WorldWideScience

Sample records for relativistic gravitational physics

  1. Gravitation relativiste

    CERN Document Server

    Hakim, Rémi

    1994-01-01

    Il existe à l'heure actuelle un certain nombre de théories relativistes de la gravitation compatibles avec l'expérience et l'observation. Toutefois, la relativité générale d'Einstein fut historiquement la première à fournir des résultats théoriques corrects en accord précis avec les faits.

  2. Relativistic gravitation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunov, A.A.; Mestvirishvili, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of the special relativity and geometrization principle a relativistic gravitation theory (RGT) is unambiguously constructed with the help of a notion of a gravitational field as a physical field in Faraday-Maxwell spirit, which posesses energy momentum and spins 2 and 0. The source of gravitation field is a total conserved energy-momentum tensor for matter and for gravitation field in Minkowski space. In the RGT conservation laws for the energy momentum and angular momentum of matter and gravitational field hold rigorously. The theory explains the whole set of gravitation experiments. Here, due to the geometrization principle the Riemannian space is of a field origin since this space arises effectively as a result of the gravitation field origin since this space arises effectively as a result of the gravitation field action on the matter. The RGT astonishing prediction is that the Universe is not closed but ''flat''. It means that in the Universe there should exist a ''missing'' mass in some form of matter

  3. Relativistic theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunov, A.A.; Mestvirishvilli, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    In the present paper a relativistic theory of gravitation (RTG) is constructed in a unique way on the basis of the special relativity and geometrization principle. In this, a gravitational field is treated as the Faraday-Maxwell spin-2 and spin-0 physical field possessing energy and momentum. The source of a gravitational field is the total conserved energy-momentum tensor of matter and of a gravitational field in Minkowski space. In the RTG, the conservation laws are strictly fulfilled for the energy-momentum and for the angular momentum of matter and a gravitational field. The theory explains the whole available set of experiments on gravitation. In virtue of the geometrization principle, the Riemannian space in our theory is of field origin, since it appears as an effective force space due to the action of a gravitational field on matter. The RTg leads to an exceptionally strong prediction: The Universe is not closed but just ''flat''. This suggests that in the Universe a ''hidden mass'' should exist in some form of matter

  4. Relativistic theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunov, A.A.; Mestvirishvili, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    In the present paper a relativistic theory of gravitation (RTG) is unambiguously constructed on the basis of the special relativity and geometrization principle. In this a gravitational field is treated as the Faraday--Maxwell spin-2 and spin-0 physical field possessing energy and momentum. The source of a gravitational field is the total conserved energy-momentum tensor of matter and of a gravitational field in Minkowski space. In the RTG the conservation laws are strictly fulfilled for the energy-moment and for the angular momentum of matter and a gravitational field. The theory explains the whole available set of experiments on gravity. By virtue of the geometrization principle, the Riemannian space in our theory is of field origin, since it appears as an effective force space due to the action of a gravitational field on matter. The RTG leads to an exceptionally strong prediction: The universe is not closed but just ''flat.'' This suggests that in the universe a ''missing mass'' should exist in a form of matter

  5. Gravitationally confined relativistic neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayenas, C. G.; Fokas, A. S.; Grigoriou, D.

    2017-09-01

    Combining special relativity, the equivalence principle, and Newton’s universal gravitational law with gravitational rather than rest masses, one finds that gravitational interactions between relativistic neutrinos with kinetic energies above 50 MeV are very strong and can lead to the formation of gravitationally confined composite structures with the mass and other properties of hadrons. One may model such structures by considering three neutrinos moving symmetrically on a circular orbit under the influence of their gravitational attraction, and by assuming quantization of their angular momentum, as in the Bohr model of the H atom. The model contains no adjustable parameters and its solution, using a neutrino rest mass of 0.05 eV/c2, leads to composite state radii close to 1 fm and composite state masses close to 1 GeV/c2. Similar models of relativistic rotating electron - neutrino pairs give a mass of 81 GeV/c2, close to that of W bosons. This novel mechanism of generating mass suggests that the Higgs mass generation mechanism can be modeled as a latent gravitational field which gets activated by relativistic neutrinos.

  6. Relativistic gravitational instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schutz, B.F.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of these lectures is to review and explain what is known about the stability of relativistic stars and black holes, with particular emphases on two instabilities which are due entirely to relativistic effects. The first of these is the post-Newtonian pulsational instability discovered independently by Chandrasekhar (1964) and Fowler (1964). This effectively ruled out the then-popular supermassive star model for quasars, and it sets a limit to the central density of white dwarfs. The second instability was also discovered by Chandrasekhar (1970): the gravitational wave induced instability. This sets an upper bound on the rotation rate of neutron stars, which is near that of the millisecond pulsar PSR 1937+214, and which is beginning to constrain the equation of state of neutron matter. 111 references, 5 figures

  7. Sub-Microarcsecond Astrometry and New Horizons in Relativistic Gravitational Physics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kopeikin, Sergei M; Gwinn, Carl R

    2000-01-01

    .... Beyond the sub-microarcsecond threshold, one will meet in the sky a new population of physical phenomena caused by primordial gravitational waves from the early universe and/or different localized...

  8. Fundamentals of the relativistic theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunov, A.A.; Mestvirishvili, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    An extended exposition of the relativistic theory of gravitation (RTG) proposed by Logunov, Vlasov, and Mestvirishvili is presented. The RTG was constructed uniquely on the basis of the relativity principle and the geometrization principle by regarding the gravitational field as a physical field in the spirit of Faraday and Maxwell possessing energy, momentum, and spins 2 and 0. In the theory, conservation laws for the energy, momentum, and angular momentum for the matter and gravitational field taken together are strictly satisfied. The theory explains all the existing gravitational experiments. When the evolution of the universe is analyzed, the theory leads to the conclusion that the universe is infinite and flat, and it is predicted to contain a large amount of hidden mass. This missing mass exceeds by almost 40 times the amount of matter currently observed in the universe. The RTG predicts that gravitational collapse, which for a comoving observer occurs after a finite proper time, does not lead to infinite compression of matter but is halted at a certain finite density of the collapsing body. Therefore, according to the RTG there cannot be any objects in nature in which the gravitational contraction of matter to infinite density occurs, i.e., there are no black holes

  9. Workshop on gravitational waves and relativistic astrophysics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Discussions related to gravitational wave experiments viz. LIGO and LISA as well as to observations of supermassive black holes dominated the workshop sessions on gravitational waves and relativistic astrophysics in the ICGC-2004. A summary of seven papers that were presented in these workshop sessions has been ...

  10. Gravitational Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Schäfer, G.; Schutz, B.

    1996-01-01

    Gravity is truly universal. It is the force that pulls us to the Earth, that keeps the planets and moons in their orbits, and that causes the tides on the Earth to ebb and flow. It even keeps the Sun shining. Yet on a laboratory scale gravity is extremely weak. The Coulomb force between two protons is 1039 times stronger than the gravitational force between them. Moreover, Newton's gravitational constant is the least accurately known of the fundamental constants: it has been measured to 1 par...

  11. Radio Ranging Techniques to test Relativistic Gravitation

    OpenAIRE

    Cowsik, R.

    1999-01-01

    It is suggested that modern techniques of radio ranging when applied to study the motion of the Moon, can improve the accuracy of tests of relativistic gravitation obtained with currently operating laser ranging techniques. Other auxillary information relevant to the Solar system would also emerge from such a study.

  12. SPECIAL RELATIVISTIC HYDRODYNAMICS WITH GRAVITATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Jai-chan [Department of Astronomy and Atmospheric Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Hyerim [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-20

    Special relativistic hydrodynamics with weak gravity has hitherto been unknown in the literature. Whether such an asymmetric combination is possible has been unclear. Here, the hydrodynamic equations with Poisson-type gravity, considering fully relativistic velocity and pressure under the weak gravity and the action-at-a-distance limit, are consistently derived from Einstein’s theory of general relativity. An analysis is made in the maximal slicing, where the Poisson’s equation becomes much simpler than our previous study in the zero-shear gauge. Also presented is the hydrodynamic equations in the first post-Newtonian approximation, now under the general hypersurface condition. Our formulation includes the anisotropic stress.

  13. Gravitational field of relativistic gyratons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frolov, Valeri P [Theoretical Physics Institute, Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2J1 (Canada)

    2007-05-15

    A gyraton is an object moving with the speed of light and having finite energy and internal angular momentum (spin). First we derive the gravitational field of a gyraton in the linear approximation. After this we study solutions of the vacuum Einstein equations for gyratons. We demonstrate that these solutions in 4 and higher dimensions reduce to two linear problems in a Euclidean space. A similar reduction is also valid for gyraton solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell gravity and in supergravity. Namely, we demonstrate that in the both cases the solutions in 4 and higher dimensions reduce to linear problems in a Euclidean space.

  14. Gravitational Physics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Gravitational physics research at ISPAE is connected with NASA's Relativity Mission (Gravity Probe B (GP-B)) which will perform a test of Einstein's General Relativity Theory. GP-B will measure the geodetic and motional effect predicted by General Relativity Theory with extremely stable and sensitive gyroscopes in an earth orbiting satellite. Both effects cause a very small precession of the gyroscope spin axis. The goal of the GP-B experiment is the measurement of the gyroscope precession with very high precision. GP-B is being developed by a team at Stanford University and is scheduled for launch in the year 2001. The related UAH research is a collaboration with Stanford University and MSFC. This research is focussed primarily on the error analysis and data reduction methods of the experiment but includes other topics concerned with experiment systems and their performance affecting the science measurements. The hydrogen maser is the most accurate and stable clock available. It will be used in future gravitational physics missions to measure relativistic effects such as the second order Doppler effect. The HMC experiment, currently under development at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO), will test the performance and capability of the hydrogen maser clock for gravitational physics measurements. UAH in collaboration with the SAO science team will study methods to evaluate the behavior and performance of the HMC. The GP-B data analysis developed by the Stanford group involves complicated mathematical operations. This situation led to the idea to investigate alternate and possibly simpler mathematical procedures to extract the GP-B measurements form the data stream. Comparison of different methods would increase the confidence in the selected scheme.

  15. Chameleon scalar fields in relativistic gravitational backgrounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujikawa, Shinji; Tamaki, Takashi; Tavakol, Reza

    2009-01-01

    We study the field profile of a scalar field φ that couples to a matter fluid (dubbed a chameleon field) in the relativistic gravitational background of a spherically symmetric spacetime. Employing a linear expansion in terms of the gravitational potential Φ c at the surface of a compact object with a constant density, we derive the thin-shell field profile both inside and outside the object, as well as the resulting effective coupling with matter, analytically. We also carry out numerical simulations for the class of inverse power-law potentials V(φ) = M 4+n φ −n by employing the information provided by our analytical solutions to set the boundary conditions around the centre of the object and show that thin-shell solutions in fact exist if the gravitational potential Φ c is smaller than 0.3, which marginally covers the case of neutron stars. Thus the chameleon mechanism is present in the relativistic gravitational backgrounds, capable of reducing the effective coupling. Since thin-shell solutions are sensitive to the choice of boundary conditions, our analytic field profile is very helpful to provide appropriate boundary conditions for Φ c ∼< O(0.1)

  16. Chameleon scalar fields in relativistic gravitational backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujikawa, Shinji [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Tokyo University of Science, 1-3, Kagurazaka, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan); Tamaki, Takashi [Department of Physics, Waseda University, Okubo 3-4-1, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Tavakol, Reza, E-mail: shinji@rs.kagu.tus.ac.jp, E-mail: tamaki@gravity.phys.waseda.ac.jp, E-mail: r.tavakol@qmul.ac.uk [Astronomy Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2009-05-15

    We study the field profile of a scalar field {phi} that couples to a matter fluid (dubbed a chameleon field) in the relativistic gravitational background of a spherically symmetric spacetime. Employing a linear expansion in terms of the gravitational potential {Phi}{sub c} at the surface of a compact object with a constant density, we derive the thin-shell field profile both inside and outside the object, as well as the resulting effective coupling with matter, analytically. We also carry out numerical simulations for the class of inverse power-law potentials V({phi}) = M{sup 4+n}{phi}{sup -n} by employing the information provided by our analytical solutions to set the boundary conditions around the centre of the object and show that thin-shell solutions in fact exist if the gravitational potential {Phi}{sub c} is smaller than 0.3, which marginally covers the case of neutron stars. Thus the chameleon mechanism is present in the relativistic gravitational backgrounds, capable of reducing the effective coupling. Since thin-shell solutions are sensitive to the choice of boundary conditions, our analytic field profile is very helpful to provide appropriate boundary conditions for {Phi}{sub c}{approx}

  17. Gravitational waves from instabilities in relativistic stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Nils

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of stellar instabilities as sources of gravitational waves. The aim is to put recent work on secular and dynamical instabilities in compact stars in context, and to summarize the current thinking about the detectability of gravitational waves from various scenarios. As a new generation of kilometre length interferometric detectors is now coming online this is a highly topical theme. The review is motivated by two key questions for future gravitational-wave astronomy: are the gravitational waves from various instabilities detectable? If so, what can these gravitational-wave signals teach us about neutron star physics? Even though we may not have clear answers to these questions, recent studies of the dynamical bar-mode instability and the secular r-mode instability have provided new insights into many of the difficult issues involved in modelling unstable stars as gravitational-wave sources. (topical review)

  18. Gravitational mass of relativistic matter and antimatter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tigran Kalaydzhyan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The universality of free fall, the weak equivalence principle (WEP, is a cornerstone of the general theory of relativity, the most precise theory of gravity confirmed in all experiments up to date. The WEP states the equivalence of the inertial, m, and gravitational, mg, masses and was tested in numerous occasions with normal matter at relatively low energies. However, there is no confirmation for the matter and antimatter at high energies. For the antimatter the situation is even less clear – current direct observations of trapped antihydrogen suggest the limits −65gravitational mass of relativistic electrons and positrons coming from the absence of the vacuum Cherenkov radiation at the Large Electron–Positron Collider (LEP and stability of photons at the Tevatron collider in presence of the annual variations of the solar gravitational potential. Our result clearly rules out the speculated antigravity. By considering the absolute potential of the Local Supercluster (LS, we also predict the bounds 1−4×10−7

  19. The underlying principles of relativistic theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunov, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    The paper deals with the main statements of relativistic theory of gravitation, constructed in result of critical analysis of the general theory of relativity. The principle of geometrization is formulated

  20. Relativistic theory of gravitation and nonuniqueness of the predictions of general relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunov, A.A.; Loskutov, Yu.M.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that while the predictions of relativistic theory of gravitation (RTG) for the gravitational effects are unique and consistent with the experimental data available, the relevant predictions of general relativity theory are not unique. Therewith the above nonuniqueness manifests itself in some effects in the first order in the gravitational interaction constant in others in the second one. The absence in GRT of the energy-momentum and angular momentum conservation laws for the matter and gravitational field taken together and its inapplicability to give uniquely determined predictions for the gravitational phenomena compel to reject GRT as a physical theory

  1. Relativistic heavy ion physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.C.; Wohn, F.K.

    1992-01-01

    In 1992 a proposal by the Iowa State University experimental nuclear physics group entitled ''Relativistic Heavy Ion Physics'' was funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Energy Research, for a three-year period beginning November 15, 1991. This is a progress report for the first six months of that period but, in order to give a wider perspective, we report here on progress made since the beginning of calendar year 1991. In the first section, entitled ''Purpose and Trends,'' we give some background on the recent trends in our research program and its evolution from an emphasis on nuclear structure physics to its present emphasis on relativistic heavy ion and RHIC physics. The next section, entitled, ''Physics Research Programs,'' is divided into three parts. First, we discuss our participation in the program to develop a large detector named PHENIX for the RHIC accelerator. Second, we outline progress made in the study of electromagnetic dissociation (ED). A highlight of this endeavor is experiments carried out with the 197 Au beam from the AGS accelerator in April 1991. Third, we discuss progress in completion of our nuclear structure studies. In the final section a list of publications, invited talks and contributed talks starting in 1991 is given

  2. On the relativistic particle dynamics in external gravitational fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'menkov, L.S.; Naumov, N.D.

    1977-01-01

    On the base of the Riemann metrics of an event space, leading to the Newton mechanics at nonrelativistic velocities and not obligatory weak gravitational fields relativistic particle dynamics in external gravitation fields has been considered. Found are trajectories, motion laws and light ray equations for the homogeneous and Newton fields

  3. On the fundamental principles of the relativistic theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunov, A.A.; Mestvirishvili, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper expounds consistently within the frames of the Special Relativity Theory the fundamental postulates of the Relativistic Theory of Gravitation (RTG) which make it possible to obtain the unique complete system of the equations for gravitational field. Major attention has been paid to the analysis of the gauge group and of the causality principle. Some results related to the evolution of the Friedmann Universe, to gravitational collapse, etc. being the consequences of the RTG equations are also presented. 7 refs

  4. Relativistic theory of gravitation and the graviton rest mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunsov, A.A.; Mestvirishvili, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper examines a graviton rest mass (m) introduced in the framework of the relativistic theory of gravitation and obtains equations that describe a massive gravitational field. Under the assumption that the entire hidden mass of the matter in the Universe is due to the existence of a massive gravitational field, an upper bound on the rest mass is obtained: m ≤ 0.64 x 10 --65 g

  5. Relativistic heavy ion physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.C.; Wohn, F.K.

    1993-01-01

    This is a progress report for the period May 1992 through April 1993. The first section, entitled ''Purpose and Trends, gives background on the recent trends in the research program and its evolution from an emphasis on nuclear structure physics to its present emphasis on relativistic heavy ion and RHIC physics. The next section, entitled ''Physics Research Progress'', is divided into four parts: participation in the program to develop a large detector named PHENIX for the RHIC accelerator; joining E864 at the AGS accelerator and the role in that experiment; progress made in the study of electromagnetic dissociation highlight of this endeavor is an experiment carried out with the 197 Au beam from the AGS accelerator in April 1992; progress in completion of the nuclear structure studies. In the final section a list of publications, invited talks, and contributed talks is given

  6. Uniqueness of exterior axisymmetric solution for a rotating charged body in the relativistic theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karabut, P.V.; Chugreev, Yu.V.

    1989-01-01

    The relativistic theory of gravitation (RTG), which is constructed on the basis of Minkowski spacetime, the geometrization principle, and the notion of the gravitational field var-phi mn as a physical field in the spirit of Faraday and Maxwell, explains all known gravitational experiments and gives a new prediction for the evolution of the universe, collapse, etc. The RTG determines the structure of the gravitational field as a field possessing spins 2 and 0 and all conservation laws for energy, momentum, and angular momentum. An exact solution of the complete simultaneous system of equations of the relativistic theory of gravitation and Maxwell's equations is found in the axisymmetric case for an electrically charged rotating body. The uniqueness of this solution is proved

  7. Constraining Relativistic Generalizations of Modified Newtonian Dynamics with Gravitational Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesler, Paul M; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-07-21

    In the weak-field limit of general relativity, gravitational waves obey linear equations and propagate at the speed of light. These properties of general relativity are supported by the observation of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays as well as by LIGO's recent detection of gravitation waves. We argue that two existing relativistic generalizations of modified Newtonian dynamics, namely, the generalized Einstein-aether theory and bimetric modified Newtonian dynamics, display fatal inconsistencies with these observations.

  8. Unification of Gravitation and Electromagnetism in a Relativistic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A theory of gravitation is considered in a relativistic version of Finslerian geometry. It is found that both the geodesic equations and the Finslerian analogue of the Einstein\\'s field equations have terms that involve the electromagnetic field tensor, thereby pointing out to the geometrization of electrodynamics and hence to a ...

  9. Relativistic motion of spinning particles in a gravitational field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chicone, C.; Mashhoon, B.; Punsly, B.

    2005-01-01

    The relative motion of a classical relativistic spinning test particle is studied with respect to a nearby free test particle in the gravitational field of a rotating source. The effects of the spin-curvature coupling force are elucidated and the implications of the results for the motion of rotating plasma clumps in astrophysical jets are discussed

  10. Relativistic gravitational potential and its relation to mass-energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voracek, P.

    1979-01-01

    From the general theory of relativity a relation is deduced between the mass of a particle and the gravitational field at the position of the particle. For this purpose the fall of a particle of negligible mass in the gravitational field of a massive body is used. After establishing the relativistic potential and its relationship to the rest mass of the particle, we show, assuming conservation of mass-energy, that the difference between two potential-levels depends upon the value of the radial metric coefficient at the position of an observer. Further, it is proved that the relativistic potential is compatible with the general concept of the potential also from the standpoint of kinematics. In the third section it is shown that, although the mass-energy of a body is a function of the distance from it, this does not influence the relativistic potential of the body itself. From this conclusion it follows that the mass-energy of a particle in a gravitational field is anisotropic; isotropic is the mass only. Further, the possibility of an incidental feed-back between two masses is ruled out, and the law of the composition of the relativistic gravitational potentials is deduced. Finally, it is shown, by means of a simple model, that local inhomogeneities in the ideal fluid filling the Universe have negligible influence on the total potential in large regions. (orig.)

  11. Workshop on gravitational waves and relativistic astrophysics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    runs of LIGO, so crucial for detection of 'chirp' signals from compact binaries, have ... Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) like quasars and radio-galaxies require ... Shrirang Deshingkar described a new scheme for extracting gravitational ... and was applied to certain test problems, second-order convergence of the News to.

  12. Relativistic heavy-ion physics

    CERN Document Server

    Herrera Corral, G

    2010-01-01

    The study of relativistic heavy-ion collisions is an important part of the LHC research programme at CERN. This emerging field of research focuses on the study of matter under extreme conditions of temperature, density, and pressure. Here we present an introduction to the general aspects of relativistic heavy-ion physics. Afterwards we give an overview of the accelerator facility at CERN and then a quick look at the ALICE project as a dedicated experiment for heavy-ion collisions.

  13. Initial data for the relativistic gravitational N-body problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrusciel, Piotr T; Corvino, Justin; Isenberg, James

    2010-01-01

    In general relativity, an initial data set for an isolated gravitational system takes the form of a solution of the Einstein constraint equations which is asymptotically Euclidean on a specified end. Given a collection of N such data sets with a subregion of interest (bounded away from the specified end) chosen in each, we show that there exists a family of new initial data sets, each of which contains exact copies of each of the N chosen subregions, positioned in a chosen array in a single asymptotic end. These composite initial data sets model isolated, relativistic gravitational systems containing N chosen bodies in specified initial configurations. (fast track communication)

  14. Gravitational mass of relativistic matter and antimatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2015-12-01

    The universality of free fall, the weak equivalence principle (WEP), is a cornerstone of the general theory of relativity, the most precise theory of gravity confirmed in all experiments up to date. The WEP states the equivalence of the inertial, m, and gravitational, mg, masses and was tested in numerous occasions with normal matter at relatively low energies. However, there is no confirmation for the matter and antimatter at high energies. For the antimatter the situation is even less clear - current direct observations of trapped antihydrogen suggest the limits - 65 antigravity phenomenon, i.e. repulsion of the antimatter by Earth. Here we demonstrate an indirect bound 0.96 antigravity. By considering the absolute potential of the Local Supercluster (LS), we also predict the bounds 1 - 4 ×10-7

  15. Gravitational attraction until relativistic equipartition of internal and translational kinetic energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulyzhenkov, I. E.

    2018-02-01

    Translational ordering of the internal kinematic chaos provides the Special Relativity referents for the geodesic motion of warm thermodynamical bodies. Taking identical mathematics, relativistic physics of the low speed transport of time-varying heat-energies differs from Newton's physics of steady masses without internal degrees of freedom. General Relativity predicts geodesic changes of the internal heat-energy variable under the free gravitational fall and the geodesic turn in the radial field center. Internal heat variations enable cyclic dynamics of decelerated falls and accelerated takeoffs of inertial matter and its structural self-organization. The coordinate speed of the ordered spatial motion takes maximum under the equipartition of relativistic internal and translational kinetic energies. Observable predictions are discussed for verification/falsification of the principle of equipartition as a new basic for the ordered motion and self-organization in external fields, including gravitational, electromagnetic, and thermal ones.

  16. Relativistic gravitation theory for the modified Newtonian dynamics paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekenstein, Jacob D.

    2004-01-01

    The modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) paradigm of Milgrom can boast of a number of successful predictions regarding galactic dynamics; these are made without the assumption that dark matter plays a significant role. MOND requires gravitation to depart from Newtonian theory in the extragalactic regime where dynamical accelerations are small. So far relativistic gravitation theories proposed to underpin MOND have either clashed with the post-Newtonian tests of general relativity, or failed to provide significant gravitational lensing, or violated hallowed principles by exhibiting superluminal scalar waves or an a priori vector field. We develop a relativistic MOND inspired theory which resolves these problems. In it gravitation is mediated by metric, a scalar, and a 4-vector field, all three dynamical. For a simple choice of its free function, the theory has a Newtonian limit for nonrelativistic dynamics with significant acceleration, but a MOND limit when accelerations are small. We calculate the β and γ parameterized post-Newtonian coefficients showing them to agree with solar system measurements. The gravitational light deflection by nonrelativistic systems is governed by the same potential responsible for dynamics of particles. To the extent that MOND successfully describes dynamics of a system, the new theory's predictions for lensing by that system's visible matter will agree as well with observations as general relativity's predictions made with a dynamically successful dark halo model. Cosmological models based on the theory are quite similar to those based on general relativity; they predict slow evolution of the scalar field. For a range of initial conditions, this last result makes it easy to rule out superluminal propagation of metric, scalar, and vector waves

  17. Gravitational mass and Newton's universal gravitational law under relativistic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vayenas, Constantinos G; Grigoriou, Dimitrios; Fokas, Athanasios

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the predictions of Newton's universal gravitational law when using the gravitational, m g , rather than the rest masses, m o , of the attracting particles. According to the equivalence principle, the gravitational mass equals the inertial mass, m i , and the latter which can be directly computed from special relativity, is an increasing function of the Lorentz factor, γ, and thus of the particle velocity. We consider gravitationally bound rotating composite states, and we show that the ratio of the gravitational force for gravitationally bound rotational states to the force corresponding to low (γ ≈ 1) particle velocities is of the order of (m Pl /m o ) 2 where mpi is the Planck mass (ħc/G) 1/2 . We also obtain a similar result, within a factor of two, by employing the derivative of the effective potential of the Schwarzschild geodesics of GR. Finally, we show that for certain macroscopic systems, such as the perihelion precession of planets, the predictions of this relativistic Newtonian gravitational law differ again by only a factor of two from the predictions of GR. (paper)

  18. Relativistic heavy ions physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, B.

    1989-01-01

    Central nuclear collisions at energies far above 1 GeV/nucleon may provide for conditions, where the transition from highly excited hadronic matter into quark matter or quark-gluon plasma can be probed. We review current ideas about the nature of, and signals for, this transition, and we discuss the (hadronic) string model approach to the nuclear collisions dynamics. At even higher energies in the TeV/nucleon range peripheral nuclear collisions may become a laboratory for electroweak physics at the unification scale allowing, e.g., for Higgs boson production. 42 refs., 29 figs.,

  19. Optics of relativistic sources in a spherically symmetric gravitational field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of spectral shifts and gravitational focussing on radiation from sources moving geodesically in the Schwarzschild gravitational field is analyzed using the general-relativistic equations for geodesic motion and for the propagation of radiation along null geodesics in the geometrical optics approximation. The exact solutions of the Schwarzschild geodesic equations are briefly discussed for the null and time-like cases, and the method of classifying the orbital types of motion based on the effective radial potential is presented. A method of finding the stability of these orbits using this technique is discussed. The geometrical optics approximation for the propagation of radiation is discussed, and the area-intensity law for the Schwarzschild field is derived. The particularly interesting region near R = 3m is investigated by means of expansions of the exact equations. Numerical techniques for calculating radiation patterns from the propagation equations are discussed, including techniques for obtaining the time variation along geodesics and differences in propagation time along different null geodesics. Finally, the implications of these calculations for the apparent contradiction in energy requirements set by Joseph Weber's observations of galactic gravitational radiation and by astronomical observation are discussed. (Diss. Abstr. Int., B)

  20. The magnetosphere in relativistic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapffe, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    The present paper takes off from the author's earlier epistemological analysis and criticism of the Special Theory of Relativity, identifies the problem as lying in Einstein's choice of the inertial frame of Newtonian mechanics rather than the electromagnetic frame of the locally embedding Maxwellian field when discussing electrodynamics, then proposes this Maxwellian field of the magnetosphere as the specific rest frame proper to all experimentation of optical or electromagnetic sort conducted within its bounds. The result is shown to remove all paradoxes from relativistic physics. (author)

  1. Relativistic bound state approach to fundamental forces including gravitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morsch H.P.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To describe the structure of particle bound states of nature, a relativistic bound state formalism is presented, which requires a Lagrangian including scalar coupling of two boson fields. The underlying mechanisms are quite complex and require an interplay of overlapping boson fields and fermion-antifermion production. This gives rise to two potentials, a boson-exchange potential and one identified with the long sought confinement potential in hadrons. With minimal requirements, two elementary massless fermions (quantons - with and without charge - and one gauge boson, hadrons and leptons but also atoms and gravitational systems are described by bound states with electric and magnetic coupling between the charges and spins of quantons. No need is found for colour, Higgs-coupling and supersymmetry.

  2. Relativistic gravitation from massless systems of scalar and vector fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca Teixeira, A.F. da.

    1979-01-01

    Under the laws of Einstein's gravitational theory, a massless system consisting of the diffuse sources of two fields is discussed. One fields is scalar, of long range, the other is a vector field of short range. A proportionality between the sources is assumed. Both fields are minimally coupled to gravitation, and contribute positive definitely to the time component of the energy momentum tensor. A class of static, spherically symmetric solutions of the equations is obtained, in the weak field limit. The solutions are regular everywhere, stable, and can represent large or small physical systems. The gravitational field presents a Schwarzschild-type asymptotic behavior. The dependence of the energy on the various parameters characterizing the system is discussed in some detail. (Author) [pt

  3. Physical processes in relativistic plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, R.

    1984-01-01

    The continuum emission in many active galactic nuclei (AGNs) extend to 100 keV and beyond (e.g. Rothschild et al. 1983). In thermal models of the continuum emission this implies temperatures above 10 9 K or kT of order mc 2 . In such a plasma the electrons are at least mildly relativistic and furthermore the particles and the photons are energetic enough to produce electron-positron pairs. The physics of such hot plasmas has only recently been studied in any detail and here we review the results of those studies. Significant electron-positron pair production may also occur in non-thermal models of the continuum emission if the optical depth to photon-photon pair production is greater than unity. We review the few results obtained regarding this interesting but not very well studied possibility. First, however, we briefly discuss the processes taking place in relativistic plasmas and the standard models for the continuum emission from AGNs. We then summarize the effects pair production have on these models and the observational implications of the presence of electron-positron pairs. (orig./WL)

  4. Physical and Relativistic Numerical Cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anninos, Peter

    1998-01-01

    In order to account for the observable Universe, any comprehensive theory or model of cosmology must draw from many disciplines of physics, including gauge theories of strong and weak interactions, the hydrodynamics and microphysics of baryonic matter, electromagnetic fields, and spacetime curvature, for example. Although it is difficult to incorporate all these physical elements into a single complete model of our Universe, advances in computing methods and technologies have contributed significantly towards our understanding of cosmological models, the Universe, and astrophysical processes within them. A sample of numerical calculations addressing specific issues in cosmology are reviewed in this article: from the Big Bang singularity dynamics to the fundamental interactions of gravitational waves; from the quark-hadron phase transition to the large scale structure of the Universe. The emphasis, although not exclusively, is on those calculations designed to test different models of cosmology against the observed Universe.

  5. Physical and Relativistic Numerical Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Anninos

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to account for the observable Universe, any comprehensive theory or model of cosmology must draw from many disciplines of physics, including gauge theories of strong and weak interactions, the hydrodynamics and microphysics of baryonic matter, electromagnetic fields, and spacetime curvature, for example. Although it is difficult to incorporate all these physical elements into a single complete model of our Universe, advances in computing methods and technologies have contributed significantly towards our understanding of cosmological models, the Universe, and astrophysical processes within them. A sample of numerical calculations addressing specific issues in cosmology are reviewed in this article: from the Big Bang singularity dynamics to the fundamental interactions of gravitational waves; from the quark--hadron phase transition to the large scale structure of the Universe. The emphasis, although not exclusively, is on those calculations designed to test different models of cosmology against the observed Universe.

  6. Theory and experiment in gravitational physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, C. M.

    New technological advances have made it feasible to conduct measurements with precision levels which are suitable for experimental tests of the theory of general relativity. This book has been designed to fill a new need for a complete treatment of techniques for analyzing gravitation theory and experience. The Einstein equivalence principle and the foundations of gravitation theory are considered, taking into account the Dicke framework, basic criteria for the viability of a gravitation theory, experimental tests of the Einstein equivalence principle, Schiff's conjecture, and a model theory devised by Lightman and Lee (1973). Gravitation as a geometric phenomenon is considered along with the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism, the classical tests, tests of the strong equivalence principle, gravitational radiation as a tool for testing relativistic gravity, the binary pulsar, and cosmological tests.

  7. The Gravitational Field in the Relativistic Uniform Model within the Framework of the Covariant Theory of Gravitation

    OpenAIRE

    Fedosin, Sergey G.

    2018-01-01

    For the relativistic uniform system with an invariant mass density the exact expressions are determined for the potentials and strengths of the gravitational field, the energy of particles and fields. It is shown that, as in the classical case for bodies with a constant mass density, in the system with a zero vector potential of the gravitational field, the energy of the particles, associated with the scalar field potential, is twice as large in the absolute value as the energy defined by the...

  8. Relativistic nuclear physics and quantum chromodynamics. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The data of investigations on problems of high energy physics are given. Special attention pays to quantum chromodynamics at large distances, cumulative processes, multiquark states and relativistic nuclear collisions

  9. A relativistic extended Fermi-Thomas-like equation for a self-gravitating system of fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merloni, A.; Ruffini, R.; Torroni, V.

    1998-01-01

    The authors extend previous results of a Fermi-Thomas model, describing self-gravitating fermions in their ground state, to a relativistic gravitational theory in Minkowski space. In such a theory the source term of the gravitational potential depends both on the pressure and the density of the fluid. It is shown that, in correspondence of this relativistic treatment, still a Fermi-Thomas-like equation can be derived for the self-gravitating system, though the non-linearities are much more complex. No Fermi-Thomas-like equation can be obtained in the General Relativistic treatment. The canonical results for neutron stars and white dwarfs are recovered and also some erroneous statements in the scientific literature are corrected

  10. Methods in relativistic nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danos, M.; Gillet, V.; Cauvin, M.

    1984-01-01

    This book is intended to provide the methods and tools for performing actual calculations for finite many-body systems of bound relativistic constituent particles. The aim is to cover thoroughly the methodological aspects of the relativistic many-body problem for bound states while avoiding the presentation of specific models. The many examples contained in the later part of the work are meant to give concrete illustrations of how to actually apply the methods which are given in the first part. The basic framework of the approach is the lagrangian field theory solved in the time-independent Schroedinger picture. (Auth.)

  11. Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology with Gravitational Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathyaprakash B. S.

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Gravitational wave detectors are already operating at interesting sensitivity levels, and they have an upgrade path that should result in secure detections by 2014. We review the physics of gravitational waves, how they interact with detectors (bars and interferometers, and how these detectors operate. We study the most likely sources of gravitational waves and review the data analysis methods that are used to extract their signals from detector noise. Then we consider the consequences of gravitational wave detections and observations for physics, astrophysics, and cosmology.

  12. Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology with Gravitational Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyaprakash, B S; Schutz, Bernard F

    2009-01-01

    Gravitational wave detectors are already operating at interesting sensitivity levels, and they have an upgrade path that should result in secure detections by 2014. We review the physics of gravitational waves, how they interact with detectors (bars and interferometers), and how these detectors operate. We study the most likely sources of gravitational waves and review the data analysis methods that are used to extract their signals from detector noise. Then we consider the consequences of gravitational wave detections and observations for physics, astrophysics, and cosmology.

  13. Relativistic atomic physics at the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following proposed work for relativistic atomic physics at the Superconducting Super Collider: Beam diagnostics; atomic physics research; staffing; education; budget information; statement concerning matching funds; description and justification of major items of equipment; statement of current and pending support; and assurance of compliance

  14. Radiation reaction for the classical relativistic spinning particle in scalar, tensor and linearized gravitational fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barut, A.O.; Cruz, M.G.

    1992-08-01

    We use the method of analytic continuation of the equation of motion including the self-fields to evaluate the radiation reaction for a classical relativistic spinning point particle in interaction with scalar, tensor and linearized gravitational fields in flat spacetime. In the limit these equations reduce to those of spinless particles. We also show the renormalizability of these theories. (author). 10 refs

  15. General relativistic model for the gravitational field of active galactic nuclei surrounded by a disk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt, D.; Letelier, P.S.

    2005-01-01

    An exact but simple general relativistic model for the gravitational field of active galactic nuclei is constructed, based on the superposition in Weyl coordinates of a black hole, a Chazy-Curzon disk and two rods, which represent matter jets. The influence of the rods on the matter properties of

  16. RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION PHYSICS: A THEORETICAL OVERVIEW.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KHARZEEV,D.

    2004-03-28

    This is a mini-review of recent theoretical work in the field of relativistic heavy ion physics. The following topics are discussed initial conditions and the Color Glass Condensate; approach to thermalization and the hydrodynamic evolution; hard probes and the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma. Some of the unsolved problems and potentially promising directions for future research are listed as well.

  17. General Relativistic Theory of the VLBI Time Delay in the Gravitational Field of Moving Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeikin, Sergei

    2003-01-01

    The general relativistic theory of the gravitational VLBI experiment conducted on September 8, 2002 by Fomalont and Kopeikin is explained. Equations of radio waves (light) propagating from the quasar to the observer are integrated in the time-dependent gravitational field of the solar system by making use of either retarded or advanced solutions of the Einstein field equations. This mathematical technique separates explicitly the effects associated with the propagation of gravity from those associated with light in the integral expression for the relativistic VLBI time delay of light. We prove that the relativistic correction to the Shapiro time delay, discovered by Kopeikin (ApJ, 556, L1, 2001), changes sign if one retains direction of the light propagation but replaces the retarded for the advanced solution of the Einstein equations. Hence, this correction is associated with the propagation of gravity. The VLBI observation measured its speed, and that the retarded solution is the correct one.

  18. On relativistic generalization of Perelman's W-entropy and thermodynamic description of gravitational fields and cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vacaru, Olivia [National College of Iasi (Romania); Vacaru, Sergiu I. [Quantum Gravity Research, Topanga, CA (United States); University ' ' Al.I. Cuza' ' Iasi, Project IDEI, Iasi (Romania); Werner-Heisenberg-Institute, Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Leibniz University of Hannover, Institute for Theoretical Physics (Germany); Ruchin, Vyacheslav

    2017-03-15

    Using double 2 + 2 and 3 + 1 nonholonomic fibrations on Lorentz manifolds, we extend the concept of W-entropy for gravitational fields in general relativity (GR). Such F- and W-functionals were introduced in the Ricci flow theory of three dimensional (3-d) Riemannian metrics by Perelman (the entropy formula for the Ricci flow and its geometric applications. arXiv:math.DG/0211159). Non-relativistic 3-d Ricci flows are characterized by associated statistical thermodynamical values determined by W-entropy. Generalizations for geometric flows of 4-d pseudo-Riemannian metrics are considered for models with local thermodynamical equilibrium and separation of dissipative and non-dissipative processes in relativistic hydrodynamics. The approach is elaborated in the framework of classical field theories (relativistic continuum and hydrodynamic models) without an underlying kinetic description, which will be elaborated in other work. The 3 + 1 splitting allows us to provide a general relativistic definition of gravitational entropy in the Lyapunov-Perelman sense. It increases monotonically as structure forms in the Universe. We can formulate a thermodynamic description of exact solutions in GR depending, in general, on all spacetime coordinates. A corresponding 2 + 2 splitting with nonholonomic deformation of linear connection and frame structures is necessary for generating in very general form various classes of exact solutions of the Einstein and general relativistic geometric flow equations. Finally, we speculate on physical macrostates and microstate interpretations of the W-entropy in GR, geometric flow theories and possible connections to string theory (a second unsolved problem also contained in Perelman's work) in Polyakov's approach. (orig.)

  19. Relativistic equations for axisymmetric gravitational collapse with escaping neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, M.D.

    1979-01-01

    Einstein's field equations for the dynamics of a self-gravitating axially symmetric source of a perfect fluid, presented by Chandrasekhar and Friedman (1964), are modified to allow emission of neutrinos. The boundary conditions at the outer surface of the radiating axisymmetric source are obtained by matching to an exterior solution of an axisymmetric rotating, radiating core. (auth.)

  20. Localization and Entanglement in Relativistic Quantum Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yngvason, Jakob

    These notes are a slightly expanded version of a lecture presented in February 2012 at the workshop "The Message of Quantum Science—Attempts Towards a Synthesis" held at the ZIF in Bielefeld. The participants were physicists with a wide range of different expertise and interests. The lecture was intended as a survey of a small selection of the insights into the structure of relativistic quantum physics that have accumulated through the efforts of many people over more than 50 years. (Including, among many others, R. Haag, H. Araki, D. Kastler, H.-J. Borchers, A. Wightman, R. Streater, B. Schroer, H. Reeh, S. Schlieder, S. Doplicher, J. Roberts, R. Jost, K. Hepp, J. Fröhlich, J. Glimm, A. Jaffe, J. Bisognano, E. Wichmann, D. Buchholz, K. Fredenhagen, R. Longo, D. Guido, R. Brunetti, J. Mund, S. Summers, R. Werner, H. Narnhofer, R. Verch, G. Lechner, ….) This contribution discusses some facts about relativistic quantum physics, most of which are quite familiar to practitioners of Algebraic Quantum Field Theory (AQFT) [Also known as Local Quantum Physics (Haag, Local quantum physics. Springer, Berlin, 1992).] but less well known outside this community. No claim of originality is made; the goal of this contribution is merely to present these facts in a simple and concise manner, focusing on the following issues: Explaining how quantum mechanics (QM) combined with (special) relativity, in particular an upper bound on the propagation velocity of effects, leads naturally to systems with an infinite number of degrees of freedom (relativistic quantum fields).

  1. Outline of a classical theory of quantum physics and gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallop, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    It is argued that in the manner in which the Galilean-Newtonian physics may be said to have explained the Ptolemaic-Copernican theories in terms which have since been called classical, so also Milner's theories of the structure of matter may be said to explain present day quantum and relativistic theory. In both cases the former employ the concept of force and the latter, by contrast, are geometrical theories. Milner envisaged space as being stressed, whereas Einstein thought of it as strained. Development of Milner's theory from criticisms and suggestions made by Kilmister has taken it further into the realms of quantum and gravitational physics, where it is found to give a more physically comprehensible explanation of the phenomena. Further, it shows why present day quantum theory is cast in a statistical form. The theory is supported by many predictions such as the ratio of Planck's constant to the mass of the electron, the value of the fine structure constant and reason for apparent variations in past measurements, the magnetic moment of the electron and proton of the stable particles such as the neutron Λ and Σ together with the kaon, and a relation between the universal gravitational constant and Hubble's constant - all within published experimental accuracy. The latest results to be accounted for by the theory are the masses of the newly discovered psi particles and confirmation of the value of the decay of Newton's gravitational constant obtained from lunar measurements. (author)

  2. A major point in the relativistic gravitation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draminsky, P.

    1976-01-01

    In this article Draminsky gives his answer to those critics who, while noting his objections to Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, have been uncertain what Draminsky would put in its place. Draminsky's theory is based on the same foundation as Einstein's, that real space in a gravitational field is non-Euclidean. This space is contracted or dilated in relation to time in different ways from place to place. The tracks of free particles in such space are geodetic lines calculated from second-order differential equations, the form and solution of which is described. The single assumption required to provide a rigid and exact field equation is that the inertial mass of a particle in a local system of reference is the same as its gravitational mass measured and operative in the reference system: which is the 'identity principle' of Einstein formulated in the only entirely precise manner. (A.D.N.)

  3. The large numbers hypothesis and a relativistic theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Y.K.; Prokhovnik, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    A way to reconcile Dirac's large numbers hypothesis and Einstein's theory of gravitation was recently suggested by Lau (1985). It is characterized by the conjecture of a time-dependent cosmological term and gravitational term in Einstein's field equations. Motivated by this conjecture and the large numbers hypothesis, we formulate here a scalar-tensor theory in terms of an action principle. The cosmological term is required to be spatially dependent as well as time dependent in general. The theory developed is appled to a cosmological model compatible with the large numbers hypothesis. The time-dependent form of the cosmological term and the scalar potential are then deduced. A possible explanation of the smallness of the cosmological term is also given and the possible significance of the scalar field is speculated

  4. Time, gravitation, and the Universe: the evolution of relativistic theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitrow, G J

    1974-12-31

    An account is given of the historical development or the theory of relativity, particularly from Newton' s mechanics and Maxwell's electrodynamics, and with reference to the importance of the work of 19th century mathematicians such as Riemann, Klein and Neumann, leading to the work of Poincare, Minkowski, Lorentz and Einstein. The Michelson-Morley, Kennedy-Thorndike and IvesStillwell experiments are discussed, the use of the radar concept in relativity, and the discovery in 1965 of the universal black-body microwave radiation. Gravitation and cosmological problems are considered in historical review. (UK)

  5. Gravitational waves from a spinning particle scattered by a relativistic star: Axial mode case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Saijo, Motoyuki; Maeda, Kei-ichi

    2001-01-01

    We use a perturbation method to study gravitational waves from a spinning test particle scattered by a relativistic star. The present analysis is restricted to axial modes. By calculating the energy spectrum, the wave forms, and the total energy and angular momentum of gravitational waves, we analyze the dependence of the emitted gravitational waves on particle spin. For a normal neutron star, the energy spectrum has one broad peak whose characteristic frequency corresponds to the angular velocity at the turning point (a periastron). Since the turning point is determined by the orbital parameter, there exists a dependence of the gravitational wave on particle spin. We find that the total energy of l=2 gravitational waves gets larger as the spin increases in the antiparallel direction to the orbital angular momentum. For an ultracompact star, in addition to such an orbital contribution, we find the quasinormal modes excited by a scattered particle, whose excitation rate to gravitational waves depends on the particle spin. We also discuss the ratio of the total angular momentum to the total energy of gravitational waves and explain its spin dependence

  6. Advanced instrumentation for Solar System gravitational physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peron, Roberto; Bellettini, G.; Berardi, S.; Boni, A.; Cantone, C.; Coradini, A.; Currie, D. G.; Dell'Agnello, S.; Delle Monache, G. O.; Fiorenza, E.; Garattini, M.; Iafolla, V.; Intaglietta, N.; Lefevre, C.; Lops, C.; March, R.; Martini, M.; Nozzoli, S.; Patrizi, G.; Porcelli, L.; Reale, A.; Santoli, F.; Tauraso, R.; Vittori, R.

    2010-05-01

    The Solar System is a complex laboratory for testing gravitational physics. Indeed, its scale and hierarchical structure make possible a wide range of tests for gravitational theories, studying the motion of both natural and artificial objects. The usual methodology makes use of tracking information related to the bodies, fitted by a suitable dynamical model. Different equations of motion are provided by different theories, which can be therefore tested and compared. Future exploration scenarios show the possibility of placing deep-space probes near the Sun or in outer Solar System, thereby extending the available experimental data sets. In particular, the Earth-Moon is the most accurately known gravitational three-body laboratory, which is undergoing a new, strong wave of research and exploration (both robotic and manned). In addition, the benefits of a synergetic study of planetary science and gravitational physics are of the greatest importance (as shown by the success of the Apollo program), especially in the Earth-Moon, Mars-Phobos, Jovian and Saturnian sub-suystems. This scenarios open critical issues regarding the quality of the available dynamical models, i.e. their capability of fitting data without an excessive number of empirical hypotheses. A typical case is represented by the non-gravitational phenomena, which in general are difficult to model. More generally, gravitation tests with Lunar Laser Ranging, inner or outer Solar System probes and the appearance of the so-called 'anomalies'(like the one indicated by the Pioneers), whatever their real origin (either instrumental effects or due to new physics), show the necessity of a coordinated improvement of tracking and modelization techniques. A common research path will be discussed, employing the development and use of advanced instrumentation to cope with current limitations of Solar System gravitational tests. In particular, the use of high-sensitivity accelerometers, combined with microwave and laser

  7. Relativistic nuclear physics with the spectator model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, F.

    1988-01-01

    The spectator model, a general approach to the relativistic treatment of nuclear physics problems in which spectators to nuclear interactions are put on their mass-shell, will be defined nd described. The approach grows out of the relativistic treatment of two and three body systems in which one particle is off-shell, and recent numerical results for the NN interaction will be presented. Two meson-exchange models, one with only 4 mesons (π, σ, /rho/, ω) but with a 25% admixture of γ 5 coupling for the pion, and a second with 6 mesons (π, σ, /rho/, ω, δ, and /eta/) but a pure γ 5 γ/sup mu/ pion coupling, are shown to give very good quantitative fits to NN scattering phase shifts below 400 MeV, and also a good description of the /rho/ 40 Cα elastic scattering observables. 19 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  8. Quantum theoretical physics is statistical and relativistic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, C.

    1980-01-01

    A new theoretical framework for the quantum mechanism is presented. It is based on a strict deterministic behavior of single systems. The conventional QM equation, however, is found to describe statistical results of many classical systems. It will be seen, moreover, that a rigorous synthesis of our theory requires relativistic kinematics. So, QM is not only a classical statistical theory, it is, of necessity, a relativistic theory. The equation of the theory does not just duplicate QM, it indicates an inherent nonlinearity in QM which is subject to experimental verification. It is shown, therefore, that conventional QM is a corollary of classical deterministic principles. It is suggested that this concept of nature conflicts with that prevalent in modern physics. (author)

  9. On the question of establishing the equivalence of general relativity and relativistic theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulyabov, D.S.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: (author)In the construction of physical theories are several paradigms (according to Vladimirov Yu. S.). Depending on the number of entities are used paradigms include trialist (3 entities), dualist (2 entities) and monistic (1 entity). In trialist paradigm uses the following entities: geometry (G), particle (P) and field (F). Go to the dualist paradigms performed in the following ways: two entities take over the functions of the third, two entities merged into a single synthesis. Is also possible to limit the dualistic theory, which summarized the essence in addition assume the functions of a third. In turn, by way of grouping the entities dualistic theory can be divided into geometric (unification of geometry and field), relational (unification of geometry and particles) and field (unification of fields and particles). For the connection of the two theories should be to go to the common denominator: to trialist or monistic theories. Since the monistic theory at the moment completely unknown, may be used only trialist theory. General relativity is a typical representative of the geometric dualistic paradigm. However geometrized only gravity. Other fields non-geometrized. In turn, the relativistic theory of gravitation is a typical trialist theory. To establish a correspondence between theories should to geometrize material field in the general theory of relativity. It is proposed to implement this on the basis of a multi-dimensional Kaluza-Klein theory

  10. Gravitational radiation from the radial infall of highly relativistic point particles into Kerr black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Vitor; Lemos, Jose P.S.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the gravitational radiation generated by the collision of highly relativistic particles with rotating Kerr black holes. We use the Sasaki-Nakamura formalism to compute the waveform, energy spectra, and total energy radiated during this process. We show that the gravitational spectrum for high-energy collisions has definite characteristic universal features, which are independent of the spin of the colliding objects. We also discuss the possible connections between these results and black-hole-black-hole collisions at the speed of light. Our results show that during the high-speed collision of a nonrotating hole with a rotating one, at most 35% of the total energy can get converted into gravitational waves. This 35% efficiency occurs only in the most optimistic situation, that of a zero impact parameter collision, along the equatorial plane, with an almost extreme Kerr black hole. In the general situation, the total gravitational energy radiated is expected to be much less, especially if the impact parameter increases. Thus, if one is able to produce black holes at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, at most 35% of the partons' energy should be emitted during the so-called balding phase. This energy will be missing, since we do not have gravitational wave detectors able to measure such amplitudes. The collision at the speed of light between one rotating black hole and a nonrotating one or two rotating black holes turns out to be the most efficient gravitational wave generator in the Universe

  11. Relativistic Mechanics in Gravitational Fields Exterior to Rotating Homogeneous Mass Distributions within Spherical Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chifu E. N.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available General Relativistic metric tensors for gravitational fields exterior to homogeneous spherical mass distributions rotating with constant angular velocity about a fixed di- ameter are constructed. The coeffcients of affine connection for the gravitational field are used to derive equations of motion for test particles. The laws of conservation of energy and angular momentum are deduced using the generalized Lagrangian. The law of conservation of angular momentum is found to be equal to that in Schwarzschild’s gravitational field. The planetary equation of motion and the equation of motion for a photon in the vicinity of the rotating spherical mass distribution have rotational terms not found in Schwarzschild’s field.

  12. Gravitational probes of dark matter physics

    OpenAIRE

    Buckley, Matthew R.; Peter, Annika H. G.

    2017-01-01

    The nature of dark matter is one of the most pressing questions in particle physics. Yet all our present knowledge of the dark sector to date comes from its gravitational interactions with astrophysical systems. Moreover, astronomical results still have immense potential to constrain the particle properties of dark matter. We introduce a simple 2D parameter space which classifies models in terms of a particle physics interaction strength and a characteristic astrophysical scale on which new p...

  13. Effects of anisotropy on gravitational infall in galaxy clusters using an exact general relativistic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troxel, M.A.; Peel, Austin; Ishak, Mustapha, E-mail: troxel@utdallas.edu, E-mail: austin.peel@utdallas.edu, E-mail: mishak@utdallas.edu [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX, 75083 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    We study the effects and implications of anisotropies at the scale of galaxy clusters by building an exact general relativistic model of a cluster using the inhomogeneous and anisotropic Szekeres metric. The model is built from a modified Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) density profile. We compare this to a corresponding spherically symmetric structure in the Lemaȋtre-Tolman (LT) model and quantify the impact of introducing varying levels of anisotropy. We examine two physical measures of gravitational infall — the growth rate of density and the velocity of the source dust in the model. We introduce a generalization of the LT dust velocity profile for the Szekeres metric and demonstrate its consistency with the growth rate of density. We find that the growth rate of density in one substructure increases by 0.5%, 1.5%, and 3.75% for 5%, 10%, and 15% levels of introduced anisotropy, which is measured as the fractional displaced mass relative to the spherically symmetric case. The infall velocity of the dust is found to increase by 2.5, 10, and 20 km s{sup −1} (0.5%, 2%, and 4.5%), respectively, for the same three levels of anisotropy. This response to the anisotropy in a structure is found to be strongly nonlinear with respect to the strength of anisotropy. These relative velocities correspond to an equivalent increase in the total mass of the spherically symmetric structure of 1%, 3.8%, and 8.4%, indicating that not accounting for the presence of anisotropic mass distributions in cluster models can strongly bias the determination of physical properties like the total mass.

  14. Gravitational waves generated by laser accelerated relativistic ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gelfer, E.G.; Kadlecová, Hedvika; Klimo, Ondřej; Weber, Stefan A.; Korn, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 9 (2016), s. 1-6, č. článku 093107. ISSN 1070-664X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LQ1606; GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-02964S Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : plasma * ions Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.115, year: 2016

  15. Relativistic theory of gravitation and new notions of space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunov, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    The principal insurmountable difficulties of the general theory of relativity, which make one reject GRT are briefly summarised. Relativistic theory of graviton (RTG) and its principles are presented. RTG has not these difficulties and explains the whole of the observed and experimental data, besides it predicts new notions about the evolution of the Universe and gravitational collapse. RTG is a further development of the ideas put forward by Poincare, Minkovski, Einstein and Hilbert. It delivers a blow at dogmatism, and so deeply penetrating into GRT. Indeed, much time and afforts are needed to make this dogmatism the property of history

  16. Regular reduction of relativistic theories of gravitation with a quadratic Lagrangian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bel, L.; Zia, H.S.

    1985-01-01

    We consider those relativistic theories of gravitation which generalize Einstein's theory in the sense that their field equations derive from a scalar Lagrangian which, besides the matter term, contains a linear combination of the Ricci scalar, its square, and the square of the Ricci tensor. Using a generalization of a technique which has been used to deal with some dynamical systems, we regularly and covariantly reduce the corresponding fourth-order differential equations to second-order ones. We examine, in particular, at a low order of approximation, these reduced equations in cosmology, and for static and spherically symmetric interior solutions with constant density

  17. Cosmological consequences of the relativistic theory of gravitation with massive gravitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chugreev, Yu.V.

    1989-01-01

    It is well known that a number of problems are inherent in the standard scenario of the development of a homogeneous and isotropic (Friedmannian) universe. Above all there are the problems of the singularity, horizon, flatness, and concentration of fossil monopoles. Strictly speaking, to analyze these questions it is necessary to use a quantum theory of gravitation. The aim of the present paper is to show how the introduction of a graviton mass in the relativistic theory of gravitation (RTG) leads to the resolution of these problems already at the classical level, i.e., without recourse to quantum theory. Moreover, we do not need any of the great diversity of inflationary stages in the development of the universe, in which it expands exponentially. The equation of state will always have the form p = ωρ, with ω > 0

  18. Gravitational waves from nonlinear couplings of radial and polar nonradial modes in relativistic stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passamonti, Andrea; Stergioulas, Nikolaos; Nagar, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    The postbounce oscillations of newly-born relativistic stars are expected to lead to gravitational-wave emission through the excitation of nonradial oscillation modes. At the same time, the star is oscillating in its radial modes, with a central density variation that can reach several percent. Nonlinear couplings between radial oscillations and polar nonradial modes lead to the appearance of combination frequencies (sums and differences of the linear mode frequencies). We study such combination frequencies using a gauge-invariant perturbative formalism, which includes bilinear coupling terms between different oscillation modes. For typical values of the energy stored in each mode we find that gravitational waves emitted at combination frequencies could become detectable in galactic core-collapse supernovae with advanced interferometric or wideband resonant detectors

  19. Solving the relativistic inverse stellar problem through gravitational waves observation of binary neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsalhin, Tiziano; Maselli, Andrea; Ferrari, Valeria

    2018-04-01

    The LIGO/Virgo Collaboration has recently announced the direct detection of gravitational waves emitted in the coalescence of a neutron star binary. This discovery allows, for the first time, to set new constraints on the behavior of matter at supranuclear density, complementary with those coming from astrophysical observations in the electromagnetic band. In this paper we demonstrate the feasibility of using gravitational signals to solve the relativistic inverse stellar problem, i.e., to reconstruct the parameters of the equation of state (EoS) from measurements of the stellar mass and tidal Love number. We perform Bayesian inference of mock data, based on different models of the star internal composition, modeled through piecewise polytropes. Our analysis shows that the detection of a small number of sources by a network of advanced interferometers would allow to put accurate bounds on the EoS parameters, and to perform a model selection among the realistic equations of state proposed in the literature.

  20. Self-gravitating axially symmetric disks in general-relativistic rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkowski, Janusz; Kulczycki, Wojciech; Mach, Patryk; Malec, Edward; Odrzywołek, Andrzej; Piróg, Michał

    2018-05-01

    We integrate numerically axially symmetric stationary Einstein equations describing self-gravitating disks around spinless black holes. The numerical scheme is based on a method developed by Shibata, but contains important new ingredients. We derive a new general-relativistic Keplerian rotation law for self-gravitating disks around spinning black holes. Former results concerning rotation around spinless black holes emerge in the limit of a vanishing spin parameter. These rotation curves might be used for the description of rotating stars, after appropriate modification around the symmetry axis. They can be applied to the description of compact torus-black hole configurations, including active galactic nuclei or products of coalescences of two neutron stars.

  1. Atomic physics using relativistic H- beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, H.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: An 8 GeV hydrogen atom can traverse a focused laser beam of width of 1 micron in a time of 353 attoseconds in its rest frame. A design is currently underway at Fermilab for a superconducting linear accelerator that will accelerate H - ions to 8 GeV. This 'Proton Driver' beam is intended to be injected, after stripping down to protons, into the 120 GeV Main Injector for the mass production of neutrinos aimed at a neutrino detector (MINOS) in a mine shaft in Soudan, Minnesota (USA) for the study of neutrino oscillations. It has not passed unnoticed that with some advance planning a few nanoamps from the up-to-250 mA beam could be diverted for atomic physics experiments. Relativistic kinematics enable the creation of extreme conditions for a beam atom. For example, the Doppler shift allows a very large tuning range in the atom's rest frame of a laser beam that is fixed- frequency in the lab. At 8 GeV the rest frame Doppler shift ranges from a factor of 19 in the forward direction to 0.05 backward. The laser intensity is enhanced by the square of the Doppler shift, so that the world's most intense laser beam would be amplified by a factor of 360 in the atom's rest frame. Furthermore, although there are extreme changes in the frequency and intensity in the atom's frame as one changes the intersection angle, the ponderomotive potential remains constant, as it is a relativistic invariant. One of the interesting problems that arises in the planning for this accelerator is the stripping of electrons from the negative ions by photodetachment from Doppler shifted thermal photons. We estimate that, if the transfer lines are kept at 300 K (room temperature), the mean free path at 8 GeV for stripping from collisions with cavity radiation is about 1300 km. The physics of the interactions of such a beam with very thin material foils, again in the attosecond regime, has been treated theoretically, but has not been studied experimentally at such high energies. We will

  2. The physical gravitational degrees of freedom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, E; Barbour, J; Foster, B Z; Kelleher, B; Murchadha, N O

    2005-01-01

    When constructing general relativity (GR), Einstein required 4D general covariance. In contrast, we derive GR (in the compact, without boundary case) as a theory of evolving three-dimensional conformal Riemannian geometries obtained by imposing two general principles: (1) time is derived from change; (2) motion and size are relative. We write down an explicit action based on them. We obtain not only GR in the CMC gauge, in its Hamiltonian 3 + 1 reformulation, but also all the equations used in York's conformal technique for solving the initial-value problem. This shows that the independent gravitational degrees of freedom obtained by York do not arise from a gauge fixing but from hitherto unrecognized fundamental symmetry principles. They can therefore be identified as the long-sought Hamiltonian physical gravitational degrees of freedom

  3. Anisotropic generalization of well-known solutions describing relativistic self-gravitating fluid systems. An algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thirukkanesh, S. [Eastern University, Department of Mathematics, Chenkalady (Sri Lanka); Ragel, F.C. [Eastern University, Department of Physics, Chenkalady (Sri Lanka); Sharma, Ranjan; Das, Shyam [P.D. Women' s College, Department of Physics, Jalpaiguri (India)

    2018-01-15

    We present an algorithm to generalize a plethora of well-known solutions to Einstein field equations describing spherically symmetric relativistic fluid spheres by relaxing the pressure isotropy condition on the system. By suitably fixing the model parameters in our formulation, we generate closed-form solutions which may be treated as an anisotropic generalization of a large class of solutions describing isotropic fluid spheres. From the resultant solutions, a particular solution is taken up to show its physical acceptability. Making use of the current estimate of mass and radius of a known pulsar, the effects of anisotropic stress on the gross physical behaviour of a relativistic compact star is also highlighted. (orig.)

  4. Relativistic Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Font, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    The relativistic astrophysics is the field of astrophysics employing the theory of relativity Einstein as physical-mathematical model is to study the universe. This discipline analyzes astronomical contexts in which the laws of classical mechanics of Newton's law of gravitation are not valid. (Author)

  5. Relativistic Few-Body Hadronic Physics Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyzou, Wayne [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2016-06-20

    The goal of this research proposal was to use ``few-body'' methods to understand the structure and reactions of systems of interacting hadrons (neutrons, protons, mesons, quarks) over a broad range of energy scales. Realistic mathematical models of few-hadron systems have the advantage that they are sufficiently simple that they can be solved with mathematically controlled errors. These systems are also simple enough that it is possible to perform complete accurate experimental measurements on these systems. Comparison between theory and experiment puts strong constraints on the structure of the models. Even though these systems are ``simple'', both the experiments and computations push the limits of technology. The important property of ``few-body'' systems is that the ``cluster property'' implies that the interactions that appear in few-body systems are identical to the interactions that appear in complicated many-body systems. Of particular interest are models that correctly describe physics at distance scales that are sensitive to the internal structure of the individual nucleons. The Heisenberg uncertainty principle implies that in order to be sensitive to physics on distance scales that are a fraction of the proton or neutron radius, a relativistic treatment of quantum mechanics is necessary. The research supported by this grant involved 30 years of effort devoted to studying all aspects of interacting two and three-body systems. Realistic interactions were used to compute bound states of two- and three-nucleon, and two- and three-quark systems. Scattering observables for these systems were computed for a broad range of energies - from zero energy scattering to few GeV scattering, where experimental evidence of sub-nucleon degrees of freedom is beginning to appear. Benchmark calculations were produced, which when compared with calculations of other groups provided an essential check on these complicated calculations. In

  6. Gravitational physics of stellar and galactic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saslaw, W.C.

    1985-01-01

    The book concerns the gravitational interactions and evolution of astronomical systems on all scales, and is aimed at the graduate student of physics and astronomy. The text is divided into four parts, and each describes areas of the subject in order of decreasing symmetry. The four parts include: idealized homogeneous systems-basic ideas and gentle relaxation; infinite inhomogeneous systems and galaxy clustering; finite spherical systems including clusters of galaxies; galactic nuclei and globular clusters; and finite flattened systems and galaxies. (U.K.)

  7. Physics through the 1990s: Gravitation, cosmology, and cosmic-ray physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This report reviews and highlights three areas of astrophysics; gravitation; cosmology; and cosmic-ray physics. Topics such as: gravitational collapse and black holes, gravitational waves, general relativity, nucleosynthesis, and the standard model are among the many topics highlighted

  8. Newtonian self-gravitating system in a relativistic huge void universe model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, Ryusuke; Nakao, Ken-ichi [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Yoo, Chul-Moon, E-mail: ryusuke@sci.osaka-cu.ac.jp, E-mail: knakao@sci.osaka-cu.ac.jp, E-mail: yoo@gravity.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Division of Particle and Astrophysical Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2016-12-01

    We consider a test of the Copernican Principle through observations of the large-scale structures, and for this purpose we study the self-gravitating system in a relativistic huge void universe model which does not invoke the Copernican Principle. If we focus on the the weakly self-gravitating and slowly evolving system whose spatial extent is much smaller than the scale of the cosmological horizon in the homogeneous and isotropic background universe model, the cosmological Newtonian approximation is available. Also in the huge void universe model, the same kind of approximation as the cosmological Newtonian approximation is available for the analysis of the perturbations contained in a region whose spatial size is much smaller than the scale of the huge void: the effects of the huge void are taken into account in a perturbative manner by using the Fermi-normal coordinates. By using this approximation, we derive the equations of motion for the weakly self-gravitating perturbations whose elements have relative velocities much smaller than the speed of light, and show the derived equations can be significantly different from those in the homogeneous and isotropic universe model, due to the anisotropic volume expansion in the huge void. We linearize the derived equations of motion and solve them. The solutions show that the behaviors of linear density perturbations are very different from those in the homogeneous and isotropic universe model.

  9. High-energy gravitational scattering and the general relativistic two-body problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damour, Thibault

    2018-02-01

    A technique for translating the classical scattering function of two gravitationally interacting bodies into a corresponding (effective one-body) Hamiltonian description has been recently introduced [Phys. Rev. D 94, 104015 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevD.94.104015]. Using this technique, we derive, for the first time, to second-order in Newton's constant (i.e. one classical loop) the Hamiltonian of two point masses having an arbitrary (possibly relativistic) relative velocity. The resulting (second post-Minkowskian) Hamiltonian is found to have a tame high-energy structure which we relate both to gravitational self-force studies of large mass-ratio binary systems, and to the ultra high-energy quantum scattering results of Amati, Ciafaloni and Veneziano. We derive several consequences of our second post-Minkowskian Hamiltonian: (i) the need to use special phase-space gauges to get a tame high-energy limit; and (ii) predictions about a (rest-mass independent) linear Regge trajectory behavior of high-angular-momenta, high-energy circular orbits. Ways of testing these predictions by dedicated numerical simulations are indicated. We finally indicate a way to connect our classical results to the quantum gravitational scattering amplitude of two particles, and we urge amplitude experts to use their novel techniques to compute the two-loop scattering amplitude of scalar masses, from which one could deduce the third post-Minkowskian effective one-body Hamiltonian.

  10. On the physics of relativistic double layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlqvist, P.

    1982-06-01

    A model of a strong, time-independent, and relativistic double layer is studied. Besides double layers having the electric field parallel to the current the model also describes a certain type of oblique double layers. The 'Langmuir condition' (ratio of ion current density to electron current density) as well as an expression for the potential drop of the double layer are derived. Furthermore, the distribution of charged particles, electric field, and potential within the double layer are clarified and discussed. It is found that the properties of relativistic double layers differ substantially from the properties of corresponding non-relativistic double layers. (Author)

  11. Testing fundamental physics with gravitational waves

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    The landmark detection of gravitational waves (GWs) has opened a new era in physics, giving access to the hitherto unexplored strong-gravity regime, where spacetime curvature is extreme and the relevant speed is close to the speed of light. In parallel to its countless astrophysical applications, this discovery can have also important implications for fundamental physics. In this context, I will discuss some outstanding, cross-cutting problems that can be finally investigated in the GW era: the nature of black holes and of spacetime singularities, the limits of classical gravity, the existence of extra light fields, and the effects of dark matter near compact objects. Future GW measurements will provide unparalleled tests of quantum-gravity effects at the horizon scale, exotic compact objects, ultralight dark matter, and of general relativity in the strong-field regime.

  12. Gravitation

    CERN Document Server

    Misner, Charles W; Wheeler, John Archibald

    2017-01-01

    First published in 1973, Gravitation is a landmark graduate-level textbook that presents Einstein’s general theory of relativity and offers a rigorous, full-year course on the physics of gravitation. Upon publication, Science called it “a pedagogic masterpiece,” and it has since become a classic, considered essential reading for every serious student and researcher in the field of relativity. This authoritative text has shaped the research of generations of physicists and astronomers, and the book continues to influence the way experts think about the subject. With an emphasis on geometric interpretation, this masterful and comprehensive book introduces the theory of relativity; describes physical applications, from stars to black holes and gravitational waves; and portrays the field’s frontiers. The book also offers a unique, alternating, two-track pathway through the subject. Material focusing on basic physical ideas is designated as Track 1 and formulates an appropriate one-semester graduate-level...

  13. Relativistic Kinetic Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereshchagin, Gregory V.; Aksenov, Alexey G.

    2017-02-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; Acronyms and definitions; Introduction; Part I. Theoretical Foundations: 1. Basic concepts; 2. Kinetic equation; 3. Averaging; 4. Conservation laws and equilibrium; 5. Relativistic BBGKY hierarchy; 6. Basic parameters in gases and plasmas; Part II. Numerical Methods: 7. The basics of computational physics; 8. Direct integration of Boltzmann equations; 9. Multidimensional hydrodynamics; Part III. Applications: 10. Wave dispersion in relativistic plasma; 11. Thermalization in relativistic plasma; 12. Kinetics of particles in strong fields; 13. Compton scattering in astrophysics and cosmology; 14. Self-gravitating systems; 15. Neutrinos, gravitational collapse and supernovae; Appendices; Bibliography; Index.

  14. Physics of interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Caltech-MIT joint LIGO project is operating three long-baseline interferometers (one of 2 km and two of 4 km) in order to unambiguously measure the infinitesimal displacements of isolated test masses which convey the signature of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources. An interferometric gravitational wave ...

  15. Relativistic nuclear physics: symmetry and the correlation depletion principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldin, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The author's view on the role of symmetry in fundamental physics is presented. The concept of the 'symmetry of solutions' is analyzed. It is stressed that it is impossible to deduce the basic laws of relativistic nuclear physics from the QCD Lagrangians without recourse to additional hypotheses about the symmetry of solutions (Green functions). The test of these hypotheses is the major prospect of the study of hadron and nuclear collisions. Special importance is given to the Correlation Depletions Principle that makes it possible to construct mathematical models of relativistic nuclear physics, and analyze, by using simple terms, topologically complicated events of nucleus-nucleus collisions. 15 refs., 4 figs

  16. Physical stress, mass, and energy for non-relativistic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geracie, Michael; Prabhu, Kartik; Roberts, Matthew M.

    2017-06-01

    For theories of relativistic matter fields there exist two possible definitions of the stress-energy tensor, one defined by a variation of the action with the coframes at fixed connection, and the other at fixed torsion. These two stress-energy tensors do not necessarily coincide and it is the latter that corresponds to the Cauchy stress measured in the lab. In this note we discuss the corresponding issue for non-relativistic matter theories. We point out that while the physical non-relativistic stress, momentum, and mass currents are defined by a variation of the action at fixed torsion, the energy current does not admit such a description and is naturally defined at fixed connection. Any attempt to define an energy current at fixed torsion results in an ambiguity which cannot be resolved from the background spacetime data or conservation laws. We also provide computations of these quantities for some simple non-relativistic actions.

  17. Physics of interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Caltech-MIT joint LIGO project is operating three long-baseline inter- ... gravitational waves for LIGO are: (i) binary coalescing neutron star systems, (ii) ..... The fundamental mode of this basis is a purely Gaussian function which means.

  18. Physical optics in a uniform gravitational field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacyan, Shahen

    2012-01-01

    The motion of a (quasi-)plane wave in a uniform gravitational field is studied. It is shown that the energy of an elliptically polarized wave does not propagate along a geodesic, but in a direction that is rotated with respect to the gravitational force. The similarity with the walk-off effect in anisotropic crystals or the optical Magnus effect in inhomogeneous media is pointed out.

  19. Relativistic astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Demianski, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Relativistic Astrophysics brings together important astronomical discoveries and the significant achievements, as well as the difficulties in the field of relativistic astrophysics. This book is divided into 10 chapters that tackle some aspects of the field, including the gravitational field, stellar equilibrium, black holes, and cosmology. The opening chapters introduce the theories to delineate gravitational field and the elements of relativistic thermodynamics and hydrodynamics. The succeeding chapters deal with the gravitational fields in matter; stellar equilibrium and general relativity

  20. Proceedings of the 7th Italian conference on general relativity and gravitational physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruzzo, U.; Cianci, R.; Massa, E.

    1987-01-01

    The 7th Italian Conference on General Relativity and Gravitational Physics was held in Rapallo (Genoa), from September 3 to 6, 1986, under the auspices of the International Society on General Relativity and Gravitation. Like the previous conferences of this series, it brought together physicists, mathematicians, and astronomers interested in various aspects of relativity, field theory, astrophysics, and cosmology. The scientific program included two types of sessions: invited lectures and workshops for presenting contributed papers. All these have been grouped into four main sections. The divisions are the following: A: General Relativity; B: Field Theory, Supergravity, and Strings; C: Relativistic Astrophysics and Cosmology; D: Experimental and Observational Relativity. This book presents the papers discussed in the meetings on the above mentioned subjects

  1. Relativistic continuum physics for the description of heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukacs, Bela

    1986-01-01

    The application of relativistic continuum physics to the description of the nuclear fireball evolution from the start of expansion to the breaking is discussed. The basic formalism and basic assumptions of relativistic hydrodynamics and thermodynamics are analyzed in detail. The four basic assumptions are not valid in the case of nuclear fireball produced in heavy ion collisions, but thermodynamics can be extended in different ways to incorporate anisotropy, fluctuations, gradients and the lack of the local equilibrium. The extended continuum formalism is applicable to the description of the nuclear fireball dynamics, including the nuclear - quark matter phase transition. (D.Gy.)

  2. Two centre problems in relativistic atomic physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, Sean R.

    2013-01-09

    The work contained within this thesis is concerned with the explanation and usage of a set of theoretical procedures for the study of static and dynamic two-centre problems in the relativistic framework of Dirac's equation. Two distinctly different theories for handling time-dependent atomic interactions are reviewed, namely semi-classical perturbation theory and a non-perturbative numerical technique based on the coupled channel equation to directly solve the time-dependent, two-centre Dirac equation. The non-perturbative numerical technique has been developed independently and the calculations performed with it are entirely new. Calculations for ionisation cross sections and state occupancies are conducted for both these methods. The non-perturbative technique for relativistic two-centre problems is extensively explained and, given its novelty, a probity test is conducted between this technique and that of the well established perturbation theory in calculating K-and L-shell ionisation cross sections for the alpha decay of initially Hydrogen-like Polonium. To that end, an in depth outline of the perturbative technique is also made for both collision and decay processes. As well as the comparison test mentioned, this technique is also applied to the analysis of cross sections of the promotion of a single electron into the positive continuum from either a K- or L-shell due to the alpha decay of heavy, neutral nuclei (Gadolinium, Polonium and Thorium). Dirac-Coulomb eigenfunctions centred on the parent nucleus of the decay pair are taken as the basis for use in the cross section calculations utilising first order, semi-classical pertubation theory. The excellent congruence between both techniques justifies the usage of the non-perturbative algorithms in the subsequent analysis of collisions between very heavy, highly charged ions. As such, a set of calculations are performed examining the bound and continuum state occupancy of the electronic levels during a

  3. Neutron star equilibrium configurations within a fully relativistic theory with strong, weak, electromagnetic, and gravitational interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belvedere, Riccardo; Pugliese, Daniela; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo; Xue, She-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    We formulate the equations of equilibrium of neutron stars taking into account strong, weak, electromagnetic, and gravitational interactions within the framework of general relativity. The nuclear interactions are described by the exchange of the σ, ω, and ρ virtual mesons. The equilibrium conditions are given by our recently developed theoretical framework based on the Einstein–Maxwell–Thomas–Fermi equations along with the constancy of the general relativistic Fermi energies of particles, the “Klein potentials”, throughout the configuration. The equations are solved numerically in the case of zero temperatures and for selected parameterizations of the nuclear models. The solutions lead to a new structure of the star: a positively charged core at supranuclear densities surrounded by an electronic distribution of thickness ∼ℏ/(m e c)∼10 2 ℏ/(m π c) of opposite charge, as well as a neutral crust at lower densities. Inside the core there is a Coulomb potential well of depth ∼m π c 2 /e. The constancy of the Klein potentials in the transition from the core to the crust, imposes the presence of an overcritical electric field ∼(m π /m e ) 2 E c , the critical field being E c =m e 2 c 3 /(eℏ). The electron chemical potential and the density decrease, in the boundary interface, until values μ e crust e core and ρ crust core . For each central density, an entire family of core–crust interface boundaries and, correspondingly, an entire family of crusts with different mass and thickness, exist. The configuration with ρ crust =ρ drip ∼4.3×10 11 gcm −3 separates neutron stars with and without inner crust. We present here the novel neutron star mass–radius for the especial case ρ crust =ρ drip and compare and contrast it with the one obtained from the traditional Tolman–Oppenheimer–Volkoff treatment.

  4. The Mesozoic Era of relativistic heavy ion physics and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.W.

    1994-03-01

    In order to understand how matter 15 billion years ago in the form of quarks, gluons and leptons at a temperature of 2 x 10 12 degrees K evolved to become today's Universe, the goal of relativistic and ultra-relativistic heavy ion physics is to understand the equation of state of nuclear, hadronic and partonic matter. This quest is of cross-disciplinary interest. The phase transition from partonic matter to hadronic matter tens of micro-seconds after the beginning of the universe is of interest to cosmology. Fluctuations during this phase transition would influence nucleosynthesis and the understanding of baryonic inhomogeneities in the universe. The nuclear matter equation of state, which describes the incompressibility of nuclear matter, governs neutron star stability. It determines the possible existence of strange quark matter stars and the dynamics of supernova expansion in astrophysics. The existence of collective nuclear phenomena in nuclear physics is also determined by the nuclear equation of state. In relativistic heavy ion collisions collective nuclear flow has been observed and is being studied extensively to obtain a better understanding of the incompressibility of nuclear matter. In high energy nuclear and particle physics, production and excitations of hadronic final states have been studied in detail and are important to an overall understanding of the equation of state of nuclear matter at finite temperature. The possibility in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions to create and study highly excited hadronic and partonic degrees of freedom provides a unique opportunity for understanding the behavior of nuclear, hadronic and partonic matter. Study of the QCD vacuum, of particular interest in particle physics, would provide a better understanding of symmetry-breaking mechanisms and the origins of the masses of the various quarks and particles

  5. Physics at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuryak, E.V.

    1990-08-01

    This introductory talk contains a brief discussion of future experiments at RHIC related to physics of superdense matter. In particular, we consider the relation between space-time picture of the collision and spectra of the observed secondaries. We discuss where one should look for QGP signals and for possible manifestation of the phase transition. We pay more attention to a rather new topic: hadron modification in the gas phase, which is interesting by itself as a collective phenomenon, and also as a precursor indicating what happens with hadrons near the phase transition. We briefly review current understanding of the photon physics, dilepton production, charm and strangeness and J/ψ suppression. At the end we try to classify all possible experiments. 47 refs., 3 figs

  6. Relativistic string dynamics and its connection with hadron physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbashov, B.M.; Nesterenko, V.V.

    1976-01-01

    Physical reasons for using the relativistic string as a hadron model are briefly discussed. The classical and quantum dynamics of the string which is the first example of a relativistic elongated object are presented. The connection between the string and the dual-resonance models, together with the Born-Infeld field model is indicated. As it turned out from the study of the string behaviour in a constant electromagnetic field, even in the classical theory states with the negative square of the string mass - tachyons - appear. As an illustration, a series of examples of classical motion of a free string and a string in an external electromagnetic field from a given initial state is presented

  7. Gravitational radiation in relativistic theory of gravity with a nonzero graviton mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasov, A.A.; Chugreev, Yu.V.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation of gravitation waves have been analysed in the linear approximation of the relative theory of gravity, with the mass of graviton being nonzero. It is shown that the main contribution to the energy loss due to gravitational radiation has been described by the well-known quadrupole formula. Linear approximation applicability conditions have been analysed

  8. The Nustar Spectrum of Mrk 335: Extreme Relativistic Effects Within Two Gravitational Radii of the Event Horizon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, M. L.; Wilkins, D. R.; Fabian, A. C.; Grupe, D.; Dauser, T.; Matt, G.; Harrison, F. A.; Brenneman, L.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present 3-50 keV NuSTAR observations of the active galactic nuclei Mrk 335 in a very low flux state. The spectrum is dominated by very strong features at the energies of the iron line at 5-7 keV and Compton hump from 10-30 keV. The source is variable during the observation, with the variability concentrated at low energies, which suggesting either a relativistic reflection or a variable absorption scenario. In this work, we focus on the reflection interpretation, making use of new relativistic reflection models that self consistently calculate the reflection fraction, relativistic blurring and angle-dependent reflection spectrum for different coronal heights to model the spectra. We find that the spectra can be well fitted with relativistic reflection, and that the lowest flux state spectrum is described by reflection alone, suggesting the effects of extreme light-bending occurring within approx. 2 gravitational radii (RG) of the event horizon. The reflection fraction decreases sharply with increasing flux, consistent with a point source moving up to above 10 RG as the source brightens. We constrain the spin parameter to greater than 0.9 at the 3(sigma) confidence level. By adding a spin-dependent upper limit on the reflection fraction to our models, we demonstrate that this can be a powerful way of constraining the spin parameter, particularly in reflection dominated states. We also calculate a detailed emissivity profile for the iron line, and find that it closely matches theoretical predictions for a compact source within a few RG of the black hole.

  9. Proceedings of the Workshop on relativistic heavy ion physics at present and future accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csoergoe, T.; Hegyi, S.; Lukacs, B.; Zimanyi, J.

    1991-09-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the Budapest Workshop on relativistic heavy ion physics at present and future accelerators. The topics includes experimental heavy ion physics, particle phenomenology, Bose-Einstein correlations, relativistic transport theory, quark-gluon plasma rehadronization, astronuclear physics, leptonpair production and intermittency. All contributions were indexed separately for the INIS database. (G.P.)

  10. The Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontes, C J; Zhang, H L; Jr, J Abdallah; Clark, R E H; Kilcrease, D P; Colgan, J; Cunningham, R T; Hakel, P; Magee, N H; Sherrill, M E

    2015-01-01

    The Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes is a robust, mature platform that has been used to model highly charged ions in a variety of ways. The suite includes capabilities for calculating data related to fundamental atomic structure, as well as the processes of photoexcitation, electron-impact excitation and ionization, photoionization and autoionization within a consistent framework. These data can be of a basic nature, such as cross sections and collision strengths, which are useful in making predictions that can be compared with experiments to test fundamental theories of highly charged ions, such as quantum electrodynamics. The suite can also be used to generate detailed models of energy levels and rate coefficients, and to apply them in the collisional-radiative modeling of plasmas over a wide range of conditions. Such modeling is useful, for example, in the interpretation of spectra generated by a variety of plasmas. In this work, we provide a brief overview of the capabilities within the Los Alamos relativistic suite along with some examples of its application to the modeling of highly charged ions. (paper)

  11. Problems of describing the cumulative effect in relativistic nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldin, A.M.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of describing the cumulative effect i.e., the particle production on nuclei in the range kinematically forbidden for one-nucleon collisions, is studied. Discrimination of events containing cumulative particles fixes configurations in the wave function of a nucleus, when several nucleons are closely spaced and their quark-parton components are collectivized. For the cumulative processes under consideration large distances between quarks are very important. The fundamental facts and theoretical interpretation of the quantum field theory and of the condensed media theory in the relativistic nuclear physics are presented in brief. The collisions of the relativistic nuclei with low momentum transfers is considered in a fast moving coordinate system. The basic parameter determining this type of collisions is the energy of nucleon binding in nuclei. It has been shown that the short-range correlation model provides a good presentation of many characteristics of the multiple particle production and it may be regarded as an approximate universal property of hadron interactions

  12. Physical effects in gravitational field of black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frolov, V.P.

    1986-01-01

    A large number of problems related to peculiarities of physical processes in a strong gravitational field of black holes has been considered. Energy shift and the complete structure of physical fields for charged sources near a black hole have been investigated. Density matrix and generating functional for quantum effects in stationary black holes have been calculated. Contributions of massless and massive fields to vacuum polarization in black holes have been investigated and influence of quantum effects on the global structure of a black hole has been discussed

  13. Where Does the Physics of Extreme Gravitational Collapse Reside?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Barceló

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The gravitational collapse of massive stars serves to manifest the most severe deviations of general relativity with respect to Newtonian gravity: the formation of horizons and spacetime singularities. Both features have proven to be catalysts of deep physical developments, especially when combined with the principles of quantum mechanics. Nonetheless, it is seldom remarked that it is hardly possible to combine all these developments into a unified theoretical model, while maintaining reasonable prospects for the independent experimental corroboration of its different parts. In this paper we review the current theoretical understanding of the physics of gravitational collapse in order to highlight this tension, stating the position that the standard view on evaporating black holes stands for. This serves as the motivation for the discussion of a recent proposal that offers the opposite perspective, represented by a set of geometries that regularize the classical singular behavior and present modifications of the near-horizon Schwarzschild geometry as the result of the propagation of non-perturbative ultraviolet effects originated in regions of high curvature. We present an extensive exploration of the necessary steps on the explicit construction of these geometries, and discuss how this proposal could change our present understanding of astrophysical black holes and even offer the possibility of detecting genuine ultraviolet effects in gravitational-wave experiments.

  14. Two-time physics with gravitational and gauge field backgrounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bars, Itzhak

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that all possible gravitational, gauge and other interactions experienced by particles in ordinary d dimensions (one time) can be described in the language of two-time physics in a spacetime with d+2 dimensions. This is obtained by generalizing the world line formulation of two-time physics by including background fields. A given two-time model, with a fixed set of background fields, can be gauged fixed from d+2 dimensions to (d-1)+1 dimensions to produce diverse one-time dynamical models, all of which are dually related to each other under the underlying gauge symmetry of the unified two-time theory. To satisfy the gauge symmetry of the two-time theory the background fields must obey certain coupled differential equations that are generally covariant and gauge invariant in the target (d+2)-dimensional spacetime. The gravitational background obeys a closed homothety condition while the gauge field obeys a differential equation that generalizes a similar equation derived by Dirac in 1936. Explicit solutions to these coupled equations show that the usual gravitational, gauge, and other interactions in d dimensions may be viewed as embedded in the higher (d+2)-dimensional space, thus displaying higher spacetime symmetries that otherwise remain hidden

  15. 1st Karl Schwarzschild Meeting on Gravitational Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kaminski, Matthias; Mureika, Jonas; Bleicher, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    These proceedings collect the selected contributions of participants of the First Karl Schwarzschild Meeting on Gravitational Physics, held in Frankfurt, Germany to celebrate the 140th anniversary of Schwarzschild's birth. They are grouped into 4 main themes: I. The Life and Work of Karl Schwarzschild; II. Black Holes in Classical General Relativity, Numerical Relativity, Astrophysics, Cosmology, and Alternative Theories of Gravity; III. Black Holes in Quantum Gravity and String Theory; IV. Other Topics in Contemporary Gravitation. Inspired by the foundational principle ``By acknowledging the past, we open a route to the future",  the week-long meeting, envisioned as a forum for exchange between scientists from all locations and levels of education, drew participants from 15 countries across 4 continents. In addition to plenary talks from leading researchers, a special focus on young talent was provided, a feature underlined by the Springer Prize for the best student and junior presentations.

  16. Concluding Remarks: Connecting Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions and Neutron Star Mergers by the Equation of State of Dense Hadron- and Quark Matter as signalled by Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauske, Matthias; Steinheimer, Jan; Bovard, Luke; Mukherjee, Ayon; Schramm, Stefan; Takami, Kentaro; Papenfort, Jens; Wechselberger, Natascha; Rezzolla, Luciano; Stöcker, Horst

    2017-07-01

    The underlying open questions in the fields of general relativistic astrophysics and elementary particle and nuclear physics are strongly connected and their results are interdependent. Although the physical systems are quite different, the 4D-simulation of a merger of a binary system of two neutron stars and the properties of the hot and dense matter created in high energy heavy ion collisions, strongly depend on the equation of state of fundamental elementary matter. Neutron star mergers represent optimal astrophysical laboratories to investigate the QCD phase structure using a spectrogram of the post-merger phase of the emitted gravitational waves. These studies can be supplemented by observations from heavy ion collisions to possibly reach a conclusive picture on the QCD phase structure at high density and temperature. As gravitational waves (GWs) emitted from merging neutron star binaries are on the verge of their first detection, it is important to understand the main characteristics of the underlying merging system in order to predict the expected GW signal. Based on numerical-relativity simulations of merging neutron star binaries, the emitted GW and the interior structure of the generated hypermassive neutron stars (HMNS) have been analyzed in detail. This article will focus on the internal and rotational HMNS properties and their connection with the emitted GW signal. Especially, the appearance of the hadon-quark phase transition in the interior region of the HMNS and its conjunction with the spectral properties of the emitted GW will be addressed and confronted with the simulation results of high energy heavy ion collisions.

  17. PREFACE: 2nd International Symposium on the Modern Physics of Compact Stars and Relativistic Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvard Chubaryan, Professor; Aram Saharian, Professor; Armen Sedrakian, Professor

    2014-03-01

    The international conference ''The Modern Physics of Compact Stars and Relativistic Gravity'' took place in Yerevan, Armenia, from 18-21 September 2013. This was the second in a series of conferences which aim to bring together people working in astrophysics of compact stars, physics of dense matter, gravitation and cosmology, observations of pulsars and binary neutron stars and related fields. The conference was held on the occasion of 100th birthday of the founder of the Theoretical Physics Chair at the Department of Physics of Yerevan State University and prominent Armenian scientist Academician Gurgen S Sahakyan. The field of compact stars has seen extraordinary development since the discovery of pulsars in 1967. Even before this discovery, pioneering work of a number of theoretical groups had laid the foundation for this development. A pioneer of this effort was Professor G S Sahakyan who, together with Professor Victor Ambartsumyan and a group of young scientists, started in the early sixties their fundamental work on the properties of superdense matter and on the relativistic structure of compact stellar objects. This conference explored the vast diversity of the manifestations of compact stars, including the modern aspects of the equation of state of superdense matter, its magnetic and thermal properties, rotational dynamics, superfluidity and superconductivity, phase transition from hadronic to quark matter, etc. The articles on these subjects collected in this volume are evidence of liveliness of the field and of the continuous feedback between theory and the experiment. A part of this volume is devoted to the cosmology and the theories of gravity — the subfields of astrophysics that are of fundamental importance to our understanding of the universe. The reader will find here articles touching on the most diverse aspects of these fields such as modern problems in Einstein's classical theory of gravity and its alternatives, string theory motivated

  18. Does Pressure Accentuate General Relativistic Gravitational Collapse and Formation of Trapped Surfaces?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Abhas

    2013-04-01

    It is widely believed that though pressure resists gravitational collapse in Newtonian gravity, it aids the same in general relativity (GR) so that GR collapse should eventually be similar to the monotonous free fall case. But we show that, even in the context of radiationless adiabatic collapse of a perfect fluid, pressure tends to resist GR collapse in a manner which is more pronounced than the corresponding Newtonian case and formation of trapped surfaces is inhibited. In fact there are many works which show such collapse to rebound or become oscillatory implying a tug of war between attractive gravity and repulsive pressure gradient. Furthermore, for an imperfect fluid, the resistive effect of pressure could be significant due to likely dramatic increase of tangential pressure beyond the "photon sphere." Indeed, with inclusion of tangential pressure, in principle, there can be static objects with surface gravitational redshift z → ∞. Therefore, pressure can certainly oppose gravitational contraction in GR in a significant manner in contradiction to the idea of Roger Penrose that GR continued collapse must be unstoppable.

  19. Gravitational Contribution to the Heat Flux in a Simple Dilute Fluid: An Approach Based on General Relativistic Kinetic Theory to First Order in the Gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Brun-Battistini

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Richard C. Tolman analyzed the relation between a temperature gradient and a gravitational field in an equilibrium situation. In 2012, Tolman’s law was generalized to a non-equilibrium situation for a simple dilute relativistic fluid. The result in that scenario, obtained by introducing the gravitational force through the molecular acceleration, couples the heat flux with the metric coefficients and the gradients of the state variables. In the present paper it is shown, by explicitly describing the single particle orbits as geodesics in Boltzmann’s equation, that a gravitational field drives a heat flux in this type of system. The calculation is devoted solely to the gravitational field contribution to this heat flux in which a Newtonian limit to the Schwarzschild metric is assumed. The corresponding transport coefficient, which is obtained within a relaxation approximation, corresponds to the dilute fluid in a weak gravitational field. The effect is negligible in the non-relativistic regime, as evidenced by the direct evaluation of the corresponding limit.

  20. Newtonian analogue of force and relativistic drag on a free particle in the gravitational field of a combined Kerr-NUT field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, T.; Yadav, R.B.S.

    1980-01-01

    In the first part of the present paper the Newtonian analogue of force for the combined Kerr-NUT metric has been investigated. To the first order of approximation one component of the force vector corresponds to the Newtonian gravitational force. In the higher order of approximation the relativistic correction terms due to rotation and presence of gravitational analogue of a magnetic monopole are obtained. In the second part of the paper the motion of a freely falling body has been investigated. It is found that plane orbits are not possible. Also a radial fall is not possible and there is a rotational drag on the particle which has no Newtonian analogue. (author)

  1. Broken symmetry of Lie groups of transformation generating general relativistic theories of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halpern, L.

    1981-01-01

    Invariant varieties of suitable semisimple groups of transformations can serve as models of the space-time of the universe. The metric is expressible in terms of the basis vectors of the group. The symmetry of the group is broken by introducing a gauge formalism in the space of the basis vectors with the adjoint group as gauge group. The gauge potentials are expressible in terms of the basis vectors for the case of the De Sitter group. The resulting gauge theory is equivalent to De Sitter covariant general relativity. Group covariant generalizations of gravitational theory are discussed. (Auth.)

  2. The notions of mass in gravitational and particle physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Gianluca

    It is presently thought that the mass of all of the elementary particles is determined by the Higgs field. This scalar field couples directly into the trace of the energy momentum tensor of the elementary particles. The attraction between two or more masses arises from the exchange of gravitational quantum particles of spin 2, called gravitons. The gravitational field couples directly into the energy momentum tensor. Then there is a close connection between the Higgs field, that originates the mass, and the gravitational field that dictates how the masses interact. Our purpose in this thesis is to discuss this close connection in terms of fundamental definitions of inertial and gravitational masses. On a practical level we explore two properties of mass from the viewpoint of coupling into the Higgs field: (i) The coupling of the both the Higgs and gravity to the energy-pressure tensor allows for the decay of the Higgs particle into two gravitons. We use the self energy part of the Higgs propagator to calculate the electromagnetic, weak, fermionic and gravitational decay rate of the Higgs particle. We show that the former process appears to dominate the other decay modes. Since the gravitons are detectable with virtually zero probability, the number of Higgs particles with observable decay products will be much less than previously expected. (ii) Some new experimental results seem to indicate that the mass of the heavy elementary particles like the Z,W+,W- and especially the top quark, depends on the particle environment in which these particles are produced. The presence of a Higgs field due to neighboring particles could be responsible for induced mass shifts. Further measurements of mass shift effects might give an indirect proof of the Higgs particle. Such can be in principle done by re-analyzing some of the production data e +e- → ZZ (or W+W-) already collected at the LEP experiment. About the physical property of the top quark, it is too early to arrive at

  3. Observable gravitational and electromagnetic orbits and trajectories in discrete physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noyes, H.P.; McGoveran, D.O.

    1988-01-01

    Our discrete and finite version of relativistic quantum mechanics provides an elementary particle physics consistent with the standard model of quarks and leptons. Our recent relativistic calculation of the bound state spectrum of hydrogen has allowed us to make a combinatorial correction to the first order estimate of 1/α = /Dirac h/c/e 2 = 137 derived from the combinatorial hierarchy and achieve agreement with experiment up to terms of order α 3 . The same theory requires that to first order /Dirac h/c/Gm/sub p/ 2 = 2 127 + 136 ≅ 1.7 /times/ 10 38 . Using the emission and absorption of spin 1 photons and spin 2 gravitons in this framework, we try to show that we can meet the three additional tests of general relativity---solar red shift, solar bending of light, and precession of the perihelion of Mercury. We predict that a macroscopic electromagnetic orbit would have four times the Sommerfeld precession for basically the same reason that Mercury has six times the Sommerfeld precession. 20 refs

  4. To a physical interpretation of a weak gravitational field in GRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlov, N.V.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of separation of Newton components of weak vacuum gravitational fields is discussed. Chronometric- invariant (CI) characteristics of space-time and the corresponding Newton values are compared in the fixed systems of reference. Attention is paid to the following facts. ''Weak'' sources of weak gravitational fields do not interact gravitationally. If the CI characteristics of vacuum space- time permit series expansion in 1/c powers then the coefficients at odd 1/c powers are connected with the presence of non-gravitational material fields inside the sources. Masses producing gravitational field may not be the sources of gravitational waves in the form of which this field manifests itself. Perspectives of detecting laboratory gravitational waves are discussed: the simplest metrics of plane wave is considered in the quasi-inertial reference system; the flowsheet of the generator of this wave is suggested; relativistic oscillation of a test massive particle is calculated in the postnewtonian approximation. The numerical evaluations show that attempts of mechanical detection of laboratory gravitational waves are hopeless [ru

  5. Gravitational wave background from Standard Model physics: qualitative features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghiglieri, J.; Laine, M.

    2015-01-01

    Because of physical processes ranging from microscopic particle collisions to macroscopic hydrodynamic fluctuations, any plasma in thermal equilibrium emits gravitational waves. For the largest wavelengths the emission rate is proportional to the shear viscosity of the plasma. In the Standard Model at 0T > 16 GeV, the shear viscosity is dominated by the most weakly interacting particles, right-handed leptons, and is relatively large. We estimate the order of magnitude of the corresponding spectrum of gravitational waves. Even though at small frequencies (corresponding to the sub-Hz range relevant for planned observatories such as eLISA) this background is tiny compared with that from non-equilibrium sources, the total energy carried by the high-frequency part of the spectrum is non-negligible if the production continues for a long time. We suggest that this may constrain (weakly) the highest temperature of the radiation epoch. Observing the high-frequency part directly sets a very ambitious goal for future generations of GHz-range detectors

  6. Reflections on the information paradigm in quantum and gravitational physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres Höhn, Philipp

    2017-08-01

    We reflect on the information paradigm in quantum and gravitational physics and on how it may assist us in approaching quantum gravity. We begin by arguing, using a reconstruction of its formalism, that quantum theory can be regarded as a universal framework governing an observer’s acquisition of information from physical systems taken as information carriers. We continue by observing that the structure of spacetime is encoded in the communication relations among observers and more generally the information flow in spacetime. Combining these insights with an information-theoretic Machian view, we argue that the quantum architecture of spacetime can operationally be viewed as a locally finite network of degrees of freedom exchanging information. An advantage - and simultaneous limitation - of an informational perspective is its quasi-universality, i.e. quasi-independence of the precise physical incarnation of the underlying degrees of freedom. This suggests to exploit these informational insights to develop a largely microphysics independent top-down approach to quantum gravity to complement extant bottom-up approaches by closing the scale gap between the unknown Planck scale physics and the familiar physics of quantum (field) theory and general relativity systematically from two sides. While some ideas have been pronounced before in similar guise and others are speculative, the way they are strung together and justified is new and supports approaches attempting to derive emergent spacetime structures from correlations of quantum degrees of freedom.

  7. Theoretical perspective on RHIC [relativistic heavy ion collider] physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dover, C.B.

    1990-10-01

    We discuss the status of the relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) project at Brookhaven, and assess some key experiments which propose to detect the signatures of a transient quark-gluon plasma (QGP) phase in such collisions. 24 refs

  8. Gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fennelly, A.J.

    1978-01-01

    Investigations of several problems of gravitation are discussed. The question of the existence of black holes is considered. While black holes like those in Einstein's theory may not exist in other gravity theories, trapped surfaces implying such black holes certainly do. The theories include those of Brans-Dicke, Lightman-Lee, Rosen, and Yang. A similar two-tensor theory of Yilmaz is investigated and found inconsistent and nonviable. The Newman-Penrose formalism for Riemannian geometries is adapted to general gravity theories and used to implement a search for twisting solutions of the gravity theories for empty and nonempty spaces. The method can be used to find the gravitational fields for all viable gravity theories. The rotating solutions are of particular importance for strong field interpretation of the Stanford/Marshall gyroscope experiment. Inhomogeneous cosmologies are examined in Einstein's theory as generalizations of homogeneous ones by raising the dimension of the invariance groups by one more parameter. The nine Bianchi classifications are extended to Rosen's theory of gravity for homogeneous cosmological models

  9. Ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics with AFTER@LHC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Arnaldi, R.; Brodsky, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    We outline the opportunities for ultra-relativistic heavy–ion physics which are offered by a next generation and multi-purpose fixed-target experiment exploiting the proton and ion LHC beams extracted by a bent crystal.......We outline the opportunities for ultra-relativistic heavy–ion physics which are offered by a next generation and multi-purpose fixed-target experiment exploiting the proton and ion LHC beams extracted by a bent crystal....

  10. Gravitational-wave physics and astronomy an introduction to theory, experiment and data analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Creighton, Jolien D E

    2011-01-01

    This most up-to-date, one-stop reference combines coverage of both theory and observational techniques, with introductory sections to bring all readers up to the same level. Written by outstanding researchers directly involved with the scientific program of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), the book begins with a brief review of general relativity before going on to describe the physics of gravitational waves and the astrophysical sources of gravitational radiation. Further sections cover gravitational wave detectors, data analysis, and the outlook of gravitation

  11. The physics of gamma-ray bursts & relativistic jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Pawan, E-mail: pk@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Zhang, Bing, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2015-02-24

    We provide a comprehensive review of major developments in our understanding of gamma-ray bursts, with particular focus on the discoveries made within the last fifteen years when their true nature was uncovered. We describe the observational properties of photons from the radio to 100s GeV bands, both in the prompt emission and the afterglow phases. Mechanisms for the generation of these photons in GRBs are discussed and confronted with observations to shed light on the physical properties of these explosions, their progenitor stars and the surrounding medium. After presenting observational evidence that a powerful, collimated, jet moving at close to the speed of light is produced in these explosions, we describe our current understanding regarding the generation, acceleration, and dissipation of the jet. We discuss mounting observational evidence that long duration GRBs are produced when massive stars die, and that at least some short duration bursts are associated with old, roughly solar mass, compact stars. The question of whether a black-hole or a strongly magnetized, rapidly rotating neutron star is produced in these explosions is also discussed. We provide a brief summary of what we have learned about relativistic collisionless shocks and particle acceleration from GRB afterglow studies, and discuss the current understanding of radiation mechanism during the prompt emission phase. We discuss theoretical predictions of possible high-energy neutrino emission from GRBs and the current observational constraints. Finally, we discuss how these explosions may be used to study cosmology, e.g. star formation, metal enrichment, reionization history, as well as the formation of first stars and galaxies in the universe.

  12. Detecting non-relativistic cosmic neutrinos by capture on tritium: phenomenology and physics potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Andrew J.; Lunardini, Cecilia; Sabancilar, Eray, E-mail: andrewjlong@asu.edu, E-mail: Cecilia.Lunardini@asu.edu, E-mail: Eray.Sabancilar@asu.edu [Physics Department, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We study the physics potential of the detection of the Cosmic Neutrino Background via neutrino capture on tritium, taking the proposed PTOLEMY experiment as a case study. With the projected energy resolution of Δ ∼ 0.15 eV, the experiment will be sensitive to neutrino masses with degenerate spectrum, m{sub 1} ≅ m{sub 2} ≅ m{sub 3} = m{sub ν} ∼> 0.1 eV. These neutrinos are non-relativistic today; detecting them would be a unique opportunity to probe this unexplored kinematical regime. The signature of neutrino capture is a peak in the electron spectrum that is displaced by 2 m{sub ν} above the beta decay endpoint. The signal would exceed the background from beta decay if the energy resolution is Δ ∼< 0.7 m{sub ν} . Interestingly, the total capture rate depends on the origin of the neutrino mass, being Γ{sup D} ≅ 4 and Γ{sup M} ≅ 8 events per year (for a 100 g tritium target) for unclustered Dirac and Majorana neutrinos, respectively. An enhancement of the rate of up to O(1) is expected due to gravitational clustering, with the unique potential to probe the local overdensity of neutrinos. Turning to more exotic neutrino physics, PTOLEMY could be sensitive to a lepton asymmetry, and reveal the eV-scale sterile neutrino that is favored by short baseline oscillation searches. The experiment would also be sensitive to a neutrino lifetime on the order of the age of the universe and break the degeneracy between neutrino mass and lifetime which affects existing bounds.

  13. Relativistic theories of materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bressan, Aldo

    1978-01-01

    The theory of relativity was created in 1905 to solve a problem concerning electromagnetic fields. That solution was reached by means of profound changes in fundamental concepts and ideas that considerably affected the whole of physics. Moreover, when Einstein took gravitation into account, he was forced to develop radical changes also in our space-time concepts (1916). Relativistic works on heat, thermodynamics, and elasticity appeared as early as 1911. However, general theories having a thermodynamic basis, including heat conduction and constitutive equations, did not appear in general relativity until about 1955 for fluids and appeared only after 1960 for elastic or more general finitely deformed materials. These theories dealt with materials with memory, and in this connection some relativistic versions of the principle of material indifference were considered. Even more recently, relativistic theories incorporating finite deformations for polarizable and magnetizable materials and those in which couple s...

  14. Modern Gravitational Lens Cosmology for Introductory Physics and Astronomy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huwe, Paul; Field, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Recent and exciting discoveries in astronomy and cosmology have inspired many high school students to learn about these fields. A particularly fascinating consequence of general relativity at the forefront of modern cosmology research is gravitational lensing, the bending of light rays that pass near massive objects. Gravitational lensing enables…

  15. Non-relativistic and relativistic quantum kinetic equations in nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botermans, W.M.M.

    1989-01-01

    In this thesis an attempt is made to draw up a quantummechanical tranport equation for the explicit calculation oof collision processes between two (heavy) ions, by making proper approaches of the exact equations (non-rel.: N-particles Schroedinger equation; rel.: Euler-Lagrange field equations.). An important starting point in the drag-up of the theory is the behaviour of nuclear matter in equilibrium which is determined by individual as well as collective effects. The central point in this theory is the effective interaction between two nucleons both surrounded by other nucleons. In the derivation of the tranport equations use is made of the green's function formalism as developed by Schwinger and Keldys. For the Green's function kinematic equations are drawn up and are solved by choosing a proper factorization of three- and four-particle Green's functions in terms of one- and two-particle Green's functions. The necessary boundary condition is obtained by explicitly making use of Boltzmann's assumption that colliding particles are statistically uncorrelated. Finally a transport equation is obtained in which the mean field as well as the nucleon-nucleon collisions are given by the same (medium dependent) interaction. This interaction is the non-equilibrium extension of the interaction as given in the Brueckner theory of nuclear matter. Together, kinetic equation and interaction, form a self-consistent set of equations for the case of a non-relativistic as well as for the case of a relativistic starting point. (H.W.) 148 refs.; 6 figs.; 411 schemes

  16. The black hole symphony: probing new physics using gravitational waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gair, Jonathan R

    2008-12-13

    The next decade will very likely see the birth of a new field of astronomy as we become able to directly detect gravitational waves (GWs) for the first time. The existence of GWs is one of the key predictions of Einstein's theory of general relativity, but they have eluded direct detection for the last century. This will change thanks to a new generation of laser interferometers that are already in operation or which are planned for the near future. GW observations will allow us to probe some of the most exotic and energetic events in the Universe, the mergers of black holes. We will obtain information about the systems to a precision unprecedented in astronomy, and this will revolutionize our understanding of compact astrophysical systems. Moreover, if any of the assumptions of relativity theory are incorrect, this will lead to subtle, but potentially detectable, differences in the emitted GWs. Our observations will thus provide very precise verifications of the theory in an as yet untested regime. In this paper, I will discuss what GW observations could tell us about known and (potentially) unknown physics.

  17. For information: Geneva University - The search for gravitational waves. Physical motivations and experimental perspectives

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    UNIVERSITE DE GENEVE ECOLE DE PHYSIQUE Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet - 1211 GENEVE 4 Tél : (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 11 May PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 - Stückelberg Auditorium The search for gravitational waves. Physical motivations and experimental perspectives by Prof. Michele Maggiore / DPT-UniGe I will give an overview of gravitational-wave physics, addressing two main questions: What are the physical motivations for gravitational-wave research, both from the point of view of astrophysics and of high-energy physics. Present status and future perspectives of gravitational-wave experiments. Information: http://dpnc.unige.ch/seminaire/annonce.html Organizer: A. Cervera Villanueva

  18. Gravitation

    CERN Document Server

    Prasanna, A R

    2017-01-01

    This book suitable for post graduates in Physics and Astrophysics aims at introducing the theory of general relativity as an important background for doing astrophysics. Starting from a detailed discussion of the various mathematical concepts for doing general relativity, the book introduces the geometric description of gravity. It gives a brief historical perspective to classical mechanics and electrodynamics making an attempt to establish the necessity of special relativity as propounded by Einstein extending to General Relativity. This book is a good starting point for post graduates wanting to pursue the modern topics of Cosmology, High energy astrophysics and related areas.

  19. Frontiers in relativistic celestial mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Relativistic celestial mechanics – investigating the motion celestial bodies under the influence of general relativity – is a major tool of modern experimental gravitational physics. With a wide range of prominent authors from the field, this two-volume series consists of reviews on a multitude of advanced topics in the area of relativistic celestial mechanics – starting from more classical topics such as the regime of asymptotically-flat spacetime, light propagation and celestial ephemerides, but also including its role in cosmology and alternative theories of gravity as well as modern experiments in this area.

  20. Relativistic astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Price, R H

    1993-01-01

    Work reported in the workshop on relativistic astrophysics spanned a wide varicy of topics. Two specific areas seemed of particular interest. Much attention was focussed on gravitational wave sources, especially on the waveforms they produce, and progress was reported in theoretical and observational aspects of accretion disks.

  1. Topics in black-hole physics: geometric constraints on noncollapsing, gravitating systems, and tidal distortions of a Schwarzschild black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redmount, I.H.

    1984-01-01

    This dissertation consists of two studies on the general-relativistic theory of black holes. The first work concerns the fundamental issue of black-hole formation: in it geometric constraints are sought on gravitating matter systems, in the special case of axial symmetry, which determine whether or not those systems undergo gravitational collapse to form black holes. The second project deals with mechanical behavior of a black hole: specifically, the tidal deformation of a static black hole is studied by the gravitational fields of external bodies

  2. Lunar Laser Ranging Science: Gravitational Physics and Lunar Interior and Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, James G.; Turyshev, Slava G.; Boggs, Dale H.; Ratcliff, J. Todd

    2004-01-01

    Laser pulses fired at retroreflectors on the Moon provide very accurate ranges. Analysis yields information on Earth, Moon, and orbit. The highly accurate retroreflector positions have uncertainties less than a meter. Tides on the Moon show strong dissipation, with Q=33+/-4 at a month and a weak dependence on period. Lunar rotation depends on interior properties; a fluid core is indicated with radius approx.20% that of the Moon. Tests of relativistic gravity verify the equivalence principle to +/-1.4x10(exp -13), limit deviations from Einstein's general relativity, and show no rate for the gravitational constant G/G with uncertainty 9x10(exp -13)/yr.

  3. Acceleration of heavy ions to relativistic energies and their use in physics and biomedicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, M.G.

    1977-01-01

    The uses of accelerated heavy ions in physics and biomedicine are listed. The special properties of high energy heavy ions and their fields of applications, the desirable ions and energies, requirements for a relativistic heavy ion accelerator, and AGS and Bevalac parameters are discussed. 26 references

  4. Physics with relativistic heavy ions: QGP and other delicacies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    Conditions favorable to formation and observation of a deconfined state of quarks and gluons (often called the quark-gluon plasma) are thought to exist following the collision of very heavy nuclei at center-of-mass energies exceeding several tens of GeV/nucleon. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider under construction at BNL since 1991 is designed to provide such collisions at energies up to √s/A = 200 GeV. Two large dedicated experiments are being built to operate there; these two experiments take rather different approaches to the problem of classifying such collisions and probing for signals of QGP formation. Two smaller experiments are proposed to focus on specific aspects of these collisions. Recent developments in the understanding of the initial state formed in such collisions include, particularly, the possible rapid equilibration of the gluon density, leading in an equilibrium picture to such high temperatures that sizable thermal excitation of charm becomes probable. Recent theoretical conjectures have focussed on the possible formation of a disordered chiral condensate following chiral symmetry restoration in heavy-nucleus collisions, which might be a consequence of nonequilibrium deexcitation of a dense partonic state

  5. Gravitational Physics: the birth of a new era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2017-11-01

    We live the golden age of cosmology, while the era of gravitational astronomy has finally begun. Still, fundamental puzzles remain. Standard cosmology is formulated within the framework of Einstein's General theory of Relativity. Notwithstanding, General Relativity is not adequate to explain the earliest stages of cosmic existence, and cannot provide an explanation for the Big Bang itself. Modern early universe cosmology is in need of a rigorous underpinning in Quantum Gravity.

  6. (Almost) All You Need to Know About Gravitational Wave Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    General Relativity, some of which have been taken for granted without observations: are gravitons massless? Are black holes the simplest possible macroscopic objects? do event horizons and black holes really exist, or is their formation halted by some as-yet unknown mechanism? In these lectures, we will describe the anatomy of a GW event, with particular emphasis on how to compute gravitational-waves from black hole systems and what kind of information such waves carry.

  7. A Useful Expression for Relativistic Energy Conservation of a Point Mass in an Isotropic Static Gravitational Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augousti, A. T.; Radosz, A.; Ostasiewicz, K.

    2011-01-01

    By using the symmetry and time-independence properties of Schwarzschild spacetime it is demonstrated that an energy conservation law may be expressed in terms of local velocity. From this form three important results may be derived very concisely. This highlights analogies and differences between relativistic and classical approaches to mechanics…

  8. A new theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunov, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    The author believes that the General Relativity Theory (GRT) suffers from a substantial deficiency since it ignors the fundamental laws of conservation of energy. Einstein neglected the classical concept of the field due to his belief in the truth of the principle of equivalence between forces of inertid gravitation. This equivalence leads, as the author says, to nonequivalence of these forces, making GRT logically contradictory from the physical point of view. The author considers GRT as a certain stage in the course of the study of space-time and gravitation, and suggests a new theory called the Relativistic Theory of Gravitation (RTG) which obeys the fundamental laws of conservation, and which is justified in some of its aspects by astronomical observations. RTG does not suffer from some deficiencies met in Einsteins theory. One is nonunique predictions of gravitation effects within the boundaries of the solar system. Also, RTG refuses some hypothesis as that of black holes. 7 refs

  9. The NuSTAR spectrum of Mrk 335: extreme relativistic effects within two gravitational radii of the event horizon?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parker, M. L.; Wilkins, D. R.; Fabian, A. C.

    2014-01-01

    gravitational radii (R-G) of the event horizon. The reflection fraction decreases sharply with increasing flux, consistent with a point source moving up to above 10 R-G as the source brightens. We constrain the spin parameter to greater than 0.9 at the 3 sigma confidence level. By adding a spin-dependent upper...

  10. On the possibility of a fourth test of general relativity in earth's gravitational field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yuan-zhong.

    1981-03-01

    In the paper the possibility for a fourth test of general relativity (i.e. relativistic time delay) in Earth's gravitational field is discussed. The effects of Earth's gravitational field on an interferometer and a resonant cavity are calculated by means of both two definitions of physical length. (author)

  11. Relativistic effects in a rotating coordinate system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chugreev, Y.V.

    1989-01-01

    The general approach to calculating various physical effects in a rotating, noninertial reference frame based on the tetrad formalism for observables is discussed. It is shown that the method based on the search for the ''true'' coordinate transformation from an inertial to the rotating frame is ill-founded. Most special relativistic effects in a rotating frame have been calculated without any nonrelativistic restrictions. It is shown how simple physical experiments can be used to determine whether a circle is at rest in the equatorial plane of a Kerr--Newman gravitational source in the relativistic theory of gravity or is rotating about an axis through its center

  12. State vector reduction - 2: Elements of physical reality, nonlocality and stochasticity in relativistic dynamical reduction models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghirardi, G.C.; Pearle, P.

    1991-02-01

    The problem of getting a relativistic generalization of the CSL dynamical reduction model, which has been presented in part I, is discussed. In so doing we have the opportunity to introduce the idea of a stochastically invariant theory. The theoretical model we present, that satisfies this kind of invariance requirement, offers us the possibility to reconsider, from a new point of view, some conceptually relevant issues such as nonlocality, the legitimacy of attributing elements of physical reality to physical systems and the problem of establishing causal relations between physical events. (author). Refs, 3 figs

  13. Strong-field physics using lasers and relativistic heavy ions at the high-energy storage ring HESR at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehl, T; Bagnoud, V; Stoehlker, T; Litvinov, Y; Winters, D F A; Zielbauer, B; Backe, H; Spielmann, Ch; Seres, J; Tünnermann, A; Neumayer, P; Aurand, B; Namba, S; Zhao, H Y

    2014-01-01

    The HESR high-energy ion storage ring at FAIR will provide unprecedented possibilities for strong-field physics using novel laser sources on relativistic heavy ions. An overview on the planning will be given.

  14. Gravitational radiation from dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacson, R.A.; Welling, J.S.; Winicour, J.

    1985-01-01

    A dust cloud is examined within the framework of the general relativistic characteristic initial value problem. Unique gravitational initial data are obtained by requiring that the space-time be quasi-Newtonian. Explicit calculations of metric and matter fields are presented, which include all post-Newtonian corrections necessary to discuss the major physical properties of null infinity. These results establish a curved space version of the Einstein quadrupole formula, in the form ''news function equals third time derivative of transverse quadrupole moment,'' for this system. However, these results imply that some weakened notion of asymptotic flatness is necessary for the description of quasi-Newtonian systems

  15. Exact Relativistic `Antigravity' Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felber, Franklin S.

    2006-01-01

    The Schwarzschild solution is used to find the exact relativistic motion of a payload in the gravitational field of a mass moving with constant velocity. At radial approach or recession speeds faster than 3-1/2 times the speed of light, even a small mass gravitationally repels a payload. At relativistic speeds, a suitable mass can quickly propel a heavy payload from rest nearly to the speed of light with negligible stresses on the payload.

  16. PREFACE: X Workshop of the Gravitation and Mathematical Physics Division, Mexican Physical Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The collection of papers in this volume was presented during the X Workshop of the Gravitation and Mathematical Physics Division of the Mexican Physical Society (DGFM-SMF), which was held in Pachuca, Hidalgo, México, December 2-6, 2013. The Workshop is a bi-annual series of conferences sponsored by the DGFM-SMF that started in 1993 with the purposes of discussing and exchanging the research and experience of the gravitational and mathematical physics communities in Mexico. Each Mexican Workshop has been devoted to subjects of broad interest, so that students, in particular, can have access to specialized courses and talks that allow them to raise up their qualifications as professional researchers. Recurrent topics in the Mexican Workshop are supergravity, branes, black holes, the early Universe, observational cosmology, quantum gravity and cosmology and numerical relativity. Following our previous Workshops, distinguished researchers in the field, working in Mexico, were invited to give courses, whereas young researchers were invited for plenary lectures. More specialized talks were also presented in parallel sessions, with ample participation of researchers, and graduate and undergraduate students; most of the presentations have been included in these proceedings. The contributions in this volume have been peer-reviewed, and they represent most of the courses, plenary talks and contributed talks presented during our Workshop. We are indebted to the contributors of these proceedings, as well as to the other participants and organizers, all for making the event a complete success. We acknowledge the professionalism of our reviewers, who helped us to keep high quality standards in all manuscripts. Acknowledgments The organizing committee would like to acknowledge the financial support of the Mexican National Science and Technology Council (CONACyT), the Mexican Physical Society (SMF), as well as several Institutions including: Centro de Investigación y Estudios

  17. Towards Extreme Field Physics: Relativistic Optics and Particle Acceleration in the Transparent-Overdense Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegelich, B. Manuel

    2011-10-01

    A steady increase of on-target laser intensity with also increasing pulse contrast is leading to light-matter interactions of extreme laser fields with matter in new physics regimes which in turn enable a host of applications. A first example is the realization of interactions in the transperent-overdense regime (TOR), which is reached by interacting a highly relativistic (a0 >10), ultra high contrast laser pulse [1] with a solid density target, turning it transparent to the laser by the relativistic mass increase of the electrons. Thus, the interactions becomes volumetric, increasing the energy coupling from laser to plasma, facilitating a range of effects, including relativistic optics and pulse shaping, mono-energetic electron acceleration [3], highly efficient ion acceleration in the break-out afterburner regime [4], and the generation of relativistic and forward directed surface harmonics. Experiments at the LANL 130TW Trident laser facility successfully reached the TOR, and show relativistic pulse shaping beyond the Fourier limit, the acceleration of mono-energetic ~40 MeV electron bunches from solid targets, forward directed coherent relativistic high harmonic generation >1 keV Break-Out Afterburner (BOA) ion acceleration of Carbon to >1 GeV and Protons to >100 MeV. Carbon ions were accelerated with a conversion efficiency of >10% for ions >20 MeV and monoenergetic carbon ions with an energy spread of ICF diagnostics over ion fast ignition to medical physics. Furthermore, TOR targets traverse a wide range of HEDP parameter space during the interaction ranging from WDM conditions (e.g. brown dwarfs) to energy densities of ~1011 J/cm3 at peak, then dropping back to the underdense but extremely hot parameter range of gamma-ray bursts. Whereas today this regime can only be accessed on very few dedicated facilities, employing special targets and pulse cleaning technology, the next generation of laser facilities will operate in this regime by default, turning its

  18. Physics of Relativistic Objects in Compact Binaries: From Birth to Coalescence

    CERN Document Server

    Colpi, Monica; Gorini, Vittorio; Moschella, Ugo; Possenti, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive, authoritative and timely review of the astrophysical approach to the investigation of gravity theories. Particular attention is paid to strong-field tests of general relativity and alternative theories of gravity, performed using collapsed objects (neutron stars, black holes and white dwarfs) in relativistic binaries as laboratories. The book starts with an introduction which gives the background linking experimental gravity in cosmic laboratories to astrophysics and fundamental physics. Subsequent chapters cover observational and theoretical aspects of the following topics: from binaries as test-beds of gravity theories to binary pulsars as cosmic laboratories; from binary star evolution to the formation of relativistic binaries; from short gamma-ray bursts to low mass X-ray binaries; from stellar-mass black hole binaries to coalescing super-massive black holes in galaxy mergers. The book will be useful to researchers, PhD and graduate students in Astrophysics, Cosmology, ...

  19. Relic gravitational wave spectrum, the trans-Planckian physics and Horava-Lifshitz gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Seoktae

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the spectrum of the relic gravitational wave due to the trans-Planckian effect in which the standard linear dispersion relations may be modified. Of the modified dispersion relations suggested in the literature which has investigated the trans-Planckian effect, we especially use the Corley-Jacobson dispersion relations. The Corley-Jacobson-type modified dispersion relations can be obtained from Horava-Lifshitz gravity which is non-relativistic and UV complete. Although it is not clear how the transitions from Horava-Lifshitz gravity in the UV regime to Einstein gravity in the IR limit occur, we assume that the Horava-Lifshitz gravity regime is followed by the inflationary phase in Einstein gravity.

  20. A NEW MULTI-DIMENSIONAL GENERAL RELATIVISTIC NEUTRINO HYDRODYNAMICS CODE OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE. III. GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SIGNALS FROM SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of the gravitational wave (GW) signal of the post-bounce evolution of core-collapse supernovae (SNe), employing for the first time relativistic, two-dimensional explosion models with multi-group, three-flavor neutrino transport based on the ray-by-ray-plus approximation. The waveforms reflect the accelerated mass motions associated with the characteristic evolutionary stages that were also identified in previous works: a quasi-periodic modulation by prompt post-shock convection is followed by a phase of relative quiescence before growing amplitudes signal violent hydrodynamical activity due to convection and the standing accretion shock instability during the accretion period of the stalled shock. Finally, a high-frequency, low-amplitude variation from proto-neutron star (PNS) convection below the neutrinosphere appears superimposed on the low-frequency trend associated with the aspherical expansion of the SN shock after the onset of the explosion. Relativistic effects in combination with detailed neutrino transport are shown to be essential for quantitative predictions of the GW frequency evolution and energy spectrum, because they determine the structure of the PNS surface layer and its characteristic g-mode frequency. Burst-like high-frequency activity phases, correlated with sudden luminosity increase and spectral hardening of electron (anti-)neutrino emission for some 10 ms, are discovered as new features after the onset of the explosion. They correspond to intermittent episodes of anisotropic accretion by the PNS in the case of fallback SNe. We find stronger signals for more massive progenitors with large accretion rates. The typical frequencies are higher for massive PNSs, though the time-integrated spectrum also strongly depends on the model dynamics.

  1. Gravitational field self-limitation and its role in the Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gershtein, Semen S; Logunov, Anatolii A; Mestvirishvili, Mirian A [State Research Center ' Institute of High Energy Physics' , Protvino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2006-11-30

    It is shown that according to the relativistic theory of gravity, the gravitational field slows down the rate of time flow but stops doing so when the field is strong, thus displaying its tendency toward self-limitation of the gravitational potential. This property of the gravitational field prevents massive bodies from collapsing and allows a homogeneous isotropic universe to evolve cyclically. (physics of our days)

  2. Hard and soft physics of relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tywoniuk, Konrad

    2008-01-01

    somehow biased toward personal conclusion drawn during the course of the thesis work. Chapter 3 give a brief introduction to some theoretical approaches of high-energy hadronic scattering, both in the soft and hard regime. Also, the Glauber model is briefly described. Nuclear effects in hadron-nucleus collisions are introduced in Chapter 4 with a main emphasis on nuclear shadowing. Other multiple scattering effects, such as absorption and transverse momentum broadening, are briefly described. We present also some preliminary result on particle production in p+Pb and d+Au collisions at SPS and RHIC, respectively. Finally, nucleus-nucleus collisions are discussed in Chapter 5 in the context of simple model of final state interactions. In the 'string' jargon one may say, that the former chapter relates to particle production from independent strings, while the latter additionally includes the possibility of string interaction or, rather, interactions of particles originating from different strings. Chapter 6 contains a description of the main results obtained in the papers, and outlines interesting topics for further study in the LHC-era of heavy-ion physics.(Author). refs., figs., tabs

  3. Gravitation Waves

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    We will present a brief introduction to the physics of gravitational waves and their properties. We will review potential astrophysical sources of gravitational waves, and the physics and astrophysics that can be learned from their study. We will survey the techniques and technologies for detecting gravitational waves for the first time, including bar detectors and broadband interferometers, and give a brief status report on the international search effort, with special emphasis on the LIGO detectors and search results.

  4. Canonical quantization of spinning relativistic particle in external backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavrilov, S.P. [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Aracaju, SE (Brazil); Gitman, D.M. [Sao Paulo Univ. (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2000-07-01

    Full text follows: We revise the problem of the quantization of spinning relativistic particle pseudoclassical model, using a modified consistent canonical scheme. It allows one not only to include arbitrary electromagnetic and gravitational backgrounds in the consideration but to get in course of the quantization a consistent relativistic quantum mechanics, which reproduces literally the behavior of the one-particle sector of quantized spinor field. In particular, in a physical sector of the Hilbert space a complete positive spectrum of energies of relativistic particles and antiparticles is reproduced. Requirement to maintain all classical symmetries under the coordinate transformations and under U(1) transformations allows one to realize operator algebra without any ambiguities. (author)

  5. Relativistic Celestial Mechanics of the Solar System

    CERN Document Server

    Kopeikin, Sergei; Kaplan, George

    2011-01-01

    This authoritative book presents the theoretical development of gravitational physics as it applies to the dynamics of celestial bodies and the analysis of precise astronomical observations. In so doing, it fills the need for a textbook that teaches modern dynamical astronomy with a strong emphasis on the relativistic aspects of the subject produced by the curved geometry of four-dimensional spacetime. The first three chapters review the fundamental principles of celestial mechanics and of special and general relativity. This background material forms the basis for understanding relativistic r

  6. The physics of the relativistic counter-streaming instability that drives mass inflation inside black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Andrew J.S.; Avelino, Pedro P.

    2010-01-01

    If you fall into a real astronomical black hole (choosing a supermassive black hole, to make sure that the tidal forces do not get you first), then you will probably meet your fate not at a central singularity, but rather in the exponentially growing, relativistic counter-streaming instability at the inner horizon first pointed out by Poisson and Israel (1990), who called it mass inflation. The chief purpose of this paper is to present a clear exposition of the physical cause and consequence of inflation in spherical, charged black holes. Inflation acts like a particle accelerator in that it accelerates cold ingoing and outgoing streams through each other to prodigiously high energies. Inflation feeds on itself: the acceleration is powered by the gravity produced by the streaming energy. The paper: (1) uses physical arguments to develop simple approximations that follow the evolution of inflation from ignition, through inflation itself, to collapse; (2) confirms that the simple approximations capture accurately the results of fully nonlinear one- and two-fluid self-similar models; (3) demonstrates that, counter-intuitively, the smaller the accretion rate, the more rapidly inflation exponentiates; (4) shows that in single perfect fluid models, inflation occurs only if the sound speed equals the speed of light, supporting the physical idea that inflation in single fluids is driven by relativistic counter-streaming of waves; (5) shows that what happens during inflation up to the Planck curvature depends not on the distant past or future, but rather on events happening only a few hundred black hole crossing times into the past or future; (6) shows that, if quantum gravity does not intervene, then the generic end result of inflation is not a general relativistic null singularity, but rather a spacelike singularity at zero radius.

  7. Antihydrogen physics: gravitation and spectroscopy in AEgIS

    CERN Document Server

    Ferragut, R; Stroke, H H; Dassa, L; Rohne, O; Hogan, S D; Cialdi, S; Al-Qaradawi, I Y; Formaro, L; Sandaker, H; Testera, G; Stepanov, S V; Folegati, P; Morhard, C; Warring, U; Prelz, F; Belov, A S; Bonomi, G; Consolati, G; Ferrari, G; Lagomarsino, V; Krasnicky, D; Drobychev, G; Giammarchi, M G; Heyne, R; Zenoni, A; Castelli, F; Mariazzi, S; Cabaret, L; Fischer, A; Boscolo, I; Sillou, D; Villa, F; Perini, D; Djourelov, N; Zavatarelli, S; Oberthaler, M K; Manuzio, G; Carraro, C; Matveev, V A; Jorgensen, L V; Nedelec, P; Prevedelli, M; Comparat, D; Dupasquier, A; Turbabin, A V; Zvezhinskij, D S; Fontana, A; Kellerbauer, A; Canali, C; Dudarev, A; Petracek, V; Riccardi, C; Nebbia, G; Gninenko, S N; Brusa, R S; Rotondi, A; Sacerdoti, M; Calloni, A; Doser, M; Byakov, V M; Quasso, F; Trezzi, D

    2011-01-01

    AEgIS (Antimatter experiment: gravity, interferometry, spectroscopy) is an experiment approved by CERN with the goal of studying antihydrogen physics. In AEgIS, antihydrogen will be produced by charge exchange reactions of cold antiprotons with positronium atoms excited in a Rydberg state (n > 20). In the first phase of the experiment, controlled acceleration by an electric field gradient (Stark effect) and subsequent measurement of free fall in a Moire deflectometer will allow a test of the weak equivalence principle. In a second phase, the antihydrogen will be slowed, confined, and laser-cooled to perform CPT studies and detailed spectroscopy. In the present work, after a general description of the experiment, the present status of advancement will be reviewed, with special attention to the production and excitation of positronium atoms.

  8. Relativistic Outflows from ADAFs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Peter; Subramanian, Prasad; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2001-04-01

    Advection-dominated accretion flows (ADAFs) have a positive Bernoulli parameter, and are therefore gravitationally bound. The Newtonian ADAF model has been generalized recently to obtain the ADIOS model that includes outflows of energy and angular momentum, thereby allowing accretion to proceed self-consistently. However, the utilization of a Newtonian gravitational potential limits the ability of this model to describe the inner region of the disk, where any relativistic outflows are likely to originate. In this paper we modify the ADIOS scenario to incorporate a seudo - Newtonian potential, which approximates the effects of general relativity. The analysis yields a unique, self - similar solution for the structure of the coupled disk/wind system. Interesting features of the new solution include the relativistic character of the outflow in the vicinity of the radius of marginal stability, which represents the inner edge of the quasi-Keplerian disk in our model. Our self - similar model may therefore help to explain the origin of relativistic jets in active galaxies. At large distances the radial dependence of the accretion rate approachs the unique form dot M ∝ r^1/2, with an associated density variation given by ρ ∝ r-1. This density variation agrees with that implied by the dependence of the X-ray hard time lags on the Fourier frequency for a number of accreting galactic black hole candidates. While intriguing, the results of our self-similar model need to be confirmed in the future by incorporating a detailed physical description of the energization mechanism that drives the outflow, which is likely to be powered by the shear of the underlying accretion disk.

  9. The role of Einstein's general relativity theory in today's physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicak, J.

    The relationships are discussed of the general relativity theory to other fields of today's physics. Recent results are reported of studies into gravitational radiation, relativistic astrophysics, cosmology and the quantum theory. (Z.M.)

  10. Thermodynamics of polarized relativistic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovtun, Pavel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria,PO Box 1700 STN CSC, Victoria BC, V8W 2Y2 (Canada)

    2016-07-05

    We give the free energy of equilibrium relativistic matter subject to external gravitational and electromagnetic fields, to one-derivative order in the gradients of the external fields. The free energy allows for a straightforward derivation of bound currents and bound momenta in equilibrium. At leading order, the energy-momentum tensor admits a simple expression in terms of the polarization tensor. Beyond the leading order, electric and magnetic polarization vectors are intrinsically ambiguous. The physical effects of polarization, such as the correlation between the magneto-vortically induced surface charge and the electro-vortically induced surface current, are not ambiguous.

  11. Tolman temperature gradients in a gravitational field

    OpenAIRE

    Santiago, Jessica; Visser, Matt

    2018-01-01

    Tolman's relation for the temperature gradient in an equilibrium self-gravitating general relativistic fluid is broadly accepted within the general relativity community. However, the concept of temperature gradients in thermal equilibrium continues to cause confusion in other branches of physics, since it contradicts naive versions of the laws of classical thermodynamics. In this paper we discuss the crucial role of the universality of free fall, and how thermodynamics emphasises the great di...

  12. UCLA intermediate energy nuclear physics and relativistic heavy ion physics. Annual report, February 1, 1983-January 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    In this contract year the UCLA Intermediate Energy Group has continued to pursue a general set of problems in intermediate energy physics using new research tools and theoretical insights. Our program to study N-N scattering and proton-light nucleus scattering has been enhanced by a new polarized target facility (both hydrogen and deuterium) at the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). This facility has been constructed by our group in collaboration with physicists from KEK, LAMPF and the University of Minnesota; and the first set of experiments studying polarized beam-polarized target scattering at the HRS were completed this summer and early fall. The HRS mode of operation has led to some unique design features which are described. At the Bevalac, a new beam line spectrometer will be constructed for us during this year and next to significantly enhance our capability to study subthreshold k + , k - and anti p production in relativistic heavy ion collisions and to search for fractionally charged particles. During this period a proposal is being prepared for a very large acceptance spectrometer and its associated beam line which will be used to detect dilepton pairs produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions. In concert with these experimental projects, theoretical advances in the understanding of new data from the HRS, particularly spin transfer data, have been made by the UCLA group and are described

  13. Teaching the gravitational redshift: lessons from the history and philosophy of physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    The equivalence principle and the notion of an ideal clock running independently of acceleration suggest that clocks are unaffected by gravity. The apparent contradiction with the gravitational redshift points to a subtlety in general relativity theory. Indeed, early attempts for a clear derivation of the gravitational redshift were fraught with errors and ambiguities, and much confusion endured for the next two decades. This suggests that the subject should be treated carefully in introductory textbooks on relativity theory. I analyze the weaknesses of the presentation in five otherwise excellent modern introductory general relativity books (by Rindler, Schutz, Hobson et al., Weinberg, and Carroll). I also present some analysis from an history and philosophy of physics article, which proves to be a great resource to learn about, anticipate, and clarify problems in teaching the redshift. (paper)

  14. Cosmology and Gravitation: the grand scheme for High-Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Binétruy, P.

    2014-12-10

    These lectures describe how the Standard Model of cosmology ( Λ CDM) has developped, based on observational facts but also on ideas formed in the context of the theory of fundamental interactions, both gravitational and non-gravitational, the latter being described by the Standard Model of high energy physics. It focuses on the latest developments, in particular the precise knowledge of the early Universe provided by the observation of the Cosmic Microwave Background and the discovery of the present acceleration of the expansion of the Universe. While insisting on the successes of the Standard Model of cosmology, we will stress that it rests on three pillars which involve many open questions: the theory of inflation, the nature of dark matter and of dark energy. We will devote one chapter to each of these issues, describing in particular how this impacts our views on the theory of fundamental interactions. More technical parts are given in italics. They may be skipped altogether.

  15. METRIC: A Dedicated Earth-Orbiting Spacecraft for Investigating Gravitational Physics and the Space Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Peron

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A dedicated mission in low Earth orbit is proposed to test predictions of gravitational interaction theories and to directly measure the atmospheric density in a relevant altitude range, as well as to provide a metrological platform able to tie different space geodesy techniques. The concept foresees a small spacecraft to be placed in a dawn-dusk eccentric orbit between 450 and 1200 km of altitude. The spacecraft will be tracked from the ground with high precision, and a three-axis accelerometer package on-board will measure the non-gravitational accelerations acting on its surface. Estimates of parameters related to fundamental physics and geophysics should be obtained by a precise orbit determination, while the accelerometer data will be instrumental in constraining the atmospheric density. Along with the mission scientific objectives, a conceptual configuration is described together with an analysis of the dynamical environment experienced by the spacecraft and the accelerometer.

  16. Physics of the saturation of particle acceleration in relativistic magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Daniel; Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the saturation of particle acceleration in relativistic reconnection using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations at various magnetizations σ. We find that the particle energy spectrum produced in reconnection quickly saturates as a hard power law that cuts off at γ ≈ 4σ, confirming previous work. Using particle tracing, we find that particle acceleration by the reconnection electric field in X-points determines the shape of the particle energy spectrum. By analysing the current sheet structure, we show that physical cause of saturation is the spontaneous formation of secondary magnetic islands that can disrupt particle acceleration. By comparing the size of acceleration regions to the typical distance between disruptive islands, we show that the maximum Lorentz factor produced in reconnection is γ ≈ 5σ, which is very close to what we find in our particle energy spectra. We also show that the dynamic range in Lorentz factor of the power-law spectrum in reconnection is ≤40. The hardness of the power law combined with its narrow dynamic range implies that relativistic reconnection is capable of producing the hard narrow-band flares observed in the Crab nebula but has difficulty producing the softer broad-band prompt gamma-ray burst emission.

  17. An electromagnetic basis for inertia and gravitation: What are the implications for 21st century physics and technology?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisch, Bernhard; Rueda, Alfonso

    1998-01-01

    The basis of most modern technology is the manipulation of electromagnetic phenomena. Haisch, Rueda and Puthoff (1994a) published a controversial but substantive formulation of a concept proposing an explanation of inertia of matter as an electromagnetic phenomenon originating in the zero-point field (ZPF) of the quantum vacuum. This suggests that Newton's equation of motion can be derived from Maxwell's equations of electrodynamics, in that inertial mass is postulated to be not an intrinsic property of matter but rather a kind of electromagnetic drag force (which temporarily is a place holder for a more general quantum vacuum reaction effect) that proves to be acceleration dependent by virtue of the spectral characteristics of the ZPF. Moreover the principle of equivalence implies that in this view gravitation would also be electromagnetic in origin along the lines proposed by Sakharov (1968). A NASA-funded research effort has been underway at the Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center in Palo Alto and at California State University in Long Beach to develop and test these ideas. An effort to generalize the 1994 ZPF-inertia concept into a proper relativistic formulation has been successful. With regard to the goals of the NASA Breakthrough Propulsion Physics Program we can, on the basis of the ZPF-inertia concept, definitively rule out one speculatively hypothesized propulsion mechanism: matter possessing negative inertial mass, a concept originated by Bondi (1957). The existence of this is shown to be logically impossible. On the other hand, the linked ZPF-inertia and ZPF-gravity concepts open the conceptual possibility of manipulation of inertia and gravitation, since both are postulated to be electromagnetic phenomena. Whether this will translate into actual technological potential, especially with respect to spacecraft propulsion and future interstellar travel capability, is an open question. The (possibly comparable) time scale for translation of Einstein

  18. Relativistic kinetic theory with applications in astrophysics and cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Vereshchagin, Gregory V

    2017-01-01

    Relativistic kinetic theory has widespread application in astrophysics and cosmology. The interest has grown in recent years as experimentalists are now able to make reliable measurements on physical systems where relativistic effects are no longer negligible. This ambitious monograph is divided into three parts. It presents the basic ideas and concepts of this theory, equations and methods, including derivation of kinetic equations from the relativistic BBGKY hierarchy and discussion of the relation between kinetic and hydrodynamic levels of description. The second part introduces elements of computational physics with special emphasis on numerical integration of Boltzmann equations and related approaches, as well as multi-component hydrodynamics. The third part presents an overview of applications ranging from covariant theory of plasma response, thermalization of relativistic plasma, comptonization in static and moving media to kinetics of self-gravitating systems, cosmological structure formation and neut...

  19. Geodesics without differential equations: general relativistic calculations for introductory modern physics classes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowland, D R

    2006-01-01

    Introductory courses covering modern physics sometimes introduce some elementary ideas from general relativity, though the idea of a geodesic is generally limited to shortest Euclidean length on a curved surface of two spatial dimensions rather than extremal aging in spacetime. It is shown that Epstein charts provide a simple geometric picture of geodesics in one space and one time dimension and that for a hypothetical uniform gravitational field, geodesics are straight lines on a planar diagram. This means that the properties of geodesics in a uniform field can be calculated with only a knowledge of elementary geometry and trigonometry, thus making the calculation of some basic results of general relativity accessible to students even in an algebra-based survey course on physics

  20. Accuracy of inference on the physics of binary evolution from gravitational-wave observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Jim W.; Gaebel, Sebastian M.; Neijssel, Coenraad J.; Vigna-Gómez, Alejandro; Stevenson, Simon; Berry, Christopher P. L.; Farr, Will M.; Mandel, Ilya

    2018-04-01

    The properties of the population of merging binary black holes encode some of the uncertain physics underlying the evolution of massive stars in binaries. The binary black hole merger rate and chirp-mass distribution are being measured by ground-based gravitational-wave detectors. We consider isolated binary evolution, and explore how accurately the physical model can be constrained with such observations by applying the Fisher information matrix to the merging black hole population simulated with the rapid binary-population synthesis code COMPAS. We investigate variations in four COMPAS parameters: common-envelope efficiency, kick-velocity dispersion, and mass-loss rates during the luminous blue variable and Wolf-Rayet stellar-evolutionary phases. We find that ˜1000 observations would constrain these model parameters to a fractional accuracy of a few per cent. Given the empirically determined binary black hole merger rate, we can expect gravitational-wave observations alone to place strong constraints on the physics of stellar and binary evolution within a few years. Our approach can be extended to use other observational data sets; combining observations at different evolutionary stages will lead to a better understanding of stellar and binary physics.

  1. Review of physics and applications of relativistic plasmas driven by ultra-intense lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umstadter, Donald

    2001-01-01

    As tabletop lasers continue to reach record levels of peak power, the interaction of light with matter has crossed a new threshold, in which plasma electrons at the laser focus oscillate at relativistic velocities. The highest forces ever exerted by light have been used to accelerate beams of electrons and protons to energies of a million volts in distances of only microns. Not only is this acceleration gradient up to a thousand times greater than in radio-frequency-based sources, but the transverse emittance of the particle beams is comparable or lower. Additionally, laser-based accelerators have been demonstrated to work at a repetition rate of 10 Hz, an improvement of a factor of 1000 over their best performance of just a couple of years ago. Anticipated improvements in energy spread may allow these novel compact laser-based radiation sources to be useful someday for cancer radiotherapy and as injectors into conventional accelerators, which are critical tools for x-ray and nuclear physics research. They might also be used as a spark to ignite controlled thermonuclear fusion. The ultrashort pulse duration of these particle bursts and the x rays they can produce, hold great promise as well to resolve chemical, biological or physical reactions on ultrafast (femtosecond) time scales and on the spatial scale of atoms. Even laser-accelerated protons are soon expected to become relativistic. The dense electron-positron plasmas and vast array of nuclear reactions predicted to occur in this case might even help bring astrophysical phenomena down to Earth, into university laboratories. This paper reviews the many recent advances in this emerging discipline, called high-field science

  2. Relativistic Kinematics

    OpenAIRE

    Sahoo, Raghunath

    2016-01-01

    This lecture note covers Relativistic Kinematics, which is very useful for the beginners in the field of high-energy physics. A very practical approach has been taken, which answers "why and how" of the kinematics useful for students working in the related areas.

  3. Gravitation in material media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridgely, Charles T

    2011-01-01

    When two gravitating bodies reside in a material medium, Newton's law of universal gravitation must be modified to account for the presence of the medium. A modified expression of Newton's law is known in the literature, but lacks a clear connection with existing gravitational theory. Newton's law in the presence of a homogeneous material medium is herein derived on the basis of classical, Newtonian gravitational theory and by a general relativistic use of Archimedes' principle. It is envisioned that the techniques presented herein will be most useful to graduate students and those undergraduate students having prior experience with vector analysis and potential theory.

  4. Isolating relativistic effects in large-scale structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonvin, Camille

    2014-12-01

    We present a fully relativistic calculation of the observed galaxy number counts in the linear regime. We show that besides the density fluctuations and redshift-space distortions, various relativistic effects contribute to observations at large scales. These effects all have the same physical origin: they result from the fact that our coordinate system, namely the galaxy redshift and the incoming photons’ direction, is distorted by inhomogeneities in our Universe. We then discuss the impact of the relativistic effects on the angular power spectrum and on the two-point correlation function in configuration space. We show that the latter is very well adapted to isolate the relativistic effects since it naturally makes use of the symmetries of the different contributions. In particular, we discuss how the Doppler effect and the gravitational redshift distortions can be isolated by looking for a dipole in the cross-correlation function between a bright and a faint population of galaxies.

  5. Probing the Physics of Core-Collapse Supernovae and Ultra-Relativistic Outflows using Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, Joseph

    Core-collapse supernovae, the powerful explosions triggered by the gravitational collapse of massive stars, play an important role in evolution of star-forming galaxies like our Milky Way. Not only do these explosions eject the outer envelope of the progenitor star with extremely high velocities, creating a supernova remnant (SNR), the rotational energy of the resultant neutron star powers an ultra-relativistic outflow called a pulsar wind which creates a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) as it expands into its surroundings. Despite almost a century of study, many fundamental questions remain, including: How is a neutron star formed during a core-collapse supernova? How are particles created in the neutron star magnetosphere? How are particles accelerated to the PeV energies inside PWNe? Answering these questions requires measuring the properties of the progenitor star and pulsar wind for a diverse collection of neutron stars. Currently, this is best done by studying those PWNe inside a SNR, since their evolution is very sensitive to the initial spin period of the neutron star, the mass and initial kinetic energy of the supernova ejecta, and the magnetization and particle spectrum of the pulsar wind - quantities critical for answering the above questions. To this end, we propose to measure these properties for 17 neutron stars whose spin-down inferred dipole surface magnetic field strengths and characteristic ages differ by 1.5 orders of magnitude by fitting the broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) and dynamical properties of their associated PWNe with a model for the dynamical and spectral evolution of a PWN inside SNR. To do so, we will first re-analyze all archival X-ray (e.g., XMM, Chandra, INTEGRAL, NuSTAR) and gamma-ray (e.g., Fermi-LAT Pass 8) data on each PWN to ensure consistent measurements of the volume-integrated properties (e.g., X-ray photon index and unabsorbed flux, GeV spectrum) needed for this analysis. Additionally, we will use a Markoff Chain

  6. Gravitational Effects on Plasma Waves in Environment of Sun and Neutron Star

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Quankang; Hsiao-Ling Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Local plasma phenomena in environment of Sun are observed closely by spacecrafts in recent years. We provide a new method to apply general relativity to astro-plasma physics in small local area. The relativistic dispersion relations of Langmuir, electromagnetic and cyclotron waves are obtained. The red shifts of Langmuir and cyclotron frequencies are given analytically. A new equilibrium velocity distribution of particles soaked in local gravitational field is suggested. The gravitational effect of a neutron star is also estimated

  7. A Physical Model of Pulsars as Gravitational Shielding and Oscillating Neutron Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang T. X.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pulsars are thought to be fast rotating neutron stars, synchronously emitting periodic Dirac-delta-shape radio-frequency pulses and Lorentzian-shape oscillating X-rays. The acceleration of charged particles along the magnetic field lines of neutron stars above the magnetic poles that deviate from the rotating axis initiates coherent beams of ra- dio emissions, which are viewed as pulses of radiation whenever the magnetic poles sweep the viewers. However, the conventional lighthouse model of pulsars is only con- ceptual. The mechanism through which particles are accelerated to produce coherent beams is still not fully understood. The process for periodically oscillating X-rays to emit from hot spots at the inner edge of accretion disks remains a mystery. In addition, a lack of reflecting X-rays of the pulsar by the Crab Nebula in the OFF phase does not support the lighthouse model as expected. In this study, we develop a physical model of pulsars to quantitatively interpret the emission characteristics of pulsars, in accor- dance with the author’s well-developed five-dimensional fully covariant Kaluza-Klein gravitational shielding theory and the physics of thermal and accelerating charged par- ticle radiation. The results obtained from this study indicate that, with the significant gravitational shielding by scalar field, a neutron star nonlinearly oscillates and produces synchronous periodically Dirac-delta-shape radio-frequency pulses (emitted by the os- cillating or accelerating charged particles as well as periodically Lorentzian-shape os- cillating X-rays (as the thermal radiation of neutron stars whose temperature varies due to the oscillation. This physical model of pulsars broadens our understanding of neu- tron stars and develops an innovative mechanism to model the emissions of pulsars.

  8. General relativity and gravitation a centennial perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Beverly K; Isenberg, James; MacCallum, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Explore spectacular advances in cosmology, relativistic astrophysics, gravitational wave science, mathematics, computational science, and the interface of gravitation and quantum physics with this unique celebration of the centennial of Einstein's discovery of general relativity. Twelve comprehensive and in-depth reviews, written by a team of world-leading international experts, together present an up-to-date overview of key topics at the frontiers of these areas, with particular emphasis on the significant developments of the last three decades. Interconnections with other fields of research are also highlighted, making this an invaluable resource for both new and experienced researchers. Commissioned by the International Society on General Relativity and Gravitation, and including accessible introductions to cutting-edge topics, ample references to original research papers, and informative colour figures, this is a definitive reference for researchers and graduate students in cosmology, relativity, and grav...

  9. Earthquake precursors in the ionosphere: electrical linkage provided by the fundamental physics of gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmaston, Miles

    2013-04-01

    For more than a decade, evidence has been mounting that major earthquakes may be preceded, days to weeks later, by the appearance of local changes in electron density-gradient in the Earth's ionosphere above that area. Such linkage, albeit co-seismic, has been observed even when the earthquake was deep below electrically conducting seawater [1]. This appears to rule out many of the kinds of linkage that have been proposed. My inquiry as to the nature of the physical mechanism by which gravitational force is developed has led me to the surprising finding that the Newtonian potential is inevitably always accompanied by a corresponding positive-body-repelling radial electric field. I have called this the Gravity-Electric (G-E) field and have adduced evidence for its action at many astronomical scales [2 -4]. After outlining the reasoning that has led me to this result I will refer to observations which suggest that the G-E field is indeed the precursor link that we seek. Time permitting, I will show briefly how the likelihood of an ionospheric precursor will, in this case, depend on the plate dynamical mechanism and nature of the pre-quake deformation. Historical background. Newton's work on gravitation astride the end of the 17th century concentrated on the behaviour of the force, not upon its origin.. But he already endorsed the idea of an ubiquitously intervening aether tp convey the force and, as Huygens had already reasoned, also to transmit light waves. Then, in the 1860s, people [5, 6] started to think of fundamental particles as being aether in a vortex-like motion which would, by mutual attraction, provide their mass property and gravitation. In such a set-up, particles and the aether around them would not be dynamically independent, so the Michelson-Morley experiment, 20 years later [7], could equally have been interpreted as supporting that situation, not as disproving the existence of the aether. But, in setting up Relativity (1905-1916), Einstein took the

  10. Modeling the Physics of Sliding Objects on Rotating Space Elevators and Other Non-relativistic Strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubovic, Leonardo; Knudsen, Steven

    2017-01-01

    We consider general problem of modeling the dynamics of objects sliding on moving strings. We introduce a powerful computational algorithm that can be used to investigate the dynamics of objects sliding along non-relativistic strings. We use the algorithm to numerically explore fundamental physics of sliding climbers on a unique class of dynamical systems, Rotating Space Elevators (RSE). Objects sliding along RSE strings do not require internal engines or propulsion to be transported from the Earth's surface into outer space. By extensive numerical simulations, we find that sliding climbers may display interesting non-linear dynamics exhibiting both quasi-periodic and chaotic states of motion. While our main interest in this study is in the climber dynamics on RSEs, our results for the dynamics of sliding object are of more general interest. In particular, we designed tools capable of dealing with strongly nonlinear phenomena involving moving strings of any kind, such as the chaotic dynamics of sliding climbers observed in our simulations.

  11. Considerations concerning the physics of nuclear matter under extreme conditions and an accelerator for relativistic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasche, K.; Bock, R.; Franzke, B.; Greiner, W.; Gutbrod, H.H.; Povh, B.; Schmelzer, C.; Stock, R.

    1977-01-01

    The future problems of heavy-ion physics in the 10 GeV/U range are dealt with: the dynamics of relativistic nuclear collisions, phase transitions, nuclear matter, quantum electrodynamics of extremely strong fields, and astrophysical aspects. In the second part, the project of a heavy-ion accelerator in the 10 GeV/U range to be coupled to the present GSI UNILAC accelerator is discussed. (WL) [de

  12. Current status of relativistic core collapse simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Font, Jose A [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad de Valencia, Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain)

    2007-05-15

    With the first generation of ground-based gravitational wave laser interferometers already taking data, the availability of reliable waveform templates from astrophysical sources, which may help extract the signal from the anticipated noisy data, is urgently required. Gravitational stellar core collapse supernova has traditionally been considered among the most important astrophysical sources of potentially detectable gravitational radiation. Only very recently the first multidimensional simulations of relativistic rotational core collapse have been possible (albeit for models with simplified input physics), thanks to the use of conservative formulations of the hydrodynamics equations and advanced numerical methodology, as well as stable formulations of Einstein's equations. In this paper, the current status of relativistic core collapse simulations is discussed, with the emphasis given to the modelling of the collapse dynamics and to the computation of the gravitational radiation in the existing numerical approaches. Work employing the conformally-flat approximation (CFC) of the 3+1 Einstein's equations is reported, as well as extensions of this approximation (CFC+) and investigations within the framework of the so-called BSSN formulation of the 3+1 gravitational field equations (with no approximation for the spacetime dynamics). On the other hand, the incorporation of magnetic fields and the MHD equations in numerical codes to improve the realism of core collapse simulations in general relativity, is currently an emerging field where significant progress is bound to be soon achieved. The paper also contains a brief discussion of magneto-rotational simulations of core collapse, aiming at addressing the effects of magnetic fields on the collapse dynamics and on the gravitational waveforms.

  13. Current status of relativistic core collapse simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Font, Jose A

    2007-01-01

    With the first generation of ground-based gravitational wave laser interferometers already taking data, the availability of reliable waveform templates from astrophysical sources, which may help extract the signal from the anticipated noisy data, is urgently required. Gravitational stellar core collapse supernova has traditionally been considered among the most important astrophysical sources of potentially detectable gravitational radiation. Only very recently the first multidimensional simulations of relativistic rotational core collapse have been possible (albeit for models with simplified input physics), thanks to the use of conservative formulations of the hydrodynamics equations and advanced numerical methodology, as well as stable formulations of Einstein's equations. In this paper, the current status of relativistic core collapse simulations is discussed, with the emphasis given to the modelling of the collapse dynamics and to the computation of the gravitational radiation in the existing numerical approaches. Work employing the conformally-flat approximation (CFC) of the 3+1 Einstein's equations is reported, as well as extensions of this approximation (CFC+) and investigations within the framework of the so-called BSSN formulation of the 3+1 gravitational field equations (with no approximation for the spacetime dynamics). On the other hand, the incorporation of magnetic fields and the MHD equations in numerical codes to improve the realism of core collapse simulations in general relativity, is currently an emerging field where significant progress is bound to be soon achieved. The paper also contains a brief discussion of magneto-rotational simulations of core collapse, aiming at addressing the effects of magnetic fields on the collapse dynamics and on the gravitational waveforms

  14. Relativistic quantum logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittelstaedt, P.

    1983-01-01

    on the basis of the well-known quantum logic and quantum probability a formal language of relativistic quantum physics is developed. This language incorporates quantum logical as well as relativistic restrictions. It is shown that relativity imposes serious restrictions on the validity regions of propositions in space-time. By an additional postulate this relativistic quantum logic can be made consistent. The results of this paper are derived exclusively within the formal quantum language; they are, however, in accordance with well-known facts of relativistic quantum physics in Hilbert space. (author)

  15. Relativity and Gravitation : 100 Years After Einstein in Prague

    CERN Document Server

    Ledvinka, Tomáš; General Relativity, Cosmology and Astrophysics : Perspectives 100 Years After Einstein's Stay in Prague

    2014-01-01

    In early April 1911 Albert Einstein arrived in Prague to become full professor of theoretical physics at the German part of Charles University. It was there, for the first time, that he concentrated primarily on the problem of gravitation. Before he left Prague in July 1912 he had submitted the paper “Relativität und Gravitation: Erwiderung auf eine Bemerkung von M. Abraham” in which he remarkably anticipated what a future theory of gravity should look like. At the occasion of the Einstein-in-Prague centenary an international meeting was organized under a title inspired by Einstein's last paper from the Prague period: "Relativity and Gravitation, 100 Years after Einstein in Prague". The main topics of the conference included: classical relativity, numerical relativity, relativistic astrophysics and cosmology, quantum gravity, experimental aspects of gravitation, and conceptual and historical issues. The conference attracted over 200 scientists from 31 countries, among them a number of leading experts in ...

  16. Extragalactic Gravitational Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Martin J.

    After some introductory "numerology", routes towards black hole formation are briefly reviewed; some properties of black holes relevant to theories for active galactic nuclei are then described. Applications are considered to specific models for energy generation and the production of relativistic beams. The paper concludes with a discussion of extragalactic sources of gravitational waves.

  17. Comparison of approximate gravitational lens equations and a proposal for an improved new one

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozza, V.

    2008-01-01

    Keeping the exact general relativistic treatment of light bending as a reference, we compare the accuracy of commonly used approximate lens equations. We conclude that the best approximate lens equation is the Ohanian lens equation, for which we present a new expression in terms of distances between observer, lens, and source planes. We also examine a realistic gravitational lensing case, showing that the precision of the Ohanian lens equation might be required for a reliable treatment of gravitational lensing and a correct extraction of the full information about gravitational physics.

  18. Relativistic klystrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.A.; Azuma, O.; Callin, R.S.

    1989-03-01

    Experimental work is underway by a SLAC-LLNL-LBL collaboration to investigate the feasibility of using relativistic klystrons as a power source for future high gradient accelerators. Two different relativistic klystron configurations have been built and tested to date: a high grain multicavity klystron at 11.4 GHz and a low gain two cavity subharmonic buncher driven at 5.7 GHz. In both configurations power is extracted at 11.4 GHz. In order to understand the basic physics issues involved in extracting RF from a high power beam, we have used both a single resonant cavity and a multi-cell traveling wave structure for energy extraction. We have learned how to overcome our previously reported problem of high power RF pulse shortening, and have achieved peak RF power levels of 170 MW with the RF pulse of the same duration as the beam current pulse. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Gravitation and spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Ohanian, Hans C

    2013-01-01

    The third edition of this classic textbook is a quantitative introduction for advanced undergraduates and graduate students. It gently guides students from Newton's gravitational theory to special relativity, and then to the relativistic theory of gravitation. General relativity is approached from several perspectives: as a theory constructed by analogy with Maxwell's electrodynamics, as a relativistic generalization of Newton's theory, and as a theory of curved spacetime. The authors provide a concise overview of the important concepts and formulas, coupled with the experimental results underpinning the latest research in the field. Numerous exercises in Newtonian gravitational theory and Maxwell's equations help students master essential concepts for advanced work in general relativity, while detailed spacetime diagrams encourage them to think in terms of four-dimensional geometry. Featuring comprehensive reviews of recent experimental and observational data, the text concludes with chapters on cosmology an...

  20. Gravitational waves as cosmological probes for new physics between the electroweak and the grand-unification scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagunski, Laura

    2013-04-01

    Relic gravitational waves, generated by strongly first-order phase transitions in the early Universe, can serve as cosmological probes for new physics beyond the Standard Model. We investigate phase transitions at temperatures between the electroweak and the GUT scale in two extensions of the Standard Model for their possibility to provide detectable gravitational radiation. First, we study the Z 2 symmetry breaking phase transition in the Standard model extended by a real gauge singlet. The analysis yields that the gravitational wave amplitude of the first-order phase transition with a thermally induced barrier is several orders too small for being detectable. The second model we discuss is a left-right symmetric model based on the gauge group SU(2) L x SU(2) R x U(1) B-L generating a first-order phase transition already due to the emergence of a barrier in the tree-level potential. We derive an upper bound on the peak amplitude of the gravitational wave spectrum of the order h o 2 Ω GW ≅ 3 . 10 -11 . Hence, for very strong phase transitions a detection with the spaceborne interferometer LISA will be possible, whereas the sensitivity of the (cross-correlated) BBO detector will even allow to observe the gravitational wave spectrum within the whole parameter range of the model. By using the correlation between the characteristic parameters α and β of the gravitational wave spectrum, we finally compute the lower bounds on α(T * ) in dependence of the tunneling temperature T * which are necessary for a detection of the model spectrum by the specific detectors.

  1. Gravitational waves as cosmological probes for new physics between the electroweak and the grand-unification scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagunski, Laura

    2013-04-15

    Relic gravitational waves, generated by strongly first-order phase transitions in the early Universe, can serve as cosmological probes for new physics beyond the Standard Model. We investigate phase transitions at temperatures between the electroweak and the GUT scale in two extensions of the Standard Model for their possibility to provide detectable gravitational radiation. First, we study the Z{sub 2} symmetry breaking phase transition in the Standard model extended by a real gauge singlet. The analysis yields that the gravitational wave amplitude of the first-order phase transition with a thermally induced barrier is several orders too small for being detectable. The second model we discuss is a left-right symmetric model based on the gauge group SU(2){sub L} x SU(2){sub R} x U(1){sub B-L} generating a first-order phase transition already due to the emergence of a barrier in the tree-level potential. We derive an upper bound on the peak amplitude of the gravitational wave spectrum of the order h{sub o}{sup 2}{Omega}{sub GW} {approx_equal} 3 . 10{sup -11}. Hence, for very strong phase transitions a detection with the spaceborne interferometer LISA will be possible, whereas the sensitivity of the (cross-correlated) BBO detector will even allow to observe the gravitational wave spectrum within the whole parameter range of the model. By using the correlation between the characteristic parameters {alpha} and {beta} of the gravitational wave spectrum, we finally compute the lower bounds on {alpha}(T{sub *}) in dependence of the tunneling temperature T{sub *} which are necessary for a detection of the model spectrum by the specific detectors.

  2. Rotating relativistic neutron stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, F.; Glendenning, N.K.

    1991-07-21

    Models of rotating neutron stars are constructed in the framework of Einstein's theory of general relativity. For this purpose a refined version of Hartle's method is applied. The properties of these objects, e.g. gravitational mass, equatorial and polar radius, eccentricity, red- and blueshift, quadrupole moment, are investigated for Kepler frequencies of 4000 s{sup {minus}1} {le} {Omega}{sub K} {le} 9000 s{sup {minus}1}. Therefore a self-consistency problem inherent in the determination of {Omega}{sub K} must be solved. The investigation is based on neutron star matter equations of state derived from the relativistic Martin-Schwinger hierarch of coupled Green's functions. By means of introducing the Hartree, Hartree-Fock, and ladder ({Lambda}) approximations, models of the equation of state derived. A special feature of the latter approximation scheme is the inclusion of dynamical two-particle correlations. These have been calculated from the relativistic T-matrix applying both the HEA and Bonn meson-exchange potentials of the nucleon-nucleon force. The nuclear forces of the former two treatments are those of the standard scalar-vector-isovector model of quantum hadron dynamics, with parameters adjusted to the nuclear matter data. An important aspect of this work consists in testing the compatibility of different competing models of the nuclear equation of state with data on pulsar periods. By this the fundamental problem of nuclear physics concerning the behavior of the equation of state at supernuclear densities can be treated.

  3. The matter-wave laser interferometer gravitation antenna (MIGA: New perspectives for fundamental physics and geosciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canuel B.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We are building a hybrid detector of new concept that couples laser and matter-wave interferometry to study sub Hertz variations of the strain tensor of space-time and gravitation. Using a set of atomic interferometers simultaneously manipulated by the resonant optical field of a 200 m cavity, the MIGA instrument will allow the monitoring of the evolution of the gravitational field at unprecedented sensitivity, which will be exploited both for geophysical studies and for Gravitational Waves (GWs detection. This new infrastructure will be embedded into the LSBB underground laboratory, ideally located away from major anthropogenic disturbances and benefitting from very low background noise.

  4. Gravitational lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Dodelson, Scott

    2017-01-01

    Gravitational lensing is a consequence of general relativity, where the gravitational force due to a massive object bends the paths of light originating from distant objects lying behind it. Using very little general relativity and no higher level mathematics, this text presents the basics of gravitational lensing, focusing on the equations needed to understand the phenomena. It then applies them to a diverse set of topics, including multiply imaged objects, time delays, extrasolar planets, microlensing, cluster masses, galaxy shape measurements, cosmic shear, and lensing of the cosmic microwave background. This approach allows undergraduate students and others to get quickly up to speed on the basics and the important issues. The text will be especially relevant as large surveys such as LSST and Euclid begin to dominate the astronomical landscape. Designed for a one semester course, it is accessible to anyone with two years of undergraduate physics background.

  5. A background-dependent approach to the theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldoni, R.

    1976-01-01

    Using the covariant formulation of Newton's gravitational equation as derived previously by the present author (Goldoni, Gen. Relativ. Gravitation; 7:731 (1976)) as a starting point, relativistic gravitational equations are found which are supposed to hold in any conceivable universe, describe a purely geometrical theory of gravitation and explicitly incorporate Mach's principle. (U.K.)

  6. Relativistic time-dependent local-density approximation theory and applications to atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parpia, F.Z.

    1984-01-01

    A time-dependent linear-response theory appropriate to the relativistic local-density approximation (RLDA) to quantum electrodynamics (QED) is developed. The resulting theory, the relativistic time-dependent local-density approximation (RTDLDA) is specialized to the treatment of electric excitations in closed-shell atoms. This formalism is applied to the calculation of atomic photoionization parameters in the dipole approximation. The static-field limit of the RTDLDA is applied to the calculation of dipole polarizabilities. Extensive numerical calculations of the photoionization parameters for the rare gases neon, argon, krypton, and xenon, and for mercury from the RTDLDA are presented and compared in detail with the results of other theories, in particular the relativistic random-phase approximation (RRPA), and with experimental measurements. The predictions of the RTDLDA are comparable with the RRPA calculations made to date. This is remarkable in that the RTDLDA entails appreciably less computational effort. Finally, the dipole polarizabilities predicted by the static-field RTDLDA are compared with other determinations of these quantities. In view of its simplicity, the static-field RTDLDA demonstrates itself to be one of the most powerful theories available for the calculation of dipole polarizabilities

  7. Relativistic Ideal Clock

    OpenAIRE

    Bratek, Łukasz

    2015-01-01

    Two particularly simple ideal clocks exhibiting intrinsic circular motion with the speed of light and opposite spin alignment are described. The clocks are singled out by singularities of an inverse Legendre transformation for relativistic rotators of which mass and spin are fixed parameters. Such clocks work always the same way, no matter how they move. When subject to high accelerations or falling in strong gravitational fields of black holes, the clocks could be used to test the clock hypo...

  8. Theoretical physics vol. 2. Quantum mechanics, relativistic quantum mechanics, quantum field theory, elementar-particle theory, thermodynamics and statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebhan, E.

    2005-01-01

    The present second volume treats quantum mechanics, relativistic quantum mechanics, the foundations of quantum-field and elementary-particle theory as well as thermodynamics and statistics. Both volumes comprehend all fields, which are usually offered in a course about theoretical physics. In all treated fields a very careful introduction to the basic natural laws forms the starting point, whereby it is thoroughly analysed, which of them is based on empirics, which is logically deducible, and which role play basic definitions. Extendingly the matter extend of the corresponding courses starting from the relativistic quantum theory an introduction to the elementary particles is developed. All problems are very thoroughly and such extensively studied, that each step is singularly reproducible. On motivation and good understandability is cared much about. The mixing of mathematical difficulties with problems of physical nature often obstructive in the learning is so circumvented, that important mathematical methods are presented in own chapters (for instance Hilbert spaces, Lie groups). By means of many examples and problems (for a large part with solutions) the matter worked out is deepened and exercised. Developments, which are indeed important, but seem for the first approach abandonable, are pursued in excurses. This book starts from courses, which the author has held at the Heinrich-Heine university in Duesseldorf, and was in many repetitions fitted to the requirements of the students. It is conceived in such a way, that it is also after the study suited as dictionary or for the regeneration

  9. Future gravitational physics tests from ranging to the BepiColombo Mercury planetary orbiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashby, Neil; Bender, Peter L.; Wahr, John M.

    2007-01-01

    Milani et al. recently have published careful and fundamental studies of the accuracy with which both gravitational physics information and the solar quadrupole moment can be obtained from Earth-Mercury distance data. To complement these results, a quite different analysis method is used in the present paper. We calculate the first-order corrections to the Keplerian motion of a single planet around the Sun due to the parameterized post-Newtonian theory parameters β, γ, α 1 , α 2 , and ξ, as well as corrections due to the solar quadrupole moment J 2 and a possible secular change in GM · . The Nordtvedt parameter η that is used in tests of the strong equivalence principle also is included in this analysis. The expected accuracies are given for 1 yr, 2 yr, and 8 yr mission durations, assuming that the planet-planet and asteroid-planet perturbations are accurately known. The ''modified worst-case'' error analysis method that we use is quite different from the usual covariance analysis method based on assumed uncorrelated random errors, plus a bias that is fixed or that changes in a prescribed way. We believe this is appropriate because systematic measurement errors are likely to be the main limitation on the accuracy of the results. Our final estimated uncertainties are one-third of the errors that would result if a 4.5-cm rms systematic error had the most damaging possible variation with time. We discuss the resulting uncertainties for several different subsets of orbital and relativity parameters

  10. Relativistic gas in a Schwarzschild metric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kremer, Gilberto M

    2013-01-01

    A relativistic gas in a Schwarzschild metric is studied within the framework of a relativistic Boltzmann equation in the presence of gravitational fields, where Marle’s model for the collision operator of the Boltzmann equation is employed. The transport coefficients of the bulk and shear viscosities and thermal conductivity are determined from the Chapman–Enskog method. It is shown that the transport coefficients depend on the gravitational potential. Expressions for the transport coefficients in the presence of weak gravitational fields in the non-relativistic (low temperature) and ultra-relativistic (high temperature) limiting cases are given. Apart from the temperature gradient the heat flux has two relativistic terms. The first one, proposed by Eckart, is due to the inertia of energy and represents an isothermal heat flux when matter is accelerated. The other, suggested by Tolman, is proportional to the gravitational potential gradient and indicates that—in the absence of an acceleration field—a state of equilibrium of a relativistic gas in a gravitational field can be attained only if the temperature gradient is counterbalanced by a gravitational potential gradient. (paper)

  11. Gravitation Waves seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva HR-RFA

    2006-01-01

    We will present a brief introduction to the physics of gravitational waves and their properties. We will review potential astrophysical sources of gravitational waves, and the physics and astrophysics that can be learned from their study. We will survey the techniques and technologies for detecting gravitational waves for the first time, including bar detectors and broadband interferometers, and give a brief status report on the international search effort.

  12. Astronomy's New Messengers: A traveling exhibit on gravitational-wave physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavaglia, Marco; Hendry, Martin; Marka, Szabolcs; Reitze, David H; Riles, Keith

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory exhibit Astronomy's New Messengers: Listening to the Universe with Gravitational Waves is traveling to colleges, universities, museums and other public institutions throughout the United States. Astronomy's New Messengers primarily communicates with an adolescent and young adult audience, potentially inspiring them into the field of science. Acknowledging that this audience is traditionally a difficult one to attract, the exhibit publicly announces itself in a charismatic fashion to reach its principal goals of broadening the community of people interested in science and encouraging interest in science among young people.

  13. PHYSICAL-CONSTRAINT-PRESERVING CENTRAL DISCONTINUOUS GALERKIN METHODS FOR SPECIAL RELATIVISTIC HYDRODYNAMICS WITH A GENERAL EQUATION OF STATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Kailiang [School of Mathematical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Tang, Huazhong, E-mail: wukl@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: hztang@math.pku.edu.cn [HEDPS, CAPT and LMAM, School of Mathematical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2017-01-01

    The ideal gas equation of state (EOS) with a constant adiabatic index is a poor approximation for most relativistic astrophysical flows, although it is commonly used in relativistic hydrodynamics (RHD). This paper develops high-order accurate, physical-constraints-preserving (PCP), central, discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods for the one- and two-dimensional special RHD equations with a general EOS. It is built on our theoretical analysis of the admissible states for RHD and the PCP limiting procedure that enforce the admissibility of central DG solutions. The convexity, scaling invariance, orthogonal invariance, and Lax–Friedrichs splitting property of the admissible state set are first proved with the aid of its equivalent form. Then, the high-order central DG methods with the PCP limiting procedure and strong stability-preserving time discretization are proved, to preserve the positivity of the density, pressure, specific internal energy, and the bound of the fluid velocity, maintain high-order accuracy, and be L {sup 1}-stable. The accuracy, robustness, and effectiveness of the proposed methods are demonstrated by several 1D and 2D numerical examples involving large Lorentz factor, strong discontinuities, or low density/pressure, etc.

  14. Some remarks concerning relativistic kinetic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeter, J.

    1990-01-01

    The starting point of our investigation is a classical kinetic theory which includes correlational effects as well as the complete electromagnetic interaction. Also classical gravitation can be incorporated. The relativistic version of this theory is written down using some heuristic arguments. Its essential feature is the difference between terms representing gravitational interaction and the metric tensor representing geometrical properties. (author)

  15. Robust forecasts on fundamental physics from the foreground-obscured, gravitationally-lensed CMB polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errard, Josquin [Sorbonne Universités, Institut Lagrange de Paris (ILP), 98 bis Boulevard Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Feeney, Stephen M.; Jaffe, Andrew H. [Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Peiris, Hiranya V., E-mail: josquin.errard@lpnhe.in2p3.fr, E-mail: s.feeney@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: h.peiris@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: a.jaffe@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-01

    Recent results from the BICEP, Keck Array and Planck Collaborations demonstrate that Galactic foregrounds are an unavoidable obstacle in the search for evidence of inflationary gravitational waves in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. Beyond the foregrounds, the effect of lensing by intervening large-scale structure further obscures all but the strongest inflationary signals permitted by current data. With a plethora of ongoing and upcoming experiments aiming to measure these signatures, careful and self-consistent consideration of experiments' foreground- and lensing-removal capabilities is critical in obtaining credible forecasts of their performance. We investigate the capabilities of instruments such as Advanced ACTPol, BICEP3 and Keck Array, CLASS, EBEX10K, PIPER, Simons Array, SPT-3G and SPIDER, and projects as COrE+, LiteBIRD-ext, PIXIE and Stage IV, to clean contamination due to polarized synchrotron and dust from raw multi-frequency data, and remove lensing from the resulting co-added CMB maps (either using iterative CMB-only techniques or through cross-correlation with external data). Incorporating these effects, we present forecasts for the constraining power of these experiments in terms of inflationary physics, the neutrino sector, and dark energy parameters. Made publicly available through an online interface, this tool enables the next generation of CMB experiments to foreground-proof their designs, optimize their frequency coverage to maximize scientific output, and determine where cross-experimental collaboration would be most beneficial. We find that analyzing data from ground, balloon and space instruments in complementary combinations can significantly improve component separation performance, delensing, and cosmological constraints over individual datasets. In particular, we find that a combination of post-2020 ground- and space-based experiments could achieve constraints such as σ(r)∼1.3×10{sup −4}, σ(n{sub t})∼0

  16. History of Science in Physics Teaching: A Study About the Teaching of Gravitational Attraction Developed Among Prospective Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Regina Teodoro Gatti

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We report here some outcomes of a research related to a didactical experience aiming to integrate the History of Science to the Physics Teaching, taking as background the historical development of the gravitational attraction. The research, of qualitative approach, is a case study and it was carried out in a sample of eleven students belonging to an undergraduate physics program (called licenciatura in Brazil designed to from High School physics teachers in a São Paulo State Public University. We tried initially to reveal prospective teachers’ conceptions in order to provide a prepare that was used to guide the activities from the reality’s diagnosis. The aim was to promote discussions on the existence and persistence of alternative conceptions, on the historical evolution of the subject gravitational attraction, through readings and debates of texts contemplating recent subjects on the Science Education research, in order to generate dissatisfaction with traditional teaching models. The future High School physics teachers were asked to construct their own teaching proposal, through the development, in real situations, in a High School, of a mini-course based on: debates and synthesis developed in University classroom, the History of the Science and the student’s alternative conceptions. In this paper we will analyze future teachers’ alternative conceptions, the development of the course proposed, and details of the mini-courses taught by the prospective teachers in real situations, among High School students, its coherence and the posture changes observed in them.

  17. Statistical mechanics of the self-gravitating gas: II. Local physical magnitudes and fractal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega, H.J. de; Sanchez, N.

    2002-01-01

    We complete our study of the self-gravitating gas by computing the fluctuations around the saddle point solution for the three statistical ensembles (grand canonical, canonical and microcanonical). Although the saddle point is the same for the three ensembles, the fluctuations change from one ensemble to the other. The zeroes of the small fluctuations determinant determine the position of the critical points for each ensemble. This yields the domains of validity of the mean field approach. Only the S-wave determinant exhibits critical points. Closed formulae for the S- and P-wave determinants of fluctuations are derived. The local properties of the self-gravitating gas in thermodynamic equilibrium are studied in detail. The pressure, energy density, particle density and speed of sound are computed and analyzed as functions of the position. The equation of state turns out to be locally p(r→ )=Tρ V (r→ ) as for the ideal gas. Starting from the partition function of the self-gravitating gas, we prove in this microscopic calculation that the hydrostatic description yielding locally the ideal gas equation of state is exact in the N=∞ limit. The dilute nature of the thermodynamic limit (N∼L→∞ with N/L fixed) together with the long range nature of the gravitational forces play a crucial role in obtaining such ideal gas equation. The self-gravitating gas being inhomogeneous, we have PV/[NT]=f(η)≤1 for any finite volume V. The inhomogeneous particle distribution in the ground state suggests a fractal distribution with Haussdorf dimension D, D is slowly decreasing with increasing density, 1< D<3. The average distance between particles is computed in Monte Carlo simulations and analytically in the mean field approach. A dramatic drop at the phase transition is exhibited, clearly illustrating the properties of the collapse

  18. Relativistic equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, F.

    1986-01-01

    Relativistic equations for two and three body scattering are discussed. Particular attention is paid to relativistic three body kinetics because of recent form factor measurements of the Helium 3 - Hydrogen 3 system recently completed at Saclay and Bates and the accompanying speculation that relativistic effects are important for understanding the three nucleon system. 16 refs., 4 figs

  19. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (A new frontier in nuclear physics)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makdisi, Y.I.

    1992-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven is in its second year of construction with a target date for completion in late 1997. In this report, I will describe the status of the project, the designated milestones and the capabilities of this collider that set it apart as the premier facility to probe the new frontier of nuclear matter under extreme temperatures and densities. Two large detectors and a pair of smaller detectors, which are in various stages of approval, form the experimental program at this point. They provide a complementary set of probes to study quark gluon plasma formation through different signatures. The two ring design of this collider allows for collisions between different ion species ranging from protons to gold

  20. Causal wave propagation for relativistic massive particles: physical asymptotics in action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, M V

    2012-01-01

    Wavepackets representing relativistic quantum particles injected into a half-space, from a source that is switched on at a definite time, are represented by superpositions of plane waves that must include negative frequencies. Propagation is causal: it is a consequence of analyticity that at time t no part of the wave has travelled farther than ct, corresponding to the front of the signal. Nevertheless, interference fringes behind the front travel superluminally. For Klein-Gordon and Dirac wavepackets, the spatially integrated density increases because current is injected at the boundary. Even in the simplest causal model, understanding the shape of the wave after long times is an instructive exercise in the asymptotics of integrals, illustrating several techniques at a level suitable for graduate students; different spatial features involve contributions from a pole and from two saddle points, the uniform asymptotics for the pole close to a saddle, and the coalescence of two saddles into the Sommerfeld precursor immediately behind the front. (paper)

  1. A relativistic rotating frame with physics majors, photons and mirrors: causality lost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    An analysis of cylinders rotating at relativistic speeds is considered from the point of view of observers living on the cylinders and from the point of view of observers in an inertial frame at rest with respect to translational motion of the cylinder. All of the observers measure time and distance using the recently introduced floor mirrored Einstein-Langevin light clock (FMEL). Two 'obvious' choices for synchronizing clocks, the traditional Einstein method and the well-known 'global' method, will be compared. It is shown that Selleri's paradox does not actually illustrate a contradiction, and it is shown that the Einstein method seems to allow apparent time ordering violations of causality. The global method leads to a disagreement with those in the inertial frame about velocities, and to a non-isotropic value for the speed of light. Ehrenfest's paradox is explained from the point of view of observers using each choice of synchronization

  2. Theory of gravitational interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Gasperini, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    This is the second edition of a well-received book that is a modern, self-contained introduction to the theory of gravitational interactions. The new edition includes more details on gravitational waves of cosmological origin, the so-called brane world scenario, and gravitational time-delay effects. The first part of the book follows the traditional presentation of general relativity as a geometric theory of the macroscopic gravitational field, while the second, more advanced part discusses the deep analogies (and differences) between a geometric theory of gravity and the “gauge” theories of the other fundamental interactions. This fills a gap within the traditional approach to general relativity which usually leaves students puzzled about the role of gravity. The required notions of differential geometry are reduced to the minimum, allowing room for aspects of gravitational physics of current phenomenological and theoretical interest, such as the properties of gravitational waves, the gravitational inter...

  3. Gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ciufolini, I; Moschella, U; Fre, P

    2001-01-01

    Gravitational waves (GWs) are a hot topic and promise to play a central role in astrophysics, cosmology, and theoretical physics. Technological developments have led us to the brink of their direct observation, which could become a reality in the coming years. The direct observation of GWs will open an entirely new field: GW astronomy. This is expected to bring a revolution in our knowledge of the universe by allowing the observation of previously unseen phenomena, such as the coalescence of compact objects (neutron stars and black holes), the fall of stars into supermassive black holes, stellar core collapses, big-bang relics, and the new and unexpected.With a wide range of contributions by leading scientists in the field, Gravitational Waves covers topics such as the basics of GWs, various advanced topics, GW detectors, astrophysics of GW sources, numerical applications, and several recent theoretical developments. The material is written at a level suitable for postgraduate students entering the field.

  4. Some aspects of gravitational waves in an isotropic background universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, S.N.

    1981-06-01

    Gravitational waves are an inescapable consequence of the relativistic theory of gravitation. They are meaningfully comparable with electromagnetic waves. However, they are not conformally invariant. So, to investigate this property for gravitational waves, modified field equations are obtained of which the underlying Lagrangian is based on gravitation only. It gives, if helicity is preserved, amplitude modification, and the wave is represented by Bessel function of zero order. Some aspects of this theory are discussed with reference to gravitational waves only. (author)

  5. Rastall's and related theories are conservative gravitational theories although physically inequivalent to general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smalley, L.L.; Alabama Univ., Huntsville

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that (1) the proper framework for testing Rastall's theory and its generalisations is in the case of non-negligible (i.e. discernible) gravitational effects such as gravity gradients; 2) these theories have conserved integral four-momentum and angular momentum; and (3) the Nordtvedt effect then provides limits on the parameters which arise as the result of the non-zero divergence of the energy-momentum tensor. (author)

  6. Rastall's and related theories are conservative gravitational theories although physically inequivalent to general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, L. L.

    1983-01-01

    The proper framework for testing Rastall's theory and its generalizations is in the case of non-negligible (i.e. discernible) gravitational effects such as gravity gradients. These theories have conserved integral four-momentum and angular momentum. The Nordtvedt effect then provides limits on the parameters which arise as the result of the non-zero divergence of the energy-momentum tensor.

  7. A template bank to search for gravitational waves from inspiralling compact binaries: I. Physical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babak, S; Balasubramanian, R; Churches, D; Cokelaer, T; Sathyaprakash, B S

    2006-01-01

    Gravitational waves from coalescing compact binaries are searched for using the matched filtering technique. As the model waveform depends on a number of parameters, it is necessary to filter the data through a template bank covering the astrophysically interesting region of the parameter space. The choice of templates is defined by the maximum allowed drop in signal-to-noise ratio due to the discreteness of the template bank. In this paper we describe the template-bank algorithm that was used in the analysis of data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) and GEO 600 detectors to search for signals from binaries consisting of non-spinning compact objects. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we study the efficiency of the bank and show that its performance is satisfactory for the design sensitivity curves of ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors GEO 600, initial LIGO, advanced LIGO and Virgo. The bank is efficient in searching for various compact binaries such as binary primordial black holes, binary neutron stars, binary black holes, as well as a mixed binary consisting of a non-spinning black hole and a neutron star

  8. Source modelling at the dawn of gravitational-wave astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerosa, Davide

    2016-09-01

    The age of gravitational-wave astronomy has begun. Gravitational waves are propagating spacetime perturbations ("ripples in the fabric of space-time") predicted by Einstein's theory of General Relativity. These signals propagate at the speed of light and are generated by powerful astrophysical events, such as the merger of two black holes and supernova explosions. The first detection of gravitational waves was performed in 2015 with the LIGO interferometers. This constitutes a tremendous breakthrough in fundamental physics and astronomy: it is not only the first direct detection of such elusive signals, but also the first irrefutable observation of a black-hole binary system. The future of gravitational-wave astronomy is bright and loud: the LIGO experiments will soon be joined by a network of ground-based interferometers; the space mission eLISA has now been fully approved by the European Space Agency with a proof-of-concept mission called LISA Pathfinder launched in 2015. Gravitational-wave observations will provide unprecedented tests of gravity as well as a qualitatively new window on the Universe. Careful theoretical modelling of the astrophysical sources of gravitational-waves is crucial to maximize the scientific outcome of the detectors. In this Thesis, we present several advances on gravitational-wave source modelling, studying in particular: (i) the precessional dynamics of spinning black-hole binaries; (ii) the astrophysical consequences of black-hole recoils; and (iii) the formation of compact objects in the framework of scalar-tensor theories of gravity. All these phenomena are deeply characterized by a continuous interplay between General Relativity and astrophysics: despite being a truly relativistic messenger, gravitational waves encode details of the astrophysical formation and evolution processes of their sources. We work out signatures and predictions to extract such information from current and future observations. At the dawn of a revolutionary

  9. Nuclear and atomic physics governing changes in the composition of relativistic cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, L.W.

    1978-05-01

    Many quantitative studies of relativistic cosmic ray propagation exist in which ''standard'' values for the input quantities are adopted in an uncritical manner. In contrast, the major emphasis of this study is on developing the proper set of formulae and error estimates for each of the atomic and nuclear processes that govern the composition of the cosmic rays between lithium and nickel. In particular, it is shown that errors of approximately a factor of two exist in the standard (Bohr) cross sections for stripping, that the correction function from high energy photoionization needs to be introduced into the standard cross section for radiative attachment, and that because the half-life of a fast nucleus with at most one K-shell electron can differ from the half-life of a neutral atom, several laboratory-based values need correction. The framework used to assemble and correct these quantities is a matrix formalism for the leaky box model similar to that used by Cowsik and Wilson in their ''nested leaky box'' model. It is shown that once the assumption of species-independent leakage is introduced, the matrix formalism becomes virtually identical with the standard exponential path length formalism. 87 references

  10. Teaching possibilities of some elements of Albert Einstein's Gravitation theory in frame of physics courses taught at technical universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iordache, Dan-Alexandru

    2005-01-01

    As in the period of creation of the 'monumental' works of A. Einstein (1905-1920, mainly), when many outstanding physicists [theoreticians, inclusively, as Albert Einstein (alumni of the Polytechnics from Geneva), as Paul Adrian Maurice Dirac, Alexandru Proca (alumni of Bucharest Polytechnics), et al., finished their academic studies to different Polytechnics Universities, presently many students of technical Universities obtained (as high-school students) some outstanding results in the Physics field. Particularly, the leadership of the Faculty of Control Systems and Computers of the Bucharest University has found that 'the best students in their divisions are winners at the Physics Olympics Contests'. These students and many of their colleagues (those with special scientific aptitudes) want to know more details about the most difficult scientific creation of Albert Einstein: the Gravitation Theory. Taking into account that the Einstein's Gravitation Theory is particularly difficult (from mathematical point of view, especially), and the duration of the Physics study in our technical universities is so restricted (totally 42 to 98 teaching hours, depending on the technical division profile), we have to answer to the question: what elements of the Einstein's gravity theory could be presented in frame of Physics courses taught in our technical universities? After accomplishing our analysis, we concluded as possible and useful - for the scientific training of the best students 'engineers' - the assimilation of the following elements of the Einstein's gravity theory: - The time and space concepts in the Einstein's gravitation theory, in connection with the equation of electromagnetic waves in ideal media and - eventually - in relation with the Larmor's theory of the electrical dipole radiation [which needs the expressions in curvilinear coordinates of the gradient and divergence (the main elements of the mathematical theory of fields)]; - The applications of the

  11. Stationary two-variable gravitational vortex fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koppel, A.

    1974-01-01

    Some properties of stationary two-variable solutions of the Einstein equations were studied on the basis of rigorous analysis of the nonrelativistic limit of the relativistic gravitation theory. For this case a particular method was developed of determining so-called vortex gravitational fields described by vortex solutions, which in the nonrelativistic limit transform from → infinity to the nonnewtonian type solutions. The main formulae for such fields are derived and a scheme for their calculation is presented. It is shown that under certain conditions the exact stationary solutions of the Papapetrou type for vacuum relativistic equations are vortical. From this fact, first, the presence of particular exact vortical solutions for the Einstein equations is proved, and secondly, a new possibility of a physical interpretation is proposed for the Papapetrou solutions. It is also shown that the nonrelativistic limit of this class of solutions strongly depends on the structure of solution parameters (under certain conditions these solutions may also have the Newtonian limit). 'Multipole' and 'one-variable' partial solutions of the Papapetrou class solution are derived as particular examples of vortical solutions. It is shown that for a specific parameter structure the known NUT solution is also vortical, since it belongs to the Papapetrou class [ru

  12. Gravitation and relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffmann, William F

    1964-01-01

    Remarks on the observational basis of general relativity ; Riemannian geometry ; gravitation as geometry ; gravitational waves ; Mach's principle and experiments on mass anisotropy ; the many faces of Mach ; the significance for the solar system of time-varying gravitation ; relativity principles and the role of coordinates in physics ; the superdense star and the critical nucleon number ; gravitation and light ; possible effects on the solar system of φ waves if they exist ; the Lyttleton-Bondi universe and charge equality ; quantization of general relativity ; Mach's principle as boundary condition for Einstein's equations.

  13. Elementary process theory: a formal axiomatic system with a potential application as a foundational framework for physics supporting gravitational repulsion of matter and antimatter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabbolet, M.J.T.F.

    2010-01-01

    Theories of modern physics predict that antimatter having rest mass will be attracted by the earth's gravitational field, but the actual coupling of antimatter with gravitation has not been established experimentally. The purpose of the present research was to identify laws of physics that would govern the universe if antimatter having rest mass would be repulsed by the earth's gravitational field. As a result, a formalized axiomatic system was developed together with interpretation rules for the terms of the language: the intention is that every theorem of the system yields a true statement about physical reality. Seven non-logical axioms of this axiomatic system form the elementary process theory (EPT): this is then a scheme of elementary principles describing the dynamics of individual processes taking place at supersmall scale. It is demonstrated how gravitational repulsion functions in the universe of the EPT, and some observed particles and processes have been formalized in the framework of the EPT. Incompatibility of quantum mechanics (QM) and General Relativity (GR) with the EPT is proven mathematically; to demonstrate applicability to real world problems to which neither QM nor GR applies, the EPT has been applied to a theory of the Planck era of the universe. The main conclusions are that a completely formalized framework for physics has been developed supporting the existence of gravitational repulsion and that the present results give rise to a potentially progressive research program. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Gravitational waves from inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzzetti, M.C.; Bartolo, N.; Liguori, M.; Matarrese, S.

    2016-01-01

    The production of a stochastic background of gravitational waves is a fundamental prediction of any cosmological inflationary model. The features of such a signal encode unique information about the physics of the Early Universe and beyond, thus representing an exciting, powerful window on the origin and evolution of the Universe. We review the main mechanisms of gravitational-wave production, ranging from quantum fluctuations of the gravitational field to other mechanisms that can take place during or after inflation. These include e.g. gravitational waves generated as a consequence of extra particle production during inflation, or during the (p)reheating phase. Gravitational waves produced in inflation scenarios based on modified gravity theories and second-order gravitational waves are also considered. For each analyzed case, the expected power spectrum is given. We discuss the discriminating power among different models, associated with the validity/violation of the standard consistency relation between tensor-to-scalar ratio r and tensor spectral index ηT. In light of the prospects for (directly/indirectly) detecting primordial gravitational waves, we give the expected present-day gravitational radiation spectral energy-density, highlighting the main characteristics imprinted by the cosmic thermal history, and we outline the signatures left by gravitational waves on the Cosmic Microwave Background and some imprints in the Large-Scale Structure of the Universe. Finally, current bounds and prospects of detection for inflationary gravitational waves are summarized.

  15. Physical equivalence of three forms of relativistic dynamics and addition of interactions in the front and instant forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, S.N.

    1977-01-01

    The point, instant and front forms of the relativistic Hamiltonian theory are shown to be S-matrix equivalent in the general case (of many channels and particles with spin). The corresponding transformations are found. The problem of relativistic addition of the direct interactions is solved for the front and instant forms of dynamics

  16. On the role of the magnetic tension during the gravitational collapse of a magnetised fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsagas, Christos G

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the physics of magnetised gravitational collapse by studying the behaviour of a timelike congruence of non-geodesic worldlines in the presence of a magnetic field. We show that the general relativistic coupling between magnetism and geometry, and the tension properties of the field, lead to magneto-curvature stresses that resist the collapse. When these tension stresses dominate, they can prevent an initially converging family of non-geodesic worldlines from focusing without violating the standard energy conditions

  17. Relativistic quantum mechanics; Mecanique quantique relativiste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ollitrault, J.Y. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service de Physique Theorique]|[Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 75 - Paris (France)

    1998-12-01

    These notes form an introduction to relativistic quantum mechanics. The mathematical formalism has been reduced to the minimum in order to enable the reader to calculate elementary physical processes. The second quantification and the field theory are the logical followings of this course. The reader is expected to know analytical mechanics (Lagrangian and Hamiltonian), non-relativistic quantum mechanics and some basis of restricted relativity. The purpose of the first 3 chapters is to define the quantum mechanics framework for already known notions about rotation transformations, wave propagation and restricted theory of relativity. The next 3 chapters are devoted to the application of relativistic quantum mechanics to a particle with 0,1/5 and 1 spin value. The last chapter deals with the processes involving several particles, these processes require field theory framework to be thoroughly described. (A.C.) 2 refs.

  18. Anisotropic gravitational instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyachenko, V.L.; Fridman, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Exact solutions of stability problems are obtained for two anisotropic gravitational systems of different geometries - a layer of finite thickness at rest and a rotating cylinder of finite radius. It is shown that the anisotropic gravitational instability which develops in both cases is of Jeans type. However, in contrast to the classical aperiodic Jeans instability, this instability is oscillatory. The physics of the anisotropic gravitational instability is investigated. It is shown that in a gravitating layer this instability is due, in particular, to excitation of previously unknown interchange-Jeans modes. In the cylinder, the oscillatory Jeans instability is associated with excitation of a rotational branch, this also being responsible for the beam gravitational instability. This is the reason why this instability and the anisotropic gravitational instability have so much in common

  19. Physical equivalence of the point and instant forms of relativistic dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, S N [Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol' zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Serpukhov. Inst. Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij

    1975-01-01

    As a proof of total physical equivalence of point and instantaneous forms of dynamics, a unitary transformation is derived which connects these forms of dynamics without changing the scattering matrix.

  20. Theoretical physics 3. Classical field theory. On electrodynamics, non-Abelian gauge theories, and gravitation. 3. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheck, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Stringent presentation of field theory, mediates the connection from the classicalelectrodynamics up to modern gauge theories. The compact presentation is ideal for the bachelor study. New chapter on general relativity theory. Deepens the learned by numerous application from laser physic, metamaterials and different more. Theoretical physics 3. Classical field theory. On electrodynamics, non-Abelian, and gravitation is the third of five volumes on theoretical physics by professor Scheck. The cycle theoretical physics comprehends: Volume 1: Mechanics. From Newtons law to the deterministic chaos. Volume 2: Nonrelativistic quantum theory. From the hydrogen atom to the many-particle systems. Volume 3: Classical field theory. From the electrodynamics to the gauge theories. Volume 5: From the laws of thermodynamics to the quantum statistics. This textbook mediates modern theoretical physics in string presentation illustrated by many examples. It contains numerous problems with solution hints ore exemplary, complete solutions. The third edition was revised in many single topics, especially the chapter on general relativity theory was supplemented by an extensive analysis of the Schwarzschild solution. [de

  1. Gravitational waves from inspiralling compact binaries: Hexagonal template placement and its efficiency in detecting physical signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cokelaer, T.

    2007-01-01

    Matched filtering is used to search for gravitational waves emitted by inspiralling compact binaries in data from the ground-based interferometers. One of the key aspects of the detection process is the design of a template bank that covers the astrophysically pertinent parameter space. In an earlier paper, we described a template bank that is based on a square lattice. Although robust, we showed that the square placement is overefficient, with the implication that it is computationally more demanding than required. In this paper, we present a template bank based on an hexagonal lattice, which size is reduced by 40% with respect to the proposed square placement. We describe the practical aspects of the hexagonal template bank implementation, its size, and computational cost. We have also performed exhaustive simulations to characterize its efficiency and safeness. We show that the bank is adequate to search for a wide variety of binary systems (primordial black holes, neutron stars, and stellar-mass black holes) and in data from both current detectors (initial LIGO, Virgo and GEO600) as well as future detectors (advanced LIGO and EGO). Remarkably, although our template bank placement uses a metric arising from a particular template family, namely, stationary phase approximation, we show that it can be used successfully with other template families (e.g., Pade resummation and effective one-body approximation). This quality of being effective for different template families makes the proposed bank suitable for a search that would use several of them in parallel (e.g., in a binary black hole search). The hexagonal template bank described in this paper is currently used to search for nonspinning inspiralling compact binaries in data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO)

  2. Relativistic positioning systems: perspectives and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll Bartolomé

    2013-11-01

    Relativistic positioning systems are interesting technical objects for applications around the Earth and in the Solar system. But above all else, they are basic scientific objects allowing developing relativity from its own concepts. Some past and future features of relativistic positioning sys- tems, with special attention to the developments that they suggest for an epistemic relativity (relativistic experimental approach to physics), are analyzed. This includes relativistic stereometry, which, together with relativistic positioning systems, allows to introduce the general relativistic notion of (finite) laboratory (space-time region able to perform experiments of finite size).

  3. Projective relativity, cosmology and gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcidiacono, G.

    1986-01-01

    This book describes the latest applications of projective geometry to cosmology and gravitation. The contents of the book are; the Poincare group and Special Relativity, the thermodynamics and electromagnetism, general relativity, gravitation and cosmology, group theory and models of universe, the special projective relativity, the Fantappie group and Big-Bang cosmology, a new cosmological projective mechanics, the plasma physics and cosmology, the projective magnetohydrodynamics field, projective relativity and waves propagation, the generalizations of the gravitational field, the general projective relativity, the projective gravitational field, the De Sitter Universe and quantum physics, the conformal relativity and Newton gravitation

  4. Do Gravitational Fields Have Mass? Or on the Nature of Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Kunst, Ernst Karl

    1999-01-01

    As has been shown before (a brief comment will be given in the text), relativistic mass and relativistic time dilation of moving bodies are equivalent as well as time and mass in the rest frame. This implies that the time dilation due to the gravitational field is combined with inertial and gravitational mass as well and permits the computation of the gravitational action of the vacuum constituting the gravitational field in any distance from the source of the field. Theoretical predictions a...

  5. Relativistic polarized neutrons at the Laboratory of High Energy Physics, JINR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirillov, A.; Komolov, L.; Kovalenko, A.; Matyushevskij, E.; Nomofilov, A.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Sharov, V.; Starikov, A.; Strunov, L.; Svetov, A.

    1996-01-01

    Using slowly extracted polarized deuterons, available at the accelerator facility of the Laboratory of High Energy Physics, JINR, polarized quasi-monochromatic neutrons with momenta from 1.1 to 4.5 GeV/c have been generated. Depending on momentum, from 10 4 to 10 6 polarized neutrons per accelerator cycle were produced. At present, the polarized neutrons are mainly intended for measuring the (n vec, p vec) total cross section differences. 6 refs., 2 figs

  6. Spinning relativistic particles in external fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomeranskii, Andrei A; Sen'kov, Roman A; Khriplovich, Iosif B

    2000-01-01

    The motion of spinning relativistic particles in external electromagnetic and gravitational fields is considered. The self-consistent equations of motion are built with the noncovariant description of spin and with the usual, 'naive' definition of the coordinate of a relativistic particle. A simple derivation of the gravitational interaction of first order in spin is presented for a relativistic particle. The approach developed allows one to consider effects of higher order in spin. Concrete calculations are performed for the second order. The gravimagnetic moment is discussed, a special spin effect in general relativity. We also consider the contributions of the spin interactions of first and second order to the gravitational radiation of compact binary stars. (from the current literature)

  7. Nucleus-acoustic Solitons in Self-gravitating Magnetized Quantum Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaduzzaman, Dewan Mohammad; Amina, Moriom; Mamun, Abdullah Al

    2018-03-01

    The basic properties of the nucleus-acoustic (NA) solitary waves (SWs) are investigated in a super-dense self-gravitating magnetized quantum plasma (SDSGMQP) system in the presence of an external magnetic field, whose constituents are the non-degenerate light as well as heavy nuclei, and non-/ultra-relativistically degenerate electrons. The Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation has been derived by employing the reductive perturbation method. The NA SWs are formed with negative (positive) electrostatic (self-gravitational) potential. It is also observed that the effects of non-/ultra-relativistically degenerate electron pressure and the obliqueness of the external magnetic field significantly change the basic properties (e.g., amplitude, width, and speed) of NA SWs. The implications of the findings of our present investigation in explaining the physics behind the formation of the NA SWs in astrophysical compact objects like neutron stars are briefly discussed.

  8. Lectures in relativistic quantum mechanics an introductory course for postgraduates in particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Azfar, Farrukh

    2017-01-01

    This book is based on a series of lectures taught by the author to all incoming first year Oxford University postgraduates in experimental particle physics. It begins by deriving the Dirac equation and incorporating the electro-magnetic interaction and calculating several bread and butter processes at tree level using the Feynman Stueckelberg approach: Mott scattering, electron-electron scattering, electron-positron scattering, Compton scattering, Bremsstrahlung and electron-positron to muon-anti-muon. The intention is for the student to become fluent in detail with all the steps leading to the calculation of these processes. Every step is motivated using the most basic arguments.

  9. Relativistic astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Ruder, Hanns; Nollert, Hans-Peter; Hehl, Friedrich

    1998-01-01

    This book summarizes the lectures given at the 162. WE-Heraeus Seminar which took place in the house of the German Physical Society in Bad Honnefin August 1996. Already the number 162 shows the activity and effectiveness of the WE-Heraeus Foundation. We would like to express our thanks to Jutta Adam and Dr. Volker Schafer for the almost incredibly simple and unbureaucratical procedure of funding, organization and realization, and, of course, to the founders. Similar to the 152. WE-Heraeus Seminar Relativity and Scientific Computing (Springer Verlag 1996), this seminar was a joint venture of the Astronomical Society (AG) and of the Section 'Gravitation und Relativity Theory' of the German Physical Society (DPG). Since Einstein has developed his Theory of General Relativity more than 80 years ago, the situation has changed dramatically. In the first decades main efforts were untertaken for a better understanding and for the experimental verification of the theory. Mean­ while General Relativity (GR) is one of ...

  10. Gravitational Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Jonah Maxwell [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-18

    This report has slides on Gravitational Waves; Pound and Rebka: A Shocking Fact; Light is a Ruler; Gravity is the Curvature of Spacetime; Gravitational Waves Made Simple; How a Gravitational Wave Affects Stuff Here; LIGO; This Detection: Neutron Stars; What the Gravitational Wave Looks Like; The Sound of Merging Neutron Stars; Neutron Star Mergers: More than GWs; The Radioactive Cloud; The Kilonova; and finally Summary, Multimessenger Astronomy.

  11. Outline of the relativistic electron beam (REB) generator at Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuzuki, Tetsuya

    1979-01-01

    The REB generators at the Institute of Plasma Physics are introduced. The generators Phoebus-2 and Phoebus-3 are main generators. The generators consist of a Marx generator (a condenser bank), a pulse forming line (PFL), a transmission line (TL) and a diode part. The rise time of current in the Marx generator must be short. The charge up time of the Phoebus-2 and the Phoebus-3 is less than 400 ns. The jitter is less than 10 ns. The dielectric material of the PFL is water, since the dielectric constant is large, and it makes self recovering. The inductance of gap at the edge of PFL should be small. The gap is useful for short rise time. The TL prevents the prepulse at the time of charging-up and works as an impedance transformer. The Phoebus-3 is connected to the torus system (SPAC-6) to make experiment on REB ring formation. (Kato, T.)

  12. Noether Symmetries and Covariant Conservation Laws in Classical, Relativistic and Quantum Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Fatibene

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We review the Lagrangian formulation of (generalised Noether symmetries in the framework of Calculus of Variations in Jet Bundles, with a special attention to so-called “Natural Theories” and “Gauge-Natural Theories” that include all relevant Field Theories and physical applications (from Mechanics to General Relativity, to Gauge Theories, Supersymmetric Theories, Spinors, etc.. It is discussed how the use of Poincar´e–Cartan forms and decompositions of natural (or gauge-natural variational operators give rise to notions such as “generators of Noether symmetries”, energy and reduced energy flow, Bianchi identities, weak and strong conservation laws, covariant conservation laws, Hamiltonian-like conservation laws (such as, e.g., so-calledADMlaws in General Relativity with emphasis on the physical interpretation of the quantities calculated in specific cases (energy, angular momentum, entropy, etc.. A few substantially new and very recent applications/examples are presented to better show the power of the methods introduced: one in Classical Mechanics (definition of strong conservation laws in a frame-independent setting and a discussion on the way in which conserved quantities depend on the choice of an observer; one in Classical Field Theories (energy and entropy in General Relativity, in its standard formulation, in its spin-frame formulation, in its first order formulation “à la Palatini” and in its extensions to Non-Linear Gravity Theories; one in Quantum Field Theories (applications to conservation laws in Loop Quantum Gravity via spin connections and Barbero–Immirzi connections.

  13. Relativistic Celestial Mechanics of the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeikin, Sergei; Efroimsky, Michael; Kaplan, George

    2011-09-01

    The general theory of relativity was developed by Einstein a century ago. Since then, it has become the standard theory of gravity, especially important to the fields of fundamental astronomy, astrophysics, cosmology, and experimental gravitational physics. Today, the application of general relativity is also essential for many practical purposes involving astrometry, navigation, geodesy, and time synchronization. Numerous experiments have successfully tested general relativity to a remarkable level of precision. Exploring relativistic gravity in the solar system now involves a variety of high-accuracy techniques, for example, very long baseline radio interferometry, pulsar timing, spacecraft Doppler tracking, planetary radio ranging, lunar laser ranging, the global positioning system (GPS), torsion balances and atomic clocks. Over the last few decades, various groups within the International Astronomical Union have been active in exploring the application of the general theory of relativity to the modeling and interpretation of high-accuracy astronomical observations in the solar system and beyond. A Working Group on Relativity in Celestial Mechanics and Astrometry was formed in 1994 to define and implement a relativistic theory of reference frames and time scales. This task was successfully completed with the adoption of a series of resolutions on astronomical reference systems, time scales, and Earth rotation models by the 24th General Assembly of the IAU, held in Manchester, UK, in 2000. However, these resolutions only form a framework for the practical application of relativity theory, and there have been continuing questions on the details of the proper application of relativity theory to many common astronomical problems. To ensure that these questions are properly addressed, the 26th General Assembly of the IAU, held in Prague in August 2006, established the IAU Commission 52, "Relativity in Fundamental Astronomy". The general scientific goals of the new

  14. Contraint's theory and relativistic dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhi, G.; Lusanna, L.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this Workshop was to examine the current situation of relativistic dynamics. In particular, Dirac-Bergmann's theory of constraints, which lies at the heart of gauge theories, general relativity, relativistic mechanics and string theories, was chosen as the unifying theoretical framework best suited to investigate such a field. The papers discussed were on general relativity; relativistic mechanics; particle physics and mathematical physics. Also discussed were the problems of classical and quantum level, namely the identification of the classical observables of constrained systems, the equivalence of the nonequivalence of the various ways to quantize such systems; the problem of the anomalies; the best geometrical approach to the theory of constraints; the possibility of unifying all the treatments of relativistic mechanics. This book compiles the papers presented at proceedings of relativistic dynamics and constraints theory

  15. Relativistic theory of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logunov, A.A.; Mestvirishvili, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    This work presents an unambiguous construction of the relativistic theory of gravity (RTG) in the framework of relativity and the geometrization principle. The gauge principle has been formulated, and the Lagrangian density of the gravitational field has thus been constructed. This theory explains the totality of the available experimental data on the solar system and predicts the existence of gravitational waves of the Faraday-Maxwell type. According to the RTG, the Universe is infinite and ''flat'', hence it follows that its matter density should be equal to its critical density. Therefore, an appreciable ''hidden mass'' exceeding the presently observed mass of the matter almost 40-fold should exist in the Universe in some form of the matter or other. In accordance with the RTG, a massive body having a finite density ceases to contract under gravitational forces within a finite interval of proper time. From the viewpoint of an external reference frame, the brightness of the body decreases exponentially (it is getting darker), but nothing extraordinary happens in this case because its density always remains finite and, for example, for a body with the mass of about 10 8 M 0 it is equal to 2 g/cm 3 . That is why it follows from the RTG that there could be no object whatsoever (black holes) in which gravitational collapse of matter develops to an infinite density. As has been shown, the presence of a cosmological term necessarily requires the introduction of a term with an explicit dependence on the Minkowski metrics. For the long-range gravitational forces the cosmological constant vanishes

  16. Relativistically Self-Channeled Femtosecond Terawatt Lasers for High-Field Physics and X-Ray Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisov, A.B.; Boyer, K.; Cameron, S.M.; Luk, T.S.; McPherson, A.; Nelson, T.; Rhodes, C.K.

    1999-01-01

    Optical channeling or refractive guiding processes involving the nonlinear interaction of intense femtosecond optical pulses with matter in the self-focussing regime has created exciting opportunities for next-generation laser plasma-based x-ray sources and directed energy applications. This fundamentally new form of extended paraxial electromagnetic propagation in nonlinear dispersive media such as underdense plasma is attributed to the interplay between normal optical diffraction and intensity-dependent nonlinear focussing and refraction contributions in the dielectric response. Superposition of these mechanisms on the intrinsic index profile acts to confine the propagating energy in a dynamic self-guiding longitudinal waveguide structure which is stable for power transmission and robust compression. The laser-driven channels are hypothesized to support a degree of solitonic transport behavior, simultaneously stable in the space and time domains (group velocity dispersion balances self-phase modulation), and are believed to be self-compensating for diffraction and dispersion over many Rayleigh lengths in contrast with the defining characteristics of conventional diffractive imaging and beamforming. By combining concentrated power deposition with well-ordered spatial localization, this phenomena will also create new possibilities for production and regulation of physical interactions, including electron beams, enhanced material coupling, and self-modulated plasma wakefields, over extended gain distances with unprecedented energy densities. Harmonious combination of short-pulse x-ray production with plasma channeling resulting from a relativistic charge displacement nonlinearity mechanism in the terawatt regime (10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) has been shown to generate high-field conditions conducive to efficient multi-kilovolt x-ray amplification and peak spectral brightness. Channeled optical propagation with intense short-pulse lasers is expected to impact several

  17. Scale-relativistic cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nottale, Laurent

    2003-01-01

    The principle of relativity, when it is applied to scale transformations, leads to the suggestion of a generalization of fundamental dilations laws. These new special scale-relativistic resolution transformations involve log-Lorentz factors and lead to the occurrence of a minimal and of a maximal length-scale in nature, which are invariant under dilations. The minimal length-scale, that replaces the zero from the viewpoint of its physical properties, is identified with the Planck length l P , and the maximal scale, that replaces infinity, is identified with the cosmic scale L=Λ -1/2 , where Λ is the cosmological constant.The new interpretation of the Planck scale has several implications for the structure and history of the early Universe: we consider the questions of the origin, of the status of physical laws at very early times, of the horizon/causality problem and of fluctuations at recombination epoch.The new interpretation of the cosmic scale has consequences for our knowledge of the present universe, concerning in particular Mach's principle, the large number coincidence, the problem of the vacuum energy density, the nature and the value of the cosmological constant. The value (theoretically predicted ten years ago) of the scaled cosmological constant Ω Λ =0.75+/-0.15 is now supported by several different experiments (Hubble diagram of Supernovae, Boomerang measurements, gravitational lensing by clusters of galaxies).The scale-relativity framework also allows one to suggest a solution to the missing mass problem, and to make theoretical predictions of fundamental energy scales, thanks to the interpretation of new structures in scale space: fractal/classical transitions as Compton lengths, mass-coupling relations and critical value 4π 2 of inverse couplings. Among them, we find a structure at 3.27+/-0.26x10 20 eV, which agrees closely with the observed highest energy cosmic rays at 3.2+/-0.9x10 20 eV, and another at 5.3x10 -3 eV, which corresponds to the

  18. Quantum limit on time measurement in a gravitational field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Supurna; Samuel, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Good clocks are of importance both to fundamental physics and for applications in astronomy, metrology and global positioning systems. In a recent technological breakthrough, researchers at NIST have been able to achieve a stability of one part in 10 18 using an ytterbium clock. This naturally raises the question of whether there are fundamental limits to time keeping. In this article we point out that gravity and quantum mechanics set a fundamental limit on the fractional frequency uncertainty of clocks. This limit comes from a combination of the uncertainty relation, the gravitational redshift and the relativistic time dilation effect. For example, a single ion aluminium clock in a terrestrial gravitational field cannot achieve a fractional frequency uncertainty better than one part in 10 22 . This fundamental limit explores the interaction between gravity and quantum mechanics on a laboratory scale. (paper)

  19. On the ambiguity in relativistic tidal deformability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gralla, Samuel E.

    2018-04-01

    The LIGO collaboration recently reported the first gravitational-wave constraints on the tidal deformability of neutron stars. I discuss an inherent ambiguity in the notion of relativistic tidal deformability that, while too small to affect the present measurement, may become important in the future. I propose a new way to understand the ambiguity and discuss future prospects for reliably linking observed gravitational waveforms to compact object microphysics.

  20. Physics to a degree

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, EG

    2014-01-01

    Physics to a Degree provides an extensive collection of problems suitable for self-study or tutorial and group work at the level of an undergraduate physics course. This novel set of exercises draws together the core elements of an undergraduate physics degree and provides students with the problem solving skills needed for general physics' examinations and for real-life situations encountered by the professional physicist. Topics include force, momentum, gravitation, Bernoulli's Theorem, magnetic fields, blackbody radiation, relativistic travel, mechanics near the speed of light, radioactive

  1. Relativistic quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ollitrault, J.Y.

    1998-12-01

    These notes form an introduction to relativistic quantum mechanics. The mathematical formalism has been reduced to the minimum in order to enable the reader to calculate elementary physical processes. The second quantification and the field theory are the logical followings of this course. The reader is expected to know analytical mechanics (Lagrangian and Hamiltonian), non-relativistic quantum mechanics and some basis of restricted relativity. The purpose of the first 3 chapters is to define the quantum mechanics framework for already known notions about rotation transformations, wave propagation and restricted theory of relativity. The next 3 chapters are devoted to the application of relativistic quantum mechanics to a particle with 0,1/5 and 1 spin value. The last chapter deals with the processes involving several particles, these processes require field theory framework to be thoroughly described. (A.C.)

  2. Relativistic solitons and pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpman, V I [Inst. of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere, and Radio-Wave Propagation, Moscow; Norman, C A; ter Haar, D; Tsytovich, V N

    1975-05-01

    A production mechanism for stable electron bunches or sheets of localized electric fields is investigated which may account for pulsar radio emission. Possible soliton phenomena in a one-dimensional relativistic plasma are analyzed, and it is suggested that the motion of a relativistic soliton, or ''relaton'', along a curved magnetic-field line may produce radio emission with the correct polarization properties. A general MHD solution is obtained for relatons, the radiation produced by a relativistic particle colliding with a soliton is evaluated, and the emission by a soliton moving along a curved field line is estimated. It is noted that due to a number of severe physical restrictions, curvature radiation is not a very likely solution to the problem of pulsar radio emission. (IAA)

  3. Presenting Newtonian gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Counihan, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The basic principles of the Newtonian theory of gravitation are presented in a way which students may find more logically coherent, mathematically accessible and physically interesting than other approaches. After giving relatively simple derivations of the circular hodograph and the elliptical orbit from the inverse-square law, the concept of gravitational energy is developed from vector calculus. It is argued that the energy density of a gravitational field may reasonably be regarded as -g 2 /8πG, and that the inverse-square law may be replaced by a Schwarzschild-like force law without the need to invoke non-Euclidean geometry

  4. Gravitational Anomaly and Transport Phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landsteiner, Karl; Megias, Eugenio; Pena-Benitez, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Quantum anomalies give rise to new transport phenomena. In particular, a magnetic field can induce an anomalous current via the chiral magnetic effect and a vortex in the relativistic fluid can also induce a current via the chiral vortical effect. The related transport coefficients can be calculated via Kubo formulas. We evaluate the Kubo formula for the anomalous vortical conductivity at weak coupling and show that it receives contributions proportional to the gravitational anomaly coefficient. The gravitational anomaly gives rise to an anomalous vortical effect even for an uncharged fluid.

  5. Leading quantum gravitational corrections to scalar QED

    OpenAIRE

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N. E. J.

    2002-01-01

    We consider the leading post-Newtonian and quantum corrections to the non-relativistic scattering amplitude of charged scalars in the combined theory of general relativity and scalar QED. The combined theory is treated as an effective field theory. This allows for a consistent quantization of the gravitational field. The appropriate vertex rules are extracted from the action, and the non-analytic contributions to the 1-loop scattering matrix are calculated in the non-relativistic limit. The n...

  6. A flat space-time relativistic explanation for the perihelion advance of Mercury

    OpenAIRE

    Behera, Harihar; Naik, P. C.

    2003-01-01

    Starting with the flat space-time relativistic versions of Maxwell-Heaviside's toy model vector theory of gravity and introducing the gravitational analogues for the electromagnetic Lienard-Wiechert potentials together with the notion of a gravitational Thomas Precession; the observed anomalous perihelion advance of Mercury's orbit is here explained as a relativistic effect in flat (Minkowski) space-time, unlike Einstein's curved space-time relativistic explanation. In this new explanation fo...

  7. Relativistic heavy ion physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, O.

    1985-01-01

    In the fall of 1986 beams of heavy ions up to A ∼ 40 at total energies up to E ∼ 225 GeV/-nucleon will become available for experiments at CERN (60 and 225 GeV/nucleon) and at Brookhaven (15.5 GeV/nucleon). Are these energies interesting in relation to the ideas of creating quark deconfinement? An energy consideration of the planned experiments is presented, as well as a description of the experimental arrangement. (Auth.)

  8. Relativistic hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Luciano, Rezzolla

    2013-01-01

    Relativistic hydrodynamics is a very successful theoretical framework to describe the dynamics of matter from scales as small as those of colliding elementary particles, up to the largest scales in the universe. This book provides an up-to-date, lively, and approachable introduction to the mathematical formalism, numerical techniques, and applications of relativistic hydrodynamics. The topic is typically covered either by very formal or by very phenomenological books, but is instead presented here in a form that will be appreciated both by students and researchers in the field. The topics covered in the book are the results of work carried out over the last 40 years, which can be found in rather technical research articles with dissimilar notations and styles. The book is not just a collection of scattered information, but a well-organized description of relativistic hydrodynamics, from the basic principles of statistical kinetic theory, down to the technical aspects of numerical methods devised for the solut...

  9. Nuclear Quantum Gravitation - The Correct Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotas, Ronald

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Quantum Gravitation provides a clear, definitive Scientific explanation of Gravity and Gravitation. It is harmonious with Newtonian and Quantum Mechanics, and with distinct Scientific Logic. Nuclear Quantum Gravitation has 10 certain, Scientific proofs and 21 more good indications. With this theory the Physical Forces are obviously Unified. See: OBSCURANTISM ON EINSTEIN GRAVITATION? http://www.santilli- Foundation.org/inconsistencies-gravitation.php and Einstein's Theory of Relativity versus Classical Mechanics http://www.newtonphysics.on.ca/einstein/

  10. Sarcopenia Is Negatively Related to High Gravitational Impacts Achieved From Day-to-day Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, April; Gregson, Celia L; Hannam, Kimberly; Deere, Kevin C; Clark, Emma M; Tobias, Jon H

    2018-04-17

    Sarcopenia has been associated with reduced physical activity (PA). We aimed to determine if sarcopenia, and specific components of muscle size, function, and physical performance, are associated with high impacts achieved during habitual PA, as these are related to bone strength in community-dwelling older women. Participants were older women from the Cohort of Skeletal Health in Bristol and Avon. We defined sarcopenia using the EWGSOP criteria. Lower limb peak muscle power and force were assessed using Jumping Mechanography (JM). High vertical impacts were assessed by tri-axial accelerometry (at least 1.5g above gravity). Cross-sectional associations were analyzed by linear regression, adjusting for age, height and weight (or fat mass for models including appendicular lean mass index), comorbidities, smoking, alcohol, and Index of Multiple Deprivation. Our analyses included 380 participants, with mean age 76.7 (SD 3.0) years; 242 (64%) also completed JM. In age-adjusted analysis, a negative relationship was observed between severity of sarcopenia and high, but not medium or low, impacts (p = .03 for trend). Regarding components of sarcopenia underlying this relationship, multivariable analyses revealed that gait speed (β 1.47 [95% CI 1.14, 1.89], [β-1] reflects the proportionate increase in high impacts per SD increase in exposure) and peak force (1.40 [1.07, 1.84]) were independently associated with high impacts. Older women with sarcopenia experienced fewer bone-strengthening high impacts than those with presarcopenia or without sarcopenia. To increase bone strengthening activity in older women, interventions need to improve both lower limb muscle force and walking speed.

  11. A COMPREHENSIVE STUDY OF CLOSE DOUBLE WHITE DWARFS AS GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SOURCES: EVOLUTIONARY CHANNELS, BIRTH RATES, AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jinzhong; Han Zhanwen; Zhang Fenghui; Zhang Yu

    2010-01-01

    Close double white dwarfs (CDWDs) are believed to dominate the Galactic gravitational wave (GW) radiation in the frequency range 10 -4 to 0.1 Hz, which will be detected by the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) detector. The aim of this detector is to detect GW radiation from astrophysical sources in the universe and to help improve our understanding of the origin of the sources and their physical properties (masses and orbital periods). In this paper, we study the probable candidate sources in the Galaxy for the LISA detector: CDWDs. We use the binary population synthesis approach of CDWDs together with the latest findings of the synthesis models from Han, who proposed three evolutionary channels: (1) stable Roche lobe overflow plus common envelope (RLOF+CE), (2) CE+CE, and (3) exposed core plus CE. As a result, we systematically investigate the detailed physical properties (the distributions of masses, orbital periods, and chirp masses) of the CDWD sources for the LISA detector, examine the importance of the three evolutionary channels for the formation of CDWDs, and carry out Monte Carlo simulations. Our results show that RLOF+CE and CE+CE are the main evolutionary scenarios leading to the formation of CDWDs. For the LISA detectable sources, we also explore and discuss the importance of these three evolutionary channels. Using the calculated birth rate, we compare our results to the LISA sensitivity curve and the foreground noise floor of CDWDs. We find that our estimate for the number of CDWD sources that can be detected by the LISA detector is greater than 10,000. We also find that the detectable CDWDs are produced via the CE+CE channel and we analyze the fraction of the detectable CDWDs that are double helium (He+He), or carbon-oxygen plus helium (CO+He) WD binary systems.

  12. A study of the neutrino-gravitation interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, I.D.

    1976-01-01

    A study of the neutrino-gravitation interaction is made in the framework of Einstein-Dirac coupled equations. Two classes of solutions are obtained, corresponding to two specific physical situations. One cosmological model with expansion is obtained, having neutrinos as the only curvature source; their properties and the parameters which can to characterize the solution as a cosmological model are studied. The second class of solutions corresponds to a naive complete model of a spherically symmetric star emitting neutrinos: the inner region is suposed to be built up of a spherically symmetric distribution of a perfect fluid, bounded in space and which emitts neutrinos; the star matter is considered transparent for neutrinos; the outer region contains only neutrinos and gravitational field. The problem of neutrino compatibility with spherically symmetric gravitational fields is examined. The local conservation laws and the function conditions of the inner and outer solutions in the fluid surface are studied and permit to characterize two kinds of solutions. In one case, the solution describes the neutrino emission phase, with consequent configuration contraction, immediately before the fluid to be completely contained in the interior of the schwarzchild radius, when the neutrino emission and the star contraction stop. The other possibility can correspond to a quasi-stationary configuration, with neutrino emission, where the relativistic equation of radiative equilibrium permits to define the equivalent of 'Radiation pressure' for neutrinos, which acts in the same sense of the gravitational pressure. (L.C.) [pt

  13. Major Gravitational Phenomena Explained by the Micro-Quanta Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelini M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Some major problems of physics, which remained unsolved within classical and relativistic gravitation theories, are explained adopting the quantum gravity interaction descending from the micro-quanta paradigm. The energy source of the gravitational power $P_{gr}$, which heats and contracts the Bok's gas globules harbouring the future stars, is identified and defined as well as the gravitational power generated on the solid/fluid planets. Calculations are carried out to make the comparison between $P_{gr}$ predicted for the solar giant planets and the measured infrared radiation power $P_{int}$ coming from the interior. The case of planets with solid crust (Earth, etc. requires a particular attention due to the threat to stability produced by the thermal dilatation. An analysis is done of the Earth's planetary equilibrium which may be attained eliminating the temperature rise through the migration of hot internal magma across the crust fractured by earthquakes. The temperatures observed up to 420,000 years ago in Antartica through Vostok and Epica ice cores suggest the possibility that the Earth gravitational power $P_{gr}$ may be radiated in space through these temperature cycles (Glacial Eras. In this general frame the Earth's high seismicity and the dynamics of Plate tectonics may find their origin.

  14. Investigation of some galactic and extragalactic gravitational phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović P.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we present a short overview of the most important results of our investigations of the following galactic and extragalactic gravitational phenomena: supermassive black holes in centers of galaxies and quasars, supermassive black hole binaries, gravitational lenses and dark matter. For the purpose of these investigations, we developed a model of a relativistic accretion disk around a supermassive black hole, based on the ray-tracing method in the Kerr metric, a model of a bright spot in an accretion disk and three different models of gravitational microlenses. All these models enabled us to study physics, spacetime geometry and effects of strong gravity in the vicinity of supermassive black holes, variability of some active galaxies and quasars, different effects in the lensed quasars with multiple images, as well as the dark matter fraction in the Universe. We also found an observational evidence for the first spectroscopically resolved sub-parsec orbit of a supermassive black hole binary system in the core of active galaxy NGC 4151. Besides, we studied applications of one potential alternative to dark matter in the form of a modified theory of gravity on Galactic scales, to explain the recently observed orbital precession of some S-stars, which are orbiting around a massive black hole at the Galactic center. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176003: Gravitation and the Large Scale Structure of the Universe

  15. Classroom computer animations of relativistic objects

    OpenAIRE

    Brewin, Leo

    2003-01-01

    This is a short note to announce the availability of some movies that may be useful in classroom discussions on the photographic appearance of objects moving at relativistic speeds. The images are based on special relativity with no account taken of (other than to ignore) the effects of doppler shifts, intensity shifts or gravitational effects.

  16. Relativity in modern physics

    CERN Document Server

    Deruelle, Nathalie

    2018-01-01

    This comprehensive textbook on relativity integrates Newtonian physics, special relativity and general relativity into a single book that emphasizes the deep underlying principles common to them all, yet explains how they are applied in different ways in these three contexts. Newton's ideas about how to represent space and time, his laws of dynamics, and his theory of gravitation established the conceptual foundation from which modern physics developed. Book I in this volume offers undergraduates a modern view of Newtonian theory, emphasizing those aspects needed for understanding quantum and relativistic contemporary physics. In 1905, Albert Einstein proposed a novel representation of space and time, special relativity. Book II presents relativistic dynamics in inertial and accelerated frames, as well as a detailed overview of Maxwell's theory of electromagnetism. This provides undergraduate and graduate students with the background necessary for studying particle and accelerator physics, astrophysics and ...

  17. Hilbert's 'Foundations of Physics': Gravitation and electromagnetism within the axiomatic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brading, K. A.; Ryckman, T. A.

    2008-01-01

    In November and December 1915, Hilbert presented two communications to the Göttingen Academy of Sciences under the common title 'The Foundations of Physics'. Versions of each eventually appeared in the Nachrichten of the Academy. Hilbert's first communication has received significant reconsideration in recent years, following the discovery of printer's proofs of this paper, dated 6 December 1915. The focus has been primarily on the 'priority dispute' over the Einstein field equations. Our contention, in contrast, is that the discovery of the December proofs makes it possible to see the thematic linkage between the material that Hilbert cut from the published version of the first communication and the content of the second, as published in 1917. The latter has been largely either disregarded or misinterpreted, and our aim is to show that (a) Hilbert's two communications should be regarded as part of a wider research program within the overarching framework of 'the axiomatic method' (as Hilbert expressly stated was the case), and (b) the second communication is a fine and coherent piece of work within this framework, whose principal aim is to address an apparent tension between general invariance and causality (in the precise sense of Cauchy determination), pinpointed in Theorem I of the first communication. This is not the same problem as that found in Einstein's 'hole argument'-something that, we argue, never confused Hilbert.

  18. General Relativistic Plasma Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moortgat, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis I discuss the importance of general relativity on plasma physics in several astrophysical and cosmological contexts. The first chapters show how gravitational waves can excite all three fundamental low frequency magnetohydrodynamic plasma modes, the Alfven, slow and fast

  19. Relativistic stars in vector-tensor theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kase, Ryotaro; Minamitsuji, Masato; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2018-04-01

    We study relativistic star solutions in second-order generalized Proca theories characterized by a U (1 )-breaking vector field with derivative couplings. In the models with cubic and quartic derivative coupling, the mass and radius of stars become larger than those in general relativity for negative derivative coupling constants. This phenomenon is mostly attributed to the increase of star radius induced by a slower decrease of the matter pressure compared to general relativity. There is a tendency that the relativistic star with a smaller mass is not gravitationally bound for a low central density and hence is dynamically unstable, but that with a larger mass is gravitationally bound. On the other hand, we show that the intrinsic vector-mode couplings give rise to general relativistic solutions with a trivial field profile, so the mass and radius are not modified from those in general relativity.

  20. Gravitation. [Book on general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misner, C. W.; Thorne, K. S.; Wheeler, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    This textbook on gravitation physics (Einstein's general relativity or geometrodynamics) is designed for a rigorous full-year course at the graduate level. The material is presented in two parallel tracks in an attempt to divide key physical ideas from more complex enrichment material to be selected at the discretion of the reader or teacher. The full book is intended to provide competence relative to the laws of physics in flat space-time, Einstein's geometric framework for physics, applications with pulsars and neutron stars, cosmology, the Schwarzschild geometry and gravitational collapse, gravitational waves, experimental tests of Einstein's theory, and mathematical concepts of differential geometry.

  1. Relativistic Descriptions of Few-Body Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karmanov, V. A.

    2011-01-01

    A brief review of relativistic effects in few-body systems, of theoretical approaches, recent developments and applications is given. Manifestations of relativistic effects in the binding energies, in the electromagnetic form factors and in three-body observables are demonstrated. The three-body forces of relativistic origin are also discussed. We conclude that relativistic effects in nuclei can be important in spite of small binding energy. At high momenta they clearly manifest themselves and are necessary to describe the deuteron e.m. form factors. At the same time, there is still a discrepancy in three-body observables which might be a result of less clarity in understanding the corresponding relativistic effects, the relativistic NN kernel and the three-body forces. Relativistic few-body physics remains to be a field of very intensive and fruitful researches. (author)

  2. General relativity and gravitation, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashby, N.; Bartlett, D.F.; Wyss, W.

    1990-01-01

    This volume records the lectures and symposia of the 12th International Conference on General Relativity and Gravitation. Plenary lecturers reviewed the major advances since the previous conference in 1986. The reviews cover classical and quantum theory of gravity, colliding gravitational waves, gravitational lensing, relativistic effects on pulsars, tests of the inverse square law, numerical relativity, cosmic microwave background radiation, experimental tests of gravity theory, gravitational wave detectors, and cosmology. The plenary lectures are complemented by summaries of symposia, provided by the chairmen. Almost 700 contributed papers were presented at these and they cover an even wider range of topics than the plenary talks. The book provides a comprehensive guide to research activity in both experimental and theoretical gravitation and its applications in astrophysics and cosmology. It will be essential reading for research workers in these fields, as well as theoretical and experimental physicists, astronomers, and mathematicians who wish to be acquainted with modern developments in gravitational theory and general relativity. All the papers and summaries of the workshop sessions are indexed separately. (16 united talks, 20 workshop sessions). (author)

  3. Gravitational wave generation by stellar core collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, T.A.

    1981-01-01

    Stars which have masses greater than 5 to 8 solar masses are thought to undergo a stage of catastrophic core collapse and subsequent supernova explosion at the end of their lives. If the core is not spherically symmetric, the bounce which halts its collapse at transnuclear densities will generate a pulse of gravitational waves. This thesis presents a fully relativistic model of core collapse which treats deviations from spherical symmetry as small perturbations on a spherical background. This model may be used to predict qualitative and quantitative features of the gravitational radiation emitted by stellar cores with odd-parity, axisymmetric fluid perturbations, and represents a first step in the application of perturbative methods to more general asymmetries. The first chapter reviews the present consensus on the physics of core collapse and outlines the important features, assumptions, and limitations of the model. A series of model runs are presented and discussed. Finally, several proposals for future research are presented. Subsequent chapters explore in detail the mathematical features of the present model and its realization on the computer

  4. Relativistic charged Bose gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hines, D.F.; Frankel, N.E.

    1979-01-01

    The charged Bose has been previously studied as a many body problem of great intrinsic interest which can also serve as a model of some real physical systems, for example, superconductors, white dwarf stars and neutron stars. In this article the excitation spectrum of a relativistic spin-zero charged Bose gas is obtained in a dielectric response formulation. Relativity introduces a dip in the spectrum and consequences of this dip for the thermodynamic functions are discussed

  5. Relativistic klystron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, R.

    1985-09-01

    Theoretical analysis is presented of a relativisic klystron; i.e. a high-relativistic bunched electron beam which is sent through a succession of tuned cavities and has its energy replenished by periodic induction accelerator units. Parameters are given for a full-size device and for an experimental device using the FEL at the ETA; namely the ELF Facility. 6 refs., 2 figs

  6. An introduction to geometrical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Aldrovandi, R

    1995-01-01

    This book stresses the unifying power of the geometrical framework in bringing together concepts from the different areas of physics. Common underpinnings of optics, elasticity, gravitation, relativistic fields, particle mechanics and other subjects are underlined. It attempts to extricate the notion of space currently in the physical literature from the metric connotation.The book's goal is to present mathematical ideas associated with geometrical physics in a rather introductory language. Included are many examples from elementary physics and also, for those wishing to reach a higher level o

  7. Black-Hole Binaries, Gravitational Waves, and Numerical Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bernard J.; Centrella, Joan; Baker, John G.; Kelly, Bernard J.; vanMeter, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the predictions of general relativity for the dynamical interactions of two black holes has been a long-standing unsolved problem in theoretical physics. Black-hole mergers are monumental astrophysical events ' releasing tremendous amounts of energy in the form of gravitational radiation ' and are key sources for both ground- and spacebased gravitational wave detectors. The black-hole merger dynamics and the resulting gravitational waveforms can only he calculated through numerical simulations of Einstein's equations of general relativity. For many years, numerical relativists attempting to model these mergers encountered a host of problems, causing their codes to crash after just a fraction of a binary orbit cnuld be simulated. Recently ' however, a series of dramatic advances in numerical relativity has ' for the first time, allowed stable / robust black hole merger simulations. We chronicle this remarkable progress in the rapidly maturing field of numerical relativity, and the new understanding of black-hole binary dynamics that is emerging. We also discuss important applications of these fundamental physics results to astrophysics, to gravitationalwave astronomy, and in other areas.

  8. Gravitational lensing by a regular black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiroa, Ernesto F; Sendra, Carlos M

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study a regular Bardeen black hole as a gravitational lens. We find the strong deflection limit for the deflection angle, from which we obtain the positions and magnifications of the relativistic images. As an example, we apply the results to the particular case of the supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy.

  9. Gravitational lensing by a regular black hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eiroa, Ernesto F; Sendra, Carlos M, E-mail: eiroa@iafe.uba.ar, E-mail: cmsendra@iafe.uba.ar [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, CC 67, Suc. 28, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-04-21

    In this paper, we study a regular Bardeen black hole as a gravitational lens. We find the strong deflection limit for the deflection angle, from which we obtain the positions and magnifications of the relativistic images. As an example, we apply the results to the particular case of the supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy.

  10. PREFACE: X Mexican School on Gravitation and Mathematical Physics: ''Reaching a Century: Classical and Modified General Relativity's Attempts to explain de evolution of the Universe''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárcenas, R. B.; Hernández, H. H. H.; Sabido, M.

    2015-11-01

    The collection of papers in this volume was presented during the X Mexican School on Gravitation and Mathematical Physics, which was held in Playa del Carmen, Quintana Roo, México, December 1-5, 2014. The Mexican School on Gravitation and Mathematical Physics is a series of conferences sponsored by the Mexican Physical Society that started in 1994 with the purposes of discussing and exchanging current ideas in gravitational physics. Each Mexican School has been devoted to a particular subject, and these have included supergravity, branes, black holes, the early Universe, observational cosmology, quantum gravity and numerical relativity. In this ocasion the theme of the school was Reaching a Century: Classical and Modified General Relativity's Attempts to explain the evolution of the Universe, which focused on the discussion of classical and modified aspects of general relativity. Following our previous Schools, world leaders in the field were invited to give courses and plenary lectures. More specialized talks were also presented in parallel sessions, and some of them have been included in these proceedings. The contributions in this volume have been reviewed and represent some of the courses, plenary talks and contributed talks presented during our X School. We are indebted to the contributors of these proceedings as well as to the rest of the participants in our Mexican School all for making of it a complete success. As for financial support we should mention the Mexican National Science and Technology Council (CONACyT), the Royal Society of London (UK), the Mexican Physical Society (SMF), as well as several Institutions including: Centro de Investigación y Estudios Avanzados (CINVESTAV), Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa (UAM-I), Universidad de Guanajuato (UG), and Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM).

  11. Quantum phenomena in gravitational field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdel, Th.; Doser, M.; Ernest, A. D.; Voronin, A. Yu.; Voronin, V. V.

    2011-10-01

    The subjects presented here are very different. Their common feature is that they all involve quantum phenomena in a gravitational field: gravitational quantum states of ultracold antihydrogen above a material surface and measuring a gravitational interaction of antihydrogen in AEGIS, a quantum trampoline for ultracold atoms, and a hypothesis on naturally occurring gravitational quantum states, an Eötvös-type experiment with cold neutrons and others. Considering them together, however, we could learn that they have many common points both in physics and in methodology.

  12. Quantum phenomena in gravitational field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdel, Th.; Doser, M.; Ernest, A.D.; Voronin, A.Y.; Voronin, V.V.

    2010-01-01

    The subjects presented here are very different. Their common feature is that they all involve quantum phenomena in a gravitational field: gravitational quantum states of ultracold anti-hydrogen above a material surface and measuring a gravitational interaction of anti-hydrogen in AEGIS, a quantum trampoline for ultracold atoms, and a hypothesis on naturally occurring gravitational quantum states, an Eoetvoes-type experiment with cold neutrons and others. Considering them together, however, we could learn that they have many common points both in physics and in methodology. (authors)

  13. Gravitational waves and antennas

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    Gravitational waves and their detection represent today a hot topic, which promises to play a central role in astrophysics, cosmology and theoretical physics. Technological developments have enabled the construction of such sensitive detectors that the detection of gravitational radiation and the start of a new astronomy could become a reality during the next few years. This is expected to bring a revolution in our knowledge of the universe by allowing the observation of hiterto unseen phenomena such as coalescence of compact objects (neutron stars and black holes) fall of stars into supermassive black holes, stellar core collapses, big bang relics and the new and unexpected. In these lectures I give a brief overview of this challenging field of modern physics. Topics : Basic properties of gravitational radiation. Astrophysical sources. Principle of operation of detectors. Interferometers (both ground based and space-based), bars and spheres. Present status of the experiments, their recent results and their f...

  14. The Discovery of Gravitational Repulsion by Johannes Droste

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGruder, Charles Hosewell; VanDerMeer, B. Wieb

    2018-01-01

    In 1687 Newton published his universal law of gravitation, which states that the gravitational force is always attractive. This law is based on our terrestrial experience with slowly moving bodies (v Einstein completed his theory of general relativity (also referred to as Einstein’s Theory of Gravitation), which is valid not just for slowly moving bodies but also for those with relativistic velocities. In 1916 Johannes Droste submitted a PhD thesis on general relativity to his advisor, H.A. Lorentz. In it he calculated the motion of a particle in what he called a “single center” and today we call the Schwarzschild field and found that highly relativistic particles experience gravitational repulsion. Thus, his thesis written in Dutch and never before translated contains the discovery of gravitational repulsion. Because of its historical importance we translate the entire section of his thesis containing the discovery of gravitational repulsion. We also translate his thesis in the hope of clearing up a major historical misconception. Namely, that David Hilbert in 1917 discovered gravitational repulsion. In fact, Hilbert rediscovered it, apparently completely independent of Droste’s work. Finally we note that one of the biggest mysteries of astrophysics is the question of how highly energetic particles in relativistic jets and cosmic rays are accelerated. It has been suggested that gravitational repulsion is the mechanism responsible for these phenomena. An historical understanding of gravitational repulsion is therefore pertinent.

  15. Gravitational capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondi, H.

    1979-01-01

    In spite of the strength of gravitational focres between celestial bodies, gravitational capture is not a simple concept. The principles of conservation of linear momentum and of conservation of angular momentum, always impose severe constraints, while conservation of energy and the vital distinction between dissipative and non-dissipative systems allows one to rule out capture in a wide variety of cases. In complex systems especially those without dissipation, long dwell time is a more significant concept than permanent capture. (author)

  16. Loading relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenitani, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Numerical algorithms to load relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle-in-cell (PIC) and Monte-Carlo simulations are presented. For stationary relativistic Maxwellian, the inverse transform method and the Sobol algorithm are reviewed. To boost particles to obtain relativistic shifted-Maxwellian, two rejection methods are proposed in a physically transparent manner. Their acceptance efficiencies are ≈50% for generic cases and 100% for symmetric distributions. They can be combined with arbitrary base algorithms

  17. Loading relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenitani, Seiji, E-mail: seiji.zenitani@nao.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    Numerical algorithms to load relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle-in-cell (PIC) and Monte-Carlo simulations are presented. For stationary relativistic Maxwellian, the inverse transform method and the Sobol algorithm are reviewed. To boost particles to obtain relativistic shifted-Maxwellian, two rejection methods are proposed in a physically transparent manner. Their acceptance efficiencies are ≈50% for generic cases and 100% for symmetric distributions. They can be combined with arbitrary base algorithms.

  18. The Highly Relativistic Binary Pulsar PSR J0737-3039A: Discovery and Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Burgay, M.; D'Amico, N.; Possenti, A.; Manchester, R. N.; Lyne, A. G.; Joshi, B. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Kramer, M.; Sarkissian, J. M.; Camilo, F.; Kalogera, V.; Kim, C.; Lorimer, D. R.

    2004-01-01

    PSR J0737-3039A is a millisecond pulsar with a spin period of 22.7 ms included in a double-neutron star system with an orbital period of 2.4 hrs. Its companion has also been detected as a radio pulsar, making this binary the first known double-pulsar system. Its discovery has important implications for relativistic gravity tests, gravitational wave detection and plasma physics. Here we will shortly describe the discovery of the first pulsar in this unique system and present the first results ...

  19. Gravitation radiation observations

    OpenAIRE

    Glass, E. N.

    2017-01-01

    The notion of gravitational radiation begins with electromagnetic radiation. In 1887 Heinrich Hertz, working in one room, generated and received electromagnetic radiation. Maxwell's equations describe the electromagnetic field. The quanta of electromagnetic radiation are spin 1 photons. They are fundamental to atomic physics and quantum electrodynamics.

  20. Erwin Schroedinger's views on gravitational physics during his last years at the University of Vienna and some research ensuing from it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halpern, L.

    1987-01-01

    The author, who was Schroedinger's assistant during his last years in Vienna, gives an account of Schroedinger's views and activities during that time which lead him to a different approach to research on the relations between gravitation and quantum phenomena. Various features of past research are outlined in nontechnical terms. A heuristic argument is presented for the role of the zero-point energy of massive particles in counteracting gravitational collapse and the formation of horizons. Arguments are presented for the view that progress in describing extreme gravitational phenomena can be achieved by the new outlook obtained from the introduction of the analog of Maxwell's vacuum displacement term with a quasiconstant parameter, rather than from renormalization of special processes, even if this is successful. The results can be expected to be in accord with Schroedinger's conjectures. A physical interpretation for the change of sign of the differential invariant of Karlhede, Lindstroem, and Aman at the horizon is suggested. Some important historical details about Schroedinger are touched upon

  1. The relativistic gravity train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seel, Max

    2018-05-01

    The gravity train that takes 42.2 min from any point A to any other point B that is connected by a straight-line tunnel through Earth has captured the imagination more than most other applications in calculus or introductory physics courses. Brachystochron and, most recently, nonlinear density solutions have been discussed. Here relativistic corrections are presented. It is discussed how the corrections affect the time to fall through Earth, the Sun, a white dwarf, a neutron star, and—the ultimate limit—the difference in time measured by a moving, a stationary and the fiducial observer at infinity if the density of the sphere approaches the density of a black hole. The relativistic gravity train can serve as a problem with approximate and exact analytic solutions and as numerical exercise in any introductory course on relativity.

  2. Gravitational waves from gravitational collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryer, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; New, Kimberly C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  3. Gravitational Waves from Gravitational Collapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris L. Fryer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gravitational-wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion-induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  4. Gravitational Waves from Gravitational Collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Chris L; New, Kimberly C B

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational-wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion-induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars. Supplementary material is available for this article at 10.12942/lrr-2011-1.

  5. Relativistic wave mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Corinaldesi, Ernesto

    1963-01-01

    Geared toward advanced undergraduate and graduate students of physics, this text provides readers with a background in relativistic wave mechanics and prepares them for the study of field theory. The treatment originated as a series of lectures from a course on advanced quantum mechanics that has been further amplified by student contributions.An introductory section related to particles and wave functions precedes the three-part treatment. An examination of particles of spin zero follows, addressing wave equation, Lagrangian formalism, physical quantities as mean values, translation and rotat

  6. Gravitational-Wave Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    Einstein's General Theory of Relativity is our best classical description of gravity, and informs modern astronomy and astrophysics at all scales: stellar, galactic, and cosmological. Among its surprising predictions is the existence of gravitational waves -- ripples in space-time that carry energy and momentum away from strongly interacting gravitating sources. In my talk, I will give an overview of the properties of this radiation, recent breakthroughs in computational physics allowing us to calculate the waveforms from galactic mergers, and the prospect of direct observation with interferometric detectors such as LIGO and LISA.

  7. Gravitational waves from supernova matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheidegger, S; Whitehouse, S C; Kaeppeli, R; Liebendoerfer, M

    2010-01-01

    We have performed a set of 11 three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) core-collapse supernova simulations in order to investigate the dependences of the gravitational wave signal on the progenitor's initial conditions. We study the effects of the initial central angular velocity and different variants of neutrino transport. Our models are started up from a 15M o-dot progenitor and incorporate an effective general relativistic gravitational potential and a finite temperature nuclear equation of state. Furthermore, the electron flavour neutrino transport is tracked by efficient algorithms for the radiative transfer of massless fermions. We find that non- and slowly rotating models show gravitational wave emission due to prompt- and lepton driven convection that reveals details about the hydrodynamical state of the fluid inside the protoneutron stars. Furthermore we show that protoneutron stars can become dynamically unstable to rotational instabilities at T/|W| values as low as ∼2% at core bounce. We point out that the inclusion of deleptonization during the postbounce phase is very important for the quantitative gravitational wave (GW) prediction, as it enhances the absolute values of the gravitational wave trains up to a factor of ten with respect to a lepton-conserving treatment.

  8. Radiation dominated relativistic current sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaroschek, C.H.

    2008-01-01

    Relativistic Current Sheets (RCS) feature plasma instabilities considered as potential key to magnetic energy dissipation and non-thermal particle generation in Poynting flux dominated plasma flows. We show in a series of kinetic plasma simulations that the physical nature of non-linear RCS evolution changes in the presence of incoherent radiation losses: In the ultra-relativistic regime (i.e. magnetization parameter sigma = 104 defined as the ratio of magnetic to plasma rest frame energy density) the combination of non-linear RCS dynamics and synchrotron emission introduces a temperature anisotropy triggering the growth of the Relativistic Tearing Mode (RTM). As direct consequence the RTM prevails over the Relativistic Drift Kink (RDK) Mode as competitive RCS instability. This is in contrast to the previously studied situation of weakly relativistic RCS (sigma ∼ 1) where the RDK is dominant and most of the plasma is thermalized. The simulations witness the typical life cycle of ultra-relativistic RCS evolving from a violent radiation induced collapse towards a radiation quiescent state in rather classical Sweet-Parker topology. Such a transition towards Sweet-Parker configuration in the late non-linear evolution has immediate consequences for the efficiency of magnetic energy dissipation and non-thermal particle generation. Ceasing dissipation rates directly affect our present understanding of non-linear RCS evolution in conventional striped wind scenarios. (author)

  9. Anisotropic solutions by gravitational decoupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovalle, J.; Casadio, R.; da Rocha, R.; Sotomayor, A.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the extension of isotropic interior solutions for static self-gravitating systems to include the effects of anisotropic spherically symmetric gravitational sources by means of the gravitational decoupling realised via the minimal geometric deformation approach. In particular, the matching conditions at the surface of the star with the outer Schwarzschild space-time are studied in great detail, and we describe how to generate, from a single physically acceptable isotropic solution, new families of anisotropic solutions whose physical acceptability is also inherited from their isotropic parent.

  10. Anisotropic solutions by gravitational decoupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovalle, J. [Silesian University in Opava, Institute of Physics and Research Centre of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Faculty of Philosophy and Science, Opava (Czech Republic); Universidad Simon Bolivar, Departamento de Fisica, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Casadio, R. [Alma Mater Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Bologna (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bologna (Italy); Rocha, R. da [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Centro de Matematica, Computacao e Cognicao, Santo Andre, SP (Brazil); Sotomayor, A. [Universidad de Antofagasta, Departamento de Matematicas, Antofagasta (Chile)

    2018-02-15

    We investigate the extension of isotropic interior solutions for static self-gravitating systems to include the effects of anisotropic spherically symmetric gravitational sources by means of the gravitational decoupling realised via the minimal geometric deformation approach. In particular, the matching conditions at the surface of the star with the outer Schwarzschild space-time are studied in great detail, and we describe how to generate, from a single physically acceptable isotropic solution, new families of anisotropic solutions whose physical acceptability is also inherited from their isotropic parent. (orig.)

  11. Relativistic positioning systems: Numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchades Colmenero, Neus

    -time (ST) corresponding to an ideal static spherically symmetric Earth. Since this ST is asymptotically Minkowskian, as soon as Schwarzschild's metric is assumed, there is a reference system with origin in the Earth center, which is inertial from the theoretical point of view, and almost inertial - since the acceleration due to the Sun and other small effects are being neglected- from the physical point of view. In one of the models, the 0-order RPS, photons move in the Minkowski ST asymptotic to Schwarzschild, whereas in the second model (1-order RPS), photons move - as the satellites - in Schwarzschild's ST. In the context of RPS, error estimations seem to be more systematic than in the framework of CPS. In the scheme presented in this thesis, there are two types of positioning errors. The U-errors are due to deviations of the actual satellite world lines with respect to the nominal lines (which have been adequately defined); whereas the S-errors arise when some sources of the gravitational field are neglected and, consequently, the metric and the photon null geodesics are not fully accurate. For every user, the total error is the addition of the U and the S errors. We have found, represented, and studied, the distributions of bifurcation points, U-errors, and S-errors, inside a wide spherical region with a radius of 100.000 km, which is located around Earth and centered in an arbitrary point on Earth's surface; in this way, we have discussed - for the first time - spacecraft positioning in this region based on GPS and GALILEO 4-tuples. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  12. General Relativity and Gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Berger, Beverly; Isenberg, James; MacCallum, Malcolm

    2015-07-01

    Part I. Einstein's Triumph: 1. 100 years of general relativity George F. R. Ellis; 2. Was Einstein right? Clifford M. Will; 3. Cosmology David Wands, Misao Sasaki, Eiichiro Komatsu, Roy Maartens and Malcolm A. H. MacCallum; 4. Relativistic astrophysics Peter Schneider, Ramesh Narayan, Jeffrey E. McClintock, Peter Mészáros and Martin J. Rees; Part II. New Window on the Universe: 5. Receiving gravitational waves Beverly K. Berger, Karsten Danzmann, Gabriela Gonzalez, Andrea Lommen, Guido Mueller, Albrecht Rüdiger and William Joseph Weber; 6. Sources of gravitational waves. Theory and observations Alessandra Buonanno and B. S. Sathyaprakash; Part III. Gravity is Geometry, After All: 7. Probing strong field gravity through numerical simulations Frans Pretorius, Matthew W. Choptuik and Luis Lehner; 8. The initial value problem of general relativity and its implications Gregory J. Galloway, Pengzi Miao and Richard Schoen; 9. Global behavior of solutions to Einstein's equations Stefanos Aretakis, James Isenberg, Vincent Moncrief and Igor Rodnianski; Part IV. Beyond Einstein: 10. Quantum fields in curved space-times Stefan Hollands and Robert M. Wald; 11. From general relativity to quantum gravity Abhay Ashtekar, Martin Reuter and Carlo Rovelli; 12. Quantum gravity via unification Henriette Elvang and Gary T. Horowitz.

  13. Relativistic quantum mechanics an introduction to relativistic quantum fields

    CERN Document Server

    Maiani, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Written by two of the world's leading experts on particle physics and the standard model - including an award-winning former Director General of CERN - this textbook provides a completely up-to-date account of relativistic quantum mechanics and quantum field theory. It describes the formal and phenomenological aspects of the standard model of particle physics, and is suitable for advanced undergraduate and graduate students studying both theoretical and experimental physics.

  14. Relativistic Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing; Li, Kunyang

    2018-02-01

    The “Breakthrough Starshot” aims at sending near-speed-of-light cameras to nearby stellar systems in the future. Due to the relativistic effects, a transrelativistic camera naturally serves as a spectrograph, a lens, and a wide-field camera. We demonstrate this through a simulation of the optical-band image of the nearby galaxy M51 in the rest frame of the transrelativistic camera. We suggest that observing celestial objects using a transrelativistic camera may allow one to study the astronomical objects in a special way, and to perform unique tests on the principles of special relativity. We outline several examples that suggest transrelativistic cameras may make important contributions to astrophysics and suggest that the Breakthrough Starshot cameras may be launched in any direction to serve as a unique astronomical observatory.

  15. Relativistic magnetohydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, Juan; Kovtun, Pavel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria,Victoria, BC, V8P 5C2 (Canada)

    2017-05-02

    We present the equations of relativistic hydrodynamics coupled to dynamical electromagnetic fields, including the effects of polarization, electric fields, and the derivative expansion. We enumerate the transport coefficients at leading order in derivatives, including electrical conductivities, viscosities, and thermodynamic coefficients. We find the constraints on transport coefficients due to the positivity of entropy production, and derive the corresponding Kubo formulas. For the neutral state in a magnetic field, small fluctuations include Alfvén waves, magnetosonic waves, and the dissipative modes. For the state with a non-zero dynamical charge density in a magnetic field, plasma oscillations gap out all propagating modes, except for Alfvén-like waves with a quadratic dispersion relation. We relate the transport coefficients in the “conventional” magnetohydrodynamics (formulated using Maxwell’s equations in matter) to those in the “dual” version of magnetohydrodynamics (formulated using the conserved magnetic flux).

  16. Is a Relativistic Thermodynamics possible?; Es posible una Termodinamica Relativista?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guemez, J.

    2010-07-01

    A brief historical review the literature on developing the concept of Thermodynamics Relativistic. We analyze two examples of application of the Galilean and Relativistic Thermodynamics discussed under what circumstances could build a relativistic Thermodynamics Lorentz covariant with physical sense. (Author) 19 refs.

  17. Spacetime and gravitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopczyński, W.; Trautman, A.

    This book is a revised translation of the Polish original "Czasoprzestrzeń i grawitacja", Warszawa (Poland), Państwowe Wydawnictwo Naukowe, 1984. Ideas about space and time are at the root of one's understanding of nature, both at the intuitive level of everyday experience and in the framework of sophisticated physical theories. These ideas have led to the development of geometry and its applications to physics. The contemporary physical theory of space and time, including its extention to the phenomena of gravitation, is Einstein's theory of relativity. The book is a short introduction to this theory. A great deal of emphasis is given to the geometrical aspects of relativity theory and its comparison with the Newtonian view of the world. There are short chapters on the origins of Einstein's theory, gravitational waves, cosmology, spinors and the Einstein-Cartan theory.

  18. Topics in Gravitation and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami Taghanaki, Sina

    This thesis is focused on two topics in which relativistic gravitational fields play an important role, namely early Universe cosmology and black hole physics. The theory of cosmic inflation has emerged as the most successful theory of the very early Universe with concrete and verifiable predictions for the properties of anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background radiation and large scale structure. Coalescences of black hole binaries have recently been detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), opening a new arena for observationally testing the dynamics of gravity. In part I of this thesis we explore some modifications to the standard theory of inflation. The main predictions of single field slow-roll inflation have been largely consistent with cosmological observations. However, there remain some aspects of the theory that are not presently well understood. Among these are the somewhat interrelated issues of the choice of initial state for perturbations and the potential imprints of pre-inflationary dynamics. It is well known that a key prediction of the standard theory of inflation, namely the Gaussianity of perturbations, is a consequence of choosing a natural vacuum initial state. In chapter 3, we study the generation and detectability of non-Gaussianities in inflationary scalar perturbations that originate from more general choices of initial state. After that, in chapter 4, we study a simple but predictive model of pre-inflationary dynamics in an attempt to test the robustness of inflationary predictions. We find that significant deviations from the standard predictions are unlikely to result from models in which the inflaton field decouples from the pre-inflationary degrees of freedom prior to freeze-out of the observable modes. In part II we turn to a study of an aspect of the thermodynamics of black holes, a subject which has led to important advances in our understanding of quantum gravity. For objects which

  19. Gravitational decoherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassi, Angelo; Großardt, André; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2017-01-01

    We discuss effects of loss of coherence in low energy quantum systems caused by or related to gravitation, referred to as gravitational decoherence. These effects, resulting from random metric fluctuations, for instance, promise to be accessible by relatively inexpensive table-top experiments, way before the scales where true quantum gravity effects become important. Therefore, they can provide a first experimental view on gravity in the quantum regime. We will survey models of decoherence induced both by classical and quantum gravitational fluctuations; it will be manifest that a clear understanding of gravitational decoherence is still lacking. Next we will review models where quantum theory is modified, under the assumption that gravity causes the collapse of the wave functions, when systems are large enough. These models challenge the quantum-gravity interplay, and can be tested experimentally. In the last part we have a look at the state of the art of experimental research. We will review efforts aiming at more and more accurate measurements of gravity ( G and g ) and ideas for measuring conventional and unconventional gravity effects on nonrelativistic quantum systems. (topical review)

  20. Gravitational Grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahvar, Sohrab

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we study the interaction of the electromagnetic wave (EW) from a distant quasar with the gravitational wave (GW) sourced by the binary stars. While in the regime of geometric optics, the light bending due to this interaction is negligible, we show that the phase shifting on the wavefront of an EW can produce the diffraction pattern on the observer plane. The diffraction of the light (with the wavelength of λe) by the gravitational wave playing the role of gravitational grating (with the wavelength of λg) has the diffraction angle of Δβ ˜ λe/λg. The relative motion of the observer, the source of gravitational wave and the quasar results in a relative motion of the observer through the interference pattern on the observer plane. The consequence of this fringe crossing is the modulation in the light curve of a quasar with the period of few hours in the microwave wavelength. The optical depth for the observation of this phenomenon for a Quasar with the multiple images strongly lensed by a galaxy where the light trajectory of some of the images crosses the lensing galaxy is τ ≃ 0.2. By shifting the time-delay of the light curves of the multiple images in a strong lensed quasar and removing the intrinsic variations of a quasar, our desired signals, as a new method for detection of GWs can be detected.

  1. Interaction of high-current relativistic electron beams with plasma. Physical nature of the phenomenon and its application in microwave electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rukhadze, A.A.

    1981-01-01

    Pulsed high-current electron beams with characteristic parameters: electron energy 10 5 -10 7 eV, electron current 10 3 -10 6 A, pulse duration 10 -8 -10 -6 s, beam energy 10 2 -10 6 J and power 10 8 -10 13 W, are widely used in different branches of science and technology such as controlled thermonuclear fusion, relativistic microwave electronics, powerful semiconductors, chemical and gaseous lasers, new principles of heavy-ion acceleration, and long-distance energy transmission. The paper discusses a new branch of science - pulsed high-current electronics, which has its own experimental technique and methods of theoretical analysis. Parts I and II determine what is meant by ''high current'' in an electron beam and calculate the maximum obtainable current values; these calculations are made for the simplest geometrical configurations realizable in practice. Current methods for theoretical analysis of high-current electron beam physics are described, together with classification of current experimental devices for generating such beams according to high-current parameters. The stability of electron beams is discussed and the concept of critical currents is introduced. Part III gives a detailed account of plasma-beam instability which occurs on the interaction of a high-current electron beam with high-density space-limited plasma. The linear and non-linear stages of beam instability are considered. The given theory is used for calculations for amplifiers and microwave generators of electromagnetic radiation. Finally, the experimental achievements in high-current relativistic microwave electronics are reviewed. (author)

  2. Hydrodynamics of ultra-relativistic bubble walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Leitao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In cosmological first-order phase transitions, gravitational waves are generated by the collisions of bubble walls and by the bulk motions caused in the fluid. A sizeable signal may result from fast-moving walls. In this work we study the hydrodynamics associated to the fastest propagation modes, namely, ultra-relativistic detonations and runaway solutions. We compute the energy injected by the phase transition into the fluid and the energy which accumulates in the bubble walls. We provide analytic approximations and fits as functions of the net force acting on the wall, which can be readily evaluated for specific models. We also study the back-reaction of hydrodynamics on the wall motion, and we discuss the extrapolation of the friction force away from the ultra-relativistic limit. We use these results to estimate the gravitational wave signal from detonations and runaway walls.

  3. Hydrodynamics of ultra-relativistic bubble walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, Leonardo, E-mail: lleitao@mdp.edu.ar; Mégevand, Ariel, E-mail: megevand@mdp.edu.ar

    2016-04-15

    In cosmological first-order phase transitions, gravitational waves are generated by the collisions of bubble walls and by the bulk motions caused in the fluid. A sizeable signal may result from fast-moving walls. In this work we study the hydrodynamics associated to the fastest propagation modes, namely, ultra-relativistic detonations and runaway solutions. We compute the energy injected by the phase transition into the fluid and the energy which accumulates in the bubble walls. We provide analytic approximations and fits as functions of the net force acting on the wall, which can be readily evaluated for specific models. We also study the back-reaction of hydrodynamics on the wall motion, and we discuss the extrapolation of the friction force away from the ultra-relativistic limit. We use these results to estimate the gravitational wave signal from detonations and runaway walls.

  4. Relativistic theory of tidal Love numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binnington, Taylor; Poisson, Eric

    2009-01-01

    In Newtonian gravitational theory, a tidal Love number relates the mass multipole moment created by tidal forces on a spherical body to the applied tidal field. The Love number is dimensionless, and it encodes information about the body's internal structure. We present a relativistic theory of Love numbers, which applies to compact bodies with strong internal gravities; the theory extends and completes a recent work by Flanagan and Hinderer, which revealed that the tidal Love number of a neutron star can be measured by Earth-based gravitational-wave detectors. We consider a spherical body deformed by an external tidal field, and provide precise and meaningful definitions for electric-type and magnetic-type Love numbers; and these are computed for polytropic equations of state. The theory applies to black holes as well, and we find that the relativistic Love numbers of a nonrotating black hole are all zero.

  5. Probing the early universe with inflationary gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, Latham A.; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    Near comoving wave number k, the gravitational-wave background (GWB) from inflation carries information about the physical conditions near two moments in cosmic history: the moment when k 'left the horizon' during inflation, and the moment when it 're-entered the horizon' after inflation. We investigate the extent to which this information can be extracted if the GWB is measured by a combination of cosmic-microwave-background polarization experiments on large scales and space-based laser-interferometer experiments on small scales. To disentangle this information, we derive a new gravitational-wave transfer function that incorporates a number of physical effects that were treated less accurately, less generally, or were missing altogether in previous treatments. In particular, it incorporates: (i) dark energy with time-varying equation of state w(z); (ii) tensor anisotropic stress due to free-streaming relativistic particles in the early universe; and (iii) a variety of physical effects that cause deviations from the standard equation of state w=1/3 during the radiation era. Based on this transfer function, we consider the degree to which the GWB can be used to test inflation and to probe the 'primordial dark age' between the end of inflation and the electroweak phase transition.

  6. Localization of relativistic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omnes, R.

    1997-01-01

    In order to discuss localization experiments and also to extend the consistent history interpretation of quantum mechanics to relativistic properties, the techniques introduced in a previous paper [J. Math. Phys. 38, 697 (1997)] are applied to the localization of a photon in a given region of space. An essential requirement is to exclude arbitrarily large wavelengths. The method is valid for a particle with any mass and spin. Though there is no proper position operator for a photon, one never needs one in practice. Causality is valid up to exponentially small corrections. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  7. [Relativistic heavy ion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The present document describes our second-year application for a continuation grant on relativistic heavy-ion research at Nevis Laboratories, Columbia University, over the two-year period starting from November 15, 1990. The progress during the current budget year is presented. This year, construction of RHIC officially began. As a result, the entire Nevis nuclear physics group has made a coherent effort to create new proposal for an Open Axially Symmetric Ion Spectrometer (OASIS) proposal. Future perspectives and our plans for this proposal are described

  8. Magnetic tension and gravitational collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsagas, Christos G

    2006-01-01

    The gravitational collapse of a magnetized medium is investigated by studying qualitatively the convergence of a timelike family of non-geodesic worldlines in the presence of a magnetic field. Focusing on the field's tension, we illustrate how the winding of the magnetic forcelines due to the fluid's rotation assists the collapse, while shear-like distortions in the distribution of the field's gradients resist contraction. We also show that the relativistic coupling between magnetism and geometry, together with the tension properties of the field, lead to a magneto-curvature stress that opposes the collapse. This tension stress grows stronger with increasing curvature distortion, which means that it could potentially dominate over the gravitational pull of the matter. If this happens, a converging family of non-geodesic worldlines can be prevented from focusing without violating the standard energy conditions

  9. Relativistic Binaries in Globular Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Benacquista

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Galactic globular clusters are old, dense star systems typically containing 10^4 – 10^6 stars. As an old population of stars, globular clusters contain many collapsed and degenerate objects. As a dense population of stars, globular clusters are the scene of many interesting close dynamical interactions between stars. These dynamical interactions can alter the evolution of individual stars and can produce tight binary systems containing one or two compact objects. In this review, we discuss theoretical models of globular cluster evolution and binary evolution, techniques for simulating this evolution that leads to relativistic binaries, and current and possible future observational evidence for this population. Our discussion of globular cluster evolution will focus on the processes that boost the production of tight binary systems and the subsequent interaction of these binaries that can alter the properties of both bodies and can lead to exotic objects. Direct N-body integrations and Fokker–Planck simulations of the evolution of globular clusters that incorporate tidal interactions and lead to predictions of relativistic binary populations are also discussed. We discuss the current observational evidence for cataclysmic variables, millisecond pulsars, and low-mass X-ray binaries as well as possible future detection of relativistic binaries with gravitational radiation.

  10. Gravitational perturbation theory and synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuer, R A [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik und Astrophysik, Muenchen (F.R. Germany). Inst. fuer Astrophysik

    1975-01-01

    This article presents methods and results for a gravitational perturbation theory which treats massless fields as linearized perturbations of an arbitrary gravitational vacuum background spacetime. The formalism is outlined for perturbations of type (22) spacetimes. As an application, high-frequency radiation emitted by particles moving approximately on relativistic circular geodesic orbits is computed. More precisely, the test particle assumption is made; throughout it is therefore assumed that the reaction of the radiation on the particle motion is negligible. In particular, these orbits are studied in the gravitational field of a spherically symmetric (Schwarzschild-) black hole as well as of a rotating (Kerr-) black hole. In this model, the outgoing radiation is highly focussed and of much higher fequency than the orbital frequency, i.e. one is dealing with 'gravitational synchrotron radiation'.

  11. Future relativistic heavy ion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugh, H.G.

    1980-12-01

    Equations of state for nuclear matter and ongoing experimental studies are discussed. Relativistic heavy ion physics is the only opportunity to study in the laboratory the properties of extended multiquark systems under conditions such that quarks might run together into new arrangements previously unobserved. Several lines of further study are mentioned

  12. An application of information theory to stochastic classical gravitational fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, J.; Angulo, J. C.; Angulo, J. M.

    2018-06-01

    The objective of this study lies on the incorporation of the concepts developed in the Information Theory (entropy, complexity, etc.) with the aim of quantifying the variation of the uncertainty associated with a stochastic physical system resident in a spatiotemporal region. As an example of application, a relativistic classical gravitational field has been considered, with a stochastic behavior resulting from the effect induced by one or several external perturbation sources. One of the key concepts of the study is the covariance kernel between two points within the chosen region. Using this concept and the appropriate criteria, a methodology is proposed to evaluate the change of uncertainty at a given spatiotemporal point, based on available information and efficiently applying the diverse methods that Information Theory provides. For illustration, a stochastic version of the Einstein equation with an added Gaussian Langevin term is analyzed.

  13. Gravitation, Symmetry and Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Jamie

    2001-04-01

    This talk will discuss "Project Petrov" Which is designed to investigate gravitational fields with symmetry. Project Petrov represents a collaboration involving physicists, mathematicians as well as graduate and undergraduate math and physics students. An overview of Project Petrov will be given, with an emphasis on students' contributions, including software to classify and generate Lie algebras, to classify isometry groups, and to compute the isometry group of a given metric.

  14. General Relativity and Gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, J.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The General Theory of Relativity (GR), created by Albert Einstein between 1907 and 1915, is a theory both of gravitation and of spacetime structure. It is based on the assumption that matter, via its energy-momentum, interacts with the metric of spacetime, which is considered (in contrast to Newtonian physics and SPECIAL RELATIVITY) as a dynamical field having degrees of freedom of its own (GRAVI...

  15. General relativistic effects in the structure of massive white dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, G. A.; Marinho, R. M.; Malheiro, M.

    2018-04-01

    In this work we investigate the structure of white dwarfs using the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations and compare our results with those obtained from Newtonian equations of gravitation in order to put in evidence the importance of general relativity (GR) for the structure of such stars. We consider in this work for the matter inside white dwarfs two equations of state, frequently found in the literature, namely, the Chandrasekhar and Salpeter equations of state. We find that using Newtonian equilibrium equations, the radii of massive white dwarfs (M>1.3M_{⊙ }) are overestimated in comparison with GR outcomes. For a mass of 1.415M_{⊙ } the white dwarf radius predicted by GR is about 33% smaller than the Newtonian one. Hence, in this case, for the surface gravity the difference between the general relativistic and Newtonian outcomes is about 65%. We depict the general relativistic mass-radius diagrams as M/M_{⊙ }=R/(a+bR+cR^2+dR^3+kR^4), where a, b, c and d are parameters obtained from a fitting procedure of the numerical results and k=(2.08× 10^{-6}R_{⊙ })^{-1}, being R_{⊙ } the radius of the Sun in km. Lastly, we point out that GR plays an important role to determine any physical quantity that depends, simultaneously, on the mass and radius of massive white dwarfs.

  16. Quantum biological gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopvillem, U.Kh.

    1985-01-01

    A possibility of producing biological detectors of gravitational waves is considered. High sensitivity of biological systems to outer effects can be ensured by existence of molecule subgroups in Dicke states. Existence of clusters in Dicke state-giant electric dipoles (GED) is supposed in the Froehlich theory. Comparison of biological and physical detectors shows that GED systems have unique properties for detection of gravitational waves if the reception range is narrow

  17. BOOK REVIEW: Gravitational Waves, Volume 1: Theory and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisson, Eric

    2008-10-01

    discussion is helpful, as it clarifies some of the puzzling aspects of general covariance. Next the treatment becomes more sophisticated: the waves are allowed to propagate in an arbitrary background spacetime, and the energy momentum carried by the wave is identified by the second-order perturbation of the Einstein tensor. In chapter 2 the waves are given a field-theoretic foundation that is less familiar (but refreshing) to a relativist, but would appeal to a practitioner of effective field theories. In an interesting section of chapter 2, the author gives a mass to the (classical) graviton and explores the physical consequences of this proposal. In chapter 3 the author returns to the standard linearized theory and develops the multipolar expansion of the gravitational-wave field in the context of slowly-moving sources; at leading order he obtains the famous quadrupole formula. His treatment is very detailed, and it includes a complete account of symmetric-tracefree tensors and tensorial spherical harmonics. It is, however, necessarily limited to sources with negligible internal gravity. Unfortunately (and this is a familiar complaint of relativists) the author omits to warn the reader of this important limitation. In fact, the chapter opens with a statement of the virial theorem of Newtonian gravity, which may well mislead the reader to believe that the linearized theory can be applied to a system bound by gravitational forces. This misconception is confirmed when, in chapter 4, the author applies the quadrupole formula to gravitationally-bound systems such as an inspiraling compact binary, a rigidly rotating body, and a mass falling toward a black hole. This said, the presentation of these main sources of gravitational waves is otherwise irreproachable, and a wealth of useful information is presented in a clear and lucid manner. For example, the discussion of inspiraling compact binaries includes a derivation of the orbital evolution of circular and eccentric orbits

  18. Searching for gravitational waves from neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrisy, Ashikuzzaman

    In this dissertation we discuss gravitational waves (GWs) and their neutron star (NS) sources. We begin with a general discussion of the motivation for searching for GWs and the indirect experimental evidence of their existence. Then we discuss the various mechanisms through which NS can emit GWs, paying special attention the r-mode oscillations. Finally we end with discussion of GW detection. In Chapter 2 we describe research into the frequencies of r-mode oscillations. Knowing these frequencies can be useful for guiding and interpreting gravitational wave and electromagnetic observations. The frequencies of slowly rotating, barotropic, and non-magnetic Newtonian stars are well known, but subject to various corrections. After making simple estimates of the relative strengths of these corrections we conclude that relativistic corrections are the most important. For this reason we extend the formalism of K. H. Lockitch, J. L. Friedman, and N. Andersson [Phys. Rev. D 68, 124010 (2003)], who consider relativistic polytropes, to the case of realistic equations of state. This formulation results in perturbation equations which are solved using a spectral method. We find that for realistic equations of state the r-mode frequency ranges from 1.39--1.57 times the spin frequency of the star when the relativistic compactness parameter (M/R) is varied over the astrophysically motivated interval 0.110--0.310. Following a successful r-mode detection our results can help constrain the high density equation of state. In Chapter 3 we present a technical introduction to the data analysis tools used in GW searches. Starting from the plane-wave solutions derived in Chapter 1 we develop the F-statistic used in the matched filtering technique. This technique relies on coherently integrating the GW detector's data stream with a theoretically modeled wave signal. The statistic is used to test the null hypothesis that the data contains no signal. In this chapter we also discuss how to

  19. Loading relativistic Maxwell distributions in particle simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenitani, S.

    2015-12-01

    In order to study energetic plasma phenomena by using particle-in-cell (PIC) and Monte-Carlo simulations, we need to deal with relativistic velocity distributions in these simulations. However, numerical algorithms to deal with relativistic distributions are not well known. In this contribution, we overview basic algorithms to load relativistic Maxwell distributions in PIC and Monte-Carlo simulations. For stationary relativistic Maxwellian, the inverse transform method and the Sobol algorithm are reviewed. To boost particles to obtain relativistic shifted-Maxwellian, two rejection methods are newly proposed in a physically transparent manner. Their acceptance efficiencies are 􏰅50% for generic cases and 100% for symmetric distributions. They can be combined with arbitrary base algorithms.

  20. Relativité et gravitation

    CERN Document Server

    Tourrenc, Philippe

    1992-01-01

    La relativité générale a cessé d'être une pure théorie justifiée par les "trois tests classiques" disponibles il y a trente ans. Des pulsars, vrais laboratoires de gravitation relativiste, ont été découverts et étudiés. A l'automne 1991 les Etats-Unis ont pris la décision de construire deux détecteurs interférométriques d'ondes gravitationnelles. Au début de l'été 1992, le ministre français de la Recherche et de l'Espace a pris un engagement de même nature concernant le projet VIRGO, projet franco-italien de construction d'une antenne interférométrique. La gravitation relativiste est devenue un riche domaine d'observation et d'expérimentation. Cet ouvrage est un manuel de physique dont les intentions et le contenu se veulent adaptés au contexte scientifique actuel. Il doit beaucoup aux divers enseignements donnés par l'auteur, principalement l'enseignement de relativité générale en maîtrise de physique à l'université Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris VI). Dans la première partie, l...

  1. Post-Newtonian reference ellipsoid for relativistic geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeikin, Sergei; Han, Wenbiao; Mazurova, Elena

    2016-02-01

    We apply general relativity to construct the post-Newtonian background manifold that serves as a reference spacetime in relativistic geodesy for conducting a relativistic calculation of the geoid's undulation and the deflection of the plumb line from the vertical. We chose an axisymmetric ellipsoidal body made up of a perfect homogeneous fluid uniformly rotating around a fixed axis, as a source generating the reference geometry of the background manifold through Einstein's equations. We then reformulate and extend hydrodynamic calculations of rotating fluids done by a number of previous researchers for astrophysical applications to the realm of relativistic geodesy to set up algebraic equations defining the shape of the post-Newtonian reference ellipsoid. To complete this task, we explicitly perform all integrals characterizing gravitational field potentials inside the fluid body and represent them in terms of the elementary functions depending on the eccentricity of the ellipsoid. We fully explore the coordinate (gauge) freedom of the equations describing the post-Newtonian ellipsoid and demonstrate that the fractional deviation of the post-Newtonian level surface from the Maclaurin ellipsoid can be made much smaller than the previously anticipated estimate based on the astrophysical application of the coordinate gauge advocated by Bardeen and Chandrasekhar. We also derive the gauge-invariant relations of the post-Newtonian mass and the constant angular velocity of the rotating fluid with the parameters characterizing the shape of the post-Newtonian ellipsoid including its eccentricity, a semiminor axis, and a semimajor axis. We formulate the post-Newtonian theorems of Pizzetti and Clairaut that are used in geodesy to connect the geometric parameters of the reference ellipsoid to the physically measurable force of gravity at the pole and equator of the ellipsoid. Finally, we expand the post-Newtonian geodetic equations describing the post-Newtonian ellipsoid to

  2. The relativistic virial theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucha, W.; Schoeberl, F.F.

    1989-11-01

    The relativistic generalization of the quantum-mechanical virial theorem is derived and used to clarify the connection between the nonrelativistic and (semi-)relativistic treatment of bound states. 12 refs. (Authors)

  3. The use of ring lasers for the measurement of relativistic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, V I; Zubrilo, A A; Kravtsov, Nikolai V; Pinchuk, V B

    1999-01-01

    The possibility of using a ring laser for the investigation of relativistic effects is analysed. It is shown that gravitational experiments permitting a refinement of certain (fundamental) aspects of the theory of gravitation will become possible in the near future. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  4. Gravitational lensing by a Horndeski black hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badia, Javier [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio (IAFE, CONICET-UBA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Eiroa, Ernesto F. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio (IAFE, CONICET-UBA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria Pabellon I, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2017-11-15

    In this article we study gravitational lensing by non-rotating and asymptotically flat black holes in Horndeski theory. By adopting the strong deflection limit, we calculate the deflection angle, from which we obtain the positions and the magnifications of the relativistic images. We compare our results with those corresponding to black holes in General Relativity. We analyze the astrophysical consequences in the case of the nearest supermassive black holes. (orig.)

  5. Gravitational lensing by a Horndeski black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badia, Javier; Eiroa, Ernesto F.

    2017-01-01

    In this article we study gravitational lensing by non-rotating and asymptotically flat black holes in Horndeski theory. By adopting the strong deflection limit, we calculate the deflection angle, from which we obtain the positions and the magnifications of the relativistic images. We compare our results with those corresponding to black holes in General Relativity. We analyze the astrophysical consequences in the case of the nearest supermassive black holes. (orig.)

  6. Path integral measure for gravitational interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Fujikawa

    1983-10-01

    Full Text Available It is pointed out that the path-integral variables as well as the local measure for gravitational interactions are uniquely specified if one imposes the anomaly-free condition on the Becchi-Rouet-Stora supersymmetry associated with general coordinate transformations. This prescription is briefly illustrated for the Einstein gravity and supergravity in four space-time dimensions and the relativistic string theory in two dimensions.

  7. Gravitational curvature: an introduction to Einstein's theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankel, T.

    1979-01-01

    The basic aspects of general relativity are presented from a geometric point of view. The content of the book is well indicated by chapter headings: aspects of special relativity, clocks and gravitational potential, a heuristic derivation of Einstein's equations, the geometry of Einstein's equations, the Schwarzschild solution, the classical motion of a continuum, the relativistic equations of motion, light rays and Fermat's principle, electromagnetism in three-space and Minkowski space, electromagnetism in general relativity, the interior solution, and cosmology. 28 figures

  8. Gravitational anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leutwyler, H; Mallik, S

    1986-12-01

    The effective action for fermions moving in external gravitational and gauge fields is analyzed in terms of the corresponding external field propagator. The central object in our approach is the covariant energy-momentum tensor which is extracted from the regular part of the propagator at short distances. It is shown that the Lorentz anomaly, the conformal anomaly and the gauge anomaly can be expressed in terms of the local polynomials which determine the singular part of the propagator. (There are no coordinate anomalies). Except for the conformal anomaly, for which we give explicit representations only in dless than or equal to4, we consider an arbitrary number of dimensions.

  9. GRAVITATIONAL RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin SALTIK

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available According to classical electromagnetic theory, an accelerated charge or system of charges radiates electromagnetic waves. In a radio transmitter antenna charges are accelerated along the antenna and release electromagnetic waves, which is radiated at the velocity of light in the surrounding medium. All of the radio transmitters work on this principle today. In this study an analogy is established between the principles by which accelerated charge systems markes radiation and the accelerated mass system, and the systems cousing gravitational radiation are investigated.

  10. Gravitational lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, E.L.

    1989-01-01

    The author discusses how gravitational lens studies is becoming a major focus of extragalactic astronomy and cosmology. This review is organized into five parts: an overview of the observational situation, a look at the state of theoretical work on lenses, a detailed look at three recently discovered types of lensing phenomena (luminous arcs, radio rings, quasar-galaxy associations), a review of progress on two old problems in lens studies (deriving unique lens mass distribution models, measurements of differential time delays), and an attempt to look into the future of lens studies

  11. Radiation of a relativistic particle falling into a black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymnikova, I.G.

    1980-01-01

    The gravitational and electromagnetic radiation emitted by a relativistic test body falling into a black hole at a velocity that is not small compared with the velocity of light is studied. For ω 3 γ 0 /(GM), the spectra of the electromagnetic and gravitational radiation do not depend on the frequency, but for ω > c 3 γ 0 (GM) they fall off exponentially. The total radiated power is proportional to γ 0 1n γ 0 and γ 3 0 , respectively, for the electromagnetic and gravitational radiation

  12. Fluid/Gravity Correspondence, Second Order Transport and Gravitational Anomaly*,**

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megías Eugenio

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We study the transport properties of a relativistic fluid affected by chiral and gauge-gravitational anomalies. The computation is performed in the framework of the fluid/gravity correspondence for a 5 dim holographic model with Chern-Simons terms in the action. We find new anomalous and non anomalous transport coefficients, as well as new contributions to the existing ones coming from the mixed gauge-gravitational anomaly. Consequences for the shear waves dispersion relation are analyzed.

  13. Quantum space-time and gravitational consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namsrai, K.

    1986-01-01

    Relativistic particle dynamics and basic physical quantities for the general theory of gravity are reconstructed from a quantum space-time point of view. An additional force caused by quantum space-time appears in the equation of particle motion, giving rise to a reformulation of the equivalence principle up to values of O(L 2 ), where L is the fundamental length. It turns out that quantum space-time leads to quantization of gravity, i.e. the metric tensor g/sub uv/ (/ZETA/) becomes operator-valued and is not commutative at different points x/sup micro/ and y/sup micro/ in usual space-time on a large scale, and its commutator depending on the ''vielbein'' field (gaugelike graviton field) is proportional to L 2 multiplied by a translationinvariant wave function propagated between points x/sup micro/ and y/sup micro/. In the given scheme, there appears to be an antigravitational effect in the motion of a particle in the gravitational force. This effect depends on the value of particle mass; when a particle is heavy its free-fall time is long compared to that for a light-weight particle. The problem of the change of time scale and the anisotropy of inertia are discussed. From experimental data from testing of the latter effect it follows that L ≤ 10 -22 cm

  14. Leading quantum gravitational corrections to scalar QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N.E.J.

    2002-01-01

    We consider the leading post-Newtonian and quantum corrections to the non-relativistic scattering amplitude of charged scalars in the combined theory of general relativity and scalar QED. The combined theory is treated as an effective field theory. This allows for a consistent quantization of the gravitational field. The appropriate vertex rules are extracted from the action, and the non-analytic contributions to the 1-loop scattering matrix are calculated in the non-relativistic limit. The non-analytical parts of the scattering amplitude, which are known to give the long range, low energy, leading quantum corrections, are used to construct the leading post-Newtonian and quantum corrections to the two-particle non-relativistic scattering matrix potential for two charged scalars. The result is discussed in relation to experimental verifications

  15. Spin in stationary gravitational fields and rotating frames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obukhov, Yuri N.; Silenko, Alexander J.; Teryaev, Oleg V.

    2010-01-01

    A spin motion of particles in stationary spacetimes is investigated in the framework of the classical gravity and relativistic quantum mechanics. We bring the Dirac equation for relativistic particles in nonstatic spacetimes to the Hamiltonian form and perform the Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation. We show the importance of the choice of tetrads for description of spin dynamics in the classical gravity. We derive classical and quantum mechanical equations of motion of the spin for relativistic particles in stationary gravitational fields and rotating frames and establish the full agreement between the classical and quantum mechanical approaches.

  16. Gravitational properties of antimatter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, T.; Nieto, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    Quantum gravity is at the forefront of modern particle physics, yet there are no direct tests, for antimatter, of even the principle of equivalence. We note that modern descriptions of gravity, such as fibre bundles and higher dimensional spacetimes, allow violations of the commonly stated form of the principle of equivalence, and of CPT. We review both indirect arguments and experimental tests of the expected gravitational properties of CPT-conjugate states. We conclude that a direct experimental test of the gravitational properties of antimatter, at the 1% (or better) level, would be of great value. We identify some experimental reasons which make the antiproton a prime candidate for this test, and we strongly urge that such an experiment be done at LEAR. 21 references

  17. Gravitation and electromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Apsel, D

    1979-01-01

    Through an examination of the Bohm-Aharonov experiment, a new theory of gravitation and electromagnetism is proposed. The fundamental assumption of the theory is that the motion of a particle in a combination of gravitational and electromagnetic fields is determined from a variational principle of the form delta integral /sub A//sup B /d tau =0. The form of the physical time is determined from an examination of the Maxwell-Einstein action function. The field and motion equations are formally identical to those of Maxwell-Einstein theory. The theory predicts that even in a field-free region of space, electromagnetic potentials can alter the phase of a wave function and the lifetime of a charged particle. The phase alteration has been observed in the Bohm-Aharonov experiment. There is an indication that the lifetime alteration has shown up in a recent CERN storage ring experiment. Experimental tests are proposed. (11 refs).

  18. Predicting Mercury's precession using simple relativistic Newtonian dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Y.; Steiner, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    We present a new simple relativistic model for planetary motion describing accurately the anomalous precession of the perihelion of Mercury and its origin. The model is based on transforming Newton's classical equation for planetary motion from absolute to real spacetime influenced by the gravitational potential and introducing the concept of influenced direction.

  19. Highlights in gravitation and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, B.R.; Kembhavi, Ajit; Narlikar, J.V.; Vishveshwara, C.V.

    1988-01-01

    This book assesses research into gravitation and cosmology by examining the subject from various viewpoints: the classical and quantum pictures, along with the cosmological and astrophysical applications. There are 35 articles by experts of international standing. Each defines the state of the art and contains a concise summary of our present knowledge of a facet of gravitational physics. These edited papers are based on those first given at an international conference held in Goa, India at the end of 1987. The following broad areas are covered: classical relativity, quantum gravity, cosmology, black holes, compact objects, gravitational radiation and gravity experiments. In this volume there are also summaries of discussions on the following special topics: exact solutions of cosmological equations, mathematical aspects of general relativity, the early universe, and quantum gravity. For research workers in cosmology and gravitation this reference book provides a broad view of present achievements and current problems. (author)

  20. Smartphones as Experimental Tools: Different Methods to Determine the Gravitational Acceleration in Classroom Physics by Using Everyday Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Jochen; Vogt, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    New media technology becomes more and more important for our daily life as well as for teaching physics. Within the scope of our N.E.T. research project we develop experiments using New Media Experimental Tools (N.E.T.) in physics education and study their influence on students learning abilities. We want to present the possibilities e.g. of…

  1. Progress in gravitational wave detection: Interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Kazuaki

    2002-01-01

    A gravitational wave (GW) is a physical entity of space-time derived from Einstein's theory of general relativity. Challenging projects to observe gravitational waves are being conducted throughout the world. A Japanese project involving a 300 m baseline laser interferometer, TAMA, achieved 1000 hr of continuous observation with the best sensitivity in the world during the summer of 2001. After achieving promising results, the realization of LCGT (Large-scale Cryogenic Gravitational wave Telescope) will become possible in the near future

  2. Whispering gallery effect in relativistic optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Y.; Law, K. F. F.; Korneev, Ph.; Fujioka, S.; Kojima, S.; Lee, S.-H.; Sakata, S.; Matsuo, K.; Oshima, A.; Morace, A.; Arikawa, Y.; Yogo, A.; Nakai, M.; Norimatsu, T.; d'Humières, E.; Santos, J. J.; Kondo, K.; Sunahara, A.; Gus'kov, S.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2018-03-01

    relativistic laser pulse, confined in a cylindrical-like target, under specific conditions may perform multiple scattering along the internal target surface. This results in the confinement of the laser light, leading to a very efficient interaction. The demonstrated propagation of the laser pulse along the curved surface is just yet another example of the "whispering gallery" effect, although nonideal due to laser-plasma coupling. In the relativistic domain its important feature is a gradual intensity decrease, leading to changes in the interaction conditions. The proccess may pronounce itself in plenty of physical phenomena, including very efficient electron acceleration and generation of relativistic magnetized plasma structures.

  3. Local density approximations for relativistic exchange energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, A.H.

    1986-01-01

    The use of local density approximations to approximate exchange interactions in relativistic electron systems is reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the physical content of these exchange energies by discussing results for the uniform relativistic electron gas from a new point of view. Work on applying these local density approximations in atoms and solids is reviewed and it is concluded that good accuracy is usually possible provided self-interaction corrections are applied. The local density approximations necessary for spin-polarized relativistic systems are discussed and some new results are presented

  4. Quantum gravity. On the entity of gravitation generating interacting fields and the elementary fields of quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bencivinni, Daniele

    2011-01-01

    The chapters about the propagation of the electromagnetic field, its properties in view of the propagation in space, the accompanying momentum, its kinetic energy and its mass-equivalent distribution of the total energy coupled to the relativistic mass represent today known and scientifically for a long time acknowledged as well as proved description of each phenomena. They are successively in a mathematically simple way formally listed and explained. The fundamental results of quantum mechanics, the quantum-mechanical momentum, Planck's action quantum etc. are also presented in a simplified way. Also the essential forms of special relativity theory concerning the propagation of energy and momentum are presented. In a last setpit is checked, whether a possible common entity between the listed scientific experiences can be established. Possible explanation approaches on the described connections and the subsequent results are presented. If the gravitational waves are interpreted as quantized electromagnetic quantum waves, as matter waves, which can be assigned to a mass in the sense of Louis de Broglie and are for instance detectable as electron waves, by means of the relativistic quantum-mechanical spatial radiation gravitation could be described. So the ''quantum-mechanical wave'' could be responsible for the generation of mass via the interaction of elementary quantum fields. The propagation of one of these as mass appearing interaction of bound quantum fields can carry a conventional momentum because of its kinetic energy. The interaction in the Bose-Einstein condensate shows that the cooled rest mass exhibits the picture of a standing wave, the wave front of which propagates into the space. Because of the massive superposition of interference pattern warns the gravitational respectively matter wave can no more be isolated. A spatial radiation is however possible. Matter can generate a radiation in front of the inertial mass (quantum waves). If it succeeds to

  5. Energy-momentum tensor of the gravitational field for material spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, S.N.

    1990-01-01

    Density of the energy-momentum tensor of a gravitational field which can be defined in the general relativity theory with the help of ideas of the relativistic gravitational theory is found for the case of material spheres. A relationship of this quantity with the Riemann tensor R αβγδ is discussed

  6. Gravitational microlensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakharov, Aleksandr F [Russian Federation State Scientific Center ' A.I. Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Sazhin, Mikhail V [P.K. Shternberg State Astronomical Institute at the M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1998-10-31

    The foundations of standard microlensing theory are discussed as applied to stars in the Galactic bulge, Magellanic Clouds or other nearby galaxies and gravitational microlenses assumed to lie in-between these stars and the terrestrial observer. In contrast to the review article by Gurevich et al. [48], microlensing by compact objects is mainly considered. Criteria for the identification of microlensing events are discussed as also are microlensing events not satisfying these criteria, such as non-symmetrical light curves and chromatic and polarization effects. The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Galactic bulge microlensing data of the MACHO group are discussed in detail and also the LMC data of EROS and the Galactic bulge data of OGLE are presented. A detailed comparison of theoretical predictions and observations is given. (reviews of topical problems)

  7. Gravitational microlensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, Aleksandr F; Sazhin, Mikhail V

    1998-01-01

    The foundations of standard microlensing theory are discussed as applied to stars in the Galactic bulge, Magellanic Clouds or other nearby galaxies and gravitational microlenses assumed to lie in-between these stars and the terrestrial observer. In contrast to the review article by Gurevich et al. [48], microlensing by compact objects is mainly considered. Criteria for the identification of microlensing events are discussed as also are microlensing events not satisfying these criteria, such as non-symmetrical light curves and chromatic and polarization effects. The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Galactic bulge microlensing data of the MACHO group are discussed in detail and also the LMC data of EROS and the Galactic bulge data of OGLE are presented. A detailed comparison of theoretical predictions and observations is given. (reviews of topical problems)

  8. 11th Edoardo Amaldi Conference on Gravitational Waves (AMALDI 11)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyung Mok; Oh, John

    2016-01-01

    The 11 th Amaldi Conference on gravitational waves was held from June 21 to 26, 2016 in Gwangju, Korea. This meeting was sponsored by the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), Korean Astronomical Society, Korean Physical Society, Korean Federation of Science and Technology (KOFST), National Research Foundation (NRF), Korea Tourism Organism, and Gwangju Convention Bureau. More than 150 scientists from 26 countries attended the 11 th Amaldi Confernece. Although there was an outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) just before the conference, there were very little cancellations. There was no incident related to the MERS disease. The scientific program, including the list of the invited plenary speakers, was arranged by the Gravitational Wave International Committee (GWIC) chaired by Eugenio Coccia. Most of the communication between the GWIC and the Local Organizing Committee (LOC) was handled by Stan Whitcomb, general secretary of the GWIC. There were 10 plenary sessions and 13 parallel sessions. Two plenary sessions were held each morning from Monday to Friday while the afternoon was devoted to parallel sessions. A special lecture for the participants of the meeting on ultra-high intensity lasers was delivered by Chang Hee Nam, director of the Center for Relativistic Laser Science located at the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology. Bernard Schutz gave a public talk entitled “Listening to Black Holes and the Big Bang - the Oldest Concert of the Universe” in the evening on June 23. More than 250 students and general public attended this talk. Most of the topics ranging from detector instruments, data analysis, to astrophysics and source modeling were covered in 10 invited talks, 67 contributed oral presentations, and 39 posters. After the conference, we invited all participants to submit written papers for proceedings. We received 35 papers and went through the peer review process and accepted 34 papers for publications. We

  9. Gravitational Lensing from a Spacetime Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perlick Volker

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The theory of gravitational lensing is reviewed from a spacetime perspective, without quasi-Newtonian approximations. More precisely, the review covers all aspects of gravitational lensing where light propagation is described in terms of lightlike geodesics of a metric of Lorentzian signature. It includes the basic equations and the relevant techniques for calculating the position, the shape, and the brightness of images in an arbitrary general-relativistic spacetime. It also includes general theorems on the classification of caustics, on criteria for multiple imaging, and on the possible number of images. The general results are illustrated with examples of spacetimes where the lensing features can be explicitly calculated, including the Schwarzschild spacetime, the Kerr spacetime, the spacetime of a straight string, plane gravitational waves, and others.

  10. Fluid/Gravity Correspondence, Second Order Transport and Gravitational Anomaly***

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megías, Eugenio; Pena-Benitez, Francisco

    2014-03-01

    We study the transport properties of a relativistic fluid affected by chiral and gauge-gravitational anomalies. The computation is performed in the framework of the fluid/gravity correspondence for a 5 dim holographic model with Chern-Simons terms in the action. We find new anomalous and non anomalous transport coefficients, as well as new contributions to the existing ones coming from the mixed gauge-gravitational anomaly. Consequences for the shear waves dispersion relation are analyzed. Talk given by E. Megías at the International Nuclear Physics Conference INPC 2013, 2-7 June 2013, Firenze, Italy.Supported by Plan Nacional de Altas Energías (FPA2009-07908, FPA2011-25948), Spanish MICINN Consolider-Ingenio 2010 Programme CPAN (CSD2007-00042), Comunidad de Madrid HEP-HACOS S2009/ESP-1473, Spanish MINECO's Centro de Excelencia Severo Ochoa Program (SEV-2012-0234, SEV-2012-0249), and the Juan de la Cierva Program.

  11. Cosmological measurements with general relativistic galaxy correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Montanari, Francesco; Durrer, Ruth; Bertacca, Daniele; Doré, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the cosmological dependence and the constraining power of large-scale galaxy correlations, including all redshift-distortions, wide-angle, lensing and gravitational potential effects on linear scales. We analyze the cosmological information present in the lensing convergence and in the gravitational potential terms describing the so-called ''relativistic effects'', and we find that, while smaller than the information contained in intrinsic galaxy clustering, it is not negligible. We investigate how neglecting them does bias cosmological measurements performed by future spectroscopic and photometric large-scale surveys such as SKA and Euclid. We perform a Fisher analysis using the CLASS code, modified to include scale-dependent galaxy bias and redshift-dependent magnification and evolution bias. Our results show that neglecting relativistic terms, especially lensing convergence, introduces an error in the forecasted precision in measuring cosmological parameters of the order of a few tens of percent, in particular when measuring the matter content of the Universe and primordial non-Gaussianity parameters. The analysis suggests a possible substantial systematic error in cosmological parameter constraints. Therefore, we argue that radial correlations and integrated relativistic terms need to be taken into account when forecasting the constraining power of future large-scale number counts of galaxy surveys.

  12. 9th International Conference on General Relativity and Gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmutzer, E.

    1980-01-01

    Volume 2 presents the abstracts of the following discussion groups: Astrophysics of compacts objects (19 abstracts); Cosmology (27 abstracts); Terrestrial and planetary experiments, time and length standards (14 abstracts); Continuous signal antennae, and Doppler spacecraft ranging for gravity wave detection (10 abstracts); Parametric transducers and squid transducers for gravity wave antennae (4 abstracts); Laser experiments on gravitational waves (5 abstracts); Resonant detectors for gravitational waves (Weber bars) (7 abstracts); Quantum non-demolition detectors (3 abstracts); Relativistic thermodynamics and statistics (11 abstracts); Alternative classical theories of gravitation; Mach's principle (47 abstracts)

  13. Proceedings of the Budapest workshop on relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csoergoe, T.; Hegyi, S.; Levai, P.

    1993-04-01

    This volume is the Proceedings of the Budapest workshop on relativistic heavy ion collisions held in Budapest, 10-13 Aug, 1992. The topics include experimental heavy ion physics, Bose-Einstein correlations, intermittency, relativistic transport theory, Quark-Gluon Plasma rehadronization, astronuclear physics and cosmology. All contributions were indexed and abstracted. (author)

  14. Theoretical physics 3. Classical field theory. On electrodynamics, non-Abelian gauge theories, and gravitation. 4. ed.; Theoretische Physik 3. Klassische Feldtheorie. Von Elektrodynamik, nicht-Abelschen Eichtheorien und Gravitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheck, Florian [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    2017-09-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Maxwell's equations together with their symmetry and covariance, the Maxwell theory as classical field theory, simple applications of Maxwell's theory, local gauge theories, classical field theory of gravitation. (HSI)

  15. Fundamentals of interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Saulson, Peter R

    2017-01-01

    LIGO's recent discovery of gravitational waves was headline news around the world. Many people will want to understand more about what a gravitational wave is, how LIGO works, and how LIGO functions as a detector of gravitational waves.This book aims to communicate the basic logic of interferometric gravitational wave detectors to students who are new to the field. It assumes that the reader has a basic knowledge of physics, but no special familiarity with gravitational waves, with general relativity, or with the special techniques of experimental physics. All of the necessary ideas are developed in the book.The first edition was published in 1994. Since the book is aimed at explaining the physical ideas behind the design of LIGO, it stands the test of time. For the second edition, an Epilogue has been added; it brings the treatment of technical details up to date, and provides references that would allow a student to become proficient with today's designs.

  16. Coordinates in relativistic Hamiltonian mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, S.N.

    1984-01-01

    The physical (covariant and measurable) coordinates of free particles and covariant coordinates of the center of inertia are found for three main forms of relativistic dynamics. In the point form of dynamics, the covariant coordinates of two directly interacting particles are found, and the equations of motion are brought to the explicitly covariant form. These equations are generalized to the case of interaction with an external electromagnetic field

  17. Possible role of torsion in gravitational theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieh, H.T.

    1983-01-01

    Torsion is of interest in an indirect way, in that it has the potential of being an important ingredient in a future successful quantum theory of gravitation. Einstein's theory of gravitation, despite its simplicity and elegance, and its successes in large-scale gravitational phenomena, can only be regarded as a macroscopic classical theory. It is a non-renormalizable quantum field theory, and, therefore, lacks the status of a good microscopic theory. It is the search for a successful quantum field theory of gravitation that poses as one of the great challenges to theoretical physics today. (Auth.)

  18. Actuality of the Einstein theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanenko, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    Problems of actuality of the Einstein theory of gravitation are lightened. The great Einstein theory of gravitation is shown to remain a reliable base of understanding of modern physical world pattern and its inevitable further inexhaustible precising. The main GRT difficulties are enumirated: determination of reference systems, presence of singularities in the theory, absence of consistent determination of the gravity energy, impossibility of accounting the relations between atomic, gravitational and cosmological characteristics. The attention is paid to gauge, twistor problems and to unified interaction theory. The great contribution of the soviet science in the theory of gravitation is stressed

  19. Chirality and gravitational parity violation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargueño, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    In this review, parity-violating gravitational potentials are presented as possible sources of both true and false chirality. In particular, whereas phenomenological long-range spin-dependent gravitational potentials contain both truly and falsely chiral terms, it is shown that there are models that extend general relativity including also coupling of fermionic degrees of freedom to gravity in the presence of torsion, which give place to short-range truly chiral interactions similar to that usually considered in molecular physics. Physical mechanisms which give place to gravitational parity violation together with the expected size of the effects and their experimental constraints are discussed. Finally, the possible role of parity-violating gravity in the origin of homochirality and a road map for future research works in quantum chemistry is presented. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Gravitational Waves from Oscillons with Cuspy Potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Guo, Zong-Kuan; Cai, Rong-Gen; Shiu, Gary

    2018-01-19

    We study the production of gravitational waves during oscillations of the inflaton around the minimum of a cuspy potential after inflation. We find that a cusp in the potential can trigger copious oscillon formation, which sources a characteristic energy spectrum of gravitational waves with double peaks. The discovery of such a double-peak spectrum could test the underlying inflationary physics.

  1. Relativistic Outflows from Advection-dominated Accretion Disks around Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Peter A.; Subramanian, Prasad; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2001-05-01

    Advection-dominated accretion flows (ADAFs) have a positive Bernoulli parameter and are therefore gravitationally unbound. The Newtonian ADAF model has been generalized recently to obtain the ADIOS model that includes outflows of energy and angular momentum, thereby allowing accretion to proceed self-consistently. However, the utilization of a Newtonian gravitational potential limits the ability of this model to describe the inner region of the disk, where any relativistic outflows are likely to originate. In this paper we modify the ADIOS scenario to incorporate a pseudo-Newtonian potential, which approximates the effects of general relativity. The analysis yields a unique, self-similar solution for the structure of the coupled disk/wind system. Interesting features of the new solution include the relativistic character of the outflow in the vicinity of the radius of marginal stability, which represents the inner edge of the quasi-Keplerian disk in our model. Hence, our self-similar solution may help to explain the origin of relativistic jets in active galaxies. At large distances the radial dependence of the accretion rate approaches the unique form M~r1/2, with an associated density variation given by ρ~r-1. This density variation agrees with that implied by the dependence of the hard X-ray time lags on the Fourier frequency for a number of accreting galactic black hole candidates. While intriguing, the predictions made using our self-similar solution need to be confirmed in the future using a detailed model that includes a physical description of the energization mechanism that drives the outflow, which is likely to be powered by the shear of the underlying accretion disk.

  2. Relativistic entanglement from relativistic quantum mechanics in the rest-frame instant form of dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lusanna, Luca

    2011-01-01

    After a review of the problems induced by the Lorentz signature of Minkowski space-time, like the need of a clock synchronization convention for the definition of 3-space and the complexity of the notion of relativistic center of mass, there is the introduction of a new formulation of relativistic quantum mechanics compatible with the theory of relativistic bound states. In it the zeroth postulate of non-relativistic quantum mechanics is not valid and the physics is described in the rest frame by a Hilbert space containing only relative variables. The non-locality of the Poincare' generators imply a kinematical non-locality and non-separability influencing the theory of relativistic entanglement and not connected with the standard quantum non-locality.

  3. Towards relativistic atomic physics. Part 1. The rest-frame instant form of dynamics and a canonical transformation for a system of charged particles plus the electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alba, D.; Crater, H.W.; Lusanna, L.

    2010-01-01

    A complete exposition of the rest-frame instant form of dynamics for arbitrary isolated systems (particles, fields, strings, fluids) admitting a Lagrangian description is given. The starting point is the parametrized Minkowski theory describing the system in arbitrary admissible noninertial frames in Minkowski space-time, which allows one to define the energy-momentum tensor of the system and to show the independence of the description from the clock synchronization convention and from the choice of the 3-coordinates. The restriction to the inertial rest frame, centered on the inertial observer having the Fokker-Pryce center-of-inertia world-line, and the study of relativistic collective variables replacing the nonrelativistic center of mass lead to the description of the isolated system as a decoupled globally defined noncovariant canonical external center of mass carrying a pole-dipole structure (the invariant mass M and the rest spin S¯ of the system) and an external realization of the Poincare group. Mc and S¯ are the energy and angular momentum of a unfaithful internal realization of the Poincare group built with the energy-momentum tensor of the system and acting inside the instantaneous Wigner 3-spaces where all the 3-vectors are Wigner covariant. The vanishing of the internal 3-momentum and of the internal Lorentz boosts eliminate the internal 3-center of mass inside the Wigner 3-spaces, so that at the end the isolated system is described only by Wigner-covariant canonical internal relative variables. Then an isolated system of positive-energy charged scalar articles with mutual Coulomb interaction plus a transverse electromagnetic field in the radiation gauge is investigated as a classical background for defining relativistic atomic physics. The electric charges of the particles are Grassmann-valued to regularize the self-energies. The external and internal realizations of the Poincare algebra in the rest-frame instant form of dynamics are found. This

  4. Physical processes of gravitions and gray quarks in the interior of cosomod and supergravity cosmic stellar entities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayana, K.L.

    1986-01-01

    Supergravity theories indicate drastic modifications and entirely new thoughts of approach for study of the physical processes. In a separate paper, the author has emphasized the importance of SU(8) symmetric group within the frame work of a U(10,2) supergravity theory. This has also been cited in literature, subsequently, for a spinorial theoretic formulation of light and classification of photon and W-meson multiplets. The object of the present paper is to present an example of a specific gauge-gravity theory that employs SL(2,C) infinitesional group together with a SU(2) group. The reason of the choice is its close analogy with the Einstein's theory, that leads to automatically the important physical quantities. The difference, however, arises in a relevant version of quantized theory. At first, he emphasizes the basic structure of the model, discusses the symmetry breaking patterns which ensures ISL(2,C) X SU(2) as the low energy symmetry. He next points out the new interactions present in the extended framework and obtain the reasonable physical processes that may play an important role in the super gravity cosmic entities

  5. How does pressure gravitate? Cosmological constant problem confronts observational cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narimani, Ali; Afshordi, Niayesh; Scott, Douglas

    2014-08-01

    An important and long-standing puzzle in the history of modern physics is the gross inconsistency between theoretical expectations and cosmological observations of the vacuum energy density, by at least 60 orders of magnitude, otherwise known as the cosmological constant problem. A characteristic feature of vacuum energy is that it has a pressure with the same amplitude, but opposite sign to its energy density, while all the precision tests of General Relativity are either in vacuum, or for media with negligible pressure. Therefore, one may wonder whether an anomalous coupling to pressure might be responsible for decoupling vacuum from gravity. We test this possibility in the context of the Gravitational Aether proposal, using current cosmological observations, which probe the gravity of relativistic pressure in the radiation era. Interestingly, we find that the best fit for anomalous pressure coupling is about half-way between General Relativity (GR), and Gravitational Aether (GA), if we include Planck together with WMAP and BICEP2 polarization cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations. Taken at face value, this data combination excludes both GR and GA at around the 3 σ level. However, including higher resolution CMB observations (``highL'') or baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO) pushes the best fit closer to GR, excluding the Gravitational Aether solution to the cosmological constant problem at the 4- 5 σ level. This constraint effectively places a limit on the anomalous coupling to pressure in the parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) expansion, ζ4 = 0.105 ± 0.049 (+highL CMB), or ζ4 = 0.066 ± 0.039 (+BAO). These represent the most precise measurement of this parameter to date, indicating a mild tension with GR (for ΛCDM including tensors, with 0ζ4=), and also among different data sets.

  6. How does pressure gravitate? Cosmological constant problem confronts observational cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narimani, Ali; Scott, Douglas; Afshordi, Niayesh

    2014-01-01

    An important and long-standing puzzle in the history of modern physics is the gross inconsistency between theoretical expectations and cosmological observations of the vacuum energy density, by at least 60 orders of magnitude, otherwise known as the cosmological constant problem. A characteristic feature of vacuum energy is that it has a pressure with the same amplitude, but opposite sign to its energy density, while all the precision tests of General Relativity are either in vacuum, or for media with negligible pressure. Therefore, one may wonder whether an anomalous coupling to pressure might be responsible for decoupling vacuum from gravity. We test this possibility in the context of the Gravitational Aether proposal, using current cosmological observations, which probe the gravity of relativistic pressure in the radiation era. Interestingly, we find that the best fit for anomalous pressure coupling is about half-way between General Relativity (GR), and Gravitational Aether (GA), if we include Planck together with WMAP and BICEP2 polarization cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations. Taken at face value, this data combination excludes both GR and GA at around the 3 σ level. However, including higher resolution CMB observations (''highL'') or baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO) pushes the best fit closer to GR, excluding the Gravitational Aether solution to the cosmological constant problem at the 4- 5 σ level. This constraint effectively places a limit on the anomalous coupling to pressure in the parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) expansion, ζ 4  = 0.105 ± 0.049 (+highL CMB), or ζ 4  = 0.066 ± 0.039 (+BAO). These represent the most precise measurement of this parameter to date, indicating a mild tension with GR (for ΛCDM including tensors, with 0ζ 4 =), and also among different data sets

  7. Matvei Petrovich Bronstein and Soviet theoretical physics in the thirties

    CERN Document Server

    Gorelik, Gennady E

    1994-01-01

    Gennady E. Gorelik and Victor Ya. Frenkel Matvei Petrovich Bronstein and Soviet Theoretical Physics in the Thirties Translated by Valentina M. Levina The short life and tragic death of Matvei Petrovich Bronstein (1906-1938) may be seen as a symbol of the man's time and his country. One of the most remarkable features of Soviet history was the impressive advance of its physical sciences against the brutal and violent background of totalitarianism. Soviet advances in nuclear and space technology form an important part of world history. These achievements had their roots in the 1930s, when Bronstein's generation entered science. Among his friends were the famous physicists Lev Landau and George Gamow. Bronstein worked in the vast field of theoretical physics, ranging from nuclear physics to astrophysics and from relativistic quantum theory to cosmology. His pioneering work on quantizing gravitation goes beyond the history of physics, because today the quantum theory of gravitation occupies a special place in fun...

  8. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  9. Time Operator in Relativistic Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorasani, Sina

    2017-07-01

    It is first shown that the Dirac’s equation in a relativistic frame could be modified to allow discrete time, in agreement to a recently published upper bound. Next, an exact self-adjoint 4 × 4 relativistic time operator for spin-1/2 particles is found and the time eigenstates for the non-relativistic case are obtained and discussed. Results confirm the quantum mechanical speculation that particles can indeed occupy negative energy levels with vanishingly small but non-zero probablity, contrary to the general expectation from classical physics. Hence, Wolfgang Pauli’s objection regarding the existence of a self-adjoint time operator is fully resolved. It is shown that using the time operator, a bosonic field referred here to as energons may be created, whose number state representations in non-relativistic momentum space can be explicitly found.

  10. BOOK REVIEW: Relativistic Figures of Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, M.

    2009-08-01

    Compact fluid bodies in equilibrium under its own gravitational field are abundant in the Universe and a proper treatment of them can only be carried out using the full theory of General Relativity. The problem is of enormous complexity as it involves two very different regimes, namely the interior and the exterior of the fluid, coupled through the surface of the body. This problem is very challenging both from a purely theoretical point of view, as well as regarding the obtaining of realistic models and the description of their physical properties. It is therefore an excellent piece of news that the book 'Relativistic Figures of Equilibrium' by R Meinel, M Ansorg, A Kleinwächter, G Neugebauer and D Petroff has been recently published. This book approaches the topic in depth and its contents will be of interest to a wide range of scientists working on gravitation, including theoreticians in general relativity, mathematical physicists, astrophysicists and numerical relativists. This is an advanced book that intends to present some of the present-day results on this topic. The most basic results are presented rather succinctly, and without going into the details, of their derivations. Although primarily not intended to serve as a textbook, the presentation is nevertheless self-contained and can therefore be of interest both for experts on the field as well as for anybody wishing to learn more about rotating self-gravitating compact bodies in equilibrium. It should be remarked, however, that this book makes a rather strong selection of topics and concentrates fundamentally on presenting the main results obtained by the authors during their research in this field. The book starts with a chapter where the fundamental aspects of rotating fluids in equilibrium, including its thermodynamic properties, are summarized. Of particular interest are the so-called mass-shedding limit, which is the limit where the body is rotating so fast that it is on the verge of starting

  11. Second-order perturbations of cosmological fluids: Relativistic effects of pressure, multicomponent, curvature, and rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Jai-chan; Noh, Hyerim

    2007-01-01

    We present general relativistic correction terms appearing in Newton's gravity to the second-order perturbations of cosmological fluids. In our previous work we have shown that to the second-order perturbations, the density and velocity perturbation equations of general relativistic zero-pressure, irrotational, single-component fluid in a spatially flat background coincide exactly with the ones known in Newton's theory without using the gravitational potential. We also have shown the effect of gravitational waves to the second order, and pure general relativistic correction terms appearing in the third-order perturbations. Here, we present results of second-order perturbations relaxing all the assumptions made in our previous works. We derive the general relativistic correction terms arising due to (i) pressure, (ii) multicomponent, (iii) background spatial curvature, and (iv) rotation. In the case of multicomponent zero-pressure, irrotational fluids under the flat background, we effectively do not have relativistic correction terms, thus the relativistic equations expressed in terms of density and velocity perturbations again coincide with the Newtonian ones. In the other three cases we generally have pure general relativistic correction terms. In the case of pressure, the relativistic corrections appear even in the level of background and linear perturbation equations. In the presence of background spatial curvature, or rotation, pure relativistic correction terms directly appear in the Newtonian equations of motion of density and velocity perturbations to the second order; to the linear order, without using the gravitational potential (or metric perturbations), we have relativistic/Newtonian correspondences for density and velocity perturbations of a single-component fluid including the rotation even in the presence of background spatial curvature. In the small-scale limit (far inside the horizon), to the second-order, relativistic equations of density and

  12. Relativistic, accreting disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramowicz, M.A; Jaroszynski, M.; Sikora, M.

    1978-01-01

    An analytic theory of the hydrodynamical structure of accreting disks (without self-gravitation but with pressure) orbiting around and axially symmetric, stationary, compact body (e.g. black hole) is presented. The inner edge of the marginally stable accreting disk (i.e. disk with constant angular momentum density) has a sharp cusp located on the equatorial plane between rsub(ms) and rsub(mb). The existence of the cusp is also typical for any angular momentum distribution. The physical importance of the cusp follows from the close analogy with the case of a close binary system (L 1 Lagrange point on the Roche lobe). The existence of the cusp is thus a crucial phenomenon in such problems as boundary condition for the viscous stresses, accretion rate etc. (orig.) [de

  13. Relativistic, accreting disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, M A; Jaroszynski, M; Sikora, M [Polska Akademia Nauk, Warsaw

    1978-02-01

    An analytic theory of the hydrodynamical structure of accreting disks (without self-gravitation but with pressure) orbiting around an axially symmetric, stationary, compact body (e.g. black hole) is presented. The inner edge of the marginally stable accreting disk (i.e. disk with constant angular momentum density) has a sharp cusp located on the equatorial plane between r/sub ms/ and r/sub mb/. The existence of the cusp is also typical for any angular momentum distribution. The physical importance of the cusp follows from the close analogy with the case of a close binary system (L/sub 1/ Lagrange point on the Roche lobe). The existence of the cusp is thus a crucial phenomenon in such problems as boundary condition for the viscous stresses, accretion rate, etc.

  14. Artium mater in relativistic astrophysics : New perspectives for a European-Latin American PhD program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chardonnet, Pascal [Coordinator IRAP PhD EMJD, Université de Nice 28, avenue Valrose 06103 Nice (France); LAPTh, Université de Savoie, CNRS, B.P. 110, Annecy-le-Vieux F-74941 (France); ICRANet, Piazza della Repubblica 10, 65122 Pescara (Italy); Department for Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Research Nuclear University Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, MEPhI, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-17

    Following the successful scientific space missions by the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) in Chile, as well as the high-energy particle activities at CERN in Genve, we have created a Ph.D. program dedicated to the formation of scientists in the field of relativistic astrophysics. The students of such a program will lead the theoretical developments of one of the most active fields of research, based on the above observational and experimental facilities. This program needs expertise in the most advanced topics of mathematical and theoretical physics, and in relativistic field theories. It requires the ability to model the observational data received from the above facilities, as well as all the basic knowledge in astronomy, astrophysics and cosmology. This activity is necessarily international, no single university can cover the broad expertises. From this, the proposed program of the IRAP Ph.D., in one of the youngest and most dynamical French universities, pole of research and teaching in the Euro-Mediterranean region (PRES): the University of Nice. It benefits from the presence of the astrophysics research institute of Observatoire de la Cte d’Azur involved in relativistic and non-photonic astrophysics. The participation of the Freie Universitaet Berlin, Oldenburg and Bremen Universities and of the Einstein Institute in Potsdam offers the possibility of teaching in relativistic field theories at the highest level. The University of Savoy offers the link to the particle physics at CERN. The activities at the University of Rome, at Stockholm University and at ICRANet offer teaching programs in all the fields of relativistic astrophysics, including cosmology, the physics of gravitational collapse, gamma-ray bursts, and black hole physics. Finally, the University of Ferrara will be present with lectures and researches in the topics they have pioneered such as x-ray astrophysics and observational cosmology. Through ICRANet

  15. Artium mater in relativistic astrophysics : New perspectives for a European-Latin American PhD program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chardonnet, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Following the successful scientific space missions by the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) in Chile, as well as the high-energy particle activities at CERN in Genve, we have created a Ph.D. program dedicated to the formation of scientists in the field of relativistic astrophysics. The students of such a program will lead the theoretical developments of one of the most active fields of research, based on the above observational and experimental facilities. This program needs expertise in the most advanced topics of mathematical and theoretical physics, and in relativistic field theories. It requires the ability to model the observational data received from the above facilities, as well as all the basic knowledge in astronomy, astrophysics and cosmology. This activity is necessarily international, no single university can cover the broad expertises. From this, the proposed program of the IRAP Ph.D., in one of the youngest and most dynamical French universities, pole of research and teaching in the Euro-Mediterranean region (PRES): the University of Nice. It benefits from the presence of the astrophysics research institute of Observatoire de la Cte d’Azur involved in relativistic and non-photonic astrophysics. The participation of the Freie Universitaet Berlin, Oldenburg and Bremen Universities and of the Einstein Institute in Potsdam offers the possibility of teaching in relativistic field theories at the highest level. The University of Savoy offers the link to the particle physics at CERN. The activities at the University of Rome, at Stockholm University and at ICRANet offer teaching programs in all the fields of relativistic astrophysics, including cosmology, the physics of gravitational collapse, gamma-ray bursts, and black hole physics. Finally, the University of Ferrara will be present with lectures and researches in the topics they have pioneered such as x-ray astrophysics and observational cosmology. Through ICRANet

  16. Artium mater in relativistic astrophysics : New perspectives for a European-Latin American PhD program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chardonnet, Pascal

    2015-12-01

    Following the successful scientific space missions by the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) in Chile, as well as the high-energy particle activities at CERN in Genve, we have created a Ph.D. program dedicated to the formation of scientists in the field of relativistic astrophysics. The students of such a program will lead the theoretical developments of one of the most active fields of research, based on the above observational and experimental facilities. This program needs expertise in the most advanced topics of mathematical and theoretical physics, and in relativistic field theories. It requires the ability to model the observational data received from the above facilities, as well as all the basic knowledge in astronomy, astrophysics and cosmology. This activity is necessarily international, no single university can cover the broad expertises. From this, the proposed program of the IRAP Ph.D., in one of the youngest and most dynamical French universities, pole of research and teaching in the Euro-Mediterranean region (PRES): the University of Nice. It benefits from the presence of the astrophysics research institute of Observatoire de la Cte d'Azur involved in relativistic and non-photonic astrophysics. The participation of the Freie Universitaet Berlin, Oldenburg and Bremen Universities and of the Einstein Institute in Potsdam offers the possibility of teaching in relativistic field theories at the highest level. The University of Savoy offers the link to the particle physics at CERN. The activities at the University of Rome, at Stockholm University and at ICRANet offer teaching programs in all the fields of relativistic astrophysics, including cosmology, the physics of gravitational collapse, gamma-ray bursts, and black hole physics. Finally, the University of Ferrara will be present with lectures and researches in the topics they have pioneered such as x-ray astrophysics and observational cosmology. Through ICRANet the

  17. The relativistic electron wave equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirac, P.A.M.

    1977-08-01

    The paper was presented at the European Conference on Particle Physics held in Budapest between the 4th and 9th July of 1977. A short review is given on the birth of the relativistic electron wave equation. After Schroedinger has shown the equivalence of his wave mechanics and the matrix mechanics of Heisenberg, a general transformation theory was developed by the author. This theory required a relativistic wave equation linear in delta/delta t. As the Klein--Gordon equation available at this time did not satisfy this condition the development of a new equation became necessary. The equation which was found gave the value of the electron spin and magnetic moment automatically. (D.P.)

  18. Diffraction radiation from relativistic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Potylitsyn, Alexander Petrovich; Strikhanov, Mikhail Nikolaevich; Tishchenko, Alexey Alexandrovich

    2010-01-01

    This book deals with diffraction radiation, which implies the boundary problems of electromagnetic radiation theory. Diffraction radiation is generated when a charged particle moves in a vacuum near a target edge. Diffraction radiation of non-relativistic particles is widely used to design intense emitters in the cm wavelength range. Diffraction radiation from relativistic charged particles is important for noninvasive beam diagnostics and design of free electron lasers based on Smith-Purcell radiation which is diffraction radiation from periodic structures. Different analytical models of diffraction radiation and results of recent experimental studies are presented in this book. The book may also serve as guide to classical electrodynamics applications in beam physics and electrodynamics. It can be of great use for young researchers to develop skills and for experienced scientists to obtain new results.

  19. Volatility smile as relativistic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakushadze, Zura

    2017-06-01

    We give an explicit formula for the probability distribution based on a relativistic extension of Brownian motion. The distribution (1) is properly normalized and (2) obeys the tower law (semigroup property), so we can construct martingales and self-financing hedging strategies and price claims (options). This model is a 1-constant-parameter extension of the Black-Scholes-Merton model. The new parameter is the analog of the speed of light in Special Relativity. However, in the financial context there is no ;speed limit; and the new parameter has the meaning of a characteristic diffusion speed at which relativistic effects become important and lead to a much softer asymptotic behavior, i.e., fat tails, giving rise to volatility smiles. We argue that a nonlocal stochastic description of such (Lévy) processes is inadequate and discuss a local description from physics. The presentation is intended to be pedagogical.

  20. Diffraction radiation from relativistic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potylitsyn, Alexander Petrovich; Ryazanov, Mikhail Ivanovich; Strikhanov, Mikhail Nikolaevich; Tishchenko, Alexey Alexandrovich

    2010-01-01

    This book deals with diffraction radiation, which implies the boundary problems of electromagnetic radiation theory. Diffraction radiation is generated when a charged particle moves in a vacuum near a target edge. Diffraction radiation of non-relativistic particles is widely used to design intense emitters in the cm wavelength range. Diffraction radiation from relativistic charged particles is important for noninvasive beam diagnostics and design of free electron lasers based on Smith-Purcell radiation which is diffraction radiation from periodic structures. Different analytical models of diffraction radiation and results of recent experimental studies are presented in this book. The book may also serve as guide to classical electrodynamics applications in beam physics and electrodynamics. It can be of great use for young researchers to develop skills and for experienced scientists to obtain new results. (orig.)

  1. Relativistic theory of surficial Love numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Philippe; Poisson, Eric

    2014-06-01

    A relativistic theory of surficial Love numbers, which characterize the surface deformation of a body subjected to tidal forces, was initiated by Damour and Nagar. We revisit this effort in order to extend it, clarify some of its aspects, and simplify its computational implementation. First, we refine the definition of surficial Love numbers proposed by Damour and Nagar and formulate it directly in terms of the deformed curvature of the body's surface, a meaningful geometrical quantity. Second, we develop a unified theory of surficial Love numbers that applies equally well to material bodies and black holes. Third, we derive a compactness-dependent relation between the surficial and (electric-type) gravitational Love numbers of a perfect-fluid body and show that it reduces to the familiar Newtonian relation when the compactness is small. And fourth, we simplify the tasks associated with the practical computation of the surficial and gravitational Love numbers for a material body.

  2. Feynman Lectures on Gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borcherds, P

    2003-01-01

    In the early 1960s Feynman lectured to physics undergraduates and, with the assistance of his colleagues Leighton and Sands, produced the three-volume classic Feynman Lectures in Physics. These lectures were delivered in the mornings. In the afternoons Feynman was giving postgraduate lectures on gravitation. This book is based on notes compiled by two students on that course: Morinigo and Wagner. Their notes were checked and approved by Feynman and were available at Caltech. They have now been edited by Brian Hatfield and made more widely available. The book has a substantial preface by John Preskill and Kip Thorne, and an introduction entitled 'Quantum Gravity' by Brian Hatfield. You should read these before going on to the lectures themselves. Preskill and Thorne identify three categories of potential readers of this book. 1. Those with a postgraduate training in theoretical physics. 2. 'Readers with a solid undergraduate training in physics'. 3. 'Admirers of Feynman who do not have a strong physics background'. The title of the book is perhaps misleading: readers in category 2 who think that this book is an extension of the Feynman Lectures in Physics may be disappointed. It is not: it is a book aimed mainly at those in category 1. If you want to get to grips with gravitation (and general relativity) then you need to read an introductory text first e.g. General Relativity by I R Kenyon (Oxford: Oxford University Press) or A Unified Grand Tour of Theoretical Physics by Ian D Lawrie (Bristol: IoP). But there is no Royal Road. As pointed out in the preface and in the introduction, the book represents Feynman's thinking about gravitation some 40 years ago: the lecture course was part of his attempts to understand the subject himself, and for readers in all three categories it is this that makes the book one of interest: the opportunity to observe how a great physicist attempts to tackle some of the hardest challenges of physics. However, the book was written 40

  3. Relativistic heavy ion facilities: worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1986-05-01

    A review of relativistic heavy ion facilities which exist, are in a construction phase, or are on the drawing boards as proposals is presented. These facilities span the energy range from fixed target machines in the 1 to 2 GeV/nucleon regime, up to heavy ion colliders of 100 GeV/nucleon on 100 GeV/nucleon. In addition to specifying the general features of such machines, an outline of the central physics themes to be carried out at these facilities is given, along with a sampling of the detectors which will be used to extract the physics. 22 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Advanced interferometric gravitational-wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Saulson, Peter R

    2019-01-01

    Gravitational waves are one of the most exciting and promising emerging areas of physics and astrophysics today. The detection of gravitational waves will rank among the most significant physics discoveries of the 21st century.Advanced Interferometric Gravitational-Wave Detectors brings together many of the world's top experts to deliver an authoritative and in-depth treatment on current and future detectors. Volume I is devoted to the essentials of gravitational-wave detectors, presenting the physical principles behind large-scale precision interferometry, the physics of the underlying noise sources that limit interferometer sensitivity, and an explanation of the key enabling technologies that are used in the detectors. Volume II provides an in-depth look at the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo interferometers that have just finished construction, as well as examining future interferometric detector concepts. This two-volume set will provide students and researchers the comprehensive background needed to und...

  5. Theorem on axially symmetric gravitational vacuum configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadopoulos, A; Le Denmat, G [Paris-6 Univ., 75 (France). Inst. Henri Poincare

    1977-01-24

    A theorem is proved which asserts the non-existence of axially symmetric gravitational vacuum configurations with non-stationary rotation only. The eventual consequences in black-hole physics are suggested.

  6. Gravitating discs around black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karas, V; Hure, J-M; Semerak, O

    2004-01-01

    Fluid discs and tori around black holes are discussed within different approaches and with the emphasis on the role of disc gravity. First reviewed are the prospects of investigating the gravitational field of a black hole-disc system using analytical solutions of stationary, axially symmetric Einstein equations. Then, more detailed considerations are focused to the middle and outer parts of extended disc-like configurations where relativistic effects are small and the Newtonian description is adequate. Within general relativity, only a static case has been analysed in detail. Results are often very inspiring. However, simplifying assumptions must be imposed: ad hoc profiles of the disc density are commonly assumed and the effects of frame-dragging are completely lacking. Astrophysical discs (e.g. accretion discs in active galactic nuclei) typically extend far beyond the relativistic domain and are fairly diluted. However, self-gravity is still essential for their structure and evolution, as well as for their radiation emission and the impact on the surrounding environment. For example, a nuclear star cluster in a galactic centre may bear various imprints of mutual star-disc interactions, which can be recognized in observational properties, such as the relation between the central mass and stellar velocity dispersion. (topical review)

  7. Towards relativistic quantum geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridao, Luis Santiago [Instituto de Investigaciones Físicas de Mar del Plata (IFIMAR), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Mar del Plata (Argentina); Bellini, Mauricio, E-mail: mbellini@mdp.edu.ar [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Funes 3350, C.P. 7600, Mar del Plata (Argentina); Instituto de Investigaciones Físicas de Mar del Plata (IFIMAR), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2015-12-17

    We obtain a gauge-invariant relativistic quantum geometry by using a Weylian-like manifold with a geometric scalar field which provides a gauge-invariant relativistic quantum theory in which the algebra of the Weylian-like field depends on observers. An example for a Reissner–Nordström black-hole is studied.

  8. Relativistic Coulomb Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear fission reactions induced by the electromagnetic field of relativistic nuclei are studied for energies relevant to present and future relativistic heavy ion accelerators. Cross sections are calculated for U-238 and Pu-239 fission induced by C-12, Si-28, Au-197, and U-238 projectiles. It is found that some of the cross sections can exceed 10 b.

  9. Relativistic Shock Acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, P.; Downes, T.P.; Gallant, Y.A.; Kirk, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we briefly review the basic theory of shock waves in relativistic hydrodynamics and magneto-hydrodynamics, emphasising some astrophysically interesting cases. We then present an overview of the theory of particle acceleration at such shocks describing the methods used to calculate the spectral indices of energetic particles. Recent results on acceleration at ultra-relativistic shocks are discussed. (author)

  10. Atomic and gravitational clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canuto, V.M.; City Coll., New York; Goldman, I.

    1982-01-01

    Atomic and gravitational clocks are governed by the laws of electrodynamics and gravity respectively. While the strong equivalence principle (SEP) assumes that the two clocks have been synchronous at all times, recent planetary data seem to suggest a possible violation of the SEP. Past analysis of the implications of an SEP violation on different physical phenomena revealed no disagreement. However, these studies assumed that the two different clocks can be consistently constructed within the framework. The concept of scale invariance, and the physical meaning of different systems of units, are now reviewed and the construction of two clocks that do not remain synchronous-whose rates are related by a non-constant function βsub(a)-is demonstrated. The cosmological character of βsub(a) is also discussed. (author)

  11. Influence of weathering and pre-existing large scale fractures on gravitational slope failure: insights from 3-D physical modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bachmann

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a new 3-D physical modelling technique we investigated the initiation and evolution of large scale landslides in presence of pre-existing large scale fractures and taking into account the slope material weakening due to the alteration/weathering. The modelling technique is based on the specially developed properly scaled analogue materials, as well as on the original vertical accelerator device enabling increases in the 'gravity acceleration' up to a factor 50. The weathering primarily affects the uppermost layers through the water circulation. We simulated the effect of this process by making models of two parts. The shallower one represents the zone subject to homogeneous weathering and is made of low strength material of compressive strength σl. The deeper (core part of the model is stronger and simulates intact rocks. Deformation of such a model subjected to the gravity force occurred only in its upper (low strength layer. In another set of experiments, low strength (σw narrow planar zones sub-parallel to the slope surface (σwl were introduced into the model's superficial low strength layer to simulate localized highly weathered zones. In this configuration landslides were initiated much easier (at lower 'gravity force', were shallower and had smaller horizontal size largely defined by the weak zone size. Pre-existing fractures were introduced into the model by cutting it along a given plan. They have proved to be of small influence on the slope stability, except when they were associated to highly weathered zones. In this latter case the fractures laterally limited the slides. Deep seated rockslides initiation is thus directly defined by the mechanical structure of the hillslope's uppermost levels and especially by the presence of the weak zones due to the weathering. The large scale fractures play a more passive role and can only influence the shape and the volume of the sliding units.

  12. Gravitational Radiation from Post-Newtonian Sources and Inspiralling Compact Binaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanchet Luc

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the current status of a theoretical approach to the problem of the emission of gravitational waves by isolated systems in the context of general relativity. Part A of the article deals with general post-Newtonian sources. The exterior field of the source is investigated by means of a combination of analytic post-Minkowskian and multipolar approximations. The physical observables in the far-zone of the source are described by a specific set of radiative multipole moments. By matching the exterior solution to the metric of the post-Newtonian source in the near-zone we obtain the explicit expressions of the source multipole moments. The relationships between the radiative and source moments involve many non-linear multipole interactions, among them those associated with the tails (and tails-of-tails of gravitational waves. Part B of the article is devoted to the application to compact binary systems. We present the equations of binary motion, and the associated Lagrangian and Hamiltonian, at the third post-Newtonian (3PN order beyond the Newtonian acceleration. The gravitational-wave energy flux, taking consistently into account the relativistic corrections in the binary moments as well as the various tail effects, is derived through 3.5PN order with respect to the quadrupole formalism. The binary's orbital phase, whose prior knowledge is crucial for searching and analyzing the signals from inspiralling compact binaries, is deduced from an energy balance argument.

  13. On the possibility of a new relativistic contraction law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossler, O.E.; Froehlich, D.; Kleiner, N.; Pfaff, M.; Argyris, J.

    2004-01-01

    How does a 'standing' light wave that is perpendicular to the direction of motion of a receding observer, look to the observer? Both the relativistic Doppler effect and the relativistic conservation of lateral distances, implicit in the Lorentz transformation, are valid. Nevertheless, the size of all objects in the receding frame can be shown to be changed. To keep the observed light consistent with the observed nodal separation, a scale transformation is required. The factor is the same as governs the frequency change. The proposed result is consistent with a recent size-change result obtained in a gravitational setting

  14. A Comprehensive Comparison of Relativistic Particle Integrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripperda, B.; Bacchini, F.; Teunissen, J.; Xia, C.; Porth, O.; Sironi, L.; Lapenta, G.; Keppens, R.

    2018-03-01

    We compare relativistic particle integrators commonly used in plasma physics, showing several test cases relevant for astrophysics. Three explicit particle pushers are considered, namely, the Boris, Vay, and Higuera–Cary schemes. We also present a new relativistic fully implicit particle integrator that is energy conserving. Furthermore, a method based on the relativistic guiding center approximation is included. The algorithms are described such that they can be readily implemented in magnetohydrodynamics codes or Particle-in-Cell codes. Our comparison focuses on the strengths and key features of the particle integrators. We test the conservation of invariants of motion and the accuracy of particle drift dynamics in highly relativistic, mildly relativistic, and non-relativistic settings. The methods are compared in idealized test cases, i.e., without considering feedback onto the electrodynamic fields, collisions, pair creation, or radiation. The test cases include uniform electric and magnetic fields, {\\boldsymbol{E}}× {\\boldsymbol{B}} fields, force-free fields, and setups relevant for high-energy astrophysics, e.g., a magnetic mirror, a magnetic dipole, and a magnetic null. These tests have direct relevance for particle acceleration in shocks and in magnetic reconnection.

  15. Can JWST Follow Up on Gravitational-Wave Detections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Bitten by the gravitational-wave bug? While we await Thursdays press conference, heres some food for thought: if LIGO were able to detect gravitational waves from compact-object mergers, how could we follow up on the detections? A new study investigates whether the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be able to observe electromagnetic signatures of some compact-object mergers.Hunting for MergersStudying compact-object mergers (mergers of black holes and neutron stars) can help us understand a wealth of subjects, like high-energy physics, how matter behaves at nuclear densities, how stars evolve, and how heavy elements in the universe were created.The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is searching for the signature ripples in spacetime identifying these mergers, but gravitational waves are squirrelly: LIGO will only be able to localize wave sources to tens of square degrees. If we want to find out more about any mergers LIGO discovers in gravitational waves, well need a follow-up search for electromagnetic counterparts with other observatories.The Kilonova KeyOne possible electromagnetic counterpart is kilonovae, explosions that can be produced during a merger of a binary neutron star or a neutron starblack hole system. If the neutron star is disrupted during the merger, some of the hot mass is flung outward and shines brightly by radioactive decay.Kilonovae are especially promising as electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves for three reasons:They emit isotropically, so the number of observable mergers isnt limited by relativistic beaming.They shine for a week, giving follow-up observatories time to search for them.The source location can beeasily recovered.The only problem? We dont currently have any sensitive survey instruments in the near-infrared band (where kilonova emission peaks) that can provide coverage over tens of square degrees. Luckily, we will soon have just the thing: JWST, launching in 2018!JWSTs

  16. Prevention of gravitational collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffat, J.W.; Taylor, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    We apply a new theory of gravitation to the question of gravitational collapse to show that collapse is prevented in this theory under very reasonable conditions. This result also extends to prevent ultimate collapse of the Universe. (orig.)

  17. Underdevelopment’s gravitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin Dinu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The energy necessary to escape the gravitational pull of underdevelopment and to enter an evolutional trajectory dependent on the gravitational pull of development is unintelligible in economic terms.

  18. Gravitational waves from neutron stars and asteroseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Wynn C. G.

    2018-05-01

    Neutron stars are born in the supernova explosion of massive stars. Neutron stars rotate as stably as atomic clocks and possess densities exceeding that of atomic nuclei and magnetic fields millions to billions of times stronger than those created in laboratories on the Earth. The physical properties of neutron stars are determined by many areas of fundamental physics, and detection of gravitational waves can provide invaluable insights into our understanding of these areas. Here, we describe some of the physics and astrophysics of neutron stars and how traditional electromagnetic wave observations provide clues to the sorts of gravitational waves we expect from these stars. We pay particular attention to neutron star fluid oscillations, examining their impact on electromagnetic and gravitational wave observations when these stars are in a wide binary or isolated system, then during binary inspiral right before merger, and finally at times soon after merger. This article is part of a discussion meeting issue `The promises of gravitational-wave astronomy'.

  19. Gravitation in Material Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2011-01-01

    When two gravitating bodies reside in a material medium, Newton's law of universal gravitation must be modified to account for the presence of the medium. A modified expression of Newton's law is known in the literature, but lacks a clear connection with existing gravitational theory. Newton's law in the presence of a homogeneous material medium…

  20. Detection of gravitational radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holten, J.W. van [ed.

    1994-12-31

    In this report the main contributions presented at the named symposium are collected. These concern astrophysical sources of gravitational radiation, ultracryogenic gravitational wave experiments, read out and data analysis of gravitational wave antennas, cryogenic aspects of large mass cooling to mK temperatures, and metallurgical and engineering aspects of large Cu structure manufacturing. (HSI).

  1. Detection of gravitational radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holten, J.W. van

    1994-01-01

    In this report the main contributions presented at the named symposium are collected. These concern astrophysical sources of gravitational radiation, ultracryogenic gravitational wave experiments, read out and data analysis of gravitational wave antennas, cryogenic aspects of large mass cooling to mK temperatures, and metallurgical and engineering aspects of large Cu structure manufacturing. (HSI)

  2. Relativity theory and gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondi, H.

    1986-01-01

    The paper on relativity theory and gravitation is presented as a preface to the first of the articles submitted to the Journal on general relativity. Newtonian gravitation and and observation, relativity, and the sources of the gravitational field, are all discussed. (UK)

  3. Gravitational wave emission from oscillating millisecond pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Mark G.; Schwenzer, Kai

    2015-02-01

    Neutron stars undergoing r-mode oscillation emit gravitational radiation that might be detected on the Earth. For known millisecond pulsars the observed spin-down rate imposes an upper limit on the possible gravitational wave signal of these sources. Taking into account the physics of r-mode evolution, we show that only sources spinning at frequencies above a few hundred Hertz can be unstable to r-modes, and we derive a more stringent universal r-mode spin-down limit on their gravitational wave signal. We find that this refined bound limits the gravitational wave strain from millisecond pulsars to values below the detection sensitivity of next generation detectors. Young sources are therefore a more promising option for the detection of gravitational waves emitted by r-modes and to probe the interior composition of compact stars in the near future.

  4. Relativistic hydrodynamic evolutions with black hole excision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duez, Matthew D.; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Yo, H.-J.

    2004-01-01

    We present a numerical code designed to study astrophysical phenomena involving dynamical spacetimes containing black holes in the presence of relativistic hydrodynamic matter. We present evolutions of the collapse of a fluid star from the onset of collapse to the settling of the resulting black hole to a final stationary state. In order to evolve stably after the black hole forms, we excise a region inside the hole before a singularity is encountered. This excision region is introduced after the appearance of an apparent horizon, but while a significant amount of matter remains outside the hole. We test our code by evolving accurately a vacuum Schwarzschild black hole, a relativistic Bondi accretion flow onto a black hole, Oppenheimer-Snyder dust collapse, and the collapse of nonrotating and rotating stars. These systems are tracked reliably for hundreds of M following excision, where M is the mass of the black hole. We perform these tests both in axisymmetry and in full 3+1 dimensions. We then apply our code to study the effect of the stellar spin parameter J/M 2 on the final outcome of gravitational collapse of rapidly rotating n=1 polytropes. We find that a black hole forms only if J/M 2 2 >1, the collapsing star forms a torus which fragments into nonaxisymmetric clumps, capable of generating appreciable 'splash' gravitational radiation

  5. Thermal effects in gravitational Hartree systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aki, Gonca L. [Weierstrass-Institut fuer Angewandte Analysis und Stochastik (WIAS) im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (Germany); Dolbeault, Jean [Paris-Dauphine Univ. (FR). Ceremade (UMR CNRS 7534); Sparber, Christof [Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science

    2010-07-01

    We consider the non-relativistic Hartree model in the gravitational case, i.e. with attractive Coulomb-Newton interaction. For a given mass M>0, we construct stationary states with non-zero temperature T by minimizing the corresponding free energy functional. It is proved that minimizers exist if and only if the temperature of the system is below a certain threshold T*>0 (possibly infinite), which itself depends on the specific choice of the entropy functional. We also investigate whether the corresponding minimizers are mixed or pure quantum states and characterize a critical temperature T{sub c} element of (0,T*) above which mixed states appear. (orig.)

  6. Thermal Effects in Gravitational Hartree Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Aki, Gonca L.

    2011-04-06

    We consider the non-relativistic Hartree model in the gravitational case, i. e. with attractive Coulomb-Newton interaction. For a given mass M > 0, we construct stationary states with non-zero temperature T by minimizing the corresponding free energy functional. It is proved that minimizers exist if and only if the temperature of the system is below a certain threshold T* > 0 (possibly infinite), which itself depends on the specific choice of the entropy functional. We also investigate whether the corresponding minimizers are mixed or pure quantum states and characterize a critical temperature Tc ∈ (0,T*) above which mixed states appear. © 2011 Springer Basel AG.

  7. Leading quantum gravitational corrections to QED

    OpenAIRE

    Butt, M. S.

    2006-01-01

    We consider the leading post-Newtonian and quantum corrections to the non-relativistic scattering amplitude of charged spin-1/2 fermions in the combined theory of general relativity and QED. The coupled Dirac-Einstein system is treated as an effective field theory. This allows for a consistent quantization of the gravitational field. The appropriate vertex rules are extracted from the action, and the non-analytic contributions to the 1-loop scattering matrix are calculated in the non-relativi...

  8. Thermal Effects in Gravitational Hartree Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Aki, Gonca L.; Dolbeault, Jean; Sparber, Christof

    2011-01-01

    We consider the non-relativistic Hartree model in the gravitational case, i. e. with attractive Coulomb-Newton interaction. For a given mass M > 0, we construct stationary states with non-zero temperature T by minimizing the corresponding free energy functional. It is proved that minimizers exist if and only if the temperature of the system is below a certain threshold T* > 0 (possibly infinite), which itself depends on the specific choice of the entropy functional. We also investigate whether the corresponding minimizers are mixed or pure quantum states and characterize a critical temperature Tc ∈ (0,T*) above which mixed states appear. © 2011 Springer Basel AG.

  9. Gravitational waves emitted by extrasolar planetary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berti, E.; Ferrari, V.

    2001-01-01

    The recently discovered Extrasolar Planetary Systems (EPS's) are potentially interesting sources of gravitational waves, since they are very close to Earth (at distances ∼ 10 pc), and their orbital features and positions in the sky are quite well known. As a first estimate, we compute the orbital emission of these systems using the quadrupole formula. Then we show that, in principle, the orbiting planet could resonantly excite the quasi-normal modes of the central star. We use the general-relativistic theory of stellar pulsations to estimate the effects of such a resonance on the gravitational-wave emission of the system. We also consider radiation-reaction effects on the orbital evolution, and give upper limits on the timescales required for a planet to get off-resonance. (author)

  10. Gravitational radiation from preheating with many fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jr, John T. Giblin; Price, Larry R.; Siemens, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Parametric resonances provide a mechanism by which particles can be created just after inflation. Thus far, attention has focused on a single or many inflaton fields coupled to a single scalar field. However, generically we expect the inflaton to couple to many other relativistic degrees of freedom present in the early universe. Using simulations in an expanding Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker spacetime, in this paper we show how preheating is affected by the addition of multiple fields coupled to the inflaton. We focus our attention on gravitational wave production — an important potential observational signature of the preheating stage. We find that preheating and its gravitational wave signature is robust to the coupling of the inflaton to more matter fields

  11. Gravitational radiation from preheating with many fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jr, John T. Giblin [Department of Physics, Kenyon College, 201 North College Road, Gambier, OH 43022 (United States); Price, Larry R.; Siemens, Xavier, E-mail: giblinj@kenyon.edu, E-mail: larry@gravity.phys.uwm.edu, E-mail: siemens@gravity.phys.uwm.edu [Center for Gravitation and Cosmology, Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin — Milwaukee, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Parametric resonances provide a mechanism by which particles can be created just after inflation. Thus far, attention has focused on a single or many inflaton fields coupled to a single scalar field. However, generically we expect the inflaton to couple to many other relativistic degrees of freedom present in the early universe. Using simulations in an expanding Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker spacetime, in this paper we show how preheating is affected by the addition of multiple fields coupled to the inflaton. We focus our attention on gravitational wave production — an important potential observational signature of the preheating stage. We find that preheating and its gravitational wave signature is robust to the coupling of the inflaton to more matter fields.

  12. Testing the gravitational interaction in the field of the Earth via satellite laser ranging and the Laser Ranged Satellites Experiment (LARASE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucchesi, D M; Peron, R; Visco, M; Anselmo, L; Pardini, C; Bassan, M; Pucacco, G

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the Laser Ranged Satellites Experiment (LARASE) is presented. This is a research program that aims to perform new refined tests and measurements of gravitation in the field of the Earth in the weak field and slow motion (WFSM) limit of general relativity (GR). For this objective we use the free available data relative to geodetic passive satellite lasers tracked from a network of ground stations by means of the satellite laser ranging (SLR) technique. After a brief introduction to GR and its WFSM limit, which aims to contextualize the physical background of the tests and measurements that LARASE will carry out, we focus on the current limits of validation of GR and on current constraints on the alternative theories of gravity that have been obtained with the precise SLR measurements of the two LAGEOS satellites performed so far. Afterward, we present the scientific goals of LARASE in terms of upcoming measurements and tests of relativistic physics. Finally, we introduce our activities and we give a number of new results regarding the improvements to the modelling of both gravitational and non-gravitational perturbations to the orbit of the satellites. These activities are a needed prerequisite to improve the forthcoming new measurements of gravitation. An innovation with respect to the past is the specialization of the models to the LARES satellite, especially for what concerns the modelling of its spin evolution, the neutral drag perturbation and the impact of Earth's solid tides on the satellite orbit. (paper)

  13. Workshop on relativistic astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramowicz, M.A.

    1989-12-01

    The consequences of the discovery of a half-millisecond pulsar in the Supernova SN 1987A, the problem of test particle motion in a given gravitational field and problems connected with the gravitational radiation are discussed. 10 refs, 2 figs

  14. Plasma relativistic microwave electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzelev, M.V.; Loza, O.T.; Rukhadze, A.A.; Strelkov, P.S.; Shkvarunets, A.G.

    2001-01-01

    One formulated the principles of plasma relativistic microwave electronics based on the induced Cherenkov radiation of electromagnetic waves at interaction of a relativistic electron beam with plasma. One developed the theory of plasma relativistic generators and accelerators of microwave radiation, designed and studied the prototypes of such devices. One studied theoretically the mechanisms of radiation, calculated the efficiencies and the frequency spectra of plasma relativistic microwave generators and accelerators. The theory findings are proved by the experiment: intensity of the designed sources of microwave radiation is equal to 500 μW, the frequency of microwave radiation is increased by 7 times (from 4 up to 28 GHz), the width of radiation frequency band may vary from several up to 100%. The designed sources of microwave radiation are no else compared in the electronics [ru

  15. Relativistic generalization and extension to the non-Abelian gauge theory of Feynman's proof of the Maxwell equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimura, Shogo

    1992-01-01

    R. P. Feynman showed F. J. Dyson a proof of the Lorentz force law and the homogeneous Maxwell equations, which he obtained starting from Newton's law of motion and the commutation relations between position and velocity for a single nonrelativistic particle. The author formulate both a special relativistic and a general relativistic version of Feynman's derivation. Especially in the general relativistic version they prove that the only possible fields that can consistently act on a quantum mechanical particle are scalar, gauge, and gravitational fields. They also extend Feynman's scheme to the case of non-Abelian gauge theory in the special relativistic context. 8 refs

  16. The relativistic rocket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antippa, Adel F [Departement de Physique, Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, Trois-Rivieres, Quebec G9A 5H7 (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    We solve the problem of the relativistic rocket by making use of the relation between Lorentzian and Galilean velocities, as well as the laws of superposition of successive collinear Lorentz boosts in the limit of infinitesimal boosts. The solution is conceptually simple, and technically straightforward, and provides an example of a powerful method that can be applied to a wide range of special relativistic problems of linear acceleration.

  17. Relativistic Quantum Revivals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strange, P.

    2010-01-01

    Quantum revivals are now a well-known phenomena within nonrelativistic quantum theory. In this Letter we display the effects of relativity on revivals and quantum carpets. It is generally believed that revivals do not occur within a relativistic regime. Here we show that while this is generally true, it is possible, in principle, to set up wave packets with specific mathematical properties that do exhibit exact revivals within a fully relativistic theory.

  18. Illuminating gravitational waves: A concordant picture of photons from a neutron star merger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasliwal, M. M.; Nakar, E.; Singer, L. P.; Kaplan, D. L.; Cook, D. O.; Van Sistine, A.; Lau, R. M.; Fremling, C.; Gottlieb, O.; Jencson, J. E.; Adams, S. M.; Feindt, U.; Hotokezaka, K.; Ghosh, S.; Perley, D. A.; Yu, P.-C.; Piran, T.; Allison, J. R.; Anupama, G. C.; Balasubramanian, A.; Bannister, K. W.; Bally, J.; Barnes, J.; Barway, S.; Bellm, E.; Bhalerao, V.; Bhattacharya, D.; Blagorodnova, N.; Bloom, J. S.; Brady, P. R.; Cannella, C.; Chatterjee, D.; Cenko, S. B.; Cobb, B. E.; Copperwheat, C.; Corsi, A.; De, K.; Dobie, D.; Emery, S. W. K.; Evans, P. A.; Fox, O. D.; Frail, D. A.; Frohmaier, C.; Goobar, A.; Hallinan, G.; Harrison, F.; Helou, G.; Hinderer, T.; Ho, A. Y. Q.; Horesh, A.; Ip, W.-H.; Itoh, R.; Kasen, D.; Kim, H.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Kupfer, T.; Lynch, C.; Madsen, K.; Mazzali, P. A.; Miller, A. A.; Mooley, K.; Murphy, T.; Ngeow, C.-C.; Nichols, D.; Nissanke, S.; Nugent, P.; Ofek, E. O.; Qi, H.; Quimby, R. M.; Rosswog, S.; Rusu, F.; Sadler, E. M.; Schmidt, P.; Sollerman, J.; Steele, I.; Williamson, A. R.; Xu, Y.; Yan, L.; Yatsu, Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhao, W.

    2017-12-01

    Merging neutron stars offer an excellent laboratory for simultaneously studying strong-field gravity and matter in extreme environments. We establish the physical association of an electromagnetic counterpart (EM170817) with gravitational waves (GW170817) detected from merging neutron stars. By synthesizing a panchromatic data set, we demonstrate that merging neutron stars are a long-sought production site forging heavy elements by r-process nucleosynthesis. The weak gamma rays seen in EM170817 are dissimilar to classical short gamma-ray bursts with ultrarelativistic jets. Instead, we suggest that breakout of a wide-angle, mildly relativistic cocoon engulfing the jet explains the low-luminosity gamma rays, the high-luminosity ultraviolet-optical-infrared, and the delayed radio and x-ray emission. We posit that all neutron star mergers may lead to a wide-angle cocoon breakout, sometimes accompanied by a successful jet and sometimes by a choked jet.

  19. Relativistic structure, stability, and gravitational collapse of charged neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghezzi, Cristian R.

    2005-01-01

    Charged stars have the potential of becoming charged black holes or even naked singularities. We present a set of numerical solutions of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov equations that represents spherical charged compact stars in hydrostatic equilibrium. The stellar models obtained are evolved forward in time integrating the Einstein-Maxwell field equations. We assume an equation of state of a neutron gas at zero temperature. The charge distribution is taken as being proportional to the rest mass density distribution. The set of solutions present an unstable branch, even with charge-to-mass ratios arbitrarily close to the extremum case. We perform a direct check of the stability of the solutions under strong perturbations and for different values of the charge-to-mass ratio. The stars that are in the stable branch oscillate and do not collapse, while models in the unstable branch collapse directly to form black holes. Stars with a charge greater than or equal to the extreme value explode. When a charged star is suddenly discharged, it does not necessarily collapse to form a black hole. A nonlinear effect that gives rise to the formation of a shell of matter (in supermassive stars), is negligible in the present simulations. The results are in agreement with the third law of black hole thermodynamics and with the cosmic censorship conjecture

  20. Relativistic viscoelastic fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Sakatani, Yuho

    2011-01-01

    A detailed study is carried out for the relativistic theory of viscoelasticity which was recently constructed on the basis of Onsager's linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. After rederiving the theory using a local argument with the entropy current, we show that this theory universally reduces to the standard relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics in the long time limit. Since effects of elasticity are taken into account, the dynamics at short time scales is modified from that given by the Navier-Stokes equations, so that acausal problems intrinsic to relativistic Navier-Stokes fluids are significantly remedied. We in particular show that the wave equations for the propagation of disturbance around a hydrostatic equilibrium in Minkowski space-time become symmetric hyperbolic for some range of parameters, so that the model is free of acausality problems. This observation suggests that the relativistic viscoelastic model with such parameters can be regarded as a causal completion of relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics. By adjusting parameters to various values, this theory can treat a wide variety of materials including elastic materials, Maxwell materials, Kelvin-Voigt materials, and (a nonlinearly generalized version of) simplified Israel-Stewart fluids, and thus we expect the theory to be the most universal description of single-component relativistic continuum materials. We also show that the presence of strains and the corresponding change in temperature are naturally unified through the Tolman law in a generally covariant description of continuum mechanics.

  1. Relativistic viscoelastic fluid mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Sakatani, Yuho

    2011-08-01

    A detailed study is carried out for the relativistic theory of viscoelasticity which was recently constructed on the basis of Onsager's linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. After rederiving the theory using a local argument with the entropy current, we show that this theory universally reduces to the standard relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics in the long time limit. Since effects of elasticity are taken into account, the dynamics at short time scales is modified from that given by the Navier-Stokes equations, so that acausal problems intrinsic to relativistic Navier-Stokes fluids are significantly remedied. We in particular show that the wave equations for the propagation of disturbance around a hydrostatic equilibrium in Minkowski space-time become symmetric hyperbolic for some range of parameters, so that the model is free of acausality problems. This observation suggests that the relativistic viscoelastic model with such parameters can be regarded as a causal completion of relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics. By adjusting parameters to various values, this theory can treat a wide variety of materials including elastic materials, Maxwell materials, Kelvin-Voigt materials, and (a nonlinearly generalized version of) simplified Israel-Stewart fluids, and thus we expect the theory to be the most universal description of single-component relativistic continuum materials. We also show that the presence of strains and the corresponding change in temperature are naturally unified through the Tolman law in a generally covariant description of continuum mechanics.

  2. Dissipative relativistic hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imshennik, V.S.; Morozov, Yu.I.

    1989-01-01

    Using the comoving reference frame in the general non-inertial case, the relativistic hydrodynamics equations are derived with an account for dissipative effects in the matter. From the entropy production equation, the exact from for the dissipative tensor components is obtained. As a result, the closed system of equations of dissipative relativistic hydrodynamics is obtained in the comoving reference frame as a relativistic generalization of the known Navier-Stokes equations for Lagrange coordinates. Equations of relativistic hydrodynamics with account for dissipative effects in the matter are derived using the assocoated reference system in general non-inertial case. True form of the dissipative tensor components is obtained from entropy production equation. Closed system of equations for dissipative relativistic hydrodynamics is obtained as a result in the assocoated reference system (ARS) - relativistic generalization of well-known Navier-Stokes equations for Lagrange coordinates. Equation system, obtained in this paper for ARS, may be effectively used in numerical models of explosive processes with 10 51 erg energy releases which are characteristic for flashes of supernovae, if white dwarf type compact target suggested as presupernova

  3. Testing the gravitational instability hypothesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babul, Arif; Weinberg, David H.; Dekel, Avishai; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1994-01-01

    that show correlations between galaxy density and velocity fields can rule out some physically interesting models of large-scale structure. In particular, successful reconstructions constrain the nature of any bias between the galaxy and mass distributions, since processes that modulate the efficiency of galaxy formation on large scales in a way that violates the continuity equation also produce a mismatch between the observed galaxy density and the density inferred from the peculiar velocity field. We obtain successful reconstructions for a gravitational model with peaks biasing, but we also show examples of gravitational and nongravitational models that fail reconstruction tests because of more complicated modulations of galaxy formation.

  4. Review of multi-dimensional large-scale kinetic simulation and physics validation of ion acceleration in relativistic laser-matter interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Hui-Chun; Hegelich, B.M.; Fernandez, J.C.; Shah, R.C.; Palaniyappan, S.; Jung, D.; Yin, L.; Albright, B.J.; Bowers, K.; Kwan, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    Two new experimental technologies enabled realization of Break-out afterburner (BOA) - High quality Trident laser and free-standing C nm-targets. VPIC is an powerful tool for fundamental research of relativistic laser-matter interaction. Predictions from VPIC are validated - Novel BOA and Solitary ion acceleration mechanisms. VPIC is a fully explicit Particle In Cell (PIC) code: models plasma as billions of macro-particles moving on a computational mesh. VPIC particle advance (which typically dominates computation) has been optimized extensively for many different supercomputers. Laser-driven ions lead to realization promising applications - Ion-based fast ignition; active interrogation, hadron therapy.

  5. Properties of general relativistic kink solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, T.; Oliveira, L.C.S. de; Santos, F.C.

    1978-12-01

    Properties of the general relativistic kink solution of a nonlinear scalar field recently obtained, are discussed. It has been shown that the kink solution is stable against radical perturbations. Possible applications to Hadron physics from the geometrodynamic point of view are suggested [pt

  6. Consistent resolution of some relativistic quantum paradoxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, Robert B.

    2002-01-01

    A relativistic version of the (consistent or decoherent) histories approach to quantum theory is developed on the basis of earlier work by Hartle, and used to discuss relativistic forms of the paradoxes of spherical wave packet collapse, Bohm's formulation of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox, and Hardy's paradox. It is argued that wave function collapse is not needed for introducing probabilities into relativistic quantum mechanics, and in any case should never be thought of as a physical process. Alternative approaches to stochastic time dependence can be used to construct a physical picture of the measurement process that is less misleading than collapse models. In particular, one can employ a coarse-grained but fully quantum-mechanical description in which particles move along trajectories, with behavior under Lorentz transformations the same as in classical relativistic physics, and detectors are triggered by particles reaching them along such trajectories. States entangled between spacelike separate regions are also legitimate quantum descriptions, and can be consistently handled by the formalism presented here. The paradoxes in question arise because of using modes of reasoning which, while correct for classical physics, are inconsistent with the mathematical structure of quantum theory, and are resolved (or tamed) by using a proper quantum analysis. In particular, there is no need to invoke, nor any evidence for, mysterious long-range superluminal influences, and thus no incompatibility, at least from this source, between relativity theory and quantum mechanics

  7. Global existence proof for relativistic Boltzmann equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudynski, M.; Ekiel-Jezewska, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    The existence and causality of solutions to the relativistic Boltzmann equation in L 1 and in L loc 1 are proved. The solutions are shown to satisfy physically natural a priori bounds, time-independent in L 1 . The results rely upon new techniques developed for the nonrelativistic Boltzmann equation by DiPerna and Lions

  8. Relativistic generalization of the Newtonian force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qadir, A.; Quamar, J.

    1982-06-01

    Whereas there is no denying the essential contribution of geometrodynamics, it must be admitted that our physical intuition is still firmly based in the Newtonian concept of force. Here we extend some earlier work re-introducing the Newtonian force concept into relativity theory. Some fundamentally new insights into the relativistic effects due to charge and rotation are presented. (author)

  9. Relativistic rotation and the anholonomic object

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corum, J.F.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this communication is to call attention to the conceptual economy provided by the object of anholonomity for the theory of relativity. This geometric object expresses certain consequences of relativity theory and provides a single, simple framework for discussing a variety of phenomena. It particularly clarifies the description of relativistic rotation. The relativistic rotational transformation of the four coordinate differentials of flat space--time generates a set of anholonomic, or inexact differentials, whose duals are an orthogonal set of basis vectors. How should a rotating observer interpret physical events referred to such orthogonal, but anholonomic frames The answer to this question rests upon the origin and physical significance of the object of anholonomity. It is demonstrated that not only is the rotational Lorentz transformation an anholonomic transformation, but that the intrinsic anholonomic effects are essential to interpreting rotational phenomena. In particular, the Sagnac effect may be interpreted as the physical manifestation of temporal anholonomity under rotation. The Thomas precession of a reference axis may be interpreted as a consequence of the spatial anholonomity of the rotating frame. Further, the full four-dimensional covariance of Maxwellian electrodynamics, under a relativistic Lorentz rotation, is possible only with the inclusion of anholonomic effects. The anholonomic approach clarifies the distinction between the physically different operations of source rotation and observer rotation in a flat space--time. It is finally concluded that a consistant theory of relativistic rotation, satisfying the principle of general covariance, inherently requires the presence of the object of anholonomity

  10. New Metrics from a Fractional Gravitational Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Nabulsi, Rami Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Agop et al. proved in Commun. Theor. Phys. (2008) that, a Reissner–Nordstrom type metric is obtained, if gauge gravitational field in a fractal spacetime is constructed by means of concepts of scale relativity. We prove in this short communication that similar result is obtained if gravity in D-spacetime dimensions is fractionalized by means of the Glaeske–Kilbas–Saigo fractional. Besides, non-singular gravitational fields are obtained without using extra-dimensions. We present few examples to show that these gravitational fields hold a number of motivating features in spacetime physics. (paper)

  11. Detecting the Stochastic Gravitational-Wave Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colacino, Carlo Nicola

    2017-12-01

    The stochastic gravitational-wave background (SGWB) is by far the most difficult source of gravitational radiation detect. At the same time, it is the most interesting and intriguing one. This book describes the initial detection of the SGWB and describes the underlying mathematics behind one of the most amazing discoveries of the 21st century. On the experimental side it would mean that interferometric gravitational wave detectors work even better than expected. On the observational side, such a detection could give us information about the very early Universe, information that could not be obtained otherwise. Even negative results and improved upper bounds could put constraints on many cosmological and particle physics models.

  12. Non-Euclidean Geometry and Gravitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavroulakis N.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A great deal of misunderstandings and mathematical errors are involved in the currently accepted theory of the gravitational field generated by an isotropic spherical mass. The purpose of the present paper is to provide a short account of the rigorous mathematical theory and exhibit a new formulation of the problem. The solution of the corresponding equations of gravitation points out several new and unusual features of the stationary gravitational field which are related to the non-Euclidean structure of the space. Moreover it precludes the black hole from being a mathematical and physical notion.

  13. Gravitational wave extraction in simulations of rotating stellar core collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reisswig, C.; Ott, C. D.; Sperhake, U.; Schnetter, E.

    2011-01-01

    We perform simulations of general relativistic rotating stellar core collapse and compute the gravitational waves (GWs) emitted in the core-bounce phase of three representative models via multiple techniques. The simplest technique, the quadrupole formula (QF), estimates the GW content in the spacetime from the mass-quadrupole tensor only. It is strictly valid only in the weak-field and slow-motion approximation. For the first time, we apply GW extraction methods in core collapse that are fully curvature based and valid for strongly radiating and highly relativistic sources. These techniques are not restricted to weak-field and slow-motion assumptions. We employ three extraction methods computing (i) the Newman-Penrose (NP) scalar Ψ 4 , (ii) Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli-Moncrief master functions, and (iii) Cauchy-characteristic extraction (CCE) allowing for the extraction of GWs at future null infinity, where the spacetime is asymptotically flat and the GW content is unambiguously defined. The latter technique is the only one not suffering from residual gauge and finite-radius effects. All curvature-based methods suffer from strong nonlinear drifts. We employ the fixed-frequency integration technique as a high-pass waveform filter. Using the CCE results as a benchmark, we find that finite-radius NP extraction yields results that agree nearly perfectly in phase, but differ in amplitude by ∼1%-7% at core bounce, depending on the model. Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli-Moncrief waveforms, while, in general, agreeing in phase, contain spurious high-frequency noise of comparable amplitudes to those of the relatively weak GWs emitted in core collapse. We also find remarkably good agreement of the waveforms obtained from the QF with those obtained from CCE. The results from QF agree very well in phase and systematically underpredict peak amplitudes by ∼5%-11%, which is comparable to the NP results and is certainly within the uncertainties associated with core collapse physics.

  14. The relativistic Brownian motion: Interdisciplinary applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragones-Munoz, A; Sandoval-Villalbazo, A

    2010-01-01

    Relativistic Brownian motion theory will be applied to the study of analogies between physical and economic systems, emphasizing limiting cases in which Gaussian distributions are no longer valid. The characteristic temperatures of the particles will be associated with the concept of variance, and this will allow us to choose whether the pertinent distribution is classical or relativistic, while working specific situations. The properties of particles can be interpreted as economic variables, in order to study the behavior of markets in terms of Levy financial processes, since markets behave as stochastic systems. As far as we know, the application of the Juettner distribution to the study of economic systems is a new idea.

  15. The impact of particle production on gravitational baryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, J.A.S., E-mail: jas.lima@iag.usp.br [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão 1226, 05508-900, São Paulo (Brazil); Singleton, D., E-mail: dougs@csufresno.edu [Department of Physics, California State University Fresno, Fresno, CA 93740-8031 (United States); ICTP South American Institute for Fundamental Research, UNESP – Univ. Estadual Paulista, Rua Dr. Bento T. Ferraz 271, 01140-070, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics Al-Farabi KazNU, Almaty, 050040 (Kazakhstan)

    2016-11-10

    Baryogenesis driven by curvature effects is investigated by taking into account gravitationally induced particle production in the very early Universe. In our scenario, the baryon asymmetry is generated dynamically during an inflationary epoch powered by ultra-relativistic particles. The adiabatic particle production rate provides both the needed negative pressure to accelerate the radiation dominated Universe and a non-zero chemical potential which distinguishes baryons and anti-baryons thereby producing a baryon asymmetry in agreement with the observed value. Reciprocally, the present day asymmetry may be used to determine the inflationary scale at early times. Successful gravitational baryogenesis is dynamically generated for many different choices of the relevant model parameters.

  16. About the short-scale perturbations of plasma in gravitational field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gedalin, M.E.; Machabeli, G.Z.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of plasma wave generation and propagation in the presence of strong gravitational fields is studied in the framework of general relativity theory. The coupled relativistic hydrodynamic and Maxwellian equations are solved in circumstances of the surface of the neutron star. The wave solution of the system of equation is analyzed, some limit cases are discussed in detail. The instability criteria of relativistic plasma are also found. (D.Gy.)

  17. Studying extremely peripheral collisions of relativistic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatyga, M.

    1990-01-01

    Relativistic heavy ion facilities have been proposed (and in some cases constructed) with an intent to search for a new state of matter, a quark gluon plasma. As with all tools in the experimental physics, one should always search for ways in which relativistic heavy ions can be used to study physical phenomena beyond this original goal. New possibilities for a study of higher order photonuclear excitations in extremely peripheral collisions of relativistic heavy ions are discussed in this contribution. Data on the electromagnetic and nuclear fragmentation of a 14.6Gev/nucleon 28 Si projectile are presented

  18. A course in classical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bettini, Alessandro

    This first volume covers the mechanics of point particles, gravitation, extended systems (starting from the two-body system), the basic concepts of relativistic mechanics and the mechanics of rigid bodies and fluids. The four-volume textbook, which covers electromagnetism, mechanics, fluids and thermodynamics, and waves and light, is designed to reflect the typical syllabus during the first two years of a calculus-based university physics program. Throughout all four volumes, particular attention is paid to in-depth clarification of conceptual aspects, and to this end the historical roots of the principal concepts are traced. Writings by the founders of classical mechanics, G. Galilei and I. Newton, are reproduced, encouraging students to consult them. Emphasis is also consistently placed on the experimental basis of the concepts, highlighting the experimental nature of physics. Whenever feasible at the elementary level, concepts relevant to more advanced courses in modern physics are included. Each chapter b...

  19. Theory of relativistic radiation reflection from plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonoskov, Arkady

    2018-01-01

    We consider the reflection of relativistically strong radiation from plasma and identify the physical origin of the electrons' tendency to form a thin sheet, which maintains its localisation throughout its motion. Thereby, we justify the principle of relativistic electronic spring (RES) proposed in [Gonoskov et al., Phys. Rev. E 84, 046403 (2011)]. Using the RES principle, we derive a closed set of differential equations that describe the reflection of radiation with arbitrary variation of polarization and intensity from plasma with an arbitrary density profile for an arbitrary angle of incidence. We confirm with ab initio PIC simulations that the developed theory accurately describes laser-plasma interactions in the regime where the reflection of relativistically strong radiation is accompanied by significant, repeated relocation of plasma electrons. In particular, the theory can be applied for the studies of plasma heating and coherent and incoherent emissions in the RES regime of high-intensity laser-plasma interaction.

  20. Relativistic dynamical reduction models and nonlocality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghirardi, G.C.; Grassi, R.

    1990-09-01

    We discuss some features of continuous dynamical models yielding state vector reduction and we briefly sketch some recent attempts to get a relativistic generalization of them. Within the relativistic context we analyze in detail the local an nonlocal features of the reduction mechanism and we investigate critically the possibility of attributing objective properties to individual systems in the micro and macroscopic cases. At the nonrelativistic level, two physically equivalent versions of continuous reduction mechanisms have been presented. However, only one of them can be taken as a starting point for the above considered relativistic generalization. By resorting to counterfactual arguments we show that the reason for this lies in the fact that the stochasticity involved in the two approaches has different conceptual implications. (author). 7 refs, 4 figs

  1. Relativistic modeling capabilities in PERSEUS extended MHD simulation code for HED plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlin, Nathaniel D., E-mail: nh322@cornell.edu [438 Rhodes Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853 (United States); Seyler, Charles E., E-mail: ces7@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    We discuss the incorporation of relativistic modeling capabilities into the PERSEUS extended MHD simulation code for high-energy-density (HED) plasmas, and present the latest hybrid X-pinch simulation results. The use of fully relativistic equations enables the model to remain self-consistent in simulations of such relativistic phenomena as X-pinches and laser-plasma interactions. By suitable formulation of the relativistic generalized Ohm’s law as an evolution equation, we have reduced the recovery of primitive variables, a major technical challenge in relativistic codes, to a straightforward algebraic computation. Our code recovers expected results in the non-relativistic limit, and reveals new physics in the modeling of electron beam acceleration following an X-pinch. Through the use of a relaxation scheme, relativistic PERSEUS is able to handle nine orders of magnitude in density variation, making it the first fluid code, to our knowledge, that can simulate relativistic HED plasmas.

  2. Five-dimensional Hamiltonian-Jacobi approach to relativistic quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, Harald

    2003-01-01

    A novel theory is outlined for describing the dynamics of relativistic electrons and positrons. By introducing the Lorentz-invariant universal time as a fifth independent variable, the Hamilton-Jacobi formalism of classical mechanics is extended from three to four spatial dimensions. This approach allows one to incorporate gravitation and spin interactions in the extended five-dimensional Lagrangian in a covariant form. The universal time has the function of a hidden Bell parameter. By employing the method of variation with respect to the four coordinates of the particle and the components of the electromagnetic field, the path equation and the electromagnetic field produced by the charge and the spin of the moving particle are derived. In addition the covariant equations for the dynamics of the components of the spin tensor are obtained. These equations can be transformed to the familiar BMT equation in the case of homogeneous electromagnetic fields. The quantization of the five-dimensional Hamilton-Jacobi equation yields a five-dimensional spinor wave equation, which degenerates to the Dirac equation in the stationary case if we neglect gravitation. The quantity which corresponds to the probability density of standard quantum mechanics is the four-dimensional mass density which has a real physical meaning. By means of the Green method the wave equation is transformed into an integral equation enabling a covariant relativistic path integral formulation. Using this approach a very accurate approximation for the four-dimensional propagator is derived. The proposed formalism makes Dirac's hole theory obsolete and can readily be extended to many particles

  3. Gravitational Wave Astronomy

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    Gravitational wave astronomy is expected to become an observational field within the next decade. First direct detection of gravitational waves is possible with existing terrestrial-based detectors, and highly probable with proposed upgrades. In this three-part lecture series, we give an overview of the field, including material on gravitional wave sources, detection methods, some details of interferometric detectors, data analysis methods, and current results from observational data-taking runs of the LIGO and GEO projects.

  4. RELATIVISTIC MEASUREMENTS FROM TIMING THE BINARY PULSAR PSR B1913+16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisberg, J. M.; Huang, Y., E-mail: jweisber@carleton.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Carleton College, Northfield, MN 55057 (United States)

    2016-09-20

    We present relativistic analyses of 9257 measurements of times-of-arrival from the first binary pulsar, PSR B1913+16, acquired over the last 35 years. The determination of the “Keplerian” orbital elements plus two relativistic terms completely characterizes the binary system, aside from an unknown rotation about the line of sight, leading to a determination of the masses of the pulsar and its companion: 1.438 ± 0.001 M {sub ☉} and 1.390 ± 0.001 M {sub ☉}, respectively. In addition, the complete system characterization allows for the creation of relativistic gravitation test by comparing measured and predicted sizes of various relativistic phenomena. We find that the ratio of the observed orbital period decrease caused by gravitational wave damping (corrected by a kinematic term) to the general relativistic prediction is 0.9983 ± 0.0016, thereby confirms the existence and strength of gravitational radiation as predicted by general relativity. For the first time in this system, we have also successfully measured the two parameters characterizing the Shapiro gravitational propagation delay, and found that their values are consistent with general relativistic predictions. For the first time in any system, we have also measured the relativistic shape correction to the elliptical orbit, δ {sub θ} , although its intrinsic value is obscured by currently unquantified pulsar emission beam aberration. We have also marginally measured the time derivative of the projected semimajor axis, which, when improved in combination with beam aberration modeling from geodetic precession observations, should ultimately constrain the pulsar’s moment of inertia.

  5. Relativistic classical strings. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvao, C.A.P.

    1985-01-01

    The interactions of strings with electromagnetic and gravitational fields are extensively discussed. Some concepts of differential geometry are reviewed. Strings in Kaluza-Klein manifolds are studied. (L.C.) [pt

  6. Status of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.

    1990-01-01

    Accelerator Physics issues, such as the dynamical aperture, the beam lifetime and the current--intensity limitation are carefully studied for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The single layer superconducting magnets, of 8 cm coil inner diameter, satisfying the beam stability requirements have also been successfully tested. The proposal has generated wide spread interest in the particle and nuclear physics. 1 ref., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Verifying the gravitational shift due to the earth's rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briatore, L.; Leschiutta, S.

    1976-01-01

    Data on various independent time scales kept in different laboratories are elaborated in order to verify the gravitational shift due to the earth's rotation. It is shown that the state of the art in the measurement of time is just now resulting in the possibility to make measurement of Δ t/t approximately 10 -13 . Moreover it is shown an experimental evidence of the earth's rotation relativistic effects

  8. Relativistic and non-relativistic studies of nuclear matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banerjee, MK; Tjon, JA

    2002-01-01

    We point out that the differences between the results of the non-relativistic lowest order Brueckner theory (LOBT) and the relativistic Dirac-Brueckner analysis predominantly arise from two sources. Besides effects from a nucleon mass modification M* in nuclear medium we have in a relativistic

  9. Modified gravity (MOG), the speed of gravitational radiation and the event GW170817/GRB170817A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, M. A.; Moffat, J. W.; Toth, V. T.

    2018-05-01

    Modified gravity (MOG) is a covariant, relativistic, alternative gravitational theory whose field equations are derived from an action that supplements the spacetime metric tensor with vector and scalar fields. Both gravitational (spin 2) and electromagnetic waves travel on null geodesics of the theory's one metric. MOG satisfies the weak equivalence principle and is consistent with observations of the neutron star merger and gamma ray burster event GW170817/GRB170817A.

  10. Relativistic quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Horwitz, Lawrence P

    2015-01-01

    This book describes a relativistic quantum theory developed by the author starting from the E.C.G. Stueckelberg approach proposed in the early 40s. In this framework a universal invariant evolution parameter (corresponding to the time originally postulated by Newton) is introduced to describe dynamical evolution. This theory is able to provide solutions for some of the fundamental problems encountered in early attempts to construct a relativistic quantum theory. A relativistically covariant construction is given for which particle spins and angular momenta can be combined through the usual rotation group Clebsch-Gordan coefficients. Solutions are defined for both the classical and quantum two body bound state and scattering problems. The recently developed quantum Lax-Phillips theory of semigroup evolution of resonant states is described. The experiment of Lindner and coworkers on interference in time is discussed showing how the property of coherence in time provides a simple understanding of the results. Th...

  11. Handbook of relativistic quantum chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Wenjian

    2017-01-01

    This handbook focuses on the foundations of relativistic quantum mechanics and addresses a number of fundamental issues never covered before in a book. For instance: How can many-body theory be combined with quantum electrodynamics? How can quantum electrodynamics be interfaced with relativistic quantum chemistry? What is the most appropriate relativistic many-electron Hamiltonian? How can we achieve relativistic explicit correlation? How can we formulate relativistic properties? - just to name a few. Since relativistic quantum chemistry is an integral component of computational chemistry, this handbook also supplements the ''Handbook of Computational Chemistry''. Generally speaking, it aims to establish the 'big picture' of relativistic molecular quantum mechanics as the union of quantum electrodynamics and relativistic quantum chemistry. Accordingly, it provides an accessible introduction for readers new to the field, presents advanced methodologies for experts, and discusses possible future perspectives, helping readers understand when/how to apply/develop the methodologies.

  12. Handbook of relativistic quantum chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wenjian (ed.) [Peking Univ., Beijing (China). Center for Computational Science and Engineering

    2017-03-01

    This handbook focuses on the foundations of relativistic quantum mechanics and addresses a number of fundamental issues never covered before in a book. For instance: How can many-body theory be combined with quantum electrodynamics? How can quantum electrodynamics be interfaced with relativistic quantum chemistry? What is the most appropriate relativistic many-electron Hamiltonian? How can we achieve relativistic explicit correlation? How can we formulate relativistic properties? - just to name a few. Since relativistic quantum chemistry is an integral component of computational chemistry, this handbook also supplements the ''Handbook of Computational Chemistry''. Generally speaking, it aims to establish the 'big picture' of relativistic molecular quantum mechanics as the union of quantum electrodynamics and relativistic quantum chemistry. Accordingly, it provides an accessible introduction for readers new to the field, presents advanced methodologies for experts, and discusses possible future perspectives, helping readers understand when/how to apply/develop the methodologies.

  13. Dark matter: a problem in relativistic metrology?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lusanna, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Besides the tidal degrees of freedom of Einstein general relativity (GR) (namely the two polarizations of gravitational waves after linearization of the theory) there are the inertial gauge ones connected with the freedom in the choice of the 4-coordinates of the space-time, i.e. in the choice of the notions of time and 3-space (the 3+1 splitting of space-time) and in their use to define a non-inertial frame (the inertial ones being forbidden by the equivalence principle) by means of a set of conventions for the relativistic metrology of the space-time (like the GPS ones near the Earth). The canonical York basis of canonical ADM gravity allows us to identify the Hamiltonian inertial gauge variables in globally hyperbolic asymptotically Minkowskian space-times without super-translations and to define the family of non-harmonic Schwinger time gauges. In these 3+1 splittings of space-time the freedom in the choice of time (the problem of clock synchronization) is described by the inertial gauge variable York time (the trace of the extrinsic curvature of the instantaneous 3-spaces). This inertial gauge freedom and the non-Euclidean nature of the instantaneous 3-spaces required by the equivalence principle need to be incorporated as metrical conventions in a relativistic suitable extension of the existing (essentially Galilean) ICRS celestial reference system. In this paper I make a short review of the existing possibilities to explain the presence of dark matter (or at least of part of it) as a relativistic inertial effect induced by the non- Euclidean nature of the 3-spaces. After a Hamiltonian Post-Minkowskian (HPM) linearization of canonical ADM tetrad gravity with particles, having equal inertial and gravitational masses, as matter, followed by a Post-Newtonian (PN) expansion, we find that the Newtonian equality of inertial and gravitational masses breaks down and that the inertial gauge York time produces an increment of the inertial masses explaining at least

  14. Primordial gravitational waves and cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Lawrence M; Dodelson, Scott; Meyer, Stephan

    2010-05-21

    The observation of primordial gravitational waves could provide a new and unique window on the earliest moments in the history of the universe and on possible new physics at energies many orders of magnitude beyond those accessible at particle accelerators. Such waves might be detectable soon, in current or planned satellite experiments that will probe for characteristic imprints in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background, or later with direct space-based interferometers. A positive detection could provide definitive evidence for inflation in the early universe and would constrain new physics from the grand unification scale to the Planck scale.

  15. Asymptotic matching of the solar-system gravitational yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopejkin, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    In the framework of the general relativity, the structure of the Solar-system gravitational fields is investigated and the relativistic formulae of transformation between nonrotating in the dynamical sense harmonic reference systems - barycentric, planetocentric and topocentric (satelite) ones - are derived by the method of the asymptotic mathing of components of the metric tensor. The derived formulae generalize the linear Poincare transformation in the case of curved space-time. With the help of the asymptotic matching formulae, the relationships between relativistic time scales inside the Solar system have been established, the equations of relativistic precession of the space axis of one reference system with respect to another one have been derived, the equations of translational motion of the center-of-mass of planets (the Sun) and their satellites have been obtained

  16. Biquaternions and relativistic kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogush, A.A.; Kurochkin, Yu.A.; Fedorov, F.I.

    1979-01-01

    The problems concerning the use of quaternion interpretation of the Lorentz group vector parametrization are considered for solving relativistic kinematics problems. A vector theory convenient for describing the characteristic features of the Lobachevsky space is suggested. The kinematics of elementary particle scattering is investigated on the basis of this theory. A synthesis of vector parametrization and of quaternion calculation has been shown to lead to natural formulation of the theory of vectors in the three-dimensional Lobachevsky space, realized on mass hyperboloids of relativistic particles

  17. Relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barz, H.W.; Kaempfer, B.; Schulz, H.

    1984-12-01

    An elementary introduction is given into the scenario of relativistic heavy ion collisions. It deals with relativistic kinematics and estimates of energy densities, extrapolations of the present knowledge of hadron-hadron and hadron-nuleus to nucleus-nucleus collisions, the properties of the quark-gluon plasma and the formation of the plasma and possible experimental signatures. Comments are made on a cosmic ray experiment which could be interpreted as a first indication of the quark-gluon phase of the matter. (author)

  18. Gravitational lensing and extra dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, X-G.; University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC; Joshi, G.C.; McKellar, B.H.J.

    1999-08-01

    We study gravitational tensing and the bending of light in low energy scale (M s ) gravity theories with extra space-time dimensions 'n'. We find that due to the presence of spin-2 Kaluza-Klein states from compactification, a correction to the deflection angle with a strong quadratic dependence on the photon energy is introduced. No deviation from the Einstein General Relativity prediction for the deflection angle for photons grazing the Sun in the visible band with 15% accuracy (90% c.l.) implies that the scale M s has to be larger than 1.4(2/(n-2)) 1/4 TeV and approximately 4 TeV for n=2. This lower bound is comparable with that from collider physics constraints. Gravitational tensing experiments with higher energy photons can provide stronger constraints. (authors)

  19. Gravitating multidefects from higher dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2007-01-01

    Warped configurations admitting pairs of gravitating defects are analyzed. After devising a general method for the construction of multidefects, specific examples are presented in the case of higher-dimensional Einstein-Hilbert gravity. The obtained profiles describe diverse physical situations such as (topological) kink-antikink systems, pairs of non-topological solitons and bound configurations of a kink and of a non-topological soliton. In all the mentioned cases the geometry is always well behaved (all relevant curvature invariants are regular) and tends to five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space-time for large asymptotic values of the bulk coordinate. Particular classes of solutions can be generalized to the framework where the gravity part of the action includes, as a correction, the Euler-Gauss-Bonnet combination. After scrutinizing the structure of the zero modes, the obtained results are compared with conventional gravitating configurations containing a single topological defect.

  20. Gravitational effects in field gravitation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, V.I.; Logunov, A.A.; Mestvirishvili, M.A.; Vlasov, A.A.

    1979-01-01

    The possibilities to describe various gravitation effects of field gravitation theory (FGT) are considered. Past-Newtonian approximation of the FGT has been constructed and on the basis of this approximation it has been shown that the field theory allows one to describe the whole set of experimental facts. The comparison of post-Newtonian parameters in FGT with those in the Einstein's theory makes it clear that these two; theories are undistinguishable from the viewpoint of any experiments, realized with post-Newtonian accuracy. Gravitational field of an island type source with spherically symmetrical distribution of matter and unstationary homogeneous model of Universe, which allows to describe the effect of cosmological red shift, are considered

  1. Optical-Gravitation Nonlinearity: A Change of Gravitational Coefficient G induced by Gravitation Field

    OpenAIRE

    R. Vlokh; M. Kostyrko

    2006-01-01

    Nonlinear effect of the gravitation field of spherically symmetric mass on the gravitational coefficient G has been analysed. In frame of the approaches of parametric optics and gravitation nonlinearity we have shown that the gravitation field of spherically symmetric mass can lead to changes in the gravitational coefficient G.

  2. From Lattice Boltzmann to hydrodynamics in dissipative relativistic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbana, Alessandro; Mendoza, Miller; Succi, Sauro; Tripiccione, Raffaele

    2017-11-01

    Relativistic fluid dynamics is currently applied to several fields of modern physics, covering many physical scales, from astrophysics, to atomic scales (e.g. in the study of effective 2D systems such as graphene) and further down to subnuclear scales (e.g. quark-gluon plasmas). This talk focuses on recent progress in the largely debated connection between kinetic transport coefficients and macroscopic hydrodynamic parameters in dissipative relativistic fluid dynamics. We use a new relativistic Lattice Boltzmann method (RLBM), able to handle from ultra-relativistic to almost non-relativistic flows, and obtain strong evidence that the Chapman-Enskog expansion provides the correct pathway from kinetic theory to hydrodynamics. This analysis confirms recently obtained theoretical results, which can be used to obtain accurate calibrations for RLBM methods applied to realistic physics systems in the relativistic regime. Using this calibration methodology, RLBM methods are able to deliver improved physical accuracy in the simulation of the physical systems described above. European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie Grant Agreement No. 642069.

  3. Hunting for Dark Particles with Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Giudice, Gian F.; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    The LIGO observation of gravitational waves from a binary black hole merger has begun a new era in fundamental physics. If new dark sector particles, be they bosons or fermions, can coalesce into exotic compact objects (ECOs) of astronomical size, then the first evidence for such objects, and their underlying microphysical description, may arise in gravitational wave observations. In this work we study how the macroscopic properties of ECOs are related to their microscopic properties, such as dark particle mass and couplings. We then demonstrate the smoking gun exotic signatures that would provide observational evidence for ECOs, and hence new particles, in terrestrial gravitational wave observatories. Finally, we discuss how gravitational waves can test a core concept in general relativity: Hawking's area theorem.

  4. Hunting for Dark Particles with Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudice, Gian F.

    2017-12-01

    The LIGO observation of gravitational waves from a binary black hole merger has begun a new era in fundamental physics. If new dark sector particles, be they bosons or fermions, can coalesce into exotic compact objects (ECOs) of astronomical size, then the first evidence for such objects, and their underlying microphysical description, may arise in gravitational wave observations. In this work we study how the macroscopic properties of ECOs are related to their microscopic properties, such as dark particle mass and couplings. We then demonstrate the smoking gun exotic signatures that would provide observational evidence for ECOs, and hence new particles, in terrestrial gravitational wave observatories. Finally, we discuss how gravitational waves can test a core concept in general relativity: Hawking's area theorem.

  5. Hunting for dark particles with gravitational waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giudice, Gian F.; McCullough, Matthew; Urbano, Alfredo [CERN, Theoretical Physics Department,Geneva (Switzerland)

    2016-10-03

    The LIGO observation of gravitational waves from a binary black hole merger has begun a new era in fundamental physics. If new dark sector particles, be they bosons or fermions, can coalesce into exotic compact objects (ECOs) of astronomical size, then the first evidence for such objects, and their underlying microphysical description, may arise in gravitational wave observations. In this work we study how the macroscopic properties of ECOs are related to their microscopic properties, such as dark particle mass and couplings. We then demonstrate the smoking gun exotic signatures that would provide observational evidence for ECOs, and hence new particles, in terrestrial gravitational wave observatories. Finally, we discuss how gravitational waves can test a core concept in general relativity: Hawking’s area theorem.

  6. Hunting for dark particles with gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giudice, Gian F.; McCullough, Matthew; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    The LIGO observation of gravitational waves from a binary black hole merger has begun a new era in fundamental physics. If new dark sector particles, be they bosons or fermions, can coalesce into exotic compact objects (ECOs) of astronomical size, then the first evidence for such objects, and their underlying microphysical description, may arise in gravitational wave observations. In this work we study how the macroscopic properties of ECOs are related to their microscopic properties, such as dark particle mass and couplings. We then demonstrate the smoking gun exotic signatures that would provide observational evidence for ECOs, and hence new particles, in terrestrial gravitational wave observatories. Finally, we discuss how gravitational waves can test a core concept in general relativity: Hawking’s area theorem.

  7. Relativistic particle in a box

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto, P.; Fiolhais, Carlos; Gil, Victor

    1996-01-01

    The problem of a relativistic spin 1/2 particle confined to a one-dimensional box is solved in a way that resembles closely the solution of the well known quantum-mechanical textbook problem of a non-relativistic particle in a box. The energy levels and probability density are computed and compared with the non-relativistic case

  8. Testing gravitational parity violation with coincident gravitational waves and short gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunes, Nicolas; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Owen, Benjamin J.; Alexander, Stephon

    2010-01-01

    Gravitational parity violation is a possibility motivated by particle physics, string theory, and loop quantum gravity. One effect of it is amplitude birefringence of gravitational waves, whereby left and right circularly polarized waves propagate at the same speed but with different amplitude evolution. Here we propose a test of this effect through coincident observations of gravitational waves and short gamma-ray bursts from binary mergers involving neutron stars. Such gravitational waves are highly left or right circularly polarized due to the geometry of the merger. Using localization information from the gamma-ray burst, ground-based gravitational wave detectors can measure the distance to the source with reasonable accuracy. An electromagnetic determination of the redshift from an afterglow or host galaxy yields an independent measure of this distance. Gravitational parity violation would manifest itself as a discrepancy between these two distance measurements. We exemplify such a test by considering one specific effective theory that leads to such gravitational parity violation, Chern-Simons gravity. We show that the advanced LIGO-Virgo network and all-sky gamma-ray telescopes can be sensitive to the propagating sector of Chern-Simons gravitational parity violation to a level roughly 2 orders of magnitude better than current stationary constraints from the LAGEOS satellites.

  9. A New Light-Speed Anisotropy Experiment: Absolute Motion and Gravitational Waves Detected

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Data from a new experiment measuring the anisotropy of the one-way speed of EM waves in a coaxial cable, gives the speed of light as 300,000 +/- 400 (+/- 20 km/s in a measured direction RA=5.5 +/- 2 hrs, Dec=70 +/- 10 Deg S, is shown to be in excellent agreement with the results from seven previous anisotropy experiments, particularly those of Miller (1925/26, and even those of Michelson and Morley (1887. The Miller gas-mode interferometer results, and those from the RF coaxial cable experiments of Torr and Kolen (1983, De Witte (1991 and the new experiment all reveal the presence of gravitational waves, as indicated by the last +/- variations above, but of a kind different from those supposedly predicted by General Relativity. Miller repeated the Michelson-Morley 1887 gas-mode interferometer experiment and againdetected the anisotropy of the speed of light, primarily in the years 1925/1926 atop Mt.Wilson, California. The understanding of the operation of the Michelson interferometer in gas-mode was only achieved in 2002 and involved a calibration for the interferometer that necessarily involved Special Relativity effects and the refractive index of the gas in the light paths. The results demonstrate the reality of the Fitzgerald-Lorentz contraction as an observer independent relativistic effect. A common misunderstanding is that the anisotropy of the speed of light is necessarily in conflict with Special Relativity and Lorentz symmetry - this is explained. All eight experiments and theory show that we have both anisotropy of the speed of light and relativistic effects, and that a dynamical 3-space exists - that absolute motion through that space has been repeatedly observed since 1887. These developments completely change fundamental physics and our understanding of reality. Modern vacuum-mode Michelson interferometers, particularly the long baseline terrestrial versions, are, by design flaw, incapable of detecting the anisotropy effect and the

  10. The Schroedinger-Newton equation as model of self-gravitating quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossardt, Andre

    2013-01-01

    The Schroedinger-Newton equation (SN equation) describes a quantummechanical one-particle-system with gravitational self-interaction and might play a role answering the question if gravity must be quantised. As non-relativistic limit of semi-classical gravity, it provides testable predictions of the effects that classical gravity has on genuinely quantum mechanical systems in the mass regime between a few thousand proton masses and the Planck mass, which is experimentally unexplored. In this thesis I subsume the mathematical properties of the SN equation and justify it as a physical model. I will give a short outline of the controversial debate around semi-classical gravity as a fundamental theory, along with the idea of the SN equation as a model of quantum state reduction. Subsequently, I will respond to frequent objections against nonlinear Schrodinger equations. I will show how the SN equation can be obtained from Einstein's General Relativity coupled to either a KleinGordon or a Dirac equation, in the same sense as the linear Schroedinger equation can be derived in flat Minkowski space-time. The equation is, to this effect, a non-relativistic approximation of the semi-classical Einstein equations. Additionally, I will discuss, first by means of analytic estimations and later numerically, in which parameter range effects of gravitational selfinteraction - e.g. in molecular-interferometry experiments - should be expected. Besides the one-particle SN equation I will provide justification for a modified equation describing the centre-of-mass wave-function of a many-particle system. Furthermore, for this modified equation, I will examine, numerically, the consequences for experiments. Although one arrives at the conclusion that no effects of the SN equation can be expected for masses up to six or seven orders of magnitude above those considered in contemporary molecular interferometry experiments, tests of the equation, for example in satellite experiments, seem

  11. Those Elusive Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOSAIC, 1976

    1976-01-01

    The presence of gravitational waves was predicted by Einstein in his theory of General Relativity. Since then, scientists have been attempting to develop a detector sensitive enough to measure these cosmic signals. Once the presence of gravitational waves is confirmed, scientists can directly study star interiors, galaxy cores, or quasars. (MA)

  12. Gravitationally coupled electroweak monopole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Y.M., E-mail: ymcho7@konkuk.ac.kr [Administration Building 310-4, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); School of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kimm, Kyoungtae [Faculty of Liberal Education, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, J.H. [Department of Physics, College of Natural Sciences, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-10

    We present a family of gravitationally coupled electroweak monopole solutions in Einstein–Weinberg–Salam theory. Our result confirms the existence of globally regular gravitating electroweak monopole which changes to the magnetically charged black hole as the Higgs vacuum value approaches to the Planck scale. Moreover, our solutions could provide a more accurate description of the monopole stars and magnetically charged black holes.

  13. Relativistic extension of a charge-conservative finite element solver for time-dependent Maxwell-Vlasov equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, D.-Y.; Moon, H.; Omelchenko, Y. A.; Teixeira, F. L.

    2018-01-01

    Accurate modeling of relativistic particle motion is essential for physical predictions in many problems involving vacuum electronic devices, particle accelerators, and relativistic plasmas. A local, explicit, and charge-conserving finite-element time-domain (FETD) particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm for time-dependent (non-relativistic) Maxwell-Vlasov equations on irregular (unstructured) meshes was recently developed by Moon et al. [Comput. Phys. Commun. 194, 43 (2015); IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 44, 1353 (2016)]. Here, we extend this FETD-PIC algorithm to the relativistic regime by implementing and comparing three relativistic particle-pushers: (relativistic) Boris, Vay, and Higuera-Cary. We illustrate the application of the proposed relativistic FETD-PIC algorithm for the analysis of particle cyclotron motion at relativistic speeds, harmonic particle oscillation in the Lorentz-boosted frame, and relativistic Bernstein modes in magnetized charge-neutral (pair) plasmas.

  14. A gravitational entropy proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifton, Timothy; Tavakol, Reza; Ellis, George F R

    2013-01-01

    We propose a thermodynamically motivated measure of gravitational entropy based on the Bel–Robinson tensor, which has a natural interpretation as the effective super-energy–momentum tensor of free gravitational fields. The specific form of this measure differs depending on whether the gravitational field is Coulomb-like or wave-like, and reduces to the Bekenstein–Hawking value when integrated over the interior of a Schwarzschild black hole. For scalar perturbations of a Robertson–Walker geometry we find that the entropy goes like the Hubble weighted anisotropy of the gravitational field, and therefore increases as structure formation occurs. This is in keeping with our expectations for the behaviour of gravitational entropy in cosmology, and provides a thermodynamically motivated arrow of time for cosmological solutions of Einstein’s field equations. It is also in keeping with Penrose’s Weyl curvature hypothesis. (paper)

  15. New theory of space-time and gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, V.I.; Logunov, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    It is shown that the general theory of relativity is not satisfactory physical theory, since in it there are no laws of conservation for the matter and gravitational field taken together and it does not satisfy the principle of correspondence with Newton's theory. In the present paper, we construct a new theory of gravitation which possesses conservation laws, can describe all the existing gravitational experiments, satisfies the correspondence principle, and predicts a number of fundamental consequences

  16. Iz ''general relativity'' necessary for the Einstein gravitation theory gravitation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondi, G.

    1982-01-01

    Main principles of relativity and gravitation theories are deeply analyzed. Problems of boundaries of applicability for these theories and possible ways of their change and generalization are discussed. It is shown that the notion of general relativity does not introduce any post-newton physics - it only deals with coordinate transformations. It is supposed that ''general relativity'' is a physically senseless phrase which can be considered only as a historical remainder of an interesting philosophic discourse. The paper reveals that there exists appropriate physical substantiation of the Einstein gravitation theory not including a physically senseless concept of general relativity and promoting its fundamental relations with the experiment

  17. Relativistic impulse dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Stanley M

    2011-08-01

    Classical electrodynamics has some annoying rough edges. The self-energy of charges is infinite without a cutoff. The calculation of relativistic trajectories is difficult because of retardation and an average radiation reaction term. By reconceptuallizing electrodynamics in terms of exchanges of impulses rather than describing it by forces and potentials, we eliminate these problems. A fully relativistic theory using photonlike null impulses is developed. Numerical calculations for a two-body, one-impulse-in-transit model are discussed. A simple relationship between center-of-mass scattering angle and angular momentum was found. It reproduces the Rutherford cross section at low velocities and agrees with the leading term of relativistic distinguishable-particle quantum cross sections (Møller, Mott) when the distance of closest approach is larger than the Compton wavelength of the particle. Magnetism emerges as a consequence of viewing retarded and advanced interactions from the vantage point of an instantaneous radius vector. Radiation reaction becomes the local conservation of energy-momentum between the radiating particle and the emitted impulse. A net action is defined that could be used in developing quantum dynamics without potentials. A reinterpretation of Newton's laws extends them to relativistic motion.

  18. Non-relativistic supersymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, T.E.; Love, S.T.

    1984-01-01

    The most general one- and two-body hamiltonian invariant under galilean supersymmetry is constructed in superspace. The corresponding Feynman rules are given for the superfield Green functions. As demonstrated by a simple example, it is straightforward to construct models in which the supersymmetry is spontaneously broken by the non-relativistic vacuum. (orig.)

  19. Relativistic stellar dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contopoulos, G.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper, three main areas of relativistic stellar dynamics are reviewed: (a) The dynamics of clusters, or nuclei of galaxies, of very high density; (b) The dynamics of systems containing a massive black hole; and (c) The dynamics of particles (and photons) in an expanding Universe. The emphasis is on the use of orbit perturbations. (Auth.)

  20. Relativistic Wigner functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bialynicki-Birula Iwo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Original definition of the Wigner function can be extended in a natural manner to relativistic domain in the framework of quantum field theory. Three such generalizations are described. They cover the cases of the Dirac particles, the photon, and the full electromagnetic field.