of the magnetosphere, possible predictors are listed, and their classification is given. An example of a predictive model for forecasting relativistic electron flux with a 1–2-day lead time is proposed. Some questions of practical organization of prediction are discussed; the main objectives of short-term, medium-term, and long-term forecasts are listed.

  11. First observation of Smith-Purcell radiation from relativistic electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doucas, G.; Mulvey, J.H.; Omori, M.; Walsh, J.; Kimmitt, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    A beam of 3.6 MeV electrons has been used to study the generation of radiation in far infra-red (FIR) by the Smith-Purcell mechanism. The dependence of wavelength on angle of emission, over angles from 56 deg to 150 deg and wavelengths from 350 μm to 1860 μm, is in excellent agreement with the Smith-Purcell dispersion relation. Comparison of the yield with that from a 5000 K source suggests that the spontaneous Smith-Purcell effect offers an easily tunable alternative to the synchrotron as a coherent FIR source, and could form the basis of a cheap, compact Free Electron Laser (FEL). (author) 6 refs.; 5 figs

  12. PMMA/MWCNT nanocomposite for proton radiation shielding applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenhao; Chen, Siyuan; Nambiar, Shruti; Sun, Yonghai; Zhang, Mingyu; Zheng, Wanping; Yeow, John T. W.

    2016-06-01

    Radiation shielding in space missions is critical in order to protect astronauts, spacecraft and payloads from radiation damage. Low atomic-number materials are efficient in shielding particle-radiation, but they have relatively weak material properties compared to alloys that are widely used in space applications as structural materials. However, the issues related to weight and the secondary radiation generation make alloys not suitable for space radiation shielding. Polymers, on the other hand, can be filled with different filler materials for reinforcement of material properties, while at the same time provide sufficient radiation shielding function with lower weight and less secondary radiation generation. In this study, poly(methyl-methacrylate)/multi-walled carbon nanotube (PMMA/MWCNT) nanocomposite was fabricated. The role of MWCNTs embedded in PMMA matrix, in terms of radiation shielding effectiveness, was experimentally evaluated by comparing the proton transmission properties and secondary neutron generation of the PMMA/MWCNT nanocomposite with pure PMMA and aluminum. The results showed that the addition of MWCNTs in PMMA matrix can further reduce the secondary neutron generation of the pure polymer, while no obvious change was found in the proton transmission property. On the other hand, both the pure PMMA and the nanocomposite were 18%-19% lighter in weight than aluminum for stopping the protons with the same energy and generated up to 5% fewer secondary neutrons. Furthermore, the use of MWCNTs showed enhanced thermal stability over the pure polymer, and thus the overall reinforcement effects make MWCNT an effective filler material for applications in the space industry.

  13. Neutron production in interactions of relativistic protons and deuterons with lead targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurevich, V.I.; Amelin, N.S.; Yakovlev, R.M.; Nikolaev, V.A.; Lyapin, V.G.; Tsvetkov, I.O.

    2005-01-01

    Results on the neutron double-differential cross sections and yields obtained in the time-of-flight measurements with different lead targets and beams of protons and deuterons at an energy of about 2 GeV are discussed. The neutron spatial-energy distribution for an extended lead target was studied by the threshold detector method in the energy range of protons and deuterons 1-3.7 GeV. A dependence of the mean neutron multiplicity, energy of neutrons, and process of neutron multiplication in lead on the target dimension, and the type and energy of the beam particle is analyzed. (author)

  14. Half-lives of proton emitters using relativistic mean field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, Bidhubhusan; Patra, S. K.; Agarwalla, S. K.

    2011-01-01

    The proton radioactivity lifetimes of proton emitters from the ground and the isomeric states are calculated using the microscopic M3Y + Ex and R3Y + Ex (proposed) nucleon-nucleus interaction potentials. These interaction potentials are obtained by single folding the densities of the daughter nuclei supplemented by a zero-range pseudopotential. The quantum-mechanical-tunneling probability is calculated within the WKB approximation. The calculated results are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data for both the M3Y and R3Y interactions.

  15. Elastic and radiative heavy quark interactions in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uphoff, Jan; Fochler, Oliver; Xu, Zhe; Greiner, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Elastic and radiative heavy quark interactions with light partons are studied with the partonic transport model named the Boltzmann approach to multiparton scatterings (BAMPSs). After calculating the cross section of radiative processes for finite masses in the improved Gunion–Bertsch approximation and verifying this calculation by comparing to the exact result, we study elastic and radiative heavy quark energy loss in a static medium of quarks and gluons. Furthermore, the full 3 + 1D space–time evolution of gluons, light quarks, and heavy quarks in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are calculated with BAMPS including elastic and radiative heavy flavor interactions. Treating light and heavy particles on the same footing in the same framework, we find that the experimentally measured nuclear modification factor of charged hadrons and D mesons at the LHC can be simultaneously described. In addition, we calculate the heavy flavor evolution with an improved screening procedure from hard-thermal-loop calculations and confront the results with experimental data of the nuclear modification factor and the elliptic flow of heavy flavor particles at the RHIC and the LHC. (paper)

  16. First indication of the coherent unipolar diffraction radiation generated by relativistic electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumenko, G.; Shevelev, M.

    2018-05-01

    As is generally known, the integral of the electric field strength over all time for usual (bipolar) radiation is zero. The first demonstration of the possibility of unipolar radiation generation has been considered theoretically by Bessonov in 1981 [E.G. Bessonov, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 80 (1981) 852]. According to this work, the unipolar radiation (or strange electromagnetic waves) is radiation for which the integral of the electric field strength over the entire duration of a pulse differs significantly from zero. Later, several theoretical papers devoted to this phenomenon have appeared in the literature, where authors investigated mainly synchrotron radiation. However, despite the critical interest, the experimental investigations ignored this effect. In this paper we present results of the first experimental investigation of the unipolar radiation generated by a relativistic electron beam. To detect the unipolar radiation the detector that is sensitive to the selected direction of the electric field strength has been elaborated and tested. We used a designed detector to observe the coherent backward diffraction radiation appearing when a bunched electron beam travels in the vicinity of a flat conductive target. The asymmetry of the electric field strength of the coherent backward diffraction radiation has been demonstrated.

  17. Radiation shielding technology development for proton linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Ouk; Lee, Y. O.; Cho, Y. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, M. H.; Sin, M. W.; Park, B. I. [Kyunghee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    2005-09-01

    This report was presented as an output of 2-year project of the first phase Proton Engineering Frontier Project(PEFP) on 'Radiation Shielding Technology Development for Proton Linear Accelerator' for 20/100 MeV accelerator beam line and facility. It describes a general design concept, provision and update of basic design data, and establishment of computer code system. It also includes results of conceptual and preliminary designs of beam line, beam dump and beam facilities as well as an analysis of air-activation inside the accelerator equipment. This report will guides the detailed shielding design and production of radiation safety analysis report scheduled in the second phase project.

  18. Proton radius, Darwin-Foldy term and radiative corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jentschura, U.D.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the role of the so-called Darwin-Foldy term in the evaluation of the proton and deuteron charge radii from atomic hydrogen spectroscopy and nuclear scattering data. The question of whether this term should be included or excluded from the nuclear radius has been controversially discussed in the literature. We attempt to clarify which literature values correspond to which conventions. A detailed discussion of the conventions appears useful because a recent experiment [R. Pohl et al., Nature 466, 213 (2010)] has indicated that there is a discrepancy between the proton charge radii inferred from ordinary ('electronic') atomic hydrogen and muonic hydrogen. We also investigate the role of quantum electrodynamic radiative corrections in the determination of nuclear radii from scattering data, and propose a definition of the nuclear self energy which is compatible with the subtraction of the radiative corrections in scattering experiments. (author)

  19. Limits on dark radiation, early dark energy, and relativistic degrees of freedom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calabrese, Erminia; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Huterer, Dragan; Linder, Eric V.; Pagano, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Recent cosmological data analyses hint at the presence of an extra relativistic energy component in the early universe. This component is often parametrized as an excess of the effective neutrino number N eff over the standard value of 3.046. The excess relativistic energy could be an indication for an extra (sterile) neutrino, but early dark energy and barotropic dark energy also contribute to the relativistic degrees of freedom. We examine the capabilities of current and future data to constrain and discriminate between these explanations, and to detect the early dark energy density associated with them. We find that while early dark energy does not alter the current constraints on N eff , a dark radiation component, such as that provided by barotropic dark energy models, can substantially change current constraints on N eff , bringing its value back to agreement with the theoretical prediction. Both dark energy models also have implications for the primordial mass fraction of Helium Y p and the scalar perturbation index n s . The ongoing Planck satellite mission will be able to further discriminate between sterile neutrinos and early dark energy.

  20. Analytical study of the relativistic dispersion: Application to the generation of the auroral kilometric radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Queau, D.; Louarn, P.

    1989-01-01

    The measurements recently performed by the Viking spacecraft have shown that, in addition to being cold plasma depleted, the source regions of the Auroral Kilometric Radiation (A.K.R.) are characterized by a relatively denser, more energetic electron component. In order to properly study the Cyclotron Maser Instability (C.M.I.) which is thought to be responsible for the A.K.R. generation, it is thus necessary to include relativistic corrections in both the hermitian and the antihermitian parts of the dielectric tensor characterizing the linear properties of the plasma. Here one presents an analytical study of the corresponding dispersion equation which aims to describe stable and unstable waves having frequencies lying very close to the electronic gyrofrequency and propagating across the geomagnetic field with a perpendicular refractive index less than a few units (n perpendicular 1 and χ small), the growth rate could maximize at the cut-off frequency of the relativistic X mode. Moreover, for small χ, the relativistic X mode is connected to freely propagating modes which guarantees an easy access of the electromagnetic energy to free space

  1. First experiments on transmutation studies of iodine-129 and neptunium-237 using relativistic protons of 3.7 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivopustov, M.I.; Adam, J.; Bradnova, V.

    1997-01-01

    First experiments on the transmutation of long-lived 129 I and 237 Np using relativistic protons of 3.7 GeV are described. Relativistic protons generate in extended Pb-targets substantial neutron fluences. These neutrons get moderated in paraffin and are used for transmutation as follows: 129 (n, γ) 130 I(β - ) → 130 Xe(stable) and 237 Np(n, γ) 238 Np(β - ) →. The isotopes 130 I (T 1/2 =12.36 h) and 238 Np (T 1/2 =2.117 days) were identified radiochemically. One can estimate the transmutation cross section (n, γ) in the given neutron field as σ( 129 I(n, γ))=(10±2)b and σ( 237 Np(n, γ))=(140±30)b. The experiments were carried out in November 1996 at the Synchrophasotron, Laboratory of High Energies (LHE), Dubna, Russia

  2. Radiative interaction of a focused relativistic electron beam in energy-loss spectroscopy of nanoscopic platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itskovsky, M. A.; Maniv, T.; Cohen, H.

    2008-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical scattering theory for relativistic, highly focused electron beams in the vacuum near nanoscopic platelets is presented, revealing an excitation mechanism due to the electron wave scattering from the platelet edges. Radiative electromagnetic excitations within the light cone are shown to arise, allowed by the breakdown of momentum conservation along the beam axis in the inelastic-scattering process. Calculated for metallic (silver and gold) and insulating (SiO 2 and MgO) nanoplatelets, radiative features are revealed above the main surface-plasmon-polariton peak, and dramatic enhancements in the electron-energy-loss probability at gaps of the 'classical' spectra are found. The corresponding radiation should be detectable in the vacuum far-field zone, with e beams exploited as sensitive 'tip detectors' of electronically excited nanostructures

  3. Radiative interaction of a focused relativistic electron beam in energy-loss spectroscopy of nanoscopic platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itskovsky, M. A.; Cohen, H.; Maniv, T.

    2008-07-01

    A quantum-mechanical scattering theory for relativistic, highly focused electron beams in the vacuum near nanoscopic platelets is presented, revealing an excitation mechanism due to the electron wave scattering from the platelet edges. Radiative electromagnetic excitations within the light cone are shown to arise, allowed by the breakdown of momentum conservation along the beam axis in the inelastic-scattering process. Calculated for metallic (silver and gold) and insulating ( SiO2 and MgO) nanoplatelets, radiative features are revealed above the main surface-plasmon-polariton peak, and dramatic enhancements in the electron-energy-loss probability at gaps of the “classical” spectra are found. The corresponding radiation should be detectable in the vacuum far-field zone, with e beams exploited as sensitive “tip detectors” of electronically excited nanostructures.

  4. Near-real time forecasts of MeV protons based on sub-relativistic electrons: communicating the outputs to the end users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlanis, Christos; Heber, Bernd; Labrenz, Johannes; Kühl, Patrick; Marquardt, Johannes; Dimitroulakos, John; Papaioannou, Athanasios; Posner, Arik

    2017-04-01

    Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events are one of the most important elements of space weather. Given that the complexity of the underlying physical processes of the acceleration and propagation of SEP events is still a very active research area, the prognosis of SEP event occurrence and their corresponding characteristics remains challenging. In order to provide up to an hour warning time before these particles arrive at Earth, relativistic electron and below 50 MeV proton data from the Electron Proton Helium Instrument (EPHIN) on SOHO were used to implement the 'Relativistic Electron Alert System for Exploration (REleASE)'. The REleASE forecasting scheme was recently rewritten in the open access programming language PYTHON and will be made publicly available. As a next step, along with relativistic electrons (v > 0.9 c) provided by SOHO, near-relativistic (v work, we demonstrate the real-time outputs derived by the end user from the REleASE using both SOHO/EPHIN and ACE/EPAM. We further, show a user friendly illustration of the outputs that make use of a "traffic light" to monitor the different warning stages: quiet, warning, alert offering a simple guidance to the end users. Finally, the capabilities offered by this new system, accessing both the pictorial and textural outputs REleASE are being presented. This work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324.

  5. Beam transfer functions for relativistic proton bunches with beam–beam interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Görgen, P., E-mail: goergen@temf.tu-darmstadt.de [Institut für Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder (TEMF), Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schloßgartenstr. 8 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Boine-Frankenheim, O. [Institut für Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder (TEMF), Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schloßgartenstr. 8 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2015-03-21

    We present a method for the recovery of the transverse tune spread directly from the beam transfer function (BTF). The model is applicable for coasting beams and bunched beams at high energy with a tune spread from transverse nonlinearities induced by the beam–beam effect or by an electron lens. Other sources of tune spread can be added. A method for the recovery of the incoherent tune spread without prior knowledge of the nonlinearity is presented. The approach is based on the analytic model for BTFs of coasting beams, which agrees very well with simulations results for bunched beams at relativistic energies with typically low synchrotron tune. A priori the presented tune spread recovery method is usable only in the absence of coherent modes, but additional simulation data shows its applicability even in the presence of coherent beam–beam modes. Finally agreement of both the analytic and simulation models with measurement data obtained at RHIC is presented. The proposed method successfully recovers the tune spread from analytic, simulated and measured BTF.

  6. Definitive proton beam radiation therapy for inoperable gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Susumu; Takase, Yasuhiro; Aoyagi, Hiroyuki; Orii, Kazuo; Sharma, N.; Iwasaki, Yoji; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tsujii, Hiroshi.

    1991-01-01

    Proton beam radiation therapy using 250 MeV protons was carried out on two patients with early gastric cancer (T1, N0, M0). One patient was an 85-year-old man with early gastric cancer of type IIa + IIc. The other one was a 70-year-old man with early gastric cancer of type IIc. In both cases histological examination of biopsy specimens showed differential adenocarcinoma; distant metastasis was not found by other examinations. Both patients were considered inoperable due to their poor cardiac and/or respiratory functions. Therefore, it was decided to treat them by definitive proton irradiation, delivering total doses of 86 Gy and 83 Gy, respectively. In both patients, skin erythema that did not require any special treatment was found in the irradiation field. Hematobiological examinations did not show any abnormality. Although endoscopic examination at two years after irradiation in the former case and at seven months in the latter case showed persistent gastric ulcer at the site of the cancerous lesions, cancer cells were not found histologically. Therefore, we concluded that proton irradiation therapy was useful for inoperable early gastric cancers. (author)

  7. Standard Practice for Dosimetry of Proton Beams for use in Radiation Effects Testing of Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahan, Margaret A.; Blackmore, Ewart; Cascio, Ethan W.; Castaneda, Carlos; von Przewoski, Barbara; Eisen, Harvey

    2008-01-01

    Representatives of facilities that routinely deliver protons for radiation effect testing are collaborating to establish a set of standard best practices for proton dosimetry. These best practices will be submitted to the ASTM International for adoption

  8. Standard Practice for Dosimetry of Proton Beams for use in Radiation Effects Testing of Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahan, Margaret A.; Blackmore, Ewart; Cascio, Ethan W.; Castaneda, Carlos; von Przewoski, Barbara; Eisen, Harvey

    2008-07-25

    Representatives of facilities that routinely deliver protons for radiation effect testing are collaborating to establish a set of standard best practices for proton dosimetry. These best practices will be submitted to the ASTM International for adoption.

  9. Calculation of radiative opacity of plasma mixtures using a relativistic screened hydrogenic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, M.A.; Rubiano, J.G.; Gil, J.M.; Rodríguez, R.; Florido, R.; Espinosa, G.; Martel, P.; Mínguez, E.

    2014-01-01

    We present the code ATMED based on an average atom model and conceived for fast computing the population distribution and radiative properties of hot and dense single and multicomponent plasmas under LTE conditions. A relativistic screened hydrogenic model (RSHM), built on a new set of universal constants considering j-splitting, is used to calculate the required atomic data. The opacity model includes radiative bound–bound, bound–free, free–free, and scattering processes. Bound–bound line-shape function has contributions from natural, Doppler and electron-impact broadenings. An additional dielectronic broadening to account for fluctuations in the average level populations has been included, which improves substantially the Rosseland mean opacity results. To illustrate the main features of the code and its capabilities, calculations of several fundamental quantities of one-component plasmas and mixtures are presented, and a comparison with previously published data is performed. Results are satisfactorily compared with those predicted by more elaborate codes. - Highlights: • A new opacity code, ATMED, based on the average atom approximation is presented. • Atomic data are computed by means of a relativistic screened hydrogenic model. • An effective bound level degeneracy is included for accounting pressure ionization. • A new dielectronic line broadening is included to improve the mean opacities. • ATMED has the possibility to handle with single element and multicomponent plasmas

  10. Radiative pion-proton scattering in the static Chew-Low model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho-Kim, Q.; Lavine, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a non-relativistic calculation of π +- -proton bremsstrahlung cross-sections at the pion laboratory kinetic energy of 298 MeV for backward photon angles are presented. The πp interaction is described by the static Chew-Low model. (Auth.)

  11. XI International Symposium on Radiation from Relativistic Electrons in Periodic Structures (RREPS2015)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    These Proceedings are published as a recollection of contributions presented at the XI International Symposium on “Radiation from Relativistic Electrons in Periodic Structures” (RREPS-15), which was held in Saint Petersburg, September 6-11, 2015, Russian Federation. RREPS-15 was co-organized by Saint-Petersburg State University, National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, and National Research Nuclear University (MEPhI). The main goal of the symposium was to bring together the scientists from around the world who work on designs of new radiation sources and their applications. There were 108 participants registered from 12 countries. The website of the symposium is available at http://rreps.tpu.ru/. (paper)

  12. Effect of neutron and proton radiations on magnetization of biotite

    CERN Document Server

    Abdurakhimov, A U; Sharipov, S M; Yugaj, V P; Granovskij, A B; Radkovskaya, A A

    2002-01-01

    One analyzes curves of field dependence of magnetization of biotite measured in the initial state under 4.2 K temperature subsequent to irradiation of 14 MeV energy and 1.2 x 10 sup 1 sup 3 cm sup - sup 2 dose neutrons and by 3 MeV energy and 2.2 x 10 sup 1 sup 4 cm sup - sup 2 dose protons, as well as, subsequent to annealing under 1000 deg temperature during 15 min. Irradiation by neutrons and protons was determined to result in increase of magneto-ordered phase content in biotite and, thus, in increase of magnetization of specimen. It is accounted for by formation of oxides in melt radiation thermal peaks and by freezing of high-temperature phase states corresponding to magnetite or solid solution of magnetite and hematite there. Thermal treatment does not change content of magneto-ordered phase in specimens

  13. Mixed optical Cherenkov–Bremsstrahlung radiation in vicinity of the Cherenkov cone from relativistic heavy ions: Unusual dependence of the angular distribution width on the radiator thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozhkova, E.I., E-mail: elenafiks@gmail.com; Pivovarov, Yu.L.

    2016-07-15

    The Cherenkov radiation (ChR) angular distribution is usually described by the Tamm–Frank (TF) theory, which assumes that relativistic charged particle moves uniformly and rectilinearly in the optically transparent radiator. According to the TF theory, the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the ChR angular distribution inversely depends on the radiator thickness. In the case of relativistic heavy ions (RHI) a slowing-down in the radiator may sufficiently change the angular distribution of optical radiation in vicinity of the Cherenkov cone, since there appears a mixed ChR–Bremsstrahlung radiation. As a result, there occurs a drastic transformation of the FWHM of optical radiation angular distribution in dependence on the radiator thickness: from inversely proportional (TF theory) to the linearly proportional one. In our paper we present the first analysis of this transformation taking account of the gradual velocity decrease of RHI penetrating through a radiator. - Highlights: • Stopping of relativistic heavy ions leads to appearance of a Cherenkov–Bremsstrahlung radiation near the Cherenkov cone. • Mixed Cherenkov–Bremsstrahlung optical radiation FWHM differs from the standard one determined by the Tamm–Frank theory. • The Cherenkov–Bremsstrahlung radiation angular distribution FWHM linearly depends on the radiator thickness.

  14. Three-dimensional relativistic pair plasma reconnection with radiative feedback in the Crab Nebula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerutti, B. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Werner, G. R.; Uzdensky, D. A. [Center for Integrated Plasma Studies, Physics Department, University of Colorado, UCB 390, Boulder, CO 80309-0390 (United States); Begelman, M. C., E-mail: bcerutti@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: greg.werner@colorado.edu, E-mail: uzdensky@colorado.edu, E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, UCB 440, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

    2014-02-20

    The discovery of rapid synchrotron gamma-ray flares above 100 MeV from the Crab Nebula has attracted new interest in alternative particle acceleration mechanisms in pulsar wind nebulae. Diffuse shock-acceleration fails to explain the flares because particle acceleration and emission occur during a single or even sub-Larmor timescale. In this regime, the synchrotron energy losses induce a drag force on the particle motion that balances the electric acceleration and prevents the emission of synchrotron radiation above 160 MeV. Previous analytical studies and two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations indicate that relativistic reconnection is a viable mechanism to circumvent the above difficulties. The reconnection electric field localized at X-points linearly accelerates particles with little radiative energy losses. In this paper, we check whether this mechanism survives in three dimension (3D), using a set of large PIC simulations with radiation reaction force and with a guide field. In agreement with earlier works, we find that the relativistic drift kink instability deforms and then disrupts the layer, resulting in significant plasma heating but few non-thermal particles. A moderate guide field stabilizes the layer and enables particle acceleration. We report that 3D magnetic reconnection can accelerate particles above the standard radiation reaction limit, although the effect is less pronounced than in 2D with no guide field. We confirm that the highest-energy particles form compact bunches within magnetic flux ropes, and a beam tightly confined within the reconnection layer, which could result in the observed Crab flares when, by chance, the beam crosses our line of sight.

  15. FOREWORD: IX International Symposium on Radiation from Relativistic Electrons in Periodic Structures (RREPS-2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potylitsyn, Alexander; Karataev, Pavel

    2012-05-01

    This volume contains papers presented at the IX International Symposium on Radiation from Relativistic Electrons in Periodic Structures (RREPS'11) which was held at Royal Holloway, University of London on September 12-16, Egham, United Kingdom. The symposium was organized jointly by Royal Holloway, University of London and Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia. RREPS is a biennial series of symposia founded in September 1993 as an initiative of the Nuclear Physics Institute at Tomsk Polytechnic University. The intention was to strengthen the basic and applied research focused on radiation from relativistic electrons in condensed media, particularly from natural and artificial periodic structures, and to review the research activity in this area. Since then, the symposium has developed into a forum attracting young scientists from different areas of research and from many countries. Previous successful symposia were held at Tomsk, Russia (1993, 1995, 1997, 2003), Lake Baikal, Russia (1999), Lake Aiya, Altai, Russia (2001), Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic (2007) and Zvenigorod, Moscow region, Russia (2009). As an outcome of the symposia the conference proceedings have been published in Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research, Section B (Vol. 145 No 1-2, October 1998; Vol. 173 No 1-2, January 2001; Vol. 201 No 1 January 2003; Vol. 227 No 1-2, January 2005; Vol. 266 No 17, September 2008) and Journal of Physics: Conference Series (Vol. 236, June 2010). The purpose of the present RREPS'11 symposium was to review the up-to-date situation in the area of electromagnetic radiation generated by relativistic charged particles in condensed media, and to discuss the research strategy for the near future. Nowadays, electromagnetic radiation studies cover electron energies from a few MeV up to hundreds of GeV in many laboratories throughout the world. The goal is to study the physics of the generation of various kinds of radiation and their

  16. Radiation tolerance of CVD diamond detectors for pions and protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, W.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bertuccio, G.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; D' Angelo, P.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Hallewell, G.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F. E-mail: f.hartjes@nikhef.nl; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Koeth, T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Mac Lynne, L.; Manfredotti, C.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Moroni, L.; Noomen, J.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Perera, L.; Pirollo, S.; Procario, M.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Rousseau, L.; Rudge, A.; Russ, J.; Sala, S.; Sampietro, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trischuk, W.; Tromson, D.; Vittone, E.; Walsh, A.M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Zoeller, M

    2002-01-11

    The paper gives new results on the radiation tolerance of CVD diamond for irradiation with 300 MeV/c pions and 24 GeV/c protons. The measured charge signal spectrum is compared at several irradiation levels with the spectrum calculated by a model. Irradiation by particles causes damage leading to a decrease of the charge signal. However, both the measurements and the outcome from the model show that for tracker applications this drawback is at least partly counterbalanced by a narrowing of the distribution curve of the charge signal. As a result, the efficiency of a CVD diamond tracker is less affected by irradiation than the mean charge signal.

  17. Radiation tolerance of CVD diamond detectors for pions and protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, W.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bertuccio, G.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; D'Angelo, P.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; van Eijk, B.; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K. K.; Gheeraert, E.; Hallewell, G.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Koeth, T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; mac Lynne, L.; Manfredotti, C.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Moroni, L.; Noomen, J.; Oh, A.; Pan, L. S.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Perera, L.; Pirollo, S.; Procario, M.; Riester, J. L.; Roe, S.; Rousseau, L.; Rudge, A.; Russ, J.; Sala, S.; Sampietro, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R. J.; Tesarek, R.; Trischuk, W.; Tromson, D.; Vittone, E.; Walsh, A. M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Zoeller, M.

    2002-01-01

    The paper gives new results on the radiation tolerance of CVD diamond for irradiation with 300 MeV/ c pions and 24 GeV/ c protons. The measured charge signal spectrum is compared at several irradiation levels with the spectrum calculated by a model. Irradiation by particles causes damage leading to a decrease of the charge signal. However, both the measurements and the outcome from the model show that for tracker applications this drawback is at least partly counterbalanced by a narrowing of the distribution curve of the charge signal. As a result, the efficiency of a CVD diamond tracker is less affected by irradiation than the mean charge signal.

  18. Conformal proton radiation therapy for pediatric low-grade astrocytomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hug, E.B.; Loma Linda Univ. Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA; Darthmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire; Muenter, M.W.; Archambeau, J.O.; DeVries, A.; Loredo, L.N.; Grove, R.I.; Slater, J.D.; Liwnicz, B.

    2002-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of proton radiation therapy (PRT) for intracranial low-grade astrocytomas, the authors analyzed the first 27 pediatric patients treated at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC). Patients and Method: Between September 1991 and August 1997, 27 patients (13 female, 14 male) underwent fractionated proton radiation therapy for progressive or recurrent low-grade astrocytoma. Age at time of treatment ranged from 2 to 18 years (mean: 8.7 years). Tumors were located centrally (diencephatic) in 15 patients, in the cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres in seven patients, and in the brainstem in five patients. 25/27 patients (92%) were treated for progressive, unresectable, or residual disease following subtotal resection. Tissue diagnosis was available in 23/27 patients (85%). Four patients with optic pathway tumors were treated without histologic confirmation. Target doses between 50.4 and 63.0 CGE (cobalt gray equivalent, mean: 55.2 CGE) were prescribed at 1.8 CGE per fraction, five treatments per week. Results: At a mean follow-up period of 3.3 years (0.6-6.8 years), 6/27 patients experienced local failure (all located within the irradiated field), and 4/27 patients had died. By anatomic site these data translated into rates of local control and survival of 87% (13/15 patients) and 93% (14/15 patients) for central tumors, 71% (5/7 patients) and 86% (6/7 patients) for hemispheric tumors, and 60% (3/5 patients) and 60% (3/5 patients) for tumors located in the brainstem. Proton radiation therapy was generally well tolerated. All children with local control maintained their performance status. One child with associated neurofibromatosis, Type 1, developed Moyamoya disease. All six patients with optic pathway tumors and useful vision maintained or improved their visual status. Conclusions: This report on pediatric low-grade astrocytomas confirms proton radiation therapy as a safe and efficacious 3-D conformal treatment

  19. Radiation tolerance of CVD diamond detectors for pions and protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, W.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bertuccio, G.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; D'Angelo, P.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Hallewell, G.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Koeth, T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Mac Lynne, L.; Manfredotti, C.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Moroni, L.; Noomen, J.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Perera, L.; Pirollo, S.; Procario, M.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Rousseau, L.; Rudge, A.; Russ, J.; Sala, S.; Sampietro, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trischuk, W.; Tromson, D.; Vittone, E.; Walsh, A.M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Zoeller, M.

    2002-01-01

    The paper gives new results on the radiation tolerance of CVD diamond for irradiation with 300 MeV/c pions and 24 GeV/c protons. The measured charge signal spectrum is compared at several irradiation levels with the spectrum calculated by a model. Irradiation by particles causes damage leading to a decrease of the charge signal. However, both the measurements and the outcome from the model show that for tracker applications this drawback is at least partly counterbalanced by a narrowing of the distribution curve of the charge signal. As a result, the efficiency of a CVD diamond tracker is less affected by irradiation than the mean charge signal

  20. Radiomodifying effect of caffeine on mammalian cellular system using gamma radiation and proton beam radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanth, Sneha P.; Yadav, Usha; Shirsath, K.B.; Desai, Utkarsha N.; Chaurasia, Rajesh K.; Bhat, Nagesh N.; Anjaria, K.B.; Sapra, B.K.

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is a commonly consumed neurostimulant in the world. Reports suggest the radiomodifying effects of caffeine against low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation when administered pre and post irradiation by releasing checkpoint arrest. In the present report, the radioprotective and radiosensitizing ability of caffeine (10μM - 2mM) were studied on Chinese Hamster Ovary (CRO) cell line against low as well as high LET radiation when administered pre, post and continuously during radiation. Effect of caffeine treatment on the genotoxicity induced by gamma and proton beam radiation was assessed by micronucleus assay. Effect of caffeine treatment on clonogenic survival of irradiated cells was also assessed

  1. Multiplicities of pions and slow protons in nuclear interactions at relativistic energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idh, J.

    1993-02-01

    The distributions of the transverse energy and the multiplicity of charged particles in oxygen induced reactions are examined in the Fritiof Monte Carlo model. The shape of the distributions are found to be determined by the distribution of the number of particle-emitting sources, i.e. strings. The fluctuations in particle emission from each string is hidden by these much larger fluctuations. The fluctuations of these distributions when partial phase space coverage is used is well described by purely stochastic emission. Distributions of slow singly-charged fragments in the target region is measured for both hadron and oxygen induced reactions. The distributions extends to much larger values than simulated data from the Monte Carlo models Fritiof 1.7 and Venus 3.14. The hadron induced reactions give distributions that can be reproduced assuming that each participating target nucleon produced fragments according to a geometric distribution, where the average number of fragments per participating target nucleon is target dependent. The extracted average number of produced fragments are similar for proton and pion induced reactions. When the tails of the distributions are studied their extension can be parametrized, and for such an approach a target dependence of A 2/3 is found for all projectiles. The data for 60 and 200 A GeV are almost identical for distributions as well as angular and energy examined distributions. The angular distributions follow an exponential in cos(θ). If the slopes of the angular distributions are examined and target dependences as well as centrality dependences are extracted. For light targets there is a strong target dependence, but for targets heavier than copper there is not any great differences. The centrality dependence is almost negligible for a gold-target but for a copper-target the most central collisions have more forward peaked distributions. (62 refs.)

  2. Radiative proton-capture nuclear processes in metallic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimaru, Setsuo

    2001-01-01

    Protons being the lightest nuclei, metallic hydrogen may exhibit the features of quantum liquids most relevant to enormous enhancement of nuclear reactions; thermonuclear and pycnonuclear rates and associated enhancement factors of radiative proton captures of high-Z nuclei as well as of deuterons are evaluated. Atomic states of high-Z impurities are determined in a way consistent with the equations of state and screening characteristics of the metallic hydrogen. Rates of pycnonuclear p-d reactions are prodigiously high at densities ≥20 g/cm 3 , pressures ≥1 Gbar, and temperatures ≥950 K near the conditions of solidification. It is also predicted that proton captures of nuclei such as C, N, O, and F may take place at considerable rates, owing to strong screening by K-shell electrons, if the densities ≥60-80 g/cm 3 , the pressures ≥7-12 Gbar, and the temperatures just above solidification. The possibilities and significance of pycnonuclear p-d fusion experiments are specifically remarked

  3. Neutron, Proton, and Photonuclear Cross Sections for Radiation Therapy and Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, M.B.

    1998-01-01

    The authors review recent work at Los Alamos to evaluate neutron, proton, and photonuclear cross section up to 150 MeV (to 250 MeV for protons), based on experimental data and nuclear model calculations. These data are represented in the ENDF format and can be used in computer codes to simulate radiation transport. They permit calculations of absorbed dose in the body from therapy beams, and through use of kerma coefficients allow absorbed dose to be estimated for a given neutron energy distribution. For radiation protection, these data can be used to determine shielding requirements in accelerator environments, and to calculate neutron, proton, gamma-ray, and radionuclide production. Illustrative comparisons of the evaluated cross section and kerma coefficient data with measurements are given

  4. Causal dissipation and shock profiles in the relativistic fluid dynamics of pure radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freistühler, Heinrich; Temple, Blake

    2014-06-08

    CURRENT THEORIES OF DISSIPATION IN THE RELATIVISTIC REGIME SUFFER FROM ONE OF TWO DEFICITS: either their dissipation is not causal or no profiles for strong shock waves exist. This paper proposes a relativistic Navier-Stokes-Fourier-type viscosity and heat conduction tensor such that the resulting second-order system of partial differential equations for the fluid dynamics of pure radiation is symmetric hyperbolic. This system has causal dissipation as well as the property that all shock waves of arbitrary strength have smooth profiles. Entropy production is positive both on gradients near those of solutions to the dissipation-free equations and on gradients of shock profiles. This shows that the new dissipation stress tensor complies to leading order with the principles of thermodynamics. Whether higher order modifications of the ansatz are required to obtain full compatibility with the second law far from the zero-dissipation equilibrium is left to further investigations. The system has exactly three a priori free parameters χ , η , ζ , corresponding physically to heat conductivity, shear viscosity and bulk viscosity. If the bulk viscosity is zero (as is stated in the literature) and the total stress-energy tensor is trace free, the entire viscosity and heat conduction tensor is determined to within a constant factor.

  5. Magnetic Field Generation, Particle Energization and Radiation at Relativistic Shear Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Edison; Fu, Wen; Spisak, Jake; Boettcher, Markus

    2015-11-01

    Recent large scale Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations have demonstrated that in unmagnetized relativistic shear flows, strong transverse d.c. magnetic fields are generated and sustained by ion-dominated currents on the opposite sides of the shear interface. Instead of dissipating the shear flow free energy via turbulence formation and mixing as it is usually found in MHD simulations, the kinetic results show that the relativistic boundary layer stabilizes itself via the formation of a robust vacuum gap supported by a strong magnetic field, which effectively separates the opposing shear flows, as in a maglev train. Our new PIC simulations have extended the runs to many tens of light crossing times of the simulation box. Both the vacuum gap and supporting magnetic field remain intact. The electrons are energized to reach energy equipartition with the ions, with 10% of the total energy in electromagnetic fields. The dominant radiation mechanism is similar to that of a wiggler, due to oscillating electron orbits around the boundary layer.

  6. Synchrotron radiation based on laser-plasma interaction in the relativistic range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, F.

    2007-12-01

    This work illustrates the experimental characterization of a new compact X-ray source: the Betatron X-ray source. It is the first time that collimated hard X-ray source is produced by laser. Through the focusing of an ultra-intense laser radiation (30 TW, 30 fs) on a helium plasma, the ponderomotive force linked to the light intensity gradient expels the plasma electrons forming an accelerating cavity in the wake of the laser plasma. Some electrons trapped in the back of this structure, are accelerated and oscillate to produce X-radiation. This document is composed of 8 chapters. The first one is a presentation of the topic. The second chapter gives an account of the physics behind the laser-plasma interaction in the relativistic range and for ultra-short pulses. The third chapter presents the theoretical characteristics of the Betatron X-ray source. This chapter begins with an analogy with current synchrotron radiation and the radiation emitted by an electron undergoing Betatron oscillations is described in terms of power, spectral intensity and photon flux. The fourth chapter is dedicated to the numerical simulation of the Betatron radiation. The trajectories of the electrons are computed from the equation of motion, taking into account longitudinal and transverse forces. The radiation emission term is then computed from the radiation equation detailed in the previous chapter. The fifth chapter presents the experimental setting to produce Betatron X-rays. The sixth chapter gives the experimental characterization of the source (size, divergence and spectrum) on one hand, and on the other hand studies how source flux and spectra vary when laser and plasma parameters change. The seventh chapter presents experimental methods used to characterize the electrons trajectories in the plasma wiggler. The last chapter draws some perspectives on this source in terms of improvement and uses. (A.C.)

  7. On the radiation emitted by a particle falling into a black hole in the semi-relativistic approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coretti, C.; Ferrari, V.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper the limits of applicability of the semi-relativistic approximation for estimating the radiation emitted in processes of capture of particles by black holes are discussed. It is shown that it gives reliable estimates in the case of spherically symmetric black holes, but it fails in the case of rotating black holes

  8. Proton-minibeam radiation therapy: A proof of concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prezado, Y. [IMNC-UMR 8165, CNRS, Paris 7 and Paris 11 Universities, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Fois, G. R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Cagliari, Strada provinciale Monserrato Sestu km 0.700, Monserrato, Cagliari 09042 (Italy)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: This Monte Carlo simulation work aims at studying a new radiotherapy approach called proton-minibeam radiation therapy (pMBRT). The main objective of this proof of concept was the evaluation of the possible gain in tissue sparing, thanks to the spatial fractionation of the dose, which could be used to deposit higher and potentially curative doses in clinical cases where tissue tolerances are a limit for conventional methods. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations (GATE v.6) have been used as a method to calculate the ratio of the peak-to-valley doses (PVDR) for arrays of proton minibeams of 0.7 mm width and several center-to-center distances, at different depths in a water phantom. The beam penumbras were also evaluated as an important parameter for tissue sparing, for example, in the treatment of non-cancer diseases like epilepsy. Two proton energies were considered in this study: a clinically relevant energy (105 MeV) and a very high energy (1 GeV), to benefit from a reduced lateral scattering. For the latter case, an interlaced geometry was also evaluated. Results: Higher or similar PVDR than the ones obtained in x-rays minibeam radiation therapy were achieved in several pMBRT configurations. In addition, for the two energies studied, the beam penumbras are smaller than in the case of Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Conclusions: The high PVDR obtained for some configurations and the small penumbras in comparison with existing radiosurgery techniques, suggest a potential gain in healthy tissue sparing in this new technique. Biological studies are warranted to assess the effects of pMBRT on both normal and tumoral tissues.

  9. System for detecting neutrons in the harsh radiation environment of a relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruse, L.W.

    1978-06-01

    Newly developed detectors and procedures allow measurement of neutron yield and energy in the harsh radiation environment of a relativistic electron beam source. A new photomultiplier tube design and special gating methods provide the basis for novel time-of-flight and total-yield detectors. The technique of activation analysis is expanded to provide a neutron energy spectrometer. There is a demonstrated potential in the use of the integrated system as a valuable diagnostic tool to study particle-beam fusion, intense ion-beam interactions, and pulsed neutron sources for simulating weapons effects. A physical lower limit of 10 8 neutrons into 4π is established for accurate and meaningful measurements in the REB environment

  10. Relativistic, Viscous, Radiation Hydrodynamic Simulations of Geometrically Thin Disks. I. Thermal and Other Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragile, P. Chris; Etheridge, Sarina M.; Anninos, Peter; Mishra, Bhupendra; Kluźniak, Włodek

    2018-04-01

    We present results from two-dimensional, general relativistic, viscous, radiation hydrodynamic numerical simulations of Shakura–Sunyaev thin disks accreting onto stellar-mass Schwarzschild black holes. We consider cases on both the gas- and radiation-pressure-dominated branches of the thermal equilibrium curve, with mass accretion rates spanning the range from \\dot{M}=0.01{L}Edd}/{c}2 to 10L Edd/c 2. The simulations directly test the stability of this standard disk model on the different branches. We find clear evidence of thermal instability for all radiation-pressure-dominated disks, resulting universally in the vertical collapse of the disks, which in some cases then settle onto the stable, gas-pressure-dominated branch. Although these results are consistent with decades-old theoretical predictions, they appear to be in conflict with available observational data from black hole X-ray binaries. We also find evidence for a radiation-pressure-driven instability that breaks the unstable disks up into alternating rings of high and low surface density on a timescale comparable to the thermal collapse. Since radiation is included self-consistently in the simulations, we are able to calculate light curves and power density spectra (PDS). For the most part, we measure radiative efficiencies (ratio of luminosity to mass accretion rate) close to 6%, as expected for a nonrotating black hole. The PDS appear as broken power laws, with a break typically around 100 Hz. There is no evidence of significant excess power at any frequencies, i.e., no quasi-periodic oscillations are observed.

  11. Lightning initiation mechanism based on the development of relativistic runaway electron avalanches triggered by background cosmic radiation: Numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babich, L. P.; Bochkov, E. I.; Kutsyk, I. M.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of lightning initiation due to electric field enhancement by the polarization of a conducting channel produced by relativistic runaway electron avalanches triggered by background cosmic radiation has been simulated numerically. It is shown that the fields at which the start of a lightning leader is possible even in the absence of precipitations are locally realized for realistic thundercloud configurations and charges. The computational results agree with the in-situ observations of penetrating radiation enhancement in thunderclouds.

  12. Lightning initiation mechanism based on the development of relativistic runaway electron avalanches triggered by background cosmic radiation: Numerical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babich, L. P., E-mail: babich@elph.vniief.ru; Bochkov, E. I.; Kutsyk, I. M. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation)

    2011-05-15

    The mechanism of lightning initiation due to electric field enhancement by the polarization of a conducting channel produced by relativistic runaway electron avalanches triggered by background cosmic radiation has been simulated numerically. It is shown that the fields at which the start of a lightning leader is possible even in the absence of precipitations are locally realized for realistic thundercloud configurations and charges. The computational results agree with the in-situ observations of penetrating radiation enhancement in thunderclouds.

  13. Splitting of the spectral radiation density maximum for relativistic positrons moving through a single crystal near the crystallographic axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adejshvili, D.I.; Anufriev, O.V.; Bochek, G.L.; Vit'ko, V.I.; Kovalenko, G.D.; Nikolajchuk, L.I.; Khizhnyak, N.A.; Shramenko, B.I.

    1986-01-01

    The fast particle radiation is studied on the basis of the periodic potential model which takes into account the discrete structure of atomic strings or planes along the channel direction. Results of the experiments on the linear accelerator on radiation of relativistic 1035 and 1050 MeV positrons in the diamond (axis 110) and silicon (axis 111) single crystals, respectively, are in good agreement with calculated data

  14. On the theory of the relativistic motion of a charged particle in the field of intense electromagnetic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milant' ev, V. P., E-mail: vmilantiev@sci.pfu.edu.ru; Castillo, A. J., E-mail: vmilant@mail.ru [Peoples' Friendship University of Russia (Russian Federation)

    2013-04-15

    Averaged relativistic equations of motion of a charged particle in the field of intense electromagnetic radiation have been obtained in the geometrical optics approximation using the Bogoliubov method. Constraints are determined under which these equations are valid. Oscillating additions to the smoothed dynamical variables of the particle have been found; they are reduced to known expressions in the case of the circularly and linearly polarized plane waves. It has been shown that the expressions for the averaged relativistic force in both cases contain new additional small terms weakening its action. The known difference between the expressions for the ponderomotive force in the cases of circularly and linearly polarized waves has been confirmed.

  15. Gravitational radiation from the radial infall of highly relativistic point particles into Kerr black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Vitor; Lemos, Jose P.S.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the gravitational radiation generated by the collision of highly relativistic particles with rotating Kerr black holes. We use the Sasaki-Nakamura formalism to compute the waveform, energy spectra, and total energy radiated during this process. We show that the gravitational spectrum for high-energy collisions has definite characteristic universal features, which are independent of the spin of the colliding objects. We also discuss the possible connections between these results and black-hole-black-hole collisions at the speed of light. Our results show that during the high-speed collision of a nonrotating hole with a rotating one, at most 35% of the total energy can get converted into gravitational waves. This 35% efficiency occurs only in the most optimistic situation, that of a zero impact parameter collision, along the equatorial plane, with an almost extreme Kerr black hole. In the general situation, the total gravitational energy radiated is expected to be much less, especially if the impact parameter increases. Thus, if one is able to produce black holes at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, at most 35% of the partons' energy should be emitted during the so-called balding phase. This energy will be missing, since we do not have gravitational wave detectors able to measure such amplitudes. The collision at the speed of light between one rotating black hole and a nonrotating one or two rotating black holes turns out to be the most efficient gravitational wave generator in the Universe

  16. RADIATION PROTECTION FOR THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION-COLLIDER AT THE BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musolino, S.V.; Stevens, A.J.

    1999-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a high energy particle accelerator built to study basic nuclear physics. It consists of two counter-rotating beams of fully stripped gold ions that are accelerated in two rings to an energy of 100 GeV/nucleon. The rings consist of a circular lattice of superconducting magnets 3.8 km in circumference. The beams can be stored for a period of five to ten hours and brought into collision for experiments during that time. The first major physics objective when the facility goes into operation is to recreate a state of matter, the quark-gluon plasma, that has been predicted to have existed at a short time after the creation of the universe. There are only a few other high energy particle accelerators like RHIC in the world. The rules promulgated in the Code of Federal Regulations under the Atomic Energy Act do not cover prompt radiation from accelerators, nor are there any State regulations that govern the design and operation of a superconducting collider. Special design criteria for prompt radiation were developed to provide guidance for the design of radiation shielding

  17. Properties of spectra of the reflected and transmitted radiation during propagation of relativistically strong laser pulses in underdense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulanov, S.V.; Esirkepov, T.Z.; Naumova, N.M.

    1996-01-01

    Particle-in-cell simulation has been performed to study the spatial-temporal evolution of the pulse propagating in an underdense plasma. The spectra both of the reflected and transmitted radiation are investigated. The spectrum structure of the reflected radiation is due to the backward stimulated Raman scattering meanwhile the transmitted radiation structure is mainly due to the nonlinear self-phase-modulation. The influence of the pulse shape on the transmitted radiation spectrum is revealed. The dependence of the main features of the spectrum and the self-consistent pulse distortion is found. The pulse distortion is accompanied by the relativistic electrons generation. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  18. Analysis of Proton Radiation Effects on Gallium Nitride High Electron Mobility Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    non - ionizing proton radiation damage effects at different energy levels on a GaN-on-silicon high electron mobility transistor...DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) In this work, a physics-based simulation of non - ionizing proton radiation damage effects at different...Polarization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2.3 Non - Ionizing Radiation Damage Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 2.4 Non - Ionizing Radiation Damage in

  19. Multiple loss processes of relativistic electrons outside the heart of outer radiation belt during a storm sudden commencement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, J.

    2015-01-01

    By examining the compression-induced changes in the electron phase space density and pitch angle distribution observed by two satellites of Van Allen Probes (RBSP-A/B), we find that the relativistic electrons (>2 MeV) outside the heart of outer radiation belt (L*≥5) undergo multiple losses during a storm sudden commencement. The relativistic electron loss mainly occurs in the field-aligned direction (pitch angle α < 30° or >150°), and the flux decay of the field-aligned electrons is independent of the spatial location variations of the two satellites. However, the relativistic electrons in the pitch angle range of 30°–150° increase (decrease) with the decreasing (increasing) geocentric distance (|ΔL|<0.25) of the RBSP-B (RBSP-A) location, and the electron fluxes in the quasi-perpendicular direction display energy-dispersive oscillations in the Pc5 period range (2–10 min). The relativistic electron loss is confirmed by the decrease of electron phase space density at high-L shell after the magnetospheric compressions, and their loss is associated with the intense plasmaspheric hiss, electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, relativistic electron precipitation (observed by POES/NOAA satellites at 850 km), and magnetic field fluctuations in the Pc5 band. Finally, the intense EMIC waves and whistler mode hiss jointly cause the rapidly pitch angle scattering loss of the relativistic electrons within 10 h. Moreover, the Pc5 ULF waves also lead to the slowly outward radial diffusion of the relativistic electrons in the high-L region with a negative electron phase space density gradient.

  20. Radiation damage in silicon exposed to high-energy protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, Gordon; Hayama, Shusaku; Murin, Leonid; Krause-Rehberg, Reinhard; Bondarenko, Vladimir; Sengupta, Asmita; Davia, Cinzia; Karpenko, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Photoluminescence, infrared absorption, positron annihilation, and deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) have been used to investigate the radiation damage produced by 24 GeV/c protons in crystalline silicon. The irradiation doses and the concentrations of carbon and oxygen in the samples have been chosen to monitor the mobility of the damage products. Single vacancies (and self-interstitials) are introduced at the rate of ∼1 cm -1 , and divacancies at 0.5 cm -1 . Stable di-interstitials are formed when two self-interstitials are displaced in one damage event, and they are mobile at room temperature. In the initial stages of annealing the evolution of the point defects can be understood mainly in terms of trapping at the impurities. However, the positron signal shows that about two orders of magnitude more vacancies are produced by the protons than are detected in the point defects. Damage clusters exist, and are largely removed by annealing at 700 to 800 K, when there is an associated loss of broad band emission between 850 and 1000 meV. The well-known W center is generated by restructuring within clusters, with a range of activation energies of about 1.3 to 1.6 eV, reflecting the disordered nature of the clusters. Comparison of the formation of the X centers in oxygenated and oxygen-lean samples suggests that the J defect may be interstitial related rather than vacancy related. To a large extent, the damage and annealing behavior may be factorized into point defects (monitored by sharp-line optical spectra and DLTS) and cluster defects (monitored by positron annihilation and broadband luminescence). Taking this view to the limit, the generation rates for the point defects are as predicted by simply taking the damage generated by the Coulomb interaction of the protons and Si nuclei

  1. A new Predictive Model for Relativistic Electrons in Outer Radiation Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Relativistic electrons trapped in the Earth's outer radiation belt present a highly hazardous radiation environment for spaceborne electronics. These energetic electrons, with kinetic energies up to several megaelectron-volt (MeV), manifest a highly dynamic and event-specific nature due to the delicate interplay of competing transport, acceleration and loss processes. Therefore, developing a forecasting capability for outer belt MeV electrons has long been a critical and challenging task for the space weather community. Recently, the vital roles of electron resonance with waves (including such as chorus and electromagnetic ion cyclotron) have been widely recognized; however, it is still difficult for current diffusion radiation belt models to reproduce the behavior of MeV electrons during individual geomagnetic storms, mainly because of the large uncertainties existing in input parameters. In this work, we expanded our previous cross-energy cross-pitch-angle coherence study and developed a new predictive model for MeV electrons over a wide range of L-shells inside the outer radiation belt. This new model uses NOAA POES observations from low-Earth-orbits (LEOs) as inputs to provide high-fidelity nowcast (multiple hour prediction) and forecast (> 1 day prediction) of the energization of MeV electrons as well as the evolving MeV electron distributions afterwards during storms. Performance of the predictive model is quantified by long-term in situ data from Van Allen Probes and LANL GEO satellites. This study adds new science significance to an existing LEO space infrastructure, and provides reliable and powerful tools to the whole space community.

  2. radiation-accompanied π0 photoproduction on the proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumann, S.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes an experiment for the radiation-accompanied π 0 photoproduction on the proton int the energy range of the Δ resonance. With the detector system from Crystal Ball (672 NaI(Tl) crystals) and the TAPS forward wall (510 BaF 2 modules) and the space-angle covering of this arrangement of nearly 4π the reaction γp→pπ 0 γ' could be studied with high statistics; furthermore the use of a both linearly and circularly polarized photon beam allowed beside the study of unpolarized cross sections also the consideration of polarization observables like the photon asymmetry of the π 0 meson or the single-spin asymmetry of the photon γ'. The experiment described hera was performed with a real photon beam, which was produced via the bremsstrahlung of the MAMI electron beam with energies of E 0 =883 MeV respectively E 0 =570 MeV on a diamond respectively iron radiator. By the momentum determination in a magnetic spectrometer (Glasgow-Mainz-Tagger) and a coincidence analysis with the product detectors Crystal Ball and TAPS this photon beam was energy-marked and allowed by this together with the liquid-hydrogen target a precise knowledge of the incident side of the photoinduced reactions. For the study of the reaction γp→pπ 0 γ' all final-state particle were detected in the detector systems with their complete energy and momentum informations. With the data analysis described in this thesis about 27,000 events of the radiation-accompanied π 0 production could be reconstructed, from which in connection with a simulation of the detector and analysis efficiency energy and angular differential cross sections of the photon γ', the π 0 meson, as well as the proton were determined in each three intervals of the beam energy (ω=325..375 MeV, ω=375..425 MeV, and ω=425..475 MeV). In the energy range between 325 MeV and 475 MeV for the total cross section values of about 60 nb to 80 nb result. Additionally the photon asymmetry (linearly polarized photons

  3. ODYSSEY: A PUBLIC GPU-BASED CODE FOR GENERAL RELATIVISTIC RADIATIVE TRANSFER IN KERR SPACETIME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu, Hung-Yi [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, 11F of Astronomy-Mathematics Building, AS/NTU No. 1, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Yun, Kiyun; Yoon, Suk-Jin [Department of Astronomy and Center for Galaxy Evolution Research, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Younsi, Ziri [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Max-von-Laue-Straße 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2016-04-01

    General relativistic radiative transfer calculations coupled with the calculation of geodesics in the Kerr spacetime are an essential tool for determining the images, spectra, and light curves from matter in the vicinity of black holes. Such studies are especially important for ongoing and upcoming millimeter/submillimeter very long baseline interferometry observations of the supermassive black holes at the centers of Sgr A* and M87. To this end we introduce Odyssey, a graphics processing unit (GPU) based code for ray tracing and radiative transfer in the Kerr spacetime. On a single GPU, the performance of Odyssey can exceed 1 ns per photon, per Runge–Kutta integration step. Odyssey is publicly available, fast, accurate, and flexible enough to be modified to suit the specific needs of new users. Along with a Graphical User Interface powered by a video-accelerated display architecture, we also present an educational software tool, Odyssey-Edu, for showing in real time how null geodesics around a Kerr black hole vary as a function of black hole spin and angle of incidence onto the black hole.

  4. SUB-PHOTOSPHERIC EMISSION FROM RELATIVISTIC RADIATION MEDIATED SHOCKS IN GRBs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromberg, Omer; Mikolitzky, Ziv; Levinson, Amir

    2011-01-01

    It is proposed that the prompt emission observed in bursts that exhibit a thermal component originates from relativistic radiation mediated shocks (RRMS) that form below the photosphere of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow. It is argued that such shocks are expected to form in luminous bursts via collisions of shells that propagate with moderate Lorentz factors Γ ∼< 500. Faster shells will collide above the photosphere to form collisionless shocks. We demonstrate that in events like GRB 090902B a substantial fraction of the explosion energy is dissipated below the photosphere, in a region of moderate optical depth τ ∼< 300, whereas in GRB 080916C the major fraction of the energy dissipates above the photosphere. We show that under conditions anticipated in many GRBs, such RRMS convect enough radiation upstream to render photon production in the shock transition negligible, unlike the case of shock breakout in supernovae. The resulting spectrum, as measured in the shock frame, has a relatively low thermal peak, followed by a broad, nonthermal component extending up to the Klein-Nishina limit.

  5. Evaluation on the Radiation Exposure of Radiation Workers in Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Jang, Yo Jong; Kim, Tae Yoon; Jeong, Do Hyung; Choi, Gye Suk

    2012-01-01

    Unlike the existing linear accelerator with photon, proton therapy produces a number of second radiation due to the kinds of nuclide including neutron that is produced from the interaction with matter, and more attention must be paid on the exposure level of radiation workers for this reason. Therefore, thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) that is being widely used to measure radiation was utilized to analyze the exposure level of the radiation workers and propose a basic data about the radiation exposure level during the proton therapy. The subjects were radiation workers who worked at the proton therapy center of National Cancer Center and TLD Badge was used to compare the measured data of exposure level. In order to check the dispersion of exposure dose on body parts from the second radiation coming out surrounding the beam line of proton, TLD (width and length: 3 mm each) was attached to on the body spots (lateral canthi, neck, nipples, umbilicus, back, wrists) and retained them for 8 working hours, and the average data was obtained after measuring them for 80 hours. Moreover, in order to look into the dispersion of spatial exposure in the treatment room, TLD was attached on the snout, PPS (Patient Positioning System), Pendant, block closet, DIPS (Digital Image Positioning System), Console, doors and measured its exposure dose level during the working hours per day. As a result of measuring exposure level of TLD Badge of radiation workers, quarterly average was 0.174 mSv, yearly average was 0.543 mSv, and after measuring the exposure level of body spots, it showed that the highest exposed body spot was neck and the lowest exposed body spot was back (the middle point of a line connecting both scapula superior angles). Investigation into the spatial exposure according to the workers' movement revealed that the exposure level was highest near the snout and as the distance becomes distant, it went lower. Even a small amount of exposure will eventually increase

  6. Application of the personnel photographic monitoring method to determine equivalent radiation dose beyond proton accelerator shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gel'fand, E.K.; Komochkov, M.M.; Man'ko, B.V.; Salatskaya, M.I.; Sychev, B.S.

    1980-01-01

    Calculations of regularities to form radiation dose beyond proton accelerator shielding are carried out. Numerical data on photographic monitoring dosemeter in radiation fields investigated are obtained. It was shown how to determine the total equivalent dose of radiation fields beyond proton accelerator shielding by means of the photographic monitoring method by introduction into the procedure of considering nuclear emulsions of division of particle tracks into the black and grey ones. A comparison of experimental and calculational data has shown the applicability of the used calculation method for modelling dose radiation characteristics beyond proton accelerator shielding [ru

  7. Observation of coherently enhanced tunable narrow-band terahertz transition radiation from a relativistic sub-picosecond electron bunch train

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piot, P.; Maxwell, T. J.; Sun, Y.-E; Ruan, J.; Lumpkin, A. H.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Rihaoui, M. M.

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the production of narrow-band (δf/f≅20% at f≅0.5THz) transition radiation with tunable frequency over [0.37, 0.86] THz. The radiation is produced as a train of sub-picosecond relativistic electron bunches transits at the vacuum-aluminum interface of an aluminum converter screen. The bunch train is generated via a transverse-to-longitudinal phase space exchange technique. We also show a possible application of modulated beams to extend the dynamical range of a popular bunch length diagnostic technique based on the spectral analysis of coherent radiation.

  8. Incidence of Second Malignancies Among Patients Treated With Proton Versus Photon Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Christine S., E-mail: chungc1@sutterhealth.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, Berkeley, California (United States); Yock, Torunn I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Nelson, Kerrie [Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Xu, Yang [Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Keating, Nancy L. [Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of General Internal Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Tarbell, Nancy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Office of the Executive Dean, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Proton radiation, when compared with photon radiation, allows delivery of increased radiation dose to the tumor while decreasing dose to adjacent critical structures. Given the recent expansion of proton facilities in the United States, the long-term sequelae of proton therapy should be carefully assessed. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of second cancers in patients treated with proton radiation with a population-based cohort of matched patients treated with photon radiation. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 558 patients treated with proton radiation from 1973 to 2001 at the Harvard Cyclotron in Cambridge, MA and 558 matched patients treated with photon therapy in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program cancer registry. Patients were matched by age at radiation treatment, sex, year of treatment, cancer histology, and site. The main outcome measure was the incidence of second malignancies after radiation. Results: We matched 558 proton patients with 558 photon patients from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry. The median duration of follow-up was 6.7 years (interquartile range, 7.4) and 6.0 years (interquartile range, 9.3) in the proton and photon cohorts, respectively. The median age at treatment was 59 years in each cohort. Second malignancies occurred in 29 proton patients (5.2%) and 42 photon patients (7.5%). After we adjusted for sex, age at treatment, primary site, and year of diagnosis, proton therapy was not associated with an increased risk of second malignancy (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.52 [95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.85]; P=.009). Conclusions: The use of proton radiation therapy was not associated with a significantly increased risk of secondary malignancies compared with photon therapy. Longer follow-up of these patients is needed to determine if there is a significant decrease in second malignancies. Given the limitations of the study

  9. Incidence of Second Malignancies Among Patients Treated With Proton Versus Photon Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Christine S.; Yock, Torunn I.; Nelson, Kerrie; Xu, Yang; Keating, Nancy L.; Tarbell, Nancy J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Proton radiation, when compared with photon radiation, allows delivery of increased radiation dose to the tumor while decreasing dose to adjacent critical structures. Given the recent expansion of proton facilities in the United States, the long-term sequelae of proton therapy should be carefully assessed. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of second cancers in patients treated with proton radiation with a population-based cohort of matched patients treated with photon radiation. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 558 patients treated with proton radiation from 1973 to 2001 at the Harvard Cyclotron in Cambridge, MA and 558 matched patients treated with photon therapy in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program cancer registry. Patients were matched by age at radiation treatment, sex, year of treatment, cancer histology, and site. The main outcome measure was the incidence of second malignancies after radiation. Results: We matched 558 proton patients with 558 photon patients from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry. The median duration of follow-up was 6.7 years (interquartile range, 7.4) and 6.0 years (interquartile range, 9.3) in the proton and photon cohorts, respectively. The median age at treatment was 59 years in each cohort. Second malignancies occurred in 29 proton patients (5.2%) and 42 photon patients (7.5%). After we adjusted for sex, age at treatment, primary site, and year of diagnosis, proton therapy was not associated with an increased risk of second malignancy (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.52 [95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.85]; P=.009). Conclusions: The use of proton radiation therapy was not associated with a significantly increased risk of secondary malignancies compared with photon therapy. Longer follow-up of these patients is needed to determine if there is a significant decrease in second malignancies. Given the limitations of the study

  10. Energy Dependence of Proton Radiation Damage in Si-Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084399; Neubüser, C.

    2014-01-01

    Irradiation experiments on silicon sensors are used to mimic the radiation environment at collider experiments with the aim to forecast the change of the electrical properties of a detector with irradiation. Measurements on irradiated sensors are invaluable in choosing a material well suited for a silicon tracking detector. This is especially true for the upgraded detectors to be used in the high-luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC), where silicon sensors as currently used would suffer severe loss in signal from irradiation with charged and neutral hadrons.\\\\ The CMS Tracker Collaboration has initiated irradiation studies with protons with energies ranging from 23 MeV to 23 GeV. They are often used instead of charged hadrons, their radiation induced damage to the silicon being rather similar. However, in oxygen rich silicon, NIEL violation concerning the full depletion voltage has been observed.\\\\ In this paper results from investigations on bulk defects compared to the change of the electrical properties of ...

  11. Electromagnetic radiation of protons in edge fields of synchrotron dipole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolyakov, N.V.

    1986-01-01

    Effect of the edge shape of magnetic field of a dipole on the short-wave part of electromagnetic radiation spectrum of a proton beam is investigated. In some cases short-wave photons are shown to be shaped in the ranges of largest edge curvature of the magnetic field. Universality of edge radiation spectrum is proved. Spectral characteristics of proton edge radiation in a superconducting magnetic dipole of the storage-accelerator complex are obtained

  12. Radiation effects of protons and 60Co γ rays on CMOS operational amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Wu; Ren Diyuan; Guo Qi; Yu Xuefeng; Yan Rongliang

    1997-01-01

    Radiation effects of 60 Co γ ray and 4,7 and 30 MeV protons on LF 7650 CMOS operational amplifier were investigated. The damage mechanism of LF7650 was discussed. It is indicated that the mobility reduction of major carrier caused by ionizing and displacement damage is the chief mechanism causing the failure of CMOS operational amplifier irradiated by protons, and that is why the degradation of LF 7650 caused by protons is much more serious than that caused by 60 Co γ ray. In addition, a comparison of proton radiation effects on CMOS operational amplifier and MOSFET showed a significant difference in mechanism

  13. Quasicharacteristic radiation of relativistic electrons at orientation motion in lithium halides crystals along charged planes and axes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksyuta, N. V.; Vysotskii, V. I.; Efimenko, S. V.

    2016-07-01

    The paper deals with the investigation of the orientation motion of relativistic electrons in charged (111) planes and charged [110] axes of lithium halides ionic crystals of LiF, LiCl, LiBr and LiI. On the basis of these investigations the spectra of quasicharacteristic radiation for the electron beams with various Lorentz-factors both in planar and axial cases have been calculated numerically.

  14. Terahertz Pulse Generation in Underdense Relativistic Plasmas: From Photoionization-Induced Radiation to Coherent Transition Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Déchard, J.; Debayle, A.; Davoine, X.; Gremillet, L.; Bergé, L.

    2018-04-01

    Terahertz to far-infrared emission by two-color, ultrashort optical pulses interacting with underdense helium gases at ultrahigh intensities (>1019 W /cm2 ) is investigated by means of 3D particle-in-cell simulations. The terahertz field is shown to be produced by two mechanisms occurring sequentially, namely, photoionization-induced radiation (PIR) by the two-color pulse, and coherent transition radiation (CTR) by the wakefield-accelerated electrons escaping the plasma. We exhibit laser-plasma parameters for which CTR proves to be the dominant process, providing terahertz bursts with field strength as high as 100 GV /m and energy in excess of 10 mJ. Analytical models are developed for both the PIR and CTR processes, which correctly reproduce the simulation data.

  15. Radiative leptonic B{sub c} decay in the relativistic independent quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barik, N [Department of Physics, Utkal University, Bhubaneswar-751004 (India); Naimuddin, Sk; Dash, P C [Department of Physics, Prananath Autonomous College, Khurda-752057 (India); Kar, Susmita [Department of Physics, North Orissa University, Baripada-757003 (India)

    2008-12-01

    The radiative leptonic decay B{sub c}{sup -}{yields}{mu}{sup -}{nu}{sub {mu}}{gamma} is analyzed in its leading order in a relativistic independent quark model based on a confining potential in an equally mixed scalar-vector harmonic form. The branching ratio for this decay in the vanishing lepton mass limit is obtained as Br(B{sub c}{yields}{mu}{nu}{sub {mu}}{gamma})=6.83x10{sup -5}, which includes the contributions of the internal bremsstrahlung and structure-dependent diagrams at the level of the quark constituents. The contributions of the bremsstrahlung and the structure-dependent diagrams, as well as their additive interference parts, are compared and found to be of the same order of magnitude. Finally, the predicted photon energy spectrum is observed here to be almost symmetrical about the peak value of the photon energy at E-tilde{sub {gamma}}{approx_equal}(M{sub B{sub c}}/4), which may be quite accessible experimentally at LHC in near future.

  16. Transverse phase space mapping of relativistic electron beams using optical transition radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Le Sage

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Optical transition radiation (OTR has proven to be a versatile and effective diagnostic for measuring the profile, divergence, and emittance of relativistic electron beams with a wide range of parameters. Diagnosis of the divergence of modern high brightness beams is especially well suited to OTR interference (OTRI techniques, where multiple dielectric or metal foils are used to generate a spatially coherent interference pattern. Theoretical analysis of measured OTR and OTRI patterns allows precise measurement of electron beam emittance characteristics. Here we describe an extension of this technique to allow mapping of divergence characteristics as a function of transverse coordinates within a measured beam. We present the first experimental analysis of the transverse phase space of an electron beam using all optical techniques. Comparing an optically masked portion of the beam to the entire beam, we measure different angular spread and average direction of the particles. Direct measurement of the phase-space ellipse tilt angle has been demonstrated using this optical masking technique.

  17. Proton Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouw, Kent W. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sethi, Roshan V.; Yeap, Beow Y.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.; Munzenrider, John E.; Adams, Judith [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Grabowski, Eric [Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mukai, Shizuo [Retina Service, Department of Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Shih, Helen A., E-mail: hshih@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate long-term disease and toxicity outcomes for pediatric retinoblastoma patients treated with proton radiation therapy (PRT). Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective analysis of 49 retinoblastoma patients (60 eyes) treated with PRT between 1986 and 2012. Results: The majority (84%) of patients had bilateral disease, and nearly half (45%) had received prior chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 8 years (range, 1-24 years), no patients died of retinoblastoma or developed metastatic disease. The post-PRT enucleation rate was low (18%), especially in patients with early-stage disease (11% for patients with International Classification for Intraocular Retinoblastoma [ICIR] stage A-B disease vs 23% for patients with ICIR stage C-D disease). Post-PRT ophthalmologic follow-up was available for 61% of the preserved eyes (30 of 49): 14 of 30 eyes (47%) had 20/40 visual acuity or better, 7 of 30 (23%) had moderate visual acuity (20/40-20/600), and 9 of 30 (30%) had little or no useful vision (worse than 20/600). Twelve of 60 treated eyes (20%) experienced a post-PRT event requiring intervention, with cataracts the most common (4 eyes). No patients developed an in-field second malignancy. Conclusions: Long-term follow-up of retinoblastoma patients treated with PRT demonstrates that PRT can achieve high local control rates, even in advanced cases, and many patients retain useful vision in the treated eye. Treatment-related ocular side effects were uncommon, and no radiation-associated malignancies were observed.

  18. Conformal proton radiation therapy for pediatric low-grade astrocytomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hug, E.B. [Loma Linda Univ. Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Medicine; Loma Linda Univ. Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States). Dept. of Pediatrics and Dept. of Pathology; Darthmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States). Section of Radiation Oncology; Muenter, M.W.; Archambeau, J.O.; DeVries, A.; Loredo, L.N.; Grove, R.I.; Slater, J.D. [Loma Linda Univ. Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Medicine; Liwnicz, B. [Loma Linda Univ. Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States). Dept. of Pathology

    2002-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of proton radiation therapy (PRT) for intracranial low-grade astrocytomas, the authors analyzed the first 27 pediatric patients treated at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC). Patients and Method: Between September 1991 and August 1997, 27 patients (13 female, 14 male) underwent fractionated proton radiation therapy for progressive or recurrent low-grade astrocytoma. Age at time of treatment ranged from 2 to 18 years (mean: 8.7 years). Tumors were located centrally (diencephatic) in 15 patients, in the cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres in seven patients, and in the brainstem in five patients. 25/27 patients (92%) were treated for progressive, unresectable, or residual disease following subtotal resection. Tissue diagnosis was available in 23/27 patients (85%). Four patients with optic pathway tumors were treated without histologic confirmation. Target doses between 50.4 and 63.0 CGE (cobalt gray equivalent, mean: 55.2 CGE) were prescribed at 1.8 CGE per fraction, five treatments per week. Results: At a mean follow-up period of 3.3 years (0.6-6.8 years), 6/27 patients experienced local failure (all located within the irradiated field), and 4/27 patients had died. By anatomic site these data translated into rates of local control and survival of 87% (13/15 patients) and 93% (14/15 patients) for central tumors, 71% (5/7 patients) and 86% (6/7 patients) for hemispheric tumors, and 60% (3/5 patients) and 60% (3/5 patients) for tumors located in the brainstem. Proton radiation therapy was generally well tolerated. All children with local control maintained their performance status. One child with associated neurofibromatosis, Type 1, developed Moyamoya disease. All six patients with optic pathway tumors and useful vision maintained or improved their visual status. Conclusions: This report on pediatric low-grade astrocytomas confirms proton radiation therapy as a safe and efficacious 3-D conformal treatment

  19. Transmutation of 239Pu and other nuclides using spallation neutrons produced by relativistic protons reacting with massive U- and Pb- targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, J.; Balabekyan, A.; Bamblevskij, V.P.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental studies on the transmutation of some long-lived radioactive waste nuclei, such as 129 I, 237 Np, and 239 Pu, as well as on natural uranium and lanthanum (all of them used as sensors) were carried out at the Synchrophasotron of the Laboratory of High Energies (JINR, Dubna). Spallation neutrons were produced by relativistic protons with energies in the range of 0.5 GeV ≤ E(p) ≤ 1.5 GeV interacting with 20 cm long uranium or lead target stacks. The targets were surrounded by 6 cm paraffin moderators. The radioactive sensors mentioned above were positioned on the outside surface of the moderator and contained typically approximately 0.5 up to 1 gram of long-lived isotopes. The highly radioactive targets were produced perfectly well-sealed in aluminium containers by the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk, Russia. From the experimentally observed transmutation rates one can easily extrapolate, that in a subcritical nuclear power assembly (or 'energy amplifier') using a 10 mA proton beam of 1 GeV onto a Pb-target as used here, one can transmute in one gram samples of the isotope within one month about 3 mg 129 I, 21 mg 237 Np, 3.3 mg 238 U, and 200 mg 239 Pu under the same geometrical conditions. Our observations show, that the transmutation ability of our system increases linearly with the proton energy within the energy interval studied

  20. Net-baryon-, net-proton-, and net-charge kurtosis in heavy-ion collisions within a relativistic transport approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahrgang, Marlene; Schuster, Tim; Stock, Reinhard; Mitrovski, Michael; Bleicher, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    We explore the potential of net-baryon, net-proton and net-charge kurtosis measurements to investigate the properties of hot and dense matter created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Contrary to calculations in a grand-canonical ensemble we explicitly take into account exact electric and baryon charge conservation on an event-by-event basis. This drastically limits the width of baryon fluctuations. A simple model to account for this is to assume a grand-canonical distribution with a sharp cut-off at the tails. We present baseline predictions of the energy dependence of the net-baryon, net-proton and net-charge kurtosis for central (b≤2.75 fm) Pb+Pb/Au+Au collisions from E lab =2A GeV to √(s NN )=200 GeV from the UrQMD model. While the net-charge kurtosis is compatible with values around zero, the net-baryon number decreases to large negative values with decreasing beam energy. The net-proton kurtosis becomes only slightly negative for low √(s NN ). (orig.)

  1. Interference effects in angular and spectral distributions of X-ray Transition Radiation from Relativistic Heavy Ions crossing a radiator: Influence of absorption and slowing-down

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiks, E.I.; Pivovarov, Yu.L.

    2015-07-15

    Theoretical analysis and representative calculations of angular and spectral distributions of X-ray Transition Radiation (XTR) by Relativistic Heavy Ions (RHI) crossing a radiator are presented taking into account both XTR absorption and RHI slowing-down. The calculations are performed for RHI energies of GSI, FAIR, CERN SPS and LHC and demonstrate the influence of XTR photon absorption as well as RHI slowing-down in a radiator on the appearance/disappearance of interference effects in both angular and spectral distributions of XTR.

  2. Transient pulse analysis of ionized electronics exposed to γ-radiation generated from a relativistic electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Sun-Hong; Kwon, Ohjoon; Sattorov, Matlabjon; Baek, In-Keun; Kim, Seontae; Hong, Dongpyo; Jeong, Jin-Young; Jang, Jungmin; Bera, Anirban; Barik, Ranjan Kumar; Bhattacharya, Ranajoy; Cho, Ilsung; Kim, Byungsu; Park, Chawon; Jung, Wongyun; Park, Seunghyuk; Park, Gun-Sik

    2018-02-01

    When a semiconductor element is irradiated with radiation in the form of a transient pulse emitted from a nuclear explosion, a large amount of charge is generated in a short time in the device. A photocurrent amplified in a certain direction by these types of charges cause the device to break down and malfunction or in extreme cases causes them to burn out. In this study, a pulse-type γ-ray generator based on a relativistic electron beam accelerator (γ=2.2, β=0.89) which functions by means of tungsten impingement was constructed and tested in an effort to investigate the process and effects of the photocurrent formed by electron hole pairs (EHP) generated in a pMOSFET device when a transient radiation pulse is incident in the device. The pulse-type γ-ray irradiating device used here to generate the electron beam current in a short time was devised to allow an increase in the irradiation dose. A precise signal processing circuit was constructed to measure the photocurrent of the small signal generated by the pMOSFET due to the electron beam accelerator pulse signal from the large noise stemming from the electromagnetic field around the relativistic electron beam accelerator. The pulse-type γ-ray generator was installed to meet the requirements of relativistic electron beam accelerators, and beam irradiation was conducted after a beam commissioning step.

  3. Comparing of γ-ray, proton and neutron radiation effects on optoelectronics for space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Qingkui; Tang Min; Meng Meng; Li Pengwei; Wen Ping; Li Haian; Tang Jiesen; Wang Sixin; Song Yamei

    2014-01-01

    We performed irradiation test on optoelectronics with γ-rays, proton and neutron. The electrical measurements were performed pre and after irradiation. The degradations induced by each radiation source was compared. (authors)

  4. Plasma relativistic microwave electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzelev, M.V.; Loza, O.T.; Rukhadze, A.A.; Strelkov, P.S.; Shkvarunets, A.G.

    2001-01-01

    One formulated the principles of plasma relativistic microwave electronics based on the induced Cherenkov radiation of electromagnetic waves at interaction of a relativistic electron beam with plasma. One developed the theory of plasma relativistic generators and accelerators of microwave radiation, designed and studied the prototypes of such devices. One studied theoretically the mechanisms of radiation, calculated the efficiencies and the frequency spectra of plasma relativistic microwave generators and accelerators. The theory findings are proved by the experiment: intensity of the designed sources of microwave radiation is equal to 500 μW, the frequency of microwave radiation is increased by 7 times (from 4 up to 28 GHz), the width of radiation frequency band may vary from several up to 100%. The designed sources of microwave radiation are no else compared in the electronics [ru

  5. Design concept of radiation control system for the high intensity proton accelerator facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Yukihiro; Ikeno, Koichi; Akiyama, Shigenori; Harada, Yasunori [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-11-01

    Description is given for the characteristic radiation environment for the High Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility and the design concept of the radiation control system of it. The facility is a large scale accelerator complex consisting of high energy proton accelerators carrying the highest beam intensity in the world and the related experimental facilities and therefore provides various issues relevant to the radiation environment. The present report describes the specifications for the radiation control system for the facility, determined in consideration of these characteristics. (author)

  6. A system for monitoring the radiation effects of a proton linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skorkin, V. M., E-mail: skorkin@inr.ru; Belyanski, K. L.; Skorkin, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The system for real-time monitoring of radioactivity of a high-current proton linear accelerator detects secondary neutron emission from proton beam losses in transport channels and measures the activity of radionuclides in gas and aerosol emissions and the radiation background in the environment affected by a linear accelerator. The data provided by gamma, beta, and neutron detectors are transferred over a computer network to the central server. The system allows one to monitor proton beam losses, the activity of gas and aerosol emissions, and the radiation emission level of a linear accelerator in operation.

  7. Radiation damage in proton-irradiated epitaxial silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, Joern

    2009-07-01

    In this work radiation hardness of 75 μm, 100 μm and 150 μm thick epitaxial silicon pad diodes of both standard and oxygenated material was investigated. Damage after 24 GeV/c proton irradiation in a 1MeV neutron equivalent fluence range between 10 14 cm -2 and 10 16 cm -2 was studied and isothermal annealing experiments at 80 C were carried out. Standard CV/IV measurements could be performed up to 4 x 10 15 cm -2 . The volume-normalised reverse current was found to increase linearly with fluence with a slope independent of the thickness and impurity concentration. However, due to large fluctuations the fluences had to be renormalised using the current-related damage parameter. Concerning the depletion voltage, nearly all materials remained at a moderate level up to 4 x 10 15 cm -2 . During short-term annealing acceptors annealed out, whereas others were introduced during the long-term annealing. The stable damage was characterised by donor removal at low fluences and fluence-proportional predominant donor introduction for highly irradiated diodes, depending on the oxygen level. No type inversion was observed. Time-resolved measurements with a new 670 nm laser-TCT setup made the determination of the trapping time constant with the charge correction method possible. The results agreed with expectations and showed a linear increase of trapping probability with fluence. The electric field exhibited a double peak structure in highly irradiated diodes. Charge collection efficiency measurements with α-particles were independent of oxygen concentration, but showed an improved efficiency for thinner diodes. A comparison to simulation revealed systematic discrepancies. A non-constant trapping time parameter was proposed as possible solution. (orig.)

  8. Radiation damage in proton-irradiated epitaxial silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, Joern

    2009-07-15

    In this work radiation hardness of 75 {mu}m, 100 {mu}m and 150 {mu}m thick epitaxial silicon pad diodes of both standard and oxygenated material was investigated. Damage after 24 GeV/c proton irradiation in a 1MeV neutron equivalent fluence range between 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} and 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} was studied and isothermal annealing experiments at 80 C were carried out. Standard CV/IV measurements could be performed up to 4 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The volume-normalised reverse current was found to increase linearly with fluence with a slope independent of the thickness and impurity concentration. However, due to large fluctuations the fluences had to be renormalised using the current-related damage parameter. Concerning the depletion voltage, nearly all materials remained at a moderate level up to 4 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. During short-term annealing acceptors annealed out, whereas others were introduced during the long-term annealing. The stable damage was characterised by donor removal at low fluences and fluence-proportional predominant donor introduction for highly irradiated diodes, depending on the oxygen level. No type inversion was observed. Time-resolved measurements with a new 670 nm laser-TCT setup made the determination of the trapping time constant with the charge correction method possible. The results agreed with expectations and showed a linear increase of trapping probability with fluence. The electric field exhibited a double peak structure in highly irradiated diodes. Charge collection efficiency measurements with {alpha}-particles were independent of oxygen concentration, but showed an improved efficiency for thinner diodes. A comparison to simulation revealed systematic discrepancies. A non-constant trapping time parameter was proposed as possible solution. (orig.)

  9. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, J.H.; Rusek, A.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X.S.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  10. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, J H; Sanzari, J; Avery, S; Sayers, C; Krigsfeld, G; Nuth, M; Wan, X S; Rusek, A; Kennedy, A R

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  11. Properties of light transition radiation of 660 MeV proton inclined incidence (γ=1.7) on a thick nickel plate. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zrelov, V.P.; Pavlovic, P.; Ruzicka, J.

    1975-01-01

    The basic properties of transition radiation in the visible fraction of the spectrum have been calculated for 660 MeV protons (γ=1.7) obliquely incident on a thick nickel plate in vacuum. The angular distributions of the summary radiation (i.e. the sums of radiations of various polarizations) both 'forward' and 'backward' for different azimuthal planes are presented in tables and diagrams for different particle inclination angles to the separation boundary. The examples of angular distributions of radiation having various polarizations (at the inclination angle of 45 0 ) show that they differ considerably. The spectra of summary radiation are of a monotonous character. The calculations have shown that in a relativistic case the forward radiation is concentrated near the direction of particle motion and backward radiation moves in an opposite direction with respect to that of the particle inclination. The dependence of the total yield of forward and backward transition radiations upon the particle inclination angle is approximately cos 2 psi. (Auth.)

  12. Team Update on North American Proton Facilities for Radiation Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Label, Kenneth A.; Turflinger, Thomas; Haas, Thurman; George, Jeffrey; Moss, Steven; Davis, Scott; Kostic, Andrew; Wie, Brian; Reed, Robert; Guertin, Steven; hide

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of the closure of the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF), this presentation provides an overview of the options for North American proton facilities. This includes those in use by the aerospace community as well as new additions from the cancer therapy regime. In addition, proton single event testing background is provided for understanding the criteria needed for these facilities for electronics testing.

  13. Detailed spectra of high power broadband microwave radiation from interactions of relativistic electron beams with weakly magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, K.G.; Benford, G.; Tzach, D.

    1983-01-01

    Prodigious quantities of microwave energy are observed uniformly across a wide frequency band when a relativistic electron beam (REB) penetrates a plasma. Measurement calculations are illustrated. A model of Compton-like boosting of ambient plasma waves by beam electrons, with collateral emission of high frequency photons, qualitatively explain the spectra. A transition in spectral behavior is observed from the weak to strong turbulence theories advocated for Type III solar burst radiation, and further into the regime the authors characterize as super-strong REB-plasma interactions

  14. A novel transition radiation detector utilizing superconducting microspheres for measuring the energy of relativistic high-energy charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Luke C.L.; Chen, C.P.; Huang, C.Y.; Lee, S.C.; Waysand, G.; Perrier, P.; Limagne, D.; Jeudy, V.; Girard, T.

    2000-01-01

    A novel transition radiation detector (TRD) utilizing superheated superconducting microspheres of tin of 22-26, 27-32 and 32-38 μm in diameter, respectively, has been constructed which is capable of measuring accurately the energy of relativistic high-energy charged particles. The test has been conducted in a high-energy electron beam facility at the CERN PS in the energy range of 1-10 GeV showing an energy dependence of the TR X-ray photon produced and hence the value γ=E/mc 2 of the charged particle

  15. Proton radiotherapy for chest wall and regional lymphatic radiation; dose comparisons and treatment delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, Shannon M; Jimenez, Rachel; Paetzold, Peter; Adams, Judith; Beatty, Jonathan; DeLaney, Thomas F; Kooy, Hanne; Taghian, Alphonse G; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The delivery of post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) can be challenging for patients with left sided breast cancer that have undergone mastectomy. This study investigates the use of protons for PMRT in selected patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy. We also report the first clinical application of protons for these patients. Eleven patients were planned with protons, partially wide tangent photon fields (PWTF), and photon/electron (P/E) fields. Plans were generated with the goal of achieving 95% coverage of target volumes while maximally sparing cardiac and pulmonary structures. In addition, we report on two patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy and IMN involvement that were treated with a mix of proton and standard radiation. PWTF, P/E, and proton plans were generated and compared. Reasonable target volume coverage was achieved with PWTF and P/E fields, but proton therapy achieved superior coverage with a more homogeneous plan. Substantial cardiac and pulmonary sparing was achieved with proton therapy as compared to PWTF and P/E. In the two clinical cases, the delivery of proton radiation with a 7.2 to 9 Gy photon and electron component was feasible and well tolerated. Akimbo positioning was necessary for gantry clearance for one patient; the other was treated on a breast board with standard positioning (arms above her head). LAO field arrangement was used for both patients. Erythema and fatigue were the only noted side effects. Proton RT enables delivery of radiation to the chest wall and regional lymphatics, including the IMN, without compromise of coverage and with improved sparing of surrounding normal structures. This treatment is feasible, however, optimal patient set up may vary and field size is limited without multiple fields/matching

  16. The semiconductor doping with radiation defects via proton and alpha-particle irradiation. Review

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlov, V A

    2001-01-01

    Paper presents an analytical review devoted to semiconductor doping with radiation defects resulted from irradiation by light ions, in particular, by protons and alpha-particles. One studies formation of radiation defects in silicon, gallium arsenide and indium phosphide under light ion irradiation. One analyzes effect of proton and alpha-particle irradiation on electric conductivity of the above-listed semiconducting materials. Semiconductor doping with radiation defects under light ion irradiation enables to control their electrophysical properties and to design high-speed opto-, micro- and nanoelectronic devices on their basis

  17. Determination of spatial and energy distributions of neutrons in experiments on transmutation of radioactive waste using relativistic protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuk, I.V.; Lomonosova, E.M.; Boulyga, S.F.; Kievitskaia, A.I.; Rakhno, I.L.; Chigrinov, S.E.; Bradnova, V.; Krivopustov, M.I.; Kulakov, B.A.; Brandt, R.; Ochs, M.; Wan, J.-S.

    1999-01-01

    The experiments on transmutation of 129 I and 237 Np using uranium-lead targets surrounded by a paraffin moderator were performed at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Russia). The targets were irradiated by 1.5 GeV and 7.4 GeV protons at the Synchrophasotron of JINR. In the frame of present work spatial and energy distributions of neutrons on the surface of the paraffin moderator were measured using SSNTD technique. It is shown that measured values of spectral indices do not depend on the energy of incident protons but depend on the target composition. The presence of the uranium insertion softens neutron spectra

  18. Radiation-accompanied pion photoproduction on the proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rost, M.

    2004-01-01

    In the year 1997, Tatischeff et al. found resonance-like states in the invariant mass spectrum of the missing particle X at M=1004, 1044 and 1094 MeV, utilizing the reaction pp→Xpπ + . Investigating the reaction pd→ppX, resonance structures have been observed at M=966, 986 and 1003 MeV in a further experiment by Filkov et al. Such kinds of exotic states contradict various nucleon models which describe the Δ(1232) resonance as the first excited state. Instead, quark cluster models with and without color-magnetic interactions have been formulated to explain these resonance structures. Lvov et al. argued that no such structure had been reported in real Compton scattering data. As a counter argument, Kobushkin suggested that these resonances have a total anti-symmetric spin-flavour wave function and therefore only the N-2γ decay channel is allowed. In this work, the reaction γp→X 0 π + →nγγπ + is utilized for the search of these exotic resonances. Data were taken in parallel with the pion polarizability experiment at the MAMI accelerator facility in Mainz. Real photons are created by the bremsstrahlung process of the electrons in a thin radiator foil. Their energy is determined by the A2 photon tagging facility (Glasgow tagger). A 10 cm long liquid hydrogen target was used as a proton target. Charged reaction products are detected in a multi wire proportional chamber in forward direction, at theta 2 crystals containing TAPS spectrometer at polar angles of theta >60 . For neutron detection, a time of flight detector with 111 single modules was used. Additionally, the reaction channels γp→pπ 0 and γp→nπ 0 π + are analysed to test the apparatuses. For single pion production, differential cross sections are obtained and compared with theoretical models as well as experimental data. For the γp→nπ 0 π + channel, invariant mass spectra of particles in the final state are determined and compared with simulation. The data indicate that the main

  19. A new approach to the theory of Cherenkov radiation based on relativistic generalization of the Landau criterion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chefranov, S.G.

    2004-01-01

    Relativistic generalization of the Landau criterion is obtained which, in contrast to the classical Tamm-Frank and Ginzburg theories, determines the primary energy mechanism of emission of nonbremsstrahlung Cherenkov radiation. It is shown that Cherenkov radiation may correspond to a threshold energetically favorable conversion of the condensate (ultimately long-wavelength) elementary Bose perturbations of a medium into transverse Cherenkov photons emitted by the medium proper during its interaction with a sufficiently fast charged particle. The threshold conditions of emission are determined for a medium with an arbitrary refractive index n, including the case of isotropic plasma with n < 1 for which the classical theory of Cherenkov radiation prohibits such direct and effective nonbremsstrahlung emission of these particular transverse high-frequency electromagnetic waves. It is established that these conditions of emission agree with the data of well-known experiments on the threshold for observation of Cherenkov radiation, whereas the classical theory only corresponds to the conditions of observation of the interference maximum of this radiation. The possibility of direct effective emission of nonbremsstrahlung Cherenkov radiation, not taken into account in the classical theory, is considered for many observed astrophysical phenomena (type III solar radio bursts, particle acceleration by radiation, etc.)

  20. Predicted Rates of Secondary Malignancies From Proton Versus Photon Radiation Therapy for Stage I Seminoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simone, Charles B., E-mail: csimone@alumni.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Kramer, Kevin [Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Rockville, Maryland (United States); O' Meara, William P. [Division of Radiation Oncology, National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Belard, Arnaud [Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Rockville, Maryland (United States); McDonough, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); O' Connell, John [Radiation Oncology Service, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Photon radiotherapy has been the standard adjuvant treatment for stage I seminoma. Single-dose carboplatin therapy and observation have emerged as alternative options due to concerns for acute toxicities and secondary malignancies from radiation. In this institutional review board-approved study, we compared photon and proton radiotherapy for stage I seminoma and the predicted rates of excess secondary malignancies for both treatment modalities. Methods and Material: Computed tomography images from 10 consecutive patients with stage I seminoma were used to quantify dosimetric differences between photon and proton therapies. Structures reported to be at increased risk for secondary malignancies and in-field critical structures were contoured. Reported models of organ-specific radiation-induced cancer incidence rates based on organ equivalent dose were used to determine the excess absolute risk of secondary malignancies. Calculated values were compared with tumor registry reports of excess secondary malignancies among testicular cancer survivors. Results: Photon and proton plans provided comparable target volume coverage. Proton plans delivered significantly lower mean doses to all examined normal tissues, except for the kidneys. The greatest absolute reduction in mean dose was observed for the stomach (119 cGy for proton plans vs. 768 cGy for photon plans; p < 0.0001). Significantly more excess secondary cancers per 10,000 patients/year were predicted for photon radiation than for proton radiation to the stomach (4.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.22-5.01), large bowel (0.81; 95% CI, 0.39-1.01), and bladder (0.03; 95% CI, 0.01-0.58), while no difference was demonstrated for radiation to the pancreas (0.02; 95% CI, -0.01-0.06). Conclusions: For patients with stage I seminoma, proton radiation therapy reduced the predicted secondary cancer risk compared with photon therapy. We predict a reduction of one additional secondary cancer for every 50 patients

  1. Basic features of proton-proton interactions at ultra-relativistic energies and RFT-based quark-gluon string model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabrodin E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Proton-proton collisions at energies from √s = 200 GeV up to √s = 14 TeV are studied within the microscopic quark-gluon string model. The model is based on Gribov’s Reggeon Field Theory accomplished by string phenomenology. Comparison with experimental data shows that QGSM describes well particle yields, rapidity - and transverse momentum spectra, rise of mean 〈 pT 〉 and forward-backward multiplicity correlations. The latter arise in QGSM because of the addition of various processes with different mean multiplicities. The model also indicates fulfillment of extended longitudinal scaling and violation of Koba-Nielsen-Olesen scaling at LHC. The origin of both features is traced to short-range particle correlations in the strings. Predictions are made for √s = 14 TeV.

  2. The EMP excitation of radiation by the pulsed relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakirev, V.A.; Sidelnikov, G.L.

    1996-01-01

    The mechanisms of excitation of ultra-wideband electromagnetic pulses (EMP) by short pulses of high-current relativistic electron beams were proposed and investigated. It is shown that the transformation efficiency of the bunch kinetic energy to the excited energy of the EMP can be very significant. (author). 2 figs., 4 refs

  3. The EMP excitation of radiation by the pulsed relativistic electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakirev, V A; Sidelnikov, G L [Kharkov Inst. of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The mechanisms of excitation of ultra-wideband electromagnetic pulses (EMP) by short pulses of high-current relativistic electron beams were proposed and investigated. It is shown that the transformation efficiency of the bunch kinetic energy to the excited energy of the EMP can be very significant. (author). 2 figs., 4 refs.

  4. Non-adiabatic radiative collapse of a relativistic star under different ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ditions. The collapse of a star filled with a homogeneous perfect fluid is compared with that of a star filled with ... We have examined the collapse of a relativistic star with matter density and fluid pressure decreasing ..... are invoked to extract information about the change in the equation of state of the interior matter of a ...

  5. Fabrication and optimization of a fiber-optic radiation sensor for proton beam dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, K.W.; Yoo, W.J.; Seo, J.K.; Heo, J.Y.; Moon, J.; Park, J.-Y.; Hwang, E.J.; Shin, D.; Park, S.-Y.; Cho, H.-S.; Lee, B.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated a fiber-optic radiation sensor for proton therapy dosimetry and measured the output and the peak-to-plateau ratio of scintillation light with various kinds of organic scintillators in order to select an organic scintillator appropriate for measuring the dose of a proton beam. For the optimization of an organic scintillator, the linearity between the light output and the stopping power of a proton beam was evaluated for two different diameters of the scintillator, and the angular dependency and standard deviation of the light pulses were investigated for four different scintillator lengths. We also evaluated the linearity between the light output and the dose rate and monitor units of a proton generator, respectively. The relative depth-dose curve of the proton beam was obtained and corrected using Birk's theory.

  6. Proton radiation therapy for clivus chordoma; Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshii, Yoshihiko; Tsunoda, Takashi; Hyodo, Akio; Nose, Tadao [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Inada, Tetsuo; Maruhashi, Akira; Hayakawa, Yoshinori

    1993-03-01

    A 57-year-old male with clival chordoma developed severe hoarseness, dysphagia, and dysphonia 1 month after a second removal of the tumor. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a mass 10 cm in diameter in the region of the middle clivus enhanced inhomogeneously by gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid, and a defect in the skull base. There was evidence of compression of the anterior surface of the pons. He received proton irradiation employing a pair of parallel opposed lateral proton beams. The dose aimed at the tumor mass was 75.5 Gy, to the pharyngeal wall less than 38 Gy, and to the anterior portion of the pons less than 30 Gy. Time dose and fractionation factor was calculated at 148. Thirty-one months following treatment, he was free of clinical neurological sequelae. Proton therapy should be considered in treatment planning following initial surgical removal or for inoperable clivus chordoma. (author).

  7. Focused radiation hepatitis after Bragg-peak proton therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma: CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Toshiyuki; Itai, Yuji; Tsuji, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    Radiation hepatitis is clearly demonstrated by noncontrast and contrast enhanced CT following radiotherapy for liver diseases. Radiation hepatitis is dependent on dose distribution and is usually demonstrated as nonsegmental bandlike lesion after photon therapy. We report a case of focused, oval-shaped radiation hepatitis that was induced by photon therapy. The attenuation difference was localized in a high-dose area caused by Bragg-peak proton therapy. 17 refs., 2 figs

  8. Some aspects of radiation protection near high-energy proton accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Tuyn, Jan Willem Nicolaas

    1977-01-01

    The CERN site near Geneva borders Satigny and Meyrin in Switzerland and Saint-Genis-Pouilly and Prevention in France. The 600 MeV proton synchrocyclotron (SC) has been in operation since 1957, the 28 GeV proton synchrotron (PS) since 1960, and the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) since 1971. A fourth large accelerator, the 400 GeV super proton synchrotron (SPS), will soon be in service. The internal and external radiation protection problems caused by these machines, together with the solutions, are reviewed in the light of experience. (5 refs).

  9. Determination of spatial and energy distributions of neutrons in experiments on transmutation of radioactive waste using relativistic protons

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuk, I V; Boulyga, S F; Kievitskaia, A I; Rakhno, I L; Chigrinov, S E; Bradnova, V; Krivopustov, M I; Kulakov, B A; Brandt, R; Ochs, M; Wan, J S

    1999-01-01

    The experiments on transmutation of sup 1 sup 2 sup 9 I and sup 2 sup 3 sup 7 Np using uranium-lead targets surrounded by a paraffin moderator were performed at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Russia). The targets were irradiated by 1.5 GeV and 7.4 GeV protons at the Synchrophasotron of JINR. In the frame of present work spatial and energy distributions of neutrons on the surface of the paraffin moderator were measured using SSNTD technique. It is shown that measured values of spectral indices do not depend on the energy of incident protons but depend on the target composition. The presence of the uranium insertion softens neutron spectra.

  10. Determination of spatial and energy distributions of neutrons in experiments on transmutation of radioactive waste using relativistic protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuk, I.V.; Lomonosova, E.M.; Boulyga, S.F.; Kievitskaia, A.I.; Rakhno, I.L.; Chigrinov, S.E.; Bradnova, V.; Krivopustov, M.I.; Kulakov, B.A.; Brandt, R.; Ochs, M.; Wan, J.-S

    1999-06-01

    The experiments on transmutation of {sup 129}I and {sup 237}Np using uranium-lead targets surrounded by a paraffin moderator were performed at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Russia). The targets were irradiated by 1.5 GeV and 7.4 GeV protons at the Synchrophasotron of JINR. In the frame of present work spatial and energy distributions of neutrons on the surface of the paraffin moderator were measured using SSNTD technique. It is shown that measured values of spectral indices do not depend on the energy of incident protons but depend on the target composition. The presence of the uranium insertion softens neutron spectra.

  11. Non-invasive anesthesia for children undergoing proton radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owusu-Agyemang, Pascal; Grosshans, David; Arunkumar, Radha; Rebello, Elizabeth; Popovich, Shannon; Zavala, Acsa; Williams, Cynthia; Ruiz, Javier; Hernandez, Mike; Mahajan, Anita; Porche, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    Background: Proton therapy is a newer modality of radiotherapy during which anesthesiologists face specific challenges related to the setup and duration of treatment sessions. Purpose: Describe our anesthesia practice for children treated in a standalone proton therapy center, and report on complications encountered during anesthesia. Materials and methods: A retrospective review of anesthetic records for patients ⩽18 years of age treated with proton therapy at our institution between January 2006 and April 2013 was performed. Results: A total of 9328 anesthetics were administered to 340 children with a median age of 3.6 years (range, 0.4–14.2). The median daily anesthesia time was 47 min (range, 15–79). The average time between start of anesthesia to the start of radiotherapy was 7.2 min (range, 1–83 min). All patients received Total Intravenous Anesthesia (TIVA) with spontaneous ventilation, with 96.7% receiving supplemental oxygen by non-invasive methods. None required daily endotracheal intubation. Two episodes of bradycardia, and one episode each of; seizure, laryngospasm and bronchospasm were identified for a cumulative incidence of 0.05%. Conclusions: In this large series of children undergoing proton therapy at a freestanding center, TIVA without daily endotracheal intubation provided a safe, efficient, and less invasive option of anesthetic care

  12. Multi-dimensional fiber-optic radiation sensor for ocular proton therapy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, K.W.; Yoo, W.J.; Moon, J.; Han, K.T.; Park, B.G.; Shin, D.; Park, S-Y.; Lee, B.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated a multi-dimensional fiber-optic radiation sensor, which consists of organic scintillators, plastic optical fibers and a water phantom with a polymethyl methacrylate structure for the ocular proton therapy dosimetry. For the purpose of sensor characterization, we measured the spread out Bragg-peak of 120 MeV proton beam using a one-dimensional sensor array, which has 30 fiber-optic radiation sensors with a 1.5 mm interval. A uniform region of spread out Bragg-peak using the one-dimensional fiber-optic radiation sensor was obtained from 20 to 25 mm depth of a phantom. In addition, the Bragg-peak of 109 MeV proton beam was measured at the depth of 11.5 mm of a phantom using a two-dimensional sensor array, which has 10×3 sensor array with a 0.5 mm interval.

  13. Radiation sensors based on the generation of mobile protons in organic dielectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Eleftherios; Douvas, Antonios M; Argitis, Panagiotis; Normand, Pascal

    2013-06-26

    A sensing scheme based on mobile protons generated by radiation, including ionizing radiation (IonR), in organic gate dielectrics is investigated for the development of metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS)-type dosimeters. Application of an electric field to the gate dielectric moves the protons and thereby alters the flat band voltage (VFB) of the MIS device. The shift in the VFB is proportional to the IonR-generated protons and, therefore, to the IonR total dose. Triphenylsulfonium nonaflate (TPSNF) photoacid generator (PAG)-containing poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) polymeric films was selected as radiation-sensitive gate dielectrics. The effects of UV (249 nm) and gamma (Co-60) irradiations on the high-frequency capacitance versus the gate voltage (C-VG) curves of the MIS devices were investigated for different total dose values. Systematic improvements in sensitivity can be accomplished by increasing the concentration of the TPSNF molecules embedded in the polymeric matrix.

  14. National Cancer Database Analysis of Proton Versus Photon Radiation Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, Kristin A., E-mail: kristin.higgins@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); O' Connell, Kelli [Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Liu, Yuan [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Gillespie, Theresa W. [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Surgery, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); McDonald, Mark W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Pillai, Rathi N. [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Patel, Kirtesh R.; Patel, Pretesh R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Robinson, Clifford G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Simone, Charles B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Owonikoko, Taofeek K. [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Belani, Chandra P. [Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute, Pennsylvania University, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States); and others

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze outcomes and predictors associated with proton radiation therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the National Cancer Database. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Database was queried to capture patients with stage I-IV NSCLC treated with thoracic radiation from 2004 to 2012. A logistic regression model was used to determine the predictors for utilization of proton radiation therapy. The univariate and multivariable association with overall survival were assessed by Cox proportional hazards models along with log–rank tests. A propensity score matching method was implemented to balance baseline covariates and eliminate selection bias. Results: A total of 243,822 patients (photon radiation therapy: 243,474; proton radiation therapy: 348) were included in the analysis. Patients in a ZIP code with a median income of <$46,000 per year were less likely to receive proton treatment, with the income cohort of $30,000 to $35,999 least likely to receive proton therapy (odds ratio 0.63 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.44-0.90]; P=.011). On multivariate analysis of all patients, non-proton therapy was associated with significantly worse survival compared with proton therapy (hazard ratio 1.21 [95% CI 1.06-1.39]; P<.01). On propensity matched analysis, proton radiation therapy (n=309) was associated with better 5-year overall survival compared with non-proton radiation therapy (n=1549), 22% versus 16% (P=.025). For stage II and III patients, non-proton radiation therapy was associated with worse survival compared with proton radiation therapy (hazard ratio 1.35 [95% CI 1.10-1.64], P<.01). Conclusions: Thoracic radiation with protons is associated with better survival in this retrospective analysis; further validation in the randomized setting is needed to account for any imbalances in patient characteristics, including positron emission tomography–computed tomography staging.

  15. The choice of treatment after incomplete adenomectomy in acromegaly: Proton - versus highvoltage radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luedecke, D.K.; Lutz, B.S.; Niedworok, G.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report the results of a study designed to compare the effectiveness of two different types of radiation in patients with acromegaly where surgical therapy had failed to normalize growth hormone(GH). Longterm follow-up after conventional high voltage radiation in 17 patients and protons therapy in 13 patients confirmed a similar reduction of GH levels in both groups. After 4,5 years a decrease of about 80% was achieved. After 'conventional radiation' GH was normal in 8(47%) and near normal in 6(35%) while proton therapy resulted in normalization in 5 and improvement in 5(38%). The slightly better results of 'conventional radiation' must be attributed to lower pretreatment levels of GH. Side effects as additional pituitary deficits and oculomotor palsies were more often seen after proton treatment. Since the results of both radiation methods are similar and proton therapy has a tendency to more serious side effects we recommend 'conventional radiation' as secondary treatment of acromegaly. (Authors)

  16. Radiation control around the proton synchrotron Saturne (1962)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joffre, H.; Lamberieux, J.; Stirling, A.

    1962-01-01

    After giving the main characteristics of the Synchrotron at Saclay, the authors present on the one hand the general arrangements made for ensuring the safety of the personnel: specification of radiation levels, automatic devices, visual indications, etc... and on the other hand, the means employed for radiation detection. These detection methods include fixed γ and fast neutron detectors whose indications are centralised on a radiation control panel, and mobile detectors for specific or more precise measurements. The authors give results of radiation level measurements and some results of the diminishing of radiation intensity by wood, concrete and water. (author) [fr

  17. Characterization of the proton irradiation induced luminescence of materials and application in radiation oncology dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darafsheh, Arash; Zhang, Rongxiao; Kassaee, Alireza; Finlay, Jarod C.

    2018-03-01

    Visible light generated as the result of interaction of ionizing radiation with matter can be used for radiation therapy quality assurance. In this work, we characterized the visible light observed during proton irradiation of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and silica glass fiber materials by performing luminescence spectroscopy. The spectra of the luminescence signal from PMMA and silica glass fibers during proton irradiation showed continuous spectra whose shape were different from that expected from Čerenkov radiation, indicating that Čerenkov radiation cannot be the responsible radioluminescence signal. The luminescence signal from each material showed a Bragg peak pattern and their corresponding proton ranges are in agreement with measurements performed by a standard ion chamber. The spectrum of the silica showed two peaks at 460 and 650 nm stem from the point defects of the silica: oxygen deficiency centers (ODC) and non-bridging oxygen hole centers (NBOHC), respectively. The spectrum of the PMMA fiber showed a continuous spectrum with a peak at 410 nm whose origin is connected with the fluorescence of the PMMA material. Our results are of interest for various applications based on imaging radioluminescent signal in proton therapy and will inform on the design of high-resolution fiber probes for proton therapy dosimetry.

  18. Radiative transitions of B and Bs mesons in a non relativistic quark model with hulthen potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Souza, Praveen P.; Monteiro, A.P.; Vijaya Kumar, K.B.

    2017-01-01

    Heavy light mesons composed of one heavy quark and one light quark. They are the only mesons containing quarks of the third generation. Which has contributed enormously to our understanding of elementary particles and their interactions. In our calculation we get variational parameter for different heavy-light mesons. Having variational parameter eigen energy will be obtained. For meson system, the Hulthen term acts like a Coulombic term. The spin dependent potential from One Gluon Exchange Potential (OGEP) is introduced. The goal of the present work is to obtain the decay widths and understand the uncertainties in the calculation in the frame work of non-relativistic quark models. In the non-relativistic models this is satisfied for the c, b and t quarks

  19. Mass dependence of spectral and angular distributions of Cherenkov radiation from relativistic isotopes in solid radiators and its possible application as mass selector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, O. V.; Rozhkova, E. I.; Pivovarov, Yu. L.; Kuzminchuk-Feuerstein, N.

    2018-02-01

    The first proof of principle experiment with a prototype of a Time-of-Flight (TOF) - Cherenkov detector of relativistic heavy ions (RHI) exploiting a liquid Iodine Naphthalene radiator has been performed at Cave C at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany). A conceptual design for a liquid Cherenkov detector was proposed as a prototype for the future TOF measurements at the Super-FRS by detection of total number of Cherenkov photons. The ionization energy loss of RHI in a liquid radiator decreases only slightly this number, while in a solid radiator changes sufficiently not the total number of ChR photons, but ChR angular and spectral distributions. By means of computer simulations, we showed that these distributions are very sensitive to the isotope mass, due to different stopping powers of isotopes with initial equal relativistic factors. The results of simulations for light (Li, Be) and heavy (Xe) isotopes at 500-1000 MeV/u are presented indicating the possibility to use the isotopic effect in ChR of RHI as the mass selector.

  20. Semi-classical approximation and the problem of boundary conditions in the theory of relativistic particle radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhiezer, A.I.; Shul'ga, N.F.

    1991-01-01

    The process of relativistic particle radiation in an external field has been studied in the semi-classical approximation rather extensively. The main problem arising in the studies is in expressing the formula of the quantum theory of radiation in terms of classical quantities, for example of the classical trajectories. However, it still remains unclear how the particle trajectory is assigned, that is which particular initial or boundary conditions determine the trajectory in semi-classical approximation quantum theory of radiation. We shall try to solve this problem. Its importance comes from the fact that in some cases one and the same boundary conditions may give rise to two or more trajectories. We demonstrate that this fact must necessarily be taken into account on deriving the classical limit for the formulae of the quantum theory of radiation, since it leads to a specific interference effect in radiation. The method we used to deal with the problem is similar to the method employed by Fock to analyze the problem of a canonical transformation in classical and quantum mechanics. (author)

  1. Synthetic Secoisolariciresinol Diglucoside (LGM2605 Protects Human Lung in an Ex Vivo Model of Proton Radiation Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Velalopoulou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy for the treatment of thoracic malignancies has improved significantly by directing of the proton beam in higher doses on the targeted tumor while normal tissues around the tumor receive much lower doses. Nevertheless, exposure of normal tissues to protons is known to pose a substantial risk in long-term survivors, as confirmed by our work in space-relevant exposures of murine lungs to proton radiation. Thus, radioprotective strategies are being sought. We established that LGM2605 is a potent protector from radiation-induced lung toxicity and aimed in the current study to extend the initial findings of space-relevant, proton radiation-associated late lung damage in mice by looking at acute changes in human lung. We used an ex vivo model of organ culture where tissue slices of donor living human lung were kept in culture and exposed to proton radiation. We exposed donor human lung precision-cut lung sections (huPCLS, pretreated with LGM2605, to 4 Gy proton radiation and evaluated them 30 min and 24 h later for gene expression changes relevant to inflammation, oxidative stress, and cell cycle arrest, and determined radiation-induced senescence, inflammation, and oxidative tissue damage. We identified an LGM2605-mediated reduction of proton radiation-induced cellular senescence and associated cell cycle changes, an associated proinflammatory phenotype, and associated oxidative tissue damage. This is a first report on the effects of proton radiation and of the radioprotective properties of LGM2605 on human lung.

  2. Laser Radiation Pressure Accelerator for Quasi-Monoenergetic Proton Generation and Its Medical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. S.; Shao, X.; Liu, T. C.; Su, J. J.; He, M. Q.; Eliasson, B.; Tripathi, V. K.; Dudnikova, G.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Wilks, S.; Chen, C. D.; Sheng, Z. M.

    Laser radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of ultrathin foils of subwavelength thickness provides an efficient means of quasi-monoenergetic proton generation. With an optimal foil thickness, the ponderomotive force of the intense short-pulse laser beam pushes the electrons to the edge of the foil, while balancing the electric field due to charge separation. The electron and proton layers form a self-organized plasma double layer and are accelerated by the radiation pressure of the laser, the so-called light sail. However, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability can limit the acceleration and broaden the energy of the proton beam. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have shown that the formation of finger-like structures due to the nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability limits the acceleration and leads to a leakage of radiation through the target by self-induced transparency. We here review the physics of quasi-monoenergetic proton generation by RPA and recent advances in the studies of energy scaling of RPA, and discuss the RPA of multi-ion and gas targets. The scheme for generating quasi-monoenergetic protons with RPA has the potential of leading to table-top accelerators as sources for producing monoenergetic 50-250 MeV protons. We also discuss potential medical implications, such as particle therapy for cancer treatment, using quasi-monoenergetic proton beams generated from RPA. Compact monoenergetic ion sources also have applications in many other areas such as high-energy particle physics, space electronics radiation testing, and fast ignition in laser fusion.

  3. Relativistic polarized deuteron fragmentation into protons as test of six-quark nature of deuteron at small distances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobushkin, A.P.; Vizireva, L.

    1981-01-01

    A study of the nature of the short-range few-nucleon correlations in nuclei is proposed in the polarized high-energy deuteron fragmentation experiments. The presence of 6q-state in deuteron with probability of several percents is shown to change essentially the cross-section behaviour of this process in the momentum region where the fraction of the deuteron momentum carried out by proton in the infinite momentum frame is about 0.78. It is shown how the character of the cross-section of the transverse polarized deuteron fragmentation is changed depending on the parameters of 6q-admixure in deuteron [ru

  4. Single particle inclusive spectra resulting from the collision of relativistic protons, deuterons, alpha particles, and carbon ions with nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papp, J.

    1975-05-01

    The yields of positive and negative particles resulting from the collision of 1.05 GeV/nucleon and 2.1 GeV/nucleon protons, deuterons, alpha particles, and 1.05 GeV/nucleon carbon nuclei with various targets have been measured. Single particle inclusive cross sections for production of π + , π - , p, d, 3 H, 3 He, and 4 He at 2.5 0 (lab) were obtained. How the results bear on the concepts of limiting fragmentation and scaling, the structure of the alpha particle and deuteron, and the possibility of ''coherent'' production of pions by heavy ions are discussed. (U.S.)

  5. Relativistic Calculations and Measurements of Energies, Auger Rates, and Lifetimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    Research and Industry, Denton, Texas, 8-10 November 1982. 7. B. Crasemann: "Efectos Relativ’sticos y de QED Sobre las Transiciones Rayos - X y Auger Entre...INNER-SHELL IONIZATION BY PROTONS X -RAY EMISSION BREIT INTERACTION AUGER TRANSITIONS DIRAC-HARTREE-SLATER COMPUTATIONS SYNCHROTRON RADIATION RESONANT...computations, including relativistic and quantum- electrodynamic effects, of atomic energy levels and of x -ray and Auger transitions in atoms with one or

  6. SU-F-J-56: The Connection Between Cherenkov Light Emission and Radiation Absorbed Dose in Proton Irradiated Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darafsheh, A; Kassaee, A; Finlay, J [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Taleei, R [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Range verification in proton therapy is of great importance. Cherenkov light follows the photon and electron energy deposition in water phantom. The purpose of this study is to investigate the connection between Cherenkov light generation and radiation absorbed dose in a water phantom irradiated with proton beams. Methods: Monte Carlo simulation was performed by employing FLUKA Monte Carlo code to stochastically simulate radiation transport, ionizing radiation dose deposition, and Cherenkov radiation in water phantoms. The simulations were performed for proton beams with energies in the range 50–600 MeV to cover a wide range of proton energies. Results: The mechanism of Cherenkov light production depends on the initial energy of protons. For proton energy with 50–400 MeV energy that is below the threshold (∼483 MeV in water) for Cherenkov light production directly from incident protons, Cherenkov light is produced mainly from the secondary electrons liberated as a result of columbic interactions with the incident protons. For proton beams with energy above 500 MeV, in the initial depth that incident protons have higher energy than the Cherenkov light production threshold, the light has higher intensity. As the slowing down process results in lower energy protons in larger depths in the water phantom, there is a knee point in the Cherenkov light curve vs. depth due to switching the Cherenkov light production mechanism from primary protons to secondary electrons. At the end of the depth dose curve the Cherenkov light intensity does not follow the dose peak because of the lack of high energy protons to produce Cherenkov light either directly or through secondary electrons. Conclusion: In contrast to photon and electron beams, Cherenkov light generation induced by proton beams does not follow the proton energy deposition specially close to the end of the proton range near the Bragg peak.

  7. Monitoring proton radiation therapy with in-room PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xuping; Ouyang Jinsong; El Fakhri, Georges; Espana, Samuel; Daartz, Juliane; Liebsch, Norbert; Paganetti, Harald; Bortfeld, Thomas R

    2011-01-01

    We used a mobile positron emission tomography (PET) scanner positioned within the proton therapy treatment room to study the feasibility of proton range verification with an in-room, stand-alone PET system, and compared with off-line equivalent studies. Two subjects with adenoid cystic carcinoma were enrolled into a pilot study in which in-room PET scans were acquired in list-mode after a routine fractionated treatment session. The list-mode PET data were reconstructed with different time schemes to generate in-room short, in-room long and off-line equivalent (by skipping coincidences from the first 15 min during the list-mode reconstruction) PET images for comparison in activity distribution patterns. A phantom study was followed to evaluate the accuracy of range verification for different reconstruction time schemes quantitatively. The in-room PET has a higher sensitivity compared to the off-line modality so that the PET acquisition time can be greatly reduced from 30 to 15 O component and lower biological washout. For soft tissue-equivalent material, the distal fall-off edge of an in-room short acquisition is deeper compared to an off-line equivalent scan, indicating a better coverage of the high-dose end of the beam. In-room PET is a promising low cost, high sensitivity modality for the in vivo verification of proton therapy. Better accuracy in Monte Carlo predictions, especially for biological decay modeling, is necessary.

  8. Transmutation of $^{239}$Pu and Other Nuclides Using Spallation Neutrons Produced by Relativistic Protons Reacting with Massive U- and Pb-Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, J; Bamblevski, V P; Barabanov, M Yu; Bradnova, V; Chaloun, P; Hella, K M; Kalinnikov, V G; Krivopustov, M I; Kulakov, B A; Perelygin, V P; Pronskikh, V S; Pavliouk, A V; Solnyshkin, A A; Sosnin, A N; Stegailov, V I; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V M; Zaverioukha, O S; Adloff, J C; Debeauvais, M; Brandt, R; Langrock, E J; Vater, P; Van, J S; Westmeier, W; Dwivedi, K K; Guo Shi Lun; Li Li Qiang; Hashemi-Nezhad, S R; Kievets, M K; Lomonosova, E M; Zhuk, I V; Modolo, G; Odoj, R; Zamani-Valassiadou, M

    2001-01-01

    Experimental studies on the transmutation of some long-lived radioactive waste nuclei, such as ^{129}I, ^{237}Np, and ^{239}Pu, as well as on natural uranium and lanthanum (all of them used as sensors) were carried out at the Synchrophasotron of the Laboratory for High Energies (JINR, Dubna). Spallation neutrons were produced by relativistic protons with energies in the range of 0.5 GeV\\le E(p)\\le 1.5 GeV interacting with 20 cm long uranium or lead target stacks. The targets were surrounded by 6 cm paraffin moderators. The radioactive sensors mentioned above were positioned on the outside surface of the moderator and contained typically approximately 0.5 up to 1 gram of long-lived isotopes. The highly radioactive targets were produced perfectly well-sealed in aluminum containers by the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk, Russia. From the experimentally observed transmutation rates one can easily extrapolate, that in a subcritical nuclear power assembly (or "energy amplifier") using a 10 mA pr...

  9. Observational evidence of competing source, loss, and transport processes for relativistic electrons in Earth's outer radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Drew; Mann, Ian; Usanova, Maria; Rodriguez, Juan; Henderson, Mike; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Morley, Steven; Claudepierre, Seth; Li, Wen; Kellerman, Adam; Boyd, Alexander; Kim, Kyung-Chan

    Earth’s outer electron radiation belt is a region of extreme variability, with relativistic electron intensities changing by orders of magnitude over time scales ranging from minutes to years. Extreme variations of outer belt electrons ultimately result from the relative impacts of various competing source (and acceleration), loss, and transport processes. Most of these processes involve wave-particle interactions between outer belt electrons and different types of plasma waves in the inner magnetosphere, and in turn, the activity of these waves depends on different solar wind and magnetospheric driving conditions and thus can vary drastically from event to event. Using multipoint analysis with data from NASA’s Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, and SAMPEX missions, NOAA’s GOES and POES constellations, and ground-based observatories, we present results from case studies revealing how different source/acceleration and loss mechanisms compete during active periods to result in drastically different distributions of outer belt electrons. By using a combination of low-Earth orbiting and high-altitude-equatorial orbiting satellites, we briefly review how it is possible to get a much more complete picture of certain wave activity and electron losses over the full range of MLTs and L-shells throughout the radiation belt. We then show example cases highlighting the importance of particular mechanisms, including: substorm injections and whistler-mode chorus waves for the source and acceleration of relativistic electrons; magnetopause shadowing and wave-particle interactions with EMIC waves for sudden losses; and ULF wave activity for driving radial transport, a process which is important for redistributing relativistic electrons, contributing both to acceleration and loss processes. We show how relativistic electron enhancement events involve local acceleration that is consistent with wave-particle interactions between a seed population of 10s to 100s of keV electrons, with a

  10. The Role of Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy with Photons, Protons and Heavy Ions for Treating Extracranial Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Michael Laine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, the ability to deliver large doses of ionizing radiation to a tumor has been limited by radiation induced toxicity to normal surrounding tissues. This was the initial impetus for the development of conventionally fractionated radiation therapy, where large volumes of healthy tissue received radiation and were allowed the time to repair the radiation damage. However, advances in radiation delivery techniques and image guidance have allowed for more ablative doses of radiation to be delivered in a very accurate, conformal and safe manner with shortened fractionation schemes. Hypofractionated regimens with photons have already transformed how certain tumor types are treated with radiation therapy. Additionally, hypofractionation is able to deliver a complete course of ablative radiation therapy over a shorter period of time compared to conventional fractionation regimens making treatment more convenient to the patient and potentially more cost-effective. Recently there has been an increased interest in proton therapy because of the potential further improvement in dose distributions achievable due to their unique physical characteristics. Furthermore, with heavier ions the dose conformality is increased and in addition there is potentially a higher biological effectiveness compared to protons and photons. Due to the properties mentioned above, charged particle therapy has already become an attractive modality to further investigate the role of hypofractionation in the treatment of various tumors. This review will discuss the rationale and evolution of hypofractionated radiation therapy, the reported clinical success with initially photon and then charged particle modalities, and further potential implementation into treatment regimens going forward.

  11. Equivalence of displacement radiation damage in superluminescent diodes induced by protons and heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xingji, E-mail: lxj0218@hit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu, Chaoming [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Lan, Mujie; Xiao, Liyi [Center of Micro-electronics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu, Jianchun; Ding, Dongfa [Beijing Aerospace Times Optical-electronic Technology Co.Ltd, Beijing 100854 (China); Yang, Dezhuang; He, Shiyu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2013-07-11

    The degradation of optical power for superluminescent diodes is in situ measured under exposures of protons with various energies (170 keV, 3 MeV and 5 MeV), and 25 MeV carbon ions for several irradiation fluences. Experimental results show that the optical power of the SLDs decreases with increasing fluence. The protons with lower energies cause more degradation in the optical power of SLDs than those with higher energies at a given fluence. Compared to the proton irradiation with various energies, the 25 MeV carbon ions induce more severe degradation to the optical power. To characterize the radiation damage of the SLDs, the displacement doses as a function of chip depth in the SLDs are calculated by SRIM code for the protons and carbon ions. Based on the irradiation testing and calculation results, an approach is given to normalize the equivalence of displacement damage induced by various charged particles in SLDs.

  12. Nuclear and Non-Ionizing Energy-Loss for Coulomb Scattered Particles from Low Energy up to Relativistic Regime in Space Radiation Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Boschini, M.J.; Gervasi, M.; Giani, S.; Grandi, D.; Ivantchenko, V.; Pensotti, S.; Rancoita, P.G.; Tacconi, M.

    2011-01-01

    In the space environment, instruments onboard of spacecrafts can be affected by displacement damage due to radiation. The differential scattering cross section for screened nucleus--nucleus interactions - i.e., including the effects due to screened Coulomb nuclear fields -, nuclear stopping powers and non-ionization energy losses are treated from about 50\\,keV/nucleon up to relativistic energies.

  13. A comparison of ionizing radiation damage in CMOS devices from 60Co gamma rays, electrons and protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Baoping; Yao Zhibin; Zhang Fengqi

    2009-01-01

    Radiation hardened CC4007RH and non-radiation hardened CC4011 devices were irradiated using 60 Co gamma rays, 1 MeV electrons and 1-9 MeV protons to compare the ionizing radiation damage of the gamma rays with the charged particles. For all devices examined, with experimental uncertainty, the radiation induced threshold voltage shifts (ΔV th ) generated by 60 Co gamma rays are equal to that of 1 MeV electron and 1-7 MeV proton radiation under 0 gate bias condition. Under 5 V gate bias condition, the distinction of threshold voltage shifts (ΔV th ) generated by 60 Co gamma rays and 1 MeV electrons irradiation are not large, and the radiation damage for protons below 9 MeV is always less than that of 60 Co gamma rays. The lower energy the proton has, the less serious the radiation damage becomes. (authors)

  14. Proton induced target fragmentation studies on solid state nuclear track detectors using Carbon radiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, J.; Pálfalvi, J. K.; Strádi, A.; Bilski, P.; Swakoń, J.; Stolarczyk, L.

    2018-04-01

    One of the limiting factors of an astronaut's career is the dose received from space radiation. High energy protons, being the main components of the complex radiation field present on a spacecraft, give a significant contribution to the dose. To investigate the behavior of solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) if they are irradiated by such particles, SSNTD stacks containing carbon blocks were exposed to high energy proton beams (70, 100, 150 and 230 MeV) at the Proteus cyclotron, IFJ PAN -Krakow. The incident protons cannot be detected directly; however, tracks of secondary particles, recoils and fragments of the constituent atoms of the detector material and of the carbon radiator are formed. It was found that as the proton energy increases, the number of tracks induced in the PADC material by secondary particles decreases. From the measured geometrical parameters of the tracks the linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum and the dosimetric quantities were determined, applying appropriate calibration. In the LET spectra the LET range of the most important secondary particles could be identified and their abundance showed differences in the spectra if the detectors were short or long etched. The LET spectra obtained on the SSNTDs irradiated by protons were compared to LET spectra of detectors flown on the International Space Station (ISS): they were quite similar, resulting in a quality factor difference of only 5%. Thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) were applied in each case to measure the dose from primary protons and other lower LET particles present in space. Comparing and analyzing the results of the TLD and SSNTD measurements, it was obtained that proton induced target fragments contributed to the total absorbed dose in 3.2% and to the dose equivalent in 14.2% in this particular space experiment.

  15. Strange Meson Radiative Capture on the Proton in Low Energy QCD Lagrangian

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOULi-Juan; MAWei-Xing; 等

    2002-01-01

    Based on our low energy QCD Lagrangian description of strange meson photoproduction off the proton and the crossing symmetry,the strange meson radiative capture on the proton,K-+p→γ+A,is investigated in the [SU SF(6)×O(3)]sym,SUc(3) quark model of baryon structure with the same input parameter,the only strong coupling constant αM,as that in the strange meson photoproduction off the proton γ+p-→K+ Α,a crossing channel of the capture reaction,A good agreement on the branching ratio between the predictions and data is obtained successfully.This excellent fit indicates that our low energy QCD Lagrangian theory with only one free parameter is an advanced and unified description of strange meson photoproduction and its associated radiative capture.

  16. FOKN: a relativistic Fokker-Planck code with large angle scattering and radiation losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, G.; Scharlemann, T.; Wood, L.; Weaver, T.; Chu, T.; Lee, G.

    1976-07-01

    FOKN is a computer code which employs a relativistic Fokker-Planck algorithm to evolve the distribution functions of the various mutually interacting components of a multi-species plasma forward in time, with the optional addition of high angle, large energy and momentum transfer interactions between the various charged species of the plasma. As a computational expediency, the latter processes are handled by transfer matrices which are generated separately by another code, RNUX, so that once specific transfer matrices are generated, they can be used over and over by FOKN provided the group structures are compatible

  17. Dose-dependent micronuclei formation in normal human fibroblasts exposed to proton radiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Litvinchuk, Alexandra; Vachelová, Jana; Michaelidesová, Anna; Wagner, Richard; Davídková, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 3 (2015), s. 327-334 ISSN 0301-634X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : human fibroblasts * proton radiation * micronuclei assay * biodosimetry Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.923, year: 2015

  18. Proton radiation effects on the optical properties of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnhenn, J.; Khavrus, V.; Leonhardt, A.; Eversheim, D.; Noll, C.; Hinderlich, S.; Dahl, A.

    2017-11-01

    This paper discusses proton-induced radiation effects in vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNT). VACNTs exhibit extremely low optical reflectivity which makes them interesting candidates for use in spacecraft stray light suppression. Investigating their behavior in space environment is a precondition for the implementation on a satellite.

  19. Explaining the Diverse Response of the Ultra-relativistic Van Allen Radiation Belt to Solar Wind Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, I. R.; Ozeke, L.; Murphy, K. R.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Rae, J.; Milling, D. K.; Kale, A.; Baker, D. N.

    2017-12-01

    The NASA Van Allen Probes have opened a new window on the dynamics of ultra-relativistic electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts. Under different solar wind forcing the outer belt is seen to respond in a variety of apparently diverse and sometimes remarkable ways. For example, sometimes a third radiation belt is carved out (e.g., September 2012), or the belts can remain depleted for 10 days or more (September 2014). More usually there is a sequential response of a strong and sometimes rapid depletion followed by a re-energization, the latter increasing outer belt electron flux by orders of magnitude on hour timescales during some of the strongest storms of this solar cycle (e.g., March 2013, March 2015). Such dynamics also appear to be often bounded at low-L by an apparently impenetrable barrier at L 2.8 through which ultra-relativistic electrons do not penetrate. Many studies in the Van Allen Probes era have sought explanations for these apparently diverse features, often incorporating the effects from multiple plasma waves. In contrast, we show how this apparently diverse behaviour can instead be explained by one dominant process: ULF wave radial transport. Once ULF wave transport rates are accurately specified by observations, and coupled to the dynamical variation of the outer boundary condition at the edge of the outer belt, the observed diverse responses can all be explained. However, in order to get good agreement with observations, the modeling reveals the importance of still currently unexplained very fast loss in the main phase which results in an almost total extinction of the belts and decouples pre- and post-storm ultra-relativistic electron flux on hour timescales. Similarly, varying plasmasheet source populations are seen to be of critical importance such that near-tail dynamics play a crucial role in Van Allen belt dynamics. Nonetheless, simple models incorporating accurate transport rates derived directly from ULF wave measurements are shown to

  20. Proton therapy radiation pneumonitis local dose–response in esophagus cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echeverria, Alfredo E.; McCurdy, Matthew; Castillo, Richard; Bernard, Vincent; Ramos, Natalia Velez; Buckley, William; Castillo, Edward; Liu, Ping; Martinez, Josue; Guerrero, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study quantifies pulmonary radiation toxicity in patients who received proton therapy for esophagus cancer. Materials/methods: We retrospectively studied 100 esophagus cancer patients treated with proton therapy. The linearity of the enhanced FDG uptake vs. proton dose was evaluated using the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). Pneumonitis symptoms (RP) were assessed using the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (CTCAEv4). The interaction of the imaging response with dosimetric parameters and symptoms was evaluated. Results: The RP scores were: 0 grade 4/5, 7 grade 3, 20 grade 2, 37 grade 1, and 36 grade 0. Each dosimetric parameter was significantly higher for the symptomatic group. The AIC winning models were 30 linear, 52 linear quadratic, and 18 linear logarithmic. There was no significant difference in the linear coefficient between models. The slope of the FDG vs. proton dose response was 0.022 for the symptomatic and 0.012 for the asymptomatic (p = 0.014). Combining dosimetric parameters with the slope did not improve the sensitivity or accuracy in identifying symptomatic cases. Conclusions: The proton radiation dose response on FDG PET/CT imaging exhibited a predominantly linear dose response on modeling. Symptomatic patients had a higher dose response slope

  1. Thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD) exposed to high fluxes of gamma radiation, thermal neutrons and protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambarini, G.; Martini, M.; Meinardi, F.; Raffaglio, C.; Salvadori, P.; Scacco, A.; Sichirollo, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    Thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD), widely experimented and utilized in personal dosimetry, have some advantageous characteristics which induce one to employ them also in radiotherapy. The new radiotherapy techniques are aimed at selectively depositing a high dose in cancerous tissues. This goal is reached by utilising both conventional and other more recently proposed radiation, such as thermal neutrons and heavy charged particles. In these inhomogeneous radiation fields a reliable mapping of the spatial distribution of absorbed dose is desirable, and the utilized dosemeters have to give such a possibility without notably perturbing the radiation field with the materials of the dosemeters themselves. TLDs, for their small dimension and their tissue equivalence for most radiation, give good support in the mapping of radiation fields. After exposure to the high fluxes of therapeutic beams, some commercial TL dosemeters have shown a loss of reliability. An investigation has therefore be performed, both on commercial and on laboratory made phosphors, in order to investigate their behaviour in such radiation fields. In particular the thermal neutron and gamma ray mixed field of the thermal column of a nuclear reactor, of interest for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (B.N.C.T.) and a proton beam, of interest for proton therapy, were considered. Here some results obtained with new TL phosphors exposed in such radiation fields are presented, after a short description of some radiation damage effect on commercial LiF TLDs exposed in the (n th ,γ) field of the thermal column of a reactor. (author)

  2. Comparison of proton microbeam and gamma irradiation for the radiation hardness testing of silicon PIN diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakšić, M.; Grilj, V.; Skukan, N.; Majer, M.; Jung, H. K.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, N. H.

    2013-09-01

    Simple and cost-effective solutions using Si PIN diodes as detectors are presently utilized in various radiation-related applications in which excessive exposure to radiation degrades their charge transport properties. One of the conventional methods for the radiation hardness testing of such devices is time-consuming irradiation with electron beam or gamma-ray irradiation facilities, high-energy proton accelerators, or with neutrons from research reactors. Recently, for the purpose of radiation hardness testing, a much faster nuclear microprobe based approach utilizing proton irradiation has been developed. To compare the two different irradiation techniques, silicon PIN diodes have been irradiated with a Co-60 gamma radiation source and with a 6 MeV proton microbeam. The signal degradation in the silicon PIN diodes for both irradiation conditions has been probed by the IBIC (ion beam induced charge) technique, which can precisely monitor changes in charge collection efficiency. The results presented are reviewed on the basis of displacement damage calculations and NIEL (non-ionizing energy loss) concept.

  3. Radiation exposure during in-vivo analysis of human dental enamel by proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baijot-Stroobants, J.; Bodart, F.; Deconninck, G.; Vreven, J.

    Fluorine can be analysed by proton activation, with detection of prompt γ-rays. Using external beams, it is possible to make in-vivo determinations and to follow the concentration in fluoridated enamel. Radiation damage and radiation hazards are investigated. It is found that the dose rate is very small and that the technique can be used without radiation problems. Local destruction on the enamel surface is investigated using a scanning microscope, no modification is observed in the cristallite structure after irradiation. (author)

  4. Radiation hardness of a single crystal CVD diamond detector for MeV energy protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Yuki, E-mail: y.sato@riken.jp [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Shimaoka, Takehiro; Kaneko, Junichi H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13, W8, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Murakami, Hiroyuki [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Isobe, Mitsutaka; Osakabe, Masaki [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6, Oroshi-cho Toki-city, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Tsubota, Masakatsu [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13, W8, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Ochiai, Kentaro [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Umezawa, Hitoshi; Shikata, Shinichi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan)

    2015-06-01

    We have fabricated a particle detector using single crystal diamond grown by chemical vapor deposition. The irradiation dose dependence of the output pulse height from the diamond detector was measured using 3 MeV protons. The pulse height of the output signals from the diamond detector decreases as the amount of irradiation increases at count rates of 1.6–8.9 kcps because of polarization effects inside the diamond crystal. The polarization effect can be cancelled by applying a reverse bias voltage, which restores the pulse heights. Additionally, the radiation hardness performance for MeV energy protons was compared with that of a silicon surface barrier detector.

  5. Experimental study of the response of radiochromic films to proton radiation of low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercado-Uribe, H.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.; Buenfil, A.E.; Avila, O.; Brandan, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the response of radiochromic films (MD-55 and HD-810) exposed to protons of 0.6 MeV. Each film is bombarded with a proton beam in an angular geometry, in such a way that the absorbed dose is related to angle. Depending on the energy and the angular fluence, the irradiated volume is total or partial. We compare the dose of these irradiated films with fully irradiated films exposed to γ radiation from a 60 Co calibrated source.

  6. The potential of proton beam radiation therapy in lung cancer (including mesothelioma)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjelkengren, Goeran [Univ. Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology; Glimelius, Bengt [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology and Pathology; Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology

    2005-12-01

    A Swedish group of oncologists and hospital physicists have estimated the number of patients in Sweden suitable for proton beam therapy. The estimations have been based on current statistics of tumour incidence, number of patients potentially eligible for radiation treatment, scientific support from clinical trials and model dose planning studies and knowledge of the dose-response relations of different tumours and normal tissues. It is estimated that about 350 patients with lung cancer and about 20 patients with mesothelioma annually may benefit from proton beam therapy.

  7. Toward a unified theory of the radiation by relativistic particles in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beloshitskii, V.V.; Kalinichenko, V.F.

    1989-01-01

    A quantum theory of the electromagnetic emission by relativistic particles incorporating channeling and the thermal vibrations of the crystal nuclei is derived. A general expression for the emission probability is found after an average over the initial polarizations of the particles and a summation over the final polarizations of the particles and over the polarizations of the photons. An average is carried out over the crystal states of the nuclei in the cases with and without excitation of phonons. The total emission is made up of channeling emission and bremsstrahlung, which are related to each other. During scattering by thermal vibrations, incoherent bremsstrahlung is produced. Some particular cases which determine the properties of the emission in the case of channeling are derived from the general expression and analyzed

  8. Intensity modulated radiation therapy using laser-accelerated protons: a Monte Carlo dosimetric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourkal, E; Li, J S; Xiong, W; Nahum, A; Ma, C-M

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present Monte Carlo studies of intensity modulated radiation therapy using laser-accelerated proton beams. Laser-accelerated protons coming out of a solid high-density target have broad energy and angular spectra leading to dose distributions that cannot be directly used for therapeutic applications. Through the introduction of a spectrometer-like particle selection system that delivers small pencil beams of protons with desired energy spectra it is feasible to use laser-accelerated protons for intensity modulated radiotherapy. The method presented in this paper is a three-dimensional modulation in which the proton energy spectrum and intensity of each individual beamlet are modulated to yield a homogeneous dose in both the longitudinal and lateral directions. As an evaluation of the efficacy of this method, it has been applied to two prostate cases using a variety of beam arrangements. We have performed a comparison study between intensity modulated photon plans and those for laser-accelerated protons. For identical beam arrangements and the same optimization parameters, proton plans exhibit superior coverage of the target and sparing of neighbouring critical structures. Dose-volume histogram analysis of the resulting dose distributions shows up to 50% reduction of dose to the critical structures. As the number of fields is decreased, the proton modality exhibits a better preservation of the optimization requirements on the target and critical structures. It is shown that for a two-beam arrangement (parallel-opposed) it is possible to achieve both superior target coverage with 5% dose inhomogeneity within the target and excellent sparing of surrounding tissue

  9. Radiation-Induced Cancers From Modern Radiotherapy Techniques: Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jinsung; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Se Byeong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess and compare secondary cancer risk resulting from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and proton therapy in patients with prostate and head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy in the scattering mode were planned for 5 prostate caner patients and 5 head-and-neck cancer patients. The secondary doses during irradiation were measured using ion chamber and CR-39 detectors for IMRT and proton therapy, respectively. Organ-specific radiation-induced cancer risk was estimated by applying organ equivalent dose to dose distributions. Results: The average secondary doses of proton therapy for prostate cancer patients, measured 20-60cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.4 mSv/Gy to 0.1 mSv/Gy. The average secondary doses of IMRT for prostate patients, however, ranged between 3 mSv/Gy and 1 mSv/Gy, approximately one order of magnitude higher than for proton therapy. Although the average secondary doses of IMRT were higher than those of proton therapy for head-and-neck cancers, these differences were not significant. Organ equivalent dose calculations showed that, for prostate cancer patients, the risk of secondary cancers in out-of-field organs, such as the stomach, lungs, and thyroid, was at least 5 times higher for IMRT than for proton therapy, whereas the difference was lower for head-and-neck cancer patients. Conclusions: Comparisons of organ-specific organ equivalent dose showed that the estimated secondary cancer risk using scattering mode in proton therapy is either significantly lower than the cases in IMRT treatment or, at least, does not exceed the risk induced by conventional IMRT treatment.

  10. Coherent effects in relativistic electron beams radiation in the presence of beat waves; Kogerentnye ehffekty v izluchenii relyativistskogo ehlektronnogo sgustka pri nalichii voln bienij

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevorgyan, L A; Shamamian, A N

    1992-12-31

    The problem of relativistic electron beam-laser beat waves interaction is considered. Due to interaction the electron density is changed as opposed to the case, when it interacts with still electron plasma, the change of density gets less. But it is interesting to research the coherent spontaneous radiation of the electron beam interacting with. It is shown that this interaction brings to an increase of the partial coherent effect. The radiation efficiency depends essentially on the beam parameters, i.e. on the radio of the distinctive longitudinal dimension density. The maximum amplification takes place when the beam length makes room for an odd number of wave length quarters. Since the gain factor decreases with the radiation wave length, we offer to use high-current relativistic electron beams to generate micro radio waves. 4 refs.

  11. Radiation-induced conductivity of doped silicon in response to photon, proton and neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, N.; Amekura, H.; Plaksin, O.A.; Stepanov, V.A.

    2000-01-01

    The opto-electronic performance of semiconductors during reactor operation is restricted by radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) and the synergistic effects of neutrons/ions and photons. The RICs of Si due to photons, protons and pulsed neutrons have been evaluated, aiming at radiation correlation. Protons of 17 MeV with an ionizing dose rate of 10 3 Gy/s and/or photons (hν=1.3 eV) were used to irradiate impurity-doped Si (2x10 16 B atoms/cm 3 ) at 300 and 200 K. Proton-induced RIC (p-RIC) and photoconductivity (PC) were intermittently detected in an accelerator device. Neutron-induced RIC (n-RIC) was measured for the same Si in a pulsed fast-fission reactor, BARS-6, with a 70-μs pulse of 2x10 12 n/cm 2 (E>0.01 MeV) and a dose rate of up to 6x10 5 Gy/s. The neutron irradiation showed a saturation tendency in the flux dependence at 300 K due to the strong electronic excitation. Normalization of the electronic excitation, including the pulsed regime, gave a fair agreement among the different radiation environments. Detailed comparison among PC, p-RIC and n-RIC is discussed in terms of radiation correlation including the in-pile condition

  12. Gravitational radiation in relativistic theory of gravity with a nonzero graviton mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasov, A.A.; Chugreev, Yu.V.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation of gravitation waves have been analysed in the linear approximation of the relative theory of gravity, with the mass of graviton being nonzero. It is shown that the main contribution to the energy loss due to gravitational radiation has been described by the well-known quadrupole formula. Linear approximation applicability conditions have been analysed

  13. Relativistic equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, F.

    1986-01-01

    Relativistic equations for two and three body scattering are discussed. Particular attention is paid to relativistic three body kinetics because of recent form factor measurements of the Helium 3 - Hydrogen 3 system recently completed at Saclay and Bates and the accompanying speculation that relativistic effects are important for understanding the three nucleon system. 16 refs., 4 figs

  14. Studies of radiation damage in silicon sensors and a measurement of the inelastic proton--proton cross-section at 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00360674; Ward, Patricia

    This thesis presents studies of radiation damage in silicon sensors for the new ATLAS tracker at the high-luminosity LHC, calibrations of the LHC luminosity scale, and a measurement of the proton--proton inelastic cross-section at 13 TeV~with ATLAS data. The studies of radiation damage are performed by comparing sensor performance before and after irradiation, and include annealing studies. The measured quantities include: leakage current, depletion depth, inter-strip isolation, and charge collection. Surface and bulk damage is studied by comparing the results of sensors irradiated with protons and neutrons. The observed degradation of performance suggests the current sensor design will endure the radiation damage expected over the lifetime of the experiment at the high-luminosity LHC. The luminosity is calibrated for the proton--proton, proton--lead, and lead--lead collisions delivered by the LHC during 2013 and 2015. The absolute luminosity scale is derived with the van der Meer method. The systematic unc...

  15. General Relativistic Radiation MHD Simulations of Supercritical Accretion onto a Magnetized Neutron Star: Modeling of Ultraluminous X-Ray Pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki R. [Center for Computational Astrophysics, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Ohsuga, Ken, E-mail: takahashi@cfca.jp, E-mail: ken.ohsuga@nao.ac.jp [Division of Theoretical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2017-08-10

    By performing 2.5-dimensional general relativistic radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we demonstrate supercritical accretion onto a non-rotating, magnetized neutron star, where the magnetic field strength of dipole fields is 10{sup 10} G on the star surface. We found the supercritical accretion flow consists of two parts: the accretion columns and the truncated accretion disk. The supercritical accretion disk, which appears far from the neutron star, is truncated at around ≃3 R {sub *} ( R {sub *} = 10{sup 6} cm is the neutron star radius), where the magnetic pressure via the dipole magnetic fields balances with the radiation pressure of the disks. The angular momentum of the disk around the truncation radius is effectively transported inward through magnetic torque by dipole fields, inducing the spin up of a neutron star. The evaluated spin-up rate, ∼−10{sup −11} s s{sup −1}, is consistent with the recent observations of the ultraluminous X-ray pulsars. Within the truncation radius, the gas falls onto a neutron star along the dipole fields, which results in a formation of accretion columns onto the northern and southern hemispheres. The net accretion rate and the luminosity of the column are ≃66 L {sub Edd}/ c {sup 2} and ≲10 L {sub Edd}, where L {sub Edd} is the Eddington luminosity and c is the light speed. Our simulations support a hypothesis whereby the ultraluminous X-ray pulsars are powered by the supercritical accretion onto the magnetized neutron stars.

  16. Investigation of resonant polarization radiation of relativistic electrons in gratings at small angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleinik, A.N.; Chefonov, O.V.; Kalinin, B.N.; Naumenko, G.A.; Potylitsyn, A.P.; Saruev, G.A.; Sharafutdinov, A.F.

    2003-01-01

    The resonant optical polarization radiation (ROPR) in the Smith-Purcell geometry and the one from the inclined grating at the Tomsk synchrotron and 6-MeV microtron have been investigated. The polarization radiation was observed at 4.2 deg. from the 200 MeV electron beam and at 5 deg. from the 6.2 MeV electron beam. Two methods of measurement of ROPR maxima in these two cases have been used. In the first case (the experiment on synchrotron) we have fixed the wavelength of radiation using an optical filter; the orientation dependence of this radiation was measured. In this dependence we have observed two peaks of radiation from electrons in gold foil grating of 0.1 mm period. The first large peak is a zeroth order peak in direction of specular reflection, and the second one is the first-order peak of resonant polarization radiation. In the experiment on microtron the spectra of ROPR from aluminum foil strip grating of 0.2 mm period in the Smith-Purcell geometry were measured, and the peak of the first-order Smith-Purcell radiation in these spectra was observed. The comparison of data obtained with the simulation results has been performed

  17. Radiation protection of the operation of accelerator facilities. On high energy proton and electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Kenjiro

    1997-01-01

    Problems in the radiation protection raised by accelerated particles with energy higher than several hundreds MeV in strong accelerator facilities were discussed in comparison with those with lower energy in middle- and small-scale facilities. The characteristics in the protection in such strong accelerator facilities are derived from the qualitative changes in the interaction between the high energy particles and materials and from quantitative one due to the beam strength. In the former which is dependent on the emitting mechanism of the radiation, neutron with broad energy spectrum and muon are important in the protection, and in the latter, levels of radiation and radioactivity which are proportional to the beam strength are important. The author described details of the interaction between high energy particles and materials: leading to the conclusion that in the electron accelerator facilities, shielding against high energy-blemsstrahlung radiation and -neutron is important and in the proton acceleration, shielding against neutron is important. The characteristics of the radiation field in the strong accelerator facilities: among neutron, ionized particles and electromagnetic wave, neutron is most important in shielding since it has small cross sections relative to other two. Considerations for neutron are necessary in the management of exposure. Multiplicity of radionuclides produced: which is a result of nuclear spallation reaction due to high energy particles, especially to proton. Radioactivation of the accelerator equipment is a serious problem. Other problems: the interlock systems, radiation protection for experimenters and maintenance of the equipment by remote systems. (K.H.). 11 refs

  18. Parton radiative processes and pressure isotropization in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bin; Wortman, Warner A.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of radiative processes on kinetic equilibration is studied via a radiative transport model. The 2↔3 processes can significantly increase the level of thermalization. These processes lead to an approximate coupling constant scaling of the evolution of the pressure anisotropy qualitatively different from the case with only 2→2 partonic processes. Furthermore, thermal and Color Glass Condensate motivated initial conditions are shown to share the same asymptotic evolution when 2↔3 processes are included. This emphasizes the unique role of radiative processes in Quark-Gluon Plasma thermalization.

  19. On the theory of magnetic field generation by relativistically strong laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezhiani, V.I.; Shatashvili, N.L.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1996-07-01

    The authors consider the interaction of subpicosecond relativistically strong short laser pulses with an underdense cold unmagnetized electron plasma. It is shown that the strong plasma inhomogeneity caused by laser pulses results in the generation of a low frequency (quasistatic) magnetic field. Since the electron density distribution is determined completely by the pump wave intensity, the generated magnetic field is negligibly small for nonrelativistic laser pulses but increases rapidly in the ultrarelativistic case. Due to the possibility of electron cavitation (complete expulsion of electrons from the central region) for narrow and intense beams, the increase in the generated magnetic field slows down as the beam intensity is increased. The structure of the magnetic field closely resembles that of the field produced by a solenoid; the field is maximum and uniform in the cavitation region, then it falls, changes polarity and vanishes. In extremely dense plasmas, highly intense laser pulses in the self-channeling regime can generate magnetic fields ∼ 100 Mg and greater

  20. Design of radiation shielding for the proton therapy facility at the National Cancer Center in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. W.; Kwon, J. W.; Lee, J.

    2005-01-01

    The design of radiation shielding was evaluated for a proton therapy facility being established at the National Cancer Center in Korea. The proton beam energy from a 230 MeV cyclotron is varied for therapy using a graphite target. This energy variation process produces high radiation and thus thick shielding walls surround the region. The evaluation was first carried out using analytical expressions at selected locations. Further detailed evaluations have been performed using the Monte Carlo method. Dose equivalent values were calculated to be compared with analytical results. The analytical method generally yielded more conservative values. With consideration of adequate occupancy factors annual dose equivalent rates are kept -1 in all areas. Construction of the building is expected to be completed near the end of 2004 and the installation of therapy equipments will begin a few months later. (authors)

  1. Strange Meson Radiative Capture on the Proton in Low Energy QCD Lagrangian

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li-Juan; MA Wei-Xing

    2002-01-01

    Based on our low energy QCD Lagrangian description of strange meson photoproduction off the protonand the crossing symmetry, the strange meson radiative capture on the proton, K- + p →γ + A, is investigated in the[SUsF (6) O(3)]sym. SUc (3) quark model of baryon structure with the same input parameter, the only strong couplingconstant aM, as that in the strange meson photoproduction off the proton γ + p → K+ + A, a crossing channel of thecapture reaction. A good agreement on the branching ratio between the predictions and data is obtained successfully.This excellent fit indicates that our low energy QCD Lagrangian theory with only one free parameter is an advancedand unified description of strange meson photoproduction and its associated radiative capture.

  2. Characterization of commercial proton exchange membrane materials after exposure to beta and gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, S.N.; Carson, R.; Muirhead, C.; Li, H.; Castillo, I.; Boniface, H.; Suppiah, S. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Ratnayake, A.; Robinson, J. [Tyne Engineering Inc., Burlington, ON (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) type electrolysis cells have a potential use for tritium removal and heavy water upgrading. AECL is currently exposing various commercial PEM materials to both gamma (Cobalt-60 source) and beta (tritiated water) radiation to study the effects of radiation on these materials. This paper summarizes the testing methods and results that have been collected to date. The PEM materials that are or have been exposed to radiation are: Nafion 112, 212, 117 and 1110. Membrane characterization pre- and post- exposure consists of non-destructive inspection (FTIR, SEM/XPS), mechanical (tensile strength, percentage elongation, and modulus), electrical (resistance), or chemical (ion-exchange capacity - IEC). It has appeared that the best characterization techniques to compare exposed versus unexposed membranes were IEC, ultimate tensile strength and percent elongation. These testing techniques are easy and cheap to perform. The non-destructive tests, such as SEM and FTIR did not provide particularly useful information on radiation-induced degradation. Where changes in material properties were measured after radiation exposure, they would be expected to result in poorer cell performance. However, for modest γ-radiation exposure, all membranes showed a slight decrease in cell voltage (better performance). In contrast, the one β-radiation exposed membrane did show the expected increase in cell voltage. The counterintuitive trend for γ-radiation exposed membranes is not yet understood. Based on these preliminary results, it appears that γ- and β-radiation exposures have different effects.

  3. SU-F-T-174: Patient-Specific Point Dose Measurement Using Fiber Optic Radiation Sensor Using Cerenkov Radiation for Proton Therapeutic Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, J [Korea University, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Kim, M [Dongnam Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Busan, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, M [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, D [National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A fiber-optic radiation sensor using Cerenkov radiation (FOCR) has been widely studied for use as a dosimeter for proton therapeutic beam. We developed the FOCR, and it applied to patient-specific point dose measurement in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the FOCR system for proton therapy QA. Methods: Calibration of FOCR was performed with an ionization chamber whose absolute doses were determined according to the IAEA TRS-398 protocol. To determine the calibration curve, the FOCR was irradiated perpendicularly to the proton beam at the 13 dose levels steps. We selected five actual patient treatment plans performed at proton therapy center and compared the resulting FOCR measurements with the ionization chamber measurements. Results: The Cerenkov light yield of the FOCR increases linearly with as the dose measured using the ionization chamber increases from 0 cGy to 500 cGy. The results indicate that the fitting curve is linear, suggesting that dose measurement based on the light yield of the FOCR is possible. The results of proton radiation dose QA performed using the FOCR for 10 proton fields and five patients are good agreement with an ionization chamber. Conclusion: We carried out the patient QA using the FOCR for proton therapeutic beam and evaluated the effectiveness of the FOCR as a proton therapy QA tool. Our results indicate that the FOCR is suitable for use in patient QA of clinical proton beams.

  4. Proposal of experimental facilities for studies of nuclear data and radiation engineering in the Intense Proton Accelerator Project

    CERN Document Server

    Baba, M; Nagai, Y; Ishibashi, K

    2003-01-01

    A proposal is given on the facilities and experiments in the Intense Proton Accelerator Project (J-PARC) relevant to the nuclear data and radiation engineering, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear transmutation, accelerator technology and space technology and so on. (3 refs).

  5. Criteria for personal dosimetry in mixed radiation fields in space. [analyzing trapped protons, tissue disintegration stars, and neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, H. J.

    1974-01-01

    The complexity of direct reading and passive dosimeters for monitoring radiation is studied to strike the right balance of compromise to simplify the monitoring procedure. Trapped protons, tissue disintegration stars, and neutrons are analyzed.

  6. Assessment of radiation-induced second cancer risks in proton therapy and IMRT for organs inside the primary radiation field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganetti, Harald; Athar, Basit S.; Moteabbed, Maryam; Adams, Judith A.; Schneider, Uwe; Yock, Torunn I.

    2012-10-01

    There is clinical evidence that second malignancies in radiation therapy occur mainly within the beam path, i.e. in the medium or high-dose region. The purpose of this study was to assess the risk for developing a radiation-induced tumor within the treated volume and to compare this risk for proton therapy and intensity-modulated photon therapy (IMRT). Instead of using data for specific patients we have created a representative scenario. Fully contoured age- and gender-specific whole body phantoms (4 year and 14 year old) were uploaded into a treatment planning system and tumor volumes were contoured based on patients treated for optic glioma and vertebral body Ewing's sarcoma. Treatment plans for IMRT and proton therapy treatments were generated. Lifetime attributable risks (LARs) for developing a second malignancy were calculated using a risk model considering cell kill, mutation, repopulation, as well as inhomogeneous organ doses. For standard fractionation schemes, the LAR for developing a second malignancy from radiation therapy alone was found to be up to 2.7% for a 4 year old optic glioma patient treated with IMRT considering a soft-tissue carcinoma risk model only. Sarcoma risks were found to be below 1% in all cases. For a 14 year old, risks were found to be about a factor of 2 lower. For Ewing's sarcoma cases the risks based on a sarcoma model were typically higher than the carcinoma risks, i.e. LAR up to 1.3% for soft-tissue sarcoma. In all cases, the risk from proton therapy turned out to be lower by at least a factor of 2 and up to a factor of 10. This is mainly due to lower total energy deposited in the patient when using proton beams. However, the comparison of a three-field and four-field proton plan also shows that the distribution of the dose, i.e. the particular treatment plan, plays a role. When using different fractionation schemes, the estimated risks roughly scale with the total dose difference in%. In conclusion, proton therapy can

  7. Doping of semiconductors using radiation defects produced by irradiation with protons and alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, V.A.; Kozlovski, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    One of the modern methods for modifying semiconductors using beams of protons and alpha particles is analyzed; this modification is accomplished by the controlled introduction of radiation defects into the semiconductor. It is shown that doping semiconductors with radiation defects produced by irradiation with light ions opens up fresh opportunities for controlling the properties of semiconducting materials and for the development of new devices designed for optoelectronics, microelectronics, and nanoelectronics based on these materials; these devices differ favorably from those obtained by conventional doping methods, i.e., by diffusion, epitaxy, and ion implantation

  8. Elementary analysis of massive samples at excitation of characteristic x-radiation by proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altynov, V.A.; Blokhin, S.M.; Brazevich, Eh.; Brazevich, Ya.; Lyu Zaj Ik; Osetinskij, G.M.; Purehv, A.

    1982-01-01

    A simplified method is described for calculating the elementary composition in the massive samples in the case of the detection of the characteristic X-radiation emitted under the bombardment of the samples by a beam of protons. The method was experimentally verified by measuring the characteristic X-radiation from the elements with a known concentration entering the one-component and multi-component matrix. It was shown that within the experimental accuracy the discussed method gave results analogous to those obtained with the earlier used methods

  9. Acute toxicity in comprehensive head and neck radiation for nasopharynx and paranasal sinus cancers: cohort comparison of 3D conformal proton therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Mark W.; Liu, Yuan; Moore, Michael G.; Johnstone, Peter A. S.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate acute toxicity endpoints in a cohort of patients receiving head and neck radiation with proton therapy or intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Forty patients received comprehensive head and neck radiation including bilateral cervical nodal radiation, given with or without chemotherapy, for tumors of the nasopharynx, nasal cavity or paranasal sinuses, any T stage, N0-2. Fourteen received comprehensive treatment with proton therapy, and 26 were treated with IMRT, either comprehensively or matched to proton therapy delivered to the primary tumor site. Toxicity endpoints assessed included g-tube dependence at the completion of radiation and at 3 months after radiation, opioid pain medication requirement compared to pretreatment normalized as equivalent morphine dose (EMD) at completion of treatment, and at 1 and 3 months after radiation. In a multivariable model including confounding variables of concurrent chemotherapy and involved nodal disease, comprehensive head and neck radiation therapy using proton therapy was associated with a lower opioid pain requirement at the completion of radiation and a lower rate of gastrostomy tube dependence by the completion of radiation therapy and at 3 months after radiation compared to IMRT. Proton therapy was associated with statistically significant lower mean doses to the oral cavity, esophagus, larynx, and parotid glands. In subgroup analysis of 32 patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy, there was a statistically significant correlation with a greater opioid pain medication requirement at the completion of radiation and both increasing mean dose to the oral cavity and to the esophagus. Proton therapy was associated with significantly reduced radiation dose to assessed non-target normal tissues and a reduced rate of gastrostomy tube dependence and opioid pain medication requirements. This warrants further evaluation in larger studies, ideally with patient-reported toxicity outcomes and quality of life

  10. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiation, Proton beam therapy and proton arc therapy for para-aortic lymph node tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Konyang University Hospital. Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To test feasibility of proton arc therapy (PAT) in the treatment of para-aortic lymph node tumor and compare its dosimetric properties with advanced radiotherapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and conventional 3D conformal proton beam therapy (PBT). The treatment plans for para-aortic lymph node tumor were planned for 9 patients treated at our institution using IMRT, PBT, and PAT. Feasibility test and dosimetric evaluation were based on comparisons of dose volume histograms (DVHs) which reveal mean dose, D{sub 30%}, D{sub 60%}, D{sub 90%}, V{sub 30%}, V{sub 60%}, V{sub 90}%, organ equivalent doses (OEDs), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI). The average doses delivered by PAT to the liver, kidney, small bowel, duodenum, stomach were 7.6%, 3%, 17.3%, 26.7%, and 14.4%, of the prescription dose (PD), respectively, which is higher than the doses delivered by IMRT (0.4%, 7.2%, 14.2%, 15.9%, and 12.8%, respectively) and PBT (4.9%, 0.5%, 14.12%, 16.1% 9.9%, respectively). The average homogeneity index and conformity index of tumor using PAT were 12.1 and 1.21, respectively which were much better than IMRT (21.5 and 1.47, respectively) and comparable to PBT (13.1 and 1.23, respectively). The result shows that both NTCP and OED of PAT are generally lower than IMRT and PBT. This study demonstrates that PAT is better in target conformity and homogeneity than IMRT and PBT but worse than IMRT and PBT for most of dosimetric factor which indicate that PAT is not recommended for the treatment of para-aortic lymph node tumor.

  11. First observation of coherent Smith-Purcell radiation in the highly relativistic regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackmore, V.; Doucas, G.; Perry, C.; Kimmitt, M.F.

    2008-01-01

    Coherent Smith-Purcell (SP) radiation has already been applied as a technique to measure the longitudinal bunch profile of charged particle beams in the low to intermediate energy range. However, with the advent of the International Linear Collider and the need to develop a non-invasive method of measuring the bunch profile, it has become necessary to carry out experiments at the highest possible energies. The paper summarizes some recent work at intermediate (45 MeV) energy and presents the first observations of SP radiation from a 28.5 GeV beam at SLAC. The experimental challenges and future possibilities of coherent Smith-Purcell radiation as a longitudinal bunch profile diagnostic tool are also discussed

  12. Angular distributions of relativistic electrons under channeling in half-wavelength crystal and corresponding radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takabayashi, Y.; Bagrov, V.G.; Bogdanov, O.V.; Pivovarov, Yu.L.; Tukhfatullin, T.A.

    2015-01-01

    New experiments on channeling of 255 MeV electrons in a half-wavelength crystals (HWC) were performed at SAGA Light Source facilities. The simulations of trajectories for (2 2 0) and (1 1 1) planar channeling in Si were performed using the computer code BCM-1.0. Comparison of experimental and theoretical results shows a good agreement. The results of calculations of spectral distribution of radiation in forward direction (θ = 0°) from 255 MeV electrons at (2 2 0) channeling in HWC silicon are presented. Qualitative comparison with radiation spectrum from an electron moving in an arc is performed

  13. Proton Minibeam Radiation Therapy Reduces Side Effects in an In Vivo Mouse Ear Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girst, Stefanie, E-mail: stefanie.girst@unibw.de [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Greubel, Christoph; Reindl, Judith [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Siebenwirth, Christian [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Zlobinskaya, Olga [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Walsh, Dietrich W.M. [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Ilicic, Katarina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel [Research Unit Analytical Pathology, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Oberschleißheim (Germany); and others

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Proton minibeam radiation therapy is a novel approach to minimize normal tissue damage in the entrance channel by spatial fractionation while keeping tumor control through a homogeneous tumor dose using beam widening with an increasing track length. In the present study, the dose distributions for homogeneous broad beam and minibeam irradiation sessions were simulated. Also, in an animal study, acute normal tissue side effects of proton minibeam irradiation were compared with homogeneous irradiation in a tumor-free mouse ear model to account for the complex effects on the immune system and vasculature in an in vivo normal tissue model. Methods and Materials: At the ion microprobe SNAKE, 20-MeV protons were administered to the central part (7.2 × 7.2 mm{sup 2}) of the ear of BALB/c mice, using either a homogeneous field with a dose of 60 Gy or 16 minibeams with a nominal 6000 Gy (4 × 4 minibeams, size 0.18 × 0.18 mm{sup 2}, with a distance of 1.8 mm). The same average dose was used over the irradiated area. Results: No ear swelling or other skin reactions were observed at any point after minibeam irradiation. In contrast, significant ear swelling (up to fourfold), erythema, and desquamation developed in homogeneously irradiated ears 3 to 4 weeks after irradiation. Hair loss and the disappearance of sebaceous glands were only detected in the homogeneously irradiated fields. Conclusions: These results show that proton minibeam radiation therapy results in reduced adverse effects compared with conventional homogeneous broad-beam irradiation and, therefore, might have the potential to decrease the incidence of side effects resulting from clinical proton and/or heavy ion therapy.

  14. Relativistic generalization of the Van-Cittert-Zernike theorem and coherent properties of rotating star radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandjos, A.V.; Khmil', S.V.

    1979-01-01

    The formula is derived for the complex coherence degree of radiation from the surface moving arbitrarily in the gravitational field. The calculations are carried out referina to the rotating star observed at the spectral line by the interferometric method. The possibility of determining interferometrically the star rotational velocity and axis orientation is grounded

  15. Echo-enabled tunable terahertz radiation generation with a laser-modulated relativistic electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A new scheme to generate narrow-band tunable terahertz (THz radiation using a variant of the echo-enabled harmonic generation is analyzed. We show that by using an energy chirped beam, THz density modulation in the beam phase space can be produced with two lasers having the same wavelength. This removes the need for an optical parametric amplifier system to provide a wavelength-tunable laser to vary the central frequency of the THz radiation. The practical feasibility and applications of this scheme are demonstrated numerically with a start-to-end simulation using the beam parameters at the Shanghai Deep Ultraviolet Free-Electron Laser facility (SDUV. The central frequency of the density modulation can be continuously tuned by either varying the chirp of the beam or the momentum compactions of the chicanes. The influence of nonlinear rf chirp and longitudinal space charge effect have also been studied in our article. The methods to generate the THz radiation in SDUV with the new scheme and the estimation of the radiation power are also discussed briefly.

  16. Drift-resonant, relativistic electron acceleration at the outer planets: Insights from the response of Saturn's radiation belts to magnetospheric storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussos, E.; Kollmann, P.; Krupp, N.; Paranicas, C.; Dialynas, K.; Sergis, N.; Mitchell, D. G.; Hamilton, D. C.; Krimigis, S. M.

    2018-05-01

    The short, 7.2-day orbital period of Cassini's Ring Grazing Orbits (RGO) provided an opportunity to monitor how fast the effects of an intense magnetospheric storm-time period (days 336-343/2016) propagated into Saturn's electron radiation belts. Following the storms, Cassini's MIMI/LEMMS instrument detected a transient extension of the electron radiation belts that in subsequent orbits moved towards the inner belts, intensifying them in the process. This intensification was followed by an equally fast decay, possibly due to the rapid absorption of MeV electrons by the planet's main rings. Surprisingly, all this cycle was completed within four RGOs, effectively in less than a month. That is considerably faster than the year-long time scales of Saturn's proton radiation belt evolution. In order to explain this difference, we propose that electron radial transport is partly controlled by the variability of global scale electric fields which have a fixed local time pointing. Such electric fields may distort significantly the orbits of a particular class of energetic electrons that cancel out magnetospheric corotation due to their westward gradient and curvature drifts (termed "corotation-resonant" or "local-time stationary" electrons) and transport them radially between the ring current and the radiation belts within several days and few weeks. The significance of the proposed process is highlighted by the fact that corotation resonance at Saturn occurs for electrons of few hundred keV to several MeV. These are the characteristic energies of seed electrons from the ring current that sustain the radiation belts of the planet. Our model's feasibility is demonstrated through the use of a simple test-particle simulation, where we estimate that uniform but variable electric fields with magnitudes lower that 1.0 mV/m can lead to a very efficient transport of corotation resonant electrons. Such electric fields have been consistently measured in the magnetosphere, and here we

  17. Contribution to the theoretical study of a high power microwave radiation produced by a relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellem, F.

    1997-01-01

    This thesis is dedicated to the study of microwave radiation produced by relativistic electron beams. The vircator (virtual cathode oscillator) is a powerful microwave source based on this principle. This device is described but the complexity of the physical processes involved makes computer simulation necessary before proposing a simplified model. The existent M2V code has been useful to simulate the behaviour of a vircator but the representation of some phenomena such as hot points, the interaction of waves with particles lacks reliability. A new code CODEX has been written, it can solve Maxwell equations on a double mesh system by a finite difference method. The electric and magnetic fields are directly computed from the scalar and vectorial potentials. This new code has been satisfactorily tested on 3 configurations: the bursting of an electron beam in vacuum, the evolution of electromagnetic fields in diode and the propagation of waves in a wave tube. CODEX has been able to simulate the behaviour of a vircator, the frequency and power are well predicted and some contributions to the problem of origin of microwave production have been made. It seems that the virtual cathode is not directly involved in the microwave production. (A.C.)

  18. Proton radiation damage assessment of a CCD for use in a Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gow, J.P.D.; Mason, J.; Leese, M.; Patel, M.; Hathi, B.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the radiation environment and radiation damage analysis performed for the Nadir and Occultation for MArs Discovery (NOMAD) Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVIS) channel launched onboard the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) in 2016. The aim of the instrument is to map the temporal and spatial variation of trace gases such as ozone and dust/cloud aerosols in the atmosphere of Mars. The instrument consists of a set of two miniature telescope viewing optics which allow for selective input onto the optical bench, where an e2v technologies CCD30-11 will be used as the detector. A Geometry Description Markup Language model of the spacecraft and instrument box was created and through the use of ESA's SPace ENVironment Information System (SPENVIS) an estimate of the 10 MeV equivalent proton fluence was made at a number of radiation sensitive regions within NOMAD, including that of the CCD30-11 which is the focus of this paper. The end of life 10 MeV equivalent proton fluence at the charge coupled device was estimated to be 4.7 × 10 9 protons.cm −2 ; three devices were irradiated at different levels up a 10 MeV equivalent fluence of 9.4 × 10 9 protons.cm −2 . The dark current, charge transfer inefficiency, charge storage, and cosmetic quality of the devices was investigated pre- and post-irradiation, determining that the devices will continue to provide excellent science throughout the mission.

  19. Studies of the relativistic electron source and related phenomena in Petawatt Laser matter interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, M.H.; Campbell, E.M.; Cowan, T.E.; Hatchett, S.P.; Henry, E.A.; Koch, J.A.; Landgon, A.B.; Lasinski, B.F.; Lee, R.W.; MacKinnon, A.; Offenberger, A.; Pennington, D.M.; Perry, M.D.; Sangster, T.C.; Yasuike, K.; Snavely, R.; Roth, M.; Phillips, T.W.; Stoyer, M.A.; Wilks, S.C.; Singh, M.S.

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of laser radiation with solid targets at 1 petawatt power and intensity up to 3x10 20 Wcm -2 has been studied with emphasis on relativistic electrons and high energy ions. Secondary effects including Bremsstrahlung radiation, nuclear interactions and heating have been characterized. A collimated beam of protons with up to 55 MeV energy is emitted normal to the rear surface of thin targets and its characteristics and origin are discussed. The significance of the data for radiography, fast ignition and proton beam applications is summarized

  20. Collisional radiative model for Ar-O2 mixture plasma with fully relativistic fine structure cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priti, Gangwar, Reetesh Kumar; Srivastava, Rajesh

    2018-04-01

    A collisional radiative (C-R) model has been developed to diagnose the rf generated Ar-O2 (0%-5%) mixture plasma at low temperatures. Since in such plasmas the most dominant process is an electron impact excitation process, we considered several electron impact fine structure transitions in an argon atom from its ground as well as excited states. The cross-sections for these transitions have been obtained using the reliable fully relativistic distorted wave theory. Processes which account for the coupling of argon with the oxygen molecules have been further added to the model. We couple our model to the optical spectroscopic measurements reported by Jogi et al. [J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 47, 335206 (2014)]. The plasma parameters, viz. the electron density (ne) and the electron temperature (Te) as a function of O2 concentration have been obtained using thirteen intense emission lines out of 3p54p → 3p54s transitions observed in their spectroscopic measurements. It is found that as the content of O2 in Ar increases from 0%-5%, Te increases in the range 0.85-1.7 eV, while the electron density decreases from 2.76 × 1012-2.34 × 1011 cm-3. The Ar-3p54s (1si) fine-structure level populations at our extracted plasma parameters are found to be in very good agreement with those obtained from the measurements. Furthermore, we have estimated the individual contributions coming from the ground state, 1si manifolds and cascade contributions to the population of the radiating Ar-3p54p (2pi) states as a function of a trace amount of O2. Such information is very useful to understand the importance of various processes occurring in the plasma.

  1. Radiation modification and interaction mechanism of polypropylene and polyethylene by protons and electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guanghou

    1988-10-01

    A systematic investigation of radiation effects on isotactic polypropylene (PP) and low-density polyethylene (PE) films by protons and electrons is reported. Electrons can make polyethylene cross-linked and polypropylene crached while protons can improve the PP mechanical properties and deteriorate polyethylene with increasing the irradiation dose. The structural analysis shows that conversion between α and β phases occurs and the crystallinity remains constant in the electron-irradiated polypropylene whereas the network structure is formed by allyl-type radicals in the e - -irradiated polyethylene. The infrared spectra indicate that conformational changes have taken place in the polypropylene under proton bombardment, such as the transition from an ordered to a disordered state in the crystalline region, the formation of double bonds as well as trans-conformations. This leads to the cross-linking between macromolecules of polypropylene at the proper irradiation doses, thus enhancing its mechanical properties. The cross-linking of polypropylene by proton bombardment observed and its properties may have some potential applications

  2. A Monte Carlo Code for Relativistic Radiation Transport Around Kerr Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittman, Jeremy David; Krolik, Julian H.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new code for radiation transport around Kerr black holes, including arbitrary emission and absorption mechanisms, as well as electron scattering and polarization. The code is particularly useful for analyzing accretion flows made up of optically thick disks and optically thin coronae. We give a detailed description of the methods employed in the code and also present results from a number of numerical tests to assess its accuracy and convergence.

  3. Proton Radiation Effects on Dark Signal Distribution of PPD CMOS Image Sensors: Both TID and DDD Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yuanyuan; Wang, Zujun; Chen, Wei; Liu, Minbo; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Sheng, Jiangkun; Ma, Wuying; Dong, Guantao; Jin, Junshan

    2017-11-30

    Four-transistor (T) pinned photodiode (PPD) CMOS image sensors (CISs) with four-megapixel resolution using 11µm pitch high dynamic range pixel were radiated with 3 MeV and 10MeV protons. The dark signal was measured pre- and post-radiation, with the dark signal post irradiation showing a remarkable increase. A theoretical method of dark signal distribution pre- and post-radiation is used to analyze the degradation mechanisms of the dark signal distribution. The theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental results. This research would provide a good understanding of the proton radiation effects on the CIS and make it possible to predict the dark signal distribution of the CIS under the complex proton radiation environments.

  4. SU-F-T-140: Assessment of the Proton Boron Fusion Reaction for Practical Radiation Therapy Applications Using MCNP6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, D; Bednarz, B [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The proton boron fusion reaction is a reaction that describes the creation of three alpha particles as the result of the interaction of a proton incident upon a 11B target. Theoretically, the proton boron fusion reaction is a desirable reaction for radiation therapy applications in that, with the appropriate boron delivery agent, it could potentially combine the localized dose delivery protons exhibit (Bragg peak) and the local deposition of high LET alpha particles in cancerous sites. Previous efforts have shown significant dose enhancement using the proton boron fusion reaction; the overarching purpose of this work is an attempt to validate previous Monte Carlo results of the proton boron fusion reaction. Methods: The proton boron fusion reaction, 11B(p, 3α), is investigated using MCNP6 to assess the viability for potential use in radiation therapy. Simple simulations of a proton pencil beam incident upon both a water phantom and a water phantom with an axial region containing 100ppm boron were modeled using MCNP6 in order to determine the extent of the impact boron had upon the calculated energy deposition. Results: The maximum dose increase calculated was 0.026% for the incident 250 MeV proton beam scenario. The MCNP simulations performed demonstrated that the proton boron fusion reaction rate at clinically relevant boron concentrations was too small in order to have any measurable impact on the absorbed dose. Conclusion: For all MCNP6 simulations conducted, the increase of absorbed dose of a simple water phantom due to the 11B(p, 3α) reaction was found to be inconsequential. In addition, it was determined that there are no good evaluations of the 11B(p, 3α) reaction for use in MCNPX/6 and further work should be conducted in cross section evaluations in order to definitively evaluate the feasibility of the proton boron fusion reaction for use in radiation therapy applications.

  5. Relativistic astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Demianski, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Relativistic Astrophysics brings together important astronomical discoveries and the significant achievements, as well as the difficulties in the field of relativistic astrophysics. This book is divided into 10 chapters that tackle some aspects of the field, including the gravitational field, stellar equilibrium, black holes, and cosmology. The opening chapters introduce the theories to delineate gravitational field and the elements of relativistic thermodynamics and hydrodynamics. The succeeding chapters deal with the gravitational fields in matter; stellar equilibrium and general relativity

  6. Radiation protection studies for a high-power 160 MeV proton linac

    CERN Document Server

    Mauro, Egidio

    2009-01-01

    CERN is presently designing a new chain of accelerators to replace the present Proton Synchrotron (PS) complex: a 160 MeV room-temperature H− linac (Linac4) to replace the present 50 MeV proton linac injector, a 3.5 GeV Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) to replace the 1.4 GeV PS Booster (PSB) and a 50 GeV synchrotron (named PS2) to replace the 26 GeV PS. Linac4 has been funded and the civil engineering work started in October 2008, whilst the SPL is in an advanced stage of design. Beyond injecting into the future 50 GeV PS, the ultimate goal of the SPL is to generate a 4 MW beam for the production of intense neutrino beams. The radiation protection design is driven by the latter requirement. This work summarizes the radiation protection studies conducted for Linac4. FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations, complemented by analytical estimates, were performed to evaluate the propagation of neutrons through the waveguide, ventilation and cable ducts placed along the accelerator, to estimate the radiological impact of ...

  7. Relativistic solitons and pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpman, V I [Inst. of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere, and Radio-Wave Propagation, Moscow; Norman, C A; ter Haar, D; Tsytovich, V N

    1975-05-01

    A production mechanism for stable electron bunches or sheets of localized electric fields is investigated which may account for pulsar radio emission. Possible soliton phenomena in a one-dimensional relativistic plasma are analyzed, and it is suggested that the motion of a relativistic soliton, or ''relaton'', along a curved magnetic-field line may produce radio emission with the correct polarization properties. A general MHD solution is obtained for relatons, the radiation produced by a relativistic particle colliding with a soliton is evaluated, and the emission by a soliton moving along a curved field line is estimated. It is noted that due to a number of severe physical restrictions, curvature radiation is not a very likely solution to the problem of pulsar radio emission. (IAA)

  8. Novel radiation sources using relativistic electrons from infrared to x-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Rullhusen, P; Dhez, P

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to give a description of the state of the art in theoretical and experimental work achieved in radiation source development. It summarizes clearly and comprehensibly, the basic physical aspects needed to understand the phenomena, and also provides the interested reader with sufficient literature to be able to follow the development in more detail. In addition, it contains a unified view of most theoretical effects and their common properties. The most recent developments as well as references to further work can be found in this volume. In many cases, review article

  9. Microscopic nonlinear relativistic quantum theory of absorption of powerful x-ray radiation in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetissian, H K; Ghazaryan, A G; Matevosyan, H H; Mkrtchian, G F

    2015-10-01

    The microscopic quantum theory of plasma nonlinear interaction with the coherent shortwave electromagnetic radiation of arbitrary intensity is developed. The Liouville-von Neumann equation for the density matrix is solved analytically considering a wave field exactly and a scattering potential of plasma ions as a perturbation. With the help of this solution we calculate the nonlinear inverse-bremsstrahlung absorption rate for a grand canonical ensemble of electrons. The latter is studied in Maxwellian, as well as in degenerate quantum plasma for x-ray lasers at superhigh intensities and it is shown that one can achieve the efficient absorption coefficient in these cases.

  10. Radiation dose of aircrews during a solar proton event without ground-level enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kataoka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A significant enhancement of radiation doses is expected for aircrews during ground-level enhancement (GLE events, while the possible radiation hazard remains an open question during non-GLE solar energetic particle (SEP events. Using a new air-shower simulation driven by the proton flux data obtained from GOES satellites, we show the possibility of significant enhancement of the effective dose rate of up to 4.5 μSv h−1 at a conventional flight altitude of 12 km during the largest SEP event that did not cause a GLE. As a result, a new GOES-driven model is proposed to give an estimate of the contribution from the isotropic component of the radiation dose in the stratosphere during non-GLE SEP events.

  11. The potential of proton beam radiation therapy in intracranial and ocular tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomquist, Erik [Univ. Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology; Bjelkengren, Goeran [Univ. Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology; Glimelius, Bengt [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology and Pathology; Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology

    2005-12-01

    A group of oncologists and hospital physicists have estimated the number of patients in Sweden suitable for proton beam therapy. The estimations have been based on current statistics of tumour incidence, number of patients potentially eligible for radiation treatment, scientific support from clinical trials and model dose planning studies and knowledge of the dose-response relations of different tumours and normal tissues. In intracranial benign and malignant tumours, it is estimated that between 130 and 180 patients each year are candidates for proton beam therapy. Of these, between 50 and 75 patients have malignant glioma, 30-40 meningeoma, 20-25 arteriovenous malformations, 20-25 skull base tumours and 10-15 pituitary adenoma. In addition, 15 patients with ocular melanoma are candidates.

  12. Differential cross section measurement of radiative capture of protons by nuclei 13C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baktibayev, M.K.; Burminskii, V.P.; Burtebayev, N.; Dzazairov-Kakhramanov, V.; Kadyrzhanov, K.K.; Sagindykov, Sh.Sh.; Zarifov, R.A.; Zazulin, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The reaction 13 C(p,γ ) 14 N is the important one for the astrophysics, not only for nuclear synthesis of CNO elements, but and for nuclear synthesis of elements participating in subsequent combustion of helium [1]. The predominant yield of the reaction occurs at protons energies of less than 1 MeV. However, the clearness of the capture mechanism in this energy region is made difficult because of the superposition of the contribution of the low - energetical part of the resonance 1320 keV onto the cross section. Last experimental data for more wide energy region, informed in the work [1], and results of previous works, mentioned in that work, give reason for further continuation of the study of the reaction 13 C(p,γ ) 14 N. Measured data of the work [1] in the region of E ρ = (320 † 900) keV at the angles of 0 o and 90 o are obviously insufficient. In the present work measurements of differential cross sections of the reaction were carried out at protons energies E p = 991, 558 and 365 keV, the accuracy is not worse then 10%. There was studied the most (from the astrophysical point of view) important process of protons capture by 13 C nuclei onto the ground state of the 14 N nucleus. The 13 C (99%) targets, used in the experiment, were sprayed onto copper base. The target thickness was determined by incident protons energy losses in the target. The energy losses were clearly reflected in the corresponding spreading of transitions of radiation capture. The statement about the gamma-lines spreading is valid in this case, because energy losses in the target are here significantly more, than the energetical resolution of the detector. The peak width of the radiation capture gamma-line at half-height corresponds to energy losses of incident protons in the target. From the Table of brake values for protons in carbon [2] there was determined that the thickness of the target was 140 ± 5% μg/cm 2 . The upper part of gamma-lines in the spectrum repeats the

  13. Early Cognitive Outcomes Following Proton Radiation in Pediatric Patients With Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsifer, Margaret B.; Sethi, Roshan V.; Kuhlthau, Karen A.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report, from a longitudinal study, cognitive outcome in pediatric patients treated with proton radiation therapy (PRT) for central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients receiving PRT for medulloblastoma (38.3%), gliomas (18.3%), craniopharyngioma (15.0%), ependymoma (11.7%), and other CNS tumors (16.7%) were administered age-appropriate measures of cognitive abilities at or near PRT initiation (baseline) and afterward (follow-up). Patients were aged ≥6 years at baseline to ensure consistency in neurocognitive measures. Results: Mean age was 12.3 years at baseline; mean follow-up interval was 2.5 years. Treatment included prior surgical resection (76.7%) and chemotherapy (61.7%). Proton radiation therapy included craniospinal irradiation (46.7%) and partial brain radiation (53.3%). At baseline, mean Wechsler Full Scale IQ was 104.6; means of all 4 Index scores were also in the average range. At follow-up, no significant change was observed in mean Wechsler Full Scale IQ, Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning/Organization, or Working Memory. However, Processing Speed scores declined significantly (mean 5.2 points), with a significantly greater decline for subjects aged <12 years at baseline and those with the highest baseline scores. Cognitive outcome was not significantly related to gender, extent of radiation, radiation dose, tumor location, histology, socioeconomic status, chemotherapy, or history of surgical resection. Conclusions: Early cognitive outcomes after PRT for pediatric CNS tumors are encouraging, compared with published outcomes from photon radiation therapy

  14. Early Cognitive Outcomes Following Proton Radiation in Pediatric Patients With Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulsifer, Margaret B., E-mail: mpulsifer@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sethi, Roshan V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kuhlthau, Karen A. [Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); MacDonald, Shannon M.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To report, from a longitudinal study, cognitive outcome in pediatric patients treated with proton radiation therapy (PRT) for central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients receiving PRT for medulloblastoma (38.3%), gliomas (18.3%), craniopharyngioma (15.0%), ependymoma (11.7%), and other CNS tumors (16.7%) were administered age-appropriate measures of cognitive abilities at or near PRT initiation (baseline) and afterward (follow-up). Patients were aged ≥6 years at baseline to ensure consistency in neurocognitive measures. Results: Mean age was 12.3 years at baseline; mean follow-up interval was 2.5 years. Treatment included prior surgical resection (76.7%) and chemotherapy (61.7%). Proton radiation therapy included craniospinal irradiation (46.7%) and partial brain radiation (53.3%). At baseline, mean Wechsler Full Scale IQ was 104.6; means of all 4 Index scores were also in the average range. At follow-up, no significant change was observed in mean Wechsler Full Scale IQ, Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning/Organization, or Working Memory. However, Processing Speed scores declined significantly (mean 5.2 points), with a significantly greater decline for subjects aged <12 years at baseline and those with the highest baseline scores. Cognitive outcome was not significantly related to gender, extent of radiation, radiation dose, tumor location, histology, socioeconomic status, chemotherapy, or history of surgical resection. Conclusions: Early cognitive outcomes after PRT for pediatric CNS tumors are encouraging, compared with published outcomes from photon radiation therapy.

  15. The electromagnetic radiation fields of a relativistic electron avalanche with special attention to the origin of narrow bipolar pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooray, G. V.; Cooray, G. K.

    2011-12-01

    Gurevich et al. [1] postulated that the source of narrow bipolar pulses, a class of high energy pulses that occur during thunderstorms, could be a runaway electron avalanche driven by the intense electric fields of a thunderstorm. Recently, Watson and Marshall [2] used the modified transmission line model to test the mechanism of the source of narrow bipolar pulses. In a recent paper, Cooray and Cooray [3] demonstrated that the electromagnetic fields of accelerating charges could be used to evaluate the electromagnetic fields from electrical discharges if the temporal and spatial variation of the charges in the discharge is known. In the present study, those equations were utilized to evaluate the electromagnetic fields generated by a relativistic electron avalanche. In the analysis it is assumed that all the electrons in the avalanche are moving with the same speed. In other words, the growth or the decay of the number of electrons takes place only at the head of the avalanche. It is shown that the radiation is emanating only from the head of the avalanche where electrons are being accelerated. It is also shown that an analytical expression for the radiation field of the avalanche at any distance can be written directly in terms of the e-folding length of the avalanche. This makes it possible to extract directly the spatial variation of the e-folding length of the avalanche from the measured radiation fields. In the study this model avalanche was used to investigate whether it can be used to describe the measured electromagnetic fields of narrow bipolar pulses. The results obtained are in reasonable agreement with the two station data of Eack [4] for speeds of propagation around (2 - 2.5) x 10^8 m/s and when the propagation effects on the electric fields measured at the distant station is taken into account. [1] Gurevich et al. (2004), Phys. Lett. A., 329, pp. 348 -361. [2] Watson, S. S. and T. C. Marshall (2007), Geophys. Res. Lett., Vol. 34, L04816, doi: 10

  16. Investigation of singularities of integral intensity of the relativistic particle bremsstrahlung radiation in a diamond crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avakyan, R.O.; Armaganyan, A.A.; Arutyunyan, L.G.; Iskandaryan, A.G.; Taroyan, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    The results are given of the theoretical processing of experimental data on the investigation of orientational dependences of integral intensity of coherent bremsstrahlung radiation (CBR) of superfast electrons in a diamond crystal. It is shown that in the case of ''point effect'' right up to the electrons incident angle, which is 0.1 mrad with respect to the crystallographic plane, the CBR theory gives a good description of experimental data. In the case of ''row effect'', in order to account for the divergence between the theory and experiment at small incident angles of electrons with respect to the crystallographic axis, it is assumed that the multiple scattering angle has an orientational dependence. By fitting the theoretical curve to experimental points the dependences are obtained of the multiple scattering angle change on the crystal orientation with respect to the electron beam

  17. Reply to ''Comments on 'Time-symmetric, approximately relativistic particle interactions and radiation' ''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krizan, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    The inclusion of screening effects, as argued by Jones, effectively brings in terms of higher order than c -2 . The Darwin Hamiltonian, like the Darwin Lagrangian, usually is written in perturbative expansion, to order c -2 . The physical effects of the Cerenkov radiation (order c -2 ) and the Bohr polarization effect result from a weak-damping analysis with the Darwin Hamiltonian; contact has been made also in previous agreement with quantum field-theoretic calculations for degenerate systems, with the same Hamiltonian. The significance of adding screening should be examined within an approximation which includes c -3 terms and higher: so neither the Darwin Hamiltonian nor the Darwin Lagrangian is sufficient to analyze these situations. The medium modifications of Jones involve macroscopic considerations and higher orders and so the criticism of the microscopic Darwin Hamiltonian is misplaced

  18. Luminosity profiles and the evolution of shock waves in general relativistic radiating spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, L.; Nunez, L.A.

    1989-10-01

    A method recently proposed by the authors to study the evolution of discontinuities in radiating spherically symmetric distributions of matter is systematically applied to model the evolution of a composite radiant sphere. The matter configuration, free of singularities, is divided in two regions by a shock wave front, and at each side of this interface a different equation of state is considered. Solutions are matched across the shock via the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions while the outer region metric joins the Vaidya solution at the boundary surface. The influence on the evolution of these composite spheres of different shapes of neutrino outburst profiles, and particular neutrino-transfer processes from the inner core to the outer mantel is explored. Prospective applications to supernova scenarios are discussed. (author). 18 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  19. Dose distribution of secondary radiation in a water phantom for a proton pencil beam-EURADOS WG9 intercomparison exercise

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stolarczyk, L.; Trinkl, S.; Romero-Exposito, M.; Mojzeszek, N.; Ambrožová, Iva; Domingo, C.; Davídková, Marie; Farah, J.; Klodowska, M.; Kneževic, Z.; Liszka, M.; Majer, M.; Miljanic, S.; Ploc, Ondřej; Schwarz, M.; Harrison, R. M.; Olko, P.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 8 (2018), č. článku 085017. ISSN 0031-9155 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : passive detectors * neutron dosimetry * gamma radiation dosimetry * water phantom measurements * secondary radiation measurements * pencil beam scanning proton radiotherapy Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines OBOR OECD: Radiology, nuclear medicine and medical imaging Impact factor: 2.742, year: 2016

  20. Quenching-free fluorescence signal from plastic-fibres in proton dosimetry: understanding the influence of Čerenkov radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jeppe Brage; Almhagen, Erik; Nyström, Håkan

    2018-01-01

    The origin of photons emitted in optical fibres under proton irradiation has been attributed to either entirely Čerenkov radiation or light consisting of fluorescence with a substantial amount of Čerenkov radiation. The source of the light emission is assessed in order to understand why the signal...... from optical fibres irradiated with protons is reportedly quenching-free. The present study uses the directional emittance of Čerenkov photons in 12 MeV and 20 MeV electron beams to validate a Monte Carlo model for simulating the emittance and transmission of Čerenkov radiation in optical fibres. We...

  1. Laser Acceleration of Quasi-Monoenergetic Protons via Radiation Pressure Driven Thin Foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chuan S.; Shao Xi; Liu, T. C.; Dudnikova, Galina; Sagdeev, Roald Z.; Eliasson, Bengt

    2011-01-01

    We present a theoretical and simulation study of laser acceleration of quasi-monoenergetic protons in a thin foil irradiated by high intensity laser light. The underlying physics of radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) is discussed, including the importance of optimal thickness and circularly polarized light for efficient acceleration of ions to quasi-monoenergetic beams. Preliminary two-dimensional simulation studies show that certain parameter regimes allow for stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and possibility of acceleration of monoenergetic ions to an excess of 200 MeV, making them suitable for important applications such as medical cancer therapy and fast ignition.

  2. Second dip as a signature of ultrahigh energy proton interactions with cosmic microwave background radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezinsky, V; Gazizov, A; Kachelrieb, M

    2006-12-08

    We discuss as a new signature for the interaction of extragalactic ultrahigh energy protons with cosmic microwave background radiation a spectral feature located at E= 6.3 x 10(19) eV in the form of a narrow and shallow dip. It is produced by the interference of e+e(-)-pair and pion production. We show that this dip and, in particular, its position are almost model-independent. Its observation by future ultrahigh energy cosmic ray detectors may give the conclusive confirmation that an observed steepening of the spectrum is caused by the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin effect.

  3. Morphofunctional lesions in kidneys of monkeys pretreated with drugs and exposed to proton radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorenko, B.S.; Kabachenko, A.N.; Smirnova, O.A.

    1980-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of adeturon or complex treatment on the development of structural derangements, the volume of renal glomeruli and Bowman's capsules in kidneys of monkeys exposed to 240 MeV protons in a dosage of 700 rad. Injection or adeturon (100 mg/kg) 15 min before irradiation, or treatment with antibiotics and vitamins fail to lower the degree of morphological damage to kidneys. It is assumed that processes of autosensitization in the irradiated animal organism play an important role in the development of radiation injury to kidneys

  4. Using gEUD based plan analysis method to evaluate proton vs. photon plans for lung cancer radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhiyan; Zou, Wei J; Chen, Ting; Yue, Ning J; Jabbour, Salma K; Parikh, Rahul; Zhang, Miao

    2018-03-01

    The goal of this study was to exam the efficacy of current DVH based clinical guidelines draw from photon experience for lung cancer radiation therapy on proton therapy. Comparison proton plans and IMRT plans were generated for 10 lung patients treated in our proton facility. A gEUD based plan evaluation method was developed for plan evaluation. This evaluation method used normal lung gEUD(a) curve in which the model parameter "a" was sampled from the literature reported value. For all patients, the proton plans delivered lower normal lung V 5 Gy with similar V 20 Gy and similar target coverage. Based on current clinical guidelines, proton plans were ranked superior to IMRT plans for all 10 patients. However, the proton and IMRT normal lung gEUD(a) curves crossed for 8 patients within the tested range of "a", which means there was a possibility that proton plan would be worse than IMRT plan for lung sparing. A concept of deficiency index (DI) was introduced to quantify the probability of proton plans doing worse than IMRT plans. By applying threshold on DI, four patients' proton plan was ranked inferior to the IMRT plan. Meanwhile if a threshold to the location of curve crossing was applied, 6 patients' proton plan was ranked inferior to the IMRT plan. The contradictory ranking results between the current clinical guidelines and the gEUD(a) curve analysis demonstrated there is potential pitfalls by applying photon experience directly to the proton world. A comprehensive plan evaluation based on radio-biological models should be carried out to decide if a lung patient would really be benefit from proton therapy. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  5. Physics and Novel Schemes of Laser Radiation Pressure Acceleration for Quasi-monoenergetic Proton Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chuan S. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Physics; Shao, Xi [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-06-14

    The main objective of our work is to provide theoretical basis and modeling support for the design and experimental setup of compact laser proton accelerator to produce high quality proton beams tunable with energy from 50 to 250 MeV using short pulse sub-petawatt laser. We performed theoretical and computational studies of energy scaling and Raleigh--Taylor instability development in laser radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) and developed novel RPA-based schemes to remedy/suppress instabilities for high-quality quasimonoenergetic proton beam generation as we proposed. During the project period, we published nine peer-reviewed journal papers and made twenty conference presentations including six invited talks on our work. The project supported one graduate student who received his PhD degree in physics in 2013 and supported two post-doctoral associates. We also mentored three high school students and one undergraduate student of physics major by inspiring their interests and having them involved in the project.

  6. ULTRA-LOW INTENSITY PROTON BEAMS FOR RADIATION RESPONSE RELATED EXPERIMENTS AT THE U-120M CYCLOTRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Matlocha

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The U-120M cyclotron at the Nuclear Physics Institute (NPI of the Czech Academy of Sciences in Rez is used for radiation hardness tests of electronics for high-energy physics experiments. These tests are usually carried out with proton fluxes of the order of 105–109 proton·cm−2·s−1. Some tests done for the upgrade of the Inner Tracking System of the ALICE experiment at CERN, however, required proton beam intensities several orders of magnitude lower. This paper presents a method which has been developed to achieve the proton beam flux of the order of 1 proton · cm−2·s−1. The method is mainly based on reduction of the discharge current in the cyclotron internal Penning type ion source. Influence of this new operation mode on the lifetime of ion source cathodes is discussed.

  7. Kinetic Modeling of Radiative Turbulence in Relativistic Astrophysical Plasmas: Particle Acceleration and High-Energy Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, John

    In the near future, next-generation telescopes, covering most of the electromagnetic spectrum, will provide a view into the very earliest stages of galaxy formation. To accurately interpret these future observations, accurate and high-resolution simulations of the first stars and galaxies are vital. This proposal is centered on the formation of the first galaxies in the Universe and their observational signatures in preparation for these future observatories. This proposal has two overall goals: 1. To simulate the formation and evolution of a statistically significant sample of galaxies during the first billion years of the Universe, including all relevant astrophysics while resolving individual molecular clouds, in various cosmological environments. These simulations will utilize a sophisticated physical model of star and black hole formation and feedback, including radiation transport and magnetic fields, which will lead to the most realistic and resolved predictions for the early universe; 2. To predict the observational features of the first galaxies throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, allowing for optimal extraction of galaxy and dark matter halo properties from their photometry, imaging, and spectra; The proposed research plan addresses a timely and relevant issue to theoretically prepare for the interpretation of future observations of the first galaxies in the Universe. A suite of adaptive mesh refinement simulations will be used to follow the formation and evolution of thousands of galaxies observable with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) that will be launched during the second year of this project. The simulations will have also tracked the formation and death of over 100,000 massive metal-free stars. Currently, there is a gap of two orders of magnitude in stellar mass between the smallest observed z > 6 galaxy and the largest simulated galaxy from "first principles", capturing its entire star formation history. This project will eliminate this

  8. RADIATION STABILITY OF NAFION MEMBRANES USED FOR ISOTOPE SEPARATION BY PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE ELECTROLYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, E.

    2009-01-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolyzers have potential interest for use for hydrogen isotope separation from water. In order for PEME to be fully utilized, more information is needed on the stability of Nafion when exposed to radiation. This work examines Nafion 117 under varying exposure conditions, including dose rate, total dosage and atmospheric condition. Analytical tools, such as FT-IR, ion exchange capacity, DMA and TIC-TOC were used to characterize the exposed membranes. Analysis of the water from saturated membranes can provide important data on the stability of the membranes during radiation exposure. It was found that the dose rate of exposure plays an important role in membrane degradation. Potential mechanisms for membrane degradation include peroxide formation by free radicals

  9. RADIATION STABILITY OF NAFION MEMBRANES USED FOR ISOTOPE SEPARATION BY PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE ELECTROLYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, E

    2009-05-15

    Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolyzers have potential interest for use for hydrogen isotope separation from water. In order for PEME to be fully utilized, more information is needed on the stability of Nafion when exposed to radiation. This work examines Nafion 117 under varying exposure conditions, including dose rate, total dosage and atmospheric condition. Analytical tools, such as FT-IR, ion exchange capacity, DMA and TIC-TOC were used to characterize the exposed membranes. Analysis of the water from saturated membranes can provide important data on the stability of the membranes during radiation exposure. It was found that the dose rate of exposure plays an important role in membrane degradation. Potential mechanisms for membrane degradation include peroxide formation by free radicals.

  10. Relativistic impulse dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Stanley M

    2011-08-01

    Classical electrodynamics has some annoying rough edges. The self-energy of charges is infinite without a cutoff. The calculation of relativistic trajectories is difficult because of retardation and an average radiation reaction term. By reconceptuallizing electrodynamics in terms of exchanges of impulses rather than describing it by forces and potentials, we eliminate these problems. A fully relativistic theory using photonlike null impulses is developed. Numerical calculations for a two-body, one-impulse-in-transit model are discussed. A simple relationship between center-of-mass scattering angle and angular momentum was found. It reproduces the Rutherford cross section at low velocities and agrees with the leading term of relativistic distinguishable-particle quantum cross sections (Møller, Mott) when the distance of closest approach is larger than the Compton wavelength of the particle. Magnetism emerges as a consequence of viewing retarded and advanced interactions from the vantage point of an instantaneous radius vector. Radiation reaction becomes the local conservation of energy-momentum between the radiating particle and the emitted impulse. A net action is defined that could be used in developing quantum dynamics without potentials. A reinterpretation of Newton's laws extends them to relativistic motion.

  11. Partial Breast Radiation Therapy With Proton Beam: 5-Year Results With Cosmetic Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, David A., E-mail: dbush@llu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Do, Sharon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Lum, Sharon; Garberoglio, Carlos [Department of Surgical Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Mirshahidi, Hamid [Department of Medical Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Patyal, Baldev; Grove, Roger; Slater, Jerry D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: We updated our previous report of a phase 2 trial using proton beam radiation therapy to deliver partial breast irradiation (PBI) in patients with early stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible subjects had invasive nonlobular carcinoma with a maximal dimension of 3 cm. Patients underwent partial mastectomy with negative margins; axillary lymph nodes were negative on sampling. Subjects received postoperative proton beam radiation therapy to the surgical bed. The dose delivered was 40 Gy in 10 fractions, once daily over 2 weeks. Multiple fields were treated daily, and skin-sparing techniques were used. Following treatment, patients were evaluated with clinical assessments and annual mammograms to monitor toxicity, tumor recurrence, and cosmesis. Results: One hundred subjects were enrolled and treated. All patients completed the assigned treatment and were available for post-treatment analysis. The median follow-up was 60 months. Patients had a mean age of 63 years; 90% had ductal histology; the average tumor size was 1.3 cm. Actuarial data at 5 years included ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence-free survival of 97% (95% confidence interval: 100%-93%); disease-free survival of 94%; and overall survival of 95%. There were no cases of grade 3 or higher acute skin reactions, and late skin reactions included 7 cases of grade 1 telangiectasia. Patient- and physician-reported cosmesis was good to excellent in 90% of responses, was not changed from baseline measurements, and was well maintained throughout the entire 5-year follow-up period. Conclusions: Proton beam radiation therapy for PBI produced excellent ipsilateral breast recurrence-free survival with minimal toxicity. The treatment proved to be adaptable to all breast sizes and lumpectomy cavity configurations. Cosmetic results appear to be excellent and unchanged from baseline out to 5 years following treatment. Cosmetic results may be improved over those reported with photon

  12. Estimates of the astrophysical S-factors for proton radiative capture by 10B and 24Mg nuclei using the ANCs from proton transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artemov, S.V.; Igamov, S.B.; Karakhodzhaev, A.A.; Nie, G.K.; Yarmukhamedov, R.; Zaparov, E.A.; Burtebaev, N.; Rehm, K.E.

    2010-01-01

    The contribution of the direct radiative capture of protons by 10 B and 24 Mg nuclei at low energies to the astrophysical S-factors in the reactions 10 B(p,γ) 11 C and 24 Mg(p,γ) 25 Al have been calculated within the R-matrix formalism by using empirical proton asymptotical normalization coefficients (ANC). The ANCs for bound proton configurations { 10 B+p} and { 24 Mg+p} were obtained from the analysis of the reactions ( 3 He, d). The ANCs were also estimated from the values of the neutron ANCs in the mirror nucleus 25 Mg following the suggestion that the neutron and the proton in the mirror states have equivalent nuclear potentials. It has been found that the S-factor for the reaction 10 B(p,γ) 11 C extrapolated to zero energy contributes ~100 keV b to the radiative capture to the ground state of 11 C. For the reaction 24 Mg(p,γ) 25 Al the value S(0) gives 58 keV b with a direct capture contribution of 41 keV b. (author)

  13. Average profiles of the solar wind and outer radiation belt during the extreme flux enhancement of relativistic electrons at geosynchronous orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kataoka

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We report average profiles of the solar wind and outer radiation belt during the extreme flux enhancement of relativistic electrons at geosynchronous orbit (GEO. It is found that seven of top ten extreme events at GEO during solar cycle 23 are associated with the magnetosphere inflation during the storm recovery phase as caused by the large-scale solar wind structure of very low dynamic pressure (<1.0 nPa during rapid speed decrease from very high (>650 km/s to typical (400–500 km/s in a few days. For the seven events, the solar wind parameters, geomagnetic activity indices, and relativistic electron flux and geomagnetic field at GEO are superposed at the local noon period of GOES satellites to investigate the physical cause. The average profiles support the "double inflation" mechanism that the rarefaction of the solar wind and subsequent magnetosphere inflation are one of the best conditions to produce the extreme flux enhancement at GEO because of the excellent magnetic confinement of relativistic electrons by reducing the drift loss of trapped electrons at dayside magnetopause.

  14. The Midwest Proton Radiation Institute project at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anferov, V; Broderick, B; Collins, J C; Friesel, D L; Jenner, D; Jones, W P; Katuin, J; Klein, S B; Starks, W; Self, J; Schreuder, N [IUCF, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States)

    2001-12-12

    The IUCF cyclotrons ceased delivering particle beams for physics research and became dedicated medical proton beam accelerators in 1999. Removal of the beam lines and nuclear research facilities associated with the cyclotrons to make room for the new medical beam delivery systems was completed in October, 2000. A new achromatic beam line was completed, extending from the main stage cyclotron and ending at a temporary research platform. This beam line is being commissioned during ongoing applied research. The achromatic line will deliver 0.5 {mu}A of 205 MeV protons from which the treatment room technician may draw current at any time via fast switching, laminated magnets located at the entrances to the energy selection systems upstream of each of the treatment rooms. Three treatment rooms are planned, one containing two fixed horizontal lines and two gantry rooms. The cyclotrons will also support full time research in radiation effects, single event upset, radiation biology and pre-clinical research. This contribution describes the status of the medical construction project.

  15. Protonated ions as systemic trapping agents for noble gases: From electronic structure to radiative association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgurel, O; Pauzat, F; Pilmé, J; Ellinger, Y; Bacchus-Montabonel, M-C; Mousis, O

    2017-10-07

    The deficiencies of argon, krypton, and xenon observed in the atmosphere of Titan as well as anticipated in some comets might be related to a scenario of sequestration by H 3 + in the gas phase at the early evolution of the solar nebula. The chemical process implied is a radiative association, evaluated as rather efficient in the case of H 3 + , especially for krypton and xenon. This mechanism of chemical trapping might not be limited to H 3 + only, considering that the protonated ions produced in the destruction of H 3 + by its main competitors present in the primitive nebula, i.e., H 2 O, CO, and N 2 , might also give stable complexes with the noble gases. However the effective efficiency of such processes is still to be proven. Here, the reactivity of the noble gases Ar, Kr, and Xe, with all protonated ions issued from H 2 O, CO, and N 2 , expected to be present in the nebula with reasonably high abundances, has been studied with quantum simulation method dynamics included. All of them give stable complexes and the rate coefficients of their radiative associations range from 10 -16 to 10 -19 cm 3 s -1 , which is reasonable for such reactions and has to be compared to the rates of 10 -16 to 10 -18 cm 3 s -1 , obtained with H 3 + . We can consider this process as universal for all protonated ions which, if present in the primitive nebula as astrophysical models predict, should act as sequestration agents for all three noble gases with increasing efficiency from Ar to Xe.

  16. Relativistic ion acceleration by ultraintense laser interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, K.; Koga, J.K.; Nakagawa, K.

    2001-01-01

    There has been a great interest in relativistic particle generation by ultraintense laser interactions with matter. We propose the use of relativistically self-focused laser pulses for the acceleration of ions. Two dimensional PIC simulations are performed, which show the formation of a large positive electrostatic field near the front of a relativistically self-focused laser pulse. Several factors contribute to the acceleration including self-focusing distance, pulse depletion, and plasma density. Ultraintense laser-plasma interactions are capable of generating enormous electrostatic fields of ∼3 TV/m for acceleration of protons with relativistic energies exceeding 1 GeV

  17. Radiation effects for high-energy protons and X-ray in integrated circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, M.A.G.; Santos, R.B.B. [Centro Universitario da FEI, Sao Bernardo do Campo, SP (Brazil); Medina, N.H.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M.H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Lima, J.A. de [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Cirne, K.H. [Empresa Brasileira de Aeronautica S.A. (EMBRAER), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Electronic circuits are strongly influenced by ionizing radiation. The necessity to develop integrated circuits (IC's) featuring radiation hardness is largely growing to meet the stringent environment in space electronics [1]. This work aims to development a test platform to qualify electronic devices under the influence of high radiation dose, for aerospace applications. To understand the physical phenomena responsible for changes in devices exposed to ionizing radiation several kinds of radiation should then be considered, among them heavy ions, alpha particles, protons, gamma and X-rays. Radiation effects on the ICs are usually divided into three categories: Total Ionizing Dose (TID), a cumulative dose that shifts the threshold voltage and increases transistor's off-state current; Single Events Effects (SEE), a transient effect which can deposit charge directly into the device and disturb the properties of electronic circuits and Displacement Damage (DD) which can change the arrangement of the atoms in the lattice [2]. In this study we are investigating the radiation effects in rectangular-gate and circular-gate MOSFETs, manufactured with standard CMOS fabrication process, using particle beams produced in electrostatic tandem accelerators and X-rays. Initial tests for TID effects were performed using the 1.7 MV 5SDH tandem Pelletron accelerator of the Instituto de Fisica da USP with a proton beam of 2.6 MeV. The devices were exposed to different doses, varying the beam current, and irradiation time with the accumulated dose reaching up to Grad. To study the effect of X-rays on the electronic devices, an XRD-7000 (Shimadzu) X-ray setup was used as a primary X-ray source. The devices were irradiated with a total dose from krad to Grad using different dose rates. The results indicate that changes of the I-V characteristic curve are strongly dependents on the geometry of the devices. [1] Duzellier, S., Aerospace Science and Technology 9, p. 93

  18. A Simulation Study for Radiation Treatment Planning Based on the Atomic Physics of the Proton-Boron Fusion Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sunmi; Yoon, Do-Kun; Shin, Han-Back; Jung, Joo-Young; Kim, Moo-Sub; Kim, Kyeong-Hyeon; Jang, Hong-Seok; Suh, Tae Suk [the Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this research is to demonstrate, based on a Monte Carlo simulation code, the procedure of radiation treatment planning for proton-boron fusion therapy (PBFT). A discrete proton beam (60 - 120 MeV) relevant to the Bragg peak was simulated using a Monte Carlo particle extended (MCNPX, Ver. 2.6.0, National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM, USA) simulation code. After computed tomography (CT) scanning of a virtual water phantom including air cavities, the acquired CT images were converted using the simulation source code. We set the boron uptake regions (BURs) in the simulated water phantom to achieve the proton-boron fusion reaction. Proton sources irradiated the BUR, in the phantom. The acquired dose maps were overlapped with the original CT image of the phantom to analyze the dose volume histogram (DVH). We successfully confirmed amplifications of the proton doses (average: 130%) at the target regions. From the DVH result for each simulation, we acquired a relatively accurate dose map for the treatment. A simulation was conducted to characterize the dose distribution and verify the feasibility of proton boron fusion therapy (PBFT). We observed a variation in proton range and developed a tumor targeting technique for treatment that was more accurate and powerful than both conventional proton therapy and boron-neutron capture therapy.

  19. Imaging Changes in Pediatric Intracranial Ependymoma Patients Treated With Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Compared to Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunther, Jillian R.; Sato, Mariko; Chintagumpala, Murali; Ketonen, Leena; Jones, Jeremy Y.; Allen, Pamela K.; Paulino, Arnold C.; Okcu, M. Fatih; Su, Jack M.; Weinberg, Jeffrey; Boehling, Nicholas S.; Khatua, Soumen; Adesina, Adekunle; Dauser, Robert; Whitehead, William E.; Mahajan, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The clinical significance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes after radiation therapy (RT) in children with ependymoma is not well defined. We compared imaging changes following proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) to those after photon-based intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients with nonmetastatic intracranial ependymoma who received postoperative RT (37 PBRT, 35 IMRT) were analyzed retrospectively. MRI images were reviewed by 2 neuroradiologists. Results: Sixteen PBRT patients (43%) developed postradiation MRI changes at 3.8 months (median) with resolution by 6.1 months. Six IMRT patients (17%) developed changes at 5.3 months (median) with 8.3 months to resolution. Mean age at radiation was 4.4 and 6.9 years for PBRT and IMRT, respectively (P=.06). Age at diagnosis (>3 years) and time of radiation (≥3 years) was associated with fewer imaging changes on univariate analysis (odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, P=.048; OR: 0.36, P=.05). PBRT (compared to IMRT) was associated with more frequent imaging changes, both on univariate (OR: 3.68, P=.019) and multivariate (OR: 3.89, P=.024) analyses. Seven (3 IMRT, 4 PBRT) of 22 patients with changes had symptoms requiring intervention. Most patients were treated with steroids; some PBRT patients also received bevacizumab and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. None of the IMRT patients had lasting deficits, but 2 patients died from recurrent disease. Three PBRT patients had persistent neurological deficits, and 1 child died secondarily to complications from radiation necrosis. Conclusions: Postradiation MRI changes are more common with PBRT and in patients less than 3 years of age at diagnosis and treatment. It is difficult to predict causes for development of imaging changes that progress to clinical significance. These changes are usually self-limiting, but some require medical intervention, especially those involving the brainstem

  20. Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Proton Beam Radiation Therapy with Transarterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Results of an Interim Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, David A., E-mail: dbush@llu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Smith, Jason C. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Slater, Jerry D. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Volk, Michael L. [Transplantation Institute and Liver Center, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Reeves, Mark E. [VA Loma Linda Health Care System, Loma Linda, California (United States); Cheng, Jason [Transplantation Institute and Liver Center, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Grove, Roger [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Vera, Michael E. de [Transplantation Institute and Liver Center, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To describe results of a planned interim analysis of a prospective, randomized clinical trial developed to compare treatment outcomes among patients with newly diagnosed hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: Eligible subjects had either clinical or pathologic diagnosis of HCC and met either Milan or San Francisco transplant criteria. Patients were randomly assigned to transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) or to proton beam radiation therapy. Patients randomized to TACE received at least 1 TACE with additional TACE for persistent disease. Proton beam radiation therapy was delivered to all areas of gross disease to a total dose of 70.2 Gy in 15 daily fractions over 3 weeks. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival, with secondary endpoints of overall survival, local tumor control, and treatment-related toxicities as represented by posttreatment days of hospitalization. Results: At the time of this analysis 69 subjects were available for analysis. Of these, 36 were randomized to TACE and 33 to proton. Total days of hospitalization within 30 days of TACE/proton was 166 and 24 days, respectively (P<.001). Ten TACE and 12 proton patients underwent liver transplantation after treatment. Viable tumor identified in the explanted livers after TACE/proton averaged 2.4 and 0.9 cm, respectively. Pathologic complete response after TACE/proton was 10%/25% (P=.38). The 2-year overall survival for all patients was 59%, with no difference between treatment groups. Median survival time was 30 months (95% confidence interval 20.7-39.3 months). There was a trend toward improved 2-year local tumor control (88% vs 45%, P=.06) and progression-free survival (48% vs 31%, P=.06) favoring the proton beam treatment group. Conclusions: This interim analysis indicates similar overall survival rates for proton beam radiation therapy and TACE. There is a trend toward improved local tumor control and progression-free survival with proton beam. There are

  1. Photoluminescence of radiation-induced color centers in lithium fluoride thin films for advanced diagnostics of proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piccinini, M., E-mail: massimo.piccinini@enea.it; Ampollini, A.; Picardi, L.; Ronsivalle, C.; Bonfigli, F.; Libera, S.; Vincenti, M. A.; Montereali, R. M. [ENEA, C.R. Frascati, UTAPRAD, Technical Unit for Development and Applications of Radiations, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Rome) (Italy); Ambrosini, F. [University Sapienza-Roma I, Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Nichelatti, E. [ENEA, C.R. Casaccia, UTTMAT, Technical Unit for Materials Technologies, Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 S. Maria di Galeria (Rome) (Italy)

    2015-06-29

    Systematic irradiation of thermally evaporated 0.8 μm thick polycrystalline lithium fluoride films on glass was performed by proton beams of 3 and 7 MeV energies, produced by a linear accelerator, in a fluence range from 10{sup 11} to 10{sup 15} protons/cm{sup 2}. The visible photoluminescence spectra of radiation-induced F{sub 2} and F{sub 3}{sup +} laser active color centers, which possess almost overlapping absorption bands at about 450 nm, were measured under laser pumping at 458 nm. On the basis of simulations of the linear energy transfer with proton penetration depth in LiF, it was possible to obtain the behavior of the measured integrated photoluminescence intensity of proton irradiated LiF films as a function of the deposited dose. The photoluminescence signal is linearly dependent on the deposited dose in the interval from 10{sup 3} to about 10{sup 6 }Gy, independently from the used proton energies. This behavior is very encouraging for the development of advanced solid state radiation detectors based on optically transparent LiF thin films for proton beam diagnostics and two-dimensional dose mapping.

  2. Photoluminescence of radiation-induced color centers in lithium fluoride thin films for advanced diagnostics of proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinini, M.; Ambrosini, F.; Ampollini, A.; Picardi, L.; Ronsivalle, C.; Bonfigli, F.; Libera, S.; Nichelatti, E.; Vincenti, M. A.; Montereali, R. M.

    2015-06-01

    Systematic irradiation of thermally evaporated 0.8 μm thick polycrystalline lithium fluoride films on glass was performed by proton beams of 3 and 7 MeV energies, produced by a linear accelerator, in a fluence range from 1011 to 1015 protons/cm2. The visible photoluminescence spectra of radiation-induced F2 and F3+ laser active color centers, which possess almost overlapping absorption bands at about 450 nm, were measured under laser pumping at 458 nm. On the basis of simulations of the linear energy transfer with proton penetration depth in LiF, it was possible to obtain the behavior of the measured integrated photoluminescence intensity of proton irradiated LiF films as a function of the deposited dose. The photoluminescence signal is linearly dependent on the deposited dose in the interval from 103 to about 106 Gy, independently from the used proton energies. This behavior is very encouraging for the development of advanced solid state radiation detectors based on optically transparent LiF thin films for proton beam diagnostics and two-dimensional dose mapping.

  3. Relativistic nuclear collisions: theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyulassy, M.

    1980-07-01

    Some of the recent theoretical developments in relativistic (0.5 to 2.0-GeV/nucleon) nuclear collisions are reviewed. The statistical model, hydrodynamic model, classical equation of motion calculations, billiard ball dynamics, and intranuclear cascade models are discussed in detail. Inclusive proton and pion spectra are analyzed for a variety of reactions. Particular attention is focused on how the complex interplay of the basic reaction mechanism hinders attempts to deduce the nuclear matter equation of state from data. 102 references, 19 figures

  4. SU-F-T-209: Multicriteria Optimization Algorithm for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Pencil Proton Beam Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, C; Kamal, H [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To provide a multicriteria optimization algorithm for intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning. Methods: Intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning requires efficient optimization algorithms to overcome the uncertainties in the Bragg peaks locations. This work is focused on optimization algorithms that are based on Monte Carlo simulation of the treatment planning and use the weights and the dose volume histogram (DVH) control points to steer toward desired plans. The proton beam treatment planning process based on single objective optimization (representing a weighted sum of multiple objectives) usually leads to time-consuming iterations involving treatment planning team members. We proved a time efficient multicriteria optimization algorithm that is developed to run on NVIDIA GPU (Graphical Processing Units) cluster. The multicriteria optimization algorithm running time benefits from up-sampling of the CT voxel size of the calculations without loss of fidelity. Results: We will present preliminary results of Multicriteria optimization for intensity modulated proton therapy based on DVH control points. The results will show optimization results of a phantom case and a brain tumor case. Conclusion: The multicriteria optimization of the intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning provides a novel tool for treatment planning. Work support by a grant from Varian Inc.

  5. SU-F-T-209: Multicriteria Optimization Algorithm for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Pencil Proton Beam Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, C; Kamal, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a multicriteria optimization algorithm for intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning. Methods: Intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning requires efficient optimization algorithms to overcome the uncertainties in the Bragg peaks locations. This work is focused on optimization algorithms that are based on Monte Carlo simulation of the treatment planning and use the weights and the dose volume histogram (DVH) control points to steer toward desired plans. The proton beam treatment planning process based on single objective optimization (representing a weighted sum of multiple objectives) usually leads to time-consuming iterations involving treatment planning team members. We proved a time efficient multicriteria optimization algorithm that is developed to run on NVIDIA GPU (Graphical Processing Units) cluster. The multicriteria optimization algorithm running time benefits from up-sampling of the CT voxel size of the calculations without loss of fidelity. Results: We will present preliminary results of Multicriteria optimization for intensity modulated proton therapy based on DVH control points. The results will show optimization results of a phantom case and a brain tumor case. Conclusion: The multicriteria optimization of the intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning provides a novel tool for treatment planning. Work support by a grant from Varian Inc.

  6. A Novel Approach to Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy Using Scanned Proton Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depauw, Nicolas, E-mail: ndepauw@partners.org [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia); Batin, Estelle; Daartz, Julianne [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Rosenfeld, Anatoly [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia); Adams, Judith; Kooy, Hanne; MacDonald, Shannon; Lu, Hsiao-Ming [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT), currently offered at Massachusetts General Hospital, uses proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) with intensity modulation, achieving complete target coverage of the chest wall and all nodal regions and reduced dose to the cardiac structures. This work presents the current methodology for such treatment and the ongoing effort for its improvements. Methods and Materials: A single PBS field is optimized to ensure appropriate target coverage and heart/lung sparing, using an in–house-developed proton planning system with the capability of multicriteria optimization. The dose to the chest wall skin is controlled as a separate objective in the optimization. Surface imaging is used for setup because it is a suitable surrogate for superficial target volumes. In order to minimize the effect of beam range uncertainties, the relative proton stopping power ratio of the material in breast implants was determined through separate measurements. Phantom measurements were also made to validate the accuracy of skin dose calculation in the treatment planning system. Additionally, the treatment planning robustness was evaluated relative to setup perturbations and patient breathing motion. Results: PBS PMRT planning resulted in appropriate target coverage and organ sparing, comparable to treatments by passive scattering (PS) beams but much improved in nodal coverage and cardiac sparing compared to conventional treatments by photon/electron beams. The overall treatment time was much shorter than PS and also shorter than conventional photon/electron treatment. The accuracy of the skin dose calculation by the planning system was within ±2%. The treatment was shown to be adequately robust relative to both setup uncertainties and patient breathing motion, resulting in clinically satisfying dose distributions. Conclusions: More than 25 PMRT patients have been successfully treated at Massachusetts General Hospital by using single-PBS fields

  7. A Novel Approach to Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy Using Scanned Proton Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depauw, Nicolas; Batin, Estelle; Daartz, Julianne; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Adams, Judith; Kooy, Hanne; MacDonald, Shannon; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT), currently offered at Massachusetts General Hospital, uses proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) with intensity modulation, achieving complete target coverage of the chest wall and all nodal regions and reduced dose to the cardiac structures. This work presents the current methodology for such treatment and the ongoing effort for its improvements. Methods and Materials: A single PBS field is optimized to ensure appropriate target coverage and heart/lung sparing, using an in–house-developed proton planning system with the capability of multicriteria optimization. The dose to the chest wall skin is controlled as a separate objective in the optimization. Surface imaging is used for setup because it is a suitable surrogate for superficial target volumes. In order to minimize the effect of beam range uncertainties, the relative proton stopping power ratio of the material in breast implants was determined through separate measurements. Phantom measurements were also made to validate the accuracy of skin dose calculation in the treatment planning system. Additionally, the treatment planning robustness was evaluated relative to setup perturbations and patient breathing motion. Results: PBS PMRT planning resulted in appropriate target coverage and organ sparing, comparable to treatments by passive scattering (PS) beams but much improved in nodal coverage and cardiac sparing compared to conventional treatments by photon/electron beams. The overall treatment time was much shorter than PS and also shorter than conventional photon/electron treatment. The accuracy of the skin dose calculation by the planning system was within ±2%. The treatment was shown to be adequately robust relative to both setup uncertainties and patient breathing motion, resulting in clinically satisfying dose distributions. Conclusions: More than 25 PMRT patients have been successfully treated at Massachusetts General Hospital by using single-PBS fields

  8. Estimated radiation pneumonitis risk after photon versus proton therapy alone or combined with chemotherapy for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogelius, Ivan R.; Westerly, David C; Aznar, Marianne Camille

    2011-01-01

    Background. Traditionally, radiation therapy plans are optimized without consideration of chemotherapy. Here, we model the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in the presence of a possible interaction between chemotherapy and radiation dose distribution. Material and methods. Three alternative......-radiation combinations could be an interesting indication for selecting patients for proton therapy. It is likely that the IMRT plans would perform better if the CERD was accounted for during optimization, but more clinical data is required to facilitate evidence-based plan optimization in the multi-modality setting....... treatment plans are compared in 18 non-small cell lung cancer patients previously treated with helical tomotherapy; the tomotherapy plan, an intensity modulated proton therapy plan (IMPT) and a three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plan. All plans are optimized without consideration...

  9. Proton spectroscopic imaging of polyacrylamide gel dosimeters for absolute radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, P.S.; Schwarz, A.J.; Leach, M.O.

    2000-01-01

    Proton spectroscopy has been evaluated as a method for quantifying radiation induced changes in polyacrylamide gel dosimeters. A calibration was first performed using BANG-type gel samples receiving uniform doses of 6 MV photons from 0 to 9 Gy in 1 Gy intervals. The peak integral of the acrylic protons belonging to acrylamide and methylenebisacrylamide normalized to the water signal was plotted against absorbed dose. Response was approximately linear within the range 0-7 Gy. A large gel phantom irradiated with three, coplanar 3x3cm square fields to 5.74 Gy at isocentre was then imaged with an echo-filter technique to map the distribution of monomers directly. The image, normalized to the water signal, was converted into an absolute dose map. At the isocentre the measured dose was 5.69 Gy (SD = 0.09) which was in good agreement with the planned dose. The measured dose distribution elsewhere in the sample shows greater errors. A T 2 derived dose map demonstrated a better relative distribution but gave an overestimate of the dose at isocentre of 18%. The data indicate that MR measurements of monomer concentration can complement T 2 -based measurements and can be used to verify absolute dose. Compared with the more usual T 2 measurements for assessing gel polymerization, monomer concentration analysis is less sensitive to parameters such as gel pH and temperature, which can cause ambiguous relaxation time measurements and erroneous absolute dose calculations. (author)

  10. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Alfred R

    2006-01-01

    Proton therapy has become a subject of considerable interest in the radiation oncology community and it is expected that there will be a substantial growth in proton treatment facilities during the next decade. I was asked to write a historical review of proton therapy based on my personal experiences, which have all occurred in the United States, so therefore I have a somewhat parochial point of view. Space requirements did not permit me to mention all of the existing proton therapy facilities or the names of all of those who have contributed to proton therapy. (review)

  11. Effect of proton and electron-irradiation intensity on radiation-induced damages in silicon bioolar transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannikov, Yu.A.; Gorin, B.M.; Kozhevnikov, V.P.; Mikhnovich, V.V.; Gusev, L.I.

    1981-01-01

    The increase of radiation-induced damages of bipolar n-p-n transistors 8-12 times with the irradiation intensity decrease by protons from 4.07x1010 to 2.5x107 cm-2 x c-1 has been found experimentally. damages of p-n-p transistors vary in the opposite way - they are decreased 2-3 times with the irradiation intensity decrease within the same limits. the dependence of damages on intansity of proton irradiation occurs at the dose rate by three orders less than it has been observed for electron irradiation. the results obtained are explained by the dependence of radiation defectoformation reactions on charge state of defects with account for the role of formation of disordering regions upon proton irradiation [ru

  12. Tumor Cells Surviving Exposure to Proton or Photon Radiation Share a Common Immunogenic Modulation Signature, Rendering Them More Sensitive to T Cell–Mediated Killing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gameiro, Sofia R.; Malamas, Anthony S. [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Bernstein, Michael B. [Division of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tsang, Kwong Y. [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Vassantachart, April; Sahoo, Narayan; Tailor, Ramesh; Pidikiti, Rajesh [Division of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Guha, Chandan P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States); Hahn, Stephen M.; Krishnan, Sunil [Division of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hodge, James W., E-mail: jh241d@nih.gov [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To provide the foundation for combining immunotherapy to induce tumor antigen–specific T cells with proton radiation therapy to exploit the activity of those T cells. Methods and Materials: Using cell lines of tumors frequently treated with proton radiation, such as prostate, breast, lung, and chordoma, we examined the effect of proton radiation on the viability and induction of immunogenic modulation in tumor cells by flow cytometric and immunofluorescent analysis of surface phenotype and the functional immune consequences. Results: These studies show for the first time that (1) proton and photon radiation induced comparable up-regulation of surface molecules involved in immune recognition (histocompatibility leukocyte antigen, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and the tumor-associated antigens carcinoembryonic antigen and mucin 1); (2) proton radiation mediated calreticulin cell-surface expression, increasing sensitivity to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte killing of tumor cells; and (3) cancer stem cells, which are resistant to the direct cytolytic activity of proton radiation, nonetheless up-regulated calreticulin after radiation in a manner similar to non-cancer stem cells. Conclusions: These findings offer a rationale for the use of proton radiation in combination with immunotherapy, including for patients who have failed radiation therapy alone or have limited treatment options.

  13. Measurement of the unaccompanied pion-proton flux ratio at 2,900 meters using a transition radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellsworth, R.W.; Ito, A.S.; MacFall, J.R.; Siohan, F.; Streitmatter, R.E.; Tonwar, S.C.; Yodh, G.B.

    1975-01-01

    A transition radiation dedector and an ionization calorimeter have been used to measure the unaccompanied pion to proton flux ratio for energies greater than 400 and 600 GeV at an altitude of 2,900 meters. (orig./BJ) [de

  14. Outcomes of Proton Radiation Therapy for Peripapillary Choroidal Melanoma at the BC Cancer Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Eric, E-mail: etran2@bccancer.bc.ca [Radiation Therapy Program, BC Cancer Agency and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Ma, Roy [Radiation Therapy Program, BC Cancer Agency and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Paton, Katherine [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Vancouver Hospital Eye Care Centre and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Blackmore, Ewart [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Pickles, Tom [Radiation Therapy Program, BC Cancer Agency and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To report toxicity, local control, enucleation, and survival rates for patients with peripapillary choroidal melanoma treated with proton therapy in Canada. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with peripapillary choroidal melanoma ({<=}2 mm from optic disc) treated between 1995 and 2007 at the only Canadian proton therapy facility. A prospective database was updated for follow-up information from a chart review. Descriptive and actuarial data are presented. Results: In total, 59 patients were treated. The median age was 59 years. According to the 2010 American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM classification, there were 20 T1 tumors (34%), 28 T2 tumors (48%), and 11 T3 tumors (19%). The median tumor diameter was 11.4 mm, and the median thickness was 3.5 mm. Median follow-up was 63 months. Nineteen patients received 54 cobalt gray equivalents (CGE) and forty patients received 60 CGE, each in 4 fractions. The 5-year actuarial local control rate was 91% (T1, 100%; T2, 93%; and T3, 59%) (p = 0.038). There was a suggestive relationship between local control and dose. The local control rate was 97% with 60 CGE and 83% with 54 CGE (p = 0.106). The metastasis-free survival rate was 82% and related to T stage (T1, 94%; T2, 84%; and T3, 47%) (p < 0.001). Twelve patients died, including eleven with metastases. The 5-year actuarial rate of neovascular glaucoma was 31% (23% for T1-T2 and 68% for T3, p < 0.001), and that of enucleation was 0% for T1, 14% for T2, and 72% for T3 (p < 0.001). Radiation retinopathy (74%) and optic neuropathy (64%) were common within-field effects. Conclusions: Proton therapy provides excellent local control with acceptable toxicity while conserving the globe in 80% of cases. These results are consistent with other single-institution series using proton radiotherapy, and toxicity rates were acceptable. T3 tumors carry a higher rate of both local recurrence and metastasis.

  15. Outcomes of Proton Radiation Therapy for Peripapillary Choroidal Melanoma at the BC Cancer Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Eric; Ma, Roy; Paton, Katherine; Blackmore, Ewart; Pickles, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report toxicity, local control, enucleation, and survival rates for patients with peripapillary choroidal melanoma treated with proton therapy in Canada. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with peripapillary choroidal melanoma (≤2 mm from optic disc) treated between 1995 and 2007 at the only Canadian proton therapy facility. A prospective database was updated for follow-up information from a chart review. Descriptive and actuarial data are presented. Results: In total, 59 patients were treated. The median age was 59 years. According to the 2010 American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM classification, there were 20 T1 tumors (34%), 28 T2 tumors (48%), and 11 T3 tumors (19%). The median tumor diameter was 11.4 mm, and the median thickness was 3.5 mm. Median follow-up was 63 months. Nineteen patients received 54 cobalt gray equivalents (CGE) and forty patients received 60 CGE, each in 4 fractions. The 5-year actuarial local control rate was 91% (T1, 100%; T2, 93%; and T3, 59%) (p = 0.038). There was a suggestive relationship between local control and dose. The local control rate was 97% with 60 CGE and 83% with 54 CGE (p = 0.106). The metastasis-free survival rate was 82% and related to T stage (T1, 94%; T2, 84%; and T3, 47%) (p < 0.001). Twelve patients died, including eleven with metastases. The 5-year actuarial rate of neovascular glaucoma was 31% (23% for T1–T2 and 68% for T3, p < 0.001), and that of enucleation was 0% for T1, 14% for T2, and 72% for T3 (p < 0.001). Radiation retinopathy (74%) and optic neuropathy (64%) were common within-field effects. Conclusions: Proton therapy provides excellent local control with acceptable toxicity while conserving the globe in 80% of cases. These results are consistent with other single-institution series using proton radiotherapy, and toxicity rates were acceptable. T3 tumors carry a higher rate of both local recurrence and metastasis.

  16. Relativistic hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Luciano, Rezzolla

    2013-01-01

    Relativistic hydrodynamics is a very successful theoretical framework to describe the dynamics of matter from scales as small as those of colliding elementary particles, up to the largest scales in the universe. This book provides an up-to-date, lively, and approachable introduction to the mathematical formalism, numerical techniques, and applications of relativistic hydrodynamics. The topic is typically covered either by very formal or by very phenomenological books, but is instead presented here in a form that will be appreciated both by students and researchers in the field. The topics covered in the book are the results of work carried out over the last 40 years, which can be found in rather technical research articles with dissimilar notations and styles. The book is not just a collection of scattered information, but a well-organized description of relativistic hydrodynamics, from the basic principles of statistical kinetic theory, down to the technical aspects of numerical methods devised for the solut...

  17. Experimental demonstration of a Ku-band radial-line relativistic klystron oscillator based on transition radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Fangchao; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Jun; Ju, Jinchuan; Zhong, Huihuang

    2017-03-01

    We report on a radial-line relativistic klystron oscillator (RL-RKO), which is physically designed to generate gigawatt-level high power microwaves (HPMs) at Ku-band. The 3π/4 mode of a four-gap buncher is selected to highly modulate the radially propagating intense relativistic electron beam (IREB). A three-gap extractor operating at the π mode is employed to extract the radio-frequency energy efficiently. The Ku-band RL-RKO is investigated experimentally on an intense-current electron beam accelerator. The radially propagating IREB is well focused with an axial-width of 2 mm by a radial magnetic field of 0.4 T. Microwaves with a frequency of 14.86 GHz and a power of 1.5 GW are generated, corresponding to an efficiency of 24%, which indicates a significant advance for the research of radial-line HPM sources.

  18. First experimental evidence of hydrodynamic tunneling of ultra-relativistic protons in extended solid copper target at the CERN HiRadMat facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, R.; Blanco Sancho, J.; Burkart, F.; Grenier, D.; Wollmann, D.; Tahir, N. A.; Shutov, A.; Piriz, A. R.

    2014-08-01

    A novel experiment has been performed at the CERN HiRadMat test facility to study the impact of the 440 GeV proton beam generated by the Super Proton Synchrotron on extended solid copper cylindrical targets. Substantial hydrodynamic tunneling of the protons in the target material has been observed that leads to significant lengthening of the projectile range, which confirms our previous theoretical predictions [N. A. Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. Spec. Top.-Accel. Beams 15, 051003 (2012)]. Simulation results show very good agreement with the experimental measurements. These results have very important implications on the machine protection design for powerful machines like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the future High Luminosity LHC, and the proposed huge 80 km circumference Future Circular Collider, which is currently being discussed at CERN. Another very interesting outcome of this work is that one may also study the field of High Energy Density Physics at this test facility.

  19. First experimental evidence of hydrodynamic tunneling of ultra–relativistic protons in extended solid copper target at the CERN HiRadMat facility

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, R; Sancho, J Blanco; Burkart, F; Grenier, D; Wollmann, D; Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Piriz, A R

    2014-01-01

    A novel experiment has been performed at the CERN HiRadMat test facility to study the impact of the 440 GeV proton beam generated by the Super Proton Synchrotron on extended solid copper cylindrical targets. Substantial hydrodynamic tunneling of the protons in the target material has been observed that leads to significant lengthening of the projectile range, which confirms our previous theoretical predictions [N. A. Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. Spec. Top.-Accel. Beams 15, 051003 (2012)]. Simulation results show very good agreement with the experimental measurements. These results have very important implications on the machine protection design for powerful machines like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the future High Luminosity LHC, and the proposed huge 80 km circumference Future Circular Collider, which is currently being discussed at CERN. Another very interesting outcome of this work is that one may also study the field of High Energy Density Physics at this test facility.

  20. Patterns of Care in Proton Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Central Nervous System Malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odei, Bismarck; Frandsen, Jonathan E.; Boothe, Dustin; Ermoian, Ralph P.; Poppe, Matthew M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Proton beam therapy (PBT) potentially allows for improved sparing of normal tissues, hopefully leading to decreased late side effects in children. Using a national registry, we sought to perform a patterns-of-care analysis for children receiving PBT for primary malignancies of the central nervous system (CNS). Methods and Materials: Using the National Cancer Data Base, we identified pediatric patients with primary CNS malignancies that were diagnosed between 2004 and 2012. We used a standard t test for comparison of means and χ"2 testing to identify differences in demographic and clinical characteristics. Univariate and multivariate logistical regression was applied to identify predictors of PBT use. Results: We identified 4637 pediatric patients receiving radiation therapy from 2004 to 2012, including a subset of 267 patients treated with PBT. We found that PBT use increased with time from 200 miles from a radiation treatment facility (P<.05). Conclusions: We noted the proportion of children receiving PBT to be significantly increasing over time from <1% to 15% from 2004 to 2012. We also observed important disparities in receipt of PBT based on socioeconomic status. Children from higher-income households and with private insurance were more likely to use this expensive technology. As we continue to demonstrate the potential benefits of PBT in children, efforts are needed to expand the accessibility of PBT for children of all socioeconomic backgrounds and regions of the country.

  1. Relativistic astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Price, R H

    1993-01-01

    Work reported in the workshop on relativistic astrophysics spanned a wide varicy of topics. Two specific areas seemed of particular interest. Much attention was focussed on gravitational wave sources, especially on the waveforms they produce, and progress was reported in theoretical and observational aspects of accretion disks.

  2. Relativistic Kinematics

    OpenAIRE

    Sahoo, Raghunath

    2016-01-01

    This lecture note covers Relativistic Kinematics, which is very useful for the beginners in the field of high-energy physics. A very practical approach has been taken, which answers "why and how" of the kinematics useful for students working in the related areas.

  3. Relativistic Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Font, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    The relativistic astrophysics is the field of astrophysics employing the theory of relativity Einstein as physical-mathematical model is to study the universe. This discipline analyzes astronomical contexts in which the laws of classical mechanics of Newton's law of gravitation are not valid. (Author)

  4. Influence of the flux density on the radiation damage of bipolar silicon transistors by protons and electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannikov, Y.; Gorin, B.; Kozhevnikov, V.; Mikhnovich, V.; Gusev, L.

    1981-01-01

    It was found experimentally that the radiation damage of bipolar n-p-n transistors increased by a factor of 8--12 when the proton flux density was reduced from 4.07 x 10 10 to 2.5 x 10 7 cm -2 sec -1 . In the case of p-n-p transistors the effect was opposite: there was a reduction in the radiation damage by a factor of 2--3 when the dose rate was lowered between the same limits. A similar effect was observed for electrons but at dose rates three orders of magnitude greater. The results were attributed to the dependences of the radiation defect-forming reactions on the charge state of defects which was influenced by the formation of disordered regions in the case of proton irradiation

  5. A proton-exchange membrane prepared by the radiation grafting of styrene and silica into polytetrafluoroethylene films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongyan; Shi, Jianheng; Zeng, Xinmiao; Bao, Mao; Zhao, Xinqing

    2009-07-01

    A polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) based organic-inorganic hybrid proton-exchange membrane was prepared from simultaneous radiation grafting of styrene (St) into porous PTFE membrane with the in situ sol-gel reaction of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) followed by sulfonation in fuming sulfonic acid. The effect of radiation on the sol-gel reaction was studied. The results show that radiation promotes the sol-gel reaction with the help of St at room temperature. Incorporated silica gel helps to produce higher degree of grafting (DOG). SEM analysis was conducted to confirm that the inorganic silicon oxide was introduced to produce hybrid membrane in this work. The proton conductivity of membrane evaluated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy is much higher (14.3×10 -2 S cm -1) than that of Nafion ® 117 at temperature of 80 °C with acceptable water uptake 51 wt%.

  6. Implication of the Proton-Deuteron Radiative Capture for Big Bang Nucleosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcucci, L E; Mangano, G; Kievsky, A; Viviani, M

    2016-03-11

    The astrophysical S factor for the radiative capture d(p,γ)^{3}He in the energy range of interest for big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is calculated using an ab initio approach. The nuclear Hamiltonian retains both two- and three-nucleon interactions-the Argonne v_{18} and the Urbana IX, respectively. Both one- and many-body contributions to the nuclear current operator are included. The former retain for the first time, besides the 1/m leading order contribution (m is the nucleon mass), also the next-to-leading order term, proportional to 1/m^{3}. The many-body currents are constructed in order to satisfy the current conservation relation with the adopted Hamiltonian model. The hyperspherical harmonics technique is applied to solve the A=3 bound and scattering states. Particular attention is paid in this second case in order to obtain, in the energy range of BBN, an uncertainty on the astrophysical S factor of the order or below ∼1%. Then, in this energy range, the S factor is found to be ∼10% larger than the currently adopted values. Part of this increase (1%-3%) is due to the 1/m^{3} one-body operator, while the remaining is due to the new more accurate scattering wave functions. We have studied the implication of this new determination for the d(p,γ)^{3}He S factor on the deuterium primordial abundance. We find that the predicted theoretical value for ^{2}H/H is in excellent agreement with its experimental determination, using the most recent determination of the baryon density of the Planck experiment, and with a standard number of relativistic degrees of freedom N_{eff}=3.046 during primordial nucleosynthesis. This calls for a more accurate measurement of the astrophysical S factor in order to confirm the present predictions.

  7. The studies of radiation distorations in CdS single crystals by using a proton back-scattering method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigor'ev, A.N.; Dikij, N.P.; Matyash, P.P.; Nikolajchuk, L.I.; Pivovar, L.I.

    1974-01-01

    The radiation defects in semiconducting CdS single crystals induced during doping with 140 keV Na ions (10 15 -2.10 16 ion/cm 2 ) were studied by the orientation dependence of 700 keV proton backscattering. The absence of discrete peaks in the scattered proton eneryg spectra indicates a small contribution of direct scattering at large angles. The defects formed during doping increase the fractionof dechanneled particles, which are then scattered at large anlges. No amorphization of CdS was observed at high Na ion dose 2x10 16 ion/cm 2

  8. SU-E-T-111: Development of Proton Dosimetry System Using Fiber-Optic Cerenkov Radiation Sensor Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, J [National Cancer Center, Ilsan, Gyeonggi-do, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, M; Shin, D; Lim, Y; Lee, S; Kim, J; Kim, J [National Cancer Center, Goyangsi, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, U [National Medical Center in Korea, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, M [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We had developed and evaluated a new dosimetric system for proton therapy using array of fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor (FOCRS) which can measure a percent depth dose (PDD) instantly. In this study, the Bragg peaks and spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) of the proton beams measured by FOCRS array were compared with those measured by an ion chamber. Methods and Method: We fabricated an optical fiber array of FOCRS in a handmade phantom which is composed of poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA). There are 75 holes of 1mm diameter inside the phantom which is designed to be exposed in direction of beam when it is emerged in water phantom. The proton beam irradiation was carried out using IBA cyclotron PROTEUS 235 at national cancer center in Korea and a commercial data acquisition system was used to digitize the analog signal. Results: The measured Bragg peak and SOBP for the proton ranges of 7∼ 20 cm were well matched with the result from ion chamber. The comparison results show that the depth of proton beam ranges and the width of SOBP measured by array of FOCRS are comparable with the measurement from multi-layer ion chamber (MLIC) although there are some uncertainty in the measurement of FOCRS array for some specific beam ranges. Conclusion: The newly developed FOCRS array based dosimetric system for proton therapy can efficiently reduce the time and effort needed for proton beam range measurement compared to the conventional method and has the potential to be used for the proton pencil beam application.

  9. Effect of Film Dressing on Acute Radiation Dermatitis Secondary to Proton Beam Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimura, Takeshi; Ogino, Takashi; Yoshiura, Takashi; Toi, Yuya; Kawabata, Michiko; Chuman, Ikuko; Wada, Kiyotaka; Kondo, Naoaki; Nagayama, Shinichi; Hishikawa, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Acute radiation dermatitis (ARD) is one of the most common adverse events of proton beam therapy (PBT), and there is currently no effective method to manage ARD. The purpose of this study was to examine the prophylactic effect of a film dressing using Airwall on PBT-induced ARD compared with standard skin managements. Methods and Materials: A total of 271 patients with prostate cancer who were scheduled for PBT at our center were divided into 2 groups based on their own requests: 145 patients (53%) chose Airwall (group A) and 126 patients (47%) received standard treatments (group B). We evaluated irradiated skin every other day during PBT and followed up once a week for a month after completion of PBT. Results: Grade 0, 1, 2, and 3 dermatitis were seen in 2, 122, 21, and 0 and 0, 65, 57, and 4 patients in groups A and B, respectively (P<.001). Numbers of days to grades 1 and 2 ARD development were 34.9 ± 14.3 and 54.7 ± 10.3 and 31.8 ± 11.3 and 54.4 ± 11.6 in groups A and B, respectively. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups. Eighteen patients (12%) in group A who experienced problems in the region covered with Airwall switched to standard skin care after peeling the film off. Conclusions: Film dressing using Airwall reduced the severity of ARD without delaying the response time of the skin to proton beam irradiation compared with standard skin management. Hence, film dressing is considered a promising measure for preventing ARD secondary to PBT.

  10. Effect of Film Dressing on Acute Radiation Dermatitis Secondary to Proton Beam Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arimura, Takeshi, E-mail: arimura-takeshi@medipolis.org [Medipolis Proton Therapy and Research Center, Ibusuki (Japan); Department of Radiology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Ogino, Takashi [Medipolis Proton Therapy and Research Center, Ibusuki (Japan); Yoshiura, Takashi [Department of Radiology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Toi, Yuya; Kawabata, Michiko; Chuman, Ikuko; Wada, Kiyotaka; Kondo, Naoaki; Nagayama, Shinichi; Hishikawa, Yoshio [Medipolis Proton Therapy and Research Center, Ibusuki (Japan)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Acute radiation dermatitis (ARD) is one of the most common adverse events of proton beam therapy (PBT), and there is currently no effective method to manage ARD. The purpose of this study was to examine the prophylactic effect of a film dressing using Airwall on PBT-induced ARD compared with standard skin managements. Methods and Materials: A total of 271 patients with prostate cancer who were scheduled for PBT at our center were divided into 2 groups based on their own requests: 145 patients (53%) chose Airwall (group A) and 126 patients (47%) received standard treatments (group B). We evaluated irradiated skin every other day during PBT and followed up once a week for a month after completion of PBT. Results: Grade 0, 1, 2, and 3 dermatitis were seen in 2, 122, 21, and 0 and 0, 65, 57, and 4 patients in groups A and B, respectively (P<.001). Numbers of days to grades 1 and 2 ARD development were 34.9 ± 14.3 and 54.7 ± 10.3 and 31.8 ± 11.3 and 54.4 ± 11.6 in groups A and B, respectively. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups. Eighteen patients (12%) in group A who experienced problems in the region covered with Airwall switched to standard skin care after peeling the film off. Conclusions: Film dressing using Airwall reduced the severity of ARD without delaying the response time of the skin to proton beam irradiation compared with standard skin management. Hence, film dressing is considered a promising measure for preventing ARD secondary to PBT.

  11. Development of Less Water-Dependent Radiation Grafted Proton Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasef, M M; Ahmad, A; Saidi, H; Dahlan, K Z.M. [Institute of Hydrogen Economy, Energy Research Alliance (ERA), International Campus, Univeristi Teknologi Malaysia, Jalan Semarak, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Radiation Processing Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, Kajang (Malaysia)

    2012-09-15

    The aim of these studies was the development of proton exchange membranes for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell operated above 100{sup o}C, in order to obtain less water dependent, high quality and cheap electrolyte membrane. Sulfonic acid membranes were prepared by radiation induced grafting (RIG) of sodium styrene sulfonate (SSS) onto electron beam (EB) irradiated poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) films in a single step reaction for the first time using synergetic effect of acid addition to grafting mixture under various grafting conditions. The fuel cell related properties of the membranes were evaluated and the in situ performance was tested in a single H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} fuel cell under dynamic conditions and compared with a similar sulfonated polystyrene PVDF membrane obtained by two-step conventional RIG method i.e. grafting of styrene and subsequent sulfonation. The newly obtained membrane (degree of grafting, G% = 53) showed an improved performance and higher stability together with a cost reduction mainly as a result of elimination of sulfonation reaction. Acid-base composite membranes were also studied. EB pre-irradiated poly(ethylene-co-tetrafluoroethylene) (ETFE) films were grafted with N-vinyl pyridine (NVP). The effects of monomer concentration, dose, reaction time, film thickness, temperature and film storage time on G% were investigated. The membranes were subsequently doped with phosphoric acid under controlled condition. The proton conductivity of these membranes was investigated under low water conditions in correlation with the variation in G% and temperature (30-130{sup o}C). The performance of 34 and 49% grafted and doped membranes was tested in a single fuel cell at 130{sup o}C under dynamic conditions with 146 and 127 mW/cm{sup 2} power densities. The polarization, power density characteristics and the initial stability of the membrane showed a promising electrolyte candidate for fuel cell operation above 100 deg. C. (author)

  12. Radiative leptonic decay: B{sup -}{yields}{mu}{sup -}{nu}{sub {mu}}{gamma} in a relativistic independent quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barik, N [Department of Physics, Utkal University, Bhubaneswar-751004 (India); Naimuddin, Sk; Dash, P C [Department of Physics, Prananath Autonomous College, Khurda-752057 (India); Kar, Susmita [Department of Physics, North Orissa University, Baripada-757003 (India)

    2008-01-01

    We study the radiative leptonic decay, B{sup -}{yields}{mu}{sup -}{nu}{sub {mu}}{gamma}, in the framework of a relativistic independent quark model, based on the confining potential in the scalar-vector harmonic form. As expected, we find that the photon emission in this decay overcomes the so-called helicity suppression inevitable in the case of pure leptonic decay (B{sup -}{yields}{mu}{sup -}{nu}{sub {mu}}). Our result for the branching ratio is Br(B{sup -}{yields}{mu}{sup -}{nu}{sub {mu}}{gamma})=1.70x10{sup -6}, which is comparable with other model predictions within the current experimental upper limit. The photon energy spectrum predicted in the model is slightly asymmetric with the peak value around 1.45 GeV, which should render it quite accessible to experimental analysis.

  13. Proton Radiation Therapy in the Hospital Environment: Conception, Development, and Operation of the Initial Hospital-Based Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, James M.; Slater, Jerry D.; Wroe, Andrew J.

    The world's first hospital-based proton treatment center opened at Loma Linda University Medical Center in 1990, following two decades of development. Patients' needs were the driving force behind its conception, development, and execution; the primary needs were delivery of effective conformal doses of ionizing radiation and avoidance of normal tissue to the maximum extent possible. The facility includes a proton synchrotron and delivery system developed in collaboration with physicists and engineers at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and from other high-energy-physics laboratories worldwide. The system, operated and maintained by Loma Linda personnel, was designed to be safe, reliable, flexible in utilization, efficient in use, and upgradeable to meet demands of changing patient needs and advances in technology. Since the facility opened, nearly 14,000 adults and children have been treated for a wide range of cancers and other diseases. Ongoing research is expanding the applications of proton therapy, while reducing costs.

  14. Relativistic Quantum Mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoine, J-P

    2004-01-01

    The aim of relativistic quantum mechanics is to describe the finer details of the structure of atoms and molecules, where relativistic effects become nonnegligible. It is a sort of intermediate realm, between the familiar nonrelativistic quantum mechanics and fully relativistic quantum field theory, and thus it lacks the simplicity and elegance of both. Yet it is a necessary tool, mostly for quantum chemists. Pilkuhn's book offers to this audience an up-to-date survey of these methods, which is quite welcome since most previous textbooks are at least ten years old. The point of view of the author is to start immediately in the relativistic domain, following the lead of Maxwell's equations rather than classical mechanics, and thus to treat the nonrelativistic version as an approximation. Thus Chapter 1 takes off from Maxwell's equations (in the noncovariant Coulomb gauge) and gradually derives the basic aspects of Quantum Mechanics in a rather pedestrian way (states and observables, Hilbert space, operators, quantum measurement, scattering,. Chapter 2 starts with the Lorentz transformations, then continues with the Pauli spin equation and the Dirac equation and some of their applications (notably the hydrogen atom). Chapter 3 is entitled 'Quantum fields and particles', but falls short of treating quantum field theory properly: only creation/annihilation operators are considered, for a particle in a box. The emphasis is on two-electron states (the Pauli principle, the Foldy--Wouthuysen elimination of small components of Dirac spinors, Breit projection operators. Chapter 4 is devoted to scattering theory and the description of relativistic bound states. Chapter 5, finally, covers hyperfine interactions and radiative corrections. As we said above, relativistic quantum mechanics is by nature limited in scope and rather inelegant and Pilkuhn's book is no exception. The notation is often heavy (mostly noncovariant) and the mathematical level rather low. The central topic

  15. Simulation of planar channeling-radiation spectra of relativistic electrons and positrons channeled in a diamond-structure or tungsten single crystal (classical approach)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azadegan, B.; Wagner, W.

    2015-01-01

    We present a Mathematica package for simulation of spectral-angular distributions and energy spectra of planar channeling radiation of relativistic electrons and positrons channeled along major crystallographic planes of a diamond-structure or tungsten single crystal. The program is based on the classical theory of channeling radiation which has been successfully applied to study planar channeling of light charged particles at energies higher than 100 MeV. Continuous potentials for different planes of diamond, Si, Ge and W single crystals are calculated using the Doyle–Turner approximation to the atomic scattering factor and taking thermal vibrations of the crystal atoms into account. Numerical methods are applied to solve the classical one-dimensional equation of motion. The code is designed to calculate the trajectories, velocities and accelerations of electrons (positrons) channeled by the planar continuous potential. In the framework of classical electrodynamics, these data allow realistic simulations of spectral-angular distributions and energy spectra of planar channeling radiation. Since the generated output is quantitative, the results of calculation may be useful, e.g., for setup configuration and crystal alignment in channeling experiments, for the study of the dependence of channeling radiation on the input parameters of particle beams with respect to the crystal orientation, but also for the simulation of positron production by means of pair creation what is mandatory for the design of efficient positron sources necessary in high-energy and collider physics. Although the classical theory of channeling is well established for long time, there is no adequate library program for simulation of channeling radiation up to now, which is commonly available, sufficiently simple and effective to employ and, therefore, of benefit as for special investigations as for a quick overview of basic features of this type of radiation

  16. Multivoxel proton MRS for differentiation of radiation-induced necrosis and tumor recurrence after gamma knife radiosurgery for brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernov, M.F.; Hayashi, Motohiro; Izawa, Masahiro

    2006-01-01

    Multivoxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used for differentiation of radiation-induced necrosis and tumor recurrence after gamma knife radiosurgery for intracranial metastases in 33 consecutive cases. All patients presented with enlargement of the treated lesion, increase of perilesional brain edema, and aggravation or appearance of neurological signs and symptoms on average 9.3±4.9 months after primary treatment. Metabolic imaging defined four types of lesions: pure tumor recurrence (11 cases), partial tumor recurrence (11 cases), radiation-induced tumor necrosis (10 cases), and radiation-induced necrosis of the peritumoral brain (1 case). In 1 patient, radiation-induced tumor necrosis was diagnosed 9 months after radiosurgery; however, partial tumor recurrence was identified 6 months later. With the exception of midline shift, which was found to be more typical for radiation-induced necrosis (P<0.01), no one clinical, radiologic, or radiosurgical parameter either at the time of primary treatment or at the time of deterioration showed a statistically significant association with the type of the lesion. Proton MRS-based diagnosis was confirmed histologically in all surgically treated patients (7 cases) and corresponded well to the clinical course in others. In conclusion, multivoxel proton MRS is an effective diagnostic modality for identification of radiation-induced necrosis and tumor recurrence that can be used for monitoring of metabolic changes in intracranial neoplasms after radiosurgical treatment. It can be also helpful for differentiation of radiation-induced necrosis of the tumor and that of the peritumoral brain, which may have important clinical and medicolegal implications. (author)

  17. Relativistic klystrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.A.; Azuma, O.; Callin, R.S.

    1989-03-01

    Experimental work is underway by a SLAC-LLNL-LBL collaboration to investigate the feasibility of using relativistic klystrons as a power source for future high gradient accelerators. Two different relativistic klystron configurations have been built and tested to date: a high grain multicavity klystron at 11.4 GHz and a low gain two cavity subharmonic buncher driven at 5.7 GHz. In both configurations power is extracted at 11.4 GHz. In order to understand the basic physics issues involved in extracting RF from a high power beam, we have used both a single resonant cavity and a multi-cell traveling wave structure for energy extraction. We have learned how to overcome our previously reported problem of high power RF pulse shortening, and have achieved peak RF power levels of 170 MW with the RF pulse of the same duration as the beam current pulse. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Gravitation relativiste

    CERN Document Server

    Hakim, Rémi

    1994-01-01

    Il existe à l'heure actuelle un certain nombre de théories relativistes de la gravitation compatibles avec l'expérience et l'observation. Toutefois, la relativité générale d'Einstein fut historiquement la première à fournir des résultats théoriques corrects en accord précis avec les faits.

  19. Relativistic klystron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, R.

    1985-09-01

    Theoretical analysis is presented of a relativisic klystron; i.e. a high-relativistic bunched electron beam which is sent through a succession of tuned cavities and has its energy replenished by periodic induction accelerator units. Parameters are given for a full-size device and for an experimental device using the FEL at the ETA; namely the ELF Facility. 6 refs., 2 figs

  20. Generation of quasi-monoenergetic protons from a double-species target driven by the radiation pressure of an ultraintense laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pae, Ki Hong [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science, Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chul Min, E-mail: chulmin@gist.ac.kr [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science, Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Photonics Research Institute, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Chang Hee, E-mail: chnam@gist.ac.kr [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science, Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics and Photon Science, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    In laser-driven proton acceleration, generation of quasi-monoenergetic proton beams has been considered a crucial feature of the radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) scheme, but the required difficult physical conditions have hampered its experimental realization. As a method to generate quasi-monoenergetic protons under experimentally viable conditions, we investigated using double-species targets of controlled composition ratio in order to make protons bunched in the phase space in the RPA scheme. From a modified optimum condition and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we showed by varying the ion composition ratio of proton and carbon that quasi-monoenergetic protons could be generated from ultrathin plane targets irradiated with a circularly polarized Gaussian laser pulse. The proposed scheme should facilitate the experimental realization of ultrashort quasi-monoenergetic proton beams for unique applications in high field science.

  1. Patterns of Care in Proton Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Central Nervous System Malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odei, Bismarck [University of California Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Frandsen, Jonathan E.; Boothe, Dustin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Ermoian, Ralph P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington (United States); Poppe, Matthew M., E-mail: Matthew.poppe@hci.utah.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Proton beam therapy (PBT) potentially allows for improved sparing of normal tissues, hopefully leading to decreased late side effects in children. Using a national registry, we sought to perform a patterns-of-care analysis for children receiving PBT for primary malignancies of the central nervous system (CNS). Methods and Materials: Using the National Cancer Data Base, we identified pediatric patients with primary CNS malignancies that were diagnosed between 2004 and 2012. We used a standard t test for comparison of means and χ{sup 2} testing to identify differences in demographic and clinical characteristics. Univariate and multivariate logistical regression was applied to identify predictors of PBT use. Results: We identified 4637 pediatric patients receiving radiation therapy from 2004 to 2012, including a subset of 267 patients treated with PBT. We found that PBT use increased with time from <1% in 2004 to 15% in 2012. In multivariate logistical regression, we found the following to be predictors of receipt of PBT: private insurance, the highest income bracket, younger age, living in a metropolitan area, and residing >200 miles from a radiation treatment facility (P<.05). Conclusions: We noted the proportion of children receiving PBT to be significantly increasing over time from <1% to 15% from 2004 to 2012. We also observed important disparities in receipt of PBT based on socioeconomic status. Children from higher-income households and with private insurance were more likely to use this expensive technology. As we continue to demonstrate the potential benefits of PBT in children, efforts are needed to expand the accessibility of PBT for children of all socioeconomic backgrounds and regions of the country.

  2. Interaction of ring current and radiation belt protons with ducted plasmaspheric hiss. 2. Time evolution of the distribution function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Rasmussen, C. E.; Miller, R. H.; Villalon, E.

    1995-11-01

    The evolution of the bounce-averaged ring current/radiation belt proton distribution is simulated during resonant interactions with ducted plasmaspheric hiss. The plasmaspheric hiss is assumed to be generated by ring current electrons and to be damped by the energetic protons. Thus energy is transferred between energetic electrons and protons using the plasmaspheric hiss as a mediary. The problem is not solved self-consistently. During the simulation period, interactions with ring current electrons (not represented in the model) are assumed to maintain the wave amplitudes in the presence of damping by the energetic protons, allowing the wave spectrum to be held fixed. Diffusion coefficients in pitch angle, cross pitch angle/energy, and energy were previously calculated by Kozyra et al. (1994) and are adopted for the present study. The simulation treats the energy range, E>=80 keV, within which the wave diffusion operates on a shorter timescale than other proton loss processes (i.e., Coulomb drag and charge exchange). These other loss processes are not included in the simulation. An interesting result of the simulation is that energy diffusion maximizes at moderate pitch angles near the edge of the atmospheric loss cone. Over the simulation period, diffusion in energy creates an order of magnitude enhancement in the bounce-averaged proton distribution function at moderate pitch angles. The loss cone is nearly empty because scattering of particles at small pitch angles is weak. The bounce-averaged flux distribution, mapped to ionospheric heights, results in elevated locally mirroring proton fluxes. OGO 5 observed order of magnitude enhancements in locally mirroring energetic protons at altitudes between 350 and 1300 km and invariant latitudes between 50° and 60° (Lundblad and Soraas, 1978). The proton distributions were highly anisotropic in pitch angle with nearly empty loss cones. The similarity between the observed distributions and those resulting from this

  3. High and Low Energy Proton Radiation Damage in p/n InP MOCVD Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, George; Weinberg, Irv; Scheiman, Dave; Vargas-Aburto, Carlos; Uribe, Roberto

    1995-01-01

    InP p(+)/n/n(+) solar cells, fabricated by metal organic chemical vapor deposition, (MOCVD) were irradiated with 0.2 MeV and 10 MeV protons to a fluence of 10(exp 13)/sq cm. The power output degradation, IV behavior, carrier concentration and defect concentration were observed at intermediate points throughout the irradiations. The 0.2 MeV proton-irradiated solar cells suffered much greater and more rapid degradation in power output than those irradiated with 10 MeV protons. The efficiency losses were accompanied by larger increases in the recombination currents in the 0.2 MeV proton-irradiated solar cells. The low energy proton irradiations also had a larger impact on the series resistance of the solar cells. Despite the radiation induced damage, the carrier concentration in the base of the solar cells showed no reduction after 10 MeV or 0.2 MeV proton irradiations and even increased during irradiation with 0.2 MeV protons. In a deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) study of the irradiated samples, the minority carrier defects H4 and H5 at E(sub v) + 0.33 and E(sub v) + 0.52 eV and the majority carrier defects E7 and El0 at E(sub c) - 0.39 and E(sub c) - 0.74 eV, were observed. The defect introduction rates for the 0.2 MeV proton irradiations were about 20 times higher than for the 10 MeV proton irradiations. The defect El0, observed here after irradiation, has been shown to act as a donor in irradiated n-type InP and may be responsible for obscuring carrier removal. The results of this study are consistent with the much greater damage produced by low energy protons whose limited range causes them to stop in the active region of the solar cell.

  4. A 2D simulation of the proton radiation belt with PELLPACK code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, A.; Martin, I.; Pugacheva, G.; Christy, A.; Spjeldvik, W.

    1999-01-01

    The numerical solution of diffusion equation for geomagnetically trapped protons taking into account deceleration of protons by Coulomb interactions with free and bounded electrons, the charge exchange process, the cosmic ray albedo neutron decay source and electric and magnetic radial diffusion was obtained using the PELLPACK code based on the finite element method. The advantage of the method in comparison with the traditional finite differences method is a several order greater speed of computation at the same precision. When boundary conditions at L=7 are given with the distribution function extracted from proton spectrum obtained on board of ATS 6 satellite, the PELLPACK code produces 2D unidirectional proton flux at the top of geomagnetic lines from L=1 up to L=7 that satisfactory agrees with the AP8 model proton flux for all proton energies more than ∼ 300-500 keV. For less proton energies AP8 model predicts the trapped protons fluxes on several orders of magnitude greater than the PELLPACK code at L < 4 that possibly could be explained by uncertainty of very low energy proton flux data at L=7. The detailed fitness of observational model proton fluxes by numerical theoretical solution of transport equation is still not attained. (author)

  5. Visual outcome of accelerated fractionated radiation for advanced sinonasal malignancies employing photons/protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Damien C.; Chan, Annie W.; Lessell, Simmons; McIntyre, James F.; Goldberg, Saveli I.; Bussiere, Marc R.; Fitzek, Markus M.; Thornton, Allan F.; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the visual outcomes of patients with advanced sinonasal malignancies treated with proton/photon accelerated fractionated radiation (AFR). Patients and methods: Between 1991 and 2001, AFR was used to treat 36 patients with advanced stage primary (n = 33) or recurrent (n = 3) nasal or paranasal malignant tumors. Full ophthalmologic follow-up was documented. The median dose to the gross tumor volume (GTV) was 69.6 CGE (range 60.8-77). Visual complications were graded according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) and the late effects of normal tissue (LENT) scoring systems. The median follow-up was 52.4 months (range 17-122.8). Results: Thirteen patients developed late visual/ocular toxicity. Cataracts were LENT grade 1 and 3 in 2 patients and 1 patient, respectively. One LENT grade 1 vascular retinopathy and 1 optic neuropathy were also observed. Three and five patients presented with nasolacrimal duct stenosis (CTC grade 2, 2 patients; CTC grade 3, 1 patient) and dry-eye syndrome (CTC grade 1, 1 patient; CTC grade 2, 4 patients), respectively. The 3- and 5-year probability of LENT/CTC grade ≥2 visual toxicity were 15.8 ± 6.7% and 20.7 ± 7.8%, respectively. Conclusions: AFR for locally advanced nasal cavity and paranasal sinus tumors enables delivery of 70 CGE to the tumor with acceptable ophthalmologic complications

  6. Radiative neutron capture on a proton at big-bang nucleosynthesis energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, S.; Cyburt, R. H.; Hong, S. W.; Hyun, C. H.

    2006-01-01

    The total cross section for radiative neutron capture on a proton, np→dγ, is evaluated at big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) energies. The electromagnetic transition amplitudes are calculated up to next-to-leading-order within the framework of pionless effective field theory with dibaryon fields. We also calculate the dγ→np cross section and the photon analyzing power for the dγ(vector sign)→np process from the amplitudes. The values of low-energy constants that appear in the amplitudes are estimated by a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis using the relevant low-energy experimental data. Our result agrees well with those of other theoretical calculations except for the np→dγ cross section at some energies estimated by an R-matrix analysis. We also study the uncertainties in our estimation of the np→dγ cross section at relevant BBN energies and find that the estimated cross section is reliable to within ∼1% error

  7. Disruption of SLX4-MUS81 Function Increases the Relative Biological Effectiveness of Proton Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qi [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Underwood, Tracy S.A.; Kung, Jong [Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wang, Meng [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Paganetti, Harald [Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Held, Kathryn D.; Hong, Theodore S.; Efstathiou, Jason A. [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Willers, Henning, E-mail: hwillers@mgh.harvard.edu [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Clinical proton beam therapy has been based on the use of a generic relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of ∼1.1. However, emerging data have suggested that Fanconi anemia (FA) and homologous recombination pathway defects can lead to a variable RBE, at least in vitro. We investigated the role of SLX4 (FANCP), which acts as a docking platform for the assembly of multiple structure-specific endonucleases, in the response to proton irradiation. Methods and Materials: Isogenic cell pairs for the study of SLX4, XPF/ERCC1, MUS81, and SLX1 were irradiated at the mid-spread-out Bragg peak of a clinical proton beam (linear energy transfer 2.5 keV/μm) or with 250 kVp x-rays, and the clonogenic survival fractions were determined. To estimate the RBE of the protons relative to cobalt-60 photons (Co60Eq), we assigned a RBE(Co60Eq) of 1.1 to x-rays to correct the physical dose measured. Standard DNA repair foci assays were used to monitor the damage responses, and the cell cycle distributions were assessed by flow cytometry. The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor olaparib was used for comparison. Results: Loss of SLX4 function resulted in an enhanced proton RBE(Co60Eq) of 1.42 compared with 1.11 for wild-type cells (at a survival fraction of 0.1; P<.05), which correlated with increased persistent DNA double-strand breaks in cells in the S/G{sub 2} phase. Genetic analysis identified the SLX4-binding partner MUS81 as a mediator of resistance to proton radiation. Both proton irradiation and olaparib treatment resulted in a similar prolonged accumulation of RAD51 foci in SLX4/MUS81-deficient cells, suggesting a common defect in the repair of DNA replication fork-associated damage. Conclusions: A defect in the FA pathway at the level of SLX4 results in hypersensitivity to proton radiation, which is, at least in part, due to impaired MUS81-mediated processing of replication forks that stall at clustered DNA damage. In vivo and clinical studies are needed to

  8. Ambient dose equivalent measurements in secondary radiation fields at proton therapy facility CCB IFJ PAN in Krakow using recombination chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubowska Edyta A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This work presents recombination methods used for secondary radiation measurements at the Facility for Proton Radiotherapy of Eye Cancer at the Institute for Nuclear Physics, IFJ, in Krakow (Poland. The measurements of H*(10 were performed, with REM-2 tissue equivalent chamber in two halls of cyclotrons AIC-144 and Proteus C-235 and in the corridors close to treatment rooms. The measurements were completed by determination of gamma radiation component, using a hydrogen-free recombination chamber. The results were compared with the measurements using rem meter types FHT 762 (WENDI-II and NM2 FHT 192 gamma probe and with stationary dosimetric system.

  9. Lung Cancer Cell Line Screen Links Fanconi Anemia/BRCA Pathway Defects to Increased Relative Biological Effectiveness of Proton Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qi; Ghosh, Priyanjali; Magpayo, Nicole; Testa, Mauro; Tang, Shikui; Gheorghiu, Liliana; Biggs, Peter; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Held, Kathryn D.; Willers, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Growing knowledge of genomic heterogeneity in cancer, especially when it results in altered DNA damage responses, requires re-examination of the generic relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1 of protons. Methods and Materials: For determination of cellular radiosensitivity, we irradiated 17 lung cancer cell lines at the mid-spread-out Bragg peak of a clinical proton beam (linear energy transfer, 2.5 keV/μm). For comparison, 250-kVp X rays and 137 Cs γ-rays were used. To estimate the RBE of protons relative to 60 Co (Co60eq), we assigned an RBE(Co60Eq) of 1.1 to X rays to correct the physical dose measured. Standard DNA repair foci assays were used to monitor damage responses. FANCD2 was depleted using RNA interference. Results: Five lung cancer cell lines (29.4%) exhibited reduced clonogenic survival after proton irradiation compared with X-irradiation with the same physical doses. This was confirmed in a 3-dimensional sphere assay. Corresponding proton RBE(Co60Eq) estimates were statistically significantly different from 1.1 (P≤.05): 1.31 to 1.77 (for a survival fraction of 0.5). In 3 of these lines, increased RBE was correlated with alterations in the Fanconi anemia (FA)/BRCA pathway of DNA repair. In Calu-6 cells, the data pointed toward an FA pathway defect, leading to a previously unreported persistence of proton-induced RAD51 foci. The FA/BRCA-defective cells displayed a 25% increase in the size of subnuclear 53BP1 foci 18 hours after proton irradiation. Conclusions: Our cell line screen has revealed variations in proton RBE that are partly due to FA/BRCA pathway defects, suggesting that the use of a generic RBE for cancers should be revisited. We propose that functional biomarkers, such as size of residual 53BP1 foci, may be used to identify cancers with increased sensitivity to proton radiation

  10. Lung Cancer Cell Line Screen Links Fanconi Anemia/BRCA Pathway Defects to Increased Relative Biological Effectiveness of Proton Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qi; Ghosh, Priyanjali; Magpayo, Nicole [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Testa, Mauro; Tang, Shikui [Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gheorghiu, Liliana [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Biggs, Peter; Paganetti, Harald [Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A. [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lu, Hsiao-Ming [Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Held, Kathryn D. [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Willers, Henning, E-mail: hwillers@mgh.harvard.edu [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: Growing knowledge of genomic heterogeneity in cancer, especially when it results in altered DNA damage responses, requires re-examination of the generic relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1 of protons. Methods and Materials: For determination of cellular radiosensitivity, we irradiated 17 lung cancer cell lines at the mid-spread-out Bragg peak of a clinical proton beam (linear energy transfer, 2.5 keV/μm). For comparison, 250-kVp X rays and {sup 137}Cs γ-rays were used. To estimate the RBE of protons relative to {sup 60}Co (Co60eq), we assigned an RBE(Co60Eq) of 1.1 to X rays to correct the physical dose measured. Standard DNA repair foci assays were used to monitor damage responses. FANCD2 was depleted using RNA interference. Results: Five lung cancer cell lines (29.4%) exhibited reduced clonogenic survival after proton irradiation compared with X-irradiation with the same physical doses. This was confirmed in a 3-dimensional sphere assay. Corresponding proton RBE(Co60Eq) estimates were statistically significantly different from 1.1 (P≤.05): 1.31 to 1.77 (for a survival fraction of 0.5). In 3 of these lines, increased RBE was correlated with alterations in the Fanconi anemia (FA)/BRCA pathway of DNA repair. In Calu-6 cells, the data pointed toward an FA pathway defect, leading to a previously unreported persistence of proton-induced RAD51 foci. The FA/BRCA-defective cells displayed a 25% increase in the size of subnuclear 53BP1 foci 18 hours after proton irradiation. Conclusions: Our cell line screen has revealed variations in proton RBE that are partly due to FA/BRCA pathway defects, suggesting that the use of a generic RBE for cancers should be revisited. We propose that functional biomarkers, such as size of residual 53BP1 foci, may be used to identify cancers with increased sensitivity to proton radiation.

  11. Proton Fast Ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, M H; Freeman, R R; Hatchett, S P; MacKinnon, A J; Patel, P K; Snavely, R A; Stephens, R B

    2006-04-01

    Fast ignition (FI) by a laser generated ballistically focused proton beam is a more recently proposed alternative to the original concept of FI by a laser generated beam of relativistic electrons. It has potential advantages in less complex energy transport into dense plasma. Recent successful target heating experiments motivate further investigation of the feasibility of proton fast ignition. The concept, the physics and characteristics of the proton beams, the recent experimental work on focusing of the beams and heating of solid targets and the overall prospects for proton FI are discussed

  12. Universal cross sections for K-shell ionization by low-velocity protons; importance of relativistic and energy-loss effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zander, A.R.; Lapicki, G.

    1981-01-01

    When Z 1 2 , inner-shell ionization of a target atom of atomic number Z 2 by a projectile of atomic number Z 1 occurs predominately via removal of an inner-shell electron to the target atom continuum (direct ionization). Electron capture contributes then insignificantly to the ionization, and thus the predictions of perturbativein-Z 1 /Z 2 theories of direct ionization can be tested through comparison with measured ionization cross sections. We present such a comparison with the recently reported data for K-shell ionization of the Z 2 =22, 26, 28, and 30 elements by 60-150 keV protons (Z 1 =1). These ionization cross sections were inferred from x-ray production measurements using Krause's fluorescence yields

  13. Atomic physics using relativistic H- beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, H.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: An 8 GeV hydrogen atom can traverse a focused laser beam of width of 1 micron in a time of 353 attoseconds in its rest frame. A design is currently underway at Fermilab for a superconducting linear accelerator that will accelerate H - ions to 8 GeV. This 'Proton Driver' beam is intended to be injected, after stripping down to protons, into the 120 GeV Main Injector for the mass production of neutrinos aimed at a neutrino detector (MINOS) in a mine shaft in Soudan, Minnesota (USA) for the study of neutrino oscillations. It has not passed unnoticed that with some advance planning a few nanoamps from the up-to-250 mA beam could be diverted for atomic physics experiments. Relativistic kinematics enable the creation of extreme conditions for a beam atom. For example, the Doppler shift allows a very large tuning range in the atom's rest frame of a laser beam that is fixed- frequency in the lab. At 8 GeV the rest frame Doppler shift ranges from a factor of 19 in the forward direction to 0.05 backward. The laser intensity is enhanced by the square of the Doppler shift, so that the world's most intense laser beam would be amplified by a factor of 360 in the atom's rest frame. Furthermore, although there are extreme changes in the frequency and intensity in the atom's frame as one changes the intersection angle, the ponderomotive potential remains constant, as it is a relativistic invariant. One of the interesting problems that arises in the planning for this accelerator is the stripping of electrons from the negative ions by photodetachment from Doppler shifted thermal photons. We estimate that, if the transfer lines are kept at 300 K (room temperature), the mean free path at 8 GeV for stripping from collisions with cavity radiation is about 1300 km. The physics of the interactions of such a beam with very thin material foils, again in the attosecond regime, has been treated theoretically, but has not been studied experimentally at such high energies. We will

  14. Low-intensive proton generators for radiation testing; Nizkointensivnyj protonnyj generator dlya radiatsionnykh ispytanij

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Istomin, I V; Gurbich, A F; Semenov, A V

    1994-12-31

    Experiment is conducted and calculations are performed grounding the possibility of creating a low-intensity proton generator based on nuclear reaction. The necessity in such a proton source is defined by the need of conducting long-term testings and by the absence of appropriate equipment.

  15. A Mathematica package for calculation of planar channeling radiation spectra of relativistic electrons channeled in a diamond-structure single crystal (quantum approach)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadegan, B.

    2013-03-01

    The presented Mathematica code is an efficient tool for simulation of planar channeling radiation spectra of relativistic electrons channeled along major crystallographic planes of a diamond-structure single crystal. The program is based on the quantum theory of channeling radiation which has been successfully applied to study planar channeling at electron energies between 10 and 100 MeV. Continuum potentials for different planes of diamond, silicon and germanium single crystals are calculated using the Doyle-Turner approximation to the atomic scattering factor and taking thermal vibrations of the crystal atoms into account. Numerical methods are applied to solve the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation. The code is designed to calculate the electron wave functions, transverse electron states in the planar continuum potential, transition energies, line widths of channeling radiation and depth dependencies of the population of quantum states. Finally the spectral distribution of spontaneously emitted channeling radiation is obtained. The simulation of radiation spectra considerably facilitates the interpretation of experimental data. Catalog identifier: AEOH_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEOH_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 446 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 209805 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica. Computer: Platforms on which Mathematica is available. Operating system: Operating systems on which Mathematica is available. RAM: 1 MB Classification: 7.10. Nature of problem: Planar channeling radiation is emitted by relativistic charged particles during traversing a single crystal in direction parallel to a crystallographic plane. Channeling is modeled as the motion

  16. Robust Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Treatment Planning for Rectal Cancer Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco Kiely, Janid Patricia, E-mail: jkiely@sas.upenn.edu; White, Benjamin M.

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in a treatment plan design and robustness study, whether proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) has the potential to offer advantages, relative to interfraction uncertainties, over photon volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in a locally advanced rectal cancer patient population. Methods and Materials: Ten patients received a planning CT scan, followed by an average of 4 weekly offline CT verification CT scans, which were rigidly co-registered to the planning CT. Clinical PBS plans were generated on the planning CT, using a single-field uniform-dose technique with single-posterior and parallel-opposed (LAT) fields geometries. The VMAT plans were generated on the planning CT using 2 6-MV, 220° coplanar arcs. Clinical plans were forward-calculated on verification CTs to assess robustness relative to anatomic changes. Setup errors were assessed by forward-calculating clinical plans with a ±5-mm (left–right, anterior–posterior, superior–inferior) isocenter shift on the planning CT. Differences in clinical target volume and organ at risk dose–volume histogram (DHV) indicators between plans were tested for significance using an appropriate Wilcoxon test (P<.05). Results: Dosimetrically, PBS plans were statistically different from VMAT plans, showing greater organ at risk sparing. However, the bladder was statistically identical among LAT and VMAT plans. The clinical target volume coverage was statistically identical among all plans. The robustness test found that all DVH indicators for PBS and VMAT plans were robust, except the LAT's genitalia (V5, V35). The verification CT plans showed that all DVH indicators were robust. Conclusions: Pencil beam scanning plans were found to be as robust as VMAT plans relative to interfractional changes during treatment when posterior beam angles and appropriate range margins are used. Pencil beam scanning dosimetric gains in the bowel (V15, V20) over VMAT suggest that using PBS to treat rectal

  17. Robust Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Treatment Planning for Rectal Cancer Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Kiely, Janid Patricia; White, Benjamin M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in a treatment plan design and robustness study, whether proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) has the potential to offer advantages, relative to interfraction uncertainties, over photon volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in a locally advanced rectal cancer patient population. Methods and Materials: Ten patients received a planning CT scan, followed by an average of 4 weekly offline CT verification CT scans, which were rigidly co-registered to the planning CT. Clinical PBS plans were generated on the planning CT, using a single-field uniform-dose technique with single-posterior and parallel-opposed (LAT) fields geometries. The VMAT plans were generated on the planning CT using 2 6-MV, 220° coplanar arcs. Clinical plans were forward-calculated on verification CTs to assess robustness relative to anatomic changes. Setup errors were assessed by forward-calculating clinical plans with a ±5-mm (left–right, anterior–posterior, superior–inferior) isocenter shift on the planning CT. Differences in clinical target volume and organ at risk dose–volume histogram (DHV) indicators between plans were tested for significance using an appropriate Wilcoxon test (P<.05). Results: Dosimetrically, PBS plans were statistically different from VMAT plans, showing greater organ at risk sparing. However, the bladder was statistically identical among LAT and VMAT plans. The clinical target volume coverage was statistically identical among all plans. The robustness test found that all DVH indicators for PBS and VMAT plans were robust, except the LAT's genitalia (V5, V35). The verification CT plans showed that all DVH indicators were robust. Conclusions: Pencil beam scanning plans were found to be as robust as VMAT plans relative to interfractional changes during treatment when posterior beam angles and appropriate range margins are used. Pencil beam scanning dosimetric gains in the bowel (V15, V20) over VMAT suggest that using PBS to treat rectal cancer

  18. The RADEX facility as a tool for studies of radiation damage under proton and spallation neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koptelov, E.A.; Lebedev, S.G.; Matveev, V.A.; Sobolevsky, N.M. [Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Strebkov, Yu.S.; Subbotin, A.V. [Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2001-03-01

    We present results of numerical modeling for processes of primary protons and spallation neutrons interactions with structural materials at the RADiation EXperiment facility of the Neutron Complex. The installation has a vertical irradiation channel inside the beam stop for horizontally incident protons with energies up to 600 MeV of the Moscow Meson Factory of the INR (Institute for Nuclear Research) RAS (Russian Academy of Science). The calculations are based on a set of computer codes SHIELD and RADDAM, which were developed in the INR RAS and give data on point defect generation by irradiation, rate of accumulation of H and He atoms produced in nuclear reactions, energetic spectra of primary knocked-off atoms in collision displacements, temperature of samples under irradiation. Different positions of the channel, which are available by rotation of a target relatively the vertical axis for angles 0, 60, 120 and 180 degrees to the proton beam direction, are considered. Changes of irradiation damage parameters due to various inputs of primary protons and spallation neutrons at different target orientations are demonstrated. It is shown also that the spallation neutron facility RADEX may provide with perspective experimental possibilities for modeling of irradiation conditions for fusion reactors ITER and DEMO. (author)

  19. Intensity Modulated Proton Beam Radiation for Brachytherapy in Patients With Cervical Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clivio, Alessandro [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Kluge, Anne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Cozzi, Luca, E-mail: lucozzi@iosi.ch [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Köhler, Christhardt [Department of Gynecology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Neumann, Oliver [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Vanetti, Eugenio [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Marnitz, Simone [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) in patients with cervical cancer in terms of coverage, conformity, and dose–volume histogram (DVH) parameters correlated with recommendations from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients with histologically proven cervical cancer underwent primary chemoradiation for the pelvic lymph nodes, the uterus, the cervix, and the parametric region, with a symmetric margin of 1 cm. The prescription was for 50.4 Gy, with 1.8 Gy per fraction. The prescribed dose to the parametria was 2.12 Gy up to 59.36 Gy in 28 fractions as a simultaneous boost. For several reasons, the patients were unable to undergo brachytherapy. As an alternative, IMPT was planned with 5 fractions of 6 Gy to the cervix, including the macroscopic tumor with an MRI-guided target definition, with an isotropic margin of 5 mm for planning target volume (PTV) definition. Groupe-Europeen de Curietherapie and European society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) criteria were used for DVH evaluation. Reference comparison plans were optimized for volumetric modulated rapid arc (VMAT) therapy with the RapidArc (RA). Results: The dose to the high-risk volume was calculated with α/β = 10 with 89.6 Gy. For IMPT, the clinical target volume showed a mean dose of 38.2 ± 5.0 Gy (35.0 ±1.8 Gy for RA). The D{sub 98%} was 31.9 ± 2.6 Gy (RA: 30.8 ± 1.0 Gy). With regard to the organs at risk, the 2Gy Equivalent Dose (EQD2) (α/β = 3) to 2 cm{sup 3} of the rectal wall, sigmoid wall, and bladder wall was 62.2 ± 6.4 Gy, 57.8 ± 6.1 Gy, and 80.6 ± 8.7 Gy (for RA: 75.3 ± 6.1 Gy, 66.9 ± 6.9 Gy, and 89.0 ± 7.2 Gy, respectively). For the IMPT boost plans in combination with external beam radiation therapy, all DVH parameters correlated with <5% risk for grades 2 to 4 late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity. Conclusion: In patients who are not eligible for brachytherapy, IMPT as a boost

  20. Slowly rotating general relativistic superfluid neutron stars with relativistic entrainment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comer, G.L.

    2004-01-01

    Neutron stars that are cold enough should have two or more superfluids or supercondutors in their inner crusts and cores. The implication of superfluidity or superconductivity for equilibrium and dynamical neutron star states is that each individual particle species that forms a condensate must have its own, independent number density current and equation of motion that determines that current. An important consequence of the quasiparticle nature of each condensate is the so-called entrainment effect; i.e., the momentum of a condensate is a linear combination of its own current and those of the other condensates. We present here the first fully relativistic modeling of slowly rotating superfluid neutron stars with entrainment that is accurate to the second-order in the rotation rates. The stars consist of superfluid neutrons, superconducting protons, and a highly degenerate, relativistic gas of electrons. We use a relativistic σ-ω mean field model for the equation of state of the matter and the entrainment. We determine the effect of a relative rotation between the neutrons and protons on a star's total mass, shape, and Kepler, mass-shedding limit

  1. Predictive Risk of Radiation Induced Cerebral Necrosis in Pediatric Brain Cancer Patients after VMAT Versus Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, Derek; Zhang, Rui, E-mail: rzhang@marybird.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Ln., Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Nicholson Hall, Tower Dr., Baton Rouge, LA 70810 (United States); Sanders, Mary [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Ln., Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Newhauser, Wayne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Ln., Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Nicholson Hall, Tower Dr., Baton Rouge, LA 70810 (United States)

    2015-04-13

    Cancer of the brain and central nervous system (CNS) is the second most common of all pediatric cancers. Treatment of many of these cancers includes radiation therapy of which radiation induced cerebral necrosis (RICN) can be a severe and potentially devastating side effect. Risk factors for RICN include brain volume irradiated, the dose given per fraction and total dose. Thirteen pediatric patients were selected for this study to determine the difference in predicted risk of RICN when treating with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) compared to passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Plans were compared on the basis of dosimetric endpoints in the planned treatment volume (PTV) and brain and a radiobiological endpoint of RICN calculated using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman probit model. Uncertainty tests were performed to determine if the predicted risk of necrosis was sensitive to positional errors, proton range errors and selection of risk models. Both PSPT and IMPT plans resulted in a significant increase in the maximum dose to the brain, a significant reduction in the total brain volume irradiated to low doses, and a significant lower predicted risk of necrosis compared with the VMAT plans. The findings of this study were upheld by the uncertainty analysis.

  2. Predictive Risk of Radiation Induced Cerebral Necrosis in Pediatric Brain Cancer Patients after VMAT Versus Proton Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Freund

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer of the brain and central nervous system (CNS is the second most common of all pediatric cancers. Treatment of many of these cancers includes radiation therapy of which radiation induced cerebral necrosis (RICN can be a severe and potentially devastating side effect. Risk factors for RICN include brain volume irradiated, the dose given per fraction and total dose. Thirteen pediatric patients were selected for this study to determine the difference in predicted risk of RICN when treating with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT compared to passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT. Plans were compared on the basis of dosimetric endpoints in the planned treatment volume (PTV and brain and a radiobiological endpoint of RICN calculated using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman probit model. Uncertainty tests were performed to determine if the predicted risk of necrosis was sensitive to positional errors, proton range errors and selection of risk models. Both PSPT and IMPT plans resulted in a significant increase in the maximum dose to the brain, a significant reduction in the total brain volume irradiated to low doses, and a significant lower predicted risk of necrosis compared with the VMAT plans. The findings of this study were upheld by the uncertainty analysis.

  3. Terahertz radiation driven by two-color laser pulses at near-relativistic intensities: Competition between photoionization and wakefield effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    González de Alaiza Martínez, P.; Davoine, X.; Debayle, A.; Gremillet, L.; Bergé, L.

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate terahertz (THz) pulse generation by linearly-polarized, two-color femtosecond laser pulses in highly-ionized argon. Major processes consist of tunneling photoionization and ponderomotive forces associated with transverse and longitudinal field excitations. By means of two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we reveal the importance of photocurrent mechanisms besides transverse and longitudinal plasma waves for laser intensities >1015 W/cm2. We demonstrate the following. (i) With two-color pulses, photoionization prevails in the generation of GV/m THz fields up to 1017 W/cm2 laser intensities and suddenly loses efficiency near the relativistic threshold, as the outermost electron shell of ionized Ar atoms has been fully depleted. (ii) PIC results can be explained by a one-dimensional Maxwell-fluid model and its semi-analytical solutions, offering the first unified description of the main THz sources created in plasmas. (iii) The THz power emitted outside the plasma channel mostly originates from the transverse currents. PMID:27255689

  4. Detailed spectra of high-power broadband microwave radiation from interactions of relativistic electron beams with weakly magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, K.G.; Benford, G.; Tzach, D.

    1983-01-01

    Prodigious quantities of microwave energy distributed uniformly across a wide frequency band are observed when a relativistic electron beam (REB) penetrates a plasma. Typical measured values are 20 MW total for Δνapprox. =40 GHz with preliminary observations of bandwidths as large as 100 GHz. An intense annular pulsed REB (Iapprox. =128 kA; rapprox. =3 cm; Δrapprox. =1 cm; 50 nsec FWHM; γapprox. =3) is sent through an unmagnetized or weakly magnetized plasma column (n/sub plasma/approx.10 13 cm -3 ). Beam-to-plasma densities of 0.01 >ω/sub p/ and weak harmonic structure is wholly unanticipated from Langmuir scattering or soliton collapse models. A model of Compton-like boosting of ambient plasma waves by the beam electrons, with collateral emission of high-frequency photons, qualitatively explains these spectra. Power emerges largely in an angle approx.1/γ, as required by Compton mechanisms. As n/sub b//n/sub p/ falls, ω/sub p/-2ω/sub p/ structure and harmonic power ratios consistent with soliton collapse theories appear. With further reduction of n/sub b//n/sub p/ only the ω/sub p/ line persists

  5. RADCHARM++: A C++ routine to compute the electromagnetic radiation generated by relativistic charged particles in crystals and complex structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandiera, Laura; Bagli, Enrico; Guidi, Vincenzo [INFN Sezione di Ferrara and Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, 44121 Ferrara (Italy); Tikhomirov, Victor V. [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Belarusian State University, Minsk (Belarus)

    2015-07-15

    The analytical theories of coherent bremsstrahlung and channeling radiation well describe the process of radiation generation in crystals under some special cases. However, the treatment of complex situations requires the usage of a more general approach. In this report we present a C++ routine, named RADCHARM++, to compute the electromagnetic radiation emitted by electrons and positrons in crystals and complex structures. In the RADCHARM++ routine, the model for the computation of e.m. radiation generation is based on the direct integration of the quasiclassical formula of Baier and Katkov. This approach allows one taking into account real trajectories, and thereby the contribution of incoherent scattering. Such contribution can be very important in many cases, for instance for electron channeling. The generality of the Baier–Katkov operator method permits one to simulate the electromagnetic radiation emitted by electrons/positrons in very different cases, e.g., in straight, bent and periodically bent crystals, and for different beam energy ranges, from sub-GeV to TeV and above. The RADCHARM++ routine has been implemented in the Monte Carlo code DYNECHARM++, which solves the classical equation of motion of charged particles traveling through a crystal under the continuum potential approximation. The code has proved to reproduce the results of experiments performed at the MAinzer MIkrotron (MAMI) with 855 MeV electrons and has been used to predict the radiation spectrum generated by the same electron beam in a bent crystal.

  6. Differential cross section measurement of radiative capture of protons by nuclei 12C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtebayev, N.; Zazulin, D.M.; Buminskii, V.P.; Zarifov, R.A.; Tohtarov, R.N.; Sagindykov, Sh.Sh.; Baktibayev, M.K.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of differential cross sections of nuclear reaction 12 C(p, γ) 13 N at 0, 45, 90, 135 Deg. to beam direction of flying protons in the field of E p = 350-1100 KeV with an error it is not worse than 10 % have been carried out. Most important was studied, from the astrophysical point of view, process of capture of protons by nucleuses 12 C on the ground state of a nucleus 13 N. It is experimentally shown isotropy of angular distribution of differential cross sections of reaction 12 C(p, γ) 13 N, in the given field energy of protons

  7. Equation of Motion of an Interstellar Bussard Ramjet with Radiation and Mass Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semay, Claude; Silvestre-Brac, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    An interstellar Bussard ramjet is a spaceship using the protons of the interstellar medium in a fusion engine to produce thrust. In recent papers, it was shown that the relativistic equation of motion of an ideal ramjet and that of a ramjet with radiation loss are analytical. When a mass loss appears, the limit speed of the ramjet is more strongly…

  8. The detection of radiation defects by means of the Kossel effect investigated in proton-irradiated GaP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, H.J.; Rolle, S.; Geist, V.; Stephan, D.

    1984-01-01

    The line intensity of Ga-K/sub α/- and P-K/sub α/-Kossel reflections from GaP irradiated by 0.3 to 1.3 MeV protons in a wide dose range (10 14 to 5 x 10 17 cm -2 ) has been investigated. The excitation of the characteristic X-rays inside the crystal lattice has been performed either by 40 keV electrons or 1.3 MeV protons. It is established that, in contrast to the P-K/sub α/-lines, certain Ga-K/sub α/-reflections respond very sensitively to radiation defects, manifest as increase or decrease in line intensity. The reason is probably a modification of extinction effects caused by lattice defects. The different behaviour of these phenomena is discussed and an explanation proposed. The lattice disorder is determined by channeling backscattering measurements. (author)

  9. Neutron spectrometry for D-T plasmas in JET, using a tandem annular-radiator proton-recoil spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkes, N.P.; Bond, D.S.; Kiptily, V.; Jarvis, O.N. E-mail: onj@jet.uk; Conroy, S.W

    2002-01-01

    A selection of the 14-MeV neutron spectra obtained at the JET Joint Undertaking tokamak during the deuterium-tritium operating campaign in 1997 are presented and analyzed. While several neutron spectrometers were operational during this campaign, the present paper is concerned solely with one: the tandem annular-radiator proton-recoil spectrometer (or proton recoil telescope, for brevity). During neutral beam heating with combined d- and t-beams, analysis of the spectra can define the core fuel composition (D:T) ratio. The spectra are sensitive to the population balance of the fast ions streaming in directions parallel and opposite to that of the injected beams. During ICRF heating of minority deuterium in bulk tritium plasmas, the spectra provide measurements of the effective temperature of the fast-deuteron energy tail and of its relative strength, which vary with the deuterium concentration. This information contributes to the overall understanding of the fusion performance of the various operating scenarios.

  10. Proton Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Medulloblastoma and Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors: Outcomes for Very Young Children Treated With Upfront Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, Rachel B., E-mail: rbjimenez@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sethi, Roshan [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Depauw, Nicolas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Pulsifer, Margaret B. [Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Adams, Judith [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); McBride, Sean M. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ebb, David [Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Fullerton, Barbara C.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.; MacDonald, Shannon M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To report the early outcomes for very young children with medulloblastoma or supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor (SPNET) treated with upfront chemotherapy followed by 3-dimensional proton radiation therapy (3D-CPT). Methods and Materials: All patients aged <60 months with medulloblastoma or SPNET treated with chemotherapy before 3D-CPT from 2002 to 2010 at our institution were included. All patients underwent maximal surgical resection, chemotherapy, and adjuvant 3D-CPT with either craniospinal irradiation followed by involved-field radiation therapy or involved-field radiation therapy alone. Results: Fifteen patients (median age at diagnosis, 35 months) were treated with high-dose chemotherapy and 3D-CPT. Twelve of 15 patients had medulloblastoma; 3 of 15 patients had SPNET. Median time from surgery to initiation of radiation was 219 days. Median craniospinal irradiation dose was 21.6 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness); median boost dose was 54.0 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness). At a median of 39 months from completion of radiation, 1 of 15 was deceased after a local failure, 1 of 15 had died from a non-disease-related cause, and the remaining 13 of 15 patients were alive without evidence of disease recurrence. Ototoxicity and endocrinopathies were the most common long-term toxicities, with 2 of 15 children requiring hearing aids and 3 of 15 requiring exogenous hormones. Conclusions: Proton radiation after chemotherapy resulted in good disease outcomes for a small cohort of very young patients with medulloblastoma and SPNET. Longer follow-up and larger numbers of patients are needed to assess long-term outcomes and late toxicity.

  11. Relativistic Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing; Li, Kunyang

    2018-02-01

    The “Breakthrough Starshot” aims at sending near-speed-of-light cameras to nearby stellar systems in the future. Due to the relativistic effects, a transrelativistic camera naturally serves as a spectrograph, a lens, and a wide-field camera. We demonstrate this through a simulation of the optical-band image of the nearby galaxy M51 in the rest frame of the transrelativistic camera. We suggest that observing celestial objects using a transrelativistic camera may allow one to study the astronomical objects in a special way, and to perform unique tests on the principles of special relativity. We outline several examples that suggest transrelativistic cameras may make important contributions to astrophysics and suggest that the Breakthrough Starshot cameras may be launched in any direction to serve as a unique astronomical observatory.

  12. Relativistic magnetohydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, Juan; Kovtun, Pavel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria,Victoria, BC, V8P 5C2 (Canada)

    2017-05-02

    We present the equations of relativistic hydrodynamics coupled to dynamical electromagnetic fields, including the effects of polarization, electric fields, and the derivative expansion. We enumerate the transport coefficients at leading order in derivatives, including electrical conductivities, viscosities, and thermodynamic coefficients. We find the constraints on transport coefficients due to the positivity of entropy production, and derive the corresponding Kubo formulas. For the neutral state in a magnetic field, small fluctuations include Alfvén waves, magnetosonic waves, and the dissipative modes. For the state with a non-zero dynamical charge density in a magnetic field, plasma oscillations gap out all propagating modes, except for Alfvén-like waves with a quadratic dispersion relation. We relate the transport coefficients in the “conventional” magnetohydrodynamics (formulated using Maxwell’s equations in matter) to those in the “dual” version of magnetohydrodynamics (formulated using the conserved magnetic flux).

  13. A study on the electric properties of single-junction GaAs solar cells under the combined radiation of low-energy protons and electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Huijie; Wu Yiyong; Xiao Jingdong; He Shiyu; Yang Dezhuang; Sun Yanzheng; Sun Qiang; Lv Wei; Xiao Zhibin; Huang Caiyong

    2008-01-01

    Displacement damage induced by charged particle radiation is the main cause of degradation of orbital-service solar cells, while the radiation-induced ionization shows no permanent damage effect on their electrical properties. It is reported that in single crystal silicon solar cells, low-energy electron radiation does not exert permanent degradation of their properties, but the fluence of electron radiation exerts an influence on the damage magnitude under the combined radiation of protons and electrons. The electrical properties of the single-junction GaAs/Ge solar cells were investigated after irradiation by sequential and synchronous electron and proton beams. Low-energy electron radiation showed no effects on the change of the solar cell properties during sequential or synchronous irradiation, implying ionization during particle radiation could not exert influence on the displacement damage process to the solar cells under the experimental conditions

  14. The effects of electron and proton radiation on GaSb infrared solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenbaum, P. E.; Avery, J. E.; Fraas, L. M.

    1991-01-01

    Gallium antimonide (GaSb) infrared solar cells were exposed to 1 MeV electrons and protons up to fluences of 1 times 10(exp 15) cm (-2) and 1 times 10(exp 12) cm (-2) respectively. In between exposures, current voltage and spectral response curves were taken. The GaSb cells were found to degrade slightly less than typical GaAs cells under electron irradiation, and calculations from spectral response curves showed that the damage coefficient for the minority carrier diffusion length was 3.5 times 10(exp 8). The cells degraded faster than GaAs cells under proton irradiation. However, researchers expect the top cell and coverglass to protect the GaSb cell from most damaging protons. Some annealing of proton damage was observed at low temperatures (80 to 160 C).

  15. Reducing the Cost of Proton Radiation Therapy: The Feasibility of a Streamlined Treatment Technique for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newhauser, Wayne D., E-mail: newhauser@lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Department of Physics, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Zhang, Rui [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Department of Physics, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Departments of Radiation Physics and Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Jones, Timothy G. [Departments of Radiation Physics and Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Department of Physics, Abilene Christian University, ACU Box 27963, Abilene, TX 79699 (United States); Giebeler, Annelise; Taddei, Phillip J. [Departments of Radiation Physics and Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Stewart, Robert D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 356043, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Lee, Andrew [Departments of Radiation Physics and Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Vassiliev, Oleg [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Department of Physics, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States)

    2015-04-24

    Proton radiation therapy is an effective modality for cancer treatments, but the cost of proton therapy is much higher compared to conventional radiotherapy and this presents a formidable barrier to most clinical practices that wish to offer proton therapy. Little attention in literature has been paid to the costs associated with collimators, range compensators and hypofractionation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of cost-saving modifications to the present standard of care for proton treatments for prostate cancer. In particular, we quantified the dosimetric impact of a treatment technique in which custom fabricated collimators were replaced with a multileaf collimator (MLC) and the custom range compensators (RC) were eliminated. The dosimetric impacts of these modifications were assessed for 10 patients with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) and confirmed with corresponding Monte Carlo simulations. We assessed the impact on lifetime risks of radiogenic second cancers using detailed dose reconstructions and predictive dose-risk models based on epidemiologic data. We also performed illustrative calculations, using an isoeffect model, to examine the potential for hypofractionation. Specifically, we bracketed plausible intervals of proton fraction size and total treatment dose that were equivalent to a conventional photon treatment of 79.2 Gy in 44 fractions. Our results revealed that eliminating the RC and using an MLC had negligible effect on predicted dose distributions and second cancer risks. Even modest hypofractionation strategies can yield substantial cost savings. Together, our results suggest that it is feasible to modify the standard of care to increase treatment efficiency, reduce treatment costs to patients and insurers, while preserving high treatment quality.

  16. Reducing the Cost of Proton Radiation Therapy: The Feasibility of a Streamlined Treatment Technique for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newhauser, Wayne D.; Zhang, Rui; Jones, Timothy G.; Giebeler, Annelise; Taddei, Phillip J.; Stewart, Robert D.; Lee, Andrew; Vassiliev, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    Proton radiation therapy is an effective modality for cancer treatments, but the cost of proton therapy is much higher compared to conventional radiotherapy and this presents a formidable barrier to most clinical practices that wish to offer proton therapy. Little attention in literature has been paid to the costs associated with collimators, range compensators and hypofractionation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of cost-saving modifications to the present standard of care for proton treatments for prostate cancer. In particular, we quantified the dosimetric impact of a treatment technique in which custom fabricated collimators were replaced with a multileaf collimator (MLC) and the custom range compensators (RC) were eliminated. The dosimetric impacts of these modifications were assessed for 10 patients with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) and confirmed with corresponding Monte Carlo simulations. We assessed the impact on lifetime risks of radiogenic second cancers using detailed dose reconstructions and predictive dose-risk models based on epidemiologic data. We also performed illustrative calculations, using an isoeffect model, to examine the potential for hypofractionation. Specifically, we bracketed plausible intervals of proton fraction size and total treatment dose that were equivalent to a conventional photon treatment of 79.2 Gy in 44 fractions. Our results revealed that eliminating the RC and using an MLC had negligible effect on predicted dose distributions and second cancer risks. Even modest hypofractionation strategies can yield substantial cost savings. Together, our results suggest that it is feasible to modify the standard of care to increase treatment efficiency, reduce treatment costs to patients and insurers, while preserving high treatment quality

  17. SU-E-T-37: A GPU-Based Pencil Beam Algorithm for Dose Calculations in Proton Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalantzis, G; Leventouri, T; Tachibana, H; Shang, C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Recent developments in radiation therapy have been focused on applications of charged particles, especially protons. Over the years several dose calculation methods have been proposed in proton therapy. A common characteristic of all these methods is their extensive computational burden. In the current study we present for the first time, to our best knowledge, a GPU-based PBA for proton dose calculations in Matlab. Methods: In the current study we employed an analytical expression for the protons depth dose distribution. The central-axis term is taken from the broad-beam central-axis depth dose in water modified by an inverse square correction while the distribution of the off-axis term was considered Gaussian. The serial code was implemented in MATLAB and was launched on a desktop with a quad core Intel Xeon X5550 at 2.67GHz with 8 GB of RAM. For the parallelization on the GPU, the parallel computing toolbox was employed and the code was launched on a GTX 770 with Kepler architecture. The performance comparison was established on the speedup factors. Results: The performance of the GPU code was evaluated for three different energies: low (50 MeV), medium (100 MeV) and high (150 MeV). Four square fields were selected for each energy, and the dose calculations were performed with both the serial and parallel codes for a homogeneous water phantom with size 300×300×300 mm3. The resolution of the PBs was set to 1.0 mm. The maximum speedup of ∼127 was achieved for the highest energy and the largest field size. Conclusion: A GPU-based PB algorithm for proton dose calculations in Matlab was presented. A maximum speedup of ∼127 was achieved. Future directions of the current work include extension of our method for dose calculation in heterogeneous phantoms

  18. Advanced composite materials and processes for the manufacture of SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) and RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) superconducting magnets used at cryogenic temperatures in a high radiation environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sondericker, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    Presently, BNL work on superconducting magnets centers mainly on the development of 17 meter length dipoles for the Superconducting Super Collider Project, approved for construction at Waxahatchie, Texas and 9.7 meter dipoles and quadrupoles for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, a BNL project to start construction next year. This paper will discuss the role of composites in the manufacture of magnets, their operational requirements in cryogenic and radiation environments, and the benefits derived from their use. 13 figs.

  19. Advanced composite materials and processes for the manufacture of SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] and RHIC [Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider] superconducting magnets used at cryogenic temperatures in a high radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sondericker, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    Presently, BNL work on superconducting magnets centers mainly on the development of 17 meter length dipoles for the Superconducting Super Collider Project, approved for construction at Waxahatchie, Texas and 9.7 meter dipoles and quadrupoles for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, a BNL project to start construction next year. This paper will discuss the role of composites in the manufacture of magnets, their operational requirements in cryogenic and radiation environments, and the benefits derived from their use. 13 figs

  20. Spectrum of relativistic radiation from electric charges and dipoles as they fall freely into a black hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shatskiy, A. A., E-mail: shatskiy@asc.rssi.ru; Novikov, I. D.; Lipatova, L. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Astrospace Center, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-06-15

    The motion of electric charges and dipoles falling radially and freely into a Schwarzschild black hole is considered. The inverse effect of the electromagnetic fields on the black hole is neglected. Since the dipole is assumed to be a point particle, the deformation due to the action of tidal forces on it is neglected. According to the theorem stating that 'black holes have no hair', the multipole electromagnetic fields should be completely radiated as a multipole falls into a black hole. The electromagnetic radiation power spectrum for these multipoles (a monopole and a dipole) has been found. Differences have been found in the spectra for different orientations of the falling dipole. A general method has been developed to find the radiated multipole electromagnetic fields for multipoles (including higher-order multipoles-quadrupoles, etc.) falling freely into a black hole. The calculated electromagnetic spectra can be compared with observational data from stellar-mass and smaller black holes.

  1. Spontaneous and stimulated undulator radiation by an ultra-relativistic positron channeling in a periodically bent crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, W.; Korol, A.V.; Solov'yov, A.V.; Greiner, W.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the radiation generated by positrons channeling in a crystalline undulator. The undulator is produced by periodically bending a single crystal with an amplitude much larger than the interplanar spacing. Different approaches for bending the crystal are described and the restrictions on the parameters of the bending are discussed. We also present numeric calculations of the spontaneous emitted radiation and estimate the conditions for stimulated emission. Our investigations show that the proposed mechanism could be an interesting source for high energy photons and is worth to be studied experimentally

  2. A full general relativistic neutrino radiation-hydrodynamics simulation of a collapsing very massive star and the formation of a black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Takami; Kotake, Kei; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl

    2018-06-01

    We study the final fate of a very massive star by performing full general relativistic (GR), three-dimensional (3D) simulation with three-flavour multi-energy neutrino transport. Utilizing a 70 solar mass zero-metallicity progenitor, we self-consistently follow the radiation-hydrodynamics from the onset of gravitational core-collapse until the second collapse of the proto-neutron star (PNS), leading to black hole (BH) formation. Our results show that the BH formation occurs at a post-bounce time of Tpb ˜ 300 ms for the 70 M⊙ star. This is significantly earlier than those in the literature where lower mass progenitors were employed. At a few ˜10 ms before BH formation, we find that the stalled bounce shock is revived by intense neutrino heating from the very hot PNS, which is aided by violent convection behind the shock. In the context of 3D-GR core-collapse modelling with multi-energy neutrino transport, our numerical results present the first evidence to validate a fallback BH formation scenario of the 70 M⊙ star.

  3. A full general relativistic neutrino radiation-hydrodynamics simulation of a collapsing very massive star and the formation of a black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Takami; Kotake, Kei; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl

    2018-04-01

    We study the final fate of a very massive star by performing full general relativistic (GR), three-dimensional (3D) simulation with three-flavor multi-energy neutrino transport. Utilizing a 70 solar mass zero metallicity progenitor, we self-consistently follow the radiation-hydrodynamics from the onset of gravitational core-collapse until the second collapse of the proto-neutron star (PNS), leading to black hole (BH) formation. Our results show that the BH formation occurs at a post-bounce time of Tpb ˜ 300 ms for the 70 M⊙ star. This is significantly earlier than those in the literature where lower mass progenitors were employed. At a few ˜10 ms before BH formation, we find that the stalled bounce shock is revived by intense neutrino heating from the very hot PNS, which is aided by violent convection behind the shock. In the context of 3D-GR core-collapse modeling with multi-energy neutrino transport, our numerical results present the first evidence to validate a fallback BH formation scenario of the 70M⊙ star.

  4. Relativistic shocks and particle acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavens, A.F.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the fluid dynamics of relativistic shock waves, and use the results to calculate the spectral index of particles accelerated by the Fermi process in such shocks. We have calculated the distributions of Fermi-accelerated particles at shocks propagating into cold proton-electron plasma and also cold electron-positron plasma. We have considered two different power spectra for the scattering waves, and find, in contrast to the non-relativistic case, that the spectral index of the accelerated particles depends on the wave power spectrum. On the assumption of thermal equilibrium both upstream and downstream, we present some useful fits for the compression ratio of shocks propagating at arbitrary speeds into gas of any temperature. (author)

  5. High energy proton induced radiation damage of rare earth permanent magnet quadrupoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanz, M.; Endres, M.; Löwe, K.; Lienig, T.; Deppert, O.; Lang, P. M.; Varentsov, D.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Gutfleisch, O.

    2017-12-01

    Permanent magnet quadrupoles (PMQs) are an alternative to common electromagnetic quadrupoles especially for fixed rigidity beam transport scenarios at particle accelerators. Using those magnets for experimental setups can result in certain scenarios, in which a PMQ itself may be exposed to a large amount of primary and secondary particles with a broad energy spectrum, interacting with the magnetic material and affecting its magnetic properties. One specific scenario is proton microscopy, where a proton beam traverses an object and a collimator in which a part of the beam is scattered and deflected into PMQs used as part of a diagnostic system. During the commissioning of the PRIOR (Proton Microscope for Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) high energy proton microscope facility prototype at Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung in 2014, a significant reduction of the image quality was observed which was partially attributed to the demagnetization of the used PMQ lenses and the corresponding decrease of the field quality. In order to study this phenomenon, Monte Carlo simulations were carried out and spare units manufactured from the same magnetic material—single wedges and a fully assembled PMQ module—were deliberately irradiated by a 3.6 GeV intense proton beam. The performed investigations have shown that in proton radiography applications the above described scattering may result in a high irradiation dose in the PMQ magnets. This did not only decrease the overall magnetic strength of the PMQs but also caused a significant degradation of the field quality of an assembled PMQ module by increasing the parasitic multipole field harmonics which effectively makes PMQs impractical for proton radiography applications or similar scenarios.

  6. Proton and γ-ray Induced Radiation Effects on 1 Gbit LPDDR SDRAM Fabricated on Epitaxial Wafer for Space Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Young Park

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We present proton-induced single event effects (SEEs and γ-ray-induced total ionizing dose (TID data for 1 Gbit lowpower double data rate synchronous dynamic random access memory (LPDDR SDRAM fabricated on a 5 μm epitaxial layer (54 nm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS technology. We compare our radiation tolerance data for LPDDR SDRAM with those of general DDR SDRAM. The data confirms that our devices under test (DUTs are potential candidates for space flight applications.

  7. Fractionated, three-dimensional, planning-assisted proton-radiation therapy for orbital rhabdomyosarcoma: a novel technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hug, Eugen B.; Adams, Judy; Fitzek, Markus; Vries, Alexander de; Munzenrider, John E.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Most children with orbital rhabdomyosarcoma will survive their disease. However, conventional photon-radiation treatment, as part of multimodality therapy, results in varying degrees of long-term functional and cosmetic side effects. This report introduces external beam proton radiation therapy (PRT) as a conformal, three-dimensional planned radiation technique for this disease, analyzes normal tissue dosimetry, and describes the technique's application in the first 2 patients. Material and Methods: Between January 1995 and February 1996, 2 patients underwent PRT following biopsy and chemotherapy for orbital rhabdomyosarcoma. Fifty and 55 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) were delivered to the gross tumor volume and 40 CGE to clinical target volumes in both patients. A relative biologic effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1 was utilized to correlate proton dose calculations with CGE. To achieve dose conformity, a ''patch technique'' was utilized, where target regions were divided into segments, each treated by a separate proton field. Dose-volume histograms were obtained for target and nontarget regions, including lens, bony orbit, pituitary gland, optic chiasm, optic nerves, lacrimal gland, and ipsilateral frontal and temporal lobes. Results: At 3.4 and 2.5 years after PRT, both patients are clinically and radiographically free of disease. Visual acuity remains excellent, without signs of cataract formation; pituitary function is normal; cosmetically, only mild enophthalmos is noticeable. Doses to 90%, 50%, and 5% of lens volume were kept at less than 1%, less than 2%, and less than 8%, respectively. Fifty percent of lacrimal gland volume received less than 36% of the prescribed dose and 50% of the volume of the optic chiasm, pituitary gland, and hypothalamus were restricted to less than 2%. Proton conformity to orbital contents resulted in between 9% and 36% of the prescribed dose reaching the ipsilateral temporal and frontal lobes immediately adjacent to bony orbit (5

  8. Radiation protection measurements with the variance-covariance method in the stray radiation fields from photon and proton therapy facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillhök, J.; Persson, L.; Andersen, Claus E.

    2017-01-01

    , the dose-average lineal energy, the dose-average quality factor and the dose equivalent. The neutron component measured by the detectors at the proton beam was studied through Monte Carlo simulations using the code MCNP6. In the photon beam the stray absorbed dose ranged between 0.3 and 2.4 μGy per monitor...

  9. Extension of TOPAS for the simulation of proton radiation effects considering molecular and cellular endpoints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polster, Lisa; Schuemann, Jan; Rinaldi, Ilaria; McNamara, Aimee L; Paganetti, Harald; Burigo, Lucas; Stewart, Robert D; Attili, Andrea; Carlson, David J; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Ramos Méndez, José; Faddegon, Bruce; Perl, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to extend a widely used proton Monte Carlo tool, TOPAS, towards the modeling of relative biological effect (RBE) distributions in experimental arrangements as well as patients.TOPAS provides a software core which users configure by writing parameter files to, for instance, define application specific geometries and scoring conditions. Expert users may further extend TOPAS scoring capabilities by plugging in their own additional C++ code. This structure was utilized for the implementation of eight biophysical models suited to calculate proton RBE. As far as physics parameters are concerned, four of these models are based on the proton linear energy transfer, while the others are based on DNA double strand break induction and the frequency-mean specific energy, lineal energy, or delta electron generated track structure. The biological input parameters for all models are typically inferred from fits of the models to radiobiological experiments.The model structures have been implemented in a coherent way within the TOPAS architecture. Their performance was validated against measured experimental data on proton RBE in a spread-out Bragg peak using V79 Chinese Hamster cells.This work is an important step in bringing biologically optimized treatment planning for proton therapy closer to the clinical practice as it will allow researchers to refine and compare pre-defined as well as user-defined models. (paper)

  10. Proton and neutron radiation in cancer treatment: clinical and economic outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleurette, F.; Charvet-Protat, S.

    1996-01-01

    The French National Agency for Medical Evaluation (ANDEM) was requested to assess the effectiveness of proton and neutron beam therapy in cancer treatment compared to conventional radiotherapy. This task was accomplished by a critical appraisal of the clinical and economic literature. According to the published economic literature and the capital and staffing cost analysis, it appears that the costs of proton therapy are likely to be two or three times greater than those conformal therapy. According to the published clinical literature, proton beam therapy should be proposed as a routine treatment only for uveal melanoma and skull base cancers. Neutron beam therapy should be proposed as a routine treatment for inoperable salivary gland tumors; its use may be also discussed in cases of stage C-D1 prostate cancers and soft tissue sarcomas. Based on the current scientific evidence and given the incidence rate of these tumors, the time and material requirements, the current French proton/neutron beam facilities are able to meet the current demand. FOr other cancers the medical and economic potential of proton therapy is still an open question. (author)

  11. Radiation from a Relativistic Electron Beam in a Molecular Medium due to Parametric Pumping by a Strong Electromagnetic Wave,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 4WJD ASTRONOMY COLLG PAM A 2 3i 81 4 30) 235. RADIATION FROM A .ELATIVISTIC_§LECTRON BEAM IN AZOLECULAR...A MOLECULAR MEDIUM DUE TO PARAMETRIC PUMPING BY A STRONG ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVE L. Stenflo Department of Plasma Physics Umel University S-90187 Umel...GUteborg, Sweden and Laboratory for Plasma and Fusion Energy Studies University of Maryland College Park, Maryland 20742 Physics Publication Number 81

  12. Spot-scanning beam proton therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy for ipsilateral head and neck malignancies: A treatment planning comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandula, Shravan; Zhu, Xiaorong; Garden, Adam S.; Gillin, Michael; Rosenthal, David I.; Ang, Kie-Kian; Mohan, Radhe; Amin, Mayankkumar V.; Garcia, John A.; Wu, Richard; Sahoo, Narayan; Frank, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy for head and neck malignancies can have side effects that impede quality of life. Theoretically, proton therapy can reduce treatment-related morbidity by minimizing the dose to critical normal tissues. We evaluated the feasibility of spot-scanning proton therapy for head and neck malignancies and compared dosimetry between those plans and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. Plans from 5 patients who had undergone IMRT for primary tumors of the head and neck were used for planning proton therapy. Both sets of plans were prepared using computed tomography (CT) scans with the goals of achieving 100% of the prescribed dose to the clinical target volume (CTV) and 95% to the planning TV (PTV) while maximizing conformity to the PTV. Dose-volume histograms were generated and compared, as were conformity indexes (CIs) to the PTVs and mean doses to the organs at risk (OARs). Both modalities in all cases achieved 100% of the dose to the CTV and 95% to the PTV. Mean PTV CIs were comparable (0.371 IMRT, 0.374 protons, p = 0.953). Mean doses were significantly lower in the proton plans to the contralateral submandibular (638.7 cGy IMRT, 4.3 cGy protons, p = 0.002) and parotid (533.3 cGy IMRT, 48.5 cGy protons, p = 0.003) glands; oral cavity (1760.4 cGy IMRT, 458.9 cGy protons, p = 0.003); spinal cord (2112.4 cGy IMRT, 249.2 cGy protons, p = 0.002); and brainstem (1553.52 cGy IMRT, 166.2 cGy protons, p = 0.005). Proton plans also produced lower maximum doses to the spinal cord (3692.1 cGy IMRT, 2014.8 cGy protons, p = 0.034) and brainstem (3412.1 cGy IMRT, 1387.6 cGy protons, p = 0.005). Normal tissue V 10 , V 30 , and V 50 values were also significantly lower in the proton plans. We conclude that spot-scanning proton therapy can significantly reduce the integral dose to head and neck critical structures. Prospective studies are underway to determine if this reduced dose translates to improved quality of life

  13. Radiation tests of the EMU spacesuit for the International SpaceStation using energetic protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeitlin, C.; Heilbronn, L.; Miller, J.; Shavers, M.

    2001-06-04

    Measurements using silicon detectors to characterize theradiation transmitted through the EMU spacesuit and a human phantom havebeen performed using 155 and 250 MeV proton beams at the Loma LindaUniversity Medical Center (LLUMC). The beams simulate radiationencountered in space, where trapped protons having kinetic energies onthe order of 100 MeV are copious. Protons with 100 MeV kinetic energy andabove can penetrate many centimeters of water of other light materials,so that astronauts exposed to such energetic particles will receive dosesto their internal organs. This dose can be enhanced or reduced byshielding - either from the spacesuit or the self-shielding of the body -but minimization of the risk depends on details of the incident particleflux (in particular the energy spectrum) and on the dose responses of thevarious critical organs.

  14. Can active proton interrogation find shielded nuclear threats at human-safe radiation levels?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liew, Seth Van, E-mail: vanliew@gmail.com

    2017-05-21

    A new method of low-dose proton radiography is presented. The system is composed of an 800 MeV proton source, bending magnets, and compact detectors, and is designed for drive-through cargo scanning. The system has been simulated using GEANT4. Material identification algorithms and pixel sorting methods are presented that allow the system to perform imaging at doses low enough to scan passenger vehicles and people. Results are presented on imaging efficacy of various materials and cluttered cargoes. The identification of shielded nuclear materials at human-safe doses has been demonstrated.

  15. A Deterministic Electron, Photon, Proton and Heavy Ion Radiation Transport Suite for the Study of the Jovian System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Badavi, Francis F.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Atwell, William

    2011-01-01

    A deterministic suite of radiation transport codes, developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), which describe the transport of electrons, photons, protons, and heavy ions in condensed media is used to simulate exposures from spectral distributions typical of electrons, protons and carbon-oxygen-sulfur (C-O-S) trapped heavy ions in the Jovian radiation environment. The particle transport suite consists of a coupled electron and photon deterministic transport algorithm (CEPTRN) and a coupled light particle and heavy ion deterministic transport algorithm (HZETRN). The primary purpose for the development of the transport suite is to provide a means for the spacecraft design community to rapidly perform numerous repetitive calculations essential for electron, proton and heavy ion radiation exposure assessments in complex space structures. In this paper, the radiation environment of the Galilean satellite Europa is used as a representative boundary condition to show the capabilities of the transport suite. While the transport suite can directly access the output electron spectra of the Jovian environment as generated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Galileo Interim Radiation Electron (GIRE) model of 2003; for the sake of relevance to the upcoming Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM), the 105 days at Europa mission fluence energy spectra provided by JPL is used to produce the corresponding dose-depth curve in silicon behind an aluminum shield of 100 mils ( 0.7 g/sq cm). The transport suite can also accept ray-traced thickness files from a computer-aided design (CAD) package and calculate the total ionizing dose (TID) at a specific target point. In that regard, using a low-fidelity CAD model of the Galileo probe, the transport suite was verified by comparing with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for orbits JOI--J35 of the Galileo extended mission (1996-2001). For the upcoming EJSM mission with a potential launch date of 2020, the transport suite is used to compute

  16. Clinical Outcomes and Late Endocrine, Neurocognitive, and Visual Profiles of Proton Radiation for Pediatric Low-Grade Gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberger, Benjamin A.; Pulsifer, Margaret B.; Ebb, David H.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Jones, Robin M.; Butler, William E.; Huang, Mary S.; Marcus, Karen J.; Oberg, Jennifer A.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): Primary low-grade gliomas are common brain tumors of childhood, many of which require radiation therapy (RT) as definitive treatment. Increased conformality of RT could decrease the incidence and severity of late effects. We report our experience with 32 pediatric patients treated with proton RT. Methods and Materials: Thirty-two pediatric patients with low-grade gliomas of the brain or spinal cord were treated with proton RT from 1995 to 2007. Sixteen patients received at least 1 regimen of chemotherapy before definitive RT. The median radiation dose was 52.2 Gy RBE (48.6-54 Gy RBE ). Results: The median age at treatment was 11.0 years (range, 2.7-21.5 years), with a median follow-up time of 7.6 years (range, 3.2-18.2 years). The 6-year and 8-year rates of progression-free survival were 89.7% and 82.8%, respectively, with an 8-year overall survival of 100%. For the subset of patients who received serial neurocognitive testing, there were no significant declines in Full-Scale Intelligence Quotient (P=.80), with a median neurocognitive testing interval of 4.5 years (range, 1.2-8.1 years) from baseline to follow-up, but subgroup analysis indicated some significant decline in neurocognitive outcomes for young children (<7 years) and those with significant dose to the left temporal lobe/hippocampus. The incidence of endocrinopathy correlated with a mean dose of ≥40 Gy RBE to the hypothalamus, pituitary, or optic chiasm. Stabilization or improvement of visual acuity was achieved in 83.3% of patients at risk for radiation-induced injury to the optic pathways. Conclusions: This report of late effects in children with low-grade gliomas after proton RT is encouraging. Proton RT appears to be associated with good clinical outcome, especially when the tumor location allows for increased sparing of the left temporal lobe, hippocampus, and hypothalamic-pituitary axis

  17. Clinical Outcomes and Late Endocrine, Neurocognitive, and Visual Profiles of Proton Radiation for Pediatric Low-Grade Gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberger, Benjamin A. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Pulsifer, Margaret B. [Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ebb, David H. [Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); MacDonald, Shannon M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Jones, Robin M. [Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Butler, William E. [Department of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Huang, Mary S. [Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Marcus, Karen J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Oberg, Jennifer A. [Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York (United States); Tarbell, Nancy J. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Yock, Torunn I., E-mail: tyock@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): Primary low-grade gliomas are common brain tumors of childhood, many of which require radiation therapy (RT) as definitive treatment. Increased conformality of RT could decrease the incidence and severity of late effects. We report our experience with 32 pediatric patients treated with proton RT. Methods and Materials: Thirty-two pediatric patients with low-grade gliomas of the brain or spinal cord were treated with proton RT from 1995 to 2007. Sixteen patients received at least 1 regimen of chemotherapy before definitive RT. The median radiation dose was 52.2 Gy{sub RBE} (48.6-54 Gy{sub RBE}). Results: The median age at treatment was 11.0 years (range, 2.7-21.5 years), with a median follow-up time of 7.6 years (range, 3.2-18.2 years). The 6-year and 8-year rates of progression-free survival were 89.7% and 82.8%, respectively, with an 8-year overall survival of 100%. For the subset of patients who received serial neurocognitive testing, there were no significant declines in Full-Scale Intelligence Quotient (P=.80), with a median neurocognitive testing interval of 4.5 years (range, 1.2-8.1 years) from baseline to follow-up, but subgroup analysis indicated some significant decline in neurocognitive outcomes for young children (<7 years) and those with significant dose to the left temporal lobe/hippocampus. The incidence of endocrinopathy correlated with a mean dose of ≥40 Gy{sub RBE} to the hypothalamus, pituitary, or optic chiasm. Stabilization or improvement of visual acuity was achieved in 83.3% of patients at risk for radiation-induced injury to the optic pathways. Conclusions: This report of late effects in children with low-grade gliomas after proton RT is encouraging. Proton RT appears to be associated with good clinical outcome, especially when the tumor location allows for increased sparing of the left temporal lobe, hippocampus, and hypothalamic-pituitary axis.

  18. Relative biological efficiency of 592 MeV protons. Analysis of the biological effect of secondary radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legeay, G.; Baarli, J.

    1968-01-01

    The relative biological efficiency (RBE) of high energy protons is of importance because of their effects in the field of radioprotection around large accelerators and during space-flights. The nature of the interactions between 592 MeV protons and biological tissues makes it necessary to take into consideration the contribution of secondary radiation to the biological effect. Since it is not possible to obtain from a synchrotron a beam having a sufficiently large cross-section to irradiate large animals, one has to resort to certain devices concerning the mode of exposure when small laboratory animals are used. By irradiating rats individually and in groups, and by using the lethal test as a function of time, the authors show that the value of the RBE is different for animals of the same species having the same biological parameters. Thus there appears an increase in the biological effect due to secondary radiation produced in nuclear cascades which develop in a large volume, for example that of a human being. (author) [fr

  19. Radiation damage and defect behavior in proton irradiated lithium-counterdoped n/sup +/p silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stupica, J.; Goradia, C.; Swartz, C.K.; Weinberg, I.

    1987-01-01

    Two lithium-counterdoped n/sup +/p silicon solar cells with different lithium concentrations were irradiated by 10 MeV protons. Cell performance was measured as a function of fluence, and it was found that the cell with the highest concentration of lithium had the higher radiation resistance. Deep level defects were studied using deep level transient spectroscopy which yielded two defects that were lithium related. Relating the defect energy levels obtained from this study under 10 MeV protons, with an earlier work using 1 MeV electron irradiations shows no correlation of the defect energy levels. There is one marked comparison though. The absence of the boron interstitial-oxygen interstitial defect. This consistency strengthens the belief that lithium interacts with oxygen to prevent the formation of the boron interstitial-oxygen interstitial defect. The present results indicate that, in general, addition of lithium in small amounts to the p-base of a boron doped silicon solar cell such that the base remains p-type, tends to increase the radiation resistance of the cell

  20. Delayed Cardiomyocyte Response to Total Body Particle Radiation Exposure - Identification of Regulatory Gene Network [proton

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We examined molecular responses using transcriptome profiling in isolated left ventricular murine cardiomyocytes to 90 cGy 1 GeV proton (1H) and 15 cGy 1 GeV/nucleon...

  1. A Physical Model of the Proton Radiation Belts of Jupiter inside Europa's Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nénon, Q.; Sicard, A.; Kollmann, P.; Garrett, H. B.; Sauer, S. P. A.; Paranicas, C.

    2018-05-01

    A physical model of the Jovian trapped protons with kinetic energies higher than 1 MeV inward of the orbit of the icy moon Europa is presented. The model, named Salammbô, takes into account the radial diffusion process, the absorption effect of the Jovian moons, and the Coulomb collisions and charge exchanges with the cold plasma and neutral populations of the inner Jovian magnetosphere. Preliminary modeling of the wave-particle interaction with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves near the moon Io is also performed. Salammbô is validated against in situ proton measurements of Pioneer 10, Pioneer 11, Voyager 1, Galileo Probe, and Galileo Orbiter. A prominent feature of the MeV proton intensity distribution in the modeled area is the 2 orders of magnitude flux depletion observed in MeV measurements near the orbit of Io. Our simulations reveal that this is not due to direct interactions with the moon or its neutral environment but results from scattering of the protons by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves.

  2. A physical model of the proton radiation belts of Jupiter inside Europa’s orbit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nénon, Quentin; Sicard, Angelica; Kollmann, Peter

    2018-01-01

    A physical model of the Jovian trapped protons with kinetic energies higher than 1 MeV inward of the orbit of the icy moon Europa is presented. The model, named Salammbô, takes into account the radial diffusion process, the absorption effect of the Jovian moons, and the Coulomb collisions and cha...

  3. Radiative pion-proton scattering in the static Chew--Low model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho-Kim, Q.; Lavine, J.P.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a nonrelativistic calculation of π/sup +-/-proton bremsstrahlung cross sections at the pion laboratory kinetic energy of 298 MeV for backward photon angles is presented. The πp interaction is described by the static Chew-Low model

  4. Radiation damage to uracil and water by proton and electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheier, P.; Hanel, G.; Denifl, S; Gstir, B.; Maerk, T.D.; Farizon, B.; Farizon, M.; Coupier, B.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The inelastic interaction of protons (in the energy range from 20 keV to 150 keV) and electrons (from thermal energies up to 20 eV) with water and uracil, the latter a building block of the RNA has been studied in two laboratories with specially designed experimental setups. These measurements are motivated from a present lack of understanding how on a molecular level damage to living cells and organisms is caused. A unique way of simultaneous detection of the product ions after swift proton (or hydrogen) impact and the analysis of the charge state of the projectile after the collision allows to distinguish between direct ionization (e.g., projectile remains a proton) and electron capture events (e.g., proton becomes neutralized). The latter process turns out to be more destructive, i.e. leads to a higher yield of fragmentation. For electrons both the formation of positively and negatively charged ions has been investigated. We discovered that already thermal electrons lead with a rather large cross section to a dissociation of the uracil molecule producing an anion and a fast hydrogen radical. (author)

  5. Dependence of the multiplicity of relativistic charged particles on the atomic number in interactions between pi /sup -/ mesons with a 17 GeV/sec pulse and between protons with 60 GeV/sec and 67 GeV/sec pulses on photoemulsion nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Maslennikova, N V; Melnichuk, T A; Tretakova, M I

    1972-01-01

    Full account of experiments with the photo-emulsion G5 being irradiated by pi /sup -/ mesons by the CERN accelerator and the photo- emulsions BR-2 and BRx4y being irradiated by protons by the Serpukhov accelerator is presented, supported by tables and histograms. Nuclear interactions, discovered along the trace, and the division criteria between interactions of light nuclei (CNO) and heavy nuclei (AgBr) are studied. All interactions are grouped under quasi-nuclear, light nuclei and heavy nuclei, and their distribution with differing quantities of relativistic particles n/sub s/ and heavily ionized particles N/sub h/ is explained and discussed. (5 refs).

  6. Can We Advance Proton Therapy for Prostate? Considering Alternative Beam Angles and Relative Biological Effectiveness Variations When Comparing Against Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Underwood, Tracy, E-mail: tunderwood@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Moteabbed, Maryam; Zietman, Anthony; Efstathiou, Jason; Paganetti, Harald; Lu, Hsiao-Ming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: For prostate treatments, robust evidence regarding the superiority of either intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or proton therapy is currently lacking. In this study we investigated the circumstances under which proton therapy should be expected to outperform IMRT, particularly the proton beam orientations and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) assumptions. Methods and Materials: For 8 patients, 4 treatment planning strategies were considered: (A) IMRT; (B) passively scattered standard bilateral (SB) proton beams; (C) passively scattered anterior oblique (AO) proton beams, and (D) AO intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). For modalities (B)-(D) the dose and linear energy transfer (LET) distributions were simulated using the TOPAS Monte Carlo platform and RBE was calculated according to 3 different models. Results: Assuming a fixed RBE of 1.1, our implementation of IMRT outperformed SB proton therapy across most normal tissue metrics. For the scattered AO proton plans, application of the variable RBE models resulted in substantial hotspots in rectal RBE weighted dose. For AO IMPT, it was typically not possible to find a plan that simultaneously met the tumor and rectal constraints for both fixed and variable RBE models. Conclusion: If either a fixed RBE of 1.1 or a variable RBE model could be validated in vivo, then it would always be possible to use AO IMPT to dose-boost the prostate and improve normal tissue sparing relative to IMRT. For a cohort without rectum spacer gels, this study (1) underlines the importance of resolving the question of proton RBE within the framework of an IMRT versus proton debate for the prostate and (2) highlights that without further LET/RBE model validation, great care must be taken if AO proton fields are to be considered for prostate treatments.

  7. Compton scattering and electron-atom scattering in an elliptically polarized laser field of relativistic radiation power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panek, P.; Kaminski, J.Z.; Ehlotzky, F.

    2003-01-01

    Presently available laser sources can yield powers for which the ponderomotive energy of an electron U p can be equal to or even larger than the rest energy mc 2 of an electron. Therefore it has become of interest to consider fundamental radiation-induced or assisted processes in such powerful laser fields. In the present work we consider laser-induced Compton scattering and laser-assisted electron atom scattering in such fields, assuming that the laser beam has arbitrary elliptic polarization. We investigate in detail the angular and polarisation dependence of the differential cross-sections of the two laser-induced or laser-assisted nonlinear processes as a function of the order N of absorbed or emitted laser photons ω. The present work is a generalization of our previous analysis of Compton scattering and electron-atom scattering in a linearly polarized laser field. (authors)

  8. Limits and signatures of relativistic spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurtsever, Ulvi; Wilkinson, Steven

    2018-01-01

    While special relativity imposes an absolute speed limit at the speed of light, our Universe is not empty Minkowski spacetime. The constituents that fill the interstellar/intergalactic vacuum, including the cosmic microwave background photons, impose a lower speed limit on any object travelling at relativistic velocities. Scattering of cosmic microwave photons from an ultra-relativistic object may create radiation with a characteristic signature allowing the detection of such objects at large distances.

  9. The RaDIATE High-Energy Proton Materials Irradiation Experiment at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammigan, Kavin; et al.

    2017-05-01

    The RaDIATE collaboration (Radiation Damage In Accelerator Target Environments) was founded in 2012 to bring together the high-energy accelerator target and nuclear materials communities to address the challenging issue of radiation damage effects in beam-intercepting materials. Success of current and future high intensity accelerator target facilities requires a fundamental understanding of these effects including measurement of materials property data. Toward this goal, the RaDIATE collaboration organized and carried out a materials irradiation run at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer facility (BLIP). The experiment utilized a 181 MeV proton beam to irradiate several capsules, each containing many candidate material samples for various accelerator components. Materials included various grades/alloys of beryllium, graphite, silicon, iridium, titanium, TZM, CuCrZr, and aluminum. Attainable peak damage from an 8-week irradiation run ranges from 0.03 DPA (Be) to 7 DPA (Ir). Helium production is expected to range from 5 appm/DPA (Ir) to 3,000 appm/DPA (Be). The motivation, experimental parameters, as well as the post-irradiation examination plans of this experiment are described.

  10. The ionisation loss of relativistic charged particles in thin gas samples and its use for particle identification. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, J.H.; Allison, W.W.M.; Bunch, J.N.

    1976-01-01

    A brief review shows a significant discrepancy between available data and theoretical predictions on the ionisation loss of charged particles in thin gas-filled proportional counters. The discrepancy related both to the increase of the most probable loss at relativistic velocities (relativistic rise) and to the spectrum of such losses at a given velocity (the Landau distribution). The origin of this relativistic rise is discussed in simple terms and related to the phenomena of transition radiation and Cherenkov radiation. It is shown that the failure of the prediction is due to the small number of ionising collisions in a gas. This problem is overcome by using a Monte Carlo method rather than a continuous integral over the spectrum of single collision processes. A specific mode of the atomic form factors is used with a modified Born approximation to yield the differential cross sections needed for the calculation. The new predictions give improved agreement with experiment and are used to investigate the problem of identifying particles of known momenta in the relativistic region. It is shown that by measuring the ionisation loss of each particle several hundred times over 5m or more, kaon, pion and proton separation with good confidence level may be achieved. Many gases are considered and a comparison is made. The results are also compared with the velocity resolution achievable by measuring primary ionisation. (Auth.)

  11. The relativistic virial theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucha, W.; Schoeberl, F.F.

    1989-11-01

    The relativistic generalization of the quantum-mechanical virial theorem is derived and used to clarify the connection between the nonrelativistic and (semi-)relativistic treatment of bound states. 12 refs. (Authors)

  12. Multiwavelength Observations of Relativistic Jets from General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Anantua

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This work summarizes a program intended to unify three burgeoning branches of the high-energy astrophysics of relativistic jets: general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD simulations of ever-increasing dynamical range, the microphysical theory of particle acceleration under relativistic conditions, and multiwavelength observations resolving ever-decreasing spatiotemporal scales. The process, which involves converting simulation output into time series of images and polarization maps that can be directly compared to observations, is performed by (1 self-consistently prescribing models for emission, absorption, and particle acceleration and (2 performing time-dependent polarized radiative transfer. M87 serves as an exemplary prototype for this investigation due to its prominent and well-studied jet and the imminent prospect of learning much more from Event Horizon Telescope (EHT observations this year. Synthetic observations can be directly compared with real observations for observational signatures such as jet instabilities, collimation, relativistic beaming, and polarization. The simplest models described adopt the standard equipartition hypothesis; other models calculate emission by relating it to current density or shear. These models are intended for application to the radio jet instead of the higher frequency emission, the disk and the wind, which will be subjects of future investigations.

  13. Fundamentals of relativistic particle beam optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornacchia, M.

    1995-12-01

    This lecture introduces the nonaccelerator-specialist to the motion of charged particles in a Storage Ring. The topics of discussion are restricted to the linear and nonlinear dynamics of a single particle in the transverse plane, i.e., the plane perpendicular to the direction of motion. The major omissions for a complete review of accelerator theory, for which a considerable literature exists, are the energy and phase oscillations (1). Other important accelerator physics aspects not treated here are the collective instabilities (2), the role of synchrotron radiation in electron storage rings (3), scattering processes (4), and beam-beam effects in colliding beam facilities (5). Much of the discussion that follows applies equally well to relativistic electron, proton, or ion synchrotrons. In this narrative, we refer to the particle as electron. After a broad overview, the magnetic forces acting on the electrons and the associated differential equations of motion are discussed. Solutions of the equations are given without derivation; the method of solution is outlined. and references for deeper studies are given. In this paper, the word electron is used to signify electron or positron. The dynamics of a single particle are not affected by the sign of its charge when the magnetic field direction is changed accordingly

  14. An investigation of relativistic microscopic optical potential in terms of relativistic Brueckner-Bethe-Goldstone equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Baoqiu; Ma Zhongyu

    1992-01-01

    Relativistic microscopic optical potential of nucleon-nucleus is derived from the relativistic Brueckner-Bethe-Goldstone (RBBG) equation. The complex effective mass of a nucleon is determined by a fit to 200 MeV p- 40 Ca scattering data. The relativistic microscopic optical potentials with this effective mass are obtained from RBBG for p- 16O , 40 Ca, 90 Zr and 208 Pb scattering in energy range from 160 to 800 MeV. The microscopic optical potential is used to study the proton- 40 Ca scattering problem at 200 MeV. The results, such as differential cross section, analyzing power and spin rotation function are compared with those calculated from phenomenological relativistic optical potential

  15. On the parametrization of lateral dose profiles in proton radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Embriaco, A

    2015-01-01

    Hadrontherapy requires a good knowledge of the physical interactions of the particles when they cross the biological tissue: one of the aspects that determine the characterization of the beam is the study of the lateral profile. We study different parametrizations for the lateral dose profile of protons beam in water considering different energies at different depth. We compare six functions: we start from the well known Gaussian and Double Gaussian parametrizations and also analyse more recent parametrization obtained with Triple Gaussian and Double Gaussian Lorentz-Cauchy functions. Finally we propose alternative parametrizations based on the Gauss-Rutherford and Gauss-Levy functions. The goal is to improve the performances of the actual treatment planning used in proton beam therapy by suggesting alternative approaches to the Gaussian description typically employed.

  16. Radiative proton capture to the first excited state of sup 29 P nucleus at subbarrier energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matulewicz, T; Dabrowska, M; Decowski, P; Kicinska-Habior, M; Sikora, B [Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. Fizyki Doswiadczalnej; Toke, J [Rochester Univ., NY (USA). Nuclear Structure Research Lab.; Somorjai, E [Magyar Tudomanyos Akademia, Debrecen (Hungary). Atommag Kutato Intezete

    1985-08-01

    Differential cross sections at 0 deg and 90 deg measured for {sup 28}Si(p,{gamma}{sub 1}){sup 29}P reaction at proton energy range 2.3-2.9 MeV have been analyzed in terms of the direct-semidirect capture model extended by the effective potential approach. Spectroscopic factor of the first excited states of {sup 29}P nucleus was found to be 0.10+-0.05. 9 refs., 1 fig. (author).

  17. Differential cross section measurement of radiative capture of protons by nuclei 13C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baktibayev, M.K.; Burminskii, V.P.; Burtebayev, N.; Jazairov-Kakhramanov, V.; Kadyrzhanov, K.K.; Sagindykov, Sh.Sh.; Zarifov, R.A.; Zazulin, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    The reaction 13 C(p,γ ) 14 N is the important one for the astrophysics, not only for nuclear synthesis of CNO elements, but also for nuclear synthesis of elements participating in subsequent combustion of helium [1]. The predominant yield of the reaction occurs at protons energies of less than 1 MeV. However, the clearness of the capture mechanism in this energy region is made difficult because of the superposition of the contribution of the low - energy part of the resonance 1320 keV onto the cross section. Last experimental data for a wider energy region, informed in the work [1], and results of previous works, mentioned in that work, give reason for further continuation of the study of the reaction 13 C(p,γ ) 14 N. Measured data of the work [1] in the region of E P = (320 - 900) keV at the angles of 0 o and 90 o are obviously insufficient. In the present work measurements of differential cross sections of the reaction were carried out at protons energies E P = 991 - 365 keV, the accuracy is not worse than 10%. There was studied the most (from the astrophysical point of view) important process of protons capture by 13 C nuclei onto the ground state of the 14 N nucleus. The theoretical investigation of the given reaction included calculation of cross sections. The cross sections were calculated within the framework of model of direct capture with the using of optical potentials for the description of a channel of scattering. The wave functions of a bound state were generated in a potential reproducing binding energy of a proton in 14 N nucleus. Results of calculations were compared with the experimental data. (author)

  18. SU-E-T-549: Modeling Relative Biological Effectiveness of Protons for Radiation Induced Brain Necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirkovic, D; Peeler, C; Grosshans, D; Titt, U; Taleei, R; Mohan, R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a model of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of protons as a function of dose and linear energy transfer (LET) for induction of brain necrosis using clinical data. Methods: In this study, treatment planning information was exported from a clinical treatment planning system (TPS) and used to construct a detailed Monte Carlo model of the patient and the beam delivery system. The physical proton dose and LET were computed in each voxel of the patient volume using Monte Carlo particle transport. A follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study registered to the treatment planning CT was used to determine the region of the necrosis in the brain volume. Both, the whole brain and the necrosis volumes were segmented from the computed tomography (CT) dataset using the contours drawn by a physician and the corresponding voxels were binned with respect to dose and LET. The brain necrosis probability was computed as a function of dose and LET by dividing the total volume of all necrosis voxels with a given dose and LET with the corresponding total brain volume resulting in a set of NTCP-like curves (probability as a function of dose parameterized by LET). Results: The resulting model shows dependence on both dose and LET indicating the weakness of the constant RBE model for describing the brain toxicity. To the best of our knowledge the constant RBE model is currently used in all clinical applications which may Result in increased rate of brain toxicities in patients treated with protons. Conclusion: Further studies are needed to develop more accurate brain toxicity models for patients treated with protons and other heavy ions

  19. Radiation defects and electron disordering in proton-irradiated diamond films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschenko, V.E.; Soloviev, G.G.

    1991-01-01

    The absorption spectra are studied in the region of the fundamental absorption band and its longwave boundary for the 0.6 μm thick diamond films deposited onto Al 2 O 3 single crystal underlayers and irradiated by 100 keV and 50 keV protons at fluences of 10 13 -10 16 cm -2 . The E 0 β (6.10-5.9eV) and E 0 α (5.51-5.43eV) maxima and the exponential tails towards lower energies are resolved in the spectra of initial films. The halfwidths of the maxima and a weak temperature dependence of their parameters and of the Urbach tail slope are indicative of disordering of the film structure. The intrinsic maxima near and above the indirect absorption boundary in diamond Γ 25 '-Δ are identified with transitions in the disordered cubic and hexagonal phases of the diamond films. The proton irradiation stimulates the intensity redistribution of the intrinsic maxima, the absorption enhancement, and the change of the Urbach tail slope. The character of radiolysis has been found to depend on the composition of the nonirradiated carbon films and on proton fluence. (author). 8 refs.; 3 figs

  20. Proton radiation therapy for retinoblastoma: Comparison of various intraocular tumor locations and beam arrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krengli, Marco; Hug, Eugen B.; Adams, Judy A.; Smith, Alfred R.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Munzenrider, John E.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To study the optimization of proton beam arrangements for various intraocular tumor locations; and to correlate isodose distributions with various target and nontarget structures. Methods and materials: We considered posterior-central, nasal, and temporal tumor locations, with straight, intrarotated, or extrarotated eye positions. Doses of 46 cobalt grey equivalent (CGE) to gross tumor volume (GTV) and 40 CGE to clinical target volume (CTV) (2 CGE per fraction) were assumed. Using three-dimensional planning, we compared isodose distributions for lateral, anterolateral oblique, and anteromedial oblique beams and dose-volume histograms of CTVs, GTVs, lens, lacrimal gland, bony orbit, and soft tissues. Results: All beam arrangements fully covered GTVs and CTVs with optimal lens sparing. Only 15% of orbital bone received doses ≥20 CGE with a lateral beam, with 20-26 CGE delivered to two of three growth centers. The anterolateral oblique approach with an intrarotated eye resulted in additional reduction of bony volume and exposure of only one growth center. No appreciable dose was delivered to the contralateral eye, brain tissue, or pituitary gland. Conclusions: Proton therapy achieved homogeneous target coverage with true lens sparing. Doses to orbit structures, including bony growth centers, were minimized with different beam arrangements and eye positions. Proton therapy could reduce the risks of second malignancy and cosmetic and functional sequelae

  1. Acoustic signal generation in excised muscle by pulsed proton beam irradiation and the possibility of its clinical application to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Yoshinori; Tada, Junichiro; Inada, Tetsuo; Kitagawa, Toshio; Wagai, Toshio; Yoshioka, Katsuya.

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic signals generated in liquids and in metals by pulsed proton beam are thought to be thermal shock wave due to localized energy deposition of incident protons. Thus the intensity of generated acoustic signals is almost proportional to the energy deposited at the region. This suggests the possibility for measuring spatial distribution of energy deposition of proton beam using the acoustic method. In proton beam radiation therapy, treatment planning is developed from data of X-ray computer tomography which reflects the information on the electron density distribution in the patient's body. Ensuring the agreement of the dose distribution in the patient with the planned one, however, is difficult. It is expected that the acoustic method can provide a useful tool for this purpose. The pulsed proton beam of 50ns in pulse width is used for cancer therapy at the University of Tsukuba. A hydrophone is used to detect acoustic signals generated by pulsed proton beam. Detected signals are amplified ten thousand times before being averaged and analyzed by digital oscilloscope. Measurements made suggest that the method could be useful for radiation therapy. (N.K.)

  2. Tachyonic cyclotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomaschitz, R.

    2006-01-01

    We study superluminal cyclotron emission by electrons and muons in semiclassical orbits. The tachyonic line spectra of hydrogenic ions such as H, 56 Fe 25+ , and 238 U 91+ , as well as their muonic counterparts pμ - , 56 Fe 26+ μ - and 238 U 92+ μ - are calculated, in particular the tachyonic power transversally and longitudinally radiated, the total intensity, and the power radiated in the individual harmonics. We also investigate tachyonic continuum radiation from electrons and protons cycling in the surface and light cylinder fields of γ -ray and millisecond pulsars, such as the Crab pulsar, PSR B1509-58, and PSR J0218 + 4232. The superluminal spectral densities generated by non-relativistic, mildly relativistic and ultra-relativistic source particles are derived. We study the parameters determining the global shape of the transversal and longitudinal densities and the energy scales of the broadband spectrum. The observed cutoff frequency in the γ-ray band of the pulsars is used to infer the upper edge of the orbital energy, and we conclude that electrons and nuclei cycling in the surface fields can reach energies beyond the ''ankle'' of the cosmic ray spectrum. This suggests γ-ray pulsars as sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. (orig.)

  3. Optimization of adaptive radiation therapy in cervical cancer: Solutions for photon and proton therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Schoot, A.J.A.J.

    2016-01-01

    In cervical cancer radiation therapy, an adaptive strategy is required to compensate for interfraction anatomical variations in order to achieve adequate dose delivery. In this thesis, we have aimed at optimizing adaptive radiation therapy in cervical cancer to improve treatment efficiency and

  4. Proton Arc Reduces Range Uncertainty Effects and Improves Conformality Compared With Photon Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seco, Joao, E-mail: jseco@partners.org [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gu, Guan; Marcelos, Tiago; Kooy, Hanne; Willers, Henning [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To describe, in a setting of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the theoretical dosimetric advantages of proton arc stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in which the beam penumbra of a rotating beam is used to reduce the impact of range uncertainties. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with early-stage NSCLC treated with proton SBRT underwent repeat planning with photon volumetric modulated arc therapy (Photon-VMAT) and an in-house-developed arc planning approach for both proton passive scattering (Passive-Arc) and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT-Arc). An arc was mimicked with a series of beams placed at 10° increments. Tumor and organ at risk doses were compared in the context of high- and low-dose regions, represented by volumes receiving >50% and <50% of the prescription dose, respectively. Results: In the high-dose region, conformality index values are 2.56, 1.91, 1.31, and 1.74, and homogeneity index values are 1.29, 1.22, 1.52, and 1.18, respectively, for 3 proton passive scattered beams, Passive-Arc, IMPT-Arc, and Photon-VMAT. Therefore, proton arc leads to a 30% reduction in the 95% isodose line volume to 3-beam proton plan, sparing surrounding organs, such as lung and chest wall. For chest wall, V30 is reduced from 21 cm{sup 3} (3 proton beams) to 11.5 cm{sup 3}, 12.9 cm{sup 3}, and 8.63 cm{sup 3} (P=.005) for Passive-Arc, IMPT-Arc, and Photon-VMAT, respectively. In the low-dose region, the mean lung dose and V20 of the ipsilateral lung are 5.01 Gy(relative biological effectiveness [RBE]), 4.38 Gy(RBE), 4.91 Gy(RBE), and 5.99 Gy(RBE) and 9.5%, 7.5%, 9.0%, and 10.0%, respectively, for 3-beam, Passive-Arc, IMPT-Arc, and Photon-VMAT, respectively. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy with proton arc and Photon-VMAT generate significantly more conformal high-dose volumes than standard proton SBRT, without loss of coverage of the tumor and with significant sparing of nearby organs, such as chest wall. In addition

  5. Dose distribution of secondary radiation in a water phantom for a proton pencil beam—EURADOS WG9 intercomparison exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolarczyk, L.; Trinkl, S.; Romero-Expósito, M.; Mojżeszek, N.; Ambrozova, I.; Domingo, C.; Davídková, M.; Farah, J.; Kłodowska, M.; Knežević, Ž.; Liszka, M.; Majer, M.; Miljanić, S.; Ploc, O.; Schwarz, M.; Harrison, R. M.; Olko, P.

    2018-04-01

    Systematic 3D mapping of out-of-field doses induced by a therapeutic proton pencil scanning beam in a 300  ×  300  ×  600 mm3 water phantom was performed using a set of thermoluminescence detectors (TLDs): MTS-7 (7LiF:Mg,Ti), MTS-6 (6LiF:Mg,Ti), MTS-N (natLiF:Mg,Ti) and TLD-700 (7LiF:Mg,Ti), radiophotoluminescent (RPL) detectors GD-352M and GD-302M, and polyallyldiglycol carbonate (PADC)-based (C12H18O7) track-etched detectors. Neutron and gamma-ray doses, as well as linear energy transfer distributions, were experimentally determined at 200 points within the phantom. In parallel, the Geant4 Monte Carlo code was applied to calculate neutron and gamma radiation spectra at the position of each detector. For the cubic proton target volume of 100  ×  100  ×  100 mm3 (spread out Bragg peak with a modulation of 100 mm) the scattered photon doses along the main axis of the phantom perpendicular to the primary beam were approximately 0.5 mGy Gy‑1 at a distance of 100 mm and 0.02 mGy Gy‑1 at 300 mm from the center of the target. For the neutrons, the corresponding values of dose equivalent were found to be ~0.7 and ~0.06 mSv Gy‑1, respectively. The measured neutron doses were comparable with the out-of-field neutron doses from a similar experiment with 20 MV x-rays, whereas photon doses for the scanning proton beam were up to three orders of magnitude lower.

  6. SU-E-T-479: Development and Validation of Analytical Models Predicting Secondary Neutron Radiation in Proton Therapy Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farah, J; Bonfrate, A; Donadille, L; Martinetti, F; Trompier, F; Clairand, I; De Olivera, A; Delacroix, S; Herault, J; Piau, S; Vabre, I

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Test and validation of analytical models predicting leakage neutron exposure in passively scattered proton therapy. Methods: Taking inspiration from the literature, this work attempts to build an analytical model predicting neutron ambient dose equivalents, H*(10), within the local 75 MeV ocular proton therapy facility. MC simulations were first used to model H*(10) in the beam axis plane while considering a closed final collimator and pristine Bragg peak delivery. Next, MC-based analytical model was tested against simulation results and experimental measurements. The model was also expended in the vertical direction to enable a full 3D mapping of H*(10) inside the treatment room. Finally, the work focused on upgrading the literature model to clinically relevant configurations considering modulated beams, open collimators, patient-induced neutron fluctuations, etc. Results: The MC-based analytical model efficiently reproduced simulated H*(10) values with a maximum difference below 10%. In addition, it succeeded in predicting measured H*(10) values with differences <40%. The highest differences were registered at the closest and farthest positions from isocenter where the analytical model failed to faithfully reproduce the high neutron fluence and energy variations. The differences remains however acceptable taking into account the high measurement/simulation uncertainties and the end use of this model, i.e. radiation protection. Moreover, the model was successfully (differences < 20% on simulations and < 45% on measurements) extended to predict neutrons in the vertical direction with respect to the beam line as patients are in the upright seated position during ocular treatments. Accounting for the impact of beam modulation, collimation and the present of a patient in the beam path is far more challenging and conversion coefficients are currently being defined to predict stray neutrons in clinically representative treatment configurations. Conclusion

  7. Optical and electrical properties of transparent conductive ITO thin films under proton radiation with 100 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Q.; He, S.Y.; Yang, D.Z.; Liu, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    Under the simulation environment for the vacuum and heat sink in space, the changes in optical and electrical properties of transparent conductive indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films induced by radiation of protons with 100 keV were studied. The ITO thin films were deposited on JGS1 quartz substrate by a sol-gel method. The sheet resistance and transmittance spectra of the ITO thin films were measured using the four-point probe method and a spectrophotometer, respectively. The surface morphology was analyzed by AFM. The experimental results showed that the electrical and optical performances of the ITO thin films were closely related to the irradiation fluence. When the fluence exceeded a given value 2 x 10 16 cm -2 , the sheet resistance increased obviously and the optical transmittance decreased. The AFM analysis indicated that the grain size of the ITO thin films diminished. The studies about the radiation effect on ITO thin films will help to predict performance evolution of the second surface mirrors on satellites under space radiation environment. (orig.)

  8. Assessment of space proton radiation-induced charge transfer inefficiency in the CCD204 for the Euclid space observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gow, J P D; Murray, N J; Holland, A D; Hall, D J; Cropper, M; Burt, D; Hopkinson, G; Duvet, L

    2012-01-01

    Euclid is a medium class European Space Agency mission candidate for launch in 2019 with a primary goal to study the dark universe using the weak lensing and baryonic acoustic oscillations techniques. Weak lensing depends on accurate shape measurements of distant galaxies. Therefore it is beneficial that the effects of radiation-induced charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) in the Euclid CCDs over the course of the 5 year mission at L2 are understood. This will allow, through experimental analysis and modelling techniques, the effects of radiation induced CTI on shape to be decoupled from those of mass inhomogeneities along the line-of-sight. This paper discusses a selection of work from the study that has been undertaken using the e2v CCD204 as part of the initial proton radiation damage assessment for Euclid. The experimental arrangement and procedure are described followed by the results obtained, thereby allowing recommendations to be made on the CCD operating temperature, to provide an insight into CTI effects using an optical background, to assess the benefits of using charge injection on CTI recovery and the effect of the use of two different methods of serial clocking on serial CTI. This work will form the basis of a comparison with a p-channel CCD204 fabricated using the same mask set as the n-channel equivalent. A custom CCD has been designed, based on this work and discussions between e2v technologies plc. and the Euclid consortium, and designated the CCD273.

  9. Fast calculator for X-ray emission due to Radiative Recombination and Radiative Electron Capture in relativistic heavy-ion atom collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdrich, M. O.; Weber, G.; Gumberidze, A.; Wu, Z. W.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2017-10-01

    In experiments with highly charged, fast heavy ions the Radiative Recombination (RR) and Radiative Electron Capture (REC) processes have significant cross sections in an energy range of up to a few GeV / u . They are some of the most important charge changing processes in collisions of heavy ions with atoms and electrons, leading to the emission of a photon along with the formation of the ground and excited atomic states. Hence, for the understanding and planning of experiments, in particular for X-ray spectroscopy studies, at accelerator ring facilities, such as FAIR, it is crucial to have a good knowledge of these cross sections and the associated radiation characteristics. In the frame of this work a fast calculator, named RECAL, for the RR and REC process is presented and its capabilities are demonstrated with the analysis of a recently conducted experiment at the Experimental Storage Ring (ESR) at the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt, Germany. A method is presented to determine unknown X-ray emission cross sections via normalization of the recorded spectra to REC cross sections calculated by RECAL.

  10. Relativistic quantum mechanics and introduction to field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yndurain, F.J. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica

    1996-12-01

    The following topics were dealt with: relativistic transformations, the Lorentz group, Klein-Gordon equation, spinless particles, spin 1/2 particles, Dirac particle in a potential, massive spin 1 particles, massless spin 1 particles, relativistic collisions, S matrix, cross sections, decay rates, partial wave analysis, electromagnetic field quantization, interaction of radiation with matter, interactions in quantum field theory and relativistic interactions with classical sources.

  11. Relativistic quantum mechanics and introduction to field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yndurain, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    The following topics were dealt with: relativistic transformations, the Lorentz group, Klein-Gordon equation, spinless particles, spin 1/2 particles, Dirac particle in a potential, massive spin 1 particles, massless spin 1 particles, relativistic collisions, S matrix, cross sections, decay rates, partial wave analysis, electromagnetic field quantization, interaction of radiation with matter, interactions in quantum field theory and relativistic interactions with classical sources

  12. Materials for heavy current accelerators and their alteration under scattered protons resulted from acceleration and secondary radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'vov, A.N.; Sidorenko, I.S.; Khizhnyak, N.A.; Shilyaev, B.A.; Yamnitskij, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    Changes of macroscopic properties of materials for new generation accelerators during irradiation by spill protons and secondary radiations have been analyzed. It is shown, that the change in properties is a result of many interrelated processes: nuclear ones, in which initially knocked out atoms (IKA) and products of nuclear reactions (especially helium and hydrogen) are formed, atomic ones consisting in the development of cascade collisions induced by IKA and resulting in the formation of initial regions of point defects accumulation; structural ones, resulting in the formation ssociations of defects, pores, dislocations and in the processes of creep, swelling, embrittlement etc. Each process is deccribed by a model and is realized by a computer code. The full program complex is written in the FORTRAN and ALGOL (GDR) for the BEhSM-6 and EC-1040 computers. Total number of standard code library exceeds 20 thousand operators, the memory size of base data is about 10 megabyte

  13. Calibration of an electron/proton monitor for the earth's radiation belt at 4 R/sub E/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higbie, P.R.; Belian, R.D.; Argo, H.V.; Baker, D.N.

    1982-03-01

    A charged particle dosimeter (the Burst Detector Dosimeter or BDD) was designed and fabricated and will be flown on certain of the Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) series of spacecraft. The BDD will monitor the dose received by the GPS spacecraft from the fluxes of electrons and protons in the Earth's radiation belt. The BDD uses absorbers in front of silicon sensors to determine the energy thresholds for measuring incident particle fluxes; and the magnitude of energy loss in a single sensor distinguishes between ions and electrons over a wide range of energies. Our electron calibrations were performed to determine accurately the energy response function of the dosimeter. The experimentally determined energy and angular responses are used to determine the equivalent energy thresholds and geometric factors for idealized step function responses

  14. Dose–Volume Relationships Associated With Temporal Lobe Radiation Necrosis After Skull Base Proton Beam Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Mark W., E-mail: markmcdonaldmd@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, Indiana (United States); Linton, Okechukwu R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Calley, Cynthia S.J. [Department of Biostatistics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: We evaluated patient and treatment parameters correlated with development of temporal lobe radiation necrosis. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of a cohort of 66 patients treated for skull base chordoma, chondrosarcoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, or sinonasal malignancies between 2005 and 2012, who had at least 6 months of clinical and radiographic follow-up. The median radiation dose was 75.6 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]). Analyzed factors included gender, age, hypertension, diabetes, smoking status, use of chemotherapy, and the absolute dose:volume data for both the right and left temporal lobes, considered separately. A generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression analysis evaluated potential predictors of radiation necrosis, and the median effective concentration (EC50) model estimated dose–volume parameters associated with radiation necrosis. Results: Median follow-up time was 31 months (range 6-96 months) and was 34 months in patients who were alive. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of overall survival at 3 years was 84.9%. The 3-year estimate of any grade temporal lobe radiation necrosis was 12.4%, and for grade 2 or higher radiation necrosis was 5.7%. On multivariate GEE, only dose–volume relationships were associated with the risk of radiation necrosis. In the EC50 model, all dose levels from 10 to 70 Gy (RBE) were highly correlated with radiation necrosis, with a 15% 3-year risk of any-grade temporal lobe radiation necrosis when the absolute volume of a temporal lobe receiving 60 Gy (RBE) (aV60) exceeded 5.5 cm{sup 3}, or aV70 > 1.7 cm{sup 3}. Conclusions: Dose–volume parameters are highly correlated with the risk of developing temporal lobe radiation necrosis. In this study the risk of radiation necrosis increased sharply when the temporal lobe aV60 exceeded 5.5 cm{sup 3} or aV70 > 1.7 cm{sup 3}. Treatment planning goals should include constraints on the volume of temporal lobes receiving

  15. Radiative capture of cold neutrons by protons and deuteron photodisintegration with twisted beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasev, Andrei; Serbo, Valeriy G.; Solyanik, Maria

    2018-05-01

    We consider two basic nuclear reactions: capture of neutrons by protons, n + p → γ + d, and its time-reversed counterpart, photodisintegration of the deuteron, γ + d → n + p. In both of these cases we assume that the incoming beam of neutrons or photons is ‘twisted’ by having an azimuthal phase dependence, i.e., it carries an additional angular momentum along its direction of propagation. Taking a low-energy limit of these reactions, we derive relations between corresponding transition amplitudes and cross sections with plane-wave beams and twisted beams. Implications for experiments with twisted cold neutrons and twisted photon beams are discussed.

  16. Determination of absorbed dose in a proton beam for purposes of charged-particle radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhey, L.J.; Koehler, A.M.; McDonald, J.C.; Goitein, M.; Ma, I.C.; Schneider, R.J.; Wagner, M.

    1979-01-01

    Four methods are described by which absorbed dose has been measured in a proton beam extracted from the 160-MeV Harvard cyclotron. The standard dosimetry, used to determine doses for patient treatments, is based upon an absolute measurement of particle flux using a Faraday cup. Measurements have also been made using a parallel-plate ionization chamber; a thimble ionization chamber carying a 60 Co calibration traceable to NBS; and a tissue-equivalent calorimeter. The calorimeter, which provides an independent check of the dosimetry, agreed with the standard dosimetry at five widely different depths within a range from 0.8 to 2.6%

  17. Intensity maps of MeV electrons and protons below the radiation belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohno, T.; Munakata, K.; Murakami, H.; Nakamoto, A.; Hasebe, N.; Kikuchi, J.; Doke, T.

    1988-01-01

    The global distributions of energetic electrons (0.19 - 3.2 MeV) and protons (0.64 - 35 MeV) are shown in the form of contour maps. The data were obtained by two sets of energetic particle telescopes on board the satellite OHZORA. The observed altitude range is 350 - 850 Km. Ten degress meshes in longitude and latitude were used to obtain the intensity contours. A pitch angle distribution of J(α) = J(90). sin n α with n = 5 A is assumed to get the average intensity in each mesh. (author) [pt

  18. Radiation conditions in the ring hall of the IHEP proton synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borodin, V.E.; Ermolenko, L.S.; Obryashchikova, L.P.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents the results on studying the radiation conditions caused by induced radioactivity of the accelerator units in the ring hall. The data on the induced radioactivity level just on the ring vacuum chamber are reported. Radiation conditions in the most characteristic areas of the hall are considered. The changes in time of the dose rate at the internal target and at the entrance to the hall are shown

  19. Oncogenic action of beta, proton, alpha and electron radiation on the rat skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    Rat skin is being utilized as an empirical model for testing dose and time related aspects of the oncogenic action of ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Molecular lesions in the skin DNA, including, strand breaks and thymine dimers, are being measured and compared to tumor induction. The induction and repair kinetics of molcular lesions are being compared to split dose repair. Modifiers and radiosensitizers are being utilized to test specific aspects of a chromosome breakage theory of radiation oncogenesis

  20. The investigation of relativistic microscopic optical potential based on RBBG equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Baoqiu; Ma Zhongyu

    1992-01-01

    The relativistic microscopic optical potential is derived from the RBBG equation. The nucleon complex effective mass is determined phenomenologically by a fit to 200 MeV proton-nucleus scattering data. Then the relativistic microscopic optical potentials of proton scattered from different targets: 16 O, 40 Ca, 90 Zr and 208 Pb in the energies range from 160 to 800 MeV have been got. The relativistic microscopic optical potentials have been used to study proton- 40 Ca scattering at 200 MeV. Theoretical predictions for cross section and spin observables are compared with experimental data and phenomenological Dirac optical potential

  1. Evaluation of permanent alopecia in pediatric medulloblastoma patients treated with proton radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Chul Hee; Paganetti, Harald; Winey, Brian A; Adams, Judith; MacDonald, Shannon M; Tarbell, Nancy J; Yock, Torunn I

    2014-01-01

    To precisely calculate skin dose and thus to evaluate the relationship between the skin dose and permanent alopecia for pediatric medulloblastoma patients treated with proton beams. The dosimetry and alopecia outcomes of 12 children with medulloblastoma (ages 4-15 years) comprise the study cohort. Permanent alopecia was assessed and graded after completion of the entire therapy. Skin threshold doses of permanent alopecia were calculated based on the skin dose from the craniospinal irradiation (CSI) plan using the concept of generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) and accounting for chemotherapy intensity. Monte Carlo simulations were employed to accurately assess uncertainties due to beam range prediction and secondary particles. Increasing the dose of the CSI field or the dose given by the boost field to the posterior fossa increased total skin dose delivered in that region. It was found that permanent alopecia could be correlated with CSI dose with a threshold of about 21 Gy (relative biological effectiveness, RBE) with high dose chemotherapy and 30 Gy (RBE) with conventional chemotherapy. Our results based on 12 patients provide a relationship between the skin dose and permanent alopecia for pediatric medulloblastoma patients treated with protons. The alopecia risk as assessed with gEUD could be predicted based on the treatment plan information

  2. Stopping power of K electrons at extreme relativistic energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, P.T.; Rustgi, M.L.

    1983-01-01

    The recent work of Anholt on K-vacancy production by relativistic projectiles has been applied to calculate the stopping power of the K electrons. The results show that for protons of energy approx.10 3 GeV and heavy target elements, the relativistic contributions to the stopping power amount to several times the resuls due to the longitudinal terms obtained from Walske's work

  3. Relativistic mean field model for entrainment in general relativistic superfluid neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comer, G.L.; Joynt, R.

    2003-01-01

    General relativistic superfluid neutron stars have a significantly more intricate dynamics than their ordinary fluid counterparts. Superfluidity allows different superfluid (and superconducting) species of particles to have independent fluid flows, a consequence of which is that the fluid equations of motion contain as many fluid element velocities as superfluid species. Whenever the particles of one superfluid interact with those of another, the momentum of each superfluid will be a linear combination of both superfluid velocities. This leads to the so-called entrainment effect whereby the motion of one superfluid will induce a momentum in the other superfluid. We have constructed a fully relativistic model for entrainment between superfluid neutrons and superconducting protons using a relativistic σ-ω mean field model for the nucleons and their interactions. In this context there are two notions of 'relativistic': relativistic motion of the individual nucleons with respect to a local region of the star (i.e. a fluid element containing, say, an Avogadro's number of particles), and the motion of fluid elements with respect to the rest of the star. While it is the case that the fluid elements will typically maintain average speeds at a fraction of that of light, the supranuclear densities in the core of a neutron star can make the nucleons themselves have quite high average speeds within each fluid element. The formalism is applied to the problem of slowly rotating superfluid neutron star configurations, a distinguishing characteristic being that the neutrons can rotate at a rate different from that of the protons

  4. Correlated analysis of 2 MeV proton-induced radiation damage in CdZnTe crystals using photoluminescence and thermally stimulated current techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Yaxu [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Key Laboratory of Radiation Detection Materials and Devices of Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Jie, Wanqi, E-mail: jwq@nwpu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Key Laboratory of Radiation Detection Materials and Devices of Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Rong, Caicai [Institute of Modern Physics, Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wang, Yuhan; Xu, Lingyan; Xu, Yadong [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Key Laboratory of Radiation Detection Materials and Devices of Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Lv, Haoyan; Shen, Hao [Institute of Modern Physics, Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Du, Guanghua [Materials Research Center, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Fu, Xu [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Key Laboratory of Radiation Detection Materials and Devices of Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); and others

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • 2 MeV proton-induced radiation damage in CdZnTe crystals is investigated by PL and TSC techniques. • The influence of radiation damage on the luminescent and electrical properties of CdZnTe crystals is studied. • Intensity of PL spectrum is found to decrease significantly in irradiated regions, suggesting the increase of non-radiative recombination centers. • A correlated analysis of PL and TSC spectra suggests that the density of dislocations and A-centers increase after proton irradiation. - Abstract: Radiation damage induced by 2 MeV protons in CdZnTe crystals has been studied by means of photoluminescence (PL) and thermally stimulated current (TSC) techniques. A notable quenching of PL intensity is observed in the regions irradiated with a fluence of 6 × 10{sup 13} p/cm{sup 2}, suggesting the increase of non-radiative recombination centers. Moreover, the intensity of emission peak D{sub complex} centered at 1.48 eV dominates in the PL spectrum obtained from irradiated regions, ascribed to the increase of interstitial dislocation loops and A centers. The intensity of TSC spectra in irradiated regions decreases compared to the virgin regions, resulting from the charge collection inefficiency caused by proton-induced recombination centers. By comparing the intensity of identified traps obtained from numerical fitting using simultaneous multiple peak analysis (SIMPA) method, it suggests that proton irradiation under such dose can introduce high density of dislocation and A-centers in CdZnTe crystals, consistent with PL results.

  5. Relativistic Light Sails

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kipping, David, E-mail: dkipping@astro.columbia.edu [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 W. 120th St., New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2017-06-01

    One proposed method for spacecraft to reach nearby stars is by accelerating sails using either solar radiation pressure or directed energy. This idea constitutes the thesis behind the Breakthrough Starshot project, which aims to accelerate a gram-mass spacecraft up to one-fifth the speed of light toward Proxima Centauri. For such a case, the combination of the sail’s low mass and relativistic velocity renders previous treatments incorrect at the 10% level, including that of Einstein himself in his seminal 1905 paper introducing special relativity. To address this, we present formulae for a sail’s acceleration, first in response to a single photon and then extended to an ensemble. We show how the sail’s motion in response to an ensemble of incident photons is equivalent to that of a single photon of energy equal to that of the ensemble. We use this principle of ensemble equivalence for both perfect and imperfect mirrors, enabling a simple analytic prediction of the sail’s velocity curve. Using our results and adopting putative parameters for Starshot , we estimate that previous relativistic treatments underestimate the spacecraft’s terminal velocity by ∼10% for the same incident energy. Additionally, we use a simple model to predict the sail’s temperature and diffraction beam losses during the laser firing period; this allows us to estimate that, for firing times of a few minutes and operating temperatures below 300°C (573 K), Starshot will require a sail that absorbs less than one in 260,000 photons.

  6. Relativistic Light Sails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kipping, David

    2017-01-01

    One proposed method for spacecraft to reach nearby stars is by accelerating sails using either solar radiation pressure or directed energy. This idea constitutes the thesis behind the Breakthrough Starshot project, which aims to accelerate a gram-mass spacecraft up to one-fifth the speed of light toward Proxima Centauri. For such a case, the combination of the sail’s low mass and relativistic velocity renders previous treatments incorrect at the 10% level, including that of Einstein himself in his seminal 1905 paper introducing special relativity. To address this, we present formulae for a sail’s acceleration, first in response to a single photon and then extended to an ensemble. We show how the sail’s motion in response to an ensemble of incident photons is equivalent to that of a single photon of energy equal to that of the ensemble. We use this principle of ensemble equivalence for both perfect and imperfect mirrors, enabling a simple analytic prediction of the sail’s velocity curve. Using our results and adopting putative parameters for Starshot , we estimate that previous relativistic treatments underestimate the spacecraft’s terminal velocity by ∼10% for the same incident energy. Additionally, we use a simple model to predict the sail’s temperature and diffraction beam losses during the laser firing period; this allows us to estimate that, for firing times of a few minutes and operating temperatures below 300°C (573 K), Starshot will require a sail that absorbs less than one in 260,000 photons.

  7. Relativistic electron beams above thunderclouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Füellekrug, M.; Roussel-Dupre, R.; Symbalisty, E. M. D.

    2011-01-01

    Non-luminous relativistic electron beams above thunderclouds have been detected by the radio signals of low frequency similar to 40-400 kHz which they radiate. The electron beams occur similar to 2-9 ms after positive cloud-to-ground lightning discharges at heights between similar to 22-72 km above...... thunderclouds. Intense positive lightning discharges can also cause sprites which occur either above or prior to the electron beam. One electron beam was detected without any luminous sprite which suggests that electron beams may also occur independently of sprites. Numerical simulations show that beams...... of electrons partially discharge the lightning electric field above thunderclouds and thereby gain a mean energy of similar to 7MeV to transport a total charge of similar to-10mC upwards. The impulsive current similar to 3 x 10(-3) Am-2 associated with relativistic electron beams above thunderclouds...

  8. Double Relativistic Electron Accelerating Mirror

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saltanat Sadykova

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the possibility of generation of thin dense relativistic electron layers is shown using the analytical and numerical modeling of laser pulse interaction with ultra-thin layers. It was shown that the maximum electron energy can be gained by optimal tuning between the target width, intensity and laser pulse duration. The optimal parameters were obtained from a self-consistent system of Maxwell equations and the equation of motion of electron layer. For thin relativistic electron layers, the gaining of maximum electron energies requires a second additional overdense plasma layer, thus cutting the laser radiation off the plasma screen at the instant of gaining the maximum energy (DREAM-schema.

  9. Relativistic impulse approximation and deuteron spin structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokarev, M.V.

    1992-01-01

    The fragmentation processes were considered of tensor- and vector-polarized deuterons to protons in the framework of the covariant approach in the light cone variables on the basis of the relativistic deuteron wave function with one nucleon on-mass shell. The experimental verification of predicted dependences of T 20 and K is of interest for the research of the momentum and spin distributions of high momentum deuteron constituents. 21 refs.; 6 figs

  10. Is the relativistic approach really useful to nuclear reactions?

    CERN Document Server

    Miyazaki, K

    2003-01-01

    We have reconsidered the non-relativistic distorted-wave t-matrix approximation (NR-DWTA) for proton knockout (p,2p) reaction using modern high-quality phenomenological optical potentials and NN t-matrix. We have calculated 40Ca(p,2p) reactions at T_LAB=200MeV and compared the results with the relativistic distorted-wave impulse approximation (RDWIA) calculations. It is found that the NR-DWTA is superior to the RDWIA in consistent description of the cross section and the analyzing power. An immediate relativistic extension of the DWIA to the nuclear reaction has a problem.

  11. Effects of laser radiation parameters of the infrared multiphoton dissociation of protonated trichloroethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungureanu, C.; Almasan, V.

    1994-01-01

    The favorable properties of the infrared multiphoton absorption and dissociation of trichloroethylene-H, (C 2 HCl 3 ), by TEA-CO 2 laser radiation and rapid isotopic exchange between this molecule and water, indicate that it can be a promising further candidate for the final enrichment of heavy water (> 98% D 2 O), by laser method. We present the results obtained in the isotopic selectivity of multiphoton absorption measurements and in the study of the pulse energy and frequency laser radiation influence on the infrared multiphoton dissociation of C 2 HCl 3 in isotopic mixture with C 2 DCl 3 . (Author)

  12. Characterization of polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) based proton exchange membranes prepared by UV-radiation-induced graft copolymerization of styrene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Mostak; Khan, Mohammad B.; Alam, S. Shamsul; Khan, M. Anwar H. [Department of Chemistry, Shahjalal University of Science and Technology, Sylhet 3114 (Bangladesh); Khan, Mubarak A. [Radiation and Polymer Chemistry Laboratory, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box 3787, Dhaka (Bangladesh); Halim, Md. Abdul [Department of Chemistry, Jahangirnagar University, savar, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2011-01-15

    Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) were successfully prepared by simultaneous ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced graft copolymerization of styrene (35 vol.% concentration) onto poly(ethyleneterephthalate) (PET) film, followed by sulfonation on the styrene monomer units in the grafting chain using 0.05 M chlorosulfonic acid (ClSO{sub 3}H). The radiation grafting and the sulfonation have been confirmed by titrimetric and gravimetric analyses as well as Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The maximum ion-exchange capacity (IEC) of the PEM was measured to be 0.04385 mmol g{sup -1} at its highest level of grafting and sulfonation. They exhibited high thermal and mechanical properties as well as oxidative stability. They are highly stable in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions and can be used in the acidic fuel cells. The membranes showed low water uptake as well as low proton conductivity than Nafion. In this study, the preparation of PEMs from commodity-type polymers is found to be very inexpensive and is a suitable candidate for applications in fuel cells. (author)

  13. Radiation damage and defect behavior in proton irradiated lithium-counterdoped n+p silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupica, John; Goradia, Chandra; Swartz, Clifford K.; Weinberg, Irving

    1987-01-01

    Two lithium-counterdoped n+p silicon solar cells with different lithium concentrations were irradiated by 10-MeV protons. Cell performance was measured as a function of fluence, and it was found that the cell with the highest concentration of lithium had the highest radiation resistance. Deep level transient spectroscopy which showed two deep level defects that were lithium related. Relating the defect energy levels obtained from this study with those from earlier work using 1-MeV electron irradiation shows no correlation of the defect energy levels. There is one marked similarity: the absence of the boron-interstitial-oxygen-interstitial defect. This consistency strengthens the belief that lithium interacts with oxygen to prevent the formation of the boron interstitial-oxygen interstitial defect. The results indicate that, in general, addition of lithium in small amounts to the p-base of a boron doped silicon solar cell such that the base remains p-type, tends to increase the radiation resistance of the cell.

  14. The quantification of wound healing as a method to assess late radiation damage in primate skin exposed to high-energy protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, A. B.; Lett, J. T.

    In an experiment examining the effects of space radiations on primates, different groups of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were exposed to single whole-body doses of 32- or 55-MeV protons. Survivors of those exposures, together with age-matched controls, have been monitored continuously since 1964 and 1965. Late effects of nominal proton doses ranging from 2-6 Gray have been measured in vitro using skin fibroblasts from the animals. A logical extension of that study is reported here, and it involves observations of wound healing after 3-mm diameter dermal punches were removed from the ears (pinnae) of control and irradiated monkeys. Tendencies in the reduction of competence to repair cutaneous wound have been revealed by the initial examinations of animals that received doses greater than 2 Gy more than 2 decades earlier. These trends indicate that this method of assessing radiation damage to skin exposed to high-energy radiations warrants further study.

  15. Measurement of stray radiation within a scanning proton therapy facility: EURADOS WG9 intercomparison exercise of active dosimetry systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farah, J., E-mail: jad.farah@irsn.fr; Trompier, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), Pôle Radioprotection de l’Homme, BP17, Fontenay-aux-Roses 92260 (France); Mares, V.; Schinner, K.; Wielunski, M. [Helmholtz Zentrum München, Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, Neuherberg 85764 (Germany); Romero-Expósito, M.; Domingo, C. [Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra E-08193 (Spain); Trinkl, S. [Helmholtz Zentrum München, Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, Neuherberg 85764, Germany and Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, Garching 85748 (Germany); Dufek, V. [Czech Technical University in Prague, FNSPE, Břehová 7, Prague 115 19, Czech Republic and National Radiation Protection Institute, Bartoškova 28, Prague 140 00 (Czech Republic); Klodowska, M.; Liszka, M.; Stolarczyk, L.; Olko, P. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Radzikowskiego 152, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Kubancak, J. [Czech Technical University in Prague, FNSPE, Břehová 7, Prague 115 19, Czech Republic and Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Nuclear Physics Institute, Řež CZ-250 68 (Czech Republic); and others

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To characterize stray radiation around the target volume in scanning proton therapy and study the performance of active neutron monitors. Methods: Working Group 9 of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS WG9—Radiation protection in medicine) carried out a large measurement campaign at the Trento Centro di Protonterapia (Trento, Italy) in order to determine the neutron spectra near the patient using two extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometry (BSS) systems. In addition, the work focused on acknowledging the performance of different commercial active dosimetry systems when measuring neutron ambient dose equivalents, H{sup ∗}(10), at several positions inside (8 positions) and outside (3 positions) the treatment room. Detectors included three TEPCs—tissue equivalent proportional counters (Hawk type from Far West Technology, Inc.) and six rem-counters (WENDI-II, LB 6411, RadEye™ NL, a regular and an extended-range NM2B). Meanwhile, the photon component of stray radiation was deduced from the low-lineal energy transfer part of TEPC spectra or measured using a Thermo Scientific™ FH-40G survey meter. Experiments involved a water tank phantom (60 × 30 × 30 cm{sup 3}) representing the patient that was uniformly irradiated using a 3 mm spot diameter proton pencil beam with 10 cm modulation width, 19.95 cm distal beam range, and 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} field size. Results: Neutron spectrometry around the target volume showed two main components at the thermal and fast energy ranges. The study also revealed the large dependence of the energy distribution of neutrons, and consequently of out-of-field doses, on the primary beam direction (directional emission of intranuclear cascade neutrons) and energy (spectral composition of secondary neutrons). In addition, neutron mapping within the facility was conducted and showed the highest H{sup ∗}(10) value of ∼51 μSv Gy{sup −1}; this was measured at 1.15 m along the beam axis. H{sup ∗}(10) values

  16. Exchange currents in the radiative capture of thermal neutrons by protons and deuterons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konijnenberg, M.W.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements are presented about the ratio between the contributions to the radiative neutron capture process by deuterons from states with total spin J = 1/2 and J = 3/2. It is shown that the outcome of these experiments can only be understood from the electromagnetic interaction with nucleons, mesons and nucleon resonances involving meson exchange. (author). 112 refs.; 27 figs.; 7 tabs

  17. Non perturbative method for radiative corrections applied to lepton-proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chahine, C.

    1979-01-01

    We present a new, non perturbative method to effect radiative corrections in lepton (electron or muon)-nucleon scattering, useful for existing or planned experiments. This method relies on a spectral function derived in a previous paper, which takes into account both real soft photons and virtual ones and hence is free from infrared divergence. Hard effects are computed perturbatively and then included in the form of 'hard factors' in the non peturbative soft formulas. Practical computations are effected using the Gauss-Jacobi integration method which reduce the relevant integrals to a rapidly converging sequence. For the simple problem of the radiative quasi-elastic peak, we get an exponentiated form conjectured by Schwinger and found by Yennie, Frautschi and Suura. We compare also our results with the peaking approximation, which we derive independantly, and with the exact one-photon emission formula of Mo and Tsai. Applications of our method to the continuous spectrum include the radiative tail of the Δ 33 resonance in e + p scattering and radiative corrections to the Feynman scale invariant F 2 structure function for the kinematics of two recent high energy muon experiments

  18. On the proton radius problem

    OpenAIRE

    Giannini, M. M.; Santopinto, E.

    2013-01-01

    The recent values of the proton charge radius obtained by means of muonic-hydrogen laser spectroscopy are about $4\\%$ different from the electron scattering data. It has been suggested that the proton radius is actually measured in different frames and that, starting from a non relativistic quark model calculation, the Lorentz transformation of the form factors accounts properly for the discepancy. We shall show that the relation between the charge radii measured in different frames can be de...

  19. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  20. Relativistic quantum logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittelstaedt, P.

    1983-01-01

    on the basis of the well-known quantum logic and quantum probability a formal language of relativistic quantum physics is developed. This language incorporates quantum logical as well as relativistic restrictions. It is shown that relativity imposes serious restrictions on the validity regions of propositions in space-time. By an additional postulate this relativistic quantum logic can be made consistent. The results of this paper are derived exclusively within the formal quantum language; they are, however, in accordance with well-known facts of relativistic quantum physics in Hilbert space. (author)

  1. Individual neutron monitoring in workplaces with mixed neutron/proton radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolognese-Milsztajn, T.; Bartlett, D.; Boschung, M.; Coeck, M.; Curzio, G.; D'Errico, F.; Fiechtner, A.; Giusti, V.; Gressier, V.; Kylloenen, J.; Lacoste, V.; Lindborg, L.; Luszik-Bhadra, M.; Molinos, C.; Pelcot, G.; Reginatto, M.; Schuhmacher, H.; Tanner, R.; Vanhavere, F.; Derdau, D.

    2004-01-01

    EVIDOS ('evaluation of individual dosimetry in mixed neutron and photon radiation fields') is an European Commission (EC)-sponsored project that aims at a significant improvement of radiation protection dosimetry in mixed neutron/photon fields via spectrometric and dosimetric investigations in representative workplaces of the nuclear industry. In particular, new spectrometry methods are developed that provide the energy and direction distribution of the neutron fluence from which the reference dosimetric quantities are derived and compared to the readings of dosemeters. The final results of the project will be a comprehensive set of spectrometric and dosimetric data for the workplaces and an analysis of the performance of dosemeters, including novel electronic dosemeters. This paper gives an overview of the project and focuses on the results from measurements performed in calibration fields with broad energy distributions (simulated workplace fields) and on the first results from workplaces in the nuclear industry, inside a boiling water reactor and around a spent fuel transport cask. (authors)

  2. Tumorigenic action of beta, proton, alpha and electron radiation on the rat skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    Rat skin is utilized as a model system for studying dose and time related aspects of the oncogenic action of ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Molecular lesions in the DNA of the epidermis, including strand breaks and thymine dimers, are measured and compared to the temporal and dose related aspects of tumor induction. The induction and repair kinetics of molecular lesions are compared to split dose recovery as modified by sensitizers and type of radition of oncogenic damage

  3. Laser Radiation Pressure Acceleration of Monoenergetic Protons in an Ultra-Thin Foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasson, Bengt; Liu, Chuan S.; Shao, Xi; Sagdeev, Roald Z.; Shukla, Padma K.

    2009-11-01

    We present theoretical and numerical studies of the acceleration of monoenergetic protons in a double layer formed by the laser irradiation of an ultra-thin film. The stability of the foil is investigated by direct Vlasov-Maxwell simulations for different sets of laser-plasma parameters. It is found that the foil is stable, due to the trapping of both electrons and ions in the thin laser-plasma interaction region, where the electrons are trapped in a potential well composed of the ponderomo-tive potential of the laser light and the electrostatic potential due to the ions, and the ions are trapped in a potential well composed of the inertial potential in an accelerated frame and the electrostatic potential due to the electrons. The result is a stable double layer, where the trapped ions are accelerated to monoenergetic energies up to 100 MeV and beyond, which makes them suitable for medical applications cancer treatment. The underlying physics of trapped and untapped ions in a double layer is also investigated theoretically and numerically.

  4. Radiation safety aspects of a 30 MeV proton cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandy, Maitreyee; Bandyopadhyay, Tapas; Sarkar, P.K.; Maiti, Moumita

    2005-01-01

    High current accelerators are increasingly used in nuclear medicine, power industry, material properties, material damage and astrophysical studies, etc. In the present work we have assessed the direct and transmitted neutron dose, build up and decay of air activity in the vault and soil activity for a 30 MeV 350 μA proton cyclotron. The transmitted dose equivalent H through ordinary concrete shield of different thickness has been estimated using the two different sets of values of the attenuation coefficient T eff . It is observed that while the two sets of H values differ by 25-26%, the required shield thickness is around 2.1 m. in both the cases to bring down the dose to the ICRP specified limit of 1 μSv/hr. Activity induced in the air due to 13 N and 15 O has been estimated. It has been found that for a target vault of 4m.x4m.x4m. dimension the activity concentration goes above the DAC value within a few seconds of commencement of operation even with 12 air changes per hour. A theoretical study of the radioactivity that may be induced in the soil indicates formation of 40 K, 24 Na, 56 Mn, 59 Fe, 27 Mg, 60 Co, 59,63,65 Ni, 64,66 Cu, 65,69 Zn radioisotopes. (author)

  5. A Comprehensive Comparison of Relativistic Particle Integrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripperda, B.; Bacchini, F.; Teunissen, J.; Xia, C.; Porth, O.; Sironi, L.; Lapenta, G.; Keppens, R.

    2018-03-01

    We compare relativistic particle integrators commonly used in plasma physics, showing several test cases relevant for astrophysics. Three explicit particle pushers are considered, namely, the Boris, Vay, and Higuera–Cary schemes. We also present a new relativistic fully implicit particle integrator that is energy conserving. Furthermore, a method based on the relativistic guiding center approximation is included. The algorithms are described such that they can be readily implemented in magnetohydrodynamics codes or Particle-in-Cell codes. Our comparison focuses on the strengths and key features of the particle integrators. We test the conservation of invariants of motion and the accuracy of particle drift dynamics in highly relativistic, mildly relativistic, and non-relativistic settings. The methods are compared in idealized test cases, i.e., without considering feedback onto the electrodynamic fields, collisions, pair creation, or radiation. The test cases include uniform electric and magnetic fields, {\\boldsymbol{E}}× {\\boldsymbol{B}} fields, force-free fields, and setups relevant for high-energy astrophysics, e.g., a magnetic mirror, a magnetic dipole, and a magnetic null. These tests have direct relevance for particle acceleration in shocks and in magnetic reconnection.

  6. Comparative Cost-Effectiveness of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Versus Intensity-Modulated and Proton Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parthan, Anju; Pruttivarasin, Narin; Davies, Diane; Taylor, Douglas C. A.; Pawar, Vivek; Bijlani, Akash; Lich, Kristen Hassmiller; Chen, Ronald C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the cost-effectiveness of several external beam radiation treatment modalities for the treatment of patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods: A lifetime Markov model incorporated the probabilities of experiencing treatment-related long-term toxicity or death. Toxicity probabilities were derived from published sources using meta-analytical techniques. Utilities and costs in the model were obtained from publicly available secondary sources. The model calculated quality-adjusted life expectancy and expected lifetime cost per patient, and derived ratios of incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained between treatments. Analyses were conducted from both payer and societal perspectives. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Results: Compared to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and proton beam therapy (PT), stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) was less costly and resulted in more QALYs. Sensitivity analyses showed that the conclusions in the base-case scenario were robust with respect to variations in toxicity and cost parameters consistent with available evidence. At a threshold of $50,000/QALY, SBRT was cost-effective in 75% and 94% of probabilistic simulations compared to IMRT and PT, respectively, from a payer perspective. From a societal perspective, SBRT was cost-effective in 75% and 96% of simulations compared to IMRT and PT, respectively, at a threshold of $50,000/QALY. In threshold analyses, SBRT was less expensive with better outcomes compared to IMRT at toxicity rates 23% greater than the SBRT base-case rates. Conclusion: Based on the assumption that each treatment modality results in equivalent long-term efficacy, SBRT is a cost-effective strategy resulting in improved quality-adjusted survival compared to IMRT and PT for the treatment of localized prostate cancer.

  7. Comparative cost-effectiveness of stereotactic body radiation therapy versus intensity-modulated and proton radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju eParthan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the cost-effectiveness of several external beam radiation treatment modalities for the treatment of patients with localized prostate cancer.Methods. A lifetime Markov model incorporated the probabilities of experiencing treatment-related long-term toxicity or death. Toxicity probabilities were derived from published sources using meta-analytical techniques. Utilities and costs in the model were obtained from publically available secondary sources. The model calculated quality-adjusted life expectancy and expected lifetime cost per patient, and derived ratios of incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY gained between treatments. Analyses were conducted from both a payer and societal perspectives. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed.Results. Compared to intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT and proton beam therapy (PT, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT was less costly and resulted in more QALYs. Sensitivity analyses showed that the conclusions in the base-case scenario were robust with respect to variations in toxicity and cost parameters consistent with available evidence. At a threshold of $50,000/QALY, SBRT was cost effective in 75%, and 94% of probabilistic simulations compared to IMRT and PT, respectively, from a payer perspective. From a societal perspective, SBRT was cost-effective in 75%, and 96% of simulations compared to IMRT and PT, respectively, at a threshold of $50,000/QALY. In threshold analyses, SBRT was less expensive with better outcomes compared to IMRT at toxicity rates 23% greater than the SBRT base-case rates. Conclusions. Based on the assumption that each treatment modality results in equivalent long-term efficacy, SBRT is a cost-effective strategy resulting in improved quality-adjusted survival compared to IMRT and PT for the treatment of localized prostate cancer.

  8. Physical and biological studies with protons and HZE particles in a NASA supported research center in radiation health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, A.; Borak, T. H.

    2001-01-01

    NASA has established and supports a specialized center for research and training (NSCORT) to specifically address the potential deleterious effects of HZE particles on human health. The NSCORT in radiation health is a joint effort between Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Colorado State University (CSU). The overall scope of research encompasses a broad range of subjects from microdosimetric studies to cellular and tissue responses to initial damage produced by highly energetic protons and heavy charged particles of the type found in galactic cosmic rays (GCR) spectrum. The objectives of the microdosimetry studies are to determine the response of Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) to cosmic rays using ground based accelerators. This includes evaluation of energy loss due to the escape of high-energy delta rays and increased energy deposition due to the enhanced delta ray production in the wall of the detector. In this report major results are presented for 56Fe at 1000, 740, 600 and 400 MeV/nucleon. An assessment of DNA repair and early development of related chromosomal changes is extremely important to our overall understanding of enhanced biological effectiveness of high LET particle radiation. Results are presented with respect to the fidelity of the rejoining of double strand breaks and the implications of misrejoining. The relationship between molecular and cytogenetic measurements is presented by studying damage processing in highly heterochromatic supernumerary (correction of sypernumerary) X chromosomes and the active X-chromosome. One of the important consequences of cell's inability to handle DNA damage can be evaluated through mutation studies. Part of our goal is the assessment of potential radioprotectors to reduce the mutation yield following HZE exposures, and some promising results are presented on one compound. A second goal is the integration of DNA repair and mutation studies. Results are presented on a direct

  9. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearing, H.W.

    1990-01-01

    We summarize some of the information about the nucleon-nucleon force which has been obtained by comparing recent calculations of proton-proton bremsstrahlung with cross section and analyzing power data from the new TRIUMF bremsstrahlung experiment. Some comments are made as to how these results can be extended to neutron-proton bremsstrahlung. (Author) 17 refs., 6 figs

  10. Study of the radiation X-UV produced during the relativistic interaction between a femtosecond laser and an helium plasma; Etude du rayonnement X-UV produit lors de l'interaction relativiste entre un laser femtoseconde et un plasme d'helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ta Phuoc, K

    2002-10-15

    The aim of this work is to design a new source of X-radiation that is both femtosecond and polychromatic. We have studied the Larmor radiation emitted during the relativistic interaction between an intense femtosecond laser and an under dense helium plasma. When the value of a{sub 0}, the laser force parameter, is below 1 and when the interaction is volume is important, the characteristics of the emitted radiation are those of Bremsstrahlung radiation and radiative recombination. When the value of a{sub 0} is about 5 the emitted radiation is strongly different and look like much more the Larmor radiation. Nevertheless some features such as the shape of the angular distribution or the amplitude of the laser polarization effect are not yet well understood. The spectra of the X-ray produced is peaked around 150 eV and spreads up to 2 keV. The number of photons produced by laser shot is over 10{sup 9} and the duration of the X-ray impulse is expected to be in the same order of magnitude as that of the laser impulse: 30 fs. The average photon flux is 2*10{sup 3} ph/s/0.1%BW at 2 keV and reaches 6*10{sup 7} ph/s/0.1%BW at 0.15 keV. The average brilliance is 1.5*10{sup 4} ph/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1%BW at 2 keV and 8*10{sup 4} ph/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1%BW at 0.15 keV. Different ways are considered to improve the characteristics of this new X-ray source. (A.C.)

  11. High-sensitivity broadband infrared monitor of spatial structure of relativistic bunches and thermal fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mal'tsev, A.A.; Mal'tsev, M.A.; Maslova, M.V.

    2004-01-01

    The monitor is intended for registration of spatial distribution of density of energy of pulsing radiation of thermal fields and bunches of relativistic electrons and protons in a wide spectral range 0,4 - 4 μm. In a measuring system of a monitor effective means of active and passive increase of the relation of a useful signal to noise, in view of particular conditions and requirements are used. The measuring channel can confidently allocate a useful signal on a background of handicaps, the size of which can make about 20 kE in a pulse [1]. The accuracy of measurement of amplitude of a signal of radiation makes 0,2% of maximum significances of a registrar scale. (author)

  12. Relativistic Binaries in Globular Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Benacquista

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Galactic globular clusters are old, dense star systems typically containing 10^4 – 10^6 stars. As an old population of stars, globular clusters contain many collapsed and degenerate objects. As a dense population of stars, globular clusters are the scene of many interesting close dynamical interactions between stars. These dynamical interactions can alter the evolution of individual stars and can produce tight binary systems containing one or two compact objects. In this review, we discuss theoretical models of globular cluster evolution and binary evolution, techniques for simulating this evolution that leads to relativistic binaries, and current and possible future observational evidence for this population. Our discussion of globular cluster evolution will focus on the processes that boost the production of tight binary systems and the subsequent interaction of these binaries that can alter the properties of both bodies and can lead to exotic objects. Direct N-body integrations and Fokker–Planck simulations of the evolution of globular clusters that incorporate tidal interactions and lead to predictions of relativistic binary populations are also discussed. We discuss the current observational evidence for cataclysmic variables, millisecond pulsars, and low-mass X-ray binaries as well as possible future detection of relativistic binaries with gravitational radiation.

  13. Clinical Outcomes Among Children With Standard-Risk Medulloblastoma Treated With Proton and Photon Radiation Therapy: A Comparison of Disease Control and Overall Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Bree R; Esiashvili, Natia; Kim, Sungjin; Weyman, Elizabeth A; Thornton, Lauren T; Mazewski, Claire; MacDonald, Tobey; Ebb, David; MacDonald, Shannon M; Tarbell, Nancy J; Yock, Torunn I

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare long-term disease control and overall survival between children treated with proton and photon radiation therapy (RT) for standard-risk medulloblastoma. This multi-institution cohort study includes 88 children treated with chemotherapy and proton (n=45) or photon (n=43) RT between 2000 and 2009. Overall survival (OS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and patterns of failure were compared between the 2 cohorts. Median (range) age was 6 years old at diagnosis (3-21 years) for proton patients versus 8 years (3-19 years) for photon patients (P=.011). Cohorts were similar with respect to sex, histology, extent of surgical resection, craniospinal irradiation (CSI) RT dose, total RT dose, whether the RT boost was delivered to the posterior fossa (PF) or tumor bed (TB), time from surgery to RT start, or total duration of RT. RT consisted of a median (range) CSI dose of 23.4 Gy (18-27 Gy) and a boost of 30.6 Gy (27-37.8 Gy). Median follow-up time is 6.2 years (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.1-6.6 years) for proton patients versus 7.0 years (95% CI: 5.8-8.9 years) for photon patients. There was no significant difference in RFS or OS between patients treated with proton versus photon RT; 6-year RFS was 78.8% versus 76.5% (P=.948) and 6-year OS was 82.0% versus 87.6%, respectively (P=.285). On multivariate analysis, there was a trend for longer RFS with females (P=.058) and higher CSI dose (P=.096) and for longer OS with females (P=.093). Patterns of failure were similar between the 2 cohorts (P=.908). Disease control with proton and photon radiation therapy appears equivalent for standard risk medulloblastoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Polarizational bremsstrahlung in non-relativistic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korol, A.V.; Solov'yov, A.V.

    2006-01-01

    We review the developments made during the last decade in the theory of polarization bremsstrahlung in the non-relativistic domain. A literature survey covering the latest history of the phenomenon is given. The main features which distinguish the polarization bremsstrahlung from other mechanisms of radiation are discussed and illustrated by the results of numerical calculations

  15. Relativistic quantum mechanics; Mecanique quantique relativiste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ollitrault, J.Y. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service de Physique Theorique]|[Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 75 - Paris (France)

    1998-12-01

    These notes form an introduction to relativistic quantum mechanics. The mathematical formalism has been reduced to the minimum in order to enable the reader to calculate elementary physical processes. The second quantification and the field theory are the logical followings of this course. The reader is expected to know analytical mechanics (Lagrangian and Hamiltonian), non-relativistic quantum mechanics and some basis of restricted relativity. The purpose of the first 3 chapters is to define the quantum mechanics framework for already known notions about rotation transformations, wave propagation and restricted theory of relativity. The next 3 chapters are devoted to the application of relativistic quantum mechanics to a particle with 0,1/5 and 1 spin value. The last chapter deals with the processes involving several particles, these processes require field theory framework to be thoroughly described. (A.C.) 2 refs.

  16. Ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics with AFTER@LHC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Arnaldi, R.; Brodsky, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    We outline the opportunities for ultra-relativistic heavy–ion physics which are offered by a next generation and multi-purpose fixed-target experiment exploiting the proton and ion LHC beams extracted by a bent crystal.......We outline the opportunities for ultra-relativistic heavy–ion physics which are offered by a next generation and multi-purpose fixed-target experiment exploiting the proton and ion LHC beams extracted by a bent crystal....

  17. Differences in Normal Tissue Response in the Esophagus Between Proton and Photon Radiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using In Vivo Imaging Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzielski, Joshua S; Yang, Jinzhong; Mohan, Radhe; Titt, Uwe; Mirkovic, Dragan; Stingo, Francesco; Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel R; Martel, Mary K; Briere, Tina M; Court, Laurence E

    2017-11-15

    To determine whether there exists any significant difference in normal tissue toxicity between intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or proton therapy for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. A total of 134 study patients (n=49 treated with proton therapy, n=85 with IMRT) treated in a randomized trial had a previously validated esophageal toxicity imaging biomarker, esophageal expansion, quantified during radiation therapy, as well as esophagitis grade (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0), on a weekly basis during treatment. Differences between the 2 modalities were statically analyzed using the imaging biomarker metric value (Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance), as well as the incidence and severity of esophagitis grade (χ 2 and Fisher exact tests, respectively). The dose-response of the imaging biomarker was also compared between modalities using esophageal equivalent uniform dose, as well as delivered dose to an isotropic esophageal subvolume. No statistically significant difference in the distribution of esophagitis grade, the incidence of grade ≥3 esophagitis (15 and 11 patients treated with IMRT and proton therapy, respectively), or the esophageal expansion imaging biomarker between cohorts (P>.05) was found. The distribution of imaging biomarker metric values had similar distributions between treatment arms, despite a slightly higher dose volume in the proton arm (P>.05). Imaging biomarker dose-response was similar between modalities for dose quantified as esophageal equivalent uniform dose and delivered esophageal subvolume dose. Regardless of treatment modality, there was high variability in imaging biomarker response, as well as esophagitis grade, for similar esophageal doses between patients. There was no significant difference in esophageal toxicity from either proton- or photon-based radiation therapy as quantified by esophagitis grade or the esophageal expansion imaging biomarker. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  18. Towards relativistic quantum geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridao, Luis Santiago [Instituto de Investigaciones Físicas de Mar del Plata (IFIMAR), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Mar del Plata (Argentina); Bellini, Mauricio, E-mail: mbellini@mdp.edu.ar [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Funes 3350, C.P. 7600, Mar del Plata (Argentina); Instituto de Investigaciones Físicas de Mar del Plata (IFIMAR), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2015-12-17

    We obtain a gauge-invariant relativistic quantum geometry by using a Weylian-like manifold with a geometric scalar field which provides a gauge-invariant relativistic quantum theory in which the algebra of the Weylian-like field depends on observers. An example for a Reissner–Nordström black-hole is studied.

  19. Relativistic Coulomb Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear fission reactions induced by the electromagnetic field of relativistic nuclei are studied for energies relevant to present and future relativistic heavy ion accelerators. Cross sections are calculated for U-238 and Pu-239 fission induced by C-12, Si-28, Au-197, and U-238 projectiles. It is found that some of the cross sections can exceed 10 b.

  20. Relativistic Shock Acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, P.; Downes, T.P.; Gallant, Y.A.; Kirk, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we briefly review the basic theory of shock waves in relativistic hydrodynamics and magneto-hydrodynamics, emphasising some astrophysically interesting cases. We then present an overview of the theory of particle acceleration at such shocks describing the methods used to calculate the spectral indices of energetic particles. Recent results on acceleration at ultra-relativistic shocks are discussed. (author)