WorldWideScience

Sample records for relative nutrient contributions

  1. Effect of inorganic nutrients on relative contributions of fungi and bacteria to carbon flow from submerged decomposing leaf litter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladislav Gulis; Keller Suberkropp

    2003-01-01

    The relative contributions of fungi and bacteria to carbon flow from submerged decaying plant litter at different levels of inorganic nutrients (N and P) were studied. We estimated leaf mass loss, fungal and bacterial biomass and production, and microbial respiration and constructed partial carbon budgets for red maple leaf disks precolonized in a stream and then...

  2. The relative contribution of sewage and diffuse phosphorus sources in the River Avon catchment, southern England: implications for nutrient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowes, Michael J; Hilton, John; Irons, Gordon P; Hornby, Duncan D

    2005-05-15

    In order to effectively manage nutrient river load reductions and target remediation strategies, it is important to determine the relative contributions of diffuse and point sources across the river catchment. This study used a geographical information system (GIS) to apply phosphorus (P) export coefficients (obtained from the literature) to 58 water quality monitoring sites across a large, urbanised, mixed land use catchment, typical of southern lowland England (the River Avon, Warwickshire, UK). These coefficients were used to estimate the annual P load at each monitoring site, and also the relative contribution of point source (from sewage treatment works (STW)) and diffuse input (from both livestock and agricultural land use). The estimated annual P loads showed very close agreement (r2=0.98) with the measured total phosphorus (TP) loads. Sites with the highest proportion of P derived from STW had the highest TP concentrations and loads, and also had greater variations between seasons, with elevated P concentrations occurring during the summer months. The GIS model was re-run to determine the effect of an 80% reduction in P output from STW serving over 10,000 people, thereby assessing the effect of implementing the European Union's Urban Waste Water Treatment Directive (UWWTD). The exported TP load was reduced by 52%, but the sites with the highest TP concentrations were still those with the highest proportion of P derived from STW. The GIS model was re-run to estimate the impact of 80% P reductions at a further 11 STW of varying sizes. This reduced the total TP load by only 29 tonnes year-1, but greatly reduced the P concentrations in many highly nutrient contaminated tributaries. The number of sites with P concentrations greater than 1 mg l-1 was cut from 15 (before UWWTD implementation) to 2. These findings suggest that after UWWTD implementation, resources should focus on introducing tertiary sewage treatment at the remaining large STW, before targeting

  3. The contribution of school meals to energy and nutrient intake of Swedish children in relation to dietary guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Persson Osowski

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Sweden, school meals are served free of charge and Swedish law states that school meals must be nutritious. Nevertheless, data on children's energy and nutrient intake from school meals are scarce. Objective: The aim was to describe the contribution of school meals to Swedish children's nutrient and energy intake during weekdays and compare this to the reference values based on the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR, which have been adopted as the official Swedish recommendations. Design: A cross-sectional food consumption survey was performed on 1,840 Swedish children attending Grade 2 (mean age 8.6 and Grade 5 (mean age 11.7. The children's nutrient and energy intake was compared to the reference values based on the NNR. Results: The mean intake from school meals of energy, carbohydrates, dietary fiber, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA, and vitamins D and E did not reach the reference values and the intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA and sodium exceeded the reference values in both age groups (significant differences, all p≤0.001. Additionally, the pupils in Grade 5 did not reach the reference values for folate, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, selenium, and zinc (significant differences, all p≤0.001. Standardized for energy, dietary fiber, PUFA, and vitamins D and E did not reach the reference values, whereas the reference values for SFA and sodium were exceeded in both age groups (significant differences, all p≤0.001. Conclusions: The study pointed to some central nutrients in need of improvement as regards school meals in Sweden, namely the quality of fat, dietary fiber, sodium, vitamin D, and iron. Some of these results may be attributed to the children not reporting eating the recommended number of calories, the children omitting some components of the meal, or underreporting, as a consequence of which the reference values for several nutrients were not met.

  4. Contribution of cod liver oil-related nutrients (vitamins A, D, E and eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid) to daily nutrient intake and their associations with plasma concentrations in the EPIC-Norfolk cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentjes, M A H; Mulligan, A A; Welch, A A; Bhaniani, A; Luben, R N; Khaw, K-T

    2015-12-01

    Total nutrient intake (TNI) is intake from food and supplements. This provides an assessment of nutrient adequacy and the prevalence of excessive intake, as well as the response with respect to biomarkers. Cod liver oil (CLO) is the most frequently consumed supplement in the UK, containing nutrients that might have varying influences on health. We calculated TNI for vitamins A, D and E, as well as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and assessed associations with the respective blood concentrations. Seven-day diet diaries and blood samples were taken from two subsets of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC-Norfolk) cohort (age range 39-79 years; n = 1400 for vitamin D; n = 6656 for remaining nutrients). TNI was calculated for the subgroups: nonsupplement users, those consuming the nutrient in supplement form and those consuming a supplement without this nutrient. CLO-related nutrients were supplemented by 15%-33%, which approximately doubled median intakes. Almost everyone in the supplement + vitamin A group reached the estimated average requirement; however, guideline levels were likely to be exceeded. Partial correlations between intake of vitamins A and D and biomarkers were low and modestly strengthened by the inclusion of supplement sources (correlation = 0.01-0.13). Correlations between biomarker and TNI of vitamin E and EPA+DHA were in the range 0.40-0.46; however, vitamin E exceeding food intake resulted in attenuated coefficients. Linear associations between food or TNI EPA+DHA and plasma were weak but consistent across subgroups. CLO-related nutrients contribute substantially to nutrient intake, with a risk of over-consumption. Apart from EPA+DHA, biomarker data suggest that CLO-related nutrients in supplements are not linearly associated with vitamin status. © 2014 Authors. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Dietetic Association.

  5. Nutrient composition and contribution of plantain ( Musa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some plantain (Musa paradisiacea) products, which serve as dietary staple in Nigeria were studied for their nutrient composition and contribution to dietary diversification of consumers. Unripe plantain was purchased from Oje market in Ibadan, Nigeria. Proximate, mineral and vitamin composition of raw, sundried, ...

  6. A Comparison of Concentrations of Sodium and Related Nutrients (Potassium, Total Dietary Fiber, Total and Saturated Fat, and Total Sugar) in Private-Label and National Brands of Popular, Sodium-Contributing, Commercially Packaged Foods in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Jaspreet K C; Pehrsson, Pamela R; Cogswell, Mary

    2017-05-01

    Private-label brands account for about one in four foods sold in US supermarkets. They provide value to consumers due to their low cost. We know of no US studies comparing the nutrition content of private-label products with corresponding national brand products. The objective was to compare concentrations of sodium and related nutrients (potassium, total dietary fiber, total and saturated fat, and total sugar) in popular sodium-contributing, commercially packaged foods by brand type (national or private-label brand). During 2010 to 2014, the Nutrient Data Laboratory of the US Department of Agriculture obtained 1,706 samples of private-label and national brand products from up to 12 locations nationwide and chemically analyzed 937 composites for sodium and related nutrients. The samples came from 61 sodium-contributing, commercially packaged food products for which both private-label and national brands were among the top 75% to 80% of brands for US unit sales. In this post hoc comparative analysis, the authors assigned a variable brand type (national or private label) to each composite and determined mean nutrient contents by brand type overall and by food product and type. The authors tested for significant differences (Pfoods sampled, differences between brand types were not statistically significant for any of the nutrients studied. However, differences in both directions exist for a few individual food products and food categories. Concentrations of sodium and related nutrients (potassium, total dietary fiber, total and saturated fat, and total sugar) do not differ systematically between private-label and national brands, suggesting that brand type is not a consideration for nutritional quality of foods in the United States. The study data provide public health officials with baseline nutrient content by brand type to help focus US sodium-reduction efforts. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Release from native herbivores facilitates the persistence of invasive marine algae: A biogeographical comparison of the relative contribution of nutrients and herbivory to invasion success

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeij, M.J.A.; Smith, T.B.; Dailer, M.L.; Smith, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of herbivory and nutrient enrichment on the growth of invasive and native macroalgal species was simultaneously studied in two biogeographic regions: the Caribbean and Hawaii. Herbivores suppressed growth of invasive algae in their native (Caribbean) and invaded range (Hawaii), but

  8. Street foods contribute to nutrient intakes among children from rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The contribution of Street Foods (SF) to the energy and nutrient intakes of young children in rural African communities has been understudied. Under the Enhancing Child Nutrition through Animal Source Food Management (ENAM) project, a microcredit and nutrition education intervention with caregivers of children 2-to ...

  9. Micronutrient Potentials and Contribution to Nutrient Intake of Four ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1μg/100g). A 100g portion of the condiments/spices can contribute between and11.0 – 19.2% calcium, 6.0 – 21.1% Retinol Equivalent, and 9.6 – 22.1% ascorbic acid to % recommended nutrient intake (RNI) of consumers. Conclusion: The ...

  10. Nutrient density of beverages in relation to climate impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Smedman

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The food chain contributes to a substantial part of greenhouse gas (GHG emissions and growing evidence points to the urgent need to reduce GHGs emissions worldwide. Among suggestions were proposals to alter food consumption patterns by replacing animal foods with more plant-based foods. However, the nutritional dimensions of changing consumption patterns to lower GHG emissions still remains relatively unexplored. This study is the first to estimate the composite nutrient density, expressed as percentage of Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR for 21 essential nutrients, in relation to cost in GHG emissions of the production from a life cycle perspective, expressed in grams of CO2-equivalents, using an index called the Nutrient Density to Climate Impact (NDCI index. The NDCI index was calculated for milk, soft drink, orange juice, beer, wine, bottled carbonated water, soy drink, and oat drink. Due to low-nutrient density, the NDCI index was 0 for carbonated water, soft drink, and beer and below 0.1 for red wine and oat drink. The NDCI index was similar for orange juice (0.28 and soy drink (0.25. Due to a very high-nutrient density, the NDCI index for milk was substantially higher (0.54 than for the other beverages. Future discussion on how changes in food consumption patterns might help avert climate change need to take both GHG emission and nutrient density of foods and beverages into account.

  11. Contribution of Dairy to Nutrient Intake in the Western Diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettinga, Kasper; Valenberg, van Hein

    2017-01-01

    Milk and dairy products play an important role in providing nutrients in both Western and developing countries. Most research in this area focuses on the intake of individual nutrients from food products, like dairy products. However, nutrients are not consumed, and do not function, in isolation.

  12. Contribution of complementary food nutrients to estimated total nutrient intakes for rural Guatemalan infants in the second semester of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Raquel; Hernandez, Liza; Soto-Mendez, Maria Jose; Vossenaar, Marieke; Solomons, Noel W

    2010-01-01

    In developing countries, complementary foods are often introduced earlier or later than appropriate and the quality is frequently insufficient, particularly in rural areas where complementary foods have traditionally been based on starchy gruels. Adequate intakes of a number of nutrients are recognized to be problematic in traditional complementary feeding regimens in developing societies. To determine the contribution of the complementary feeding nutrients to the estimated total nutrient intake in Guatemalan infants. Three non-consecutive 24-hr recalls were collected from a convenience sample of mothers of 64 infants, aged 6-12 month on enrolment, in the rural Guatemalan highland village of Santo Domingo Xenacoj. Additional information on early introduction of pre- and post-lacteal feeds and on first foods and beverages was included. Human milk intakes were estimated by a model based on assumptions regarding satisfaction of weight-based daily energy needs by the combined diet. The 2004 WHO/FAO recommended nutrient intakes were used as the standard for adequate nutrient consumption. We observed that exclusive breastfeeding up to 6 month is rare. Mean nutrient intakes and densities were above recommended intakes for all nutrients examined, except calcium, iron and zinc. Intakes of most nutrients were greater from the complementary feeding component of the diet. Vitamin A intake was excessive due to consumption of fortified sugar. We conclude that intakes of most micronutrients were near recommendation levels, unusual within the complementary feeding experience in scientific literature. Calcium, iron and zinc were identified as "problem nutrients" as persistently reported in developing countries.

  13. Nutrient composition of important fish species in Bangladesh and potential contribution to recommended nutrient intakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogard, Jessica R.; Thilsted, Shakuntala H.; Marks, Geoffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Fish, in Bangladesh where malnutrition remains a significant development challenge, is an irreplaceable animal-source food in the diet of millions. However, existing data on the nutrient composition of fish do not reflect the large diversity available and have focused on only a few select nutrients....... The purpose of this study was to fill the gaps in existing data on the nutrient profiles of common fish in Bangladesh by analysing the proximate, vitamin, mineral and fatty acid composition of 55 fish, shrimp and prawn species from inland capture, aquaculture and marine capture fisheries. When comparing...... indigenous species, which should guide policy and programmes to improve food and nutrition security in Bangladesh....

  14. Oak contribution to litter nutrient dynamics in an Appalachian forest receiving elevated nitrogen and dolomite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piatek, K.B.; Munasinghe, P. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Forestry and Natural Resources Div.; Peterjohn, W.T.; Cumming, J.R. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). College of Arts and Sciences; Adams, M.B. [United States Dept. of Agriculture Forest Service, Parsons, WV (United States). Northern Research Station

    2009-05-15

    Oaks play a significant role in the nutrient cycling of central hardwood forests. Higher oak components in forests may influence carbon storage in the forest floors through lower rates of litter decomposition, as well as potential nutrient availability through delayed mineralization from litter. This study investigated the importance of oaks to ecosystem nitrogen (N) retention, phosphorus (P) limitation, and calcium (Ca) cycling. The potential changes under elevated atmospheric deposition and mitigation with dolomite were also evaluated. The study examined the microbial immobilization in fresh foliar litter and the first-year nutrient dynamics in the litter. Mass proportions of northern red oak, maple, yellow poplar, magnolia, sweet birch, and cherry were measured. Litter bags with and without dolomite were placed in experimental plots, then retrieved 3, 6, 7, and 12 months later. Oak was separated from the litter mix for subsequent drying, weighing, and nutrient analysis. Statistical analyses were used to test for the effects of dolomite treatments. The study showed that slower decomposition in the oak samples were a function of litter chemistry. The effect was related to the lignin to N ratio. It was concluded that oak may contribute to longer carbon storage in litter layers regardless of Ca amendments or deposition rates. 25 refs., 6 tabs., 4 figs.

  15. Contribution of pollinator-mediated crops to nutrients in the human food supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilers, Elisabeth J; Kremen, Claire; Smith Greenleaf, Sarah; Garber, Andrea K; Klein, Alexandra-Maria

    2011-01-01

    The contribution of nutrients from animal pollinated world crops has not previously been evaluated as a biophysical measure for the value of pollination services. This study evaluates the nutritional composition of animal-pollinated world crops. We calculated pollinator dependent and independent proportions of different nutrients of world crops, employing FAO data for crop production, USDA data for nutritional composition, and pollinator dependency data according to Klein et al. (2007). Crop plants that depend fully or partially on animal pollinators contain more than 90% of vitamin C, the whole quantity of Lycopene and almost the full quantity of the antioxidants β-cryptoxanthin and β-tocopherol, the majority of the lipid, vitamin A and related carotenoids, calcium and fluoride, and a large portion of folic acid. Ongoing pollinator decline may thus exacerbate current difficulties of providing a nutritionally adequate diet for the global human population.

  16. Contribution of pollinator-mediated crops to nutrients in the human food supply.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth J Eilers

    Full Text Available The contribution of nutrients from animal pollinated world crops has not previously been evaluated as a biophysical measure for the value of pollination services. This study evaluates the nutritional composition of animal-pollinated world crops. We calculated pollinator dependent and independent proportions of different nutrients of world crops, employing FAO data for crop production, USDA data for nutritional composition, and pollinator dependency data according to Klein et al. (2007. Crop plants that depend fully or partially on animal pollinators contain more than 90% of vitamin C, the whole quantity of Lycopene and almost the full quantity of the antioxidants β-cryptoxanthin and β-tocopherol, the majority of the lipid, vitamin A and related carotenoids, calcium and fluoride, and a large portion of folic acid. Ongoing pollinator decline may thus exacerbate current difficulties of providing a nutritionally adequate diet for the global human population.

  17. Higher photosynthesis, nutrient- and energy-use efficiencies contribute to invasiveness of exotic plants in a nutrient poor habitat in northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Chao; Kong, De-Liang; Lu, Xiu-Rong; Huang, Kai; Wang, Shuo; Wang, Wei-Bin; Qu, Bo; Feng, Yu-Long

    2017-08-01

    The roles of photosynthesis-related traits in invasiveness of introduced plant species are still not well elucidated, especially in nutrient-poor habitats. In addition, little effort has been made to determine the physiological causes and consequences of the difference in these traits between invasive and native plants. To address these problems, we compared the differences in 16 leaf functional traits related to light-saturated photosynthetic rate (P max ) between 22 invasive and native plants in a nutrient-poor habitat in northeast China. The invasive plants had significantly higher P max , photosynthetic nitrogen- (PNUE), phosphorus- (PPUE), potassium- (PKUE) and energy-use efficiencies (PEUE) than the co-occurring natives, while leaf nutrient concentrations, construction cost (CC) and specific leaf area were not significantly different between the invasive and native plants. The higher PNUE contributed to higher P max for the invasive plants, which in turn contributed to higher PPUE, PKUE and PEUE. CC changed independently with other traits such as P max , PNUE, PPUE, PKUE and PEUE, showing two trait dimensions, which may facilitate acclimation to multifarious niche dimensions. Our results indicate that the invasive plants have a superior resource-use strategy, i.e. higher photosynthesis under similar resource investments, contributing to invasion success in the barren habitat. © 2017 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  18. Sediment and Nutrient Contributions from Subsurface Drains and Point Sources to an Agricultural Watershed

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    Bonnie Ball Coelho

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Excess sediment and nutrients in surface waters can threaten aquatic life. To determine the relative importance of subsurface drainage as a pathway for movement of sediment and nutrients to surface waters, loading from various tile systems was compared to that from sewage treatment plants (STP within the same watershed. Movement through tiles comprised 1 to 8% of estimated total (overland plus tile annual sediment loading from the respective areas drained by the tile. Load during the growing season from five closed drain- age systems without surface inlets averaged 5 kg sediment/ha, 0.005 kg dissolved reactive P (DRP/ha, 0.003 kg NH4-N/ha, and 3.8 kg NO3-N/ha; and from two open drainage systems with surface inlets averaged 14 kg sediment/ha, 0.03 kg DRP/ha, 0.04 kg NH4-N/ha, and 3.1 kg NO3-N/ha. The eight STP contributed about 44 530 kg suspended sediments, 3380 kg total P, 1340 kg NH4-N, and 116 900 kg NO3-N to the watershed annually. Drainage systems added less NH4-N and P, but more NO3-N and suspended solids to surface waters than STP. Tile drainage pathways for NO3-N, STP in the case of P, and overland pathways for sediment are indicated as targets to control loading in artificially drained agricultural watersheds.

  19. The Contribution of Occult Precipitation to Nutrient Deposition on the West Coast of South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Strandveld mediterranean-ecosystem of the west coast of South Africa supports floristically diverse vegetation growing on mostly nutrient-poor aeolian sands and extending from the Atlantic Ocean tens of kilometers inland. The cold Benguela current upwelling interacts with warm onshore southerly winds in summer causing coastal fogs in this region. We hypothesized that fog and other forms of occult precipitation contribute moisture and nutrients to the vegetation. We measured occult precipitation over one year along a transect running inland in the direction of the prevailing wind and compared the nutrient concentrations with those in rainwater. Occult deposition rates of P, N, K, Mg, Ca, Na, Al and Fe all decreased with distance from the ocean. Furthermore, ratios of cations to Na were similar to those of seawater, suggesting a marine origin for these. In contrast, N and P ratios in occult precipitation were higher than in seawater. We speculate that this is due to marine foam contributing to occult precipitation. Nutrient loss in leaf litter from dominant shrub species was measured to indicate nutrient demand. We estimated that occult precipitation could meet the demand of the dominant shrubby species for annual N, P, K and Ca. Of these species, those with small leaves intercepted more moisture and nutrients than those with larger leaves and could take up foliar deposits of glycine, NO3-, NH4+ and Li (as tracer for K) through leaf surfaces. We conclude that occult deposition together with rainfall deposition are potentially important nutrient and moisture sources for the Strandveld vegetation that contribute to this vegetation being floristically distinct from neighbouring nutrient-poor Fynbos vegetation. PMID:26017747

  20. The nutrition contribution of dietary supplements on total nutrient intake in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, M; Kim, D W; Lee, H; Lee, Y J; Jung, H J; Paik, H-Y; Song, Y J

    2016-02-01

    The use of dietary supplements (DSs) by children and adolescents is increasing. The aim of this study was to identify the characteristics of DS users and examine the nutritional contributions of DSs to total nutrient intakes in children and adolescents, using data obtained from a national survey. In total, 3134 subjects aged 9-18 years who participated in the 4th Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007-2009) were selected; the survey included 24-h recall questions on food intake and questions on DS use over the past year. Nutrient intakes from DSs were calculated using the aid of a label-based database on such supplements, and individual total nutrient intakes were derived by combining information on the foods and DSs consumed by each subject. There were 895 DS users (28.5%), 85.2% of whom (n=577) had complete DS nutrient information and were therefore defined as identified-DS users. Identified-DS users were slightly younger and had a greater household income and better nutritional knowledge than did non-users. The most frequently consumed type of supplement was a 'multivitamin and minerals' complex. For total nutrient intake, identified-DS users had a significantly higher intake of most of the nutrients, except for macronutrient and sodium than non-users. In all identified-DS users, the contribution of vitamins and minerals from DSs to total nutrient intake was higher than energy and macronutrients. DS use by children and adolescents can improve micronutrient status, but it also increases the risk of excessive intake of certain vitamins and minerals.

  1. Contribution of Nutrient Pollution to Water Scarcity in the Water-Rich Northeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, R. L.; Lopez, C.; Vorosmarty, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Most studies of water stress focus on water-scarce regions such as drylands. Yet, even water-rich regions can be water stressed due to local water withdrawals that exceed supply or due to water pollution that makes water unusable. The northeastern United States (NE) is a water-rich region relative to the rest of the country, as it concentrates about 50% of total renewable water of the country. Yes the NE features relatively high water withdrawals, ~50 km3/yr, for thermo-power generation, agriculture, and industry, as well as to support a human population of about 70 million. At the same time, rivers and streams in the NE suffer from nutrient pollution, largely from agricultural and urban land uses. We asked: to what extent is the NE water stressed, and how do water withdrawals and water quality each contribute to water scarcity across the NE? We used information on county-level water withdrawals and runoff to calculate a water scarcity index (WSI) for 200 hydrologic units across the NE from 1987 to 2002. We used data on surface water concentrations of nitrogen to calculate the additional water necessary to dilute surface water pollution to weak, moderate, and strong water quality standards derived from the literature. Only considering withdrawals, we found that approximately 10% of the NE was water stressed. Incorporating a moderate water quality standard, 25% of the NE was water stressed. We calculated a dilution burden by sectors of water users and found that public utilities faced 41% of the total dilution burden for the region, followed by irrigation users at 21%. Our results illustrate that even water rich regions can experience water stress and even scarcity, where withdrawals exceed surface water supplies. Water quality contributes to water stress and can change the spatial patterns of water stress across a region. The common approach to address scarcity has required the use of inter-basin water transfers, or in the case of water quality-caused scarcity

  2. Quantifying ocean and ice sheet contributions to nutrient fluxes in Sermilik Fjord, Southeast Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cape, M. R.; Straneo, F.; Beaird, N.; Bundy, R.; Charette, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    Meltwater discharged at the margins of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) represents a potential source of nutrients to biological communities downstream. In Greenland's glacial fjords, this discharge occurs at depth below and along the face of deeply grounded marine-terminating glaciers. This process drives vigorous circulation and mixing between melt and ambient waters at the ice-ocean margins, giving rise to a new glacially modified water mass (GMW) which constitutes the primary vehicle for transport of meltwater in the marine environment. While previous field studies have noted nutrient enrichment in GMW with respect to unmodified waters along the shelf, the source of this enrichment, whether due to entrainment of deep ambient waters or input by meltwater, remains poorly understood. This knowledge is however critical in order to evaluate the current and future contributions of the GrIS to marine biogeochemical cycling. Here we shed light on the distribution, composition, and properties of GMW along the GrIS margin by analyzing integrated physical and chemical measurements collected in August 2015 in Sermilik Fjord, a major glacial freshwater export pathway. Our results document up to a doubling of nutrient concentrations (nitrate, silicate, phosphate, and iron) in GMW, which is distributed in the top 300 m of the water column throughout the fjord. Partitioning of ocean and ice sheet contributions to GMW nutrient load demonstrates that upwelled waters are the primary source of macro-nutrients to GMW. We expand on these results to discuss the magnitude of fluxes in context of previous observations along the GrIS margins, export pathways of GMW to the shelf, and knowledge gaps needed to be addressed to better constrain ice sheet contributions to marine ecosystem processes.

  3. Contribution of riverine nutrients to the silicon biogeochemistry of the global ocean – a model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Y. Bernard

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Continental shelf seas are known to support a large fraction of the global primary production. Yet, they are mostly ignored or neglected in global biogeochemical models. A number of processes that control the transfer of dissolved nutrients from rivers to the open ocean remain poorly understood. This applies in particular to dissolved silica which drives the growth of diatoms that form a large part of the phytoplankton biomass and are thus an important contributor to export production of carbon.

    Here, the representation of the biogeochemical cycling along continents is improved by coupling a high resolution database of riverine fluxes of nutrients to the global biogeochemical ocean general circulation model HAMOCC5-OM. Focusing on silicon (Si, but including the whole suite of nutrients – carbon (C, nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P in various forms – inputs are implemented in the model at coastal coupling points using the COSCAT global database of 156 mega-river-ensemble catchments from Meybeck et al. (2006. The catchments connect to the ocean through coastal segments according to three sets of criteria: natural limits, continental shelf topography, and geophysical dynamics.

    According to the model the largest effects on nutrient concentrations occur in hot spots such as the Amazon plume, the Arctic – with high nutrient inputs in relation to its total volume, and areas that encounter the largest increase in human activity, e.g., Southern Asia.

  4. Processed Food Contributions to Energy and Nutrient Intake Differ among US Children by Race/Ethnicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather A. Eicher-Miller

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study determined and compared the mean daily intake of energy and nutrients from processed foods by level of processing (minimally processed; processed for preservation, nutrient enhancement, and freshness; mixtures of combined ingredients; ready-to-eat processed foods; and prepared foods/meals among non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Mexican American US children. Data from participants 2–18 years old (n = 10,298 of the nationally representative cross-sectional National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003–2008 with a complete one day, 24-h dietary recall were used to determine mean intake of energy and nutrients recommended for increase and decrease, as per the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, among child race/ethnic groups by category of food processing. Regression analysis was used to estimate and compare covariate-adjusted (gender, age, and poverty-income-level least square means (p < 0.05/3 race/ethnic groups. All children, regardless of race or ethnicity consumed processed foods. Approximately 66% to 84% of total daily energy, saturated fat, cholesterol, fiber, total sugar, added sugars, calcium, vitamin D, potassium, and sodium intake are contributed by one of the five categories of processed foods. Clinicians and policy should primarily advise consideration of the energy and nutrient composition of foods, rather than the processing level, when selecting a healthy diet for children.

  5. Processed Food Contributions to Energy and Nutrient Intake Differ among US Children by Race/Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicher-Miller, Heather A.; Fulgoni, Victor L.; Keast, Debra R.

    2015-01-01

    This study determined and compared the mean daily intake of energy and nutrients from processed foods by level of processing (minimally processed; processed for preservation, nutrient enhancement, and freshness; mixtures of combined ingredients; ready-to-eat processed foods; and prepared foods/meals) among non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Mexican American US children. Data from participants 2–18 years old (n = 10,298) of the nationally representative cross-sectional National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003–2008 with a complete one day, 24-h dietary recall were used to determine mean intake of energy and nutrients recommended for increase and decrease, as per the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, among child race/ethnic groups by category of food processing. Regression analysis was used to estimate and compare covariate-adjusted (gender, age, and poverty-income-level) least square means (p foods. Approximately 66% to 84% of total daily energy, saturated fat, cholesterol, fiber, total sugar, added sugars, calcium, vitamin D, potassium, and sodium intake are contributed by one of the five categories of processed foods. Clinicians and policy should primarily advise consideration of the energy and nutrient composition of foods, rather than the processing level, when selecting a healthy diet for children. PMID:26633491

  6. Processed Food Contributions to Energy and Nutrient Intake Differ among US Children by Race/Ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicher-Miller, Heather A; Fulgoni, Victor L; Keast, Debra R

    2015-12-02

    This study determined and compared the mean daily intake of energy and nutrients from processed foods by level of processing (minimally processed; processed for preservation, nutrient enhancement, and freshness; mixtures of combined ingredients; ready-to-eat processed foods; and prepared foods/meals) among non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Mexican American US children. Data from participants 2-18 years old (n = 10,298) of the nationally representative cross-sectional National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2008 with a complete one day, 24-h dietary recall were used to determine mean intake of energy and nutrients recommended for increase and decrease, as per the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, among child race/ethnic groups by category of food processing. Regression analysis was used to estimate and compare covariate-adjusted (gender, age, and poverty-income-level) least square means (p processed foods. Approximately 66% to 84% of total daily energy, saturated fat, cholesterol, fiber, total sugar, added sugars, calcium, vitamin D, potassium, and sodium intake are contributed by one of the five categories of processed foods. Clinicians and policy should primarily advise consideration of the energy and nutrient composition of foods, rather than the processing level, when selecting a healthy diet for children.

  7. [Contribution to the intake of macro and micro nutrients exerted by moderate beer consumption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, J; Díaz, L; González-Gross, M; Wärnberg, J; Marcos, A

    2006-01-01

    Moderate beer consumption can be part of a healthy diet, like the Mediterranean diet. The aim of the present study was to analyse the contribution a moderate beer consumption makes to energy and nutrient intake in Spanish healthy adults. As part of a larger intervention study, dietary intake was measured by means of a 7-day food dietary record in 24 men and 22 women (age 34.18 +/- 5.80 years) twice: during the last week of the 30 days of complete alcohol abstinence and during the last week of 30 days of moderate beer consumption. Energy and nutrient content of food was analysed by means of the GEA program, based on the Spanish food composition tables. In women, moderate beer consumption increased significantly (p beer consumption can improve diet quality in regard to B vitamins in healthy adults.

  8. Bioactive Nutrients and Nutrigenomics in Age-Related Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rescigno, Tania; Micolucci, Luigina; Tecce, Mario F; Capasso, Anna

    2017-01-08

    The increased life expectancy and the expansion of the elderly population are stimulating research into aging. Aging may be viewed as a multifactorial process that results from the interaction of genetic and environmental factors, which include lifestyle. Human molecular processes are influenced by physiological pathways as well as exogenous factors, which include the diet. Dietary components have substantive effects on metabolic health; for instance, bioactive molecules capable of selectively modulating specific metabolic pathways affect the development/progression of cardiovascular and neoplastic disease. As bioactive nutrients are increasingly identified, their clinical and molecular chemopreventive effects are being characterized and systematic analyses encompassing the "omics" technologies (transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics) are being conducted to explore their action. The evolving field of molecular pathological epidemiology has unique strength to investigate the effects of dietary and lifestyle exposure on clinical outcomes. The mounting body of knowledge regarding diet-related health status and disease risk is expected to lead in the near future to the development of improved diagnostic procedures and therapeutic strategies targeting processes relevant to nutrition. The state of the art of aging and nutrigenomics research and the molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of bioactive nutrients on the main aging-related disorders are reviewed herein.

  9. Bioactive Nutrients and Nutrigenomics in Age-Related Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Rescigno

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased life expectancy and the expansion of the elderly population are stimulating research into aging. Aging may be viewed as a multifactorial process that results from the interaction of genetic and environmental factors, which include lifestyle. Human molecular processes are influenced by physiological pathways as well as exogenous factors, which include the diet. Dietary components have substantive effects on metabolic health; for instance, bioactive molecules capable of selectively modulating specific metabolic pathways affect the development/progression of cardiovascular and neoplastic disease. As bioactive nutrients are increasingly identified, their clinical and molecular chemopreventive effects are being characterized and systematic analyses encompassing the “omics” technologies (transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics are being conducted to explore their action. The evolving field of molecular pathological epidemiology has unique strength to investigate the effects of dietary and lifestyle exposure on clinical outcomes. The mounting body of knowledge regarding diet-related health status and disease risk is expected to lead in the near future to the development of improved diagnostic procedures and therapeutic strategies targeting processes relevant to nutrition. The state of the art of aging and nutrigenomics research and the molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of bioactive nutrients on the main aging-related disorders are reviewed herein.

  10. Relative linear power contribution with estimation statistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohnberg, P.

    1983-01-01

    The relative contribution by a noiselessly observed input signal to the power of a possibly disturbed observed stationary output signal from a linear system is expressed into signal spectral densities. Approximations of estimator statistics and derived confidence limits agree fairly well with

  11. Contributions of White Vegetables to Nutrient Intake: NHANES 2009–201012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Maureen L.; Anderson, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Vegetables, especially white potatoes, provide significant levels of key nutrients of concern, such as potassium and dietary fiber. Per capita availability (PCA) data for vegetables—often used as a proxy for vegetable consumption—show that vegetable consumption, including consumption of white potatoes, declined in the past decade. Using dietary data for participants in the NHANES 2009–2010, we examined total vegetable, white potato, and French-fried potato consumption among all age-gender groups as well as mean energy, potassium, and dietary fiber intakes. Mean total energy intake for the US population (≥2 y old) was 2080 kcal/d, with white potatoes and French-fried potatoes providing ∼4% and ∼2% of total energy, respectively. Individuals who consumed white potatoes had significantly higher total vegetable and potassium intakes than did nonconsumers. In addition, the proportion of potassium and dietary fiber contributed by white potatoes was higher than the proportion that they contributed to total energy. Among white potato consumers aged 14–18 y, white potatoes provided ∼23% of dietary fiber and ∼20% of potassium but only ∼11% of total energy in the diet. The nutrient-dense white potato may be an effective way to increase total vegetable consumption and potassium and dietary fiber intake. PMID:23674802

  12. Contributions of white vegetables to nutrient intake: NHANES 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Maureen L; Anderson, Patricia A

    2013-05-01

    Vegetables, especially white potatoes, provide significant levels of key nutrients of concern, such as potassium and dietary fiber. Per capita availability (PCA) data for vegetables-often used as a proxy for vegetable consumption-show that vegetable consumption, including consumption of white potatoes, declined in the past decade. Using dietary data for participants in the NHANES 2009-2010, we examined total vegetable, white potato, and French-fried potato consumption among all age-gender groups as well as mean energy, potassium, and dietary fiber intakes. Mean total energy intake for the US population (≥2 y old) was 2080 kcal/d, with white potatoes and French-fried potatoes providing ∼4% and ∼2% of total energy, respectively. Individuals who consumed white potatoes had significantly higher total vegetable and potassium intakes than did nonconsumers. In addition, the proportion of potassium and dietary fiber contributed by white potatoes was higher than the proportion that they contributed to total energy. Among white potato consumers aged 14-18 y, white potatoes provided ∼23% of dietary fiber and ∼20% of potassium but only ∼11% of total energy in the diet. The nutrient-dense white potato may be an effective way to increase total vegetable consumption and potassium and dietary fiber intake.

  13. One-carbon metabolism–related nutrients and prostate cancer survival123

    OpenAIRE

    Julie L Kasperzyk; Fall, Katja; Mucci, Lorelei A; Håkansson, Niclas; Wolk, Alicja; Johansson, Jan-Erik; Andersson, Swen-Olof; Andrén, Ove

    2009-01-01

    Background: Folate and other one-carbon metabolism nutrients may influence prostate cancer pathogenesis. Prior studies of these nutrients in relation to prostate cancer incidence have been inconclusive, and none have explored prostate cancer survival.

  14. Relative contribution of lipid sources to eggs of lesser scaup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutting, Kyle A.; Hobson, Keith A.; Rotella, Jay J.; Warren, Jeffrey M.; Takekawa, John Y.; De La Cruz, Susan E. W.; Parker, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Studies of how birds mobilize nutrients to eggs have traditionally considered a continuum of possible allocation strategies ranging from income breeding (rely on food sources found on the breeding grounds) to capital breeding (rely on body reserves stored prior to the breeding season). For capital breeding, stored body reserves can be acquired either on or away from the breeding grounds, but it has been difficult to quantify the relative contribution of each, precluding identification of key habitats for acquiring nutrients for clutch formation. During 2006–2009, we explored the importance of spring-staging habitats versus breeding-area habitats for egg-lipid formation in female lesser scaup Aythya affinis using stable carbon (δ13C) isotope analyses. Although δ13C values for abdominal lipid reserves brought to the breeding grounds overlapped those of local amphipods, we were able to quantify the importance of local plant carbohydrates (seeds of emergent wetland plants) to the production of eggs. We compared the importance of local wetland seeds (overall δ13C: −29.1 ± 0.9‰ SD) to combined lipid stores and lipids from local amphipods (overall δ13C: −23.8 ± 2.2‰). Local seeds and stored body lipids contributed equally to egg lipid formation across years but we found evidence of annual variation in their relative importance. Wetland seeds contributed 39% (SE = 10%) to egg lipid production, and the importance of this source varied by year (90% CI = 47–75% in 2006, 13–42% in 2007, 29–65% in 2008, and 7–30% in 2009). In contrast to earlier studies that suggest lesser scaup predominantly employ a capital breeding strategy, our results suggest that in some years females may attain half of their energy for clutch formation from foods on the breeding grounds.

  15. Age-related changes in nutrient utilization by companion animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, George C; Barry, Kathleen A; Swanson, Kelly S

    2008-01-01

    As companion animals age and pass through various life stages from in utero to the geriatric state, nutrient requirements change along with the manner in which nutrients are utilized by the various organ systems in the body. From the regulatory perspective, recognized life stages include maintenance, growth, and gestation/lactation. Other important life stages include in utero, the neonate, and the senior/geriatric state. Age affects digestive physiological properties, too, and factors such as gut microbiota, digestive hormones, gut morphology, gut immunity, and nutrient digestibility are modified as the animal becomes older. Each of the nutrients is affected in some manner by age, some more than others. Genomic biology offers promise in helping elucidate in greater detail how nutrient utilization is affected by age of the dog and cat.

  16. The Potential of the Nutrient Uptake and Outcome network (NUOnet) to Contribute to Soil and Water Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the national and global environmental challenges that we have related to nutrient management, there is a need to use large quantities of information to solve the complex agricultural challenges humanity faces. USDA-ARS is developing a national network called the Nutrient Uptake and Outcome netw...

  17. Intake of Key Chronic Disease–Related Nutrients among Baby Boomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Dana E.; Xiang, Jun; Brown, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The dietary habits of baby boomers (people born between 1946 and 1964) undoubtedly will have a substantial impact on their future health; however, dietary information regarding the intake of key chronic disease–related nutrients is lacking for this generation. The objective of this study was to compare the dietary intake of key chronic disease–related nutrients of the baby boomer generation with the previous generation of middle-aged adults. Methods National cross-sectional study comparison analyzing data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) including NHANES III (1988–1994) and the NHANES for 2007–2010, focused on adult respondents ages 46 to 64 years who were not institutionalized at the time of each survey. The two cohorts were compared with regard to dietary intake of key nutritional components. The main outcome measures were intake of total calories, sodium, cholesterol, fat, fruits, vegetables, vitamin C, water, and fiber. Results The baby boomers’ average daily intake of nutrients exceeded that of the previous generation of middle-aged adults for total calories (2118/1999), total fat (82/76 g), sodium (3513/3291 mg), and cholesterol (294/262 g; all P baby boomers compared with the previous generation of middle-aged adults. These findings are indicative of a diet that may contribute to increased rates of chronic disease among individuals in this age group. PMID:24945165

  18. Intake of key chronic disease-related nutrients among baby boomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Dana E; Xiang, Jun; Brown, Alexander

    2014-06-01

    The dietary habits of baby boomers (people born between 1946 and 1964) undoubtedly will have a substantial impact on their future health; however, dietary information regarding the intake of key chronic disease-related nutrients is lacking for this generation. The objective of this study was to compare the dietary intake of key chronic disease-related nutrients of the baby boomer generation with the previous generation of middle-aged adults. National cross-sectional study comparison analyzing data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) including NHANES III (1988-1994) and the NHANES for 2007-2010, focused on adult respondents ages 46 to 64 years who were not institutionalized at the time of each survey. The two cohorts were compared with regard to dietary intake of key nutritional components. The main outcome measures were intake of total calories, sodium, cholesterol, fat, fruits, vegetables, vitamin C, water, and fiber. The baby boomers' average daily intake of nutrients exceeded that of the previous generation of middle-aged adults for total calories (2118/1999), total fat (82/76 g), sodium (3513/3291 mg), and cholesterol (294/262 g; all P baby boomers compared with the previous generation of middle-aged adults. These findings are indicative of a diet that may contribute to increased rates of chronic disease among individuals in this age group.

  19. Contribution of Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluents to Nutrient Dynamics in Aquatic Systems: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Richard O.; Migliaccio, Kati W.

    2009-08-01

    Excessive nutrient loading (considering nitrogen and phosphorus) is a major ongoing threat to water quality and here we review the impact of nutrient discharges from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to United States (U.S.) freshwater systems. While urban and agricultural land uses are significant nonpoint nutrient contributors, effluent from point sources such as WWTPs can overwhelm receiving waters, effectively dominating hydrological characteristics and regulating instream nutrient processes. Population growth, increased wastewater volumes, and sustainability of critical water resources have all been key factors influencing the extent of wastewater treatment. Reducing nutrient concentrations in wastewater is an important aspect of water quality management because excessive nutrient concentrations often prevent water bodies from meeting designated uses. WWTPs employ numerous physical, chemical, and biological methods to improve effluent water quality but nutrient removal requires advanced treatment and infrastructure that may be economically prohibitive. Therefore, effluent nutrient concentrations vary depending on the particular processes used to treat influent wastewater. Increasingly stringent regulations regarding nutrient concentrations in discharged effluent, along with greater freshwater demand in populous areas, have led to the development of extensive water recycling programs within many U.S. regions. Reuse programs provide an opportunity to reduce or eliminate direct nutrient discharges to receiving waters while allowing for the beneficial use of reclaimed water. However, nutrients in reclaimed water can still be a concern for reuse applications, such as agricultural and landscape irrigation.

  20. Macrophytes may not contribute significantly to removal of nutrients, pharmaceuticals, and antibiotic resistance in model surface constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, Pascal; Anderson, Julie C; Carlson, Jules C; Low, Jennifer E; Challis, Jonathan K; Beattie, Sarah A; Bartel, Caitlin N; Elliott, Ashley D; Montero, Oscar F; Lokesh, Sheetal; Favreau, Alex; Kozlova, Tatiana A; Knapp, Charles W; Hanson, Mark L; Wong, Charles S

    2014-06-01

    Outdoor shallow wetland mesocosms, designed to simulate surface constructed wetlands to improve lagoon wastewater treatment, were used to assess the role of macrophytes in the dissipation of wastewater nutrients, selected pharmaceuticals, and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Specifically, mesocosms were established with or without populations of Typha spp. (cattails), Myriophyllum sibiricum (northern water milfoil), and Utricularia vulgaris (bladderwort). Following macrophyte establishment, mesocosms were seeded with ARG-bearing organisms from a local wastewater lagoon, and treated with a single pulse of artificial municipal wastewater with or without carbamazepine, clofibric acid, fluoxetine, and naproxen (each at 7.6μg/L), as well as sulfamethoxazole and sulfapyridine (each at 150μg/L). Rates of pharmaceutical dissipation over 28d ranged from 0.073 to 3.0d(-1), corresponding to half-lives of 0.23 to 9.4d. Based on calculated rate constants, observed dissipation rates were consistent with photodegradation driving clofibric acid, naproxen, sulfamethoxazole, and sulfapyridine removal, and with sorption also contributing to carbamazepine and fluoxetine loss. Of the seven gene determinants assayed, only two genes for both beta-lactam resistance (blaCTX and blaTEM) and sulfonamide resistance (sulI and sulII) were found in sufficient quantity for monitoring. Genes disappeared relatively rapidly from the water column, with half-lives ranging from 2.1 to 99d. In contrast, detected gene levels did not change in the sediment, with the exception of sulI, which increased after 28d in pharmaceutical-treated systems. These shallow wetland mesocosms were able to dissipate wastewater contaminants rapidly. However, no significant enhancement in removal of nutrients or pharmaceuticals was observed in mesocosms with extensive aquatic plant communities. This was likely due to three factors: first, use of naïve systems with an unchallenged capacity for nutrient assimilation and

  1. Vegetation patterns and nutrients in relation to grazing pressure and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A major challenge confronting managers of extensive grazing systems is uneven use of erbaceous forage plants by livestock. The concentration of grazing in preferred areas or around foci points (e.g. water points) eventually results in adverse impacts in soil nutrients, vegetation structure, production and composition.

  2. Care Aides' Relational Practices and Caring Contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Elizabeth A; Spiers, Jude

    2016-11-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE INSTRUCTIONS 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Care Aides' Relational Practices and Caring Contributions" found on pages 24-30, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until October 31, 2019. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. Define the application of Swanson's Middle Range Theory of Caring in care aides' relational care practices for nursing home

  3. Bacteria Contribute to Sediment Nutrient Release and Reflect Progressed Eutrophication-Driven Hypoxia in an Organic-Rich Continental Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkko, Hanna; Lukkari, Kaarina; Sihvonen, Leila M.; Sivonen, Kaarina; Leivuori, Mirja; Rantanen, Matias; Paulin, Lars; Lyra, Christina

    2013-01-01

    In the sedimental organic matter of eutrophic continental seas, such as the largest dead zone in the world, the Baltic Sea, bacteria may directly participate in nutrient release by mineralizing organic matter or indirectly by altering the sediment’s ability to retain nutrients. Here, we present a case study of a hypoxic sea, which receives riverine nutrient loading and in which microbe-mediated vicious cycles of nutrients prevail. We showed that bacterial communities changed along the horizontal loading and vertical mineralization gradients in the Gulf of Finland of the Baltic Sea, using multivariate statistics of terminal restriction fragments and sediment chemical, spatial and other properties of the sampling sites. The change was mainly explained by concentrations of organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, which showed strong positive correlation with Flavobacteria, Sphingobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. These bacteria predominated in the most organic-rich coastal surface sediments overlain by oxic bottom water, whereas sulphate-reducing bacteria, particularly the genus Desulfobacula, prevailed in the reduced organic-rich surface sediments in the open sea. They correlated positively with organic nitrogen and phosphorus, as well as manganese oxides. These relationships suggest that the bacterial groups participated in the aerobic and anaerobic degradation of organic matter and contributed to nutrient cycling. The high abundance of sulphate reducers in the surficial sediment layers reflects the persistence of eutrophication-induced hypoxia causing ecosystem-level changes in the Baltic Sea. The sulphate reducers began to decrease below depths of 20 cm, where members of the family Anaerolineaceae (phylum Chloroflexi) increased, possibly taking part in terminal mineralization processes. Our study provides valuable information on how organic loading affects sediment bacterial community compositions, which consequently may maintain active

  4. Bacteria contribute to sediment nutrient release and reflect progressed eutrophication-driven hypoxia in an organic-rich continental sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Sinkko

    Full Text Available In the sedimental organic matter of eutrophic continental seas, such as the largest dead zone in the world, the Baltic Sea, bacteria may directly participate in nutrient release by mineralizing organic matter or indirectly by altering the sediment's ability to retain nutrients. Here, we present a case study of a hypoxic sea, which receives riverine nutrient loading and in which microbe-mediated vicious cycles of nutrients prevail. We showed that bacterial communities changed along the horizontal loading and vertical mineralization gradients in the Gulf of Finland of the Baltic Sea, using multivariate statistics of terminal restriction fragments and sediment chemical, spatial and other properties of the sampling sites. The change was mainly explained by concentrations of organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, which showed strong positive correlation with Flavobacteria, Sphingobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. These bacteria predominated in the most organic-rich coastal surface sediments overlain by oxic bottom water, whereas sulphate-reducing bacteria, particularly the genus Desulfobacula, prevailed in the reduced organic-rich surface sediments in the open sea. They correlated positively with organic nitrogen and phosphorus, as well as manganese oxides. These relationships suggest that the bacterial groups participated in the aerobic and anaerobic degradation of organic matter and contributed to nutrient cycling. The high abundance of sulphate reducers in the surficial sediment layers reflects the persistence of eutrophication-induced hypoxia causing ecosystem-level changes in the Baltic Sea. The sulphate reducers began to decrease below depths of 20 cm, where members of the family Anaerolineaceae (phylum Chloroflexi increased, possibly taking part in terminal mineralization processes. Our study provides valuable information on how organic loading affects sediment bacterial community compositions, which consequently may

  5. Bacteria contribute to sediment nutrient release and reflect progressed eutrophication-driven hypoxia in an organic-rich continental sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkko, Hanna; Lukkari, Kaarina; Sihvonen, Leila M; Sivonen, Kaarina; Leivuori, Mirja; Rantanen, Matias; Paulin, Lars; Lyra, Christina

    2013-01-01

    In the sedimental organic matter of eutrophic continental seas, such as the largest dead zone in the world, the Baltic Sea, bacteria may directly participate in nutrient release by mineralizing organic matter or indirectly by altering the sediment's ability to retain nutrients. Here, we present a case study of a hypoxic sea, which receives riverine nutrient loading and in which microbe-mediated vicious cycles of nutrients prevail. We showed that bacterial communities changed along the horizontal loading and vertical mineralization gradients in the Gulf of Finland of the Baltic Sea, using multivariate statistics of terminal restriction fragments and sediment chemical, spatial and other properties of the sampling sites. The change was mainly explained by concentrations of organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, which showed strong positive correlation with Flavobacteria, Sphingobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. These bacteria predominated in the most organic-rich coastal surface sediments overlain by oxic bottom water, whereas sulphate-reducing bacteria, particularly the genus Desulfobacula, prevailed in the reduced organic-rich surface sediments in the open sea. They correlated positively with organic nitrogen and phosphorus, as well as manganese oxides. These relationships suggest that the bacterial groups participated in the aerobic and anaerobic degradation of organic matter and contributed to nutrient cycling. The high abundance of sulphate reducers in the surficial sediment layers reflects the persistence of eutrophication-induced hypoxia causing ecosystem-level changes in the Baltic Sea. The sulphate reducers began to decrease below depths of 20 cm, where members of the family Anaerolineaceae (phylum Chloroflexi) increased, possibly taking part in terminal mineralization processes. Our study provides valuable information on how organic loading affects sediment bacterial community compositions, which consequently may maintain active

  6. Food and nutrient intake in relation to mental wellbeing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albanes Demetrius

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We studied food consumption and nutrient intake in subjects with depressed mood, anxiety and insomnia as indices of compromised mental wellbeing. Methods The study population consisted of 29,133 male smokers aged 50 to 69 years who entered the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study in 1985–1988. This was a placebo-controlled trial to test whether supplementation with alpha-tocopherol or beta-carotene prevents lung cancer. At baseline 27,111 men completed a diet history questionnaire from which food and alcohol consumption and nutrient intake were calculated. The questionnaire on background and medical history included three symptoms on mental wellbeing, anxiety, depression and insomnia experienced in the past four months. Results Energy intake was higher in men who reported anxiety or depressed mood, and those reporting any such symptoms consumed more alcohol. Subjects reporting anxiety or depressed mood had higher intake of omega-3 fatty acids and omega-6 fatty acids. Conclusions Our findings conflict with the previous reports of beneficial effects of omega-3 fatty acids on mood.

  7. Energy and nutrient density of foods in relation to their carbon footprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewnowski, Adam; Rehm, Colin D; Martin, Agnes; Verger, Eric O; Voinnesson, Marc; Imbert, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    A carbon footprint is the sum of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGEs) associated with food production, processing, transporting, and retailing. We examined the relation between the energy and nutrient content of foods and associated GHGEs as expressed as g CO2 equivalents. GHGE values, which were calculated and provided by a French supermarket chain, were merged with the Composition Nutritionnelle des Aliments (French food-composition table) nutrient-composition data for 483 foods and beverages from the French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety. Foods were aggregated into 34 food categories and 5 major food groups as follows: meat and meat products, milk and dairy products, frozen and processed fruit and vegetables, grains, and sweets. Energy density was expressed as kcal/100 g. Nutrient density was determined by using 2 alternative nutrient-density scores, each based on the sum of the percentage of daily values for 6 or 15 nutrients, respectively. The energy and nutrient densities of foods were linked to log-transformed GHGE values expressed per 100 g or 100 kcal. Grains and sweets had lowest GHGEs (per 100 g and 100 kcal) but had high energy density and a low nutrient content. The more-nutrient-dense animal products, including meat and dairy, had higher GHGE values per 100 g but much lower values per 100 kcal. In general, a higher nutrient density of foods was associated with higher GHGEs per 100 kcal, although the slopes of fitted lines varied for meat and dairy compared with fats and sweets. Considerations of the environmental impact of foods need to be linked to concerns about nutrient density and health. The point at which the higher carbon footprint of some nutrient-dense foods is offset by their higher nutritional value is a priority area for additional research. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  8. Is lack of breakfast contributing to nutrient deficits and poor nutritional indicators among adolescent girls?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyakumar, Angeline; Ghugre, Padmini

    2017-09-01

    Breakfast is considered the first and most important meal of the day. Missing the first meal may result in significant nutritional deficits, if not compensated in subsequent meals. To describe the nutrient intake through breakfast and to study its association with nutritional indicators among adolescent girls. A cross-sectional study among adolescent girls ( n = 565) 16-18 years was carried out in urban slums of Pune, Maharashtra, India. Haemoglobin was assessed by cyanmethemoglobin method. Nutritional status was assessed through anthropometry and three 24-hours diet recall. Z scores, independent sample test, and linear logistic regression were used to assess undernutrition, to compare means of nutrient intake and to associate nutrient intake with nutritional status, respectively. Almost 50% did not consume solid food for breakfast and 99% of the participants consumed inadequate breakfast (breakfast emerged: I (bakery products + beverage) and II (traditional breakfast + beverage). Although the mean energy intake of type II breakfast (235±100.55 kcal) and the mean micronutrient intake was significantly higher than type I (micronutrients: vitamin C and folate ( p = 0.001), iron ( p = 0.01)) it did not meet the adequacy norms for breakfast. Among nutritional indicators breakfast intake was not directly associated with body mass index. However, mean intake of nutrients such as energy, protein and iron through the day were significantly lesser ( p = 0.001, p = 0.01 and p = 0.01 respectively) among anaemic adolescents. Linear regression showed significant association between energy, fat intake and BAZ scores. Compensating dietary deficits that arise in the first meal would directly address the day's nutrient deficit. The results highlight the need for a food-based approach to address undernutrition among adolescent girls in resource-poor settings.

  9. Large temporal changes in contributions of groundwater-borne nutrients to coastal waters off a volcanic island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyung-Mi; Kim, Guebuem

    2017-09-01

    We examined the contribution of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) to nutrient budgets in Hwasun Bay, Jeju Island, Korea in August 2009, October 2014, and May 2015. The concentrations of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) in fresh groundwater were in the range of 285-716 μM and 2.3-3.2 μM, respectively, which were each 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than those in the bay seawater. The outer-bay seawater flowing into the bay was oligotrophic (2.9 ± 1.9 μM for DIN and 0.2 ± 0.3 μM for DIP). Nutrient budget calculations were performed for each season by accounting for submarine fresh groundwater discharge (SFGD) and water residence times. In August 2009 (DIN = 1.8 μM and DIN:DIP ratio = 4.6 for the outerbay water), DIN inputs from SFGD accounted for approximately 40% of the DIN inventory in the bay seawater. In October 2014 (DIN = 1.1 μM and DIP nutrient budgets and stoichiometry in coastal waters off a volcanic island depending on open-ocean nutrient conditions.

  10. Contributions of White Vegetables to Nutrient Intake: NHANES 2009–201012

    OpenAIRE

    Storey, Maureen L; Anderson, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Vegetables, especially white potatoes, provide significant levels of key nutrients of concern, such as potassium and dietary fiber. Per capita availability (PCA) data for vegetables—often used as a proxy for vegetable consumption—show that vegetable consumption, including consumption of white potatoes, declined in the past decade. Using dietary data for participants in the NHANES 2009–2010, we examined total vegetable, white potato, and French-fried potato consumption among all age-gender gro...

  11. Plant Growth Environments with Programmable Relative Humidity and Homogeneous Nutrient Availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Kara R; Lee, Nigel; Sizmur, Tom; Siemianowski, Oskar; Van Bruggen, Shawn; Ganapathysubramaniam, Baskar; Cademartiri, Ludovico

    2016-01-01

    We describe the design, characterization, and use of "programmable", sterile growth environments for individual (or small sets of) plants. The specific relative humidities and nutrient availability experienced by the plant is established (RH between 15% and 95%; nutrient concentration as desired) during the setup of the growth environment, which takes about 5 minutes and advantages of hydroponics conditions (e.g., root phenotyping, complete control over nutrient composition, scalability) and soil conditions (e.g., aeration of roots, shading of roots), while being comparable in cost and setup time to Magenta® boxes.

  12. Contribution of Outer-shelf Deep Water to the nutrient inventories in the euphotic zone of Changjiang River plume during summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianfang

    2016-04-01

    Nutrient supply to the euphotic zone of high productivity area in the Changjiang Estuary,East China Sea is crucial in understanding algal bloom and hypoxia in this area. Previous studies suggested that Changjiang Diluted Water (CDW) and Outer-shelf Deep Water (ODW) are two main sources for nutrient supply while quantitative estimation of each nutrient species to the euphotic zone remains unknown. Based on a field survey and end-member mixing model, the nutrient inventories of ODW, and its contribution to the model-predicted nutrient inventory in the euphotic zone of Changjiang River plume-impacted area were assessed. Upwelling of ODW was identified, indicating that it significantly contributed to nutrient inventories in the upper layer. The nutrient inventory estimation suggested that the area-integrated nutrient inventories of ODW were higher than that of CDW in the euphotic zone of plume-impacted area. As inferred from the mixing model, the contributions of ODW to DIN and silicate inventories in the euphotic zone were 18.2% and 28.1%, respectively, much lower than that of CDW. However, 37.6% and 39.1% of the phosphate inventory were from ODW and CDW, respectively, indicating that ODW phosphate contribution was comparable with that of CDW in the euphotic zone, while DIN and silicate brought by ODW were less

  13. Bacteria and fungi can contribute to nutrients bioavailability and aggregate formation in degraded soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Muhammad Imtiaz; Mujawar, Liyakat Hamid; Shahzad, Tanvir; Almeelbi, Talal; Ismail, Iqbal M I; Oves, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Intensive agricultural practices and cultivation of exhaustive crops has deteriorated soil fertility and its quality in agroecosystems. According to an estimate, such practices will convert 30% of the total world cultivated soil into degraded land by 2020. Soil structure and fertility loss are one of the main causes of soil degradation. They are also considered as a major threat to crop production and food security for future generations. Implementing safe and environmental friendly technology would be viable solution for achieving sustainable restoration of degraded soils. Bacterial and fungal inocula have a potential to reinstate the fertility of degraded land through various processes. These microorganisms increase the nutrient bioavailability through nitrogen fixation and mobilization of key nutrients (phosphorus, potassium and iron) to the crop plants while remediate soil structure by improving its aggregation and stability. Success rate of such inocula under field conditions depends on their antagonistic or synergistic interaction with indigenous microbes or their inoculation with organic fertilizers. Co-inoculation of bacteria and fungi with or without organic fertilizer are more beneficial for reinstating the soil fertility and organic matter content than single inoculum. Such factors are of great importance when considering bacteria and fungi inocula for restoration of degraded soils. The overview of presented mechanisms and interactions will help agriculturists in planning sustainable management strategy for reinstating the fertility of degraded soil and assist them in reducing the negative impact of artificial fertilizers on our environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Health-related on-pack communication and nutritional value of ready-to-eat breakfast cereals evaluated against five nutrient profiling schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschkowski, Gesa; Hartmann, Monika; Hoffmann, Julia

    2014-11-19

    There is an ongoing debate regarding health-related on-pack information appearing on products with low nutritional quality. The purpose of the study was to contribute to this discussion by examining the relationship between health-related on-pack information and the overall nutritional value of highly processed ready-to-eat breakfast cereals (RTECs). Maximum variation sampling was used to select 128 highly processed RTECs in Germany in 2010. In 2012, two additional samples were collected in Norway (n =38) and Germany (n =73) to allow for comparisons of products from countries with different regulations concerning nutrient profiles. All products were evaluated against five nutrient profiling models from government-related agencies. Mann-Whitney U Tests and Chi-square statistics was used to compare the nutrient profiles of different product categories. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify on-pack information on German products predicting a satisfactory nutritional profile. The majority of RTECs displayed health-related information on the packaging, but only 4-36% of German products met the criteria of the different nutrient profiles. The rate was lower for cereals marketed to children, Norwegian cereals performed better (36-64%). Health-related on-pack information was not consistently related to the nutrient profiles. The following on-pack criteria predicted a satisfactory nutrient profile on RTECs of the German 2010 sample: i) cereals not marketed to children, ii) clean labelling (free-from claims) and possibly organic labelling and whole grain claims. Our results suggest that the implementation of a mandatory nutrient profiling scheme for products with health-related on-pack information could contribute to a consistent relationship between health-related information on RTECs and the overall nutritional value of the product. Improvements should also consider the provision of a simple nutritional labelling scheme on the front of the packaging

  15. Mechanisms of nutrient retention and its relation to flow connectivity in river-floodplain corridors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Laurel; Harvey, Judson; Maglio, Morgan M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding heterogeneity or patchiness in the distribution of vegetation and retention of C and nutrients in river corridors is critical for setting priorities for river management and restoration. Several mechanisms of spatial differentiation in nutrient retention in river and floodplain corridors have been recognized, but few studies have distinguished their relative importance or established their role in long-term geomorphic change, nutrient retention, and connectivity with downstream systems. We evaluated the ability of 3 mechanisms (evapotranspiration focusing [EF], differential hydrologic exchange [DHE], and particulate nutrient redistribution [PNR]) to explain spatial patterns of P retention and function in the Everglades (Florida, USA). We used field measurements in sloughs and on slightly higher, more densely vegetated ridges to quantify P fluxes attributable to the 3 mechanisms. EF does not explain Everglades nutrient retention or P concentrations on ridges and in sloughs. However, DHE resulting from different periods of groundwater–surface-water connectivity across topographic elements is the primary cause of elevated P concentrations on ridges and completely explains interpatch differences in long-term P accumulation rates. With historical flow velocities, which were an order of magnitude higher than at present, PNR would have further increased the interpatch difference in long-term P retention rates nearly 2-fold. In conclusion, DHE and PNR are the dominant drivers of nutrient patchiness in the Everglades and are hypothesized to be important in P-limited river and floodplain corridors globally.

  16. Short-term effects of a simulated acid rain upon the growth and nutrient relations of Pinus strobus, L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tim Wood; F. H. Bormann

    1976-01-01

    Acidified precipitation may affect the productivity of forests by altering the availability of plant nutrients of by affecting the ability of trees to absorb and assimilate those nutrients. In this study, the short-term effects of simulated acid rain (pH range 5.6 - 2.3) upon the growth and nutrient relations of Eastern White Pine seedlings (Pinus strobus...

  17. Relationships between Nutrient-Related Plant Traits and Combinations of Soil N and P Fertility Measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fujita, Y.; van Bodegom, P.M.; Witte, J.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Soil fertility and nutrient-related plant functional traits are in general only moderately related, hindering the progress in trait-based prediction models of vegetation patterns. Although the relationships may have been obscured by suboptimal choices in how soil fertility is expressed, there has

  18. Geographic, environmental and biotic sources of variation in the nutrient relations of tropical montane forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    James W. Dalling; Katherine Heineman; Grizelle Gonzalez; Rebecca Ostertag

    2016-01-01

    Tropicalmontane forests (TMF) are associated with a widely observed suite of characteristics encompassing forest structure, plant traits and biogeochemistry.With respect to nutrient relations, montane forests are characterized by slow decomposition of organic matter, high investment in below-ground biomass and poor litter quality, relative to tropical lowland forests....

  19. Daily intake of dairy products in Brazil and contributions to nutrient intakes: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Mary M; Barraj, Leila M; Toth, Lindsey D; Harkness, Laura S; Bolster, Douglas R

    2016-02-01

    Dairy products are sources of protein and micronutrients important in a healthy diet. The purpose of the present analysis was to estimate consumption of dairy products by Brazilians and identify contributions of dairy products to nutrient intakes. Dairy consumption data were obtained from 24 h dietary records. Dairy products were defined as milk (including flavoured), cheese and yoghurt. Estimates of dairy product intakes were generated for all individuals, individuals in urban and rural households and for age groups 10-18 years, 19-59 years and ≥60 years. Contributions to nutrient intakes were estimated for the total sample and sub-populations. Nationwide cross-sectional survey, 2008-2009. Nationally representative sample of individuals aged ≥10 years in the Individual Food Intake survey, a component of the Brazilian Household Budget Survey (n 34 003). Among individuals aged ≥10 years, per capita intake of dairy products was 142 (se 2.1) g/d. Dairy product intake was higher among individuals in urban compared with rural areas and among groups 10-18 years and ≥60 years compared with adults aged 19-59 years. Dairy products accounted for 6.1% of daily energy intake, 7.3% of protein, 16.9% of saturated fat, 11.1% and 4.3% of total and added sugars, respectively, and 10.2-37.9% of daily Ca, vitamin D, P, vitamin A and K. Dairy products were substantial contributors to daily intakes of selected nutrients of concern in Brazil, although mean daily dairy product consumption was less than a typical portion. Education efforts in Brazil to raise awareness about the nutritional role of dairy foods may serve to improve overall diet quality.

  20. Contribution of Leaf Litter to Nutrient Export during Winter Months in an Urban Residential Watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratt, Anika R; Finlay, Jacques C; Hobbie, Sarah E; Janke, Benjamin D; Worm, Adam C; Kemmitt, Kathrine L

    2017-03-21

    Identification of nonpoint sources of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in urban systems is imperative to improving water quality and better managing eutrophication. Winter contributions and sources of annual N and P loads from urban watersheds are poorly characterized in northern cities because monitoring is often limited to warm-weather periods. To determine the winter export of N and P, we monitored stormwater outflow in a residential watershed in Saint Paul, Minnesota during 2012-2014. Our data demonstrate that winter melt events contribute a high percentage of annual N and P export (50%). We hypothesized that overwintering leaf litter that is not removed by fall street sweeping could be an important source to winter loads of N and P. We estimated contributions of this source by studying decomposition in lawns, street gutters, and catch basins during two winters. Rates of mass and N loss were negligible during both winters. However, P was quickly solubilized from decomposing leaves. Using mass balances and estimates of P leaching losses, we estimated that leaf litter could contribute 80% of winter total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) loading in this watershed (∼40% of annual TDP loading). Our work indicates that urban trees adjacent to streets likely represent a major source of P pollution in northern cities. Management that targets important winter sources such as tree leaves could be highly effective for reducing P loading and may mitigate eutrophication in urban lakes and streams in developed cities.

  1. The contribution of plant uptake to nutrient removal by floating treatment wetlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer-Vlek, H.E.; Verdonschot, P.F.M.; Verdonschot, R.C.M.; Dekkers, T.B.M.

    2014-01-01

    Floating treatment wetlands (FTWs) may provide an appealing alternative to the more conventional (sub) surface flow wetlands to solve problems associated with eutrophication in urban surface waters, because they do not claim additional land area. This study examined the contribution of plant uptake

  2. Lactational Stage of Pasteurized Human Donor Milk Contributes to Nutrient Limitations for Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina J. Valentine

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Mother’s own milk is the first choice for feeding preterm infants, but when not available, pasteurized human donor milk (PDM is often used. Infants fed PDM have difficulties maintaining appropriate growth velocities. To assess the most basic elements of nutrition, we tested the hypotheses that fatty acid and amino acid composition of PDM is highly variable and standard pooling practices attenuate variability; however, total nutrients may be limiting without supplementation due to late lactational stage of the milk. Methods. A prospective cross-sectional sampling of milk was obtained from five donor milk banks located in Ohio, Michigan, Colorado, Texas-Ft Worth, and California. Milk samples were collected after Institutional Review Board (#07-0035 approval and informed consent. Fatty acid and amino acid contents were measured in milk from individual donors and donor pools (pooled per Human Milk Banking Association of North America guidelines. Statistical comparisons were performed using Kruskal–Wallis, Spearman’s, or Multivariate Regression analyses with center as the fixed factor and lactational stage as co-variate. Results. Ten of the fourteen fatty acids and seventeen of the nineteen amino acids analyzed differed across Banks in the individual milk samples. Pooling minimized these differences in amino acid and fatty acid contents. Concentrations of lysine and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA were not different across Banks, but concentrations were low compared to recommended levels. Conclusions. Individual donor milk fatty acid and amino acid contents are highly variable. Standardized pooling practice reduces this variability. Lysine and DHA concentrations were consistently low across geographic regions in North America due to lactational stage of the milk, and thus not adequately addressed by pooling. Targeted supplementation is needed to optimize PDM, especially for the preterm or volume restricted infant.

  3. Lactational Stage of Pasteurized Human Donor Milk Contributes to Nutrient Limitations for Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Christina J; Morrow, Georgia; Reisinger, Amanda; Dingess, Kelly A; Morrow, Ardythe L; Rogers, Lynette K

    2017-03-18

    Mother's own milk is the first choice for feeding preterm infants, but when not available, pasteurized human donor milk (PDM) is often used. Infants fed PDM have difficulties maintaining appropriate growth velocities. To assess the most basic elements of nutrition, we tested the hypotheses that fatty acid and amino acid composition of PDM is highly variable and standard pooling practices attenuate variability; however, total nutrients may be limiting without supplementation due to late lactational stage of the milk. A prospective cross-sectional sampling of milk was obtained from five donor milk banks located in Ohio, Michigan, Colorado, Texas-Ft Worth, and California. Milk samples were collected after Institutional Review Board (#07-0035) approval and informed consent. Fatty acid and amino acid contents were measured in milk from individual donors and donor pools (pooled per Human Milk Banking Association of North America guidelines). Statistical comparisons were performed using Kruskal-Wallis, Spearman's, or Multivariate Regression analyses with center as the fixed factor and lactational stage as co-variate. Ten of the fourteen fatty acids and seventeen of the nineteen amino acids analyzed differed across Banks in the individual milk samples. Pooling minimized these differences in amino acid and fatty acid contents. Concentrations of lysine and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were not different across Banks, but concentrations were low compared to recommended levels. Individual donor milk fatty acid and amino acid contents are highly variable. Standardized pooling practice reduces this variability. Lysine and DHA concentrations were consistently low across geographic regions in North America due to lactational stage of the milk, and thus not adequately addressed by pooling. Targeted supplementation is needed to optimize PDM, especially for the preterm or volume restricted infant.

  4. Relative Contributions of Socio-Cultural Variables to the Prediction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE. Relative Contributions of Socio-Cultural Variables to the Prediction of Maternal Mortality in Edo South. Senatorial District, Nigeria. Chinwe Lucy Marchie, Francisca Chika Anyanwu. 2. ABSTRACT. The study examined the extent of contributions of socio-cultural factors to maternal mortality ( ...

  5. Use of a multi-isotope and multi-tracer approach including organic matter isotopes for quantifying nutrient contributions from agricultural vs wastewater sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, C.; Silva, S. R.; Young, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    While nutrient isotopes are a well-established tool for quantifying nutrients inputs from agricultural vs wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) sources, we have found that combining nutrient isotopes with the C, N, and S isotopic compositions of dissolved and particulate organic matter, as part of a comprehensive multi-isotope and multi-tracer approach, is a much more diagnostic approach. The main reasons why organic matter C-N-S isotopes are a useful adjunct to studies of nutrient sources and biogeochemical processes are that the dissolved and particulate organic matter associated with (1) different kinds of animals (e.g., humans vs cows) often have distinctive isotopic compositions reflecting the different diets of the animals, and (2) the different processes associated with the different land uses (e.g., in the WWTP or associated with different crop types) often result in significant differences in the isotopic compositions of the organics. The analysis of the δ34S of particulate organic matter (POM) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) has been found to be especially useful for distinguishing and quantifying water, nutrient, and organic contributions from different land uses in aquatic systems where much of the organic matter is aquatic in origin. In such environments, the bacteria and algae incorporate S from sulfate and sulfide that is isotopically labeled by the different processes associated with different land uses. We have found that there is ~35 permil range in δ34S of POM along the river-estuary continuum in the San Joaquin/Sacramento River basin, with low values associated with sulfate reduction in the upstream wetlands and high values associated with tidal inputs of marine water into the estuary. Furthermore, rice agriculture results in relatively low δ34S values whereas WWTP effluent in the Sacramento River produces distinctly higher values than upstream of the WWTP, presumably because SO2 is used to treat chlorinated effluent. The fish living

  6. Lodgepole pine site index in relation to synoptic measures of climate, soil moisture and soil nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. Geoff Wang; Shongming Huang; Robert A. Monserud; Ryan J. Klos

    2004-01-01

    Lodgepole pine site index was examined in relation to synoptic measures of topography, soil moisture, and soil nutrients in Alberta. Data came from 214 lodgepole pine-dominated stands sampled as a part of the provincial permanent sample plot program. Spatial location (elevation, latitude, and longitude) and natural subregions (NSRs) were topographic variables that...

  7. Nutrient availability constrains the hydraulic architecture and water relations of savannah trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S.J. Bucci; F.G. Scholz; G. Goldstein; F.C. Meinzer; A.C. Franco; P.I. Campanello; R. Villalobos-Vega; M. Bustamante; F. Miralles-Wilhelm

    2006-01-01

    Several plant functional traits were studied in five dominant woody savanna species in a Brazilian savanna to determine whether removal of nutrient limitations has an effect on carbon allocation, water relations, and hydraulic architecture. Four treatments consisting of a control, and nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and N plus P additions were maintained for 5 years....

  8. Antioxidant and DNA methylation-related nutrients and risk of distal colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christina Dawn; Satia, Jessie A; Adair, Linda S; Stevens, June; Galanko, Joseph; Keku, Temitope O; Sandler, Robert S

    2010-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between antioxidant nutrients (vitamins C and E, beta-carotene, selenium) and DNA methylation-related nutrients (folate, vitamins B6 and B12) and distal colorectal cancer risk in whites and African Americans and to examine intakes from food only versus total (food plus dietary supplements) intakes. Data are from the North Carolina Colon Cancer Study-Phase II, a case-control study of 945 distal colorectal cancer (including sigmoid, rectosigmoid, and rectum) cases and 959 controls. In-person interviews captured usual dietary intake and various covariates. Multivariate logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). High intakes of each antioxidant and DNA methylation-related nutrient were significantly associated with lower risk in whites. In African Americans, the highest category of selenium from food only had a marginally significant inverse association with distal colorectal cancer risk (Q4 vs. Q1 OR: 0.55, 95% CI 0.29-1.02). Supplements did not provide additional risk reduction beyond intakes from food. Our findings provide evidence that antioxidant and DNA methylation-related nutrients may lower the risk of distal colorectal cancer in whites, and selenium may lower risk in African Americans. Optimal micronutrient intakes from food alone may be more beneficial than supplementation.

  9. Relative effects of grazers and nutrients on seagrasses: a meta-analysis approach

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, A Randall R; Bando, K J; Rodriguez, L. F.; S. L Williams

    2004-01-01

    Recent large-scale seagrass declines have prompted experimental investigations of potential mechanisms. Although many studies have implicated eutrophication or reductions of epiphyte grazers in these declines, few experiments have simultaneously manipulated both factors to assess their relative effects. This study used meta-analyses of 35 published seagrass studies to compare the relative strength of 'top-down' grazer effects and 'bottom-up' nutrient effects on epiphyte biomass and seagrass a...

  10. Plant Growth Environments with Programmable Relative Humidity and Homogeneous Nutrient Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Kara R.; Lee, Nigel; Sizmur, Tom; Siemianowski, Oskar; Van Bruggen, Shawn; Ganapathysubramaniam, Baskar

    2016-01-01

    We describe the design, characterization, and use of “programmable”, sterile growth environments for individual (or small sets of) plants. The specific relative humidities and nutrient availability experienced by the plant is established (RH between 15% and 95%; nutrient concentration as desired) during the setup of the growth environment, which takes about 5 minutes and nutrient solution and air, (iii) a compatibility with root phenotyping. We demonstrate phenotyping by characterizing root systems of Brassica rapa plants growing in different relative humidities (55%, 75%, and 95%). While most phenotypes were found to be sensitive to these environmental changes, a phenotype tightly associated with root system topology–the size distribution of the areas encircled by roots–appeared to be remarkably and counterintuitively insensitive to humidity changes. These setups combine many of the advantages of hydroponics conditions (e.g., root phenotyping, complete control over nutrient composition, scalability) and soil conditions (e.g., aeration of roots, shading of roots), while being comparable in cost and setup time to Magenta® boxes. PMID:27304431

  11. The contribution of Giordano Bruno to the principle of relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Alessandro; Santo, Catarina Espirito

    2015-11-01

    The trial and condemnation of Giordano Bruno was mainly based on arguments of a philosophical and theological nature, and therefore different from Galileo Galilei's trial. Such elements contribute to unfairly devalue the scientific contribution of Bruno and do not properly account for his contribution to physics. This paper discusses the contribution that Bruno made to the principle of relativity. This was first discussed by Galileo Galilei in 1632 using the metaphor known today as 'Galileo's ship', but we shall show that this same metaphor and some of the examples in Galileo's book were already contained in a dialogue published by Bruno in 1584. In fact, Bruno largely anticipated the arguments of Galilei on the relativity principle, in particular to support the Copernican view. It is likely that Galilei was aware of Bruno's work, and it is possible that the young Galilei discussed it with Bruno, since they both stayed in Venice for long periods in 1592.

  12. The potential contribution of yellow cassava to dietary nutrient adequacy of primary-school children in Eastern Kenya; the use of linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talsma, Elise F; Borgonjen-van den Berg, Karin J; Melse-Boonstra, Alida; Mayer, Eva V; Verhoef, Hans; Demir, Ayşe Y; Ferguson, Elaine L; Kok, Frans J; Brouwer, Inge D

    2018-02-01

    Introduction of biofortified cassava as school lunch can increase vitamin A intake, but may increase risk of other deficiencies due to poor nutrient profile of cassava. We assessed the potential effect of introducing a yellow cassava-based school lunch combined with additional food-based recommendations (FBR) on vitamin A and overall nutrient adequacy using Optifood (linear programming tool). Cross-sectional study to assess dietary intakes (24 h recall) and derive model parameters (list of foods consumed, median serving sizes, food and food (sub)group frequency distributions, food cost). Three scenarios were modelled, namely daily diet including: (i) no school lunch; (ii) standard 5d school lunch with maize/beans; and (iii) 5d school lunch with yellow cassava. Each scenario and scenario 3 with additional FBR were assessed on overall nutrient adequacy using recommended nutrient intakes (RNI). Eastern Kenya. Primary-school children (n 150) aged 7-9 years. Best food pattern of yellow cassava-based lunch scenario achieved 100 % RNI for six nutrients compared with no lunch (three nutrients) or standard lunch (five nutrients) scenario. FBR with yellow cassava and including small dried fish improved nutrient adequacy, but could not ensure adequate intake of fat (52 % of average requirement), riboflavin (50 % RNI), folate (59 % RNI) and vitamin A (49 % RNI). Introduction of yellow cassava-based school lunch complemented with FBR potentially improved vitamin A adequacy, but alternative interventions are needed to ensure dietary adequacy. Optifood is useful to assess potential contribution of a biofortified crop to nutrient adequacy and to develop additional FBR to address remaining nutrient gaps.

  13. Nutrients related to one-carbon metabolism and risk of renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eunyoung; Giovannucci, Edward L; Joh, Hee-Kyung

    2013-02-01

    Folate, vitamins B6 and B12, methionine, choline, and betaine are nutrients related to one-carbon metabolism and have been hypothesized to decrease cancer risk. Few studies have evaluated dietary intakes of these nutrients in relation to renal cell cancer (RCC). We conducted prospective follow-up studies of women in the Nurses' Health Study and men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Diet was assessed repeatedly using a validated semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire in both studies. During follow-up of 24 years among 77,208 women (918,891 person-years) and 22 years among 47,886 men (1,731,752 person-years), we accrued 436 cases of RCC (225 women and 211 men). Intakes of folate, vitamins B6 and B12, methionine, and betaine were not found to be related to RCC risk. Higher intake of free choline, but not other forms of choline, was associated with reduced RCC risk. The results were similar in men and women. We found little evidence that higher intakes of nutrients related to one-carbon metabolism lower RCC risk. One-carbon metabolism may have little influence on renal carcinogenesis.

  14. Relations of biological indicators to nutrient data for lakes and streams in Pennsylvania and West Virginia, 1990-98

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brightbill, Robin A.; Koerkle, Edward H.

    2003-01-01

    The Clean Water Action Plan of 1998 provides a blueprint for federal agencies to work with states, tribes, and other stakeholders to protect and restore the Nation?s water resources. The plan includes an initiative that addresses the nutrientenrichment problem of lakes and streams across the United States. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is working to set nutrient criteria by nationwide nutrient ecoregions that are an aggregation of the Omernik level III ecoregions.Because low levels of nutrients are necessary for healthy streams and elevated concentrations can cause algal blooms that deplete available oxygen and kill off aquatic organisms, criteria levels are to be set, in part, using the relation between chlorophyll a and concentrations of total nitrogen and total phosphorus. Data from Pennsylvania and West Virginia, collected between 1990 and 1998, were analyzed for relations between chlorophyll a, nutrients, and other explanatory variables. Both phytoplankton and periphyton chlorophyll a concentrations from lakes and streams were analyzed separately within each of the USEPA nutrient ecoregions located within the boundaries of the two states. These four nutrient ecoregions are VII (Mostly Glaciated Dairy), VIII (Nutrient Poor, Largely Glaciated Upper Midwest and Northeast), IX (Southeastern Temperate Forested Plains and Hills), and XI (Central and Eastern Forested Uplands).ytoplankton chlorophyll a concentrations in lakes were related to total nitrogen, total phosphorus, Secchi depth, concentration of dissolved oxygen, pH, water temperature, and specific conductivity. In nutrient ecoregion VII, nutrients were not significant predictors of chlorophyll a concentrations. Total nitrogen, Secchi depth, and pH were significantly related to phytoplankton chlorophyll a concentrations in nutrient ecoregion IX. Lake periphyton chlorophyll a concentrations from nutrient ecoregion XI were related to total phosphorus rather than total nitrogen, Secchi depth

  15. Relative contributions of individual, institutional and system factors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the relative contributions of individual, institutional and system factors to utilisation of Research4Life databases by scientists in the National Agricultural Research Institutes (NARIs) in Nigeria. The study adopted the descriptive survey research design of the correlational type. Simple and stratified ...

  16. Plant Growth Environments with Programmable Relative Humidity and Homogeneous Nutrient Availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara R Lind

    Full Text Available We describe the design, characterization, and use of "programmable", sterile growth environments for individual (or small sets of plants. The specific relative humidities and nutrient availability experienced by the plant is established (RH between 15% and 95%; nutrient concentration as desired during the setup of the growth environment, which takes about 5 minutes and <1$ in disposable cost. These systems maintain these environmental parameters constant for at least 14 days with minimal intervention (one minute every two days. The design is composed entirely of off-the-shelf components (e.g., LEGO® bricks and is characterized by (i a separation of root and shoot environment (which is physiologically relevant and facilitates imposing specific conditions on the root system, e.g., darkness, (ii the development of the root system on a flat surface, where the root enjoys constant contact with nutrient solution and air, (iii a compatibility with root phenotyping. We demonstrate phenotyping by characterizing root systems of Brassica rapa plants growing in different relative humidities (55%, 75%, and 95%. While most phenotypes were found to be sensitive to these environmental changes, a phenotype tightly associated with root system topology-the size distribution of the areas encircled by roots-appeared to be remarkably and counterintuitively insensitive to humidity changes. These setups combine many of the advantages of hydroponics conditions (e.g., root phenotyping, complete control over nutrient composition, scalability and soil conditions (e.g., aeration of roots, shading of roots, while being comparable in cost and setup time to Magenta® boxes.

  17. Postdiagnostic intake of one-carbon nutrients and alcohol in relation to colorectal cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochhead, Paul; Nishihara, Reiko; Qian, Zhi Rong; Mima, Kosuke; Cao, Yin; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Kim, Sun A; Inamura, Kentaro; Zhang, Xuehong; Wu, Kana; Giovannucci, Edward; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Chan, Andrew T; Fuchs, Charles S; Ogino, Shuji

    2015-11-01

    biomarkers examined. Higher postdiagnostic intakes of one-carbon nutrients are not associated with the prognosis in stage I-III colorectal cancer. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that higher folate intake after colorectal cancer diagnosis might increase risk of cancer-related death. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  18. Postdiagnostic intake of one-carbon nutrients and alcohol in relation to colorectal cancer survival123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochhead, Paul; Nishihara, Reiko; Qian, Zhi Rong; Mima, Kosuke; Cao, Yin; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Kim, Sun A; Inamura, Kentaro; Zhang, Xuehong; Wu, Kana; Giovannucci, Edward; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Chan, Andrew T; Fuchs, Charles S; Ogino, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    -carbon nutrients or alcohol and any of the tumor molecular biomarkers examined. Conclusions: Higher postdiagnostic intakes of one-carbon nutrients are not associated with the prognosis in stage I–III colorectal cancer. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that higher folate intake after colorectal cancer diagnosis might increase risk of cancer-related death. PMID:26423386

  19. Nutrient Transporter Expression in the Jejunum in Relation to Body Mass Index in Patients Undergoing Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian A. Irving

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nutrient tranters (NT facilitate nutrient absorption and contribute to the regulation of circulating nutrients. In this cross-sectional study, we determined the associations between the level of obesity; mRNA abundance for NTs; and serum concentrations of amino acids, short-chain fatty acids, and glucose in patients with morbid obesity undergoing a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Proximal jejunal samples were obtained at the time of surgery from 42 patients (90% female, age = 42.6 ± 11.9 years, pre-operative body mass index (BMI = 55.5 ± 11.3 kg/m2 undergoing a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. RNA was extracted from the jejunal mucosa and quantitative real-time–PCR was performed for the NTs studied. BMI negatively correlated with jejunal mRNA abundance of the amino acid NTs TauT (r = −0.625, p < 0.0001, ASCT2 (r = −0.320, p = 0.039, LAT1 (r = −0.304, p = 0.05. BMI positively correlated with jejunal mRNA abundance of the lactate/short-chain fatty acid NT SMCT1 (r = 0.543, p = 0.0002. Serum concentrations of the short-chain fatty acids, butyric, valeric, and isocaproic acid correlated positively with BMI (n = 30 (r = 0.45, r = 0.44, r = 0.36, p ≤ 0.05; respectively. Lower jejunal mRNA abundance for the amino acid NTs TauT, ASCT2, and LAT1 could protect against further obesity-related elevations in circulating amino acids. The positive correlation between BMI and the jejunal mRNA abundance of the high-affinity short-chain fatty acid/monocarboxylate transporter SMCT1 is intriguing and requires further investigation.

  20. Contributions to assessing the relative dimension of agglomeration theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion POHOAŢĂ

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to structure, from a historical and spatial point of view, the existing specialists' concerns in developing theories about agglomeration. The complete and complex evaluation of agglomeration economies allows us to make important contributions to assessing the relative dimension of agglomeration theories, placing them within the research area of spatial economy and identifying them with the science of location and currently with the new economic geography (NEG.

  1. Anaerobic Contribution Determined in Swimming Distances: Relation with Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Z. Campos

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Total anaerobic contribution (TAn can be assessed by accumulated oxygen deficit, and through sum of glycolytic and phosphagen contribution which enable the evaluation of TAn without influences on mechanical parameters. However, little is known about the difference of TAn within swimming distances. Therefore, the objectives of the present study were to determine and compare the TAn in different performances using the backward extrapolation technique and amount of lactate accumulated during exercise, and relate it with swimming performance. Fourteen competitive swimmers performed five maximal front crawl swims of 50, 100, 200, 400, and 800 m. The total phosphagen (AnAl and glycolytic (AnLa contributions were assumed as the fast component of post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOCFAST and amount of blood lactate accumulated during exercise, respectively. TAn was the sum of AnAl and AnLa. Significantly lower values of AnLa were observed in the 800 m (p < 0.01 than other distances. For AnAl, the 50 m performance presented the lowest values, followed by 100 and 800 m (p < 0.01. The highest values of AnAl were observed in the 200 and 400 m (p > 0.13. The TAn was significantly higher in the 200 and 400 m performances than observed at 50 and 800 m (p < 0.01. Anaerobic contributions were correlated with 50, 100, 200, and 400 m performances (p < 0.01. The AnAl contribution was not correlated with 400 m performance. Anaerobic parameters were not correlated with 800 m performance. In conclusion, the highest values of anaerobic contribution were observed in the 200 and 400 m distances. Moreover, TAn is important to performances below 400 m, and may be used in training routines.

  2. Centers for Water Research on National Priorities Related to a Systems View of Nutrient Management Kick-off Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    At this meeting, grantees from Centers for Water Research on National Priorities Related to a Systems View of Nutrient Management and Sustainable Chesapeake: A Community-Based Approach to Stormwater Management Using Green Infrastructure

  3. Prognosis of breast cancer is associated with one-carbon metabolism related nutrients among Korean women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yunhee; Lee, Sang-Ah; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Song, Minkyo; Sung, Hyuna; Jeon, Sujee; Park, Sue K; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Kang, Daehee

    2012-08-28

    The 5-year survival rate for breast cancer among Korean women has increased steadily; however, breast cancer remains the leading cause of cancer mortality among women. One-carbon metabolism, which requires an adequate supply of methyl group donors and B vitamins, may affect the prognosis of breast cancer. This aim of this study was to investigate the associations of dietary intake of vitamin B2, vitamin B6 and folate before diagnosis on the prognosis of breast cancer. We assessed the dietary intake using a food frequency questionnaire with 980 women who were newly diagnosed and histopathologically confirmed to have primary breast cancer from hospitals in Korea, and 141 disease progression events occurred. Cox's proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) adjusting for age, education, recruitment sites, TNM stage, hormone status, nuclear grade and total calorie. There was no significant association between any one-carbon metabolism related nutrients (vitamin B2, B6 and folate) and the progression of breast cancer overall. However, one-carbon metabolism related nutrients were associated with disease progression in breast cancer patients stratified by subtypes. In ER + and/or PR + breast cancers, no association was observed; however, in ER-/PR- breast cancers, a high intake of vitamin B2 and folate statistically elevated the HR of breast cancer progression (HR = 2.28; 95% CI, 1.20-4.35, HR = 1.84; 95% CI, 1.02-3.32, respectively) compared to a low intake. This positive association between the ER/PR status and progression of the disease was profound when the nutrient intakes were categorized in a combined score (Pinteraction = 0.018). In ER-/PR- breast cancers, high combined scores were associated with a significantly poor DFS compared to those belonging to the low score group (HR = 3.84; 95% CI, 1.70-8.71). In conclusion, our results suggest that one-carbon related nutrients have a role in the

  4. Contribution of Nutrient Diversity and Food Perceptions to Food and Nutrition Security Among Smallholder Farming Households in Western Kenya: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng'endo, Mary; Bhagwat, Shonil; Keding, Gudrun B

    2017-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa is the only region in the world where hunger is prevalent in over one-third of the population, with smallholder farming households, producers of over 80% of Africa's food, facing both calorie and micronutrient deficiencies. With agricultural systems serving as the main source of all nutrients, little is known about the extent to which agricultural diversity in different seasons can meet macro- and micronutrient needs in rural Africa. Linkages between nutrient diversity and food species were investigated. A case study was conducted in Western Kenya to assess the seasonal nutrient diversity, seasonal nutrient accessibility levels, and food perceptions in 30 smallholder farms, 7 markets, and among 97 focus group discussion participants, respectively. All present food plant and animal species were inventoried and assigned to 1 of the 7 major Food and Agriculture Organization-defined food groups. Based on 2 macronutrients and 5 micronutrients, dendrogram-based nutrient functional diversity metrics were calculated. On-farm and market food species offered all 7 macro- and micronutrients under investigation, regardless of seasonal variation in species numbers. Although there were varying seasonal nutrient accessibility levels in markets, farms were especially effective in readily availing 4 of the 7 nutrients. However, the main food shortage months coincided only with maize shortage, but a diversity of local foods, deemed to be of low cultural and culinary preferences, were available. Nutrition education on the importance of a diversity of local foods in meeting dietary needs, thus stimulating the demand side, can contribute to achieving year-round household food security.

  5. Dairy foods and nutrients in relation to risk of ovarian cancer and major histological subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Melissa A; Cramer, Daniel W; Vitonis, Allison F; Titus, Linda J; Terry, Kathryn L

    2013-03-01

    Inconsistent results for the role of dairy food intake in relation to ovarian cancer risk may reflect the potential adverse effects of lactose, which has been hypothesized to increase gonadotropin levels, and the beneficial antiproliferative effects of calcium and vitamin D. Using data from the New England case-control study (1,909 cases and 1,989 controls), we examined dairy foods and nutrients in relation to risk of ovarian cancer overall, histological subtypes and rapidly fatal versus less aggressive disease. We used logistic regression and polytomous logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). In models that were simultaneously adjusted for total (dietary plus supplements) calcium, total vitamin D and lactose, we observed a decreased overall risk of ovarian cancer with high intake of total calcium [Quartile 4 (Q4, >1,319 mg/day) vs. Quartile 1 (Q1, cancer risk, but was inversely associated with risk of serous borderline (Q4, >559 IU/day vs. Q1, cancer risk or that risk varied by tumor aggressiveness in the analyses of intake of dairy foods and nutrients. The overall inverse association with high intake of calcium and the inverse associations of calcium and vitamin D with specific histological subtypes warrant further investigation. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  6. Prefrontal contributions to relational encoding in amnestic mild cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris M. Foster

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Relational memory declines are well documented as an early marker for amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI. Episodic memory formation relies on relational processing supported by two mnemonic mechanisms, generation and binding. Neuroimaging studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI have primarily focused on binding deficits which are thought to be mediated by medial temporal lobe dysfunction. In this study, prefrontal contributions to relational encoding were also investigated using fMRI by parametrically manipulating generation demands during the encoding of word triads. Participants diagnosed with aMCI and healthy control subjects encoded word triads consisting of a category word with either, zero, one, or two semantically related exemplars. As the need to generate increased (i.e., two- to one- to zero-link triads, both groups recruited a core set of regions associated with the encoding of word triads including the parahippocampal gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, and superior parietal lobule. Participants diagnosed with aMCI also parametrically recruited several frontal regions including the inferior frontal gyrus and middle frontal gyrus as the need to generate increased, whereas the control participants did not show this modulation. While there is some functional overlap in regions recruited by generation demands between the groups, the recruitment of frontal regions in the aMCI participants coincides with worse memory performance, likely representing a form of neural inefficiency associated with Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Bicycling-related accidents and factors contributing to injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Perez, L.M.; Wideberg, J.; Gonzalez Perez-Somarriba, B.

    2016-07-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to find the epidemiological characteristics of bicycling-related maxillofacial fractures in a defined population, and identify factors contributing to injury. Methodology: A prospective study was carried out involving patients presenting with maxillofacial fractures sustained in bicycling-related accidents. Results: Between 908 of all cycling accidents attending for medical treatment, 122 patients (13% of all cycling accidents) were admitted with facial fractures between 2007 and 2014. Male and female ratio was 2.6:1, and the mean age was 29.4 years (standard deviation: 12.8, range: 12-79 years). Causes of injury included collisions (63%) and accidental falls (37%). The fracture patterns seen were mandibular (49%), zygomatic (32%), orbital (13%), nasal (7%), maxillary (2%), and frontal (2%). Condylar fractures were the most common of the mandibular fractures (63%). The most frequently observed concomitant lesions were orthopedic injuries. Conclusions: Bicycling-related maxillofacial injuries are common and therefore important to identify in order to design a sustainable transport system and for units that provide assistance to traffic accident victims. Missed diagnosis or delayed treatment can lead to facial deformities and functional problems. Wearing protective helmets and the improvement of the helmets design is one aspect that would be of interest for the prevention of injuries. Keywords: Cycling; bicycle-related trauma; maxillofacial fractures; risk factors; helmets. (Author)

  8. A statistical method to base nutrient recommendations on meta-analysis of intake and health-related status biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilko van der Voet

    Full Text Available Nutrient recommendations in use today are often derived from relatively old data of few studies with few individuals. However, for many nutrients, including vitamin B-12, extensive data have now become available from both observational studies and randomized controlled trials, addressing the relation between intake and health-related status biomarkers. The purpose of this article is to provide new methodology for dietary planning based on dose-response data and meta-analysis. The methodology builds on existing work, and is consistent with current methodology and measurement error models for dietary assessment. The detailed purposes of this paper are twofold. Firstly, to define a Population Nutrient Level (PNL for dietary planning in groups. Secondly, to show how data from different sources can be combined in an extended meta-analysis of intake-status datasets for estimating PNL as well as other nutrient intake values, such as the Average Nutrient Requirement (ANR and the Individual Nutrient Level (INL. For this, a computational method is presented for comparing a bivariate lognormal distribution to a health criterion value. Procedures to meta-analyse available data in different ways are described. Example calculations on vitamin B-12 requirements were made for four models, assuming different ways of estimating the dose-response relation, and different values of the health criterion. Resulting estimates of ANRs and less so for INLs were found to be sensitive to model assumptions, whereas estimates of PNLs were much less sensitive to these assumptions as they were closer to the average nutrient intake in the available data.

  9. One-carbon metabolism-related nutrients and prostate cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasperzyk, Julie L; Fall, Katja; Mucci, Lorelei A; Håkansson, Niclas; Wolk, Alicja; Johansson, Jan-Erik; Andersson, Swen-Olof; Andrén, Ove

    2009-09-01

    Folate and other one-carbon metabolism nutrients may influence prostate cancer pathogenesis. Prior studies of these nutrients in relation to prostate cancer incidence have been inconclusive, and none have explored prostate cancer survival. The objective was to assess whether dietary intakes of folate, riboflavin, vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12, and methionine measured around the time of prostate cancer diagnosis are associated with prostate cancer survival. This population-based prospective study comprised 525 men from Orebro, Sweden, who received a diagnosis of incident prostate cancer between 1989 and 1994 and completed a self-administered food-frequency questionnaire. Record linkages to the Swedish Death Registry enabled all cases to be followed for up to 20 y after diagnosis, and the cause of death was assigned via medical record review. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs. During a median of 6.4 y of follow-up, 218 men (42%) died of prostate cancer and 257 (49%) of other causes. A comparison of the highest with the lowest quartile showed that vitamin B-6 intake was inversely associated with prostate cancer-specific death (HR: 0.71; 95% CI: 0.46, 1.10; P for trend = 0.08), especially in men with a diagnosis of localized-stage disease (HR; 0.05; 95% CI: 0.01, 0.26; P for trend = 0.0003). However, vitamin B-6 intake was not associated with improved prostate cancer survival among advanced-stage cases (HR: 1.04; 95% CI: 0.64, 1.72; P for trend = 0.87). Folate, riboflavin, vitamin B-12, and methionine intakes were not associated with prostate cancer survival. A high vitamin B-6 intake may improve prostate cancer survival among men with a diagnosis of localized-stage disease.

  10. Nutrient intake and bone health status of Korean male college students as related to smoking situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yun-Jung; Cho, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Mi-Hyun

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dietary habits, nutrient intake, bone mineral density (BMD) and bone metabolism in Korean male collegians as related to smoking situation. One hundred sixty one young adult males at the age of 20-26 participated in this study. The subjects were divided into four groups: non smoker (n=42), light smoker (n=34), moderate smoker (n=49) and heavy smoker (n=36). The anthropometric characteristics, smoking situations, dietary habits and nutrient intakes were observed. Bone status of the calcaneus was measured by using quantitative ultrasound (QUS). Bone metabolism markers including serum alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) and N-mid osteocalcin (OC) were analyzed. There were no significant differences in height, weight, BMI, energy and calcium intake among the four groups. Iron intake of moderate and heavy smoker was significantly lower than that of light smoker. Heavy smokers consumed significantly lower vitamin C than moderate smokers, and their coffee consumption and lifetime alcohol consumption were significantly highest among the 4 groups. QUS parameters and serum ALP were not significantly different among the four groups. Serum OC levels were significantly lower in heavy and non smoker group compared to the moderate smoker group. In conclusion, heavy smokers in young male collegians had undesirable lifestyle and dietary habits, like as high consumption of coffee and alcohol, and low intake of Fe and vitamin C. Although, there was no significant difference in their current bone status from the other groups, these undesirable factors with heavy smoking may affect their bone health in the long term.

  11. Nutrient and salt mass balance on the Lower Arkansas River and a contributing tributary in an irrigated agricultural setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander Hulzenga; Ryan T. Bailey; Timothy K. Gates

    2016-01-01

    The Lower Arkansas River Basin is an irrigated, agricultural valley suffering from high concentrations of nutrients and salts in the coupled groundwater-surface water system. The majority of water quality data collection and associated spatial analysis of concentrations and mass loadings from the aquifer to the stream network has been performed at the regional scale (...

  12. Differential selection of growth rate-related traits in wild barley, Hordeum spontaneum, in contrasting greenhouse nutrient environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, K.J.F.; Biere, A.; Nevo, E.; Van Damme, J.M.M.

    2004-01-01

    Across-species comparisons show that inherent variation in relative growth rate (RGR) and its underlying traits are correlated with habitat productivity. In this study, we test the hypothesis that growth rate-related traits confer differential selective effects in contrasting nutrient environments.

  13. Nutrient Cycling and Phytoplankton Dynamics in Relation to Mussel Grazing in a Mesocosm Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, T.C.; Escaravage, V.L.; Smaal, A.C.; Peeters, J.K.

    1995-01-01

    An experiment was carried out with four 3 m(3) land-based mesocosms in May/June 1993. The mesocosms were supplied with a high nutrient loading, and 4 different amounts (20, 40, 80 and 160) of 17-19 mm blue mussels (Mytilus edulis). Phytoplankton development, concentrations of nutrients, primary

  14. The contribution of school meals and packed lunch to food consumption and nutrient intakes in UK primary school children from a low income population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, L; Nelson, M

    2011-06-01

    The Low Income Diet and Nutrition Survey described the food consumption and nutrient intake of UK children in low income households in 2003-2005. To describe food consumption and nutrient intake associated with school meals and packed lunches, based on a cross-sectional analysis of 680, 24-h dietary recalls from 311 school children aged 4-11 years. In children from low income households, pupils who took a packed lunch consumed more white bread, fats and oils, crisps and confectionery and fewer potatoes (cooked with or without fat) at lunchtime compared to other pupils. Many of these differences persisted when diet was assessed over the day. For younger pupils (4-7 years), packed lunches provided the least amount of folate, the highest amount of sodium, and the highest average percentage of food energy from fat and saturated fatty acids (SFA) compared to free school meals (FSMs). Over the whole day, in both younger (4-7 years) and older (8-11 years) children, there were no notable differences in energy or nutrient intake between those eating a packed lunch or a school meal. Older children's packed lunches contributed a significantly higher proportion of fat, SFA, calcium and sodium to the day's nutrient intake compared to a FSM. In children from low income households, packed lunches are less likely to contribute towards a 'healthier' diet compared to a school meal. The difference was more apparent in younger children. Key differences were the high consumption of sodium, SFA and non-milk extrinsic sugars by pupils who had packed lunches. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  15. Components of gene therapy experimentation that contribute to relative risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Sanford H

    2003-04-01

    Gene therapy is the purposeful delivery of genetic material to somatic cells for the purpose of treating disease or biomedical investigation. Either viral or non-viral vector methods can be used. The risk of collateral exposure of laboratory animal care personnel to gene therapy vectors is dependent on a number of factors. These factors are intrinsic to the gene therapy vector (the vehicle for genetic conveyance), product encoded by the genetic construct delivered, method of delivery, and immune status of the recipient. The component risks of gene therapy experiments can be analyzed to surmise the overall relative risk of the experiment. Knowledge of the components that contribute potential hazardous risk to a study can assist animal care staff in identifying area(s) where prudent practices should be focused. Gene therapy experiments involving viral vectors are generally performed at either biosafety level 2 or 3. The objective of this review is to report on various components of gene therapy experiments, focusing on characteristics of viral and non-viral vectors, to assist the laboratory animal science community in determining prudent biosafety practices.

  16. Relative Contributions of Agricultural Drift, Para-Occupational ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Increased pesticide concentrations in house dust in agricultural areas have been attributed to several exposure pathways, including agricultural drift, para-occupational, and residential use. Objective: To guide future exposure assessment efforts, we quantified relative contributions of these pathways using meta-regression models of published data on dust pesticide concentrations. Methods: From studies in North American agricultural areas published from 1995-2015, we abstracted dust pesticide concentrations reported as summary statistics (e.g., geometric means (GM)). We analyzed these data using mixed-effects meta-regression models that weighted each summary statistic by its inverse variance. Dependent variables were either the log-transformed GM (drift) or the log-transformed ratio of GMs from two groups (para-occupational, residential use). Results: For the drift pathway, predicted GMs decreased sharply and nonlinearly, with GMs 64% lower in homes 250 m versus 23 m from fields (inter-quartile range of published data) based on 52 statistics from 7 studies. For the para-occupational pathway, GMs were 2.3 times higher (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5-3.3; 15 statistics, 5 studies) in homes of farmers who applied pesticides more versus less recently or frequently. For the residential use pathway, GMs were 1.3 (95%CI: 1.1-1.4) and 1.5 (95%CI: 1.2-1.9) times higher in treated versus untreated homes, when the probability that a pesticide was used for

  17. Construct and criterion-related validation of nutrient profiling models: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Sheri L; Pelly, Fiona E; Lowe, John B

    2016-05-01

    Nutrient profiling (NP) is defined as the science of ranking foods according to their nutritional composition for the purpose of preventing disease or promoting health. The application of NP is ultimately to assist consumers to make healthier food choices, and thus provide a cost effective public health strategy to reduce the incidence of diet-related chronic disease. To our knowledge, no review has assessed the evidence to confirm the validity of NP models. We conducted a systematic review to investigate the construct and criterion-related validity of NP models in ranking food according to their nutritional composition for the purpose of preventing disease and promoting health. We searched peer-reviewed research published to 30 June 2015 and used PUBMED, Global Health (CABI), and SCOPUS databases. Within study bias was assessed using an adapted version of the QUADAS-2 (Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies -2) tool for all diagnostic studies and the Cochrane Collaboration's Risk of Bias tool for all non-diagnostic studies. The GRADE (Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) approach was used to guide our judgement of the quality of the body of evidence for each outcome measure. From a total of 83 studies, 69 confirmed the construct validity of NP models; however most of these studies contained methodological weaknesses. Six studies used objective external measures to confirm the criterion-related validity of NP models; which inherently improved quality. The overall quality of evidence on the accuracy of NP models was judged to be very low to moderate using the GRADE approach. Many carefully designed studies to establish both construct and criterion-related validity are necessary to authenticate the application of NP models and provide the evidence to support the current definition of NP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A quantitative assessment of the contributions of climatic indicators to changes in nutrients and oxygen levels in a shallow reservoir in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Zhang, Wenna; Liu, Hanan; Gao, Xueping; Huang, Yixuan

    2017-06-01

    Climate change has an indirect effect on water quality in freshwater ecosystems, but it is difficult to assess the contribution of climate change to the complex system. This study explored to what extent climatic indicators (air temperature, wind speed, and rainfall) influence nutrients and oxygen levels in a shallow reservoir, Yuqiao Reservoir, China. The study comprises three parts—describing the temporal trends of climatic indicators and water quality parameters during the period 1992-2011, analyzing the potential impacts of climate on water quality, and finally developing a quantitative assessment to evaluate how climatic factors govern nutrient levels in the reservoir. Our analyses showed that the reservoir experienced substantial cold periods (1992-2001) followed by a warm period (2002-2011). The results showed that increasing air temperature in spring, autumn, and winter and increasing annual wind speed decrease total phosphorus (TP) concentration in the reservoir in spring, summer, and winter. According to the quantitative assessment, the increase in air temperature in spring and winter had a larger contribution to the decrease in TP concentration (47.2 and 64.1%), compared with the influence from decreased wind speed and rainfall. The field data suggest that nutrients decline due to enhanced uptake by macrophytes in years when spring was warmer and the macrophytes started to grow earlier in the season. The increasing wind speed and air temperature in spring also significantly contribute to the increase in dissolved oxygen concentration. This study helps managers to foresee how potential future climate change might influence water quality in similar lake ecosystems.

  19. Dietary habits, nutrients and bone mass in Spanish premenopausal women: the contribution of fish to better bone health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon-Garcia, Julian F; Moran, Jose M; Roncero-Martin, Raul; Rey-Sanchez, Purificacion; Rodriguez-Velasco, Francisco J; Pedrera-Zamorano, Juan D

    2012-12-27

    The moderate consumption of fish is recommended for a healthy diet and is also a feature of the Mediterranean diet. Fish is a major food group in diets throughout the world, and studies show that fish consumption is associated with a lower risk of a number of conditions. Spain has one of the highest annual per capita consumptions of fish worldwide. As fish is a source of high quality protein; n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids; vitamins, such as A and D; and minerals, such as selenium, calcium, iodine, magnesium, copper and zinc, nutrients that have positive effects on bone characteristics, it has been proposed that its consumption could improve bone health. In this cross-sectional study, we have investigated the relationship between dietary habits and nutrient intake of 151 Spanish premenopausal women and analyzed the association of fish consumption on bone mass measured by quantitative ultrasound of the phalanges. A higher (P < 0.05) bone mass and vitamin D intake (P < 0.05) was observed in the group with a fish intake of 5-7 servings/week. We conclude that increased fish consumption is helpful in maintaining an adequate bone mass in Spanish premenopausal women.

  20. Scale-location specific relations between soil nutrients and topographic factors in the Fen River Basin, Chinese Loess Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongfen; Bi, Rutian; Duan, Yonghong; Xu, Zhanjun

    2016-09-01

    Understanding scale- and location-specific variations of soil nutrients in cultivated land is a crucial consideration for managing agriculture and natural resources effectively. In the present study, wavelet coherency was used to reveal the scale-location specific correlations between soil nutrients, including soil organic matter (SOM), total nitrogen (TN), available phosphorus (AP), and available potassium (AK), as well as topographic factors (elevation, slope, aspect, and wetness index) in the cultivated land of the Fen River Basin in Shanxi Province, China. The results showed that SOM, TN, AP, and AK were significantly inter-correlated, and that the scales at which soil nutrients were correlated differed in different landscapes, and were generally smaller in topographically rougher terrain. All soil nutrients but TN were significantly influenced by the wetness index at relatively large scales (32-72 km) and AK was significantly affected by the aspect at large scales at partial locations, showing localized features. The results of this study imply that the wetness index should be taken into account during farming practices to improve the soil nutrients of cultivated land in the Fen River Basin at large scales.

  1. Political Communication: Contributions to the Study of Public Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacks, Don W.

    Political communication has influenced greatly the study of modern public relations. The development of modern public relations can be traced back to the Ancients of Greece. The definition of "political communication" when applied to public relations is typically corporate in nature. That is, public relations defines the role of…

  2. Relative Contributions of Socio-Cultural Variables to the Prediction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the extent of contributions of socio-cultural factors to maternal mortality (through survey method). Two thousand one hundred and fifty seven (2,157) females of reproductive age were selected using multi-stage sampling technique. The instrument was a self developed structured and validated ...

  3. Contribution of Nutrients and some Trace Metals from a Huge Egyptian Drain to the SE-Mediterranean Sea, west of Alexandria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. EL-RAYIS

    2006-06-01

    The present work is a monthly study over a year of levels of concentration of some mainly trace elements (nutrients and some heavy metals in the proper water of the drain before mixing and in the effl uent from the lake, and calculations of both the concentrations and the corresponding expected loads of these elements contributed by the drain to the sea. The results revealed that the respective loads to the sea are 77380 ton/year for total suspended matter, 823 tons/year for dissolved PO4 -P, 4745 tons/year for inorganic N, 23.7 tons/year for Fe, 3.28 tons/year for Mn, 5.84 tons/year for Cu, 2.9 ton/year for Cd, and 24 tons/year for Zn. The elements loaded by the lake effl uent represent values ranging between 8 and 57.5% of the total load contributed by the drain to the sea. The plant nutrients (ammonia and reactive phosphorus are of values exceeding 44%.

  4. Dietary Intake of One-Carbon Metabolism-Related Nutrients and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: The Singapore Chinese Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Joyce Y; Butler, Lesley M; Wang, Renwei; Jin, Aizhen; Koh, Woon-Puay; Yuan, Jian-Min

    2016-02-01

    Nutrients involved in one-carbon metabolism are hypothesized to protect against pancreatic cancer development. The Singapore Chinese Health Study database was used to prospectively examine the association between intake of one-carbon metabolism-related nutrients and pancreatic cancer risk. Between 1993 and 1998, 63,257 men and women ages 45 to 74 years were enrolled into the cohort. The daily intakes of the following one-carbon metabolism-related nutrients were assessed at enrollment using a 165-item food frequency questionnaire: betaine, choline, folate, and vitamins B2, B6, and B12. Multivariable HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for pancreatic cancer risk associated with dietary intakes of one-carbon metabolism-related nutrients were calculated. As of December 2013, 271 incident pancreatic cancer cases were identified during an average of 16.3 years of follow-up. Higher intakes of vitamin B6 and choline were associated with statistically significant decreases in the risk of developing pancreatic cancer. Compared with the lowest quartile, HRs (95% CIs) for the highest quartiles of vitamin B6 and choline were 0.52 (0.36-0.74; P trend = 0.001) and 0.67 (0.48-0.93; P trend = 0.04), respectively. There were no clear associations between the other one-carbon metabolism-related nutrients and pancreatic cancer risk. Our study suggests that higher intake of vitamin B6 and choline may lower the risk of pancreatic cancer. Our prospective findings are consistent with the in vivo evidence for protective roles of vitamin B6 and choline on pancreatic cancer development. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Relation between selected nutrients in the chicken meat depending on phytogenic feed additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Angelovičová

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study was to evaluate the relation between selected nutrients in the breast and thigh muscles after the application of different phytogenic additives in the diet of broiler chickens and between same indicators of meat disregarding additive and parts of carcass, from which muscles originate. We realized an in vivo experiment on the Zámostie Company poultry test station with deep litter breeding system. The experiment included 100 pcs of one-day-old hybrid chickens Cobb 500 divided into 2 groups (n = 50: the 1st experimental group with an application of feed additive from chestnut tree and lemon fruit extracts and the 2nd experimental group with an application of feed additive from citrus fruits extract. We used a cereal and soybean basal diet and we divided the fattening period into four phases: starter (1 - 10 days, grower I (11 - 20 days, grower II (21 - 28 days and finisher (29 - 42 days. We applied a powder form feed mixtures. Nutritive value of feed mixtures was the same in each experimental group during the whole experiment and in accordance with the physiological needs of broiler chickens. We fed the 1st experimental group with a basal diet enriched by feed additive from chestnut tree and lemon fruit extracts (50 g/100 kg. As for the 2nd experimental group, we applied feed additive from citrus fruits extracts through the drinking water (100 mL/100 L. In the 2nd part of our experiment, we compared results obtained from two experimental groups with other four groups of diet. We applied other phytogenic additives to these four groups and we did not take into account the origin of the meat sample. We measured indicators of the chemical composition of protein, fat, water and cholesterol on a sample (50 g of breast and thigh muscle without skin by the method of FT IR by use of the apparatus Nicolet 6700. Detected relations between nutrients of breast and thigh muscles were defined by correlation coefficient of -0.6 ≤ r ≥ +0

  6. Meat Consumption, Related Nutrients, Obesity and Risk of Prostate Cancer: a Case-Control Study in Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefani, Eduardo De; Boffetta, Paolo L; Ronco, Alvaro; Deneo-Pellegrini, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    In order to determine the role of meat consumption and related nutrients in the etiology of prostate cancer we conducted a case-control study among Uruguayan men in the time period 1998-2007. The study included 464 cases and 472 controls, frequency matched for age and residence. Both series were drawn from the four major public hospitals in Montevideo. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) of prostate cancer by quartiles of meat intake and related nutrients. The highest vs. the lowest quartile of intake of total meat (OR = 5.19, 95 % CI 3.46-7.81), red meat (OR = 4.64, 95 % CI 3.10-6.95), and processed meat (OR = 1.78, 95% CI 1.22-2.59) were associated with increased risk of prostate cancer. Meat nutrients were directly associated with the risk of prostate cancer (OR for cholesterol 5.61, 95 % CI 3.75-8.50). Moreover, both total meat and red meat displayed higher risks among obese patients. This study suggests that total and red meat and meat nutrients may play a role in the etiology of prostate cancer in Uruguay.

  7. How much nutrients could biochar-related positive priming effect provide to crops?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiven, Samuel

    2017-04-01

    From a carbon mass balance perspective, positive priming effect is usually seen as a counter balancing effect of the global change mitigation potential of biochar. However, the decomposition of the native organic matter due to the inputs of another source of carbon can be also seen as a possible source of nutrients for the crop on the short scale. The direction of priming effect reported in several recent publications, i.e. positive during the first months / years, and then negative on the longer term, indicate that this nutrient mining may be an aspect to look at when it comes to crop yield improvement effect due to biochar. In this presentation, I will review the existing knowledge about this nutrient priming effect and try to quantify it importance.

  8. International Contribution to the Highway Agency's Bridge Related Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nowak, A. S.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    The objective of this paper is to summarize recent contributions of international experts to the research program sponsored by the Highways Agency. An efficient management of existing bridges requires methodology for an accurate evaluation of the actual loads and load carrying capacity and predic...... of reliability models for analysis of bridges subjected to corrosion and fatigue, and reliability-based optimization of maintenance strategies for bridges....

  9. THE NUTRIENT COMPOSITION OF THE DIET OF BOTTLENOSE DOLPHINS (TURSIOPS TRUNCATUS) IS BETTER ASSESSED RELATIVE TO METABOLIZABLE ENERGY THAN DRY MATTER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardente, Amanda J; Hill, Richard C

    2015-06-01

    Nutrient concentrations in a diet can be expressed either "as fed," relative to dry matter (DM), or relative to metabolizable energy (ME). Most published literature evaluates the diet of dolphins by comparing nutrient content relative to DM. Nevertheless, ME requirements, not DM, determine how much food dolphins need to maintain their body condition. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate why it is important to calculate the ME content of fish fed to dolphins and compare nutrient concentrations in dolphin diets relative to ME, not DM. Two studies that compared the nutrient composition of fish species on a DM basis were reevaluated. The ME content of each fish species was calculated and found to vary widely among species, from 0.94 to 1.58 Mcal/kg as fed. Water, mineral, and fat concentrations relative to ME also varied markedly among fish species. To demonstrate the magnitude of nutrient content differences between fish, the percent change in nutrient concentration for each species was calculated relative to herring. The percent changes for DM and ME analyses were then compared. Percent change in nutrient concentration was either over- or underestimated on a DM basis when compared with the percent change on an ME basis. Notable discrepancies were evident among important nutrients, such as crude protein, water, and sodium. Caretakers of managed dolphins must account for differences in energy density when deciding how much to feed and assessing the nutrient composition of the diet.

  10. Nutrient flows and related impacts between a Mediterranean river and the associated coastal area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markogianni, Vassiliki; Varkitzi, Ioanna; Pagou, Kalliopi; Pavlidou, Alexandra; Dimitriou, Elias

    2017-02-01

    Taking into consideration the Water Framework Directive's requirements, water samples were collected monthly and/or bimonthly between 2014 and 2015 from Spercheios River, its estuary and the adjacent Maliakos Gulf in order to assess the quality of these water bodies. A study on dissolved nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, phosphate and chlorophyll-a concentrations was carried out, to investigate the impact between the river and the associated coastal area and assess the nutrient loads based on water flows from Spercheios River into the marine system.Furthermore a seasonal distribution of nutrient concentrations have been studied, dividing the sampling period into dry and wet season according to the river's discharges. Correlation analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis among the available chemical data were conducted in order to enhance the detection of the two systems' interaction. Nutrients' concentrations increased from upstream to downstream sampling stations, particularly in areas where human-induced activities are detected. Marine samples were characterized by lower nutrient concentrations than the river ones, and the ecological quality of Maliakos Gulf, based on chlorophyll-a values, is characterized as moderate, except for the stations close to the river, which constantly presented poor quality. Chemical analyses and statistical analysis indicated high nutrient flows and a strong impact between the freshwater and marine systems, accompanied by the profound effect of the adjacent aquafarming areas and the wastewater treatment plant of Lamia city. The highest nutrients' and chlorophyll-a values of the coastal stations were detected close to the river mouth and they were decreasing towards the outer Maliakos Gulf.

  11. Biomass allocation and nutrients balance related to the concentration of Nitrogen and Phosphorus in Salvinia auriculata (Salviniaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. C. Medeiros

    Full Text Available Abstract Aquatic plants can use differential allocation (trade-off of carbon among their structures depending on the nutrition concentration. Given that N and P are limiting in the growth of plants, our questions were: Are the N and P concentrations in S. auriculata related to the biomass allocation to its structures? Is a differential allocation of N and P between floating and submerged leaves? We evaluated the relation between the nutrients and the biomass allocation, and the trade-off among the leaves using the Spearman correlation. Our results showed that N and P concentrations in S. auriculata are related to the biomass allocation to its structures, and that there is no trade-off of these nutrients between “shoot and root”. Thus, we can see the importance of N and P concentration in the biomass of S. auriculata, and why this plant is capable to development in different environments as a weedy.

  12. Association of folate and other one-carbon related nutrients with hypermethylation status and expression of RARB, BRCA1, and RASSF1A genes in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirouzpanah, Saeed; Taleban, Forough-Azam; Mehdipour, Parvin; Atri, Morteza

    2015-08-01

    Dietary methyl group donors could influence the hypermethylation status of certain putative genes. The present study explored the possible associations of dietary intake of one-carbon metabolism-related nutrients with promoter hypermethylation status and expression of retinoic acid receptor-beta (RARB), breast cancer-1 (BRCA1), and Ras association domain family-1, isoform A (RASSF1A) genes in Iranian women with breast cancer (BC). The hypermethylation status was investigated in 146 dissected BC tissue samples using methylation-specific PCR. The expression level was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Dietary nutrients were estimated using a validated 136-item food frequency questionnaire. Expression levels of the genes were associated with the unmethylated status of related promoters (p associated with methylated RARB and BRCA1. Low intake of residual folate and cobalamin was correlated with the methylated status of RARB for subjects at 48 years of age. High dietary intake of riboflavin and pyridoxine was the only determinant of the methylated promoter of RARB at odds ratios (ORs) of 4.15 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.28-13.50) and 2.53 (95 % CI 1.14-3.83) in multivariate models, respectively. One-carbon nutrients most often correlated inversely with the methylation-influenced expression of RARB. Although high folate intake increased the chance of unmethylation-dependent overexpression of BRCA1 3-fold, cobalamin and methionine were inversely linked to methylation-mediated expression. Nutritional epigenomics less actively influenced RASSF1A. These findings provide new insights into and a basic understanding of the selective contributions of individual B vitamins on hypermethylation and methylation-related expression of RARB and BRCA1 in BC. Hypermethylation at promoters of RARB, BRCA1, and RASSF1A is associated with reduced transcript levels of the respective gene in primary breast cancer tissue samples. Dietary folate and cobalamin intake is inversely associated

  13. Evaluation of the Brazilian population's intake of antioxidant nutrients and their relation with the nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tureck, Camila; Locateli, Gelvani; Corrêa, Vanesa Gesser; Koehnlein, Eloá Angélica

    2017-01-01

    The study of dietary antioxidants has gained prominence owing to the elucidation of the deleterious effects of oxidative stress to the human body. Objective: To evaluate the Brazilian population's intake of antioxidant nutrients and their association with the nutritional status. A cross-sectional study was carried out including secondary data on food consumption of 33,459 individuals from both sexes, aged 10 years or older, from all Brazilian regions based on microdata of the "2008-2009 Household Budget Survey, Brazilian Dairy Survey." The content of vitamins E, A, and C; zinc; manganese; copper; and selenium from 188 food items, divided into 12 groups, according to the habitual consumption form was analyzed. The means of antioxidant nutrient intake according to the nutritional status were compared using Bonferroni's t-test. Higher percentages of insufficient intake of vitamins than antioxidant minerals were seen. A significant difference in the intake of vitamin E as to the nutritional status was noticed, wherein the intake in overweight individuals was lower than in those with proper weight. Participants with low weight presented lower intake of almost all antioxidant minerals, except for copper, in which the intake of participants with low weight was equal to those with normal weight. High percentages of insufficient intake of antioxidant nutrients were observed in the studied population, especially vitamins. It was also found that the intake of antioxidant nutrients varied based on nutritional status, gender, and life stage.

  14. Age-related changes in oxygen and nutrient uptake by hindquarters in newborn pigs during cold-induced shivering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lossec, G; Lebreton, Y; Hulin, J C; Fillaut, M; Herpin, P

    1998-11-01

    Newborn pigs rely essentially on shivering thermogenesis in the cold. In order to understand the rapid postnatal enhancement of thermogenic capacities in piglets, the oxygen and nutrient uptake of hindquarters was measured in vivo in 1- (n = 6) and 5-day-old (n = 6) animals at thermal neutrality and during cold exposure. The hindquarters were considered to represent a skeletal muscle compartment. Indirect calorimetry and arterio-venous techniques were used. The cold challenge (23 C at 1 day old and 15 C at 5 days old for 90 min) induced a similar increase (+90 %) in regulatory heat production at both ages. Hindquarters blood flow was higher at 5 days than 1 day old at thermal neutrality (26 +/- 3 vs. 17 +/- 1 ml min-1 (100 g hindquarters)-1) and its increase in the cold was much more marked (+65 % at 5 days old vs. +25 % at 1 day old). Oxygen extraction by the hindquarters rose from 30-35 % at thermal neutrality to 65-70 % in the cold at both ages. The calculated contribution of skeletal muscle to total oxygen consumption averaged 34-40 % at thermal neutrality and 50-64 % in the cold and skeletal muscle was the major contributor to regulatory thermogenesis. Based on hindquarters glucose uptake and lactate release, carbohydrate appeared to be an important fuel for shivering. However, net uptake of fatty acids increased progressively during cold exposure at 5 days old. The enhancement in muscular blood supply and fatty acid utilization during shivering is probably related to the postnatal improvement in the thermoregulatory response of the piglet.

  15. Factors Contribute to Headache-Related Disability in Teens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Kathi J; Heyer, Geoffrey; Pakalnis, Ann; Binkley, Philip F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Our aim was to describe the relationship between risk factors, such as stress, depression, and anxiety and potentially protective factors against pediatric headache-related disability, such as mindfulness, resilience, and self-compassion, and to determine teens’ interest in mind-body skills training to help reduce headache-related disability. Methods This was a cross-sectional survey among adolescents seen in an academic neurology clinic reporting four or more headaches monthly using standardized instruments to determine the relationship between putative risk and protective factors as well as physiologic markers of inflammation and vagal tone and headache-related disability. Results Among the 29 participants, 31% were male, the average age was 14.8 years, average headache frequency was 11.6 per month, and the most commonly reported trigger was stress (86%). The only risk or protective factor significantly associated with headache-related disability was depression (r=0.52, P=0.004). Depression was negatively correlated with mindfulness, resilience, and self-compassion (Pheadache-related disability or depression. There was strong interest in learning skills like slow, deep breathing practices supported by a smart phone app to reduce stress and the negative impact of headaches on daily life. Discussion Among teens with frequent migraine headaches, depression is the strongest risk factor for headache-related disability. Stress is viewed as a headache trigger, and teens reported wanting to learn simple stress management strategies supported by a smart phone application to help reduce headache-related disability. PMID:26810775

  16. Nutrient enrichment is related to two facets of beta diversity for stream invertebrates across the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bini, Luis Mauricio; Landeiro, Victor Lemes; Padial, André Andrian; Siqueira, Tadeu; Heino, Jani

    2014-06-01

    Beta diversity, the spatial or temporal variability of species composition, is a key concept in community ecology. However, our ability to predict the relative importance of the main drivers of beta diversity (e.g., environmental heterogeneity, dispersal limitation, and environmental productivity) remains limited. Using a comprehensive data set on stream invertebrate assemblages across the continental United States, we found a hump-shaped relationship between beta diversity and within-ecoregion nutrient concentrations. Within-ecoregion compositional dissimilarity matrices were mainly related to environmental distances in most of the 30 ecoregions analyzed, suggesting a stronger role for species-sorting than for spatial processes. The strength of these relationships varied considerably among ecoregions, but they were unrelated to within-ecoregion environmental heterogeneity or spatial extent. Instead, we detected a negative correlation between the strength of species sorting and nutrient concentrations. We suggest that eutrophication is a major mechanism disassembling invertebrate assemblages in streams at a continental scale.

  17. Understanding the fate of sanitation-related nutrients in a shallow sandy aquifer below an urban slum area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyenje, P. M.; Havik, J. C. N.; Foppen, J. W.; Muwanga, A.; Kulabako, R.

    2014-08-01

    We hypothesized that wastewater leaching from on-site sanitation systems to alluvial aquifers underlying informal settlements (or slums) may end up contributing to high nutrient loads to surface water upon groundwater exfiltration. Hence, we conducted a hydro-geochemical study in a shallow sandy aquifer in Bwaise III parish, an urban slum area in Kampala, Uganda, to assess the geochemical processes controlling the transport and fate of dissolved nutrients (NO3, NH4 and PO4) released from on-site sanitation systems to groundwater. Groundwater was collected from 26 observation wells. The samples were analyzed for major ions (Ca, Mg, Na, Mg, Fe, Mn, Cl and SO4) and nutrients (o-PO4, NO3 and NH4). Data was also collected on soil characteristics, aquifer conductivity and hydraulic heads. Geochemical modeling using PHREEQC was used to determine the level of o-PO4 control by mineral solubility and sorption. Groundwater below the slum area was anoxic and had near neutral pH values, high values of EC (average of 1619 μS/cm) and high concentrations of Cl (3.2 mmol/L), HCO3 (11 mmol/L) and nutrients indicating the influence from wastewater leachates especially from pit latrines. Nutrients were predominantly present as NH4 (1-3 mmol/L; average of 2.23 mmol/L). The concentrations of NO3 and o-PO4 were, however, low: average of 0.2 mmol/L and 6 μmol/L respectively. We observed a contaminant plume along the direction of groundwater flow (NE-SW) characterized by decreasing values of EC and Cl, and distinct redox zones. The redox zones transited from NO3-reducing in upper flow areas to Fe-reducing in the lower flow areas. Consequently, the concentrations of NO3 decreased downgradient of the flow path due to denitrification. Ammonium leached directly into the alluvial aquifer was also partially removed because the measured concentrations were less than the potential input from pit latrines (3.2 mmol/L). We attributed this removal (about 30%) to anaerobic ammonium oxidation

  18. Umbilical cord blood nutrients in low birth weight babies in relation to birth weight & gestational age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizabeth, K E; Krishnan, Viji; Vijayakumar, T

    2008-08-01

    Low birth weight (LBW) babies are a vulnerable group and represent two outcomes--preterm birth (preterm LBW) and term with intrauterine growth retardation (term LBW). LBW babies are considered to have low nutrient reserve, but the extent of deficiency as compared to the normal babies and the differences between preterm LBW and term LBW are unclear. This study was carried out to look at key anthropometric, biochemical and clinical (ABC) parameters of LBW babies, both preterm and term, in comparison to a control group of term normal weight babies. A group of 500 babies was selected at birth from a tertiary care teaching hospital and categorized into LBW (n = 251) with preterm LBW (n = 59), term LBW (n = 192) and term controls (n = 249). Two controls were dropped as tests could not be performed in the available cord blood sample. Key anthropometric and biochemical parameters were measured. Socio-economic status, age, parity, height and pre-delivery haemoglobin of the mothers were also recorded. The maternal characteristics were comparable in the three groups. Socio-economically, majority of them belonged to lower middle or upper lower class (Class III and IV) representing the non affluent. All the anthropometric measurements and nutrients measured namely total protein, albumin, cholesterol, triglycerides, calcium, magnesium, zinc and iron were significantly lower in LBW babies compared to term control babies. These values were lowest in preterm LBW followed by term LBW. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) showed inverse association with iron. Some of the babies including control babies had protein, albumin, calcium and iron below the normal range and mean albumin, calcium and iron levels were below the normal range in all the three subsets. Preterm and term LBW babies are born with significantly lower nutrient reserves at birth compared to term control babies. Normal weight babies from the non affluent sections also have low nutrients especially albumin, calcium and

  19. Do sleep complaints contribute to age-related cognitive decline?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altena, E.; Ramautar, J.R.; van der Werf, Y.D.; van Someren, E.J.W.

    2010-01-01

    The cognitive changes that occur with ageing are usually referred to as 'age-related cognitive decline'. The most pronounced changes may be found in the executive functions that require integrity of the prefrontal cortical circuitry. With age, sleep also changes profoundly, with more sleep

  20. Contributions to Statistical Problems Related to Microarray Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Feng

    2009-01-01

    Microarray is a high throughput technology to measure the gene expression. Analysis of microarray data brings many interesting and challenging problems. This thesis consists three studies related to microarray data. First, we propose a Bayesian model for microarray data and use Bayes Factors to identify differentially expressed genes. Second, we…

  1. Dynamics of Soil Bacterial Communities Over a Vegetation Season Relate to Both Soil Nutrient Status and Plant Growth Phenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francioli, Davide; Schulz, Elke; Buscot, François; Reitz, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Soil microorganisms regulate element cycling and plant nutrition, mediate co-existence of neighbors, and stabilize plant communities. Many of these effects are dependent upon environmental conditions and, in particular, on nutrient quality and availability in soils. In this context, we set up a pot experiment in order to examine the combined effects of soil nutrient availability and microbial communities on plant-soil interactions and to investigate assemblage rules for soil bacterial communities under changed nutrient conditions. Four gamma-sterilized soils, strongly differing in their nutrient contents, were obtained from different fertilization treatments of a centenary field experiment and used to grow communities of grassland plants. The sterilized soils were either self- or cross-inoculated with microbial consortia from the same four soils. Molecular fingerprinting analyses were carried out at several time points in order to identify drivers and underlying processes of microbial community assemblage. We observed that the bacterial communities that developed in the inoculated sterilized soils differed from those in the original soils, displaying dynamic shifts over time. These shifts were illustrated by the appearance of numerous OTUs that had not been detected in the original soils. The community patterns observed in the inoculated treatments suggested that bacterial community assembly was determined by both niche-mediated and stochastic-neutral processes, whereby the relative impacts of these processes changed over the course of the vegetation season. Moreover, our experimental approach allowed us not only to evaluate the effects of soil nutrients on plant performance but also to recognize a negative effect of the microbial community present in the soil that had not been fertilized for more than 100 years on plant biomass. Our findings demonstrate that soil inoculation-based approaches are valid for investigating plant-soil-microbe interactions and for

  2. Contribution of Nutrient-enriched Groundwater to Excessive Algal Growth along a Select Reach of the East Fork Carson River, West-Central Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, N. L.; Pahl, R. A.; Rosen, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    A study during the summers of 2010 and 2012 was conducted to determine if nutrient-enriched groundwater discharge contributed to excessive algal growth observed along a 5,800-foot reach of the East Fork Carson River in Carson Valley, west-central Nevada. Groundwater discharge to the river was determined using flow-net analysis, chloride-mass balance, and differences in measured streamflow. Water samples were collected from the river and shallow groundwater wells located in the river and along the banks for determination of nutrient concentrations and sources; algae samples were collected from the 5,800-foot river reach. Groundwater was found to be discharging to the river from both banks along a 405-foot sub-reach in the middle of the 5,800-foot study reach. High nitrate concentrations (2-3 milligrams per liter as nitrogen) were found in the groundwater along the right bank of the sub-reach. Within this sub-reach, river nitrate loads ranged from 1.3 to 7.9 pounds of nitrogen (N) per day; groundwater nitrate loads were estimated to be 0.07 pounds of N per day. Dissolved orthophosphate river loads ranged from 0.12 to 0.20 pounds of phosphorus (P) per day; groundwater orthophosphate loads were estimated to be 0.005 pounds of P per day. This sub-reach had the highest average algal biomass within the study reach. The data suggest that nutrient rich groundwater discharging to the river may create a favorable microenvironment for periphyton that assimilate available nutrients before the groundwater mixes with overlying river water. The source of nitrate in groundwater is likely anthropogenic as groundwater nitrate concentrations above background concentrations were only found along the right bank of the river adjacent to a housing development. Organic-wastewater compounds detected in groundwater samples collected from wells along the right bank within this sub-reach offer independent support that the elevated nitrate concentrations were human-derived.

  3. Evaluating Relative Contributions of Various HCI Activities to Usability

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Anirudha; Sarda, N. L.

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Several activities related to human-computer interaction (HCI) design are described in literature. However, it is not clear whether each HCI activity is equally important. We propose a multi-disciplinary framework to organise HCI work in phases, activities, methods, roles, and deliverables. Using regression analyses on data from 50 industry projects, we derive weights for the HCI activities in proportion to the impact they make on usability, and compare these with the ...

  4. Assessing biological and chemical signatures related to nutrient removal by floating islands in stormwater mesocosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ni-Bin; Islam, Kamrul; Marimon, Zachary; Wanielista, Martin P

    2012-07-01

    Aquatic floating plants on BioHaven mats were tested for their potential use as a Best Management Practice to be incorporated within existing stormwater detention ponds. Plants were analyzed for their capability to remove nutrient-pollution in parallel with the study of ecological dynamics. Experiments were carried out in cylindrical mesocosms of 5 m diameter and 1.2 m height, above-ground pools with a water volume of 14 m(3). The design parameters tested were for 5% and 10% vegetated floating island coverage of the mesocosm, both with and without shoreline plants called littoral zone. This littoral shelf was 0.5 m thick, graded at a downward slope of 1:5 toward the center using loamy soil with low organic matter content, excavated from below turf grass. Endemic plant species were chosen for the experimental location in central Florida based on a wetland identification manual by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection to ensure the study was not compromised by unique climate requirements of the plants. Nutrient and aquatic chemical conditions such as pH, dissolved oxygen, temperature, turbidity, and chlorophyll a were monitored to understand their relationships to the general wetland ecosystem. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis identified the microbial activity near the rhizospheric zone. Logistical placement considerations were made using spatial sampling across the horizontal plane of the mesocosms, beneath and around the root zone, to determine if nutrients tend to aggregate around the floating island. This study concluded that the application of floating islands as a stormwater technology can remove nutrients through plant uptake and biological activity. The most cost-effective size in the outdoor mesocosms was 5% surface area coverage of the mat. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Risk of endometrial cancer in relation to individual nutrients from diet and supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biel, Rita K; Csizmadi, Ilona; Cook, Linda S; Courneya, Kerry S; Magliocco, Anthony M; Friedenreich, Christine M

    2011-11-01

    Intake of nutrients may influence the risk of endometrial cancer (EC). We aimed to estimate the association of intake of individual nutrients from food and from food plus supplements with EC occurrence. A population-based case-control study conducted in Canada (2002-2006). Nutrient intakes from food and supplements were assessed using an FFQ. Logistic regression was used to estimate EC risk within quartile levels of nutrient intakes. Incident EC cases (n 506) were identified from the Alberta Cancer Registry, and population controls were frequency- and age-matched to cases (n 981). There existed little evidence of an association with EC for the majority of macronutrients and micronutrients examined. We observed a statistically significant increased risk associated with the highest, compared with the lowest, quartile of intake of dietary cholesterol (multivariable-adjusted OR = 1·51, 95 % CI 1·08, 2·11; P for trend = 0·02). Age-adjusted risk at the highest level of intake was significantly reduced for Ca from food sources (OR = 0·73, 95 % CI 0·54, 0·99) but was attenuated in the multivariable model (OR = 0·82, 95 % CI 0·59, 1·13). When intake from supplements was included in Ca intake, risk was significantly reduced by 28 % with higher Ca (multivariable-adjusted OR = 0·72, 95 % CI 0·51, 0·99, P for trend = 0·04). We also observed unexpected increased risks at limited levels of intakes of dietary soluble fibre, vitamin C, thiamin, vitamin B6 and lutein/zeaxanthin, with no evidence for linear trend. The results of our study suggest a positive association between dietary cholesterol and EC risk and an inverse association with Ca intake from food sources and from food plus supplements.

  6. Nutrient Intake and Contribution of Home Enteral Nutrition to Meeting Nutritional Requirements after Oesophagectomy and Total Gastrectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Melanie L; Halliday, Vanessa; Robinson, Pauline; Smith, Karen; Bowrey, David J

    2017-01-01

    Background/Objectives This study evaluated nutrition after oesophago-gastric resection and the influence of home jejunostomy feeding in the six months after surgery. Subjects/Methods Data on nutritional intake and physiologic measures were collected as part of a randomised trial with measurements taken before and up to six months after surgery. Results 41 participants (32 oesophagectomy, 9 total gastrectomy) received home jejunostomy feeding (n=18) or usual care without feeding (n=23). At hospital discharge, oral intakes were adequate for energy and protein in 9% and 6% respectively. By three and six months, these values had increased to 61% & 55%, 94% & 77% respectively. Six participants (26%) who received usual care required rescue feeding. Six weeks after hospital discharge, energy intakes were met in those who received jejunal feeding due to the contribution of enteral nutrition. Jejunal feeding did not affect oral intake, being similar in both groups (fed: 77% estimated need, usual care: 79%). At three months, inadequate micronutrient intakes were seen in over one third. Compared to baseline values, six weeks after surgery, weight loss exceeding 5% was seen in 5/18 (28%) who received feeding, 14/17 (82%) who received usual care and 5/6 (83%) of those who required rescue feeding, p=0.002. Weight loss averaged 4.1% (fed), 10.4% (usual care) and 9.2% (rescue fed), p=0.004. These trends persisted out to six months. Conclusions Supplementary jejunostomy feeding made an important contribution to meeting nutrition after oesophago-gastric resection. Importantly, oral nutritional intake was not compromised dispelling the assertion that jejunal feeding deincentivises patients from eating. PMID:28656968

  7. Folate and other one-carbon metabolism-related nutrients and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Victoria L; McCullough, Marjorie L; Sun, Juzhong; Gapstur, Susan M

    2010-06-01

    Epidemiologic studies of the association of folate intake with breast cancer risk have been inconclusive, and few have investigated how related nutrients modify this association. We investigated the association of dietary (food folate plus folic acid from fortification) and total folate (food folate, folic acid from fortification, and folic acid from supplements), vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12, methionine, and alcohol intakes with postmenopausal breast cancer among women in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort. The modification of the folate associations by the other nutrients was also investigated. This prospective cohort study included 70,656 postmenopausal women for whom dietary information was collected in 1992. Of these, 3898 developed breast cancer between enrollment in 1992 and June 2005. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to calculate multivariate-adjusted hazard rate ratios and 95% CIs. Compared with the lowest quintile, the highest quintile of dietary folate intake was associated with a higher risk of breast cancer (rate ratio: 1.12; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.24). However, the test for trend was not significant (P for trend = 0.15). No association was found for total folate, vitamin B-6, or vitamin B-12, but methionine was inversely associated with breast cancer risk (P for trend = 0.04). The association of dietary folate with breast cancer was not modified by other nutrients or alcohol. This study suggests that dietary folate intake may be positively associated with postmenopausal breast cancer. However, no dose-response relation was observed. The extent to which increased supplement use and folate fortification contributes to breast cancer risk warrants further research.

  8. Empathy, Guilt Proneness, and Gender: Relative Contributions to Prosocial Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torstveit, Linda; Sütterlin, Stefan; Lugo, Ricardo Gregorio

    2016-05-01

    Guilt is a moral emotion that is often looked upon as a negative trait. However, studies show that some individuals are more predisposed to think, feel and act in a more ethical manner because of a lower threshold to experience guilt. Some theories of helping behaviour emphasize the evolutionary mechanisms, while other theories stress the importance of social variables. This study investigated whether guilt proneness as a dispositional trait can be associated with prosocial behaviour. Five hundred sixty-nine participants reported in an online survey their own levels of guilt proneness, frequency of prosocial behaviour, and related cognitions such as empathy. This study is among the first to demonstrate how guilt proneness combined with empathy can explain additional variance in prosocial behaviour. The findings also indicate gender differences in the precursors of prosocial behaviour, suggesting women are more influenced by the effects of guilt proneness on prosocial behaviour than men.

  9. Empathy, Guilt Proneness, and Gender: Relative Contributions to Prosocial Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Torstveit

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Guilt is a moral emotion that is often looked upon as a negative trait. However, studies show that some individuals are more predisposed to think, feel and act in a more ethical manner because of a lower threshold to experience guilt. Some theories of helping behaviour emphasize the evolutionary mechanisms, while other theories stress the importance of social variables. This study investigated whether guilt proneness as a dispositional trait can be associated with prosocial behaviour. Five hundred sixty-nine participants reported in an online survey their own levels of guilt proneness, frequency of prosocial behaviour, and related cognitions such as empathy. This study is among the first to demonstrate how guilt proneness combined with empathy can explain additional variance in prosocial behaviour. The findings also indicate gender differences in the precursors of prosocial behaviour, suggesting women are more influenced by the effects of guilt proneness on prosocial behaviour than men.

  10. Evaluation of the Relative Validity of the Short Diet Questionnaire for Assessing Usual Consumption Frequencies of Selected Nutrients and Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatenstein, Bryna; Payette, Hélène

    2015-08-04

    A 36-item Short Diet Questionnaire (SDQ) was developed to assess usual consumption frequencies of foods providing fats, fibre, calcium, vitamin D, in addition to fruits and vegetables. It was pretested among 30 community-dwelling participants from the Québec Longitudinal Study on Nutrition and Successful Aging, "NuAge" (n = 1793, 52.4% women), recruited in three age groups (70 ± 2 years; 75 ± 2 years; 80 ± 2 years). Following revision, the SDQ was administered to 527 NuAge participants (55% female), distributed among the three age groups, both sexes and languages (French, English) prior to the second of three non-consecutive 24 h diet recalls (24HR) and validated relative to the mean of three 24HR. Full data were available for 396 participants. Most SDQ nutrients and fruit and vegetable servings were lower than 24HR estimates (p nutrients and foods. Further testing is needed in a broader age range.

  11. Biogeographic differences in soil biota promote invasive grass response to nutrient addition relative to co-occurring species despite lack of belowground enemy release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Arthur A D; Stevens, Carly J; Ostle, Nicholas J; Orwin, Kate H

    2018-02-05

    Multiple plant species invasions and increases in nutrient availability are pervasive drivers of global environmental change that often co-occur. Many plant invasion studies, however, focus on single-species or single-mechanism invasions, risking an oversimplification of a multifaceted process. Here, we test how biogeographic differences in soil biota, such as belowground enemy release, interact with increases in nutrient availability to influence invasive plant growth. We conducted a greenhouse experiment using three co-occurring invasive grasses and one native grass. We grew species in live and sterilized soil from the invader's native (United Kingdom) and introduced (New Zealand) ranges with a nutrient addition treatment. We found no evidence for belowground enemy release. However, species' responses to nutrients varied, and this depended on soil origin and sterilization. In live soil from the introduced range, the invasive species Lolium perenne L. responded more positively to nutrient addition than co-occurring invasive and native species. In contrast, in live soil from the native range and in sterilized soils, there were no differences in species' responses to nutrients. This suggests that the presence of soil biota from the introduced range allowed L. perenne to capture additional nutrients better than co-occurring species. Considering the globally widespread nature of anthropogenic nutrient additions to ecosystems, this effect could be contributing to a global homogenization of flora and the associated losses in native species diversity.

  12. Growth and fruit development of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L. in related with plant nutrients during phenological development

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    Nilnond, C.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The imbalance or deficiency of essential nutrients in soils and plant may cause poor fruit quality of mangosteen fruit; translucent flesh disorder (TFD and internal gumming fruits. Therefore, an investigation of nutrient changes in soils and plant (root, branch, leaf and fruit of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L. during phenological development is a useful guideline for fertilizer management. This research aimed to investigate the pattern of plant nutrients accumulation and nutrient requirement during phenological development of the mangosteen trees. Soil sampling was taken at 4 depths; 0-15, 15-30, 30-50 and 50-100 cm, from soil surface around the middle of the tree canopy and analyzed for some important chemical and physical properties. Roots, branches, leaves and fruits from mangosteen trees at 4 periods of growth; preflowering, flowering, fruit development (from bloom to 7th week and harvesting were sampled, and analyzed related to the changes of soil nutrients. The results indicated that the soil texture varied from sandy clay loam to clay loam (Ruso soil series (Ro; Typic Pelehumults. In addition, the natural soils in mangosteen orchards was strong acid to very strong acid (pH 4.62-4.93, soil:water = 1:5. Mangosteen trees might take high amounts of nutrients from the surface soils (0-15 cm as follows: N, K, Mg and S for growth in the preflowering period; N, K, S and B in the flowering period; K, Ca and Mg in the 1st half of fruit development period (bloom to 7th week of fruit development and P in the 2nd half of fruit development period (7th week of fruit development to harvest compared to other growth periods. The results also showed that in the root, branch and leaf, mangosteen trees required higher amounts of Ca for growth in the preflowering period; K, Mg and S in the flowering period; N in the 1st half of fruit development period and K, Mg and B in the 2nd half of fruit development period compared to other growth periods. In the

  13. Plain Water and Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption in Relation to Energy and Nutrient Intake at Full-Service Restaurants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ruopeng

    2016-05-04

    Drinking plain water, such as tap or bottled water, provides hydration and satiety without adding calories. We examined plain water and sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption in relation to energy and nutrient intake at full-service restaurants. Data came from the 2005-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, comprising a nationally-representative sample of 2900 adults who reported full-service restaurant consumption in 24-h dietary recalls. Linear regressions were performed to examine the differences in daily energy and nutrient intake at full-service restaurants by plain water and SSB consumption status, adjusting for individual characteristics and sampling design. Over 18% of U.S. adults had full-service restaurant consumption on any given day. Among full-service restaurant consumers, 16.7% consumed SSBs, 2.6% consumed plain water but no SSBs, and the remaining 80.7% consumed neither beverage at the restaurant. Compared to onsite SSB consumption, plain water but no SSB consumption was associated with reduced daily total energy intake at full-service restaurants by 443.4 kcal, added sugar intake by 58.2 g, saturated fat intake by 4.4 g, and sodium intake by 616.8 mg, respectively. Replacing SSBs with plain water consumption could be an effective strategy to balance energy/nutrient intake and prevent overconsumption at full-service restaurant setting.

  14. Plain Water and Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption in Relation to Energy and Nutrient Intake at Full-Service Restaurants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruopeng An

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drinking plain water, such as tap or bottled water, provides hydration and satiety without adding calories. We examined plain water and sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB consumption in relation to energy and nutrient intake at full-service restaurants. Methods: Data came from the 2005–2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, comprising a nationally-representative sample of 2900 adults who reported full-service restaurant consumption in 24-h dietary recalls. Linear regressions were performed to examine the differences in daily energy and nutrient intake at full-service restaurants by plain water and SSB consumption status, adjusting for individual characteristics and sampling design. Results: Over 18% of U.S. adults had full-service restaurant consumption on any given day. Among full-service restaurant consumers, 16.7% consumed SSBs, 2.6% consumed plain water but no SSBs, and the remaining 80.7% consumed neither beverage at the restaurant. Compared to onsite SSB consumption, plain water but no SSB consumption was associated with reduced daily total energy intake at full-service restaurants by 443.4 kcal, added sugar intake by 58.2 g, saturated fat intake by 4.4 g, and sodium intake by 616.8 mg, respectively. Conclusion: Replacing SSBs with plain water consumption could be an effective strategy to balance energy/nutrient intake and prevent overconsumption at full-service restaurant setting.

  15. Relative Roles of Soil Moisture, Nutrient Supply, Depth, and Mechanical Impedance in Determining Composition and Structure of Wisconsin Prairies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernerehl, Robert W; Givnish, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Ecologists have long classified Midwestern prairies based on compositional variation assumed to reflect local gradients in moisture availability. The best known classification is based on Curtis' continuum index (CI), calculated using the presence of indicator species thought centered on different portions of an underlying moisture gradient. Direct evidence of the extent to which CI reflects differences in moisture availability has been lacking, however. Many factors that increase moisture availability (e.g., soil depth, silt content) also increase nutrient supply and decrease soil mechanical impedance; the ecological effects of the last have rarely been considered in any ecosystem. Decreased soil mechanical impedance should increase the availability of soil moisture and nutrients by reducing the root costs of retrieving both. Here we assess the relative importance of soil moisture, nutrient supply, and mechanical impedance in determining prairie composition and structure. We used leaf δ13C of C3 plants as a measure of growing-season moisture availability, cation exchange capacity (CEC) x soil depth as a measure of mineral nutrient availability, and penetrometer data as a measure of soil mechanical impedance. Community composition and structure were assessed in 17 remnant prairies in Wisconsin which vary little in annual precipitation. Ordination and regression analyses showed that δ13C increased with CI toward "drier" sites, and decreased with soil depth and % silt content. Variation in δ13C among remnants was 2.0‰, comparable to that along continental gradients from ca. 500-1500 mm annual rainfall. As predicted, LAI and average leaf height increased significantly toward "wetter" sites. CI accounted for 54% of compositional variance but δ13C accounted for only 6.2%, despite the strong relationships of δ13C to CI and CI to composition. Compositional variation reflects soil fertility and mechanical impedance more than moisture availability. This study is the

  16. Univariate and multivariate molecular spectral analyses of lipid related molecular structural components in relation to nutrient profile in feed and food mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekara, Saman; Damiran, Daalkhaijav; Yu, Peiqiang

    2013-02-01

    The objectives of this study were (i) to determine lipid related molecular structures components (functional groups) in feed combination of cereal grain (barley, Hordeum vulgare) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) based dried distillers grain solubles (wheat DDGSs) from bioethanol processing at five different combination ratios using univariate and multivariate molecular spectral analyses with infrared Fourier transform molecular spectroscopy, and (ii) to correlate lipid-related molecular-functional structure spectral profile to nutrient profiles. The spectral intensity of (i) CH3 asymmetric, CH2 asymmetric, CH3 symmetric and CH2 symmetric groups, (ii) unsaturation (Cdbnd C) group, and (iii) carbonyl ester (Cdbnd O) group were determined. Spectral differences of functional groups were detected by hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal components analysis (PCA). The results showed that the combination treatments significantly inflicted modifications (P structure spectral profiles through feed combination could be detected using molecular spectroscopy. These changes were associated with nutrient profiles and functionality.

  17. Phytoplankton variation and its relation to nutrients and allochthonous organic matter in a coastal lagoon on the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aké-Castillo, José A.; Vázquez, Gabriela

    2008-07-01

    In tropical and subtropical zones, coastal lagoons are surrounded by mangrove communities which are a source of high quantity organic matter that enters the aquatic system through litter fall. This organic matter decomposes, becoming a source of nutrients and other substances such as tannins, fulvic acids and humic acids that may affect the composition and productivity of phytoplankton communities. Sontecomapan is a coastal lagoon located in the southern Gulf of Mexico, which receives abundant litter fall from mangrove. To study the phytoplankton composition and its variation in this lagoon from October 2002 to October 2003, we evaluated the concentrations of dissolved folin phenol active substances (FPAS) as a measure of plant organic matter, salinity, temperature, pH, O 2, N-NH 4+, N-NO 3-, P-PO 43-, Si-SiO 2, and phytoplanktonic cell density in different mangrove influence zones including the three main rivers that feed the lagoon. Nutrients concentrations depended on freshwater from rivers, however these varied seasonally. Concentrations of P-PO 43-, N-NH 4+ and FPAS were the highest in the dry season, when maximum mangrove litter fall is reported. Variation of these nutrients seemed to depend on the internal biogeochemical processes of the lagoon. Blooms of diatoms ( Skeletonema spp., Cyclotella spp. and Chaetoceros holsaticus) and dinoflagellates ( Peridinium aff. quinquecorne, Prorocentrum cordatum) occurred seasonally and in the different mangrove influence zones. The high cell densities in these zones and the occurrence of certain species and its ordination along gradient of FPAS in a canonical correspondence analysis, suggest that plant organic matter (i.e. mangrove influence) may contribute to phytoplankton dynamics in Sontecomapan lagoon.

  18. Recent (2008-10) water quality in the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer and its contributing zone, central Texas, with emphasis on factors affecting nutrients and bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Barbara J.; Musgrove, MaryLynn; Sample, Thomas L.; Wong, Corinne I.

    2011-01-01

    The Barton Springs zone, which comprises the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer and the watersheds to the west that contribute to its recharge, is in south-central Texas, an area with rapid growth in population and increasing amounts of land area affected by development. During November 2008-March 2010, an investigation of factors affecting the fate and transport of nutrients and bacteria in the Barton Springs zone was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The primary objectives of the study were to characterize occurrence of nutrients and bacteria in the Barton Springs zone under a range of flow conditions; to improve understanding of the interaction between surface-water quality and groundwater quality; and to evaluate how factors such as streamflow variability and dilution affect the fate and transport of nutrients and bacteria in the Barton Springs zone. The USGS collected and analyzed water samples from five streams (Barton, Williamson, Slaughter, Bear, and Onion Creeks), two groundwater wells (Marbridge and Buda), and the main orifice of Barton Springs in Austin, Texas. During the period of the study, during which the hydrologic conditions transitioned from exceptional drought to wetter than normal, water samples were collected routinely (every 3 to 4 weeks) from the streams, wells, and spring and, in response to storms, from the streams and spring. All samples were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, the bacterium Escherichia coli, and suspended sediment. During the dry period, the geochemistry of groundwater at the two wells and at Barton Springs was dominated by flow from the aquifer matrix and was relatively similar and unchanging at the three sites. At the onset of the wet period, when the streams began to flow, the geochemistry of groundwater samples from the Marbridge well and Barton Springs changed rapidly, and concentrations of most major ions and nutrients and

  19. Levels of nutrients in relation to fish consumption among older male anglers in Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Krista Y; Thompson, Brooke A; Werner, Mark; Malecki, Kristen; Imm, Pamela; Anderson, Henry A

    2015-10-01

    Fish is an important source of nutrients including omega-3 fatty acids, which may reduce risk of adverse health outcomes such as cardiovascular disease; however, fish may also contain significant amounts of environmental pollutants. The Wisconsin Departments of Health Services and Natural Resources developed a survey instrument, along with a strategy to collect human biological samples to assess the risks and benefits associated with long-term fish consumption among older male anglers in Wisconsin. The target population was men aged 50 years and older, who fish Wisconsin waters and live in the state of Wisconsin. Participants provided blood and hair samples and completed a detailed (paper) questionnaire, which included questions on basic demographics, health status, location of catch and species of fish caught/eaten, consumption of locally caught and commercially purchased fish, and awareness and source of information for local and statewide consumption guidelines. Biological samples were used to assess levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA); vitamin D; and selenium in blood. Quantile regression analysis was used to investigate the associations between biomarker levels and self-reported consumption of fish from the Great Lakes and other areas of concern, other locally caught fish, and commercially purchased fish (meals per year). Respondents were largely non-Hispanic white men in their 60's with at least some college education, and about half were retired. Fish consumption was high (median of 54.5 meals per year), with most fish meals coming from locally-caught fish. Multivariate regression models showed that the effect of supplement use was much greater than that of fish consumption, on nutrient levels, although consumption of fish from the Great Lakes and areas of concern was significantly associated with higher levels of vitamin D even after controlling for supplement usage. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Folate-related nutrients, genetic polymorphisms, and colorectal cancer risk: the fukuoka colorectal cancer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Makiko; Yin, Guang; Yoshimitsu, Shin-ichiro; Ohnaka, Keizo; Toyomura, Kengo; Kono, Suminori; Ueki, Takashi; Tanaka, Masao; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Okamura, Takeshi; Ikejiri, Koji; Futami, Kitaroh; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yasunami, Yohichi; Takenaka, Kenji; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Terasaka, Reiji

    2013-01-01

    One-carbon metabolism plays an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Meta-analyses have suggested protective associations of folate and vitamin B6 intakes with colorectal cancer primarily based on studies in Caucasians, and genetic polymorphisms pertaining to the folate metabolism have been a matter of interest. Less investigated are the roles of methionine synthase (MTR) and thymidylate synthetase (TS) polymorphisms in colorectal carcinogenesis. In a study of 816 cases and 815 community controls in Japan, we investigated associations of dietary intakes of folate, methionine, vitamin B2, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 with colorectal cancer risk. The associations with MTR 2756A>G, MTRR 66A>G, and TSER repeat polymorphism were examined in 685 cases and 778 controls. Methionine and vitamin B12 intakes were inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk, but the associations were totally confounded by dietary calcium and n-3 fatty acids. The other nutrients showed no association with the risk even without adjustment for calcium and n-3 fatty acids. The TSER 2R allele was dose-dependently associated with an increased risk. The MTR and MTRR polymorphisms were unrelated to colorectal cancer risk. There was no measurable gene-gene or gene-nutrient interaction, but increased risk associated with the TSER 2R allele seemed to be confined to individuals with high folate status. This study does not support protective associations for folate and vitamin B6. The TSER 2R allele may confer an increased risk of colorectal cancer. The role of the TSER polymorphism in colorectal carcinogenesis may differ by ethnicity.

  1. Women's nutrient intakes and food-related knowledge in rural Kandal province, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Lauren J; Summerlee, Alastair J S; Dewey, Cate E; Hak, Chantharith; Hall, Ann; Charles, Christopher V

    2014-01-01

    In Cambodia, both anaemia and vitamin A deficiency are serious health problems. Despite this, few comprehensive nutritional surveys have been completed to date. This study evaluates the adequacy of iron and vitamin A intakes, as well as women's nutritional knowledge in rural Kandal province. Twenty-four hour recalls, pile sort activities, socioeconomic surveys, focus groups, and market surveys were carried out with 67 women from 5 villages in rural Kandal Province. Ninety seven percent of women did not meet their daily-recommended intake of iron, while 70% did not meet their daily-recommended intake of vitamin A. Although many women consume vitamin A-rich and iron rich-foods daily, they do not consume large enough quantities of these foods. Results suggest that both the cost of foods as well as the extent of health knowledge is linked to nutritional practice. Most animal-source iron and vitamin A-rich foods are considered expensive; however, small fish, and several plant-source vitamin A-rich foods are inexpensive and easy to access. Despite health education, food restrictions lead some healthy foods to be considered to be harmful to women. Ultimately, this study demonstrates the importance of developing comprehensive nutritional interventions in Cambodia. Health programming must provide women with not only suggestions to include low-cost nutrient-rich foods, but also advise them about the quantities that are likely to have an impact on nutritional status. Programs should take a community-based, inter-sectoral approach that simultaneously combines culturally informed health education with initiatives that combat poverty and increase access to nutrient rich foods.

  2. Risk of human ovarian cancer is related to dietary intake of selected nutrients, phytochemicals and food groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Susan E; Freudenheim, Jo L; Marshall, James R; Graham, Saxon

    2003-06-01

    Intakes of specific nutrients and food groups have been shown previously to be related to ovarian cancer risk, but no studies, to our knowledge, have emphasized the effect of phytochemical intakes on this cancer. We conducted a case-control study of diet and ovarian cancer in western New York involving 124 primary, histologically confirmed ovarian cancer cases and 696 population-based controls, frequency matched to cases on age and county of residence. Diet was assessed with a detailed food-frequency questionnaire. Nutrient and phytochemical intakes were calculated from published food composition data. The odds ratios (OR) and 95% CI for risk of ovarian cancer with each nutrient, phytochemical and food group were estimated with unconditional logistic regression adjusting for age, education, total months menstruating, difficulty becoming pregnant, oral contraceptive use, menopausal status and energy intake. Compared with women in the lowest quintile of intake, reduced risks were observed for women in the highest quintile of intake of dietary fiber (OR 0.43, 95% CI, 0.20-0.94), total carotenoids (OR 0.33, 95% CI, 0.16-0.68), stigmasterol (OR 0.42, 95% CI, 0.20-0.87), total lignans (OR 0.43, 95% CI, 0.21-0.85), vegetables (OR 0.47, 95% CI, 0.23-0.97) and poultry (OR 0.45, 95% CI, 0.22-0.92). These results support a protective effect on ovarian cancer of phytoestrogen intakes, and our results support the hypothesis that a plant-based diet may be important in reducing risks of hormone-related neoplasms.

  3. Nutrient Cycling Index in Relation to Organic Matter and Soil Respiration of Rehabilitated Mine Sites in Kelian, East Kalimantan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Setyawan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Degraded soils at mine sites are often associated with decreased soil fertility. However, soil nutrient status might be improved through biomass recovery primarily from re-vegetation. This paper relates nutrient cycling index (NCI derived from Landscape Function Analysis (LFA to soil respiration and soil organic matter as a measure of improving soil condition after rehabilitation. Fieldwork was conducted at Kelian Equatorial Mining, East Kalimantan in June 2001. Four sites were selected representing rehabilitation work in 1994 (7 year, 2000 (1 year and 2001 (3 month, and a reference site of undisturbed primary forest. The NCI value was calculated from scores of basal/canopy cover, litter (abundance, origin and degree of incorporation, cryptogam cover and surface roughness. Soil respiration was measured using the inverted-box method. In general, the NCI values increased with age of rehabilitation (12 to 56 % showing a significant increase compared with the values of reference site (80%. Soil respiration varied greatly and the values were equally high (200-800 mg CO2 m-2 hr2 across all sites. Tropical soils like those of Kelian might be inherently rich of soil organism as shown by high value of soil respiration. Nevertheless, the NCI values were not systematically related to soil respiration. We found that increased organic matter may be used as early sign of functioning soil resources in degraded land.

  4. An Examination of Sex Differences in Relation to the Eating Habits and Nutrient Intakes of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kin-Kit; Concepcion, Rebecca Y.; Lee, Hyo; Cardinal, Bradley J.; Ebbeck, Vicki; Woekel, Erica; Readdy, R. Tucker

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To examine sex differences in eating habits and nutrient intakes and explore whether eating habits mediate the effects of sex on nutrient intakes and whether sex moderates the effects of eating habits on nutrient intakes. Methods: Cross-sectional survey of eating habits and food-intake frequency in a convenience sample of college…

  5. Folate and one-carbon metabolism nutrients from supplements and diet in relation to breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruti, Sonia S; Ulrich, Cornelia M; White, Emily

    2009-02-01

    Few epidemiologic studies have examined very high intakes of folate and whether consumption of nutrients involved in one-carbon metabolism is associated with breast cancer risk. We prospectively examined whether the consumption of folate and nutrients involved in one-carbon metabolism (methionine, riboflavin, and vitamins B-6 and B-12) from self-reported intakes of diet (in year before baseline) and supplements (averaged over 10 y before baseline) were associated with the incidence of breast cancer and breast cancer tumor characteristics. Participants were 35,023 postmenopausal women aged 50-76 y in the VITamins And Lifestyle (VITAL) cohort study; breast cancer was diagnosed in 743 of these women between baseline (2000-2002) and 2006. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate multivariable-adjusted relative risks (RRs) and 95% CIs. Women consuming > or =1272 dietary folate equivalents (DFE)/d of total folate (10-y average) had a 22% decrease in breast cancer risk compared with women consuming cancers (RR: 0.38; 95% CI: 0.18, 0.80; P for trend = 0.02; P = 0.02 for the difference between ER- and ER+). Neither current intakes of folate nor current or long-term intakes of other one-carbon nutrients were significantly associated with breast cancer risk. Multivitamin use attenuated the increased risk of breast cancer associated with alcohol drinking (P for interaction = 0.02). Our study of predominantly supplement users suggests that high intakes of folate averaged over 10 y do not increase breast cancer risk, but may be protective, particularly against ER- breast cancers.

  6. Variations in concentrations and fluxes of dissolved inorganic nutrients related to catchment scale human interventions in Pamba River, Kerala, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, S. E.; Jennerjahn, T. C.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2012-12-01

    maximum value during the pre and NE monsoon. Highest DIN with ammonium(NH4+) as the major component in January were observed during the peak pilgrim season. Except for the temple locations NH4+ values were low in the rest of the catchment. Nitrate(NO3-) was dominant during SW monsoon in the midland and low land regions due to the various agricultural practices displaying variability along the course of the river. Maximum values for phosphate (PO43-) and silicate (Si(OH)4) were in the temple area during the premonsoon months. Average NPK fertilizer use in the basin was 80.2 kg ha-1.When compared to the average of all India (72 kg.ha-1) usage is high but lower than Western Europe and U.S (250 kg.ha-1).Yield calculated were 7186.6 kg km-2yr-1for DIN, 453.2 kg km-2yr-1for PO43--P and 17728.9 kg km-2yr- for dissolved Si. NH4+-N and dissolved Si yield were maximum in the temple and forest dominated regions, NO3--N and PO43--P in smt regions respectively. When compared to other tropical rivers, nutrient yield from the Pamba River found to be higher points to the significant hydrological and land use practices. To conclude, land use activities in the basin are the key factor contributing to varying water quality and nutrient concentrations and loading in the Pamba catchment the main being pilgrim event and agriculture in our study.

  7. Evaluation of the Relative Validity of the Short Diet Questionnaire for Assessing Usual Consumption Frequencies of Selected Nutrients and Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryna Shatenstein

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A 36-item Short Diet Questionnaire (SDQ was developed to assess usual consumption frequencies of foods providing fats, fibre, calcium, vitamin D, in addition to fruits and vegetables. It was pretested among 30 community-dwelling participants from the Québec Longitudinal Study on Nutrition and Successful Aging, “NuAge” (n = 1793, 52.4% women, recruited in three age groups (70 ± 2 years; 75 ± 2 years; 80 ± 2 years. Following revision, the SDQ was administered to 527 NuAge participants (55% female, distributed among the three age groups, both sexes and languages (French, English prior to the second of three non-consecutive 24 h diet recalls (24HR and validated relative to the mean of three 24HR. Full data were available for 396 participants. Most SDQ nutrients and fruit and vegetable servings were lower than 24HR estimates (p < 0.05 except calcium, vitamin D, and saturated and trans fats. Spearman correlations between the SDQ and 24HR were modest and significant (p < 0.01, ranging from 0.19 (cholesterol to 0.45 (fruits and vegetables. Cross-classification into quartiles showed 33% of items were jointly classified into identical quartiles of the distribution, 73% into identical and contiguous quartiles, and only 7% were frankly misclassified. The SDQ is a reasonably accurate, rapid approach for ranking usual frequencies of selected nutrients and foods. Further testing is needed in a broader age range.

  8. Molecular basis of structural make-up of feeds in relation to nutrient absorption in ruminants, revealed with advanced molecular spectroscopy: A review on techniques and models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Md. Mostafizar [Department of Animal and Poultry Science, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; Yu, Peiqiang [Department of Animal and Poultry Science, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

    2017-01-31

    Progress in ruminant feed research is no more feasible only based on wet chemical analysis, which is merely able to provide information on chemical composition of feeds regardless of their digestive features and nutritive value in ruminants. Studying internal structural make-up of functional groups/feed nutrients is often vital for understanding the digestive behaviors and nutritive values of feeds in ruminant because the intrinsic structure of feed nutrients is more related to its overall absorption. In this article, the detail information on the recent developments in molecular spectroscopic techniques to reveal microstructural information of feed nutrients and the use of nutrition models in regards to ruminant feed research was reviewed. The emphasis of this review was on (1) the technological progress in the use of molecular spectroscopic techniques in ruminant feed research; (2) revealing spectral analysis of functional groups of biomolecules/feed nutrients; (3) the use of advanced nutrition models for better prediction of nutrient availability in ruminant systems; and (4) the application of these molecular techniques and combination of nutrient models in cereals, co-products and pulse crop research. The information described in this article will promote better insight in the progress of research on molecular structural make-up of feed nutrients in ruminants.

  9. The relative labour productivity contribution of different age-skill categories for a developing economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhardus van Zyl

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The article dealt with the estimation, computation and interpretation of the relative productivity contributions of different age-skill categories.Research purpose: The aim of the article was to estimate and compute, (1 relative productivity contributions and (2 relative productivity contribution–employee remuneration cost levels for different age-skill categories.Motivation for the study: The research was deemed necessary given the current debate on relative productivity levels and possible changes to the retirement age in the South African labour market. No real research in this regard has been published regarding the South African labour market situation.Research design, approach and method: A less restrictive production function was used, allowing for the simultaneous estimation and final computation of relative labour contribution levels of different age-skill categories.Main findings: The lower-skilled segment produced significantly smaller productivity contributions and the relative productivity contribution–employee remuneration cost ratios of the 55 years and older age group were superior in the higher-skilled segment but, at the same time, the lowest in the lower-skilled segment.Practical/managerial implications: It is recommended that human resource practitioners (given the perceived rigidity of labour legislation implement and maintain structures that promote higher productivity levels for all age-skill categories in the workplace.Contribution/value-add: An estimation procedure, which can be applied to the measurement of the relative productivity contribution of different age-skill categories, has been established.

  10. Evidence for a genetical contribution to non-smoking-related lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Shamus R; Akerley, Wallace; Hashibe, Mia; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A

    2015-11-01

    The majority of lung cancers are smoking-related, with environmental and genetical factors contributing. The interplay between environmental and genetical contributions in non-smoking-related lung cancers is less clear. We analysed a population-based computerised genealogy resource linked to a state-wide cancer registry of lung cancer cases (n=5544) for evidence of a genetical contribution to lung cancer predisposition in smoking (n=1747) and non-smoking cases (n=784). Statistical methods were used to test for significant excess relatedness of cases and estimate relative risk (RR) in close and distant relatives of lung cancer cases. Significant excess relatedness was observed for all lung cancer cases (pgenetical contribution as well as an environmental contribution. Significant excess relatedness for only close family relationships in all lung cancer cases and in only smoking-related lung cancer cases implies environmental contribution. Additionally, the highest RR for lung cancer was observed in the relatives of smoking-related lung cancer, suggesting predisposition gene carriers who smoke are at highest risk for lung cancer. Screening and gene identification should focus on high-risk pedigrees. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Supermarket purchase contributes to nutrition-related non-communicable diseases in urban Kenya

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kathrin M Demmler; Stephan Klasen; Jonathan M Nzuma; Matin Qaim

    2017-01-01

    ...), typically associated with high body mass index (BMI), is rapidly rising. The fast spread of supermarkets and related shifts in diets were identified as possible factors contributing to overweight and obesity in developing countries...

  12. Drugs, nutrients, and phytoactive principles improving the health span of rodent models of human age-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebel, Michel; Picard, Frédéric; Ferland, Guylaine; Gaudreau, Pierrette

    2012-02-01

    Rodents are often the species of choice to examine the effect of drugs on survival and on the progression of specific diseased tissues. This statement is also true for research laboratories working in the field of nutrition and aging. In addition to diets that can reduce the life expectancy of rodents, such as diabetogenic or high-fat diets, genetically modified rodents exhibiting different accelerated age-associated diseases also provide important biologic tools to decipher the impact of drugs, nutrients, or phytoactive compounds on their health and life span. This review covers some of the chemicals believed to decelerate the appearance of age-related diseases in different rodent models. Such chemicals include antioxidants, anti-inflammatory molecules, modulators of metabolic sensors, calorie restriction mimetics, and vegetal polyphenolic compounds that affect mitochondrial functions, cellular proliferation or differentiation as well as cell functionality.

  13. The potential contribution of yellow cassava to dietary nutrient adequacy of primary-school children in Eastern Kenya; the use of linear programming

    OpenAIRE

    Talsma, Elise F.; Borgonjen-van den Berg, Karin J.; Melse-Boonstra, Alida; Mayer, Eva V.; Verhoef, Hans; Demir, Ayşe Y.; Ferguson, Elaine L.; Kok, Frans J.; Brouwer, Inge D.

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Introduction of biofortified cassava as school lunch can increase vitamin A intake, but may increase risk of other deficiencies due to poor nutrient profile of cassava. We assessed the potential effect of introducing a yellow cassava-based school lunch combined with additional food-based recommendations (FBR) on vitamin A and overall nutrient adequacy using Optifood (linear programming tool). Design: Cross-sectional study to assess dietary intakes (24 h recall) and derive model par...

  14. Microbial population analysis of nutrient removal-related organisms in membrane bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, A.F.; Carvalho, G.; Oehmen, A.; Lousada-Ferreira, M.; Van Nieuwenhuijzen, A.; Reis, M.A.M.; Crespo, M.T.B.

    2012-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors (MBR) are an important and increasingly implemented wastewater treatment technology, which are operated at low food to microorganism ratios (F/M) and retain slow-growing organisms. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR)-related organisms grow slower than ordinary

  15. Variation in C:N:S stoichiometry and nutrient storage related to body size in a holometabolous insect (Curculio davidi) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) larva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao; Small, Gaston E; Zhou, Xuan; Wang, Donger; Li, Hongwang; Liu, Chunjiang

    2015-01-01

    Body size can be an important factor controlling consumer stoichiometry. In holometabolous insects, body size is typically associated with nutrient storage. Consumer stoichiometry is known to vary within species across a range of body sizes; however, the contribution of nutrient storage to this variation is not well understood. We used the fifth-instar larvae of the oak weevil (Coleoptera: Curculio davidi Fairmaire), which is characterized by a high capacity for nutrient storage, to investigate the effect of shifts in nutrient storage with body mass on variations in larva stoichiometry. Our results showed that weevil larvae with larger body mass had a lower carbon (C) content, reflecting decreases in the sequestration rate of C-rich lipids. Larger larvae had elevated concentrations of nitrogen (N), sulfur (S), and protein. The similar patterns of variation in elemental composition and macromolecule storage with body weight indicate that the shift in nutrient storage is the main factor causing the variation in larval stoichiometry with body weight. This finding was further supported by the low variation in residual larval biomass C, N, and S concentrations after lipid extraction. These results help decipher the physiological mechanism of stoichiometric regulation in growing organisms. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  16. Lead phytotoxicity in soils and nutrient solutions is related to lead induced phosphorus deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheyns, Karlien; Peeters, Sofie; Delcourt, Dorien; Smolders, Erik

    2012-05-01

    This study was set up to relate lead (Pb) bioavailability with its toxicity to plants in soils. Tomato and barley seedlings were grown in six different PbCl(2) spiked soils (pH: 4.7-7.4; eCEC: 4.2-41.7 cmol(c)/kg). Soils were leached and pH corrected after spiking to exclude confounding factors. Plant growth was halved at 1600-6500 mg Pb/kg soil for tomato and at 1900-8300 mg Pb/kg soil for barley. These soil Pb threshold were unrelated to soil pH, organic carbon, texture or eCEC and neither soil solution Pb nor Pb(2+) ion activity adequately explained Pb toxicity among soils. Shoot phosphorus (P) concentrations significantly decreased with increasing soil Pb concentrations. Tomato grown in hydroponics at either varying P supply or at increasing Pb (equal initial P) illustrated that shoot P explained growth response in both scenarios. The results suggest that Pb toxicity is partially related to Pb induced P deficiency, likely due to lead phosphate precipitation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of probiotics in diets with different nutrient densities on growth performance, blood characteristics, relative organ weight and breast meat characteristics in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W; Wang, J P; Yan, L; Huang, Y Q

    2013-01-01

    1. A total of 720 1-d-old broilers were used in a 28 d experiment to determine the effects of probiotic supplementation in diets with different dietary nutrient densities. 2. Birds were randomly allotted to one of the 4 treatments in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement (12 replicateswith 15 broilers per replicate) with two levels of nutrient density [high nutrient density (metabolisable energy (ME) 12.7 MJ/kg and crude protein (CP) 230.3 g/kg for 1-7 d; ME 13.2 MJ/kg and CP 220.3 g/kg for 8-28 d) or low nutrient density (ME 12.1 MJ/kg and CP 220.2 g/kg for 0-7 d; ME 12.6 MJ/kg and CP 209.8 g/kg for 8-28 d)] and 0 or 2 g/kg probiotics (1.0 × 10(10) viable spores/g of Bacillus subtilis endospores and 1.0 × 10(9) viable spores/g of Clostridium butyricum). 3. The high-nutrient-density diet increased body weight gain (BWG), feed conversion ratio (FCR), serum cholesterol and triglyceride concentration relative to the low-nutrient-density diet. High-nutrient-density diet reduced water loss ratio of breast muscle, liver and fat relative to body weight compared to low-nutrient density-diet. The inclusion of probiotics increased BWG and feed intake throughout the experiment. Dietary probiotics increased the percentage of blood lymphocytes and relative weight of spleen and bursa of Fabricius when compared to the non-probiotic treatment. The inclusion of probiotics decreased serum cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations and lightness (L*) value of breast meat compared to the non-probiotic-supplemented diet. 4. In conclusion, high dietary nutrient density increased growth performance and serum cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations in broiler chickens. The inclusion of probiotics increased growth performance but reduced serum cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations. The positive effect of probiotic supplementation on growth performance was reduced by the high-nutrient-density diet during the first week of life.

  18. Relative Contribution of Perception/Cognition and Language on Spatial Categorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soonja; Hattrup, Kate

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relative contribution of perception/cognition and language-specific semantics in nonverbal categorization of spatial relations. English and Korean speakers completed a video-based similarity judgment task involving containment, support, tight fit, and loose fit. Both perception/cognition and language served as resources…

  19. The Contribution of Sociotechnical Factors to Health Information Technology-Related Sentinel Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Gerard M; Buczkowski, Lisa; Hafner, Joanne M

    2016-02-01

    An understanding of how health information technology (health IT) can contribute to sentinel events is necessary to learn how to safely implement and use health IT. An analysis was conducted to explore how health IT may contribute to adverse events that result in death or severe harm to the patient. For 3,375 de-identified sentinel events voluntarily reported to The Joint Commission between January 1, 2010, and June 30, 2013, categorical and keyword queries were used to search for potential health IT-related events. Each of the identified events was reviewed on the basis of findings from root cause analyses (RCAs) to determine if health IT contributed to or caused the event, and if so, how and why. The contributing factors were classified using a composite of existing classification schemes. A total of 120 health IT-related sentinel events (affecting 125 patients) were identified. More than half resulted in patient death, 30% resulted in unexpected or additional care, and 11% resulted in permanent loss of function. The three most frequently identified event types were (1) medication errors, (2) wrong-site surgery (including the wrong side, wrong procedure, and wrong patient), and (3) delays in treatment. Contributing factors were most frequently associated with the human-computer interface, workflow and communication, and clinical content-related issues. The classification of health IT-related contributing factors indicates that health IT-related events are primarily associated with the sociotechnical dimensions of human-computer interface, workflow and communication, and clinical content. Improved identification of health IT-related contributing factors in the context of the sociotechnical dimensions may help software developers, device manufacturers, and end users in health care organizations proactively identify vulnerabilities and hazards, ultimately reducing the risk of harm to patients.

  20. Major food sources of calories, added sugars, and saturated fat and their contribution to essential nutrient intakes in the U.S. diet: data from the national health and nutrition examination survey (2003–2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The risk of chronic disease cannot be predicted simply by the content of a single nutrient in a food or food group in the diet. The contribution of food sources of calories, added sugars and saturated fat (SFA) to intakes of dietary fiber and micronutrients of public health importance is also relevant to understanding the overall dietary impact of these foods. Objective Identify the top food sources of calories, added sugars and SFA in the U.S. diet and quantify their contribution to fiber and micronutrient intakes. Methods Single 24-hour dietary recalls (Day 1) collected from participants ≥2 years (n = 16,822) of the What We Eat in America, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (WWEIA/NHANES 2003–2006) were analyzed. All analyses included sample weights to account for the survey design. Calorie and nutrient intakes from foods included contributions from disaggregated food mixtures and tabulated by rank order. Results No one food category contributes more than 7.2% of calories to the overall U.S. diet, but half of the top 10 contribute 10% or more of total dietary fiber and micronutrients. Three of the top 10 sources of calories and SFA (beef, milk and cheese) contribute 46.3% of the calcium, 49.5% of the vitamin D, 42.3% of the vitamin B12 as well as other essential nutrients to the American diet. On the other hand, foods categorized as desserts, snacks, or beverages, contribute 13.6% of total calories, 83% of added sugar intake, and provide little or no nutritional value. Including food components of disaggregated recipes more accurately estimated the contribution of foods like beef, milk or cheese to overall nutrient intake compared to “as consumed” food categorizations. Conclusions Some food sources of calories, added sugars and SFA make major contributions to American dietary fiber and micronutrient intakes. Dietary modifications targeting reductions in calories, added sugar, or SFA need to take these key micronutrient

  1. Major food sources of calories, added sugars, and saturated fat and their contribution to essential nutrient intakes in the U.S. diet: data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2003-2006).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huth, Peter J; Fulgoni, Victor L; Keast, Debra R; Park, Keigan; Auestad, Nancy

    2013-08-08

    The risk of chronic disease cannot be predicted simply by the content of a single nutrient in a food or food group in the diet. The contribution of food sources of calories, added sugars and saturated fat (SFA) to intakes of dietary fiber and micronutrients of public health importance is also relevant to understanding the overall dietary impact of these foods. Identify the top food sources of calories, added sugars and SFA in the U.S. diet and quantify their contribution to fiber and micronutrient intakes. Single 24-hour dietary recalls (Day 1) collected from participants ≥2 years (n = 16,822) of the What We Eat in America, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (WWEIA/NHANES 2003-2006) were analyzed. All analyses included sample weights to account for the survey design. Calorie and nutrient intakes from foods included contributions from disaggregated food mixtures and tabulated by rank order. No one food category contributes more than 7.2% of calories to the overall U.S. diet, but half of the top 10 contribute 10% or more of total dietary fiber and micronutrients. Three of the top 10 sources of calories and SFA (beef, milk and cheese) contribute 46.3% of the calcium, 49.5% of the vitamin D, 42.3% of the vitamin B12 as well as other essential nutrients to the American diet. On the other hand, foods categorized as desserts, snacks, or beverages, contribute 13.6% of total calories, 83% of added sugar intake, and provide little or no nutritional value. Including food components of disaggregated recipes more accurately estimated the contribution of foods like beef, milk or cheese to overall nutrient intake compared to "as consumed" food categorizations. Some food sources of calories, added sugars and SFA make major contributions to American dietary fiber and micronutrient intakes. Dietary modifications targeting reductions in calories, added sugar, or SFA need to take these key micronutrient sources into account so as not to have the unintended

  2. Sex-related differences in photoinhibition, photo-oxidative stress and photoprotection in stinging nettle (Urtica dioica L.) exposed to drought and nutrient deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simancas, Bárbara; Juvany, Marta; Cotado, Alba; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2016-03-01

    Dimorphic plant species can show distinct nutrient needs due to sex-related differences in nutrient allocation to reproductive structures, which can potentially affect their sensitivity to photoinhibition and photo-oxidative stress. Here, we investigated sex-related differences in the extent of photo-oxidative stress in male and female individuals of U. dioica exposed to a combination of severe drought and nutrient starvation. Male and female individuals of U. dioica subject to severe drought stress were exposed to various levels of nutrient availability. First, a set of plants grown under field conditions and exposed to summer drought was used to test the effects of nutrient supply (given as NPK fertilizer). Secondly, the effects of various phosphate concentrations in the nutrient solution were tested in drought-stressed potted plants. The Fv/Fm ratio (maximum efficiency of PSII photochemistry), photoprotection capacity (levels of carotenoids, including the xanthophyll cycle, and vitamins C and E), and the extent of lipid peroxidation (hydroperoxide levels) were measured. Results showed that an application of the NPK fertilizer to the soil had a positive effect on drought-stressed plants, reducing the extent of lipid peroxidation in both males and females. P deficiency led to residual photoinhibition, as indicated by significant reductions in the Fv/Fm ratio, and enhanced lipid peroxidation in females, but not in males. We conclude that (i) increased nutrient availability in the soil can alleviate photo-oxidative stress in drought-stressed U. dioica plants, and (ii) U. dioica plants show sexual secondary dimorphism in terms of photoinhibition and photo-oxidative stress, but this is only apparent when stress infringed on plants is very severe. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A treelet transform analysis to relate nutrient patterns to the risk of hormonal receptor-defined breast cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assi, Nada; Moskal, Aurelie; Slimani, Nadia; Viallon, Vivian; Chajes, Veronique; Freisling, Heinz; Monni, Stefano; Knueppel, Sven; Förster, Jana; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Lujan-Barroso, Leila; Amiano, Pilar; Ardanaz, Eva; Molina-Montes, Esther; Salmerón, Diego; Quirós, José Ramón; Olsen, Anja; Tjønneland, Anne; Dahm, Christina C; Overvad, Kim; Dossus, Laure; Fournier, Agnès; Baglietto, Laura; Fortner, Renee Turzanski; Kaaks, Rudolf; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Bamia, Christina; Orfanos, Philippos; De Magistris, Maria Santucci; Masala, Giovanna; Agnoli, Claudia; Ricceri, Fulvio; Tumino, Rosario; Bueno de Mesquita, H Bas; Bakker, Marije F; Peeters, Petra Hm; Skeie, Guri; Braaten, Tonje; Winkvist, Anna; Johansson, Ingegerd; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J; Key, Tim; Travis, Ruth; Schmidt, Julie A; Merritt, Melissa A; Riboli, Elio; Romieu, Isabelle; Ferrari, Pietro

    2016-02-01

    Pattern analysis has emerged as a tool to depict the role of multiple nutrients/foods in relation to health outcomes. The present study aimed at extracting nutrient patterns with respect to breast cancer (BC) aetiology. Nutrient patterns were derived with treelet transform (TT) and related to BC risk. TT was applied to twenty-three log-transformed nutrient densities from dietary questionnaires. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals computed using Cox proportional hazards models quantified the association between quintiles of nutrient pattern scores and risk of overall BC, and by hormonal receptor and menopausal status. Principal component analysis was applied for comparison. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Women (n 334 850) from the EPIC study. The first TT component (TC1) highlighted a pattern rich in nutrients found in animal foods loading on cholesterol, protein, retinol, vitamins B12 and D, while the second TT component (TC2) reflected a diet rich in β-carotene, riboflavin, thiamin, vitamins C and B6, fibre, Fe, Ca, K, Mg, P and folate. While TC1 was not associated with BC risk, TC2 was inversely associated with BC risk overall (HRQ5 v. Q1=0·89, 95 % CI 0·83, 0·95, P trend<0·01) and showed a significantly lower risk in oestrogen receptor-positive (HRQ5 v. Q1=0·89, 95 % CI 0·81, 0·98, P trend=0·02) and progesterone receptor-positive tumours (HRQ5 v. Q1=0·87, 95 % CI 0·77, 0·98, P trend<0·01). TT produces readily interpretable sparse components explaining similar amounts of variation as principal component analysis. Our results suggest that participants with a nutrient pattern high in micronutrients found in vegetables, fruits and cereals had a lower risk of BC.

  4. The potential contribution of yellow cassava to dietary nutrient adequacy of primary-school children in Eastern Kenya; the use of linear programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talsma, Elise F.; Borgonjen-van den Berg, Karin J.; Melse-Boonstra, Alida; Mayer, Eva V.; Verhoef, Hans; Demir, Ayşe Y.; Ferguson, Elaine L.; Kok, Frans J.; Brouwer, Inge D.

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Introduction of biofortified cassava as school lunch can increase vitamin A intake, but may increase risk of other deficiencies due to poor nutrient profile of cassava. We assessed the potential effect of introducing a yellow cassava-based school lunch combined with additional

  5. Nutrient levels within leaves, stems, and roots of the xeric species Reaumuria soongorica in relation to geographical, climatic, and soil conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingzhu; Zhang, Ke; Tan, Huijuan; Hu, Rui; Su, Jieqiong; Wang, Jin; Huang, Lei; Zhang, Yafeng; Li, Xinrong

    2015-01-01

    Besides water relations, nutrient allocation, and stoichiometric traits are fundamental feature of shrubs. Knowledge concerning the nutrient stoichiometry of xerophytes is essential to predicting the biogeochemical cycling in desert ecosystems as well as to understanding the homoeostasis and variability of nutrient traits in desert plants. Here, we focused on the temperate desert species Reaumuria soongorica and collected samples from plant organs and soil over 28 different locations that covered a wide distributional gradient of this species. Carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) concentrations and their stoichiometry were determined and subsequently compared with geographic, climatic, and edaphic factors. The mean leaf C, N, and P concentrations and C/N, C/P, and N/P ratios were 371.6 mg g−1, 10.6 mg g−1, 0.73 mg g−1, and 59.7, 837.9, 15.7, respectively. Stem and root C concentrations were higher than leaf C, while leaf N was higher than stem and root N. Phosphorus concentration and N/P did not differ among plant organs. Significant differences were found between root C/N and leaf C/N as well as between root C/P and leaf C/P. Leaf nutrient traits respond to geographic and climatic factors, while nutrient concentrations of stems and roots are mostly affected by soil P and pH. We show that stoichiometric patterns in different plant organs had different responses to environmental variables. Studies of species-specific nutrient stoichiometry can help clarify plant–environment relationships and nutrient cycling patterns in desert ecosystems. PMID:25897388

  6. Unimodular Gravity and General Relativity UV divergent contributions to the scattering of massive scalar particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Martin, S.; Martin, C. P.

    2018-01-01

    We work out the one-loop and order κ2 mphi2 UV divergent contributions, coming from Unimodular Gravity and General Relativity, to the S matrix element of the scattering process phi + phi→ phi + phi in a λ phi4 theory with mass mphi. We show that both Unimodular Gravity and General Relativity give rise to the same UV divergent contributions in Dimensional Regularization. This seems to be at odds with the known result that in a multiplicative MS dimensional regularization scheme the General Relativity corrections, in the de Donder gauge, to the beta function, βλ, of the λ coupling do not vanish, whereas the Unimodular Gravity corrections, in a certain gauge, do vanish. Actually, by comparing the UV divergent contributions calculated in this paper with those which give rise to the non-vanishing gravitational corrections to βλ, one readily concludes that the UV divergent contributions that yield the just mentioned non-vanishing gravitational corrections to βλ do not contribute to the UV divergent behaviour of the S matrix element of phi + phi→ phi + phi. This shows that any physical consequence—such as the existence of asymptotic freedom due to gravitational interactions—drawn from the value of βλ is not physically meaningful.

  7. Drug-nutrient interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lingtak-Neander

    2013-07-01

    Drug-nutrient interactions are defined as physical, chemical, physiologic, or pathophysiologic relationships between a drug and a nutrient. The causes of most clinically significant drug-nutrient interactions are usually multifactorial. Failure to identify and properly manage drug-nutrient interactions can lead to very serious consequences and have a negative impact on patient outcomes. Nevertheless, with thorough review and assessment of the patient's history and treatment regimens and a carefully executed management strategy, adverse events associated with drug-nutrient interactions can be prevented. Based on the physiologic sequence of events after a drug or a nutrient has entered the body and the mechanism of interactions, drug-nutrient interactions can be categorized into 4 main types. Each type of interaction can be managed using similar strategies. The existing data that guide the clinical management of most drug-nutrient interactions are mostly anecdotal experience, uncontrolled observations, and opinions, whereas the science in understanding the mechanism of drug-nutrient interactions remains limited. The challenge for researchers and clinicians is to increase both basic and higher level clinical research in this field to bridge the gap between the science and practice. The research should aim to establish a better understanding of the function, regulation, and substrate specificity of the nutrient-related enzymes and transport proteins present in the gastrointestinal tract, as well as assess how the incidence and management of drug-nutrient interactions can be affected by sex, ethnicity, environmental factors, and genetic polymorphisms. This knowledge can help us develop a true personalized medicine approach in the prevention and management of drug-nutrient interactions.

  8. Effects on chick performance and nutrient digestibility of an endo-xylanase added to a wheat- and rye-based diet in relation to fat source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langhout, D.J.; Schutte, J.B.; Geerse, C.; Kies, A.K.; Jong, J. de; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    1997-01-01

    1. A study with growing chicks investigated the effects of an inclusion of an endo-xylanase preparation (LYXASAN®) to a wheat- and rye-based diet on performance and nutrient digestibility in relation to the fat source. 2. The basal diet contained 500 g wheat and 100 g rye/kg of diet. The basal diet

  9. Relative torque contribution of vastus medialis muscle at different knee angles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, C.J.; Hoddenbach, J.G.; Huurnink, A.; de Haan, A.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: We investigated the relative contribution of the vastus medialis (VM) muscle to total isometric knee extension torque at 10°, 30°, 60° and 90° knee flexion. In the past a more prominent role of the VM muscle at more extended knee angles has been put forward. However, different components of the

  10. The relative contributions of forest growth and areal expansion to forest biomass carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. Li; J. Zhu; H. Hu; Z. Guo; Y. Pan; R. Birdsey; J. Fang

    2016-01-01

    Forests play a leading role in regional and global terrestrial carbon (C) cycles. Changes in C sequestration within forests can be attributed to areal expansion (increase in forest area) and forest growth (increase in biomass density). Detailed assessment of the relative contributions of areal expansion and forest growth to C sinks is crucial to reveal the mechanisms...

  11. Market and Society: How do they relate, and contribute to welfare?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.A. Dolfsma (Wilfred); J. Finch; R. McMaster

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThis paper discusses how markets and society relate to each other. We present and discuss three views: markets as separate, markets as embedded, and markets as impure. One’s stance on the contribution of markets to welfare hinges on the conceptualization of market and other spheres in

  12. Relative contributions of measles virus hemagglutinin- and fusion protein- specific serum antibodies to virus neutralization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.L. de Swart (Rik); S. Yüksel (Selma); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe relative contribution of measles virus hemagglutinin (H)- or fusion protein (F)-specific antibodies to virus neutralization (VN) has not been demonstrated. We have depleted these specific antibodies from sera collected from young adults, who had been vaccinated during childhood, by

  13. Relative contribution of trunk muscles to the stability of the lumbar spine during isometric exertions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholewicki, Jacek; VanVliet, James J

    2002-02-01

    To compare the relative contribution of various trunk muscles to the stability of the lumbar spine. Quantification of spine stability with a biomechanical model. Modern low back rehabilitation techniques focus on muscles that stabilize the lumbar spine. However, the relative contribution of various trunk muscles to spine stability is currently unknown. Eight male subjects performed isometric exertions in trunk flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation, and isometric exertions under vertical trunk loading and in a lifting hold. Each isometric trial was repeated three times at 20%, 40%, and 60% of the maximum trunk flexion force or with a load of 0%, 20%, 40%, and 60% of body weight for the latter two exertions. Surface EMG data from 12 major trunk muscles were used in the biomechanical model to estimate stability of the lumbar spine. A simulation of each trial was performed repeatedly with one of the 10 major trunk muscle groups removed from the model. Relative contribution of each muscle to spine stability was significantly affected by the combination of loading magnitude and direction (3-way interaction). None of the removed muscles reduced spine stability by more than 30%. A single muscle cannot be identified as the most important for the stability of the lumbar spine. Rather, spine stability depends on the relative activation of all trunk muscles and other loading variables. This study will improve our understanding of individual trunk muscles' contribution to overall stability of the lumbar spine.

  14. Contribution of Public Relations to Organizational Decision Making : Insights from the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Mykkänen, Markus; Vos, Marita

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to clarify the contribution of public relations practitioners to organizational decision making and, in particular, how this has been seen in peer-reviewed journals over the last 10 years. After a literature search, 38 articles originating from 26 different journals were further analyzed using thematic analysis. The period investigated ranged from the start of 2002 to October 2012. In the general literature on the roles of public relations practitio...

  15. Contribution of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms) grown under different nutrient conditions to Fe-removal mechanisms in constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaweera, Mahesh W; Kasturiarachchi, Jagath C; Kularatne, Ranil K A; Wijeyekoon, Suren L J

    2008-05-01

    Severe contamination of water resources including groundwater with iron (Fe) due to various anthropogenic activities has been a major environmental problem in industrial areas of Sri Lanka. Hence, the use of the obnoxious weed, water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms) in constructed wetlands (floating aquatic macrophyte-based plant treatment systems) to phytoremediate Fe-rich wastewaters seems to be an appealing option. Although several studies have documented that hyacinths are good metal-accumulating plants none of these studies have documented the ability of this plant grown under different nutrient conditions to remove heavy metals from wastewaters. This paper, therefore, reports the phytoremediation efficiencies of water hyacinth grown under different nutrient conditions for Fe-rich wastewaters in batch-type constructed wetlands. This study was conducted for 15 weeks after 1-week acclimatization by culturing young water hyacinth plants (average height of 20+/-2cm) in 590L capacity fiberglass tanks under different nutrient concentrations of 1-fold [28 and 7.7mg/L of total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorous (TP), respectively], 2-fold, 1/2-fold, 1/4-fold and 1/8-fold with synthetic wastewaters containing 9.27Femg/L. Another set-up of hyacinths containing only Fe as a heavy metal but without any nutrients (i.e., 0-fold) was also studied. A mass balance was carried out to investigate the phytoremediation efficiencies and to determine the different mechanisms governing Fe removal from the wastewaters. Fe removal was largely due to phytoremediation mainly through the process of rhizofiltration and chemical precipitation of Fe2O3 and FeOH3 followed by flocculation and sedimentation. However, chemical precipitation was more significant especially during the first 3 weeks of the study. Plants grown in the 0-fold set-up showed the highest phytoremediation efficiency of 47% during optimum growth at the 6th week with a highest accumulation of 6707Femg/kg dry

  16. Contributions of a retreat weekend to the healing and coping of cancer patients' relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaert, Antonia; Gabos, Theresa; Ballenas, Vincent; Rutledge, Robert D H

    2010-02-01

    Relatives play a key role in the daily support and care of cancer patients. This role, however, can negatively affect relatives physically, psychologically, emotionally, and spiritually, challenging their health and well-being. Consequently, this could inhibit relatives' abilities to continue in their roles as caregivers. Although various studies have examined different interventions for the relatives of cancer patients, no formal research has been published on the role that retreat weekends play in their cancer journeys. In this qualitative study we used semistructured interviews to explore the experiences of 8 relatives who attended a "Skills for Healing Retreat Weekend" in Ontario, Canada. The findings indicate that the retreat, in bringing people together to partake in discussions and activities, fostered a sense of community among the participants. The retreat also had enduring effects, contributing to relatives' ongoing processes of healing as well as providing them with strategies for coping in their roles as caregivers.

  17. Predictable communities of soil bacteria in relation to nutrient concentration and successional stage in a laboratory culture experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Woojin; Kim, Mincheol; Tripathi, Binu M; Kim, Hyoki; Adams, Jonathan M

    2016-06-01

    It is difficult to understand the processes that structure immensely complex bacterial communities in the soil environment, necessitating a simplifying experimental approach. Here, we set up a microcosm culturing experiment with soil bacteria, at a range of nutrient concentrations, and compared these over time to understand the relationship between soil bacterial community structure and time/nutrient concentration. DNA from each replicate was analysed using HiSeq2000 Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. We found that each nutrient treatment, and each time point during the experiment, produces characteristic bacterial communities that occur predictably between replicates. It is clear that within the context of this experiment, many soil bacteria have distinct niches from one another, in terms of both nutrient concentration, and successional time point since a resource first became available. This fine niche differentiation may in part help to explain the coexistence of a diversity of bacteria in soils. In this experiment, we show that the unimodal relationship between nutrient concentration/time and species diversity often reported in communities of larger organisms is also evident in microbial communities. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The relative contribution of processes driving variability in flow, shear, and turbidity over a fringing coral reef: West Maui, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, C.D.; Jaffe, B.E.

    2008-01-01

    High-frequency measurements of waves, currents and water column properties were made on a fringing coral reef off northwest Maui, Hawaii, for 15 months between 2001 and 2003 to aid in understanding the processes governing flow and turbidity over a range of time scales and their contributions to annual budgets. The summer months were characterized by consistent trade winds and small waves, and under these conditions high-frequency internal bores were commonly observed, there was little net flow or turbidity over the fore reef, and over the reef flat net flow was downwind and turbidity was high. When the trade winds waned or the wind direction deviated from the dominant trade wind orientation, strong alongshore flows occurred into the typically dominant wind direction and lower turbidity was observed across the reef. During the winter, when large storm waves impacted the study area, strong offshore flows and high turbidity occurred on the reef flat and over the fore reef. Over the course of a year, trade wind conditions resulted in the greatest net transport of turbid water due to relatively strong currents, moderate overall turbidity, and their frequent occurrence. Throughout the period of study, near-surface current directions over the fore reef varied on average by more than 41?? from those near the seafloor, and the orientation of the currents over the reef flat differed on average by more than 65?? from those observed over the fore reef. This shear occurred over relatively short vertical (order of meters) and horizontal (order of hundreds of meters) scales, causing material distributed throughout the water column, including the particles in suspension causing the turbidity (e.g. sediment or larvae) and/or dissolved nutrients and contaminants, to be transported in different directions under constant oceanographic and meteorologic forcing.

  19. The contribution of Giordano Bruno to the special principle of relativity

    CERN Document Server

    De Angelis, Alesandro

    2015-01-01

    The trial and condemnation of Giordano Bruno was mainly based on arguments of philosophical and theological nature, and therefore di?erent from Galilei's. Such elements contribute to unfairly devalue the scientific contribution of Bruno and do not properly account in particular for his contribution to physics. This paper discusses the contribution of Bruno to the principle of relativity. According to common knowledge, the special principle of relativity was first enunciated in 1632 by Galileo Galilei in his Dialogo sopra i due massimi sistemi del mondo (Dialogue concerning the two chief world systems), using the metaphor today known as "Galileo's ship": in a boat moving at constant speed, the mechanical phenomena can be described by the same laws holding on Earth. We shall show that the same metaphor and some of the examples in Galilei's book were already contained in the dialogue La cena de le Ceneri (The Ash Wednesday Supper) published by Giordano Bruno in 1584. In fact, Giordano Bruno largely anticipated t...

  20. Determination of the essential nutrient requirements of wine-related bacteria from the genera Oenococcus and Lactobacillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrade, Nicolas; Mira de Orduña, Ramón

    2009-07-31

    Wine lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are responsible for the malolactic fermentation (MLF) in wine production. Wine LAB have fastidious nutrient requirements but their auxotrophies remain little studied. The ability of specific wine nutrients to meet the nutritional requirements of wine LAB, and thus support MLF, remains unclear. This work investigated the essential growth requirements of four strains of wine LAB from the genera Oenococcus and Lactobacillus using the single omission technique with a suitable chemically defined medium. For the determination of auxotrophies, at least 3 (and up to 15) subcultures in deficient media were made, and intra- and extracellular nutrient carry over was reduced by small inoculation rates and washing cells 3 times between transfers. This careful methodology revealed more auxotrophies than those described for wine LAB in the literature. The essential bacterial nutrient requirements were found to be strain specific. 10 compounds were essential for all wine LAB tested, the carbon and phosphate source, manganese, as well as several amino acids (proline, arginine and the branched amino acids valine, leucine and isoleucine) and vitamins (nicotinic acid and pantothenic acids). Nucleotides were not essential for any of the bacteria studied. The two Oenococcus oeni strains revealed a larger number of auxotrophies (18 and 21) and had a higher degree of nutritional similarity (86%) defined as percentage of common requirements per maximum total requirements. The two Lactobacillus strains only had 11 and 14 auxotrophies and the similarity was 79%, but both were auxotroph for riboflavin, which was not needed by the O. oeni strains. Data on the common requirements may be used to further study the ability of wines or commercial nutrients to support MLF and to consider the microbiological stability of finished wines. The results indicate that absence of riboflavin in oenological nutrient preparations may allow to create a specific advantage for

  1. Eutrophication of Buttermilk Bay, a cape cod coastal embayment: Concentrations of nutrients and watershed nutrient budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiela, Ivan; Costa, Joseph E.

    1988-07-01

    Nutrient concentrations in Buttermilk Bay, a coastal embayment on the northern end of Buzzards Bay, MA, are higher in the nearshore where salinities are lower. This pattern suggests that freshwater sources may contribute significantly to nutrient inputs into Buttermilk Bay. To evaluate the relative importance of the various sources we estimated inputs of nutrients by each major source into the watershed and into the bay itself. Septic systems contributed about 40% of the nitrogen and phosphorus entering the watershed, with precipitation and fertilizer use adding the remainder. Groundwater transported over 85% of the nitrogen and 75% of the phosphorus entering the bay. Most nutrients entering the watershed failed to reach the bay; uptake by forests, soils, denitrification, and adsorption intercepted two-thirds of the nitrogen and nine-tenths of the phosphorus that entered the watershed. The nutrients that did reach the bay most likely originated from subsoil injections into groundwater by septic tanks, plus some leaching of fertilizers. Buttermilk Bay water has relatively low nutrient concentrations, probably because of uptake of nutrients by macrophytes and because of relatively rapid tidal flushing. Annual budgets of nutrients entering the watershed showed a low nitrogen-to-phosphorus ratio of 6, but passage of nutrients through the watershed raised N/P to 23, probably because of adsorption of PO4 during transit. The N/P ratio of water that leaves the watershed and presumably enters the bay is probably high enough to maintain active growth of nitrogenlimited coastal producers. There is a seasonal shift in N/P in the water column of Buttermilk Bay. N/P exceeded the 16∶1 Redfield ratio during midwinter; the remainder of the year N/P fell below 16∶1. This suggests that annual budgets do not provide sufficiently detailed data with which to interpret nutrient-limitation of producers. Further, some idea of water turnover is also needed to evaluate impact of loading

  2. Contributions of Relational Coordination to Care Management in ACOs: Views of Managerial and Clinical Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundall, Thomas G.; Wu, Frances M.; Lewis, Valerie A.; Schoenherr, Karen E.; Shortell, Stephen M.

    2017-01-01

    Background The accountable care organization (ACO) is a new type of health care organization incentivized to improve quality of care, improve population health, and reduce the total cost of care. An ACO’s success in meeting these objectives will depend greatly upon its ability to improve patient care management. Numerous studies have found relational coordination to be positively associated with key measures of organizational performance in health care organizations, including quality and efficiency. Purpose The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) identify the extent to which ACO leaders are aware of the dimensions of relational coordination, and (2) identify the ways these leaders believe the dimensions influenced care management practices in their organization. Methodology/Approach We performed content analysis of interviews with managerial and clinical leaders from a diverse group of 11 ACOs to assess awareness of relational coordination and identify the ways that dimensions of relational coordination were perceived to influence development of care management practices. Findings ACO leaders mentioned four relational coordination dimensions: shared goals, frequency of communication, timeliness of communication, and problem solving communication. Three dimensions – shared knowledge of team members’ tasks, mutual respect, and accuracy of communication – were not mentioned. Our analysis identified numerous ways leaders believed the four mentioned dimensions contributed to the development of care management, including contributions to standardization of care, patient engagement, coordination of care, and care planning. Discussion We propose two hypotheses for future research on relational coordination and care management. Practice Implications If relational coordination is to have a beneficial influence on ACO performance, organizational leaders must become more aware of relational coordination and its various dimensions and become cognizant of relational

  3. Relational Dimension in Social Education: contributions of psychoanalysis to its understanding and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Junqueira Grandino

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper rescues Social Education practices that emerged by the work of social educators in the 1980s, emphasizing the relational dimension considering the formation of bonds of trust and building horizontal relationships between educators and pupils. From this, the paper clarifies some processes in the light of Psychoanalysis and reflects on contributions of this subject to the field of Social EducationKey words: Social education; children and adolescentes; psychoanalysis

  4. Plant water relations as affected by osmotic potential of the nutrient solution and potential transpiration in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.L.; Marcelis, L.F.M.; Stanghellini, C.

    2004-01-01

    The hypothesis that water flow into tomato fruits is affected similarly by osmotic potential of the nutrient solution and potential transpiration (shoot environment) via their effects on stem water potential, was tested through experiments carried out in two glasshouses where climate was controlled

  5. Nutrient and grazing factors in relation to phytoplankton level in a eutrophic shallow lake: the effect of low macrophyte abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, S S S; Lane, S N

    2002-08-01

    The ability of submerged macrophytes to moderate the structure of food webs with respect to lake eutrophication management has been intensively studied in recent years. Many lake managers have adopted the option of increasing macrophyte abundance in order to restore eutrophic waters, with a view to improve water quality, increase water transparency and reduce phytoplankton biomass. These studies are mostly based upon the comparison of macrophyte-rich and macrophyte-free waters. There is less quantitative information on how different levels of macrophyte abundance, in particular very low levels, influence ecosystem structure, or vice versa, within the same ecosystem. This paper takes a multivariate statistical approach to examine ecosystem function with low macrophyte abundance (ca. 5%) in the context of nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton interaction in a eutrophic shallow lake. It shows that with low levels of macrophyte coverage, phytoplankton biomass was only limited by nutrient (TP and Si) availability, whilst nutrient (Si) as well as grazing (zooplankton and Daphnia) factors were both limiting phytoplankton levels in macrophyte-free waters. With respect to interactions between Daphnia and chlorophyll-a, the results suggest that low macrophyte cover does not result in a reduction of phytoplankton biomass due to the presence of Daphnia. Rather, low macrophyte cover provides a refuge that maintains constant Daphnia predation, so reducing chlorophyll-a fluctuation. These results add credence to the causal interpretation of different interactions amongst nutrients, phytoplankton and zooplankton at very low macrophyte densities.

  6. Diet-dependent net endogenous acid load of vegan diets in relation to food groups and bone health-related nutrients: results from the German Vegan Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ströhle, Alexander; Waldmann, Annika; Koschizke, Jochen; Leitzmann, Claus; Hahn, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Dietary composition has been shown to affect acid-base homeostasis and bone health in humans. We investigated the potential renal acid load (PRAL) and the estimated diet-dependent net acid load (net endogenous acid production, NEAP) in adult vegans and evaluated the relationships between NEAP, food groups and intake of bone health-related nutrients. The German Vegan Study (GVS) is a cross-sectional study. Data from healthy men (n = 67) and women (n = 87), aged 21-75 years, who fulfilled the study criteria (vegan diet for ≥1 year prior to study start; age ≥18 years, and no pregnancy/childbirth during the last 12 months) were included in the analysis. NEAP values were calculated from diet composition using two models: one based on the protein/potassium quotient and another taking into account an anthropometry-based loss of urinary organic anions. Mean daily intakes of phosphorus, potassium, sodium, magnesium and vitamin C were above, and vitamin D and calcium below Dietary Reference Intake (DRI). Regardless of the model used, the diet in the GVS was characterized by a nearly neutral NEAP. A strong correlation was observed between the NEAP values of the two models (r(s) = 0.873, p vegan diets do not affect acid-base homeostasis. With respect to bone health, the significance of this finding needs further investigation. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Supermarket purchase contributes to nutrition-related non-communicable diseases in urban Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin M Demmler

    Full Text Available While undernutrition and related infectious diseases are still pervasive in many developing countries, the prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCD, typically associated with high body mass index (BMI, is rapidly rising. The fast spread of supermarkets and related shifts in diets were identified as possible factors contributing to overweight and obesity in developing countries. Potential effects of supermarkets on people's health have not been analyzed up till now.This study investigates the effects of purchasing food in supermarkets on people's BMI, as well as on health indicators such as fasting blood glucose (FBG, blood pressure (BP, and the metabolic syndrome.This study uses cross-section observational data from urban Kenya. Demographic, anthropometric, and bio-medical data were collected from 550 randomly selected adults. Purchasing food in supermarkets is defined as a binary variable that takes a value of one if any food was purchased in supermarkets during the last 30 days. In a robustness check, the share of food purchased in supermarkets is defined as a continuous variable. Instrumental variable regressions are applied to control for confounding factors and establish causality.Purchasing food in supermarkets contributes to higher BMI (+ 1.8 kg/m2 (P<0.01 and an increased probability (+ 20 percentage points of being overweight or obese (P<0.01. Purchasing food in supermarkets also contributes to higher levels of FBG (+ 0.3 mmol/L (P<0.01 and a higher likelihood (+ 16 percentage points of suffering from pre-diabetes (P<0.01 and the metabolic syndrome (+ 7 percentage points (P<0.01. Effects on BP could not be observed.Supermarkets and their food sales strategies seem to have direct effects on people's health. In addition to increasing overweight and obesity, supermarkets contribute to nutrition-related NCDs. Effects of supermarkets on nutrition and health can mainly be ascribed to changes in the composition of people's food choices.

  8. Supermarket purchase contributes to nutrition-related non-communicable diseases in urban Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmler, Kathrin M; Klasen, Stephan; Nzuma, Jonathan M; Qaim, Matin

    2017-01-01

    While undernutrition and related infectious diseases are still pervasive in many developing countries, the prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCD), typically associated with high body mass index (BMI), is rapidly rising. The fast spread of supermarkets and related shifts in diets were identified as possible factors contributing to overweight and obesity in developing countries. Potential effects of supermarkets on people's health have not been analyzed up till now. This study investigates the effects of purchasing food in supermarkets on people's BMI, as well as on health indicators such as fasting blood glucose (FBG), blood pressure (BP), and the metabolic syndrome. This study uses cross-section observational data from urban Kenya. Demographic, anthropometric, and bio-medical data were collected from 550 randomly selected adults. Purchasing food in supermarkets is defined as a binary variable that takes a value of one if any food was purchased in supermarkets during the last 30 days. In a robustness check, the share of food purchased in supermarkets is defined as a continuous variable. Instrumental variable regressions are applied to control for confounding factors and establish causality. Purchasing food in supermarkets contributes to higher BMI (+ 1.8 kg/m2) (Psupermarkets also contributes to higher levels of FBG (+ 0.3 mmol/L) (PSupermarkets and their food sales strategies seem to have direct effects on people's health. In addition to increasing overweight and obesity, supermarkets contribute to nutrition-related NCDs. Effects of supermarkets on nutrition and health can mainly be ascribed to changes in the composition of people's food choices.

  9. Nutrient content in macrophyta collected from southern Baltic Sea beaches in relation to eutrophication and biogas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucholc, K; Szymczak-Żyła, M; Lubecki, L; Zamojska, A; Hapter, P; Tjernström, E; Kowalewska, G

    2014-03-01

    One of the signs of eutrophication is the excessive growth of opportunistic macroalgae, a worldwide phenomenon also observed in the Baltic Sea. Mats of macroalgae may drift long distances and accumulate at the seashore, considerably decreasing the recreational value of beaches. The matter accumulating at the shore is treated usually as waste. However, it could be used, for example, as a resource for biogas production. The aim of this work was to verify the hypothesis that collecting of macrophyta accumulating on the beach and potential usage of this material for biogas production will decrease nutrient reserves in the sea to counteract eutrophication and the increase in greenhouse effects. Samples of macrophyta were collected in 2011 and 2012 and analysed for their C, N, and P contents, and degree of degradation (% Chl-a in the sum of chloropigments-a); the results were analysed statistically. The nutrient content was studied in macrophyta accumulating on the beach (Sopot, Gulf of Gdańsk, Poland) and for comparison, macrophyta collected from their habitats in less nutrient polluted area (off the Skåre coast, Trelleborg, Sweden). The nutrient content (N, P) in macrophyta depends primarily on their morphology and only secondarily on environmental nutrient pollution. Collecting the macrophyta biomass accumulating on beaches will not significantly change the eutrophication of the Baltic as a whole; any improvements in this respect are likely to be on a local scale only. Collecting macrophyta removes more nitrogen than phosphorous, so this would decrease the N/P ratio in seawater. This macrophyta biomass is a substantial reserve of renewable energy, which could be utilized with the appropriate technology for biomass collection/preservation and biofuel production as an additive to other carbon-rich biomasses. And the biofuel production should be evaluated not only from the standpoint of economic efficiency but also from the environmental point of view. Copyright

  10. A consideration of the relative contributions of different microbial subpopulations to the soil N cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eBottomley

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We examine and discuss literature targeted at identifying active subpopulations of soil microbial communities with regard to the factors that affect the balance between mineralization and immobilization/assimilation of N. Whereas a large fraction (≥50% of soil microbial biomass can immediately respire exogenous substrates, it remains unclear what percentage of both bacterial and fungal populations are capable of expressing their growth potential. The factors controlling the relative amounts of respiratorily responsive biomass versus growth-active biomass will impact the balance between N mineralization and N immobilization. Stable isotope probing of de novo DNA synthesis, and pyrosequence analyses of rRNA:rDNA ratios in soils have identified both numerically dominant and rare microbial taxa showing greatest growth potential. The relative growth responses of numerically dominant or rare members of a soil community could influence the amount of N immobilized into biomass during a growth event. Recent studies have used selective antibiotics targeted at protein synthesis to measure the relative contributions of fungi and bacteria to ammonification and NH4+ consumption, and of NH3 oxidizing archaea (AOA and bacteria (AOB to NH3 oxidation. Evidence was obtained for bacteria to dominate NH4+ assimilation and for fungi to be involved in both consumption of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON and its ammonification. Soil conditions, phase of cropping system, NH4+ availability, and soil pH influence the relative contributions of AOA and AOB to soil nitrification. A recent discovery that AOA can ammonify organic N sources and oxidize it to NO2- serves to illustrate roles for AOA in both the production and consumption of NH3/NH4+. Clearly, much remains to be learned about the factors influencing the relative contributions of bacteria, archaea and fungi to processing organic and inorganic N, and their impact on the balance between mineralization and

  11. Game auction prices are not related to biodiversity contributions of southern African ungulates and large carnivores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalerum, Fredrik; Miranda, Maria

    2016-02-01

    There is an urgent need for human societies to become environmentally sustainable. Because public policy is largely driven by economic processes, quantifications of the relationship between market prices and environmental values can provide important information for developing strategies towards sustainability. Wildlife in southern Africa is often privately owned and traded at game auctions to be utilized for commercial purposes mostly related to tourism. This market offers an interesting opportunity to evaluate how market prices relate to biologically meaningful species characteristics. In this market, prices were not correlated with species contributions to either phylogenetic or functional diversity, and species contributions to phylogenetic or functional diversity did not influence the trends in prices over time for the past 20 years. Since this economic market did not seem to appreciate evolutionary or ecologically relevant characteristics, we question if the game tourism market may contribute towards biodiversity conservation in southern Africa. We suggest that market prices in general may have limited values as guides for directing conservation and environmental management. We further suggest that there is a need to evaluate what humans value in biological organisms, and how potentially necessary shifts in such values can be instigated.

  12. Estimating relative contributions of primary and secondary sources of ambient nitrated and oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Shaojie; Du, Wei; Shen, Guofeng; Li, Bengang; Liu, Junfeng; Cheng, Hefa; Xing, Baoshan; Tao, Shu

    2017-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) derivatives like nitrated and oxygenated PAHs (nitro- and oxy-PAHs) are of growing interests due to their direct and potentially high toxic properties. PAHs derivatives can be produced from primary sources and also can derive from photochemical reactions, however, works about the quantitative contributions of primary and secondary sources are scarce. In this study, levels and seasonal distributions of ambient nitro- and oxy-PAHs were studied in a megacity Nanjing located in East China and evaluated for relative contributions of different sources. The annual average concentrations of most PAH derivatives were generally lower than the levels found in north China, but higher than the levels reported for south China. The relative contributions of secondary formation ranged from 10% to 47% for nitro-PAHs and ∼60% for oxy-PAHs. The study suggested that typical source apportionment technologies could be adopted to investigate primary and secondary sources of PAHs derivatives when derivatives are simultaneously measured with parent PAHs and other source markers. Future studies are interesting to develop, evaluate and compare different source apportionment methodologies for PAHs derivatives.

  13. The relative contributions of anthropometric variables to vertical jumping ability and leg power in Tunisian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouichaoui, Chirine; Trabelsi, Yassine; Bouhlel, Ezzdine; Tabka, Zouhair; Dogui, Mohamed; Richalet, Jean Paul; Buvry, Annick Bouchez

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relative contributions of anthropometric variables to vertical jumping ability and leg power and to establish reference values of vertical jumping parameters in athletic Tunisian children aged 7-13 years in both sexes. Three hundred and ninety-one athletic Tunisian children (208 boys and 183 girls) aged 7-13 years were randomly selected to participate in our study. They were asked to perform squat jumps and countermovement jumps. Jump heights and leg power were simultaneously provided by the optojump device. Full and stepwise regression models were calculated to identify which anthropometric parameters significantly contributed to performance variables. The multiple regressions showed that age, weight, standing height and fat-free mass were the predictors of jumping performance. The results may help in verifying the effectiveness of a specific training program and detecting highly talented athletes.

  14. Relative contribution of health-related behaviours and chronic diseases to the socioeconomic patterning of low-grade inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccio, Marialaura; Di Castelnuovo, Augusto; Pounis, George; De Curtis, Amalia; Costanzo, Simona; Persichillo, Mariarosaria; Cerletti, Chiara; Donati, Maria Benedetta; de Gaetano, Giovanni; Iacoviello, Licia

    2017-06-01

    To test the association of low-grade inflammation with socioeconomic status (SES) and determine the relative contribution of prevalent chronic diseases and health-related behaviours in explaining such association. Cross-sectional analysis on 19,867 subjects (age ≥35, 48.1% men) recruited within the Moli-sani study from 2005 to 2010 (Italy). A score of low-grade inflammation, including platelet and leukocyte counts, the granulocyte-to-lymphocyte ratio, and C-reactive protein was applied. SES was measured by education, household income, and occupational social class. Low SES was associated with elevated levels of low-grade inflammation. Health behaviours (including adiposity, smoking, physical activity, and Mediterranean diet adherence) explained 53.5, 53.9, and 84.9% of the association between social class, income, and education with low-grade inflammation, respectively. Adiposity and body mass index showed a prominent role, while prevalent chronic diseases and conditions only marginally attenuated SES inequalities in inflammation. Low-grade inflammation was socioeconomically patterned in a large Mediterranean population. Potentially modifiable behavioural factors explained the greatest part of this association with a leading contribution of adiposity, body mass index, and physical activity.

  15. Riparian and Associated Habitat Characteristics Related to Nutrient Concentrations and Biological Responses of Small Streams in Selected Agricultural Areas, United States, 2003-04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelt, Ronald B.; Munn, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    Physical factors, including both in-stream and riparian habitat characteristics that limit biomass or otherwise regulate aquatic biological condition, have been identified by previous studies. However, linking the ecological significance of nutrient enrichment to habitat or landscape factors that could allow for improved management of streams has proved to be a challenge in many regions, including agricultural landscapes, where many ecological stressors are strong and the variability among watersheds typically is large. Riparian and associated habitat characteristics were sampled once during 2003-04 for an intensive ecological and nutrients study of small perennial streams in five contrasting agricultural landscapes across the United States to determine how biological communities and ecosystem processes respond to varying levels of nutrient enrichment. Nutrient concentrations were determined in stream water at two different sampling times per site and biological samples were collected once per site near the time of habitat characterization. Data for 141 sampling sites were compiled, representing five study areas, located in parts of the Delmarva Peninsula (Delaware and Maryland), Georgia, Indiana, Ohio, Nebraska, and Washington. This report examines the available data for riparian and associated habitat characteristics to address questions related to study-unit contrasts, spatial scale-related differences, multivariate correlation structure, and bivariate relations between selected habitat characteristics and either stream nutrient conditions or biological responses. Riparian and associated habitat characteristics were summarized and categorized into 22 groups of habitat variables, with 11 groups representing land-use and land-cover characteristics and 11 groups representing other riparian or in-stream habitat characteristics. Principal components analysis was used to identify a reduced set of habitat variables that describe most of the variability among the

  16. Relative contribution of groundwater to plant transpiration estimated with stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbeta, Adrià; Peñuelas, Josep

    2017-09-05

    Water stored underground in the saturated and subsurface zones below the soil are important sources of water for plants in water-limited ecosystems. The presence of deep-rooted plants worldwide, however, suggests that the use of groundwater is not restricted to arid and seasonally dry ecosystems. We compiled the available data (71 species) on the relative contribution of groundwater to plant water estimated using stable isotopes and mixing models, which provided information about relative groundwater use, and analyzed their variation across different climates, seasons, plant types, edaphic conditions, and landscape positions. Plant use of groundwater was more likely at sites with a pronounced dry season, and represented on average 49 per cent of transpired water in dry seasons and 28 per cent in wet seasons. The relative contribution of groundwater to plant-water uptake was higher on rocky substrates (saprolite, fractured bedrock), which had reduced groundwater uptake when this source was deep belowground. In addition, we found that the connectivity between groundwater pools and plant water may be quantitatively larger and more widespread than reported by recent global estimations based on isotopic averaged values. Earth System Models should account for the feedbacks between transpiration and groundwater recharge.

  17. Relative Contribution of Arms and Legs in 30 s Fully Tethered Front Crawl Swimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro G. Morouço

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relative contribution of arm stroke and leg kicking to maximal fully tethered front crawl swimming performance remains to be solved. Twenty-three national level young swimmers (12 male and 11 female randomly performed 3 bouts of 30 s fully tethered swimming (using the whole body, only the arm stroke, and only the leg kicking. A load-cell system permitted the continuous measurement of the exerted forces, and swimming velocity was calculated from the time taken to complete a 50 m front crawl swim. As expected, with no restrictions swimmers were able to exert higher forces than that using only their arm stroke or leg kicking. Estimated relative contributions of arm stroke and leg kicking were 70.3% versus 29.7% for males and 66.6% versus 33.4% for females, with 15.6% and 13.1% force deficits, respectively. To obtain higher velocities, male swimmers are highly dependent on the maximum forces they can exert with the arm stroke (r=0.77, P<0.01, whereas female swimmers swimming velocity is more related to whole-body mean forces (r=0.81, P<0.01. The obtained results point that leg kicking plays an important role over short duration high intensity bouts and that the used methodology may be useful to identify strength and/or coordination flaws.

  18. The Brain-Gut Axis Contributes to Neuroprogression in Stress-Related Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Kieran; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing emphasis on the relationship between the complexity and diversity of the microorganisms that inhabit our gut (human gastrointestinal microbiota) and brain health. The microbiota-gut-brain axis is a dynamic matrix of tissues and organs including the brain, glands, gut, immune cells, and gastrointestinal microbiota that communicate in a complex multidirectional manner to maintain homeostasis. Changes in this environment may contribute to the neuroprogression of stress-related disorders by altering physiological processes including hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation, neurotransmitter systems, immune function, and inflammatory responses. While appropriate, coordinated physiological responses, such as immune or stress responses, are necessary for survival, the contribution of repeated or chronic exposure to stress may predispose individuals to a more vulnerable state leaving them more susceptible to stress-related disorders. In this chapter, the involvement of the gastrointestinal microbiota in stress- and immune-mediated modulation of neuroendocrine, immune, and neurotransmitter systems and the consequential behavior is considered. We also focus on the mechanisms by which commensal gut microbiota can regulate neuroinflammation and further aim to exploit our understanding of their role in the effects of the microbiota-gut-brain axis on the neuroprogression of stress-related disorders as a consequence of neuroinflammatory processes. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Contributions of Science Education for construction of a positive alterity in relation to indigenous culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleise Helen Botelho Koeppe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the contributions of science education for building a positive alterity in relation to current Brazilian indigenous groups. Remote sensing and ethnobiology were the pedagogic tools used to achieve this goal. We analyzed the material produced by three research subjects, who exemplify the processes undertaken in class, in order to identify the epistemological obstacles that may hinder the process of reformulation of stereotypes and prejudices. We conclude that building a positive alterity is a gradual and continuous process and that different approaches in science education, accompanied by critical questioning can lead to overcoming epistemological obstacles constructed by school culture.

  20. Relative Contribution of Volume and Surface-Plasma Generation of Negative Ions in Gas Discharges

    CERN Document Server

    Dudnikov, Vadim

    2005-01-01

    The relative contribution of volume and surface-plasma generation of extracted ?- ions in gas discharge sources will be analyzed. At the present time, it is well known that surface-plasma generation of extracted ?- ion is dominate above volume processes in discharges with admixture of cesium or other catalysts with low ionization potential. We will attract attention to evidences, that surface-plasma generation can be enhanced in high density discharges without cesium after electrode activation by high temperature conditioning in discharge. A diffusion of impurity with a low ionization potential can be a reason of observed enhancement of H-

  1. Discriminating between west-side sources of nutrients and organiccarbon contributing to algal growth and oxygen demand in the San JoaquinRiver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wstringfellow@lbl.gov

    2002-07-24

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the Salt and Mud Slough tributaries as sources of oxygen demanding materials entering the San Joaquin River (SJR). Mud Slough and Salt Slough are the main drainage arteries of the Grasslands Watershed, a 370,000-acre area west of the SJR, covering portions of Merced and Fresno Counties. Although these tributaries of the SJR are typically classified as agricultural, they are also heavily influenced by Federal, State and private wetlands. The majority of the surface water used for both irrigation and wetland management in the Grassland Watershed is imported from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta through the Delta-Mendota Canal. In this study, they measured algal biomass (as chlorophyll a), organic carbon, ammonia, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), and other measures of water quality in drainage from both agricultural and wetland sources at key points in the Salt Slough and Mud Slough tributaries. This report includes the data collected between June 16th and October 4th, 2001. The objective of the study was to compare agricultural and wetland drainage in the Grasslands Watershed and to determine the relative importance of each return flow source to the concentration and mass loading of oxygen demanding materials entering the SJR. Additionally, they compared the quality of water exiting our study area to water entering our study area. This study has demonstrated that Salt and Mud Sloughs both contribute significant amounts of oxygen demand to the SJR. Together, these tributaries could account for 35% of the oxygen demand observed below their confluence with the SJR. This study has characterized the sources of oxygen demanding materials entering Mud Slough and evaluated the oxygen demand conditions in Salt Slough. Salt Slough was found to be the dominant source of oxygen demand load in the study area, because of the higher flows in this tributary. The origins of oxygen demand in Salt Slough still remain largely uninvestigated

  2. Motivations for contributing to health-related articles on Wikipedia: an interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farič, Nuša; Potts, Henry W W

    2014-12-03

    Wikipedia is one of the most accessed sources of health information online. The current English-language Wikipedia contains more than 28,000 articles pertaining to health. The aim was to characterize individuals' motivations for contributing to health content on the English-language Wikipedia. A set of health-related articles were randomly selected and recent contributors invited to complete an online questionnaire and follow-up interview (by Skype, by email, or face-to-face). Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using thematic analysis and a realist grounded theory approach. A total of 32 Wikipedians (31 men) completed the questionnaire and 17 were interviewed. Those completing the questionnaire had a mean age of 39 (range 12-59) years; 16 had a postgraduate qualification, 10 had or were currently studying for an undergraduate qualification, 3 had no more than secondary education, and 3 were still in secondary education. In all, 15 were currently working in a health-related field (primarily clinicians). The median period for which they have been an active editing Wikipedia was 3-5 years. Of this group, 12 were in the United States, 6 were in the United Kingdom, 4 were in Canada, and the remainder from another 8 countries. Two-thirds spoke more than 1 language and 90% (29/32) were also active contributors in domains other than health. Wikipedians in this study were identified as health professionals, professionals with specific health interests, students, and individuals with health problems. Based on the interviews, their motivations for editing health-related content were summarized in 5 strongly interrelated categories: education (learning about subjects by editing articles), help (wanting to improve and maintain Wikipedia), responsibility (responsibility, often a professional responsibility, to provide good quality health information to readers), fulfillment (editing Wikipedia as a fun, relaxing, engaging, and rewarding activity), and positive attitude to

  3. Nutrient content in macrophyta collected from southern Baltic Sea beaches in relation to eutrophication and biogas production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucholc, K.; Szymczak-Żyła, M.; Lubecki, L. [Marine Pollution Laboratory, Institute of Oceanology, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Powstańców Warszawy 55, 81-712 Sopot (Poland); Zamojska, A. [University of Gdańsk, Department of Econometrics, ul. Armii Krajowej 101, 81-824 Sopot (Poland); Hapter, P. [Marine Pollution Laboratory, Institute of Oceanology, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Powstańców Warszawy 55, 81-712 Sopot (Poland); Tjernström, E. [Environmental Department, Trelleborg Municipality, Algatan 13, 231 83 Trelleborg (Sweden); Kowalewska, G. [Marine Pollution Laboratory, Institute of Oceanology, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Powstańców Warszawy 55, 81-712 Sopot (Poland)

    2014-03-01

    One of the signs of eutrophication is the excessive growth of opportunistic macroalgae, a worldwide phenomenon also observed in the Baltic Sea. Mats of macroalgae may drift long distances and accumulate at the seashore, considerably decreasing the recreational value of beaches. The matter accumulating at the shore is treated usually as waste. However, it could be used, for example, as a resource for biogas production. The aim of this work was to verify the hypothesis that collecting of macrophyta accumulating on the beach and potential usage of this material for biogas production will decrease nutrient reserves in the sea to counteract eutrophication and the increase in greenhouse effects. Samples of macrophyta were collected in 2011 and 2012 and analysed for their C, N, and P contents, and degree of degradation (% Chl-a in the sum of chloropigments-a); the results were analysed statistically. The nutrient content was studied in macrophyta accumulating on the beach (Sopot, Gulf of Gdańsk, Poland) and for comparison, macrophyta collected from their habitats in less nutrient polluted area (off the Skåre coast, Trelleborg, Sweden). The nutrient content (N, P) in macrophyta depends primarily on their morphology and only secondarily on environmental nutrient pollution. Collecting the macrophyta biomass accumulating on beaches will not significantly change the eutrophication of the Baltic as a whole; any improvements in this respect are likely to be on a local scale only. Collecting macrophyta removes more nitrogen than phosphorous, so this would decrease the N/P ratio in seawater. This macrophyta biomass is a substantial reserve of renewable energy, which could be utilized with the appropriate technology for biomass collection/preservation and biofuel production as an additive to other carbon-rich biomasses. And the biofuel production should be evaluated not only from the standpoint of economic efficiency but also from the environmental point of view. - Highlights:

  4. 26 CFR 1.6050L-2 - Information returns by donees relating to qualified intellectual property contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... qualified intellectual property contributions. 1.6050L-2 Section 1.6050L-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... § 1.6050L-2 Information returns by donees relating to qualified intellectual property contributions... receives or accrues net income during a taxable year from any qualified intellectual property contribution...

  5. Dispersion relation for hadronic light-by-light scattering: two-pion contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, Gilberto; Hoferichter, Martin; Procura, Massimiliano; Stoffer, Peter

    2017-04-01

    In this third paper of a series dedicated to a dispersive treatment of the hadronic light-by-light (HLbL) tensor, we derive a partial-wave formulation for two-pion intermediate states in the HLbL contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon ( g - 2) μ , including a detailed discussion of the unitarity relation for arbitrary partial waves. We show that obtaining a final expression free from unphysical helicity partial waves is a subtle issue, which we thoroughly clarify. As a by-product, we obtain a set of sum rules that could be used to constrain future calculations of γ ∗ γ ∗ → ππ. We validate the formalism extensively using the pion-box contribution, defined by two-pion intermediate states with a pion-pole left-hand cut, and demonstrate how the full known result is reproduced when resumming the partial waves. Using dispersive fits to high-statistics data for the pion vector form factor, we provide an evaluation of the full pion box, a μ π - box = - 15.9(2) × 10- 11. As an application of the partial-wave formalism, we present a first calculation of ππ-rescattering effects in HLbL scattering, with γ ∗ γ ∗ → ππ helicity partial waves constructed dispersively using ππ phase shifts derived from the inverse-amplitude method. In this way, the isospin-0 part of our calculation can be interpreted as the contribution of the f 0(500) to HLbL scattering in ( g - 2) μ . We argue that the contribution due to charged-pion rescattering implements corrections related to the corresponding pion polarizability and show that these are moderate. Our final result for the sum of pion-box contribution and its S-wave rescattering corrections reads a μ π - box + a μ, J = 0 ππ, π - pole LHC = - 24(1) × 10- 11.

  6. Nutrient sources and composition of recent algal blooms and eutrophication in the northern Jiulong River, Southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Cao, Wenzhi; Su, Caixia; Hong, Huasheng

    2011-01-01

    The natural process of eutrophication is accelerated by human activities worldwide that interrupt nutrient biogeochemical cycles. Three algal bloom events have been monitored in the northern tributary of the Jiulong River since 2009. The inflection points in a robust locally-weighted regression analysis (LOESS) of the relationship between TN and TP concentrations in the river water, and a TN:TP comparison with nutrient source loadings, suggested that both external loading and internal nutrient cycling contributed to these algal blooms. Nutrient release from the sediments may have played an important role in regulating the nutrients in the overlying water column. In particular, excessive nutrient inputs from various sources and ubiquitous river damming caused further accumulation of the nutrient loading. In-situ autochthonous primary production was enhanced in this relatively stable "river" to "lake" water body. Thus, attention must be paid to the effects of river damming and the consequent internal nutrient release. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Disentangling contributions of point and line defects in the Raman spectra of graphene-related materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cançado, Luiz Gustavo; Gomes da Silva, Mateus; Martins Ferreira, Erlon H.; Hof, Ferdinand; Kampioti, Katerina; Huang, Kai; Pénicaud, Alain; Achete, Carlos Alberto; Capaz, Rodrigo B.; Jorio, Ado

    2017-06-01

    The transition from graphene to a fully disordered sp2 carbon material can be idealized by either cutting graphene into smaller and smaller pieces, or adding more and more point defects. In other words, from the dimensionality standpoint, defects in two-dimensional (2D) systems can be either one- (1D) or zero-dimensional (0D). From an application point of view, both in terms of bottom-up as well as top-down approaches, the discrimination between these two structural disorder in two-dimensional systems is urgently desired. In graphene, both types of defects produce changes in the Raman spectrum, but identifying separately the contribution from each defect-type has not yet been achieved. Here we show that a diagram can be built for disentangling contributions of point-like and line-like defects to the Raman spectra of graphene-related materials embracing, from the topology point of view, all possible structures from perfect to fully disordered sp2 bonded carbons. Two sets of graphene-related samples, produced by well-established protocols that generate either 0D or 1D defects in a controlled way, are analysed with our model and used to parameterize the limiting values of the phase space. We then discuss the limitations and apply our new methodology to analyse the structure of two-dimensional nanocarbons generated from renewable gas, used to produce inks and conducting coatings.

  8. Relative Contributions of Various Cellular Mechanisms to Loss of Algae during Cnidarian Bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieri, Tamaki; Onishi, Masayuki; Xiang, Tingting; Grossman, Arthur R; Pringle, John R

    2016-01-01

    When exposed to stress such as high seawater temperature, corals and other cnidarians can bleach due to loss of symbiotic algae from the host tissue and/or loss of pigments from the algae. Although the environmental conditions that trigger bleaching are reasonably well known, its cellular and molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Previous studies have reported the occurrence of at least four different cellular mechanisms for the loss of symbiotic algae from the host tissue: in situ degradation of algae, exocytic release of algae from the host, detachment of host cells containing algae, and death of host cells containing algae. The relative contributions of these several mechanisms to bleaching remain unclear, and it is also not known whether these relative contributions change in animals subjected to different types and/or durations of stresses. In this study, we used a clonal population of the small sea anemone Aiptasia, exposed individuals to various precisely controlled stress conditions, and quantitatively assessed the several possible bleaching mechanisms in parallel. Under all stress conditions tested, except for acute cold shock at 4°C, expulsion of intact algae from the host cells appeared to be by far the predominant mechanism of bleaching. During acute cold shock, in situ degradation of algae and host-cell detachment also became quantitatively significant, and the algae released under these conditions appeared to be severely damaged.

  9. The relative contributions of facial shape and surface information to perceptions of attractiveness and dominance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrance, Jaimie S; Wincenciak, Joanna; Hahn, Amanda C; DeBruine, Lisa M; Jones, Benedict C

    2014-01-01

    Although many studies have investigated the facial characteristics that influence perceptions of others' attractiveness and dominance, the majority of these studies have focused on either the effects of shape information or surface information alone. Consequently, the relative contributions of facial shape and surface characteristics to attractiveness and dominance perceptions are unclear. To address this issue, we investigated the relationships between ratings of original versions of faces and ratings of versions in which either surface information had been standardized (i.e., shape-only versions) or shape information had been standardized (i.e., surface-only versions). For attractiveness and dominance judgments of both male and female faces, ratings of shape-only and surface-only versions independently predicted ratings of the original versions of faces. The correlations between ratings of original and shape-only versions and between ratings of original and surface-only versions differed only in two instances. For male attractiveness, ratings of original versions were more strongly related to ratings of surface-only than shape-only versions, suggesting that surface information is particularly important for men's facial attractiveness. The opposite was true for female physical dominance, suggesting that shape information is particularly important for women's facial physical dominance. In summary, our results indicate that both facial shape and surface information contribute to judgments of others' attractiveness and dominance, suggesting that it may be important to consider both sources of information in research on these topics.

  10. Thiamin and riboflavin vitamers in human milk: effects of lipid-based nutrient supplementation and stage of lactation on vitamer secretion and contributions to total vitamin content

    Science.gov (United States)

    While thiamin and riboflavin in breast milk have been analyzed for over 50 years, less attention has been given to the different forms of each vitamin. Thiamin-monophosphate (TMP) and free thiamin contribute to total thiamin content; flavin adenine-dinucleotide (FAD) and free riboflavin are the main...

  11. Nutrient uplift in a cyclonic eddy increases diversity, primary productivity and iron demand of microbial communities relative to a western boundary current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina A. Doblin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The intensification of western boundary currents in the global ocean will potentially influence meso-scale eddy generation, and redistribute microbes and their associated ecological and biogeochemical functions. To understand eddy-induced changes in microbial community composition as well as how they control growth, we targeted the East Australian Current (EAC region to sample microbes in a cyclonic (cold-core eddy (CCE and the adjacent EAC. Phototrophic and diazotrophic microbes were more diverse (2–10 times greater Shannon index in the CCE relative to the EAC, and the cell size distribution in the CCE was dominated (67% by larger micro-plankton $(\\geq 20\\lrm{\\mu }\\mathrm{m}$ ≥ 20 μ m , as opposed to pico- and nano-sized cells in the EAC. Nutrient addition experiments determined that nitrogen was the principal nutrient limiting growth in the EAC, while iron was a secondary limiting nutrient in the CCE. Among the diazotrophic community, heterotrophic NifH gene sequences dominated in the EAC and were attributable to members of the gamma-, beta-, and delta-proteobacteria, while the CCE contained both phototrophic and heterotrophic diazotrophs, including Trichodesmium, UCYN-A and gamma-proteobacteria. Daily sampling of incubation bottles following nutrient amendment captured a cascade of effects at the cellular, population and community level, indicating taxon-specific differences in the speed of response of microbes to nutrient supply. Nitrogen addition to the CCE community increased picoeukaryote chlorophyll a quotas within 24 h, suggesting that nutrient uplift by eddies causes a ‘greening’ effect as well as an increase in phytoplankton biomass. After three days in both the EAC and CCE, diatoms increased in abundance with macronutrient (N, P, Si and iron amendment, whereas haptophytes and phototrophic dinoflagellates declined. Our results indicate that cyclonic eddies increase delivery of nitrogen to the upper ocean to potentially

  12. Preinjury somatization symptoms contribute to clinical recovery after sport-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Lindsay D; Tarima, Sergey; LaRoche, Ashley A; Hammeke, Thomas A; Barr, William B; Guskiewicz, Kevin; Randolph, Christopher; McCrea, Michael A

    2016-05-17

    To determine the degree to which preinjury and acute postinjury psychosocial and injury-related variables predict symptom duration following sport-related concussion. A total of 2,055 high school and collegiate athletes completed preseason evaluations. Concussed athletes (n = 127) repeated assessments serially (history variables; baseline psychological, neurocognitive, and balance functioning; acute injury characteristics; and postinjury clinical measures. Preinjury somatic symptom score (Brief Symptom Inventory-18 somatization scale) was the strongest premorbid predictor of symptom duration. Acute (24-hour) postconcussive symptom burden (Sport Concussion Assessment Tool-3 symptom severity) was the best injury-related predictor of recovery. These 2 predictors were moderately correlated (r = 0.51). Path analyses indicated that the relationship between preinjury somatization symptoms and symptom recovery was mediated by postinjury concussive symptoms. Preinjury somatization symptoms contribute to reported postconcussive symptom recovery via their influence on acute postconcussive symptoms. The findings highlight the relevance of premorbid psychological factors in postconcussive recovery, even in a healthy athlete sample relatively free of psychopathology or medical comorbidities. Future research should elucidate the neurobiopsychosocial mechanisms that explain the role of this individual difference variable in outcome following concussive injury. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  13. Nutrient Patterns and Their Food Sources in an International Study Setting: Report from the EPIC Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskal, Aurelie; Pisa, Pedro T.; Ferrari, Pietro; Byrnes, Graham; Freisling, Heinz; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Cadeau, Claire; Nailler, Laura; Wendt, Andrea; Kühn, Tilman; Boeing, Heiner; Buijsse, Brian; Tjønneland, Anne; Halkjær, Jytte; Dahm, Christina C.; Chiuve, Stephanie E.; Quirós, Jose R.; Buckland, Genevieve; Molina-Montes, Esther; Amiano, Pilar; Huerta Castaño, José M.; Gurrea, Aurelio Barricarte; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Lentjes, Marleen A.; Key, Timothy J.; Romaguera, Dora; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Bamia, Christina; Orfanos, Philippos; Palli, Domenico; Pala, Valeria; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; de Magistris, Maria Santucci; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Ocké, Marga C.; Beulens, Joline W. J.; Ericson, Ulrika; Drake, Isabel; Nilsson, Lena M.; Winkvist, Anna; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Hjartåker, Anette; Riboli, Elio; Slimani, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    Background Compared to food patterns, nutrient patterns have been rarely used particularly at international level. We studied, in the context of a multi-center study with heterogeneous data, the methodological challenges regarding pattern analyses. Methodology/Principal Findings We identified nutrient patterns from food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Study and used 24-hour dietary recall (24-HDR) data to validate and describe the nutrient patterns and their related food sources. Associations between lifestyle factors and the nutrient patterns were also examined. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied on 23 nutrients derived from country-specific FFQ combining data from all EPIC centers (N = 477,312). Harmonized 24-HDRs available for a representative sample of the EPIC populations (N = 34,436) provided accurate mean group estimates of nutrients and foods by quintiles of pattern scores, presented graphically. An overall PCA combining all data captured a good proportion of the variance explained in each EPIC center. Four nutrient patterns were identified explaining 67% of the total variance: Principle component (PC) 1 was characterized by a high contribution of nutrients from plant food sources and a low contribution of nutrients from animal food sources; PC2 by a high contribution of micro-nutrients and proteins; PC3 was characterized by polyunsaturated fatty acids and vitamin D; PC4 was characterized by calcium, proteins, riboflavin, and phosphorus. The nutrients with high loadings on a particular pattern as derived from country-specific FFQ also showed high deviations in their mean EPIC intakes by quintiles of pattern scores when estimated from 24-HDR. Center and energy intake explained most of the variability in pattern scores. Conclusion/Significance The use of 24-HDR enabled internal validation and facilitated the interpretation of the nutrient patterns derived from FFQs

  14. Nutrient patterns and their food sources in an International Study Setting: report from the EPIC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskal, Aurelie; Pisa, Pedro T; Ferrari, Pietro; Byrnes, Graham; Freisling, Heinz; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Cadeau, Claire; Nailler, Laura; Wendt, Andrea; Kühn, Tilman; Boeing, Heiner; Buijsse, Brian; Tjønneland, Anne; Halkjær, Jytte; Dahm, Christina C; Chiuve, Stephanie E; Quirós, Jose R; Buckland, Genevieve; Molina-Montes, Esther; Amiano, Pilar; Huerta Castaño, José M; Gurrea, Aurelio Barricarte; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Lentjes, Marleen A; Key, Timothy J; Romaguera, Dora; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Bamia, Christina; Orfanos, Philippos; Palli, Domenico; Pala, Valeria; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; de Magistris, Maria Santucci; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Ocké, Marga C; Beulens, Joline W J; Ericson, Ulrika; Drake, Isabel; Nilsson, Lena M; Winkvist, Anna; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Hjartåker, Anette; Riboli, Elio; Slimani, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    Compared to food patterns, nutrient patterns have been rarely used particularly at international level. We studied, in the context of a multi-center study with heterogeneous data, the methodological challenges regarding pattern analyses. We identified nutrient patterns from food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Study and used 24-hour dietary recall (24-HDR) data to validate and describe the nutrient patterns and their related food sources. Associations between lifestyle factors and the nutrient patterns were also examined. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied on 23 nutrients derived from country-specific FFQ combining data from all EPIC centers (N = 477,312). Harmonized 24-HDRs available for a representative sample of the EPIC populations (N = 34,436) provided accurate mean group estimates of nutrients and foods by quintiles of pattern scores, presented graphically. An overall PCA combining all data captured a good proportion of the variance explained in each EPIC center. Four nutrient patterns were identified explaining 67% of the total variance: Principle component (PC) 1 was characterized by a high contribution of nutrients from plant food sources and a low contribution of nutrients from animal food sources; PC2 by a high contribution of micro-nutrients and proteins; PC3 was characterized by polyunsaturated fatty acids and vitamin D; PC4 was characterized by calcium, proteins, riboflavin, and phosphorus. The nutrients with high loadings on a particular pattern as derived from country-specific FFQ also showed high deviations in their mean EPIC intakes by quintiles of pattern scores when estimated from 24-HDR. Center and energy intake explained most of the variability in pattern scores. The use of 24-HDR enabled internal validation and facilitated the interpretation of the nutrient patterns derived from FFQs in term of food sources. These outcomes open research opportunities and

  15. Nutrient patterns and their food sources in an International Study Setting: report from the EPIC study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelie Moskal

    Full Text Available Compared to food patterns, nutrient patterns have been rarely used particularly at international level. We studied, in the context of a multi-center study with heterogeneous data, the methodological challenges regarding pattern analyses.We identified nutrient patterns from food frequency questionnaires (FFQ in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC Study and used 24-hour dietary recall (24-HDR data to validate and describe the nutrient patterns and their related food sources. Associations between lifestyle factors and the nutrient patterns were also examined. Principal component analysis (PCA was applied on 23 nutrients derived from country-specific FFQ combining data from all EPIC centers (N = 477,312. Harmonized 24-HDRs available for a representative sample of the EPIC populations (N = 34,436 provided accurate mean group estimates of nutrients and foods by quintiles of pattern scores, presented graphically. An overall PCA combining all data captured a good proportion of the variance explained in each EPIC center. Four nutrient patterns were identified explaining 67% of the total variance: Principle component (PC 1 was characterized by a high contribution of nutrients from plant food sources and a low contribution of nutrients from animal food sources; PC2 by a high contribution of micro-nutrients and proteins; PC3 was characterized by polyunsaturated fatty acids and vitamin D; PC4 was characterized by calcium, proteins, riboflavin, and phosphorus. The nutrients with high loadings on a particular pattern as derived from country-specific FFQ also showed high deviations in their mean EPIC intakes by quintiles of pattern scores when estimated from 24-HDR. Center and energy intake explained most of the variability in pattern scores.The use of 24-HDR enabled internal validation and facilitated the interpretation of the nutrient patterns derived from FFQs in term of food sources. These outcomes open research

  16. Nutrient acquisition by mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederweis, Michael

    2008-03-01

    The growth and nutritional requirements of mycobacteria have been intensively studied since the discovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis more than a century ago. However, the identity of many transporters for essential nutrients of M. tuberculosis and other mycobacteria is still unknown despite a wealth of genomic data and the availability of sophisticated genetic tools. Recently, considerable progress has been made in recognizing that two lipid permeability barriers have to be overcome in order for a nutrient molecule to reach the cytoplasm of mycobacteria. Uptake processes are discussed by comparing M. tuberculosis with Mycobacterium smegmatis. For example, M. tuberculosis has only five recognizable carbohydrate transporters in the inner membrane, while M. smegmatis has 28 such transporters at its disposal. The specificities of inner-membrane transporters for sulfate, phosphate and some amino acids have been determined. Outer-membrane channel proteins in both organisms are thought to contribute to nutrient uptake. In particular, the Msp porins have been shown to be required for uptake of carbohydrates, amino acids and phosphate by M. smegmatis. The set of porins also appears to be different for M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis. These differences likely reflect the lifestyles of these mycobacteria and the availability of nutrients in their natural habitats: the soil and the human body. The comprehensive identification and the biochemical and structural characterization of the nutrient transporters of M. tuberculosis will not only promote our understanding of the physiology of this important human pathogen, but might also be exploited to improve tuberculosis chemotherapy.

  17. Nutrient sources and transport along urban flowpaths to aquatic ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, J. C.; Janke, B.; Baker, L. A.; Hobbie, S. E.; Nidzgorski, D.; Sterner, R.; Wilson, B. N.

    2012-12-01

    Water quality of urban freshwater ecosystems is widely impaired by eutrophication, with little recent improvement and much potential for further degradation due to urban expansion and intensification. Despite the degradation of water quality in urban streams and lakes and adjacent coastal areas, relatively little is known about the relative importance of specific nutrient sources and the processes that regulate their movement across highly modified land-water interfaces. To better understand the nutrient sources and cycling that affect aquatic ecosystems, we assess nutrient movement through urban drainage networks in St. Paul, Minnesota. Nutrient concentrations and flux in stormwater at six intensively monitored sites show consistent seasonal patterns, with peaks in total nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in the late spring. Trees contributed to nutrient movement via litterfall and throughfall to impervious surfaces, with peaks in inputs that corresponded to stormwater nutrient patterns. Despite runoff generated primarily from impervious surfaces, organic carbon and nitrogen concentrations were high, with organic N accounting for >80% of stormwater N loading. Together, these data suggested an important role for urban tree canopies in nutrient mobilization in stormwater. Base flow, present in larger storm drains and buried streams, results primarily from groundwater seepage and from outflow of surface water connected to drains. Base flow contributed significantly to nutrient export, particularly for N (33 to 68% of warm season export) but also for P (8 to 34%). Sites with upstream hydrologic connections to lakes and remnant above-ground stream reaches had higher baseflow organic carbon and P, and reduced N concentrations compared to sites dominated by groundwater. Together, these data show that the characteristics of urban vegetation and the nature of human alterations to hydrologic connections are dominant features influencing the form and amount of nutrient movement

  18. Key Nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Extension Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Lessons written to help trainer agents prepare aides for work with families in the Food and Nutrition Program are presented in this booklet. The key nutrients discussed in the 10 lessons are protein, carbohydrates, fat, calcium, iron, iodine, and Vitamins A, B, C, and D. the format of each lesson is as follows: Purpose, Presentation, Application…

  19. Using vibrational infrared biomolecular spectroscopy to detect heat-induced changes of molecular structure in relation to nutrient availability of prairie whole oat grains on a molecular basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M D Mostafizar; Theodoridou, Katerina; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-01-01

    To our knowledge, there is little study on the interaction between nutrient availability and molecular structure changes induced by different processing methods in dairy cattle. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of heat processing methods on interaction between nutrient availability and molecular structure in terms of functional groups that are related to protein and starch inherent structure of oat grains with two continued years and three replication of each year. The oat grains were kept as raw (control) or heated in an air-draft oven (dry roasting: DO) at 120 °C for 60 min and under microwave irradiation (MIO) for 6 min. The molecular structure features were revealed by vibrational infrared molecular spectroscopy. The results showed that rumen degradability of dry matter, protein and starch was significantly lower (P grains are more sensitive to microwave irradiation than dry heating in terms of protein and starch molecular profile and nutrient availability in ruminants.

  20. Relative contributions of synoptic and intraseasonal variations to strong cold events over eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lei; Wu, Renguang; Jiao, Yang

    2017-09-01

    The present study investigates the relative roles of intraseasonal oscillations (ISOs) and synoptic variations in strong cold events over eastern China during the boreal winter. The ISOs and synoptic variations explain about 55% and 20% of the total area-mean temperature anomaly in eastern China, respectively. The advection of synoptic winds on synoptic temperature gradients has a leading contribution to the temperature decrease before the cold events and thus the synoptic variations are important in determining the time of peak cold anomalies. The ISOs have a larger role in sustaining the cold events. The height anomalies associated with ISOs and synoptic variations are manifested as Rossby wave trains propagating along the polar front jet over the Eurasian continent before the cold events. They both contribute to the deepening of the East Asian trough and the development of cold events. Compared to the ISO wave train, the synoptic wave train has a smaller spatial scale and moves faster. There are obvious intraseasonal signals in the stratosphere about 1 week before the cold events over eastern China. Large negative height anomalies associated with the weakening of the polar vortex are observed over the North Atlantic. These anomalies move eastwards and propagate downwards after reaching the west coast of Europe. The downward moving stratospheric signal triggers height anomalies in the troposphere over the entrance region of the polar front jet. Then the anomalies propagate towards East Asia along the wave train, contributing to the intensification of the Siberian high and the East Asian trough and the occurrence of cold events over eastern China.

  1. High Methylmercury in Arctic and Subarctic Ponds is Related to Nutrient Levels in the Warming Eastern Canadian Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMillan, Gwyneth A; Girard, Catherine; Chételat, John; Laurion, Isabelle; Amyot, Marc

    2015-07-07

    Permafrost thaw ponds are ubiquitous in the eastern Canadian Arctic, yet little information exists on their potential as sources of methylmercury (MeHg) to freshwaters. They are microbially active and conducive to methylation of inorganic mercury, and are also affected by Arctic warming. This multiyear study investigated thaw ponds in a discontinuous permafrost region in the Subarctic taiga (Kuujjuarapik-Whapmagoostui, QC) and a continuous permafrost region in the Arctic tundra (Bylot Island, NU). MeHg concentrations in thaw ponds were well above levels measured in most freshwater ecosystems in the Canadian Arctic (>0.1 ng L(-1)). On Bylot, ice-wedge trough ponds showed significantly higher MeHg (0.3-2.2 ng L(-1)) than polygonal ponds (0.1-0.3 ng L(-1)) or lakes (ponds near Kuujjuarapik (0.1-3.1 ng L(-1)). High water MeHg concentrations in thaw ponds were strongly correlated with variables associated with high inputs of organic matter (DOC, a320, Fe), nutrients (TP, TN), and microbial activity (dissolved CO2 and CH4). Thawing permafrost due to Arctic warming will continue to release nutrients and organic carbon into these systems and increase ponding in some regions, likely stimulating higher water concentrations of MeHg. Greater hydrological connectivity from permafrost thawing may potentially increase transport of MeHg from thaw ponds to neighboring aquatic ecosystems.

  2. Interactive effects of redox intensity and phosphate availability on growth and nutrient relations of Cladium jamaicense (Cyperaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissner, J.; Mendelssohn, I.A.; Lorenzen, B.; Brix, H.; McKee, K.L.; Miao, S.L.

    2003-01-01

    Expansion of Typha domingensis into areas previously dominated by Cladium jamaicense in the Florida Everglades has been linked to anthropogenic phosphorus (P) enrichment and increased hydroperiod. The principal stress factor for plants in flooded soils is biochemical reduction, the intensity of which is measured as redox potential (Eh). The objective of this study was to assess the growth response of C. jamaicense to Eh (-150, +150, and +600 mV) and P availability (10, 80, and 500 ??g P/L). Plants were grown hydroponically in a factorial experiment using titanium (Ti3+) citrate as an Eh buffer. Treatment effects on growth, biomass partitioning, and tissue nutrients were recorded. Growth approximately doubled in response to a 50-fold increase in P availability. Low redox significantly reduced growth and tissue P concentration. While plant P concentrations increased 20-fold between the 10 and 500 ??g P/L treatments, P concentrations were 50-100% higher at +600 mV than at -150 mV within each phosphate level. At high Eh, C. jamaicense appears well adapted to low nutrient environments because of its low P requirement and high retention of acquired E However, at low Eh the ability to acquire or conserve acquired P decreases and as a consequence, higher phosphate levels are required to sustain growth. Findings of this study indicate that young C. jamaicense exhibits low tolerance to strongly reducing conditions when phosphate is scarce.

  3. Relative Pesticide and Exposure Route Contribution to Aggregate and Cumulative Dose in Young Farmworker Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asa Bradman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Child-Specific Aggregate Cumulative Human Exposure and Dose (CACHED framework integrates micro-level activity time series with mechanistic exposure equations, environmental concentration distributions, and physiologically-based pharmacokinetic components to estimate exposure for multiple routes and chemicals. CACHED was utilized to quantify cumulative and aggregate exposure and dose estimates for a population of young farmworker children and to evaluate the model for chlorpyrifos and diazinon. Micro-activities of farmworker children collected concurrently with residential measurements of pesticides were used in the CACHED framework to simulate 115,000 exposure scenarios and quantify cumulative and aggregate exposure and dose estimates. Modeled metabolite urine concentrations were not statistically different than concentrations measured in the urine of children, indicating that CACHED can provide realistic biomarker estimates. Analysis of the relative contribution of exposure route and pesticide indicates that in general, chlorpyrifos non-dietary ingestion exposure accounts for the largest dose, confirming the importance of the micro-activity approach. The risk metrics computed from the 115,000 simulations, indicate that greater than 95% of these scenarios might pose a risk to children’s health from aggregate chlorpyrifos exposure. The variability observed in the route and pesticide contributions to urine biomarker levels demonstrate the importance of accounting for aggregate and cumulative exposure in establishing pesticide residue tolerances in food.

  4. Relative contributions of inflammation and inadequate protein intake to hypoalbuminemia in patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngmee; Molnar, Miklos Z; Rattanasompattikul, Manoch; Hatamizadeh, Parta; Benner, Debbie; Kopple, Joel D; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-02-01

    Serum albumin is one of the strongest mortality predictors in maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients. Yet, the degree to which serum albumin represents dietary protein intake or an inflammatory state, among others, is not clear. We hypothesize that these inadequate protein intake and inflammation contribute somewhat equally to hypoalbuminemia. In a cross-sectional analysis, we examined correlates of low serum albumin, appearance (nPNA), also known as normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR), were also measured. Logistic regression estimated odds ratios were employed, and spline models were plotted to examine the likelihood of relatively low serum albumin trend was steeper with increasing serum IL-6 up to a concentration of 30 ng/mL. Both low protein intakes and a high state of inflammation are associated with low serum albumin in MHD patients.

  5. Relative Contributions of Complications and Failure to Rescue on Mortality in Older Patients Undergoing Pancreatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamirisa, Nina P.; Parmar, Abhishek D.; Vargas, Gabriela M.; Mehta, Hemalkumar B.; Kilbane, E. Molly; Hall, Bruce L.; Pitt, Henry A.; Riall, Taylor S.

    2017-01-01

    STRUCTURED ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE AND SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA For pancreatectomy patients, mortality increases with increasing age. Our study evaluated the relative contribution of overall postoperative complications and failure to rescue rates on the observed increased mortality in older patients undergoing pancreatic resection at specialized centers. METHODS We identified 2,694 patients who underwent pancreatic resection from the ACS-NSQIP Pancreatectomy Demonstration Project at 37 high volume centers. Overall morbidity and in-hospital mortality were determined in patients total number of patients with postoperative complications. RESULTS No significant differences were observed between patients pancreatectomy in patients ≥80 compared to patients <80 were similar. However, when complications occurred, older patients were more likely to die. Interventions to identify and aggressively treat complications are necessary to decrease mortality in vulnerable older patients. PMID:25563871

  6. Group-Contribution based Property Estimation and Uncertainty analysis for Flammability-related Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frutiger, Jerome; Marcarie, Camille; Abildskov, Jens

    2016-01-01

    .0% and 0.99 for FP as well as 6.4% and 0.76 for AIT. Moreover, the temperature-dependence of LFL property was studied. A compound specific proportionality constant (KLFL) between LFL and temperature is introduced and an MG GC model to estimate KLFL is developed. Overall the ability to predict flammability......This study presents new group contribution (GC) models for the prediction of Lower and Upper Flammability Limits (LFL and UFL), Flash Point (FP) and Auto Ignition Temperature (AIT) of organic chemicals applying the Marrero/Gani (MG) method. Advanced methods for parameter estimation using robust...... regression and outlier treatment have been applied to achieve high accuracy. Furthermore, linear error propagation based on covariance matrix of estimated parameters was performed. Therefore, every estimated property value of the flammability-related properties is reported together with its corresponding 95...

  7. Analysis of contributing factors associated to related patients safety incidents in Intensive Care Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Delgado, M C; Merino de Cos, P; Sirgo Rodríguez, G; Álvarez Rodríguez, J; Gutiérrez Cía, I; Obón Azuara, B; Alonso Ovies, Á

    2015-01-01

    To explore contributing factors (CF) associated to related critical patients safety incidents. SYREC study pos hoc analysis. A total of 79 Intensive Care Departments were involved. The study sample consisted of 1.017 patients; 591 were affected by one or more incidents. The CF were categorized according to a proposed model by the National Patient Safety Agency from United Kingdom that was modified. Type, class and severity of the incidents was analyzed. A total 2,965 CF were reported (1,729 were associated to near miss and 1,236 to adverse events). The CF group more frequently reported were related patients factors. Individual factors were reported more frequently in near miss and task related CF in adverse events. CF were reported in all classes of incidents. The majority of CF were reported in the incidents classified such as less serious, even thought CF patients factors were associated to serious incidents. Individual factors were considered like avoidable and patients factors as unavoidable. The CF group more frequently reported were patient factors and was associated to more severe and unavoidable incidents. By contrast, individual factors were associated to less severe and avoidable incidents. In general, CF most frequently reported were associated to near miss. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  8. The energetics response to a warmer climate: relative contributions from the transient and stationary eddies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Hernández-Deckers

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We use the Lorenz Energy Cycle (LEC to evaluate changes in global energetic activity due to CO2-doubling in the coupled atmosphere-ocean ECHAM5/MPI-OM model. Globally, the energetic activity – measured as the total conversion rate of available potential energy into kinetic energy – decreases by about 4 %. This weakening results from a dual response that consists of a strengthening of the LEC in the upper-troposphere and a weakening in the lower and middle troposphere. This is fully consistent with results from a coarser resolution version of the same coupled model. We further use our experiments to investigate the individual contributions of the transient and stationary eddy components to the main energetics response.

    The transient eddy terms have a larger contribution to the total energetic activity than the stationary ones. We find that this is also true in terms of their 2 × CO2-response. Changes in the transient eddy components determine the main energetics response, whereas the stationary eddy components have very small contributions. Hence, the dual response – strengthening in the upper troposphere and weakening below – concerns mainly the transient eddy terms. We can relate qualitatively this response to the two main features of the 2 × CO2 warming pattern: (a the tropical upper-tropospheric warming increases the pole-to-equator temperature gradient – strengthening the energetic activity above – and enhances static stability – weakening the energetic activity below; and (b the high-latitude surface warming decreases the pole-to-equator temperature gradient in the lower troposphere – weakening the energetic activity below. Despite the small contribution from the stationary eddies to the main energetics response, changes in stationary eddy available potential energy (Pse reflect some features of the warming pattern: stronger land-sea contrasts at the subtropics

  9. Greater sexual reproduction contributes to differences in demography of invasive plants and their noninvasive relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Jean H; Pardini, Eleanor A; Schutzenhofer, Michele R; Chung, Y Anny; Seidler, Katie J; Knight, Tiffany M

    2013-05-01

    An understanding of the demographic processes contributing to invasions would improve our mechanistic understanding of the invasion process and improve the efficiency of prevention and control efforts. However, field comparisons of the demography of invasive and noninvasive species have not previously been conducted. We compared the in situ demography of 17 introduced plant species in St. Louis, Missouri, USA, to contrast the demographic patterns of invasive species with their less invasive relatives across a broad sample of angiosperms. Using herbarium records to estimate spread rates, we found higher maximum spread rates in the landscape for species classified a priori as invasive than for noninvasive introduced species, suggesting that expert classifications are an accurate reflection of invasion rate. Across 17 species, projected population growth was not significantly greater in invasive than in noninvasive introduced species. Among five taxonomic pairs of close relatives, however, four of the invasive species had higher projected population growth rates compared with their noninvasive relative. A Life Table Response Experiment suggested that the greater projected population growth rate of some invasive species relative to their noninvasive relatives was primarily a result of sexual reproduction. The greater sexual reproduction of invasive species is consistent with invaders having a life history strategy more reliant on fecundity than survival and is consistent with a large role of propagule pressure in invasion. Sexual reproduction is a key demographic correlate of invasiveness, suggesting that local processes influencing sexual reproduction, such as enemy escape, might be of general importance. However, the weak correlation of projected population growth with spread rates in the landscape suggests that regional processes, such as dispersal, may be equally important in determining invasion rate.

  10. Exposure sources and their relative contributions to urinary phthalate metabolites among children in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chu-Chih; Wang, Yin-Han; Wang, Shu-Li; Huang, Po-Chin; Chuang, Shu-Chun; Chen, Mei-Huei; Chen, Bai-Hsiun; Sun, Chien-Wen; Fu, Hsiao-Chun; Lee, Ching-Chang; Wu, Ming-Tsang; Chen, Mei-Lien; Hsiung, Chao A

    2017-07-01

    Phthalate exposure is omnipresent and known to have developmental and reproductive effects in children. The aim of this study was to determine the phthalate exposure sources and their relative contributions among children in Taiwan. During the first wave of the Risk Assessment of Phthalate Incident in Taiwan (RAPIT), in 2012, we measured 8 urinary phthalate metabolites in 226 children aged 1-11 years old and in 181 children from the same cohort for the wave 2 study in 2014. A two-stage statistical analysis approach was adopted. First, a stepwise regression model was used to screen 80 questions that explored the exposure frequency and lifestyle for potential associations. Second, the remaining questions with positive regression coefficients were grouped into the following 6 exposure categories: plastic container/packaging, food, indoor environment, personal care products, toys, and eating out. A mixed model was then applied to assess the relative contributions of these categories for each metabolite. The use of plastic container or food packaging were dominant exposure sources for mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), mono-2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl phthalate (MEHHP), mono-2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl phthalate (MEOHP), and mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP). The indoor environment was a major exposure source of mono-methyl phthalate (MMP), mono-benzyl phthalate (MBzP), and mono-isobutyl phthalate (MiBP). The consumption of seafood showed a significant correlation with MEHP. The children's modified dietary behavior and improved living environment in the second study wave were associated with lower phthalate metabolite levels, showing that phthalate exposures can be effectively reduced. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. The relative contributions of frontal and parietal cortex for generalized quantifier comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Olm

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Quantifiers, like some or few, are frequent in daily language. Linguists posit at least three distinct classes of quantifiers: cardinal quantifiers that rely on numerosity, majority quantifiers that additionally depend on executive resources, and logical quantifiers that rely on perceptual attention. We used BOLD fMRI to investigate the roles of frontal and parietal regions in quantifier comprehension. Participants performed a sentence-picture verification task to determine whether a sentence containing a quantifier accurately describes a picture. A whole-brain analysis identified a network involved in quantifier comprehension: This implicated bilateral inferior parietal, superior parietal and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices, and right inferior frontal cortex. We then performed region-of-interest analyses to assess the relative contribution of each region for each quantifier class. Inferior parietal cortex was equally activated across all quantifier classes, consistent with prior studies implicating the region for quantifier comprehension due in part to its role in the representation of number knowledge. Right superior parietal cortex was up-regulated in comparison to frontal regions for cardinal and logical quantifiers, but parietal and frontal regions were equally activated for majority quantifiers and each frontal region is most highly activated for majority quantifiers. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that majority quantifiers rely on numerosity mechanisms in parietal cortex and executive mechanisms in frontal cortex. Also, right inferior frontal cortex was up-regulated for logical compared to cardinal quantifiers, which may be related to selection demands associated with logical quantifier comprehension. We conclude that distinct components of a large-scale fronto-parietal network contribute to specific aspects of quantifier comprehension, and that this biologically-defined network is consistent with cognitive theories of

  12. Impact of ectomycorrhizosphere on the functional diversity of soil bacterial and fungal communities from a forest stand in relation to nutrient mobilization processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvaruso, Christophe; Turpault, Marie-Pierre; Leclerc, Elisabeth; Frey-Klett, Pascale

    2007-10-01

    The ectomycorrhizal symbiosis alters the physicochemical and biological conditions in the surrounding soil, thus creating a particular environment called ectomycorrhizosphere, which selects microbial communities suspected to play a role in gross production and nutrient cycling. To assess the ectomycorrhizosphere effect on the structure of microbial communities potentially involved in the mobilization of nutrients from the soil minerals in a poor-nutrient environment, we compared the functional diversity of soil and ectomycorrhizosphere bacterial communities in a forest stand. Two hundred and sixty-four bacterial strains and 107 fungal strains were isolated from the bulk soil of an oak (Quercus petraea) stand and from oak-Scleroderma citrinum ectomycorrhizosphere and ectomycorrhizae, in two soil organo-mineral horizons (0 to 3 cm and 5 to 10 cm). They were characterized using two in vitro tests related to their capacities to mobilize iron and phosphorus. We demonstrated that the oak-S. citrinum ectomycorrhizosphere significantly structures the culturable bacterial communities in the two soil horizons by selecting very efficient strains for phosphorus and iron mobilization. This effect was also observed on the diversity of the phosphate-solubilizing fungal communities in the lower soil horizon. A previous study already demonstrated that Laccaria bicolor-Douglas fir ectomycorrhizosphere structures the functional diversity of Pseudomonas fluorescens population in a forest nursery soil. Comparing to it, our work highlights the consistency of the mycorrhizosphere effect on the functional diversity of bacterial and fungal communities in relation to the mineral weathering process, no matter the fungal symbiont, the age and species of the host tree, or the environment (nursery vs forest). We also demonstrated that the intensity of phosphorus and iron mobilization by the ectomycorrhizosphere bacteria isolated from the lower soil horizon was significantly higher compared to

  13. The independent contribution of executive functions to health related quality of life in older women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marra Carlo A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cognition is a multidimensional construct and to our knowledge, no previous studies have examined the independent contribution of specific domains of cognition to health related quality of life. To determine whether executive functions are independently associated with health related quality of life assessed using Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs calculated from the EuroQol EQ-5D (EQ-5D in older women after adjusting for known covariates, including global cognition. Therefore, we conducted a secondary analysis of community-dwelling older women aged 65-75 years who participated in a 12-month randomized controlled trial of resistance training. We assessed global cognition using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE and executive functions using the: 1 Stroop Test; 2 Trail Making Test (Part B and 3 Digits Verbal Span Backwards Test. We calculated QALYs from the EQ-5D administered at baseline, 6 months and 12 months. Results Our multivariate linear regression model demonstrated the specific executive processes of set shifting and working memory, as measured by Trail Making Test (Part B and Digits Verbal Span Backward Test (p Conclusions Our study highlights the specific executive processes of set shifting and working memory were independently associated with QALYs -- a measure of health related quality of life. Given that executive functions explain variability in QALYs, clinicians may need to consider assessing executive functions when measuring health related quality of life. Further, the EQ-5D may be used to track changes in health status over time and serve as a screening tool for clinicians. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00426881.

  14. Aberrant expression of cell cycle and material metabolism related genes contributes to hepatocellular carcinoma occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hongxian; Li, Zhaohui; Shen, Quan; Wang, Qian; Tian, Jianguo; Jiang, Qingfeng; Gao, Linbo

    2017-04-01

    This study aims to deepen our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying the occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We first downloaded a gene expression profile dataset GSE29721 (10 HCC and 10 control samples) from Gene Expression Omnibus database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/). Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by the paired t-test using limma package. Pathway and functional enrichment analyses were performed with DAVID tools. Transcription factors were annotated with TRANSFAC database and tumor associated genes (TAGs) were annotated with TAG and TSGene databases. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was conducted using STRING online tool and function module was further identified with BioNet package. Totally, 527 up-regulated DEGs and 587 down-regulated DEGs were identified. GO functional and KEGG pathway enrichment analyses showed that the up-regulated DEGs were mainly related to cell division and cell cycle, while the down-regulated DEGs were largely related to material metabolism, especially secondary metabolism. Proteins encoded by DEGs CDK1, BUB1, CDC20, NCAPG, NDC80, CDCA8, MAD2L1, CCNB1, CCNA2 and BIRC5 were hub genes with high degrees in the PPI network; further module analysis detected a subnetwork consisting of 55 proteins, such as CYP2B6, ACAA1, BHMT and ALDH2. Taken together, aberrant expression of cell cycle related genes (e.g., CDK1, CCNA2, CCNB1, BUB1, MAD2L1 and CDC20) and material metabolism related genes (e.g., CYP2B6, ACAA1, BHMT and ALDH2) may contribute to HCC occurrence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. [Description of contributing factors in adverse events related to patient safety and their preventability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-García, María Mercedes; Campos-Rivas, Beatriz; Sanmarful-Schwarz, Alexandra; Vírseda-Sacristán, Alicia; Dorrego-López, M Aránzazu; Charle-Crespo, Ángeles

    2017-11-25

    To assess the extent of healthcare related adverse events (AEs), their effect on patients, and their seriousness. To analyse the factors leading to the development of AEs, their relationship with the damage caused, and their degree of preventability. Retrospective descriptive study. Porriño, Pontevedra, Spain, Primary Care Service, from January-2014 to April-2016. Reported AEs were entered into the Patient Safety Reporting and Learning System (SiNASP). The variables measured were: Near Incident (NI) an occurrence with no effect or harm on the patient; Adverse Event (AE) an occurrence that affects or harms a patient. The level of harm is classified as minimal, minor, moderate, critical, and catastrophic. Preventability was classified as little evidence of being preventable, 50% preventable, and sound evidence of being preventable. percentages and Chi-squared test for qualitative variables; P<.05 with SPSS.15. SiNASP. Ethical considerations: approved by the Research Ethics Committee (2016/344). There were 166 recorded AEs (50.6% in males, and 46.4% in women. The mean age was 60.80years). Almost two-thirds 62.7% of AEs affected the patient, with 45.8% causing minimal damage, while 2.4% caused critical damages. Healthcare professionals were a contributing factor in 71.7% of the AEs, with the trend showing that poor communication and lack of protocols were related to the damage caused. Degree of preventability: 96.4%. Most AEs affected the patient, and were related to medication, diagnostic tests, and laboratory errors. The level of harm was related to communication problems, lack of, or deficient, protocols and a poor safety culture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Methane emissions from river buffaloes fed on green fodders in relation to the nutrient [corrected] intake and digestibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusty, Sonali; Mohini, Madhu; Kundu, Shivlal Singh; Kumar, Ajay; Datt, Chander

    2014-01-01

    Fifteen male Murrah buffalo calves (15-18 months, 227.98 ± 4.44 kg body weight) were distributed randomly in to three equal groups and fed solely on either berseem (G1), oats (G2), or chicory fodder (G3). A digestibility trial followed by methane measurement using SF6 tracer technique was conducted. No significant difference was observed in nutrient intake; however, crude protein (CP) intake was lower in G2 (0.35 kg) than G1 (0.7) and in G3 (0.71) and non-fibrous carbohydrates (NFC), and neutral detergent insoluble CP (NDICP) intake was significantly (p digestible dry matter, organic matter, neutral detergent fiber, and ether extract intake was similar in all the groups, whereas the digestible CP and NFC intake was lower in G2 compared to G1 and G3. Chicory- and berseem-fed groups emitted 12.2 and 5.2 % less methane than oats-fed group. However, no significant difference was observed in the absolute methane loss and methane loss as percentage of energy intake (p > 0.05) among the groups. There was positive correlation between nutrient intake and total methane production. However, an inverse relationship was observed between total digestible carbohydrate intake and methane production (g/kg dry matter intake). The following regression equations were developed to estimate methane production: methane (g/kg BW) = 128.8553 + (167.7456 × dNDFI) + (216.32 × dCPI) - (40.3313 × dNFCI) and methane (g/d) = -1.7494 + (41.42 × NDFI) + (39.8686 × CPI) + (0.5197 × NFCI).

  17. The Relative Concentrations of Nutrients and Toxins Dictate Feeding by a Vertebrate Browser, the Greater Glider Petauroides volans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lora M Jensen

    Full Text Available Although ecologists believe that vertebrate herbivores must select a diet that allows them to meet their nutritional requirements, while avoiding intoxication by plant secondary metabolites, this is remarkably difficult to show. A long series of field and laboratory experiments means that we have a good understanding of the factors that affect feeding by leaf-eating marsupials. This knowledge and the natural intraspecific variation in Eucalyptus chemistry allowed us to test the hypothesis that the feeding decisions of greater gliders (Petauroides volans depend on the concentrations of available nitrogen (incorporating total nitrogen, dry matter digestibility and tannins and of formylated phloroglucinol compounds (FPCs, potent antifeedants unique to Eucalyptus. We offered captive greater gliders foliage from two species of Eucalyptus, E. viminalis and E. melliodora, which vary naturally in their concentrations of available nitrogen and FPCs. We then measured the amount of foliage eaten by each glider and compared this with our laboratory analyses of foliar total nitrogen, available nitrogen and FPCs for each tree offered. The concentration of FPCs was the main factor that determined how much gliders ate of E. viminalis and E. melliodora, but in gliders fed E. viminalis the concentration of available nitrogen was also a significant influence. In other words, greater gliders ate E. viminalis leaves with a particular combination of FPCs and available nitrogen that maximised the nutritional gain but minimised their ingestion of toxins. In contrast, the concentration of total nitrogen was not correlated with feeding. This study is among the first to empirically show that browsing herbivores select a diet that balances the potential gain (available nutrients and the potential costs (plant secondary chemicals of eating leaves. The major implication of the study is that it is essential to identify the limiting nutrients and relevant toxins in a system in

  18. The Relative Concentrations of Nutrients and Toxins Dictate Feeding by a Vertebrate Browser, the Greater Glider Petauroides volans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Lora M; Wallis, Ian R; Foley, William J

    2015-01-01

    Although ecologists believe that vertebrate herbivores must select a diet that allows them to meet their nutritional requirements, while avoiding intoxication by plant secondary metabolites, this is remarkably difficult to show. A long series of field and laboratory experiments means that we have a good understanding of the factors that affect feeding by leaf-eating marsupials. This knowledge and the natural intraspecific variation in Eucalyptus chemistry allowed us to test the hypothesis that the feeding decisions of greater gliders (Petauroides volans) depend on the concentrations of available nitrogen (incorporating total nitrogen, dry matter digestibility and tannins) and of formylated phloroglucinol compounds (FPCs), potent antifeedants unique to Eucalyptus. We offered captive greater gliders foliage from two species of Eucalyptus, E. viminalis and E. melliodora, which vary naturally in their concentrations of available nitrogen and FPCs. We then measured the amount of foliage eaten by each glider and compared this with our laboratory analyses of foliar total nitrogen, available nitrogen and FPCs for each tree offered. The concentration of FPCs was the main factor that determined how much gliders ate of E. viminalis and E. melliodora, but in gliders fed E. viminalis the concentration of available nitrogen was also a significant influence. In other words, greater gliders ate E. viminalis leaves with a particular combination of FPCs and available nitrogen that maximised the nutritional gain but minimised their ingestion of toxins. In contrast, the concentration of total nitrogen was not correlated with feeding. This study is among the first to empirically show that browsing herbivores select a diet that balances the potential gain (available nutrients) and the potential costs (plant secondary chemicals) of eating leaves. The major implication of the study is that it is essential to identify the limiting nutrients and relevant toxins in a system in order to

  19. Contribution of renal impairment to potentially preventable medication-related hospital admissions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leendertse, A.J.; Dijk, E.A. van; Smet, P.A.G.M. de; Egberts, T.C.; Bemt, P.M. van den

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medication errors and renal impairment contribute to severe adverse drug events, which may lead to hospital admission. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether medication errors and renal impairment contribute to hospital admission and examine these errors for strategies to prevent admissions.

  20. Substituent effect on the thermodynamic solubility of structural analogs: relative contribution of crystal packing and hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Shunsuke; Nakagawa, Yoshiaki; Shirai, Osamu; Kano, Kenji

    2014-11-01

    Thermodynamic analysis of the solubility of benzoylphenylurea (BPU) derivatives was conducted to investigate the relative importance of crystal packing and hydration for improving solubility with minor structural modification. The contribution of crystal packing to solubility was evaluated from the change in Gibbs energy on the transition from the crystalline to liquid state. Hydration Gibbs energy was estimated using a linear free-energy relationship between octanol-water partition coefficients and gas-water partition coefficients. The established solubility model satisfactorily explained the relative thermodynamic solubility of the model compounds and revealed that crystal packing and hydration equally controlled solubility of the structural analogs. All hydrophobic substituents were undesirable for solubility in terms of hydration, as expected. On the other hand, some of these hydrophobic substituents destabilized crystal packing and improved the solubility of the BPU derivatives when their impact on crystal packing exceeded their negative influence on hydration. The replacement of a single substituent could cause more than a 10-fold enhancement in thermodynamic solubility; this degree of improvement was comparable to that generally achieved by amorphous formulations. Detailed analysis of thermodynamic solubility will allow us to better understand the true substituent effect and design drug-like candidates efficiently. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  1. The relative contributions of biological and abiotic processes to carbon dynamics in subarctic sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Dorte Haubjerg; Thomas, David N.; Rysgaard, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge on the relative effects of biological activity and precipitation/dissolution of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in influencing the air-ice CO2 exchange in sea-ice-covered season is currently lacking. Furthermore, the spatial and temporal occurrence of CaCO3 and other biogeochemical parameters...... in sea ice are still not well described. Here we investigated autotrophic and heterotrophic activity as well as the precipitation/dissolution of CaCO3 in subarctic sea ice in South West Greenland. Integrated over the entire ice season (71 days), the sea ice was net autotrophic with a net carbon fixation...... of 56 mg C m(-2), derived from a sea-ice-related gross primary production of 153 mg C m(-2) and a bacterial carbon demand of 97 mg C m(-2). Primary production contributed only marginally to the TCO2 depletion of the sea ice (7-25 %), which was mainly controlled by physical export by brine drainage...

  2. Visual image retention does not contribute to modulation of event-related potentials by mental rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riečanský, Igor; Tomova, Livia; Katina, Stanislav; Bauer, Herbert; Fischmeister, Florian Ph S; Lamm, Claus

    2013-11-01

    Rotation of a visual image in mind is associated with a slow posterior negative deflection of the event-related potential (ERP), termed rotation-related negativity (RRN). Retention of a visual image in short-term memory is also associated with a slow posterior negative ERP, termed negative slow wave (NSW). We tested whether short-term memory retention, indexed by the NSW, contributes to the RRN. ERPs were recorded in the same subjects in two tasks, a mental rotation task, eliciting the RRN, and a visual short-term memory task, eliciting the NSW. Over both right and left parietal scalp, no association was found between the NSW and the RRN amplitudes. Furthermore, adjusting for the effect of the NSW had no influence on a significant association between the RRN amplitude and response time, an index of mental rotation performance. Our data indicate that the RRN reflects manipulation of a visual image but not its retention in short-term memory. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. RELATIVE CONTRIBUTIONS OF PARENT-PERCEIVED CHILD CHARACTERISTICS TO VARIATION IN CHILD FEEDING BEHAVIOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Victoria K; Dovey, Terence M; Martin, Clarissa I; Meyer, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relative impact of co-occurring child characteristics on problematic feeding behavior. The aim of the current study was to assess the relative contributions of parent-perceived child characteristics in multivariable models of child feeding behavior. One hundred sixty-one mothers reported on their child's feeding behavior and a number of key child characteristics. These characteristics were entered into controlled multivariable models of child feeding behavior, using child and parent frequency domains of the Behavioral Pediatrics Feeding Assessment Scale (BPFAS; W. Crist et al., 1994) as outcome measures. Child feeding problems were positively associated with food neophobia and external behavioral and social issues, but not with most domains of temperamental difficulty or sensory sensitivity. Feeding problem frequency was associated with externalizing symptoms whereas parental perceptions of problems and coping were associated with social-interaction problems in the child. Population feeding problems appear to be external and interactive problems rather than driven by innate or internalizing factors. The association with externalizing symptoms suggests that feeding problems at this level may fall within a wider profile of challenging behavior; however, the existence of problematic feeding behaviors may constitute a challenge for parents only when the child's social interactions also are seen to be deficient. © 2015 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  4. Contributions of psychology of thinking and cognition for the Farradane relational indexing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Lourenço Santana

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Study the linking nature between psychology of thinking and cognition in context of Farradane relational indexing. Cognitive science as a new study area, originated at Century XX, has instigated the discovery over its link with the psychology of thinking. The term psychology was first time mentioned in the Modern Age, therefore, previous studies used terms as organization or methodical orientation of think. It were identified this mentions in Old Greece, when methodical orientation of think was a resource used for attainment more insurance results, as a form to reduce the search uncertainty. In the Modern Age, psychology was seen as a philosophy branch that had studied mind and behavior. In Century XIX, through persistent effort of some researchers, psychology came to consist as field deserving separate discipline. Through more than a hundred years of studies, the area has contributed very much for understanding structures, processes, functions, mental information processing and representations, amongst other topics. In Century XX, it had become the base for cognitive science foundation and posterior elaboration of Farradane universal relational indexing.

  5. Less efficient pattern separation may contribute to age-related spatial memory deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather M. Holden

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Spatial memory deficits have been well documented in older adults and may serve as an early indicator of mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer’s disease in some individuals. Pattern separation is a critical mechanism for reducing potential interference among similar memory representations to enhance memory accuracy. A small but growing literature indicates that spatial pattern separation may become less efficient as a result of normal aging, possibly due to age-related changes in subregions of the hippocampus. This decreased efficiency in spatial pattern separation may be a critical processing deficit that could be a contributing factor to spatial memory deficits and episodic memory impairment associated with aging. The present paper will review recently published studies in humans, nonhuman primates, and rodents that have examined age-related changes in spatial pattern separation. The potential basic science, translational, and clinical implications from these studies are discussed to illustrate the need for future research to further examine the relationship between spatial pattern separation and brain changes associated with aging and neurodegenerative disease.

  6. Relative contribution of cognitive and physical disability components to quality of life in MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Schependom, Jeroen; D'hooghe, Marie B; De Schepper, Mélanie; Cleynhens, Krista; D'hooge, Mieke; Haelewyck, Marie-Claire; De Keyser, Jacques; Nagels, Guy

    2014-01-15

    Information on the relative influence of cognitive and physical impairment on the quality of life in multiple sclerosis is currently limited and no scientific consensus has been reached yet. For this reason, we wanted to examine the relative contribution of cognitive and physical impairment measures comprised in the MSFC test on quality of life in MS. In the National MS Center Melsbroek, patients regularly undergo MSFC and EQ5D measurements. We investigated the correlations between the EQ5D, EQVAS and the MSFC and EDSS scores by the use of ANOVA and multilinear models. We found a significant correlation between the EQVAS score and cognition in a univariate model. When including EDSS score and MSFC outcomes into the model, cognition was, however, excluded based on the Akaike Information Criterion. Cognition was, on the other hand, a significant predictor for the "Usual Activities" question of the EQ5D. Although cognitive performance as measured on the PASAT-3s does not correlate with a patient's perceived quality of life in a multivariate model, it remains an important predictor for the patient's usual activities. © 2013.

  7. Protective nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Joseph; Turkish, Aaron

    2002-11-01

    Recognition that specific nutrients can be beneficial when consumed in amounts above the accepted daily requirements has provided a major impetus for the critical examination of dietary approaches with single or multiple nutrient supplements chosen to modulate the inflammatory response, enhance immune function, or improve the blood-gut barrier. Patients suffering the effects of hypercatabolism caused by surgery, cancer, or extensive burns are prime candidates for immunonutrition, as the intervention has come to be known, as are immunosuppressed patients with the human immunodeficiency virus or other overwhelming infections. This review focuses on key nutrients used in clinical trials for which a body of information on the mode of action and metabolic pathways is available. The topics covered include the amino acids, glutamine and arginine; omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexanoic acid; vitamin A; and zinc. Lastly, we address the area of pre- and probiotics and how "friendly" microorganisms are being incorporated into therapeutic regimens aimed at sustaining health. The use of immunonutrition requires judicious consideration of the potential undesirable effects of certain additives in clinical settings where enhanced immune responsiveness can translate into tissue damage and altered mucosal defenses.

  8. Relative source contributions for perchlorate exposures in a lactating human cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Andrea B. [University of North Texas Health Sciences Center (United States); Dyke, Jason V. [University of Texas at Arlington (United States); Ohira, Shin-Ichi [Kumamoto University (Japan); Dasgupta, Purnendu K., E-mail: Dasgupta@uta.edu [University of Texas at Arlington (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Perchlorate is an iodine-uptake inhibitor and common contaminant of food and drinking water. Understanding the amount of perchlorate exposure occurring through non-water sources is essential for accurate estimates of human exposure levels, and establishment of drinking water limits for this pervasive contaminant. The study objective was to determine the amount of perchlorate intake derived from diet rather than water. Subjects provided drinking water samples, detailed fluid-intake records, 24 h urine collections and four milk samples for nine days. Samples were analyzed for perchlorate by isotope dilution ion chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Amounts of perchlorate derived from drinking water and dietary sources were calculated for each individual. Water of local origin was found to contribute a minor fraction of perchlorate intake. Estimated fraction intake from drinking water ranged from 0 to 36%. The mean and median dose of perchlorate derived from non-water sources by lactating women was 0.18 μg/kg/day (range: 0.06 to 0.36 μg/kg/day.) Lactating women consumed more fluid (mean 2.424 L/day) than has been assumed in recent risk assessments for perchlorate. The data reported here indicate that lactating women may be exposed to perchlorate through dietary sources at markedly higher levels than estimated previously. Exposures to perchlorate from non-water sources may be higher than recent estimates, including those used to develop drinking water standards. - Highlights: ► Residence in an area with perchlorate-contaminated water may be a poor predictor of exposure. ► Exposures to perchlorate from food are likely underestimated. ► The relative contributions for human perchlorate exposures should be weighted more heavily towards non-water sources.

  9. A comparison of contributing factors between alcohol related single vehicle motorcycle and car crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maistros, Alexander; Schneider, William H; Savolainen, Peter T

    2014-06-01

    Alcohol related crashes have accounted for approximately 35% of fatal crashes per year since 1994 nationwide, with approximately 30% involving impairment over the legal blood alcohol content limit of 0.08%. Educational campaigns and law enforcement efforts are two components of multi-faceted programs aimed toward reducing impaired driving. It is crucial that further research be conducted to guide the implementation of enforcement and educational programs. This research attempts to provide such guidance by examining differences in alcohol-involved crashes involving motorcycles and passenger cars. Prior safety research has shown that motorcyclists follow a significantly different culture than the average passenger car operator. These cultural differences may be reflected by differences in the contributing factors affecting crashes and the severity of the resulting injuries sustained by the driver or motorcyclist. This research is focused on single-vehicle crashes only, in order to isolate modal effects from the contribution of additional vehicles. The crash data provided for this study are from the Ohio Department of Public Safety from 2009 through 2012. The injury severity data are analysed through the development of two mixed logit models, one for motorcyclists and one for passenger car drivers. The models quantify the effects of various factors, including horizontal curves, speeds, seatbelt use, and helmet use, which indicate that the required motor skills and balance needed for proper motorcycle operation compounded with a lack of mechanical protection make motorcyclists more prone to severe injuries, particularly on curves and in collisions with roadside objects. The findings of this study have been incorporated into combined motorcycle and sober driving educational safety campaigns. The results have shown to be favorable in supporting national campaign messages with local justification and backing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Predicting gas chromatography relative retention times for polychlorinated biphenyls using chlorine substitution pattern contribution method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, An; Gao, Jie; Freels, Sally; Huang, Jun; Yu, Gang

    2016-01-04

    Various quantitative structure retention relationships have been published in an effort to understand and predict chromatographic retention times. This work presents a chlorine substitution pattern contribution (Cl-SPC) model for relative retention times (RRT) of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), using 27 sets of previously published gas chromatography RRT data. The Cl-SPC model calculates the contribution factors (βk) for each of 19 chlorine substitution "patterns" (such as 2-, 2,4-, 2,3,6-, 2,3,4,5,6-, etc.) using multiple linear regression (MLR). The 27 separate MLRs had R(2) values ranging from 0.961 to 1.000; the average absolute errors were 0.55% for the training sets and 0.95% for the test sets. Cross-validation of the model was carried out by splitting each data set into training and test sets for groupings based on nine PCB congener mixes commercialized by AccuStandard. No weakening of the model performance was observed when the size of data set used to develop the model was decreased from 209 to 39 congeners. In addition to the separate models, a single mixed model was fit combining all 27 data sets. The estimated random effects, which reflect the impact of GC configuration and operational conditions on RRTs, are minor compared with the fixed effects estimated for the βk values. The major advantages of the Cl-SPC model are its unmatched simplicity and equally excellent robustness when compared with other quantitative structure retention relationship models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Dairy Products as Essential Contributors of (Micro-) Nutrients in Reference Food Patterns: An Outline for Elderly People

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staveren, van W.A.; Steijns, J.M.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.

    2008-01-01

    he nutrient richness of dairy products is widely recognized, but mainly low fat or skimmed versions are generally advocated given the proportion of saturated fatty acids in milk fat. The question arises how to appraise this nutrient richness relative to the contribution of the saturated fraction of

  12. Risk-benefit evaluation of fish from Chinese markets: Nutrients and contaminants in 24 fish species from five big cities and related assessment for human health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Zhen-Yu, E-mail: zdu@nifes.no [National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research (NIFES), N-5817 Bergen (Norway); Zhang, Jian [National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research (NIFES), N-5817 Bergen (Norway); Institute of Nutrition and Food Safety, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, 100050 (China); Department of Biomedicine, University of Bergen (Norway); Wang, Chunrong; Li, Lixiang; Man, Qingqing [Institute of Nutrition and Food Safety, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, 100050 (China); Lundebye, Anne-Katrine; Froyland, Livar [National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research (NIFES), N-5817 Bergen (Norway)

    2012-02-01

    The risks and benefits of fish from markets in Chinese cities have not previously been fully evaluated. In the present study, 24 common fish species with more than 400 individual samples were collected from markets from five big Chinese cities in 2007. The main nutrients and contaminants were measured and the risk-benefit was evaluated based on recommended nutrient intakes and risk level criteria set by relevant authorities. The comprehensive effects of nutrients and contaminants in marine oily fish were also evaluated using the data of two related human dietary intervention trials performed in dyslipidemic Chinese men and women in 2008 and 2010, respectively. The results showed that concentrations of contaminants analyzed including DDT, PCB{sub 7}, arsenic and cadmium were much lower than their corresponding maximum limits with the exception of the mercury concentration in common carp. Concentrations of POPs and n-3 LCPUFA, mainly EPA and DHA, were positively associated with the lipid content of the fish. With a daily intake of 80-100 g marine oily fish, the persistent organic pollutants in fish would not counteract the beneficial effects of n-3 LCPUFA in reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk markers. Marine oily fish provided more effective protection against CVD than lean fish, particularly for the dyslipidemic populations. The risk-benefit assessment based on the present daily aquatic product intake in Chinese urban residents (44.9 and 62.3 g for the average values for all cities and big cities, respectively) indicated that fish, particularly marine oily fish, can be regularly consumed to achieve optimal nutritional benefits from n-3 LCPUFA, without causing significant contaminant-related health risks. However, the potential health threat from contaminants in fish should still be emphasized for the populations consuming large quantities of fish, particularly wild fish. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We collected 24 fish species with more than

  13. Evaluating nutrient impacts in urban watersheds: challenges and research opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Richard O; Hochmuth, George J; Martinez, Christopher J; Boyer, Treavor H; Dukes, Michael D; Toor, Gurpal S; Cisar, John L

    2013-02-01

    This literature review focuses on the prevalence of nitrogen and phosphorus in urban environments and the complex relationships between land use and water quality. Extensive research in urban watersheds has broadened our knowledge about point and non-point pollutant sources, but the fate of nutrients is not completely understood. For example, it is not known how long-term nutrient cycling processes in turfgrass landscapes influence nitrogen retention rates or the relative atmospheric contribution to urban nitrogen exports. The effect of prolonged reclaimed water irrigation is also unknown. Stable isotopes have been used to trace pollutants, but distinguishing sources (e.g., fertilizers, wastewater, etc.) can be difficult. Identifying pollutant sources may aid our understanding of harmful algal blooms because the extent of the relationship between urban nutrient sources and algal blooms is unclear. Further research on the delivery and fate of nutrients within urban watersheds is needed to address manageable water quality impacts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Relative contribution of persistent organic pollutants to marine phytoplankton biomass dynamics in the North Sea and the Kattegat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everaert, Gert; De Laender, Frederik; Goethals, Peter L M; Janssen, Colin R

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we use concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and of chlorophyll a to infer POP-induced effects on marine primary production in the Kattegat and the North Sea between the 1990s and the 2000s. To do so, we modelled phytoplankton dynamics using four classical drivers (light and nutrient availability, temperature and zooplankton grazing) and tested whether extending this model with a POP-induced phytoplankton growth limitation term improved model fit to observed chlorophyll a concentrations. Including monitored concentrations of PCBs and pesticides did not lead to a better model fit, suggesting that POP-induced growth limitation of marine phytoplankton in the North Sea and the Kattegat is small compared to the limitations caused by the classical drivers. In an attempt to more fully represent the multitude of POPs in the marine environment, the monitored concentrations were multiplied with a factor 10 and 100. Under these two configurations, region-specific contributions of POPs in the phytoplankton growth limitation were found. The inferred contribution of POPs to phytoplankton growth limitation was ca. 1% in Belgian marine waters, but in the Kattegat POPs explained ca. 10% of the phytoplankton growth limitation. These results suggest that there are regional differences in the contribution of POPs to the phytoplankton growth limitation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Relative contributions of geographic, socioeconomic, and lifestyle factors to quality of life, frailty, and mortality in elderly

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Woo, Jean; Chan, Ruth; Leung, Jason; Wong, Moses

    2010-01-01

    To date, few studies address disparities in older populations specifically using frailty as one of the health outcomes and examining the relative contributions of individual and environmental factors to health outcomes...

  16. Comparison of Intake of Animal and Plant Foods and Related Nutrients in Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Survivors and Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Whitney A; Vickery, Courtney R; Ward-Ritacco, Christie L; Johnson, Kristen B; Berg, Alison C; Evans, Ellen M; Johnson, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    This study's objective is to assess differences in dietary intakes in breast cancer survivors (n = 13) and women without a history of breast cancer (controls, n = 71). In a cross-sectional design, intake of foods, food groups, nutrients, and non-nutritive sweeteners was assessed using participant-completed three-day food records. All women were postmenopausal (mean age (SD) 58.5 (±3.8) y, 95% White, 2.4% Asian Pacific, and 2.4% Black). The two groups did not differ in age, energy intake, or body mass index (p > 0.05). Compared to controls, survivors consumed less dairy products, animal protein, total protein, and calcium, but more legumes, noncitrus fruit, and carbohydrates (p ≤ 0.05). Calcium intakes were of particular concern in survivors who consumed an average of 686 mg calcium/d, which is cancer survivors may benefit from consultation with a Registered Dietitian or other health professional knowledgeable in nutritional recommendations for postmenopausal breast cancer survivors.

  17. Social cognition makes an independent contribution to peer relations in children with Specific Language Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés-Roqueta, Clara; Adrian, Juan E; Clemente, Rosa A; Villanueva, Lidón

    2016-01-01

    Language is important for developing and maintaining social relationships, and also for understanding others minds. Separate studies have shown that children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) present difficulties in both abilities, although the role of social cognition (SC) on peers' perception remains unexplored. The present study aims to assess specific sociometric features of children with SLI through peer nominations of liking and disliking, and also to explore their relationship to the children's SC. Thirty-five children with SLI attending ordinary schools (3;10 to 8;00 years old) and thirty-five age-matched children (AM) were assessed with language, SC and sociometric measures. SLI group received more disliked nominations and had lower scores on SC tasks compared to the AM group. After controlling for age and language, SC made an independent contribution to disliked nominations within the SLI group. Difficulties with peers of children with SLI are related to their language level but also with their SC abilities. Consequently, only resolving language impairments will not necessarily improve early peer acceptance in children with SLI. This finding stresses the importance of early intervention programmes aimed at reducing deleterious effects in later development and socialization with peers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Eye movements and processing stages in reading: relative contribution of visual, lexical, and contextual factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Manuel G; Meseguer, Enrique

    2002-05-01

    The independent and the combined influence of word length, word frequency, and contextual predictability on eye movements in reading was examined across processing stages under two priming-context conditions. Length, frequency, and predictability were used as predictors in multiple regression analyses, with parafoveal, early, late, and spillover eye movement measures as the dependent variables. There were specific effects of: (a) length, both on where to look (how likely a word was fixated and in which location) and how long to fixate, across all processing stages; (b) frequency, on how long to fixate a word, but not on where to look, at an early processing stage; and (c) predictability, both on how likely a word was fixated and for how long, in late processing stages. The source of influence for predictability was related to global rather than to local contextual priming. The contribution of word length was independent of contextual source. These results are relevant to determine both the time course of the influence of visual, lexical, and contextual factors on eye movements in reading, and which main component of eye movements, that is, location or duration, is affected.

  19. Dysfunctional autophagy in RPE, a contributing factor in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golestaneh, Nady; Chu, Yi; Xiao, Yang-Yu; Stoleru, Gianna L; Theos, Alexander C

    2017-01-05

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease and a major cause of blindness in the developed world. Owing to its complexity and the lack of an adequate human model that recapitulates key aspects of the disease, the molecular mechanisms of AMD pathogenesis remain poorly understood. Here we show that cultured human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) from AMD donors (AMD RPE) are functionally impaired and exhibit distinct phenotypes compared with RPE cultured from normal donors (normal RPE). Accumulation of lipid droplets and glycogen granules, disintegration of mitochondria, and an increase in autophagosomes were observed in AMD RPE cultures. Compared with normal RPE, AMD RPE exhibit increased susceptibility to oxidative stress, produce higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under stress conditions, and showed reduced mitochondrial activity. Measurement of the ratio of LC3-II/ LC3-I, revealed impaired autophagy in AMD RPE as compared with normal RPE. Autophagic flux was also reduced in AMD RPE as compared with normal RPE, as shown by inability of AMD RPE to downregulate p62 levels during starvation. Impaired autophagic pathways were further shown by analyzing late autophagic vesicles; immunostaining with lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1) antibody revealed enlarged and annular LAMP-1-positive organelles in AMD RPE as opposed to smaller discrete puncta observed in normal RPE. Our study provides insights into AMD cellular and molecular mechanisms, proposes dysfunctional autophagy as an underlying mechanism contributing to the pathophysiology of the disease, and opens up new avenues for development of novel treatment strategies.

  20. Work-related activities that may contribute to musculoskeletal symptoms among dental students: validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Patrícia Petromilli Nordi Sasso; Presoto, Cristina Dupim; Maroco, João; Campos, Juliana Alvares Duarte Bonini

    2016-05-26

    Dentists are exposed to occupational hazards, such as musculoskeletal disorders, in which symptoms can manifest early in clinical practice. To estimate the reliability and validity of the Portuguese version of the "Questionnaire on work-related activities that may contribute to musculoskeletal symptoms" when applied to dental students. 553 Brazilian students participated in the study. The one-factor structure originally proposed was tested through confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) using the indexes c2/df, CFI, GFI, and RMSEA. After observing an inadequate good fit (c2/df=7.140, CFI=0.791, GFI=0.778, RMSEA=0.129), the sample was subdivided into 3 groups and an exploratory factor analysis was conducted (EFA) (n=255). A CFA was then conducted using a subsample (n=113). To test the invariance of the obtained factorial solution, a multi-group analysis was performed using a third sample, independent from the others (n=185). The convergent (AVE) and discriminant (r2) validity were assessed. The composite reliability (CR), Cronbach's alpha coefficient (a), and intra-class correlation coefficient (r) were calculated. In the EFA, 3 factors were extracted: "Repetitiveness," "Working posture," and "External factors" (c2=21895.154; pinternal consistency, and reproducibility were adequate for all factors (CR=0.736-0.883; a=0.747-0.876; r=0.729-0.940). The questionnaire proved to be reliable and valid for the sample of dentistry students if the three-factor model is used.

  1. Relative contribution of matrix metalloprotease and cysteine protease activities to cytokine-stimulated articular cartilage degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondergaard, B C; Henriksen, K; Wulf, H; Oestergaard, S; Schurigt, U; Bräuer, R; Danielsen, I; Christiansen, C; Qvist, P; Karsdal, M A

    2006-08-01

    Both matrix metalloprotease (MMP) activity and cathepsin K (CK) activity have been implicated in cartilage turnover. We investigated the relative contribution of MMP activity and CK activity in cartilage degradation using ex vivo and in vivo models. Bovine articular cartilage explants were stimulated with oncostatin M (OSM) 10 ng/ml and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) 20 ng/ml in the presence or absence of the broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor GM6001 and the cysteine protease inhibitor, E64. Cartilage degradation was evaluated in the conditioned medium by glycosaminoglycans (GAG), hydroxyproline, and cross-linked C-telopeptide fragments of type II collagen (CTX-II), which were compared to immunohistochemical evaluations of proteoglycans and CTX-II. We assessed MMP expression by gelatine zymography and CK expression by immunohistochemistry. In vivo, CTX-II release was measured from CK-deficient mice. OSM and TNF-alpha combined induced significant (Pdegradation products measured by hydroxyproline and CTX-II compared to vehicle control. The cytokines potently induced MMP expression, assessed by zymography, and CK expression investigated by immunohistochemistry. Inhibition of MMP activity completely abrogated hydroxyproline and CTX-II release (Pdegradation. In contrast, inhibition of cysteine proteases resulted in an increase rather than a decrease in MMP derived fragments of collagen type II degradation, CTX-II, suggesting altered collagen metabolism.

  2. Beyond dreams: do sleep-related movements contribute to brain development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S Blumberg

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Conventional wisdom has long held that the twitches of sleeping infants and adults are by-products of a dreaming brain. With the discovery of active (or REM sleep in the 1950s and the recognition soon thereafter that active sleep is characterized by inhibition of motor outflow, researchers elaborated on conventional wisdom and concluded that sleep-related twitches are epiphenomena that result from incomplete blockade of dream-related cortical activity. This view persists despite the fact that twitching is unaffected in infant and adults when the cortex is disconnected from the brainstem. In 1966, Roffwarg and colleagues introduced the ontogenetic hypothesis, which addressed the preponderance of active sleep in early infancy. This hypothesis posited that the brainstem mechanisms that produce active sleep provide direct ascending stimulation to the forebrain and descending stimulation to the musculature, thereby promoting brain and neuromuscular development. However, this hypothesis and the subsequent work that tested it did not directly address the developmental significance of twitching or sensory feedback as a contributor to activity-dependent development. Here I review recent findings that have inspired an elaboration of the ontogenetic hypothesis. Specifically, in addition to direct brainstem activation of cortex during active sleep, sensory feedback arising from limb twitches produces discrete and substantial activation of somatosensory cortex and, beyond that, of hippocampus. Delineating how twitching during active sleep contributes to the establishment, refinement, and maintenance of neural circuits may aid our understanding of the early developmental events that make sensorimotor integration possible. In addition, twitches may prove to be sensitive and powerful tools for assessing somatosensory function in humans across the lifespan as well as functional recovery in individuals with injuries or conditions that affect sensorimotor function.

  3. The relative contribution of DNA methylation and genetic variants on protein biomarkers for human diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ahsan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Associations between epigenetic alterations and disease status have been identified for many diseases. However, there is no strong evidence that epigenetic alterations are directly causal for disease pathogenesis. In this study, we combined SNP and DNA methylation data with measurements of protein biomarkers for cancer, inflammation or cardiovascular disease, to investigate the relative contribution of genetic and epigenetic variation on biomarker levels. A total of 121 protein biomarkers were measured and analyzed in relation to DNA methylation at 470,000 genomic positions and to over 10 million SNPs. We performed epigenome-wide association study (EWAS and genome-wide association study (GWAS analyses, and integrated biomarker, DNA methylation and SNP data using between 698 and 1033 samples depending on data availability for the different analyses. We identified 124 and 45 loci (Bonferroni adjusted P < 0.05 with effect sizes up to 0.22 standard units' change per 1% change in DNA methylation levels and up to four standard units' change per copy of the effective allele in the EWAS and GWAS respectively. Most GWAS loci were cis-regulatory whereas most EWAS loci were located in trans. Eleven EWAS loci were associated with multiple biomarkers, including one in NLRC5 associated with CXCL11, CXCL9, IL-12, and IL-18 levels. All EWAS signals that overlapped with a GWAS locus were driven by underlying genetic variants and three EWAS signals were confounded by smoking. While some cis-regulatory SNPs for biomarkers appeared to have an effect also on DNA methylation levels, cis-regulatory SNPs for DNA methylation were not observed to affect biomarker levels. We present associations between protein biomarker and DNA methylation levels at numerous loci in the genome. The associations are likely to reflect the underlying pattern of genetic variants, specific environmental exposures, or represent secondary effects to the pathogenesis of disease.

  4. Relative contribution of expectancy and immediate arousal to the facilitatory effect of an auditory accessory stimulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Del-Fava

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available An auditory stimulus speeds up a digital response to a subsequent visual stimulus. This facilitatory effect has been related to the expectancy and the immediate arousal that would be caused by the accessory stimulus. The present study examined the relative contribution of these two influences. In a first and a third experiment a simple reaction time task was used. In a second and fourth experiment a go/no-go reaction time task was used. In each of these experiments, the accessory stimulus preceded the target stimulus by 200 ms for one group of male and female volunteers (G Fix. For another group of similar volunteers (G Var the accessory stimulus preceded the target stimulus by 200 ms in 25% of the trials, by 1000 ms in 25% of the trials and was not followed by the target stimulus in 50% of the trials (Experiments 1a and 1b or preceded the target stimulus by 200 ms in 6% of the trials and by 1000 ms in 94% of the trials (Experiments 2a and 2b. There was a facilitatory effect of the accessory stimulus for G Fix in the four experiments. There was also a facilitatory effect of the accessory stimulus at the 200-ms stimulus onset asynchrony for G Var in Experiments 1a and 1b but not in Experiments 2a and 2b. The facilitatory effects observed were larger in the go/no-go task than in the simple task. Taken together, these results suggest that expectancy is much more important than immediate arousal for the improvement of performance caused by an accessory stimulus.

  5. Testing consumer perception of nutrient content claims using conjoint analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewnowski, Adam; Moskowitz, Howard; Reisner, Michele; Krieger, Bert

    2010-05-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) proposes to establish standardized and mandatory criteria upon which front-of-pack (FOP) nutrition labelling must be based. The present study aimed to estimate the relative contribution of declared amounts of different nutrients to the perception of the overall 'healthfulness' of foods by the consumer. Protein, fibre, vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium and iron were nutrients to encourage. Total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, total and added sugar, and sodium were the nutrients to limit. Two content claims per nutrient used the FDA-approved language. An online consumer panel (n 320) exposed to multiple messages (n 48) rated the healthfulness of each hypothetical food product. Utility functions were constructed using conjoint analysis, based on multiple logistic regression and maximum likelihood estimation. Consumer perception of healthfulness was most strongly driven by the declared presence of protein, fibre, calcium and vitamin C and by the declared total absence of saturated fat and sodium. For this adult panel, total and added sugar had lower utilities and contributed less to the perception of healthfulness. There were major differences between women and men. Conjoint analysis can lead to a better understanding of how consumers process information about the full nutrition profile of a product, and is a powerful tool for the testing of nutrient content claims. Such studies can help the FDA develop science-based criteria for nutrient profiling that underlies FOP and shelf labelling.

  6. Contribution of renal impairment to potentially preventable medication-related hospital admissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Leendertse (Anne); E.A. van Dijk (Elisabeth); P.A. de Smet (Peter); T.C.G. Egberts (Toine); P.M.L.A. van den Bemt (Patricia)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Medication errors and renal impairment contribute to severe adverse drug events, which may lead to hospital admission. Objective: To determine whether medication errors and renal impairment contribute to hospital admission and examine these errors for strategies to prevent

  7. Epiphyte loads on seagrasses and microphytobenthos abundance are not reliable indicators of nutrient availability in oligotrophic coastal ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourqurean, James W; Muth, Meredith F; Boyer, Joseph N

    2010-07-01

    Despite marked gradients in nutrient availability that control the abundance and species composition of seagrasses in south Florida, and the importance of nutrient availability in controlling abundance and composition of epiphytes on seagrasses in other locations, we did not find that epiphyte load on the dominant seagrass, Thalassia testudinum, or that the relative contribution of algal epiphytes to the epiphyte community, was positively correlated with nutrient availability in the water column or the sediment in oligotrophic seagrass beds. Further, the abundance of microphytobenthos, as indicated by Chlorophyll-a concentration in the sediments, was not directly correlated with concentrations of nutrients in the sediments. Our results suggest that epiphyte and microphytobenthos abundance are not unambiguous indicators of nutrient availability in relatively pristine seagrass environments, and therefore would make poor candidates for indicators of the status and trends of seagrass ecosystems in relatively low-nutrient environments like the Florida Keys. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Glycemic index and glycemic load in relation to food and nutrient intake and metabolic risk factors in a Dutch population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Huaidong; van der A, Daphne L; van Bakel, Marit M E; van der Kallen, Carla J H; Blaak, Ellen E; van Greevenbroek, Marleen M J; Jansen, Eugène H J M; Nijpels, Giel; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Feskens, Edith J M

    2008-03-01

    Previous studies on the glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) reported inconsistent findings on their association with metabolic risk factors. This may partly have been due to differences in underlying dietary patterns. We aimed to examine the association of GI and GL with food and nutrient intake and with metabolic risk factors including blood glucose, insulin, lipids, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP). The study entailed cross-sectional analyses of data from 2 joint observational studies, the CoDAM Study and the Hoorn Study. In total, 974 subjects aged 42-87 y were included in the study. The mean (+/-SD) GI was 57 +/- 4 and the mean GL was 130 +/- 39. Dairy products, potatoes and other tubers, cereal products, and fruit were the main predictive food groups for GI. GL was closely correlated with intake of total carbohydrates (r(s) = 0.97), which explained >95% of the variation in GL. After adjustment for potential confounders, GI was significantly inversely associated with HDL cholesterol and positively associated with fasting insulin, the homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance, the ratio of total to HDL cholesterol, and CRP. No association was observed between GL and any of the metabolic risk factors, except for a borderline significant positive association with CRP. In this population, a low-GI diet, which is high in dairy and fruit but low in potatoes and cereals, is associated with improved insulin sensitivity and lipid metabolism and reduced chronic inflammation. GL is highly correlated with carbohydrate intake and is not clearly associated with the investigated metabolic risk factors.

  9. Nutrient density: principles and evaluation tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewnowski, Adam; Fulgoni, Victor L

    2014-05-01

    Nutrient profiling is the technique of rating or classifying foods on the basis of their nutritional value. Foods that supply relatively more nutrients than calories are defined as nutrient dense. Nutrient profile models calculate the content of key nutrients per 100 g, 100 kcal, or per serving size of food. For maximum effectiveness, nutrient profile models need to be transparent, based on publicly accessible nutrient composition data, and validated against independent measures of a healthy diet. These rigorous scientific standards were applied to the development of the Nutrient-Rich Foods (NRF) family of nutrient profile models. First, the NRF models included nutrients to encourage as well as nutrients to limit. Second, NRF model performance was repeatedly tested against the Healthy Eating Index (HEI), an independent measure of a healthy diet. HEI values were calculated for participants in the 1999-2002 NHANES. Models based on 100 kcal and serving sizes performed better than those based on 100 g. Formulas based on sums and means performed better than those based on ratios. The final NRF9.3 index was based on 9 beneficial nutrients (protein; fiber; vitamins A, C, and E; calcium; iron; potassium; and magnesium) and on 3 nutrients to limit (saturated fat, added sugar, and sodium). Higher NRF9.3 scores were associated with lower energy density and more nutrient-rich diets. The nutrient density of foods, paired with a comprehensive program of consumer education, can become the foundation of dietary recommendations and guidelines.

  10. Relative contribution of different altered motor unit control to muscle weakness in stroke: a simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Henry; Suresh, Nina L.; Zev Rymer, William; Hu, Xiaogang

    2018-02-01

    Objective. Chronic muscle weakness impacts the majority of individuals after a stroke. The origins of this hemiparesis is multifaceted, and an altered spinal control of the motor unit (MU) pool can lead to muscle weakness. However, the relative contribution of different MU recruitment and discharge organization is not well understood. In this study, we sought to examine these different effects by utilizing a MU simulation with variations set to mimic the changes of MU control in stroke. Approach. Using a well-established model of the MU pool, this study quantified the changes in force output caused by changes in MU recruitment range and recruitment order, as well as MU firing rate organization at the population level. We additionally expanded the original model to include a fatigue component, which variably decreased the output force with increasing length of contraction. Differences in the force output at both the peak and fatigued time points across different excitation levels were quantified and compared across different sets of MU parameters. Main results. Across the different simulation parameters, we found that the main driving factor of the reduced force output was due to the compressed range of MU recruitment. Recruitment compression caused a decrease in total force across all excitation levels. Additionally, a compression of the range of MU firing rates also demonstrated a decrease in the force output mainly at the higher excitation levels. Lastly, changes to the recruitment order of MUs appeared to minimally impact the force output. Significance. We found that altered control of MUs alone, as simulated in this study, can lead to a substantial reduction in muscle force generation in stroke survivors. These findings may provide valuable insight for both clinicians and researchers in prescribing and developing different types of therapies for the rehabilitation and restoration of lost strength after stroke.

  11. Relative contributions of norspermidine synthesis and signaling pathways to the regulation of Vibrio cholerae biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotanis, Caitlin K; Brennan, William P; Angotti, Anthony D; Villa, Elizabeth A; Zayner, Josiah P; Mozina, Alexandra N; Rutkovsky, Alexandria C; Sobe, Richard C; Bond, Whitney G; Karatan, Ece

    2017-01-01

    The polyamine norspermidine is one of the major polyamines synthesized by Vibrionales and has also been found in various aquatic organisms. Norspermidine is among the environmental signals that positively regulate Vibrio cholerae biofilm formation. The NspS/MbaA signaling complex detects extracellular norspermidine and mediates the response to this polyamine. Norspermidine binding to the NspS periplasmic binding protein is thought to inhibit the phosphodiesterase activity of MbaA, increasing levels of the biofilm-promoting second messenger cyclic diguanylate monophosphate, thus enhancing biofilm formation. V. cholerae can also synthesize norspermidine using the enzyme NspC as well as import it from the environment. Deletion of the nspC gene was shown to reduce accumulation of bacteria in biofilms, leading to the conclusion that intracellular norspermidine is also a positive regulator of biofilm formation. Because V. cholerae uses norspermidine to synthesize the siderophore vibriobactin it is possible that intracellular norspermidine is required to obtain sufficient amounts of iron, which is also necessary for robust biofilm formation. The objective of this study was to assess the relative contributions of intracellular and extracellular norspermidine to the regulation of biofilm formation in V. cholerae. We show the biofilm defect of norspermidine synthesis mutants does not result from an inability to produce vibriobactin as vibriobactin synthesis mutants do not have diminished biofilm forming abilities. Furthermore, our work shows that extracellular, but not intracellular norspermidine, is mainly responsible for promoting biofilm formation. We establish that the NspS/MbaA signaling complex is the dominant mediator of biofilm formation in response to extracellular norspermidine, rather than norspermidine synthesized by NspC or imported into the cell.

  12. Relative contribution of restorative treatment to tooth extraction in a teaching institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alomari, Q D; Khalaf, M E; Al-Shawaf, N M

    2013-06-01

    Teeth can be extracted due to multiple factors. The aim of this retrospective cross-sectional study was to identify the relative contribution of restorative treatments to tooth loss. The study reviewed records of 826 patients (1102 teeth). Patient's gender, age and education were obtained. In addition to the main reason for extraction (caries, periodontal disease, pre-prosthetic extraction, restorative failure and remaining root), the following information was collected about each extracted tooth: type, the status of caries if any (primary or secondary) and pulpal status (normal or reversible pulpitis, irreversible pulpitis, necrotic or root canal treated) and type and size of restoration, if present. Following data collection, descriptive analysis was performed. A log-linear model was used to examine the association between restorative treatment and tooth loss and between reasons for tooth loss and type of tooth. Lower molars followed by upper molars were the most commonly extracted teeth. Teeth with no restorations or with crowns were less likely to be extracted (P < 0·001). Lower and upper molars and lower premolars were more likely to be extracted due to restorative failure, while lower anterior teeth were more likely to be extracted due to periodontal disease (P < 0·05). Twenty two per cent of the extractions was due to restorative failure, and at least 65·9% of these teeth had secondary caries. Gender, age and educational level were factors that affect tooth loss. In conclusion, teeth receiving multiple restorative therapies were more likely to be extracted. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Relative contribution of obesity and menopause to the association between serum adiponectin and incident metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Song Vogue; Jung, Dong-Hyuk; Yadav, Dhananjay; Kim, Jang-Young; Koh, Sang-Baek

    2017-07-31

    Metabolic syndrome is closely linked to obesity. Menopause may play a critical role in understanding the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome in women. We investigated the relative contribution of obesity and menopause to the association between serum adiponectin levels and the development of metabolic syndrome. A prospective cohort study was conducted in which a total of 1,219 women without metabolic syndrome were examined at baseline (2005-2008) and followed up (2008-2011). Women were divided according to tertiles of serum adiponectin levels and menopause status, and then stratified into four groups: the nonobese with high adiponectin; the nonobese with low adiponectin; the obese with high adiponectin; and the obese with low adiponectin. During an average 2.5-year follow-up, 44 premenopausal women (9.8%) and 161 postmenopausal women (20.9%) developed metabolic syndrome. The obese group with low serum adiponectin demonstrated an increased risk for developing metabolic syndrome in both premenopausal (odds ratio [OR] 5.92, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.24-15.66) and postmenopausal women (OR 4.22, 95% CI 2.41-7.36). However, the inverse association between serum adiponectin levels and incidence of metabolic syndrome was observed in premenopausal women with obesity (OR 0.16, 95% CI 0.03-0.81), but not in postmenopausal women with obesity (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.27-1.14). High serum adiponectin levels showed no inverse association with metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women with obesity. These findings may suggest a need for closer management of metabolic risk in postmenopausal women.

  14. The relative contribution of system failures and extreme behaviour in South Australian crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wundersitz, Lisa; Baldock, Matthew; Raftery, Simon

    2014-12-01

    Within the road system, there are compliant road users who may make an error that leads to a crash, resulting in a 'system failure', and there are also road users who deliberately take risks and display dangerous or 'extreme' behaviours that lead to a crash. Crashes resulting from system failures can be addressed through improvements to road system design more readily than crashes resulting from extreme behaviours. The classification of crash causation in terms of system failures or extreme behaviour is important for determining the extent to which a Safe System approach (i.e. improvements to road system design to serve compliant road users) is capable of reducing the number of crashes. This study examined the relative contribution of system failures and extreme behaviour in South Australian crashes as identified from information in Coroner's investigation files and in-depth crash investigations conducted by the Centre for Automotive Safety Research (CASR). The analysis of 189 fatal crashes, 272 non-fatal metropolitan injury crashes and 181 non-fatal rural crashes indicated that very few non-fatal crashes (3% metropolitan, 9% rural) involved extreme behaviour by road users and, even in fatal crashes, the majority (54%) were the result of system failures. Fatal crashes resulting from system failures were more likely than those resulting from extreme behaviour to occur during the day, on weekdays, in rural areas and on roads with high speed limits. Findings from the current study suggest that improvements to the road transport system (i.e. forgiving road infrastructure, appropriate speed limits, and safe vehicle design) can be expected to be much more effective in reducing crashes than concentrating on preventing extreme behaviours. Such a strategy could reduce the incidence and severity of a large proportion of crashes in South Australia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Investigation of the Spectroscopic Information on Functional Groups Related to Carbohydrates in Different Morphological Fractions of Corn Stover and Their Relationship to Nutrient Supply and Biodegradation Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Hangshu; Ding, Xue; Zhang, Liyang; Sun, Fang; Wang, Xiaofan; Zhang, Yonggen

    2017-05-24

    The objectives of this study were to investigate (1) nutritive values and biodegradation characteristics and (2) mid-IR spectroscopic features within the regions associated with carbohydrate functional groups (including cellulosic component (CELC), structural carbohydrate (STCHO), and total carbohydrate (CHO)) in different morphological fractions of corn stover. Furthermore, correlation and regression analyses were also applied to determine the relationship between nutritional values and spectroscopic parameters. The results showed that different morphological sections of corn stover had different nutrient supplies, in situ biodegradation characteristics, and spectral structural features within carbohydrate regions. The stem rind and ear husk were both high in fibrous content, which led to the lowest effective degradabilities (ED) among these stalk fractions. The ED values of NDF were ranked ear husk > stem pith > leaf blade > leaf sheath > whole plant > stem rind. Intensities of peak height and area within carbohydrate regions were relatively more stable compared with spectral ratio profiles. Significant difference was found only in peak area intensity of CELC, which was at the highest level for stem rind, followed by stem pith, leaf sheath, whole plant, leaf blade, and ear husk. Correlation results showed that changes in some carbohydrate spectral ratios were highly associated with carbohydrate chemical profiles and in situ rumen degradation kinetics. Among the various carbohydrate molecular spectral parameters that were tested in multiple regression analysis, CHO height ratios, and area ratios of CELC:CHO and CELC:STCHO as well as CELC area were mostly sensitive to nutrient supply and biodegradation characteristics in different morphological fractions of corn stover.

  16. Role of Relatively Small-Scale Logistics Contributions in North Atlantic Treaty Organization Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bernotas, Vaidas

    2005-01-01

    In the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), an entity of 26 member countries, logistics support to operations is challenged by a limited number of countries that are contributing logistics capabilities...

  17. Trees and Streets as Drivers of Urban Stormwater Nutrient Pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Benjamin D; Finlay, Jacques C; Hobbie, Sarah E

    2017-09-05

    Expansion of tree cover is a major management goal in cities because of the substantial benefits provided to people, and potentially to water quality through reduction of stormwater volume by interception. However, few studies have addressed the full range of potential impacts of trees on urban runoff, which includes deposition of nutrient-rich leaf litter onto streets connected to storm drains. We analyzed the influence of trees on stormwater nitrogen and phosphorus export across 19 urban watersheds in Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN, U.S.A., and at the scale of individual streets within one residential watershed. Stormwater nutrient concentrations were highly variable across watersheds and strongly related to tree canopy over streets, especially for phosphorus. Stormwater nutrient loads were primarily related to road density, the dominant control over runoff volume. Street canopy exerted opposing effects on loading, where elevated nutrient concentrations from trees near roads outweighed the weak influence of trees on runoff reduction. These results demonstrate that vegetation near streets contributes substantially to stormwater nutrient pollution, and therefore to eutrophication of urban surface waters. Urban landscape design and management that account for trees as nutrient pollution sources could improve water quality outcomes, while allowing cities to enjoy the myriad benefits of urban forests.

  18. Response of Vallisneria natans to Increasing Nitrogen Loading Depends on Sediment Nutrient Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao Gu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available High nitrogen (N loading may contribute to recession of submerged macrophytes in shallow lakes; yet, its influences vary depending on environmental conditions. In August 2013, we conducted a 28-day factorial-designed field mesocosm experiment in Lake Taihu at the Taihu Laboratory for Lake Ecosystem Research (TLLER to examine the effects of high N loading on the growth of Vallisneria natans in systems with contrasting sediment types. We ran the experiments with two levels of nutrient loading—present-day external nutrient loading (average P: 5 μg·L−1·day−1, N: 130 μg·L−1·day−1 and P: 5 μg·L−1·day−1, and with three times higher N loading (N: 390 μg·L−1·day−1 and used sediment with two contrasting nutrient levels. V. natans growth decreased significantly with increasing N loading, the effect being dependent, however, on the nutrient status of the sediment. In low nutrient sediment, relative growth rates, leaf biomass and root biomass decreased by 11.9%, 18.2% and 23.3%, respectively, at high rather than low N loading, while the decline was larger (44.0%, 32.7% and 41.8%, respectively when using high nutrient sediment. The larger effect in the nutrient-rich sediment may reflect an observed higher shading of phytoplankton and excess nutrient accumulation in plant tissue, though potential toxic effects of the high-nutrient sediment may also have contributed. Our study confirms the occurrence of a negative effect of increasing N loading on submerged plant growth in shallow nutrient-enriched lakes and further shows that this effect is augmented when the plants grow in nutrient-rich sediment. External N control may, therefore, help to protect or restore submerged macrophytes, especially when the sediment is enriched with nutrients and organic matter.

  19. Environmental impacts and nutrient recycling on pastures grazed by cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M.B. Vendramini

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Grasslands are being replaced by urbanization and more profitable agricultural activities around the world. Producers may be faced with land constraints and need to consider intensification of the remaining grasslands as a means of maintaining overall production on a decreasing land resource. However, intensification of the grazing system is usually associated with greater nutrient inputs, including those from commercial fertilizers and supplement fed to animals. Excessive loading of nutrients in intensive grazing systems via fertilizer and animal wastes can cause nutrient buildup in the soil and subsequent water quality problems. Surface runoff and leaching of nutrients are the two major process affecting water quality. Nitrogen and P represent major nutrient concerns as related to water quality. Increased nitrate concentrations render groundwater unsuitable for drinking and can cause serious health issues for humans. Excessive N and P concentrations may contribute to eutrophication of streams and lakes. Maximizing efficiency of nutrient recycling through the soil-forage-animal system minimizes off-site nutrient transport and decreases production costs by reducing the quantity of commercial fertilizer needed. Management strategies to reduce soil and water contamination include refining the balance of nutrient inputs from feeds and fertilizers as well as accounting for the nutrients recycled through the decomposition of plant litter and animal wastes. Current interest in the development and adoption of efficient and sustainable agriculture systems has led forage researchers to amplify the scope of grasslands research by increasing multidisciplinary efforts. There is an increased interest in quantifying the impacts of forage-animal management strategies on the environment, with the goal of developing economically viable best management practices that result in optimum forage production and profitability, while protecting the environment

  20. Impaired cardiac SIRT1 activity by carbonyl stress contributes to aging-related ischemic intolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhu Gu

    Full Text Available Reactive aldehydes can initiate protein oxidative damage which may contribute to heart senescence. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1 is considered to be a potential interventional target for I/R injury management in the elderly. We hypothesized that aldehyde mediated carbonyl stress increases susceptibility of aged hearts to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury, and elucidate the underlying mechanisms with a focus on SIRT1. Male C57BL/6 young (4-6 mo and aged (22-24 mo mice were subjected to myocardial I/R. Cardiac aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2, SIRT1 activity and protein carbonyls were assessed. Our data revealed that aged heart exhibited increased endogenous aldehyde/carbonyl stress due to impaired ALDH2 activity concomitant with blunted SIRT1 activity (P<0.05. Exogenous toxic aldehydes (4-HNE exposure in isolated cardiomyocyte verified that aldehyde-induced carbonyl modification on SIRT1 impaired SIRT1 activity leading to worse hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R injury, which could all be rescued by Alda-1 (ALDH2 activator (all P<0.05. However, SIRT1 inhibitor blocked the protective effect of Alda-1 on H/R cardiomyocyte. Interestingly, myocardial I/R leads to higher carbonylation but lower activity of SIRT1 in aged hearts than that seen in young hearts (P<0.05. The application of Alda-1 significantly reduced the carbonylation on SIRT1 and markedly improved the tolerance to in vivo I/R injury in aged hearts, but failed to protect Sirt1(+/- knockout mice against myocardial I/R injury. This was verified by Alda-1 treatment improved postischemic contractile function recovery in ex vivo perfused aged but not in Sirt1(+/- hearts. Thus, aldehyde/carbonyl stress is accelerated in aging heart. These results provide a new insight that impaired cardiac SIRT1 activity by carbonyl stress plays a critical role in the increased susceptibility of aged heart to I/R injury. ALDH2 activation can restore this aging-related myocardial ischemic intolerance.

  1. Including spatial data in nutrient balance modelling on dairy farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Maricke; van Middelaar, Corina; Stoof, Cathelijne; Oenema, Jouke; Stoorvogel, Jetse; de Boer, Imke

    2017-04-01

    at Dutch dairy farms. We selected two dairy farms located on cover sands in the Netherlands. One farm was located on relatively homogeneous soil type, and one on many different soil types within the sandy soils. A full year of data of N and P inputs and outputs on farm and field level were provided by the farmers, including field level yields, yield composition, manure composition, degree of grazing and degree of mowing. Soil heterogeneity was defined as the number of soil units within the farm corrected for surface area, and quantified from the Dutch 1:50.000 soil map. N and P balances at farm and field level were determined, as well as differences in nutrient use efficiency, leaching, and N emission. We will present the effect of the spatial scale on nutrient balance analysis and discuss to which degree any differences are caused by within-farm land management and soil variation. This study highlights to which extent within-farm land management and soil variation should be taken into account when modelling nutrient flows and nutrient use efficiencies at farm level, to contribute to field-based decision making for improved land management.

  2. Predicting Hydrological Drought: Relative Contributions of Soil Moisture and Snow Information to Seasonal Streamflow Prediction Skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, R.; Mahanama, S.; Livneh, B.; Lettenmaier, D.; Reichle, R.

    2011-01-01

    in this study we examine how knowledge of mid-winter snow accumulation and soil moisture conditions contribute to our ability to predict streamflow months in advance. A first "synthetic truth" analysis focuses on a series of numerical experiments with multiple sophisticated land surface models driven with a dataset of observations-based meteorological forcing spanning multiple decades and covering the continental United States. Snowpack information by itself obviously contributes to the skill attained in streamflow prediction, particularly in the mountainous west. The isolated contribution of soil moisture information, however, is found to be large and significant in many areas, particularly in the west but also in region surrounding the Great Lakes. The results are supported by a supplemental, observations-based analysis using (naturalized) March-July streamflow measurements covering much of the western U.S. Additional forecast experiments using start dates that span the year indicate a strong seasonality in the skill contributions; soil moisture information, for example, contributes to kill at much longer leads for forecasts issued in winter than for those issued in summer.

  3. Who Are the Top Contributors in a MOOC? Relating Participants' Performance and Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alario-Hoyos, C.; Muñoz-Merino, P. J.; Pérez-Sanagustín, M.; Delgado Kloos, C.; Parada Gelvez, H. A.

    2016-01-01

    The role of social tools in massive open online courses (MOOCs) is essential as they connect participants. Of all the participants in an MOOC, top contributors are the ones who more actively contribute via social tools. This article analyses and reports empirical data from five different social tools pertaining to an actual MOOC to characterize…

  4. Relative contributions of NOS isoforms during experimental colitis: endothelial-derived NOS maintains mucosal integrity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vallance, Bruce A.; Dijkstra, Gerard; Qiu, Bosheng; van der Waaij, Laurens A.; van Goor, Harry; Jansen, Peter L. M.; Mashimo, Hiroshi; Collins, Stephen M.

    2004-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in inflammatory bowel diseases has traditionally focused on the inducible form of NO synthase (iNOS). However, the constitutive endothelial (eNOS) and neuronal (nNOS) isoforms may also impact on colitis, either by contributing to the inflammation or by regulating

  5. Fruit and vegetable intake and related nutrients are associated with oxidative stress markers in middle-aged men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocate, Paula G; Natali, Antônio José; Oliveira, Alessandro de; Longo, Giana Z; Alfenas, Rita de Cássia G; Peluzio, Maria do Carmo G; Santos, Eliziária C dos; Buthers, Jéssica M; Oliveira, Leandro L de; Hermsdorff, Helen Hermana M

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the potential relationships between fruit and vegetable (FV) intake and oxidative stress markers in middle-aged men, with an emphasis on vitamin C, fiber, and magnesium content. The study was conducted with 296 healthy men, age 50.5 ± 5.0 y, and body mass index (BMI) of 25.8 ± 3.5 kg/m(2). Dietary intake, anthropometry, blood pressure, lifestyle features, and blood and urine biochemical data were assessed with validated procedures. The oxidative stress markers selected were plasma oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL), urinary 8-iso-prostaglandin F2 α (8-iso-PGF2 α) and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). The men included in the highest tertile of FV intake (≥341.1 g/d) displayed lower concentrations of ox-LDL, 8-iso-PGF2 α and 8-OHdG (P for trend iso-PGF2 α were lower in men in the highest tertile of fiber (≥6.5 g/d; P for trend = 0.034), vitamin C (≥98.0 mg/d; P for trend = 0.007), and magnesium (≥48.9 mg/d; P for trend = 0.018) from the FV-group intake. Greater FV intake was independently associated with reduced ox-LDL, 8-OHdG, and 8-iso-PGF2 α in middle-aged men. Fiber, vitamin C, and magnesium from FV seem to contribute to this beneficial relationship. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Age-related differences in altruism across adulthood: making personal financial gain versus contributing to the public good.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Alexandra M; Blanchard-Fields, Fredda

    2014-04-01

    Four studies utilizing different methodological approaches investigated adult age-related differences in altruism (i.e., contributions to the public good) and the self-centered value of increasing personal wealth. In Study 1, data from the World Values Survey (World Values Survey Association, 2009) provided 1st evidence of a negative association between age and the self-reported wish to be rich. Ecological concerns, a form of contributing to the public good, were positively related to age. Study 2 investigated whether these values are expressed behaviorally when participants solved a complex problem that allowed striving for monetary gains or contributing to a public good. Confirming hypotheses, young adults' strategies were consistent with the aim of optimizing personal financial gain, and older adults' strategies with the aim to contribute to the public good. Studies 3 and 4 showed that older adults were more likely than younger and middle-aged adults to donate money to a good cause than to keep it for themselves. Study 4 manipulated participants' future time perspective as a factor potentially contributing to age-related differences. Partly confirming hypotheses, a longer time perspective reduced donations by older adults, but a shorter time perspective did not increase donations by younger adults. These studies suggest that older adults not only report valuing contributions to the public good more highly but also are more likely to behave altruistically than younger adults. All studies used cross-sectional designs that prevent a strict test of developmental trajectories but rather provide age-related differences at 1 point in time, representing a 1st step in investigating adult age-related differences in altruism. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  7. Quantifying the relative contribution of an ecological reserve to conservation objectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Aagaard

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating the role public lands play in meeting conservation goals is an essential step in good governance. We present a tool for comparing the regional contribution of each of a suite of wildlife management units to conservation goals. We use weighted summation (simple additive weighting to compute a Unit Contribution Index (UCI based on species richness, population abundance, and a conservation score based on IUCN Red List classified threat levels. We evaluate UCI for a subset of the 729 participating wetlands of the Integrated Waterbird Management and Monitoring (IWMM Program across U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Regions 3 (Midwest USA, 4 (Southeast USA, and 5 (Northeast USA. We found that the median across-Region UCI for Region 5 was greater than Regions 3 and 4, while Region 4 had the greatest within-Region UCI median. This index is a powerful tool for wildlife managers to evaluate the performance of units within the conservation estate.

  8. Quantifying the relative contribution of an ecological reserve to conservation objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagaard, Kevin; Lyons, James E.; Thogmartin, Wayne E.

    2017-01-01

    Evaluating the role public lands play in meeting conservation goals is an essential step in good governance. We present a tool for comparing the regional contribution of each of a suite of wildlife management units to conservation goals. We use weighted summation (simple additive weighting) to compute a Unit Contribution Index (UCI) based on species richness, population abundance, and a conservation score based on IUCN Red List classified threat levels. We evaluate UCI for a subset of the 729 participating wetlands of the Integrated Waterbird Management and Monitoring (IWMM) Program across U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Regions 3 (Midwest USA), 4 (Southeast USA), and 5 (Northeast USA). We found that the median across-Region UCI for Region 5 was greater than Regions 3 and 4, while Region 4 had the greatest within-Region UCI median. This index is a powerful tool for wildlife managers to evaluate the performance of units within the conservation estate.

  9. Systematic Functional Testing of Rare Variants: Contributions of CFI to Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Perciliz L; Garrett, Melanie E; Willer, Jason R; Campochiaro, Peter A; Campochiaro, Betsy; Zack, Donald J; Ashley-Koch, Allison E; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2017-03-01

    Genome-wide association (GWAS) and sequencing studies for AMD have highlighted the importance of coding variants at loci that encode components of the complement pathway. However, assessing the contribution of such alleles to AMD, especially when they are rare, remains coarse, in part because of the persistent challenge in establishing their functional relevance. Others and we have shown previously that rare alleles in complement factor I (CFI) can be tested functionally using a surrogate in vivo assay of retinal vascularization in zebrafish embryos. Here, we have implemented and scaled these tools to assess the overall contribution of rare alleles in CFI to AMD. We performed targeted sequencing of CFI in 731 AMD patients, followed by replication in a second patient cohort of 511 older healthy individuals. Systematic functional testing of all alleles and post-hoc statistical analysis of functional variants was also performed. We discovered 20 rare coding nonsynonymous variants, including the previously reported G119R allele. In vivo testing led to the identification of nine variants that alter CFI; six of which are associated with hypoactive complement factor I (FI). Post-hoc analysis in ethnically matched, population controls showed six of these to be present exclusively in cases. Taken together, our data argue that multiple rare and ultra-rare alleles in CFI contribute to AMD pathogenesis; they improve the precision of the assessment of the contribution of CFI to AMD; and they offer a rational route to establishing both causality and direction of allele effect for genes associated with this disorder.

  10. Associations between fruit and vegetable, and antioxidant nutrient intake and age-related macular degeneration by smoking status in elderly Korean men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Hyesook; Vijayakumar, Aswathy; Kwon, Oran; Chang, Namsoo

    2017-12-04

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the major causes of irreversible blindness. The objective of this study was to determine whether there is any relationship between dietary intake of fruits and vegetables (F&V) and antioxidant nutrients including carotenoids and AMD according to smoking status in elderly men. We performed a cross-sectional analysis using nationally representative samples of elderly aged ≥ 65 years (n = 1414) from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES, 2010-2012). The current smokers consumed less food in total, and, in particular, less cereals/potatoes/sugar products, fruits and vegetables than the nonsmokers and former smokers (p < 0.05). Intake of energy, thiamin, vitamin C, vitamin A, and β-carotene were significantly lower in the current smokers than in the nonsmokers and the former smokers. For current smokers, the ORs of the highest tertile compared with the lowest tertile were 0.36 (95% CI: 0.14-0.96, p for trend = 0.0576) for F&V, 0.32 (95% CI: 0.12-0.85, p for trend = 0.0561) for vitamin C, 0.23 (95% CI: 0.08-0.67, p for trend = 0.0038) for α-carotene, 0.13 (95% CI: 0.04-0.46, p for trend = 0.0003) for β-carotene after adjusting for confounding factors. In contrast, there was no association between antioxidant nutrient intake and AMD among the nonsmokers and former smokers. These results suggest that increased consumption of fruits and vegetables containing antioxidant components such as vitamin C, α-carotene, and β-carotene may have a protective effect on AMD. These effects may be more evident among current smokers.

  11. The relative contributions of the prosthetic and sound limb to balance control in unilateral transtibial amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtze, Carolin; Hof, At L; Postema, Klaas; Otten, Bert

    2012-06-01

    In unilateral transtibial amputees maintenance of standing balance is compromised due to the lack of active ankle control in the prosthetic limb. The purpose of this study is to disentangle the contribution of the prosthetic and sound limb to balance control following waist-pull perturbations. We compared the contribution of the hip and ankle joints to balance control of 15 unilateral transtibial amputees and 13 able-bodied controls after been externally perturbed through release of a pulling force. Perturbations were applied in four different directions. Outcome measure was the proportion of joint moment integrated over time generated by the hip and ankle joints in order to restore static stability after perturbation. Analyses revealed that perturbations in backward/forward direction were recovered mainly by the ankle strategy. The amputees compensated for the absence of active ankle control in the prosthetic limb by increasing the ankle moment in the sound limb. Interestingly, the passive properties of the prosthetic foot contributed to balance control, which has important implications for prosthetic fitting and standing stability in lower limb amputees. Amputees and controls resisted perturbations in medio-lateral direction by generating the necessary hip moments. Finally, these findings are discussed with respect to prosthetic design and rehabilitation processes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Different personal propensities among scientists relate to deeper vs. broader knowledge contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Thomas S.; Hess, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Scientific journal publications, and their contributions to knowledge, can be described by their depth (specialized, domain-specific knowledge extensions) and breadth (topical scope, including spanning multiple knowledge domains). Toward generating hypotheses about how scientists’ personal dispositions would uniquely predict deeper vs. broader contributions to the literature, we assumed that conducting broader studies is generally viewed as less attractive (e.g., riskier) than conducting deeper studies. Study 1 then supported our assumptions: the scientists surveyed considered a hypothetical broader study, compared with an otherwise-comparable deeper study, to be riskier, a less-significant opportunity, and of lower potential importance; they further reported being less likely to pursue it and, in a forced choice, most chose to work on the deeper study. In Study 2, questionnaire measures of medical researchers’ personal dispositions and 10 y of PubMed data indicating their publications’ topical coverage revealed how dispositions differentially predict depth vs. breadth. Competitiveness predicted depth positively, whereas conscientiousness predicted breadth negatively. Performance goal orientation predicted depth but not breadth, and learning goal orientation contrastingly predicted breadth but not depth. Openness to experience positively predicted both depth and breadth. Exploratory work behavior (the converse of applying and exploiting one’s current knowledge) predicted breadth positively and depth negatively. Thus, this research distinguishes depth and breadth of published knowledge contributions, and provides new insights into how scientists’ personal dispositions influence research processes and products. PMID:25733900

  13. Nutrient-enhancement of Matooke banana for improved nutrient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 173 PLHIVregistered with Rakai Health Science Project were chosen and interviewed using structured questionnaires to determine the current contribution of banana to the household food security. Nutrient intake data were collected using Gibson s 24-hour recall method and food frequency questionnaires.

  14. Foliar nutrients in relation to growth, allocation and leaf traits in seedlings of a wide range of woody plant species and types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, J. H.C.; Werger, M.J.A.; Castro-Díez, P.; Van Rheenen, J. W.A.; Rowland, A. P.

    This study aimed to identify functional correlates of seedling leaf nutrient content among woody species and to characterise functional species groups with respect to leaf nutrient attributes. Seedlings of 81 woody species from the temperate zone of western Europe were grown in a standard laboratory

  15. Obesity-related hypertension: epidemiology, pathophysiology, treatments, and the contribution of perivascular adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghamohammadzadeh, Reza; Heagerty, Anthony M

    2012-06-01

    The advent of the obesity epidemic has highlighted the need to re-assess more closely the pathophysiology of obesity-related hypertension with the aim of identifying new therapies. In this article, we review the role of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, sympathetic nervous system, and inflammation in relation to the pathophysiology of this condition. We also discuss the potential role of the perivascular adipose tissue in the context of obesity-related hypertension.

  16. Beliefs Contributing to HIV-related Stigma in African and Afro-Caribbean Communities in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stutterheim, S.E.; Bos, A.E.R.; Kesteren, N.M.C. van; Shiripinda, I.; Pryor, J.B.; Bruin, M. de; Schaalma, H.P.

    2012-01-01

    Thirty years after the first diagnosis, people living with HIV (PLWH) around the world continue to report stigmatizing experiences. In this study, beliefs contributing to HIV-related stigma in African and Afro-Caribbean diaspora communities and their cultural context were explored through

  17. Relative contributions of human types 1 and 2 T-helper cell-derived eosinophilotrophic cytokines to development of eosinophilia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierenga, E. A.; Backx, B.; Snoek, M.; Koenderman, L.; Kapsenberg, M. L.

    1993-01-01

    The relative contributions of type 1 and 2 T-helper (Th1 and Th2) cell-derived interleukin (IL-5), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and IL-3 were studied in the regulation of sequential events in the development of eosinophilia. Using eosinophils from normal donors and

  18. The relative contribution of mechanical stress and systemic processes in different types of osteoarthritis: the NEO study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.W. de; Mutsert, R. de; Cessie, S. le; Heijer, M. den; Rosendaal, F.R.; Kloppenburg, M.; Assendelft, W.J.; Smit, J.W.A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the relative contribution of surrogates for mechanical stress and systemic processes with osteoarthritis (OA) in weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing joints. METHODS: The Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity study is a population-based cohort including 6673 participants (range

  19. Relative contribution of different muscle energy consumption processes in an energy-based muscle load sharing cost function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikooyan, A.A.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Westerhoff, P.; Bergmann, G.; van der Helm, F.C.T.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the relative contributions of two muscle energy consumption processes (the detachment of cross-bridges and calcium-pumping) incorporated in a recently developed muscle load sharing cost function, namely the energy-based criterion, by using in vivo measured

  20. The relative contributions of fear and disgust reductions to improvements in spider phobia following exposure-based treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olatunji, B.O.; Huijding, J.; Jong, P.J. de; Smits, J.A.J.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examines the relative contributions of changes in state fear and disgust emotions to improvements in spider phobia observed with exposure-based treatment. Sixty-one treatment-seeking spider fearful individuals underwent a one-session exposure in vivo treatment. Growth curve

  1. The relative contributions of fear and disgust reductions to improvements in spider phobia following exposure-based treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Huijding, Jorg; de Jong, Peter J.; Smits, Jasper A. J.

    The present study examines the relative contributions of changes in state fear and disgust emotions to improvements in spider phobia observed with exposure-based treatment. Sixty-one treatment-seeking spider fearful individuals underwent a one-session exposure in vivo treatment. Growth curve

  2. Age-Related Differences in Altruism across Adulthood: Making Personal Financial Gain versus Contributing to the Public Good

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Alexandra M.; Blanchard-Fields, Fredda

    2014-01-01

    Four studies utilizing different methodological approaches investigated adult age-related differences in altruism (i.e., contributions to the public good) and the self-centered value of increasing personal wealth. In Study 1, data from the World Values Survey (World Values Survey Association, 2009) provided 1st evidence of a negative association…

  3. Comparing the Contribution of Two Tests of Working Memory to Reading in Relation to Phonological Awareness and Rapid Naming Speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, George K.; Das, J. P.; Hayward, Denyse V.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the contribution of two different versions of working memory to word reading and reading comprehension in relation to phonological awareness and rapid naming speed. Fifty children were administered two measures of working memory, namely an adaptation of the Daneman and Carpenter sentence span task and…

  4. Explaining educational differences in leisure-time physical activity in Europe: the contribution of work-related factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mäkinen, T. E.; Sippola, R.; Borodulin, K.; Rahkonen, O.; Kunst, A.; Klumbiene, J.; Regidor, E.; Ekholm, O.; Mackenbach, J.; Prättälä, R.

    2012-01-01

    Although educational differences in leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) exist across Europe, the independent effect of educational level on leisure-time physical activity has rarely been explored. This study examines the relative contribution of occupational class, employment status, and

  5. The Contribution of School-Related Parental Monitoring, Self-Determination, and Self-Efficacy to Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affuso, Gaetana; Bacchini, Dario; Miranda, Maria Concetta

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the contribution of school-related parental monitoring (SR-PM), self-determined motivation, and academic self-efficacy to academic achievement across time. The authors hypothesized that SR-PM would affect academic achievement indirectly via its effects on self-determined motivation and academic self-efficacy…

  6. The influence of nutrients, biliary-pancreatic secretions, and systemic trophic hormones on intestinal adaptation in a Roux-en-Y bypass model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taqi, Esmaeel; Wallace, Laurie E; de Heuvel, Elaine

    2010-01-01

    The signals that govern the upregulation of nutrient absorption (adaptation) after intestinal resection are not well understood. A Gastric Roux-en-Y bypass (GRYB) model was used to isolate the relative contributions of direct mucosal stimulation by nutrients, biliary-pancreatic secretions, and sy...

  7. Biomass Burning Related Pollutions and Their Contributions to the Local Air Quality in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K. L.; Qin, K.

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we present a quantitative estimation of the impacts of biomass burning emissions from different source regions to the local air quality in Hong Kong in 2014 using global chemistry transport model simulations, sun photometer measurements, satellite observations and local monitoring network data. This study focuses on two major biomass burning pollutants, black carbon aerosols and carbon monoxide (CO). The model simulations of atmospheric black carbon and CO show excellent agreement with sun photometer aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements, satellite CO columns observations and local monitoring stations data. From the model simulation results, we estimated that biomass burning contributes 12 % of total black carbon and 16 % of atmospheric CO in Hong Kong on annual average. South East Asia shows the largest influence to the black carbon and CO levels in Hong Kong, accounts for 11 % of the total atmospheric black carbon and 8 % of CO. Biomass burning in North East Asia and Africa also show significant impacts to Hong Kong. Elevated levels of atmospheric black carbon aerosols and CO were observed during springtime (March and April) which is mainly due to the enhancement of biomass burning contributions. Black carbon and CO originating from biomass burning sources are estimated to contribute 40 % of atmospheric black carbon and 28 % of CO in Hong Kong during March 2014. An investigation focusing on the biomass burning pollution episode during springtime suggests the intensified biomass burning activities in the Indochinese Peninsula are the major sources of black carbon and CO in Hong Kong during the time.

  8. Contributions of national and global health estimates to monitoring health-related sustainable development goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundhamcharoen, Kanitta; Limwattananon, Supon; Kusreesakul, Khanitta; Tangcharoensathien, Viroj

    2016-01-01

    The millennium development goals triggered an increased demand for data on child and maternal mortalities for monitoring progress. With the advent of the sustainable development goals and growing evidence of an epidemiological transition toward non-communicable diseases, policymakers need data on mortality and disease trends and distribution to inform effective policies and support monitoring progress. Where there are limited capacities to produce national health estimates (NHEs), global health estimates (GHEs) can fill gaps for global monitoring and comparisons. This paper discusses lessons learned from Thailand's burden of disease (BOD) study on capacity development on NHEs and discusses the contributions and limitations of GHEs in informing policies at the country level. Through training and technical support by external partners, capacities are gradually strengthened and institutionalized to enable regular updates of BOD at national and subnational levels. Initially, the quality of cause-of-death reporting in death certificates was inadequate, especially for deaths occurring in the community. Verbal autopsies were conducted, using domestic resources, to determine probable causes of deaths occurring in the community. This method helped to improve the estimation of years of life lost. Since the achievement of universal health coverage in 2002, the quality of clinical data on morbidities has also considerably improved. There are significant discrepancies between the Global Burden of Disease 2010 study estimates for Thailand and the 1999 nationally generated BOD, especially for years of life lost due to HIV/AIDS, and the ranking of priority diseases. National ownership of NHEs and an effective interface between researchers and decision-makers contribute to enhanced country policy responses, whereas subnational data are intended to be used by various subnational partners. Although GHEs contribute to benchmarking country achievement compared with global health

  9. Antagonistic pleiotropy and mutation accumulation contribute to age-related decline in stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everman, Elizabeth R; Morgan, Theodore J

    2017-12-07

    As organisms age, the effectiveness of natural selection weakens, leading to age-related decline in fitness-related traits. The evolution of age-related changes associated with senescence is likely influenced by mutation accumulation (MA) and antagonistic pleiotropy (AP). MA predicts that age-related decline in fitness components is driven by age-specific sets of alleles, non-negative genetic correlations within trait across age, and an increase in the coefficient of genetic variance. AP predicts that age-related decline in a trait is driven by alleles with positive effects on fitness in young individuals and negative effects in old individuals, and is expected to lead to negative genetic correlations within traits across age. We build on these predictions using an association mapping approach to investigate the change in additive effects of SNPs across age and among traits for multiple stress-response fitness-related traits, including cold stress with and without acclimation and starvation resistance. We found support for both MA and AP theories of aging in the age-related decline in stress tolerance. Our study demonstrates that the evolution of age-related decline in stress tolerance is driven by a combination of alleles that have age-specific additive effects, consistent with MA, as well as non-independent and antagonistic genetic architectures characteristic of AP. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Adolescent Egocentrism: Exploration into Possible Contributions of Parent-Child Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Gerald R.; Jones, Randy M.

    1982-01-01

    A family relations model for the study of adolescent egocentrism was tested in an exploratory study of the relationship between parental socialization styles and adolescents' imaginary audience behavior. Rejection-control was associated with increased imaginary audience behavior, while physical affect was negatively related to self-consciousness.…

  11. Age-related changes in processing speed: unique contributions of cerebellar and prefrontal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Eckert

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Age-related declines in processing speed are hypothesized to underlie the widespread changes in cognition experienced by older adults. We used a structural covariance approach to identify putative neural networks that underlie age-related structural changes associated with processing speed for 42 adults ranging in age from 19-79 years. To characterize a mechanism by which age-related gray matter changes lead to slower processing speed, we examined the extent to which cerebral small vessel disease influenced the association between age-related gray matter changes and processing speed. A frontal pattern of gray matter and white matter variation that was related to cerebral small vessel disease, as well as a cerebellar pattern of gray matter and white matter variation were uniquely related to age-related declines in processing speed. These results demonstrate that at least 2 distinct factors affect age-related changes in processing speed, which might be slowed by mitigating cerebral small vessel disease and factors affecting declines in cerebellar morphology.

  12. Characteristics and contributing factors related to sports injuries in young volleyball players

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The participation of young in volleyball is becoming increasingly common, and this increased involvement raises concerns about the risk of installation of sports injuries. Therefore, the objectives the study were identify the characteristics of sports injuries in young volleyball players and associate anthropometric and training variables with contributing factors for injuries. Methods A total of 522 volleyball players participating in the High School Olympic Games of the State of São Paulo (Brazil) were interviewed. A reported condition inquiry was used to gather information on injuries, such as anatomic site affected, mechanism and moment of injury, as well as personal and training data. The level of significance was set at 5%. Results A 19% frequency of injuries was found. Higher age, weight, height, body mass index and training duration values were associated with the occurrence of injuries. The most affected anatomic site was the ankle/foot complex (45 injuries, 36.3%). Direct contact and contactless mechanisms were the main causes of injuries (61 injuries; 49.2% and 48 injuries; 38.7%, respectively). Training was the moment in which most injuries occurred (93 injuries; 75%), independently of personal and training characteristics. Conclusion Injuries affected the ankle/foot complex with a greater frequency. Direct contact and contactless mechanisms were the most frequently reported and injuries occurred mainly during training sessions. Personal and training characteristics were contributing factors for the occurrence of injuries. PMID:24124803

  13. Characteristics and contributing factors related to sports injuries in young volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlei, Franciele Marques; Bastos, Fabio Nascimento; Tsutsumi, Gustavo Yuki Cantalejo; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques; Netto Júnior, Jayme; Pastre, Carlos Marcelo

    2013-10-14

    The participation of young in volleyball is becoming increasingly common, and this increased involvement raises concerns about the risk of installation of sports injuries. Therefore, the objectives the study were identify the characteristics of sports injuries in young volleyball players and associate anthropometric and training variables with contributing factors for injuries. A total of 522 volleyball players participating in the High School Olympic Games of the State of São Paulo (Brazil) were interviewed. A reported condition inquiry was used to gather information on injuries, such as anatomic site affected, mechanism and moment of injury, as well as personal and training data. The level of significance was set at 5%. A 19% frequency of injuries was found. Higher age, weight, height, body mass index and training duration values were associated with the occurrence of injuries. The most affected anatomic site was the ankle/foot complex (45 injuries, 36.3%). Direct contact and contactless mechanisms were the main causes of injuries (61 injuries; 49.2% and 48 injuries; 38.7%, respectively). Training was the moment in which most injuries occurred (93 injuries; 75%), independently of personal and training characteristics. Injuries affected the ankle/foot complex with a greater frequency. Direct contact and contactless mechanisms were the most frequently reported and injuries occurred mainly during training sessions. Personal and training characteristics were contributing factors for the occurrence of injuries.

  14. Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction Processes in Typical Chinese Paddy Soils: Rates, Relative Contributions, and Influencing Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Jun; Zhao, Xu; Sheng, Rong; Xia, Yongqiu; Ti, Chaopu; Quan, Xiaofei; Wang, Shuwei; Wei, Wenxue; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2016-09-20

    Using soil slurry-based (15)N tracer combined with N2/Ar technique, the potential rates of denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA), and their respective contributions to total nitrate reduction were investigated in 11 typical paddy soils across China. The measured rates of denitrification, anammox, and DNRA varied from 2.37 to 8.31 nmol N g(-1) h(-1), 0.15 to 0.77 nmol N g(-1) h(-1) and 0.03 to 0.54 nmol N g(-1) h(-1), respectively. The denitrification and anammox rates were significantly correlated with the soil organic carbon content, nitrate concentration, and the abundance of nosZ genes. The DNRA rates were significantly correlated with the soil C/N, extractable organic carbon (EOC)/NO3(-) ratio, and sulfate concentration. Denitrification was the dominant pathway (76.75-92.47%), and anammox (4.48-9.23%) and DNRA (0.54-17.63%) also contributed substantially to total nitrate reduction. The N loss or N conservation attributed to anammox and DNRA was 4.06-21.24 and 0.89-15.01 g N m(-2) y(-1), respectively. This study reports the first simultaneous investigation of the dissimilatory nitrate reduction processes in paddy soils, highlighting that anammox and DNRA play important roles in removing nitrate and should be considered when evaluating N transformation processes in paddy fields.

  15. Anaemia and related nutrient deficiencies after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Ting-Chia; Chang, Chia-Hsuin; Dong, Yaa-Hui; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2015-07-16

    To obtain a pooled risk estimate on the long-term impact of anaemia and related nutritional deficiencies in patients receiving Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery. Systematic review and meta-analysis. MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched to identify English reports published before 16 May 2014. Articles with case numbers >100, follow-up period >12 months, and complete data from both before and after surgery were selected. Outcomes of interest were changes in baseline measurements of proportion of patients with anaemia, by haemoglobin, haematocrit, ferritin, iron, vitamin B12 and folate levels. Two reviewers independently reviewed data and selected six prospective and nine retrospective studies with a total of 5909 patients. A random effect model with inverse variance weighting was used to calculate summary estimates of outcomes at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months postoperatively. Proportion of patients with anaemia was 12.2% at baseline, which, respectively, increased to 20.9% and 25.9% at 12 and 24 months follow-up, consistent with decreases in haemoglobin and haematocrit levels. Although the serum iron level did not change substantially after surgery, the frequency of patients with ferritin deficiency increased from 7.9% at baseline to 13.4% and 23.0% at 12 and 24 months, respectively, postoperation. Vitamin B12 deficiency increased from 2.3% at baseline to 6.5% at 12 months after surgery in those subjects receiving RYGB. There was no obvious increase in folate deficiency. RYGB surgery is associated with an increased risk of anaemia and deficiencies of iron and vitamin B12, but not folate. Ferritin is more sensitive when serum iron level is within normal range. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Advancing Understanding on Industrial Relations in Multinational Companies: Key Research Challenges and the INTREPID Contribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnigle, Patrick; Valeria, Pulignano; Edwards, Tony

    2015-01-01

    This paper has three principal aims. It firstly provides some theoretical background on the key current research issues and challenges in regard to industrial relations in multinational companies. It then presents a concise review of scholarship to date on industrial relations in multinational...... companies using INTREPID (Investigation of Transnationals’ Employment Practices: an International Database) data. Finally, the paper identifies some of the main industrial relations issues that remain to be addressed, in effect charting a form of research agenda for future work using the INTREPID data...

  17. LITTERFALL AND NUTRIENT RETURNS IN ISOLATED STANDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Osondu

    and branch morphology, leaf size and arrangement. The main objective of this study was to examine litter production and nutrient returns through litterfall by isolated stands of Terminalia catappa, and determine the contributions of nutrient elements to the rainforest soil by the isolated exotic, through a direct comparison with.

  18. Aging of marrow stromal (skeletal) stem cells and their contribution to age-related bone loss

    OpenAIRE

    Bellantuono, Ilaria; Aldahmash, Abdullah; Kassem, Moustapha

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Marrow stromal cells (MSC) are thought to be stem cells with osteogenic potential and therefore responsible for the repair and maintenance of the skeleton. Age related bone loss is one of the most prevalent diseases in the elder population. It is controversial whether MSC undergo a process of aging in vivo, leading to decreased ability to form and maintain bone homeostasis with age. In this review we summarize evidence of MSC involvement in age related bone loss and sugges...

  19. Relative contribution of free-virus and synaptic transmission to the spread of HIV-1 through target cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, Natalia L; Anghelina, Daniela; Voznesensky, Igor; Trinité, Benjamin; Levy, David N; Wodarz, Dominik

    2013-02-23

    Human immunodeficiency virus can spread through target cells by transmission of cell-free virus or directly from cell-to-cell via formation of virological synapses. Although cell-to-cell transmission has been described as much more efficient than cell-free infection, the relative contribution of the two transmission pathways to virus growth during multiple rounds of replication remains poorly defined. Here, we fit a mathematical model to previously published and newly generated in vitro data, and determine that free-virus and synaptic transmission contribute approximately equally to the growth of the virus population.

  20. What Factors Contribute to Headache-Related Disability in Teens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Kathi J; Heyer, Geoffrey; Pakalnis, Ann; Binkley, Philip F

    2016-03-01

    Our aim was to describe the relationship between risk factors, such as stress, depression, and anxiety, and potentially protective factors against pediatric headache-related disability, such as mindfulness, resilience, and self-compassion, and to determine teens' interest in mind-body skills training to help reduce headache-related disability. This was a cross-sectional survey among adolescents seen in an academic neurology clinic reporting four or more headaches monthly using standardized instruments to determine the relationship between putative risk and protective factors as well as physiologic markers of inflammation and vagal tone and headache-related disability. Among the 29 participants, 31% were male, the average age was 14.8 years, average headache frequency was 11.6 per month, and the most commonly reported trigger was stress (86%). The only risk or protective factor significantly associated with headache-related disability was depression (r = 0.52, P = 0.004). Depression was negatively correlated with mindfulness, resilience, and self-compassion (P anxiety (P teens with frequent migraine headaches, depression is the strongest risk factor for headache-related disability. Stress is viewed as a headache trigger, and teens reported wanting to learn simple stress management strategies supported by a smart phone application to help reduce headache-related disability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. USGEO National Earth Observation Assessment Methods for Evaluating the Relative Contributions of Earth Observing Systems to Societal Benefit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, J.; Stryker, T.

    2015-12-01

    The second National Civil Earth Observation Assessment identifies the inputs and relative contributions of the portfolio of observing systems currently relied upon by Federal agencies to meet key Earth observing objectives. The Assessment employs a hierarchical value-tree framework that traces the pathways through which Earth observing systems contribute value across 13 societal benefit areas, utilizing multiple levels to provide logical traceability. This presentation describes the methods used to construct societal benefit area value-trees that include key objectives and the information products, services, and research derived from Earth observations that help satisfy them. It describes the methods for weighting nodes at multiple levels of each value-tree and the expert elicitation process for assessing the relative contributions of Earth observing systems to the development of information products, services, and research. The methodology employed in the Assessment is especially useful at assessing the interdependence and relative contributions of multiple Earth observing systems on the development of blended information products and tracing information pathways from direct observations through intermediate products, such as models, to end-products used to improve decision-making. This presentation will highlight case study examples from the 13 societal benefit areas (agriculture and forestry, biodiversity, climate, disasters, ecosystems, energy and mineral resources, human health, ocean and costal resources, space weather, transportation, water resources weather, and reference measurements) to demonstrate tractability from Earth observing systems, through information products and research that satisfy key objectives, to societal benefit.

  2. Group contribution modelling for the prediction of safety-related and environmental properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frutiger, Jerome; Abildskov, Jens; Sin, Gürkan

    warming potential and ozone depletion potential. Process safety studies and environmental assessments rely on accurate property data. Safety data such as flammability limits, heat of combustion or auto ignition temperature play an important role in quantifying the risk of fire and explosions among others....... Global warming potential and ozone depletion potential became a standard to analyze the environmental impact of processes and products. In the early stage of process development and analysis, experimental values are often not available due to cost or time constraints. In this case property prediction...... of GC factors provide additional structural information beside the functional group. The contributions of all three factors are then summed up. For the database, DIPPR are used together with the reported measurement accuracy. For parameter estimation, a comprehensive statistical methodology was followed...

  3. Depression among unaccompanied minor refugees: the relative contribution of general and acculturation-specific daily hassles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keles, Serap; Friborg, Oddgeir; Idsøe, Thormod; Sirin, Selcuk; Oppedal, Brit

    2016-01-01

    This study is designed to provide an empirical conceptualization of daily hassles among unaccompanied refugees, and whether they might affect mental health of young refugees after resettlement. First, we examined the underlying structure of daily hassles conceptualized as measuring general and acculturation-specific hassles. Second, we examined whether these two distinct categories of daily hassles significantly contribute to depression above and beyond the impact of premigration trauma. The study was based on self-report questionnaire data collected from 895 unaccompanied refugees who had been granted residence in Norway. Using structural equation modeling, the results confirmed the grouping of hassles in two general categories, which explained 43% of the variance in depression. The findings underscore the importance of current life conditions for unaccompanied refugees' mental health.

  4. Factors contributing to the fatigue-related reduction in active dorsiflexion joint range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Arthur J; Rice, Charles L

    2013-05-01

    Reductions in active joint range of motion (ROM) are responsible for decreased work-generating capacity during fatiguing repetitive isotonic shortening contractions. Factors responsible for impairing the joint-angle-specific net torque developed during muscle shortening could include fatigue-induced torque loss, shortening-induced torque depression in the agonist muscle, and opposing passive tension of the antagonists, but these have not been systematically explored. Nine men (aged 25.8 ± 2.0 years) performed a maximal-effort fatiguing task that consisted of repetitive loaded shortening dorsiflexions through a 40° ankle joint ROM until active ROM decreased by 50%. Torque developed during contractile shortening, as well as passive opposing tension, was quantified before and after the reduction in active ROM. Before fatigue, and compared with maximum voluntary isometric contraction torque at the terminal ROM, shortening-induced torque depression in the agonist muscle and passive tension from the antagonists reduced net torque developed at the end of contractile shortening by ∼42% and ∼19%, respectively. After fatigue, a steepened ascending joint torque-angle relationship remained during contractile shortening, but neither muscle coactivation nor contractile slowing contributed to the fatigue-induced torque loss. Fatigue-induced torque loss, shortening-induced torque depression in the agonist, and passive tension in the antagonist greatly depressed net torque developed at the end of contractile shortening. These contributed to the fatigue-induced reduction in active ROM by impairing the ability of the dorsiflexors to generate sufficient torque to overcome the imposed load at the end of contractile shortening.

  5. From rational numbers to algebra: separable contributions of decimal magnitude and relational understanding of fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWolf, Melissa; Bassok, Miriam; Holyoak, Keith J

    2015-05-01

    To understand the development of mathematical cognition and to improve instructional practices, it is critical to identify early predictors of difficulty in learning complex mathematical topics such as algebra. Recent work has shown that performance with fractions on a number line estimation task predicts algebra performance, whereas performance with whole numbers on similar estimation tasks does not. We sought to distinguish more specific precursors to algebra by measuring multiple aspects of knowledge about rational numbers. Because fractions are the first numbers that are relational expressions to which students are exposed, we investigated how understanding the relational bipartite format (a/b) of fractions might connect to later algebra performance. We presented middle school students with a battery of tests designed to measure relational understanding of fractions, procedural knowledge of fractions, and placement of fractions, decimals, and whole numbers onto number lines as well as algebra performance. Multiple regression analyses revealed that the best predictors of algebra performance were measures of relational fraction knowledge and ability to place decimals (not fractions or whole numbers) onto number lines. These findings suggest that at least two specific components of knowledge about rational numbers--relational understanding (best captured by fractions) and grasp of unidimensional magnitude (best captured by decimals)--can be linked to early success with algebraic expressions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Breast-related stereotype threat contributes to a symptom cluster in women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Gao, Wei; Yu, Li-Xiang; Zhu, Song-Ying; Cao, Feng-Lin

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the prevalence of breast-related stereotype threat and its effects on a symptom cluster consisting of anxiety, depression and fatigue and on each symptom. The stereotype that breasts are a sign of women's femininity results in patients with breast cancer fearing diminished femininity and rejection, which may induce psychological problems that co-occur as a symptom cluster. Cross-sectional study. A total of 131 patients with breast cancer postmastectomy completed the study. A question measuring breast-related stereotype threat, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue Scale were used to assess their breast-related stereotype threat and symptoms of anxiety, depression and fatigue. Of the 131 patients who answered the breast-related stereotype threat question, 86 (65·6%) reported breast-related stereotype threat. They did not differ significantly in social and clinical characteristics compared with those without the stereotype, but did report significantly higher levels of the symptom cluster and each symptom (anxiety, depression and fatigue). The odds ratios of the stereotype were significant for the symptom cluster, depression and fatigue (odds ratios = 2·52-3·98, p stereotype threat was common in patients with breast cancer. There was about a twofold increase in their risk of experiencing the symptom cluster and symptoms of depression and fatigue. In clinical practice, breast-related stereotype threat should be measured together with prevalent symptoms (e.g. anxiety, depression and fatigue) in patients with breast cancer. Our findings will aid the development of interventions for improving the mental health of women with breast cancer. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Aging of marrow stromal (skeletal) stem cells and their contribution to age-related bone loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellantuono, Ilaria; Aldahmash, Abdullah; Kassem, Moustapha

    2009-01-01

    Marrow stromal cells (MSC) are thought to be stem cells with osteogenic potential and therefore responsible for the repair and maintenance of the skeleton. Age related bone loss is one of the most prevalent diseases in the elder population. It is controversial whether MSC undergo a process of aging...... in vivo, leading to decreased ability to form and maintain bone homeostasis with age. In this review we summarize evidence of MSC involvement in age related bone loss and suggest new emerging targets for intervention....

  8. Factors contributing to the health-related quality of life of people ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was acceptance of PLWH at the family level and support groups were useful in helping the participants to accept their status and handle HIV-related stigma. The reliance on CD4 count as eligibility criteria for the disability grant was criticized as it was not always a true reflection of their biopsychosocial wellbeing and ...

  9. On the Relative Contributions of Noncontingent Reinforcement and Escape Extinction in the Treatment of Food Refusal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Gregory K.; Piazza, Cathleen C.; Patel, Meeta R.; Layer, Stacy A.; Bachmeyer, Melanie H.; Bethke, Stephanie D.; Gutshall, Katharine A.

    2004-01-01

    In the current investigation, we evaluated the relative effects of noncontingent reinforcement (NCR), escape extinction, and a combination of NCR and escape extinction as treatment for the feeding problems exhibited by 4 children. For each participant, consumption increased only when escape extinction was implemented, independent of whether NCR…

  10. Is Concentrated Advantage the Cause? The Relative Contributions of Neighborhood Advantage and Disadvantage to Educational Inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Odis, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Supported by persistent educational inequality and growth of the field of neighborhood effects research, this meta-analysis investigates the relative association of neighborhood advantage and disadvantage to educational outcomes; the consistency of associations across different educational indicators; and the moderating influence of model…

  11. Enhanced fire-related traits may contribute to the invasiveness of Downy Brome (Bromus tectorum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although several invasive species have induced changes to the fire regime of invaded ecosystems, potential intraspecific shifts in fire-related traits that might enhance their invasion success, have never been addressed. We assumed that traits conferring persistence and competitiveness in post-fire ...

  12. Relative Contributions of Goal Representation and Kinematic Information to Self-Monitoring by Chimpanzees and Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Takaaki; Tomonaga, Masaki

    2012-01-01

    It is important to monitor feedback related to the intended result of an action while executing that action. This monitoring process occurs hierarchically; that is, sensorimotor processing occurs at a lower level, and conceptual representation of action goals occurs at a higher level. Although the hierarchical nature of self-monitoring may derive…

  13. Water-Related Power Plant Curtailments: An Overview of Incidents and Contributing Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCall, James [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Macknick, Jordan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Macknick, Jordan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Water temperatures and water availability can affect the reliable operations of power plants in the United States. Data on water-related impacts on the energy sector are not consolidated and are reported by multiple agencies. This study provides an overview of historical incidents where water resources have affected power plant operations, discusses the various data sources providing information, and creates a publicly available and open access database that contains consolidated information about water-related power plant curtailment and shut-down incidents. Power plants can be affected by water resources if incoming water temperatures are too high, water discharge temperatures are too high, or if there is not enough water available to operate. Changes in climate have the potential to exacerbate uncertainty over water resource availability and temperature. Power plant impacts from water resources include curtailment of generation, plant shut-downs, and requests for regulatory variances. In addition, many power plants have developed adaptation approaches to reducing the potential risks of water-related issues by investing in new technologies or developing and implementing plans to undertake during droughts or heatwaves. This study identifies 42 incidents of water-related power plant issues from 2000-2015, drawing from a variety of different datasets. These incidents occur throughout the U.S., and affect coal and nuclear plants that use once-through, recirculating, and pond cooling systems. In addition, water temperature violations reported to the Environmental Protection Agency are also considered, with 35 temperature violations noted from 2012-2015. In addition to providing some background information on incidents, this effort has also created an open access database on the Open Energy Information platform that contains information about water-related power plant issues that can be updated by users.

  14. The relative contribution of NMDARs to excitatory postsynaptic currents is controlled by Ca2+-induced inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fliza eValiullina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available NMDA receptors (NMDARs are important mediators of excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity. A hallmark of these channels is their high permeability to Ca2+. At the same time, they are themselves inhibited by the elevation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration. It is unclear however, whether the Ca2+ entry associated with single NMDAR mediated synaptic events is sufficient to self-inhibit their activation. Such auto-regulation would have important effects on the dynamics of synaptic excitation in several central networks. Therefore, we studied NMDAR-mediated synaptic currents in mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Postsynaptic responses to subthreshold Schaffer collateral stimulation depended strongly on the absence or presence of intracellular Ca2+ buffers. Loading of pyramidal cells with exogenous Ca2+ buffers increased the amplitude and decay time of NMDAR mediated EPSCs (EPSP and prolonged the time window for action potential generation.Our data indicate that the Ca2+ influx mediated by unitary synaptic events is sufficient to produce detectable self-inhibition of NMDARs even at a physiological Mg2+ concentration. Therefore, the contribution of NMDARs to synaptic excitation is strongly controlled by both previous synaptic activity as well as by the Ca2+ buffer capacity of postsynaptic neurons.

  15. What makes champions? A review of the relative contribution of genes and training to sporting success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Ross; Collins, Malcolm

    2012-06-01

    Elite sporting performance results from the combination of innumerable factors, which interact with one another in a poorly understood but complex manner to mould a talented athlete into a champion. Within the field of sports science, elite performance is understood to be the result of both training and genetic factors. However, the extent to which champions are born or made is a question that remains one of considerable interest, since it has implications for talent identification and management, as well as for how sporting federations allocate scarce resources towards the optimisation of high-performance programmes. The present review describes the contributions made by deliberate practice and genetic factors to the attainment of a high level of sporting performance. The authors conclude that although deliberate training and other environmental factors are critical for elite performance, they cannot by themselves produce an elite athlete. Rather, individual performance thresholds are determined by our genetic make-up, and training can be defined as the process by which genetic potential is realised. Although the specific details are currently unknown, the current scientific literature clearly indicates that both nurture and nature are involved in determining elite athletic performance. In conclusion, elite sporting performance is the result of the interaction between genetic and training factors, with the result that both talent identification and management systems to facilitate optimal training are crucial to sporting success.

  16. GENDER RELATIONS AND KNOWLEDGE IN PSYCHOLOGY: CONTRIBUTIONS FROM THE CRITICAL THEORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Dadico

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some recent discussions raised by the feminist critical theory, which contribute to put in question the scientific objectivity of Psychology. It is alleged, first, a false neutrality of genre, built on the idea of a generic human being. This discussion leads to a necessary revision of supposedly universal concepts. One of these concepts is that of justice that pervades studies on moral in Psychology of Development. At the same time, it discusses the prevalence of a certain gender in universities, by establishing and legitimizing specific experiences in the construction of knowledge in the area. It explores works of feminist authors identified with the Critical Theory, focusing on the question of identity, as well as the political implications of language concepts involved in their positions. Finally, dialoguing with authors of the first generation of the Frankfurt School, it is proposed to consider the dialectic between concept and experience for building new knowledge and strategies for gender equality. It is expected to show that the feminist critique reached important pillars of psychology, which, like science, cannot remain inert in front of the new challenges. The various fields of psychology need to mobilize for construction of emancipatory strategies in order to ensure the very validity of the knowledge produced in the area.

  17. Relative contribution of foetal and post-natal nutritional periods on feeding regulation in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin Agnoux, A; Alexandre-Gouabau, M-C; Le Dréan, G; Antignac, J-P; Parnet, P

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the contribution of both foetal and/or post-natal nutritional periods on feeding regulation in adult rats. Body weight gain, adipose tissue development, food preferences and feeding pattern under regular chow or Western diets were characterized on four experimental groups of rats: pups born from protein-restricted dams (R) and weaned by control (RC) or R dams (RR) and pups born from control dams weaned by C (CC) or R dams (CR). Rats born with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and fed a Western diet at adulthood appeared predisposed to body weight gain and more fat accretion, whereas CR rats, despite their preference for high-fat diet and their hyperphagia for Western diet, did not show significant increase in fat tissue. Daytime food intakes, as well as their speed of ingestion, were found modified in RC and RR. Alterations in the hypothalamic appetite regulatory mechanisms were investigated through neuropeptide expression analysis. IUGR rats showed altered expression of key elements of leptin and NPY signalling, while CR rats exhibited lesser expression of enterostatin, MC4r and HT-1Br mRNA. Altogether, these results indicate that peri-natal nutrition has different lasting effects on feeding pattern and hypothalamic appetite regulation, depending on the time window insult. © 2013 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Assessment of nutrient loadings of a large multipurpose prairie reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Marín, L. A.; Wheater, H. S.; Lindenschmidt, K. E.

    2017-07-01

    The relatively low water flow velocities in reservoirs cause them to have high capacities for retaining sediments and pollutants, which can lead to a reduction in downstream nutrient loading. Hence, nutrients can progressively accumulate in reservoirs, resulting in the deterioration of aquatic ecosystems and water quality. Lake Diefenbaker (LD) is a large multipurpose reservoir, located on the South Saskatchewan River (SSR), that serves as a major source of freshwater in Saskatchewan, Canada. Over the past several years, changes in land use (e.g. expansion of urban areas and industrial developments) in the reservoir's catchment have heightened concerns about future water quality in the catchment and in the reservoir. Intensification of agricultural activities has led to an increase in augmented the application of manure and fertilizer for crops and pasture. Although previous research has attempted to quantify nutrient retention in LD, there is a knowledge gap related to the identification of major nutrient sources and quantification of nutrient export from the catchment at different spatial scales. Using the SPAtially Referenced Regression On Watershed (SPARROW) model, this gap has been addressed by assessing water quality regionally, and identifying spatial patterns of factors and processes that affect water quality in the LD catchment. Model results indicate that LD retains about 70% of the inflowing total nitrogen (TN) and 90% of the inflowing total phosphorus (TP) loads, of which fertilizer and manure applied to agricultural fields contribute the greatest proportion. The SPARROW model will be useful as a tool to guide the optimal implementation of nutrient management plans to reduce nutrient inputs to LD.

  19. Distinct hippocampal regions make unique contributions to relational memory In Press, Hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanello, Kelly Sullivan; Schnyer, David; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2009-01-01

    Neuroscientific research has shown that the hippocampus is important for binding or linking together the various components of a learning event into an integrated memory. In a prior study, we demonstrated that the anterior hippocampus is involved in memory for the relations among informational elements to a greater extent than it is involved in memory for individual elements (Giovanello, Schnyer, and Verfaellie, 2004). In the current study, we extend those findings by further specifying the r...

  20. Quality of Working Life - An Exploration of Contributing Factors and their Relative Salience to Employees

    OpenAIRE

    Blackford, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    The academic study of Quality of Working Life (QoWL) has a long tradition, vestiges of which are apparent in the classic job satisfaction and employee motivation research (see for example, Mayo and Warner, 1931; Maslow, 1943; 1932; Blauner 1964; Hertzberg, 1966). The intervening years have witnessed the accumulation of a broad, complex and, at times contradictory, literature relating to variables identified as impacting on QoWL. The potential value of investing in enhancing QoWL cannot be und...

  1. Pathophysiology of obesity-related renal dysfunction contributes to diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, George; Weinrauch, Larry A; D'Elia, John A

    2012-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the role of insulin resistance in renal injury related to obesity, with hyperfiltration leading to glomerulomegaly in a pattern similar to that found in diabetic nephropathy. Similarities in the histologic patterns of damage from obesity and diabetes point to overlapping mechanisms of injury. In this review, we will examine the hormonal mechanisms, signaling pathways and injury patterns in renal injury resulting from obesity and attempt to draw conclusions on the reasons for these similarities.

  2. The contribution of the nurse manager to healthy labour relations - Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marthie Bezuidenhout

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available With the persisting unrest in health services, the relevance and importance of labour relations as a component of management cannot be over emphasised.

    Opsomming
    Met die voortdurende onrus in gesondheidsdienste, kan die relevansie en belang van arbeidsverhoudinge as 'n komponent van bestuur nie oorbeklemtoon word nie. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

  3. Contributing factors, prevention, and management of playing-related musculoskeletal disorders among flute players internationally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdale, Karen; Laakso, E-Liisa; Tomlinson, Vanessa

    2014-09-01

    Major studies have shown that flutists report playing-related pain in the neck, middle/upper back, shoulders, wrists, and hands. The current survey was designed to establish the injury concerns of flute players and teachers of all backgrounds, as well as their knowledge and awareness of injury prevention and management. Questions addressed a range of issues including education, history of injuries, preventative and management strategies, lifestyle factors, and teaching methods. At the time of the survey, 26.7% of all respondents were suffering from flute playing-related discomfort or pain; 49.7% had experienced flute playing-related discomfort or pain that was severe enough to distract while performing; and 25.8% had taken an extended period of time off playing because of discomfort or pain. Consistent with earlier studies, the most common pain sites were the fingers, hands, arms, neck, middle/upper back, and shoulders. Further research is needed to establish possible links between sex, instrument types, and ergonomic set up. Further investigation is recommended to ascertain whether certain types of physical training, education, and practice approaches may be more suitable than current methods. A longitudinal study researching the relationship between early education, playing position, ergonomic set-up, and prevalence of injury is recommended.

  4. Relation between the mineral nutrients and the Vitamin C content in camu-camu plants (Myrciria dubia cultivated on high soils and flood soils of Ucayali, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Abanto-Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Camu - camu is a native plant of the Peruvian Amazon. It is noted for its high concentration of ascorbic acid, however this feature varies widely from one location to another due to genetic and environmental factors. In order to determine the relationship between mineral nutrients and the concentration of ascorbic acid in ca mu - camu plants, a study was conducted in three camu - camu producing areas in flood - prone soils and soils on dry land conditions in the Ucayali Region. For this purpose, soil samples and camu - camu were collected. The content of following macronutrients was a nalyzed: nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium; also was determined the concentration of aluminum, pH, organic matter and ascorbic acid. The results show that the camu - camu plantations located in upland soils had lower concentrations of as corbic acid and lower natural fertility, than soils prone to flooding. Ascorbic acid is negatively related to the concentration of aluminum and positively to the concentration of magnesium and phosphorus in the camu - camu producing areas. It is concluded th at the concentration of ascorbic acid in camu - camu plants is best expressed when soils have better chemical attributes and good conditions of natural fertility .

  5. Modelling Activities In Kinematics Understanding quantitative relations with the contribution of qualitative reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfanos, Stelios

    2010-01-01

    In Greek traditional teaching a lot of significant concepts are introduced with a sequence that does not provide the students with all the necessary information required to comprehend. We consider that understanding concepts and the relations among them is greatly facilitated by the use of modelling tools, taking into account that the modelling process forces students to change their vague, imprecise ideas into explicit causal relationships. It is not uncommon to find students who are able to solve problems by using complicated relations without getting a qualitative and in-depth grip on them. Researchers have already shown that students often have a formal mathematical and physical knowledge without a qualitative understanding of basic concepts and relations." The aim of this communication is to present some of the results of our investigation into modelling activities related to kinematical concepts. For this purpose, we have used ModellingSpace, an environment that was especially designed to allow students from eleven to seventeen years old to express their ideas and gradually develop them. The ModellingSpace enables students to build their own models and offers the choice of observing directly simulations of real objects and/or all the other alternative forms of representations (tables of values, graphic representations and bar-charts). The students -in order to answer the questions- formulate hypotheses, they create models, they compare their hypotheses with the representations of their models and they modify or create other models when their hypotheses did not agree with the representations. In traditional ways of teaching, students are educated to utilize formulas as the most important strategy. Several times the students recall formulas in order to utilize them, without getting an in-depth understanding on them. Students commonly use the quantitative type of reasoning, since it is primarily used in teaching, although it may not be fully understood by them

  6. Contributions of relational coordination to care management in accountable care organizations: Views of managerial and clinical leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundall, Thomas G; Wu, Frances M; Lewis, Valerie A; Schoenherr, Karen E; Shortell, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    The accountable care organization (ACO) is a new type of health care organization incentivized to improve quality of care, improve population health, and reduce the cost of care. An ACO's success in meeting these objectives depends greatly upon its ability to improve patient care management. Numerous studies have found relational coordination to be positively associated with key measures of organizational performance in health care organizations, including quality and efficiency. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (a) identify the extent to which ACO leaders are aware of the dimensions of relational coordination, and (b) identify the ways these leaders believe the dimensions influenced care management practices in their organization. We performed content analysis of interviews with managerial and clinical leaders from a diverse group of 11 ACOs to assess awareness of relational coordination and identify the ways that dimensions of relational coordination were perceived to influence development of care management practices. ACO leaders mentioned four relational coordination dimensions: shared goals, frequency of communication, timeliness of communication, and problem solving communication. Three dimensions - shared knowledge of team members' tasks, mutual respect, and accuracy of communication - were not mentioned. Our analysis identified numerous ways leaders believed the four mentioned dimensions contributed to the development of care management, including contributions to standardization of care, patient engagement, coordination of care, and care planning. We propose two hypotheses for future research on relational coordination and care management. If relational coordination is to have a beneficial influence on ACO performance, organizational leaders must become more aware of relational coordination and its various dimensions and become cognizant of relational coordination's influence on care management in their ACO. We suggest a number of means by which ACO

  7. Yeast hnRNP-related proteins contribute to the maintenance of telomeres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee-Soety, Julia Y., E-mail: jlee04@sju.edu [Department of Biology, Saint Joseph' s University, PA 19131 (United States); Jones, Jennifer; MacGibeny, Margaret A.; Remaly, Erin C.; Daniels, Lynsey; Ito, Andrea; Jean, Jessica; Radecki, Hannah; Spencer, Shannon [Department of Biology, Saint Joseph' s University, PA 19131 (United States)

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Yeast hnRNP-related proteins are able to prevent faster senescence in telomerase-null cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The conserved RRMs in Npl3 are important for telomere maintenance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human hnRNP A1 is unable to complement the lack of NPL3 in yeast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Npl3 and Cbc2 may work as telomere capping proteins. -- Abstract: Telomeres protect the ends of linear chromosomes, which if eroded to a critical length can become uncapped and lead to replicative senescence. Telomerase maintains telomere length in some cells, but inappropriate expression facilitates the immortality of cancer cells. Recently, proteins involved in RNA processing and ribosome assembly, such as hnRNP (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein) A1, have been found to participate in telomere maintenance in mammals. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Npl3 shares significant amino acid sequence similarities with hnRNP A1. We found that deleting NPL3 accelerated the senescence of telomerase null cells. The highly conserved RNA recognition motifs (RRM) in Npl3 appear to be important for preventing faster senescence. Npl3 preferentially binds telomere sequences in vitro, suggesting that Npl3 may affect telomeres directly. Despite similarities between the two proteins, human hnRNP A1 is unable to complement the lack of Npl3 to rescue accelerated senescence in tlc1 npl3 cells. Deletion of CBC2, which encodes another hnRNP-related protein that associates with Npl3, also accelerates senescence. Potential mechanisms by which hnRNP-related proteins maintain telomeres are discussed.

  8. Managing urban nutrient biogeochemistry for sustainable urbanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tao; Gibson, Valerie; Cui, Shenghui; Yu, Chang-Ping; Chen, Shaohua; Ye, Zhilong; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2014-09-01

    Urban ecosystems are unique in the sense that human activities are the major drivers of biogeochemical processes. Along with the demographic movement into cities, nutrients flow towards the urban zone (nutrient urbanization), causing the degradation of environmental quality and ecosystem health. In this paper, we summarize the characteristics of nutrient cycling within the urban ecosystem compared to natural ecosystems. The dynamic process of nutrient urbanization is then explored taking Xiamen city, China, as an example to examine the influence of rapid urbanization on food sourced nitrogen and phosphorus metabolism. Subsequently, the concept of a nutrient footprint and calculation method is introduced from a lifecycle perspective. Finally, we propose three system approaches to mend the broken biogeochemical cycling. Our study will contribute to a holistic solution which achieves synergies between environmental quality and food security, by integrating technologies for nutrient recovery and waste reduction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mapping with MAV: Experimental Study on the Contribution of Absolute and Relative Aerial Position Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Skaloud

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study highlights the benefit of precise aerial position control in the context of mapping using frame-based imagery taken by small UAVs. We execute several flights with a custom Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV octocopter over a small calibration field equipped with 90 signalized targets and 25 ground control points. The octocopter carries a consumer grade RGB camera, modified to insure precise GPS time stamping of each exposure, as well as a multi-frequency/constellation GNSS receiver. The GNSS antenna and camera are rigidly mounted together on a one-axis gimbal that allows control of the obliquity of the captured imagery. The presented experiments focus on including absolute and relative aerial control. We confirm practically that both approaches are very effective: the absolute control allows omission of ground control points while the relative requires only a minimum number of control points. Indeed, the latter method represents an attractive alternative in the context of MAVs for two reasons. First, the procedure is somewhat simplified (e.g. the lever-arm between the camera perspective and antenna phase centers does not need to be determined and, second, its principle allows employing a single-frequency antenna and carrier-phase GNSS receiver. This reduces the cost of the system as well as the payload, which in turn increases the flying time.

  10. Does sports club participation contribute to health-related quality of life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eime, Rochelle M; Harvey, Jack T; Brown, Wendy J; Payne, Warren R

    2010-05-01

    Given the social nature of participation in sport, we hypothesized that club sports participants would have greater well-being and quality of life than participants in other forms of physical activity (PA). The purpose of this study was to examine health-related quality of life and life satisfaction in women who participate in three contrasting forms of PA: club sport, gym activities, and walking. This was a cross-sectional study of the relationship between type of PA setting and measures of health-related quality of life (Short-Form Health Survey [SF-36]) and life satisfaction in 818 women living in rural Victoria, Australia, in 2007. Data were also compared with those from a normative sample of 2345 women. After adjustment for potential confounders (age, education, marital status, children aged life satisfaction were significantly higher in the club sport group than that in the other groups. Although cross-sectional research cannot establish causal links, the results suggest that participation in club sport may enhance the health benefits of PA.

  11. Quality of life related to oral health: contribution from social factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Carneiro, Flávia; Souza-Santos, Reinaldo; Rebelo, Maria Augusta Bessa

    2011-01-01

    Sociodental indicators have been widely used in epidemiological research related to oral health, as they add the dimension of the impact of oral health on the quality of life of individuals and populations. Various studies have been done in order to validate new instruments to assess these subjective perceptions, however, the association between social parameters and impact on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) has not been systematically studied, thus there is still doubt as to the role of the main social variables as OHRQoL impact modulators. This study aims to systematically review the literature in order to evidence the association between six social parameters and OHRQoL. Based on six exclusion criteria, the literature search revealed 40 eligible publications for analyses. The frequency of expected (positive) association between the social parameters and OHRQoL was greater than the non-expected (negative) associations for the six parameters. The social conditions most clearly associated with the perception of negative impact on OHRQoL were: women, with poor education and low income, immigrants or people belonging to minority ethnic groups.

  12. Burnout in Relation to Specific Contributing Factors and Health Outcomes among Nurses: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamisa, Natasha; Peltzer, Karl; Oldenburg, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Nurses have been found to experience higher levels of stress-related burnout compared to other health care professionals. Despite studies showing that both job satisfaction and burnout are effects of exposure to stressful working environments, leading to poor health among nurses, little is known about the causal nature and direction of these relationships. The aim of this systematic review is to identify published research that has formally investigated relationships between these variables. Six databases (including CINAHL, COCHRANE, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PROQUEST and PsyINFO) were searched for combinations of keywords, a manual search was conducted and an independent reviewer was asked to cross validate all the electronically identified articles. Of the eighty five articles that were identified from these databases, twenty one articles were excluded based on exclusion criteria; hence, a total of seventy articles were included in the study sample. The majority of identified studies exploring two and three way relationships (n = 63) were conducted in developed countries. Existing research includes predominantly cross-sectional studies (n = 68) with only a few longitudinal studies (n = 2); hence, the evidence base for causality is still very limited. Despite minimal availability of research concerning the small number of studies to investigate the relationships between work-related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and the general health of nurses, this review has identified some contradictory evidence for the role of job satisfaction. This emphasizes the need for further research towards understanding causality. PMID:23727902

  13. The relative contribution of near-bed vs. intragravel horizontal transport to fine sediment accumulation processes in river gravel beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas-Mulet, Roser; Lakhanpal, Garima; Stewardson, Michael J.

    2018-02-01

    Understanding flow-sediment interactions is important for comprehending river functioning. Fine sediment accumulation processes, in particular, have key implications for ecosystem health. However, the amount of fines generated by intragravel flows and later accumulated in gravel streambeds may have been underestimated, as the hydraulic-related driving transport mechanisms in play are not clearly identified. Specifically, the relative contribution of fines from upper vs. lower sediment layers in gravel beds is not well understood. By recreating flooded and dewatered conditions in an experimental flume filled with natural sediment, we estimated such contributions by observing and collecting intragravel transported fines that were later accumulated into a void in the middle of the sediment matrix. Near-bed transport in the upper sediment layers (named Brinkman load) during flooded conditions accounted for most (90%) of the accumulated fines. Intragravel transport in the lower sediment layers (named Interstitial load) was the sole source of transport and accumulation during dewatered conditions with steeper hydraulic gradients. Interstitial load accounted for 10% of the total transport during flooded conditions. Although small, such estimations demonstrate that hydraulic-gradient transport in the lower sediment layers occurs in spite of the contradicting analytical assessments. We provide a case study to challenge the traditional approaches of assessing intragravel transport, and a useful framework to understand the origin and relative contribution of fine sediment accumulation in gravel beds. Such knowledge will be highly useful for the design of monitoring programs aiding river management, particularly in regulated rivers.

  14. Plant functional traits reveal the relative contribution of habitat and food preferences to the diet of grasshoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanez, Sébastien; Manneville, Olivier; Miquel, Christian; Taberlet, Pierre; Valentini, Alice; Aubert, Serge; Coissac, Eric; Colace, Marie-Pascale; Duparc, Quentin; Lavorel, Sandra; Moretti, Marco

    2013-12-01

    Food preferences and food availability are two major determinants of the diet of generalist herbivores and of their spatial distribution. How do these factors interact and eventually lead to diet differentiation in co-occurring herbivores? We quantified the diet of four grasshopper species co-occurring in subalpine grasslands using DNA barcoding of the plants contained in the faeces of individuals sampled in the field. The food preferences of each grasshopper species were assessed by a choice (cafeteria) experiment from among 24 plant species common in five grassland plots, in which the four grasshoppers were collected, while the habitat was described by the relative abundance of plant species in the grassland plots. Plant species were characterised by their leaf economics spectrum (LES), quantifying their nutrient vs. structural tissue content. The grasshoppers' diet, described by the mean LES of the plants eaten, could be explained by their plant preferences but not by the available plants in their habitat. The diet differed significantly across four grasshopper species pairs out of six, which validates food preferences assessed in standardised conditions as indicators for diet partitioning in nature. In contrast, variation of the functional diversity (FD) for LES in the diet was mostly correlated to the FD of the available plants in the habitat, suggesting that diet mixing depends on the environment and is not an intrinsic property of the grasshopper species. This study sheds light on the mechanisms determining the feeding niche of herbivores, showing that food preferences influence niche position whereas habitat diversity affects niche breadth.

  15. Engineering crop nutrient efficiency for sustainable agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liyu; Liao, Hong

    2017-10-01

    Increasing crop yields can provide food, animal feed, bioenergy feedstocks and biomaterials to meet increasing global demand; however, the methods used to increase yield can negatively affect sustainability. For example, application of excess fertilizer can generate and maintain high yields but also increases input costs and contributes to environmental damage through eutrophication, soil acidification and air pollution. Improving crop nutrient efficiency can improve agricultural sustainability by increasing yield while decreasing input costs and harmful environmental effects. Here, we review the mechanisms of nutrient efficiency (primarily for nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and iron) and breeding strategies for improving this trait, along with the role of regulation of gene expression in enhancing crop nutrient efficiency to increase yields. We focus on the importance of root system architecture to improve nutrient acquisition efficiency, as well as the contributions of mineral translocation, remobilization and metabolic efficiency to nutrient utilization efficiency. © 2017 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  16. Nocebo hyperalgesia: contributions of social observation and body-related cognitive styles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vögtle E

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Elisabeth Vögtle,1 Birgit Kröner-Herwig,1 Antonia Barke21Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Georg-Elias-Müller-Institute for Psychology, University of Göttingen, Göttingen, 2Department of Psychology, Division of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg, Germany Purpose: Recently, it has been shown that nocebo hyperalgesia can be acquired through observational learning. The aim of this study was to investigate socially induced nocebo hyperalgesia and its relationship with pain catastrophizing, somatic complaints, hypochondriacal concerns, and empathy. Participants and methods: Ninety-seven women (43.1±15.5 years were randomly assigned to one of the two conditions. Participants in the nocebo condition (NC watched a video in which a female model displayed more pain when an ointment was applied and less pain when no ointment was applied. In the control condition (CC, the model demonstrated low pain with and without the ointment. Subsequently, all participants received three pressure pain stimuli (60 seconds on each hand. On one hand, the ointment was applied prior to the stimulation. The order of the stimulation of the fingers (middle, index, or ring finger, the side of ointment application (left or right hand, and the side with which the stimulation began were randomized within each group and balanced across the groups. Depending on the randomization, the pressure pain application started with or without ointment and on the left or right hand. Pain ratings on a numerical rating scale (0–10 were collected. In addition, the participants completed questionnaires regarding body-related cognitive styles and empathy. Results: There was a significant difference in the pain ratings between the CC and the NC. The effect of ointment application was also significant, but no interaction between condition and ointment application was found. Only in the CC did the nocebo response correlate with

  17. Explaining educational differences in leisure-time physical activity in Europe: the contribution of work-related factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mäkinen, T E; Sippola, R; Borodulin, K

    2011-01-01

    Although educational differences in leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) exist across Europe, the independent effect of educational level on leisure-time physical activity has rarely been explored. This study examines the relative contribution of occupational class, employment status......, and educational level to LTPA across 12 European countries. The data were obtained from 12 European health surveys conducted at the turn of the century and identified in the EUROTHINE project. All information was self-reported. Logistic regression was applied and relative inequality index (RII) was calculated...

  18. On relative contributions of fusion and fragmentation mechanisms in J/{psi} photoproduction at high energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleev, V.A. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Shipilova, A.V. [Samara State Univ. (Russian Federation). Dept. of Physics

    2006-12-15

    We study J/{psi} photoproduction via the fusion and fragmentation mechanisms at the HERA Collider within the frameworks of the collinear parton model and the quasi-multi-Regge kinematics approach using the factorization formalism of non-relativistic QCD at leading order in the strong-coupling constant {alpha}{sub s} and the relative velocity v of the bound quarks. It is shown that the fusion production mechanism dominates over the fragmentation production mechanism at the all relevant J/{psi} transverse momenta. The J/{psi} meson p{sub T}-spectra in the fragmentation and fusion production at the asymptotically large p{sub T} have equal slopes in the quasi-multi-Regge kinematics approach, opposite the collinear parton model. (orig.)

  19. Age-Related Differences in Contribution of Rule-Based Thinking toward Moral Evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona C. S. Caravita

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the interplay of different criteria of moral evaluation, related to the type of the rule and context characteristics, in moral reasoning of children, early, and late adolescents. Students attending to fourth, seventh, and tenth grade were asked to evaluate the acceptability of rule breaking actions using ad hoc scenarios. Results suggest that the role of different moral evaluation criteria changes by age. During adolescence a greater integration of the moral criteria emerged. Moreover, adolescents also prioritized the evaluation of moral rule (forbidding to harm others violations as non-acceptable when the perpetrator harms an innocent victim by applying a direct personal force. The relevance of these findings to increase the understanding of how moral reasoning changes by age for the assessment of impairments in moral reasoning of non-normative groups is also discussed.

  20. Aircraft engine exhaust emissions and other airport-related contributions to ambient air pollution: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiol, Mauro; Harrison, Roy M.

    2014-10-01

    Civil aviation is fast-growing (about +5% every year), mainly driven by the developing economies and globalisation. Its impact on the environment is heavily debated, particularly in relation to climate forcing attributed to emissions at cruising altitudes and the noise and the deterioration of air quality at ground-level due to airport operations. This latter environmental issue is of particular interest to the scientific community and policymakers, especially in relation to the breach of limit and target values for many air pollutants, mainly nitrogen oxides and particulate matter, near the busiest airports and the resulting consequences for public health. Despite the increased attention given to aircraft emissions at ground-level and air pollution in the vicinity of airports, many research gaps remain. Sources relevant to air quality include not only engine exhaust and non-exhaust emissions from aircraft, but also emissions from the units providing power to the aircraft on the ground, the traffic due to the airport ground service, maintenance work, heating facilities, fugitive vapours from refuelling operations, kitchens and restaurants for passengers and operators, intermodal transportation systems, and road traffic for transporting people and goods in and out to the airport. Many of these sources have received inadequate attention, despite their high potential for impact on air quality. This review aims to summarise the state-of-the-art research on aircraft and airport emissions and attempts to synthesise the results of studies that have addressed this issue. It also aims to describe the key characteristics of pollution, the impacts upon global and local air quality and to address the future potential of research by highlighting research needs.

  1. Salts and nutrients present in regenerated waters induce changes in water relations, antioxidative metabolism, ion accumulation and restricted ion uptake in Myrtus communis L. plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Motos, José R; Alvarez, Sara; Barba-Espín, Gregorio; Hernández, José A; Sánchez-Blanco, María J

    2014-12-01

    The use of reclaimed water (RW) constitutes a valuable strategy for the efficient management of water and nutrients in landscaping. However, RW may contain levels of toxic ions, affecting plant production or quality, a very important aspect for ornamental plants. The present paper evaluates the effect of different quality RWs on physiological and biochemical parameters and the recovery capacity in Myrtus communis L. plants. M. communis plants were submitted to 3 irrigation treatments with RW from different sources (22 weeks): RW1 (1.7 dS m(-1)), RW2 (4.0 dS m(-1)) and RW3 (8.0 dS m(-1)) and one control (C, 0.8 dS m(-1)). During a recovery period of 11 weeks, all plants were irrigated with the control water. The RW treatments did not negatively affect plant growth, while RW2 even led to an increase in biomass. After recovery,only plants irrigated with RW3 showed some negative effects on growth, which was related to a decrease in the net photosynthesis rate, higher Na accumulation and a reduction in K levels. An increase in salinity was accompanied by decreases in leaf water potential, relative water content and gas exchange parameters, and increases in Na and Cl uptake. Plants accumulated Na in roots and restricted its translocation to the aerial part. The highest salinity levels produced oxidative stress, as seen from the rise in electrolyte leakage and lipid peroxidation. The use of regenerated water together with carefully managed drainage practices, which avoid the accumulation of salt by the substrate, will provide economic and environmental benefits.

  2. Predicting self-rated mental and physical health: the contributions of subjective socioeconomic status and personal relative deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callan, Mitchell J; Kim, Hyunji; Matthews, William J

    2015-01-01

    Lower subjective socioeconomic status (SSS) and higher personal relative deprivation (PRD) relate to poorer health. Both constructs concern people's perceived relative social position, but they differ in their emphasis on the reference groups people use to determine their comparative disadvantage (national population vs. similar others) and the importance of resentment that may arise from such adverse comparisons. We investigated the relative utility of SSS and PRD as predictors of self-rated physical and mental health (e.g., self-rated health, stress, health complaints). Across six studies, self-rated physical and mental health were on the whole better predicted by measures of PRD than by SSS while controlling for objective socioeconomic status (SES), with SSS rarely contributing unique variance over and above PRD and SES. Studies 4-6 discount the possibility that the superiority of PRD over SSS in predicting health is due to psychometric differences (e.g., reliability) or response biases between the measures.

  3. Maturational and social factors contributing to relative age effects in school sports: Data from the London Youth Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, K E; Parry, D A; Sandercock, G R H

    2017-12-01

    Few studies have investigated whether relative age effects (RAEs) exist in school sport. None have sought to test the competing maturational and social-agent hypotheses proposed to explain the RAE. We aimed to determine the presence of RAEs in multiple school sports and examine the contribution of maturational and social factors in commonplace school sports. We analyzed birth dates of n=10645 competitors (11-18 years) in the 2013 London Youth Games annual inter-school multisport competition and calculated odds ratio (OR) for students competing based on their yearly birth quarter (Q1-Q4). Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the relative contribution of constituent year (Grade) and relative age in netball and football which used multiyear age groupings. In girls, RAEs were present in the team sports including hockey, netball, rugby union, cricket and volleyball but not football. In boys, RAEs were stronger in common team sports (football, basketball cricket) as well as athletics and rowing. In netball and football teams with players from two constituent years, birth quarter better-predicted selection than did constituent year. Relatively older players (Q1) from lower constituent years were overrepresented compared with players from Q3 and Q4 of the upper constituent years. RAEs are present in the many sports commonplace in English schools. Selection of relatively older players ahead of chronologically older students born later in the selection year suggests social agents contribute to RAEs in school sports. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Selective attention modulates human auditory brainstem responses: relative contributions of frequency and spatial cues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Lehmann

    Full Text Available Selective attention is the mechanism that allows focusing one's attention on a particular stimulus while filtering out a range of other stimuli, for instance, on a single conversation in a noisy room. Attending to one sound source rather than another changes activity in the human auditory cortex, but it is unclear whether attention to different acoustic features, such as voice pitch and speaker location, modulates subcortical activity. Studies using a dichotic listening paradigm indicated that auditory brainstem processing may be modulated by the direction of attention. We investigated whether endogenous selective attention to one of two speech signals affects amplitude and phase locking in auditory brainstem responses when the signals were either discriminable by frequency content alone, or by frequency content and spatial location. Frequency-following responses to the speech sounds were significantly modulated in both conditions. The modulation was specific to the task-relevant frequency band. The effect was stronger when both frequency and spatial information were available. Patterns of response were variable between participants, and were correlated with psychophysical discriminability of the stimuli, suggesting that the modulation was biologically relevant. Our results demonstrate that auditory brainstem responses are susceptible to efferent modulation related to behavioral goals. Furthermore they suggest that mechanisms of selective attention actively shape activity at early subcortical processing stages according to task relevance and based on frequency and spatial cues.

  5. Relative Contribution of Monsoon Precipitation and Pumping to Changes in Groundwater Storage in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asoka, Akarsh; Gleeson, Tom; Wada, Yoshihide; Mishra, Vimal

    2017-01-01

    The depletion of groundwater resources threatens food and water security in India. However, the relative influence of groundwater pumping and climate variability on groundwater availability and storage remains unclear. Here we show from analyses of satellite and local well data spanning the past decade that long-term changes in monsoon precipitation are driving groundwater storage variability in most parts of India either directly by changing recharge or indirectly by changing abstraction. We find that groundwater storage has declined in northern India at the rate of 2 cm/yr and increased by 1 to 2 cm/yr in southern India between 2002 and 2013. We find that a large fraction of the total variability in groundwater storage in north-central and southern India can be explained by changes in precipitation. Groundwater storage variability in northwestern India can be explained predominantly by variability in abstraction for irrigation, which is in turn influenced by changes in precipitation. Declining precipitation in northern India is linked to Indian Ocean warming, suggesting a previously unrecognized teleconnection between ocean temperatures and groundwater storage.

  6. Relative contribution of monsoon precipitation and pumping to changes in groundwater storage in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asoka, Akarsh; Gleeson, Tom; Wada, Yoshihide; Mishra, Vimal

    2017-01-01

    The depletion of groundwater resources threatens food and water security in India. However, the relative influence of groundwater pumping and climate variability on groundwater availability and storage remains unclear. Here we show from analyses of satellite and local well data spanning the past decade that long-term changes in monsoon precipitation are driving groundwater storage variability in most parts of India either directly by changing recharge or indirectly by changing abstraction. We find that groundwater storage has declined in northern India at the rate of 2 cm yr-1 and increased by 1 to 2 cm yr-1 in southern India between 2002 and 2013. We find that a large fraction of the total variability in groundwater storage in north-central and southern India can be explained by changes in precipitation. Groundwater storage variability in northwestern India can be explained predominantly by variability in abstraction for irrigation, which is in turn influenced by changes in precipitation. Declining precipitation in northern India is linked to Indian Ocean warming, suggesting a previously unrecognized teleconnection between ocean temperatures and groundwater storage.

  7. Relative Contributions of Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten to Children's Literacy and Mathematics Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skibbe, Lori E; Hindman, Annemarie H; Connor, Carol M; Housey, Michelle; Morrison, Frederick J

    2013-01-01

    A difficulty for developmental researchers is disambiguating children's general maturation from the influence of schooling. In this study, we use a natural experiment to examine the influence of pre-kindergarten and kindergarten schooling experiences on the development of literacy and mathematics. Children (n = 60) whose birthdates fell within two months of the state-determined cut-off date for pre-kindergarten and kindergarten entry were administered four subtests of the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Achievement III in the fall and spring of the school year. Using hierarchical linear modeling coupled with propensity score matching, children who were starting kindergarten, and who had prior experience in pre-kindergarten, had higher scores on measures of phonological awareness, early reading, and mathematics skills than did children who had not attended pre-kindergarten previously, even though they were essentially the same age. Fall vocabulary scores did not differ in relation to whether children had pre-kindergarten experience. In addition, although children who attended kindergarten as well as those who attended pre-kindergarten exhibited growth on all measures during the school year, children who attended kindergarten demonstrated greater gains in early reading and vocabulary during the school year. These findings highlight the potential of early schooling processes to facilitate children's intellectual growth.

  8. The Contribution of Equitation Science to Minimising Horse-Related Risks to Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Starling

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Equitation science is an evidence-based approach to horse training and riding that focuses on a thorough understanding of both equine ethology and learning theory. This combination leads to more effective horse training, but also plays a role in keeping horse riders and trainers safe around horses. Equitation science underpins ethical equitation, and recognises the limits of the horse’s cognitive and physical abilities. Equitation is an ancient practice that has benefited from a rich tradition that sees it flourishing in contemporary sporting pursuits. Despite its history, horse-riding is an activity for which neither horses nor humans evolved, and it brings with it significant risks to the safety of both species. This review outlines the reasons horses may behave in ways that endanger humans and how training choices can exacerbate this. It then discusses the recently introduced 10 Principles of Equitation Science and explains how following these principles can minimise horse-related risk to humans and enhance horse welfare.

  9. What contribution can international relations make to the evolving global health agenda?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Sara E

    2010-01-01

    This article presents two approaches that have dominated International Relations in their approach to the international politics of health. The statist approach, which is primarily security-focused, seeks to link health initiatives to a foreign or defence policy remit. The globalist approach, in contrast, seeks to advance health not because of its intrinsic security value but because it advances the well-being and rights of individuals. This article charts the evolution of these approaches and demonstrates why both have the potential to shape our understanding of the evolving global health agenda. It examines how the statist and globalist perspectives have helped shape contemporary initiatives in global health governance and suggests that there is evidence of an emerging convergence between the two perspectives. This convergence is particularly clear in the articulation of a number of UN initiatives in this area - especially the One World, One Health Strategic Framework and the Oslo Ministerial Declaration (2007) which inspired the first UN General Assembly resolution on global health and foreign policy in 2009 and the UN Secretary-General's note "Global health and foreign policy: strategic opportunities and challenges". What remains to be seen is whether this convergence will deliver on securing states' interest long enough to promote the interests of the individuals who require global efforts to deliver local health improvements.

  10. Multiple contributions to priming effects for familiar faces: analyses with backward masking and event-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörr, Peggy; Herzmann, Grit; Sommer, Werner

    2011-11-01

    The model of face recognition by Bruce and Young postulates a pool of structural representations for familiar faces in long-term memory, so-called face recognition units (FRUs). Event-related brain potentials show early repetition priming effects for familiar faces around 250-300 ms [N250r or early repetition effect (ERE)], which are thought to reflect the activation of these FRUs. However, small N250r effects are also seen for unfamiliar faces suggesting that priming of perceptual codes (i.e., pictorial and structural codes) also contributes to early repetition effects. Using a face-familiarity task in Experiment 1, we aimed to eliminate these perceptual contributions to face priming by backward masking the prime face with a different, unfamiliar face. As expected, a repetition priming effect appeared only for familiar faces. Experiment 2 used a semantic-decision task and compared the effects of different kinds of masks that interfered with either pictorial codes or with pictorial and structural codes. Our findings indicate that both structural codes and memory representations contribute to the N250r and that unfamiliar-face masks interfere only with structural codes. Face-masks may therefore provide a useful tool to extract the pure contributions of memory representations (i.e., FRUs) to repetition priming. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  11. Relative contributions of spatial weighting, explicit knowledge and proprioception to hand localisation during positional ambiguity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Valeria; Gilpin, Helen R; Stanton, Tasha R; Dagsdóttir, Lilja K; Gallace, Alberto; Lorimer Moseley, G

    2017-02-01

    When vision and proprioception are rendered incongruent during a hand localisation task, vision is initially weighted more than proprioception in determining location, and proprioception gains more weighting over time. However, it is not known whether, under these incongruency conditions, particular areas of space are also weighted more heavily than others, nor whether explicit knowledge of the sensory incongruence (i.e. disconfirming the perceived location of the hand) modulates the effect. Here, we hypothesised that both non-informative inputs coming from one side of space and explicit knowledge of sensory incongruence would modulate perceived location of the limb. Specifically, we expected spatial weighting to shift hand localisation towards the weighted area of space, and we expected greater weighting of proprioceptive input once perceived location was demonstrated to be inaccurate. We manipulated spatial weighting using an established auditory cueing paradigm (Experiment 1, n = 18) and sensory incongruence using the 'disappearing hand trick' (Experiment 2, n = 9). Our first hypothesis was not supported-spatial weighting did not modulate hand localisation. Our second hypothesis was only partially supported-disconfirmation of hand position did lead to more accurate localisations, even if participants were still unaware of their hand position. This raised the possibility that rather than disconfirmation, a simple movement of the hand in view could update the sensory-motor system, by immediately increasing the weighting of proprioceptive input relative to visual input. This third hypothesis was then confirmed (Experiment 3, n = 9). These results suggest that hand localisation is robust in the face of differential weighting of space, but open to modulation in a modality-specific manner, when one sense (vision) is rendered inaccurate.

  12. On the relative contributions of wind vs. animals to seed dispersal of four Sierra Nevada pines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Wall, Stephen B

    2008-07-01

    Selective pressures that influence the form of seed dispersal syndromes are poorly understood. Morphology of plant propagules is often used to infer the means of dispersal, but morphology can be misleading. Several species of pines, for example, have winged seeds adapted for wind dispersal but owe much of their establishment to scatter-hoarding animals. Here the relative importance of wind vs. animal dispersal is assessed for four species of pines of the eastern Sierra Nevada that have winged seeds but differed in seed size: lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta murrayana, 8 mg); ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa ponderosa, 56 mg); Jeffrey pine (Pinus jeffreyi, 160 mg); and sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana, 231 mg). Pre-dispersal seed mortality eliminated much of the ponderosa pine seed crop (66%), but had much less effect on Jeffrey pine (32% of seeds destroyed), lodgepole pine (29%), and sugar pine (7%). When cones opened most filled seeds were dispersed by wind. Animals removed > 99% of wind-dispersed Jeffrey and sugar pine seeds from the ground within 60 days, but animals gathered only 93% of lodgepole pine seeds and 38% of ponderosa pine seeds during the same period. Animals gathered and scatter hoarded radioactively labeled ponderosa, Jeffrey, and sugar pine seeds, making a total of 2103 caches over three years of study. Only three lodgepole pine caches were found. Caches typically contained 1-4 seeds buried 5-20 mm deep, depths suitable for seedling emergence. Although Jeffrey and sugar pine seeds are initially wind dispersed, nearly all seedlings arise from animal caches. Lodgepole pine is almost exclusively wind dispersed, with animals acting as seed predators. Animals treated ponderosa pine in an intermediate fashion. Two-phased dispersal of large, winged pine seeds appears adaptive; initial wind dispersal helps to minimize pre-dispersal seed mortality whereas scatter hoarding by animals places seeds in sites with a higher probability of seedling establishment.

  13. The Role of Genetic Polymorphisms as Related to One-Carbon Metabolism, Vitamin B6, and Gene–Nutrient Interactions in Maintaining Genomic Stability and Cell Viability in Chinese Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiayu Wu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism (FMOCM is linked to DNA synthesis, methylation, and cell proliferation. Vitamin B6 (B6 is a cofactor, and genetic polymorphisms of related key enzymes, such as serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT, methionine synthase reductase (MTRR, and methionine synthase (MS, in FMOCM may govern the bioavailability of metabolites and play important roles in the maintenance of genomic stability and cell viability (GSACV. To evaluate the influences of B6, genetic polymorphisms of these enzymes, and gene–nutrient interactions on GSACV, we utilized the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMN and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP techniques in the lymphocytes from female breast cancer cases and controls. GSACV showed a significantly positive correlation with B6 concentration, and 48 nmol/L of B6 was the most suitable concentration for maintaining GSACV in vitro. The GSACV indexes showed significantly different sensitivity to B6 deficiency between cases and controls; the B6 effect on the GSACV variance contribution of each index was significantly higher than that of genetic polymorphisms and the sample state (tumor state. SHMT C1420T mutations may reduce breast cancer susceptibility, whereas MTRR A66G and MS A2756G mutations may increase breast cancer susceptibility. The role of SHMT, MS, and MTRR genotype polymorphisms in GSACV is reduced compared with that of B6. The results appear to suggest that the long-term lack of B6 under these conditions may increase genetic damage and cell injury and that individuals with various genotypes have different sensitivities to B6 deficiency. FMOCM metabolic enzyme gene polymorphism may be related to breast cancer susceptibility to a certain extent due to the effect of other factors such as stress, hormones, cancer therapies, psychological conditions, and diet. Adequate B6 intake may be good for maintaining genome health and preventing breast cancer.

  14. Response-based selection of barley cultivars and legume species for complementarity: Root morphology and exudation in relation to nutrient source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Courtney D; Brown, Lawrie K; Adu, Michael O; Mezeli, Malika M; Sandral, Graeme A; Simpson, Richard J; Wendler, Renate; Shand, Charles A; Menezes-Blackburn, Daniel; Darch, Tegan; Stutter, Marc I; Lumsdon, David G; Zhang, Hao; Blackwell, Martin S A; Wearing, Catherine; Cooper, Patricia; Haygarth, Philip M; George, Timothy S

    2017-02-01

    Phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) use efficiency may be improved through increased biodiversity in agroecosystems. Phenotypic variation in plants' response to nutrient deficiency may influence positive complementarity in intercropping systems. A multicomponent screening approach was used to assess the influence of P supply and N source on the phenotypic plasticity of nutrient foraging traits in barley (H. vulgare L.) and legume species. Root morphology and exudation were determined in six plant nutrient treatments. A clear divergence in the response of barley and legumes to the nutrient treatments was observed. Root morphology varied most among legumes, whereas exudate citrate and phytase activity were most variable in barley. Changes in root morphology were minimized in plants provided with ammonium in comparison to nitrate but increased under P deficiency. Exudate phytase activity and pH varied with legume species, whereas citrate efflux, specific root length, and root diameter lengths were more variable among barley cultivars. Three legume species and four barley cultivars were identified as the most responsive to P deficiency and the most contrasting of the cultivars and species tested. Phenotypic response to nutrient availability may be a promising approach for the selection of plant combinations for minimal input cropping systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of the relative contributions of intra-abdominal and liver fat to components of the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotronen, Anna; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele; Sevastianova, Ksenia

    2011-01-01

    Abdominally obese individuals with the metabolic syndrome often have excess fat deposition both intra-abdominally (IA) and in the liver, but the relative contribution of these two deposits to variation in components of the metabolic syndrome remains unclear. We determined the mutually independent...... that both fat depots are important predictors of these components of the metabolic syndrome....... quantitative contributions of IA and liver fat to components of the syndrome, fasting serum (fS) insulin, and liver enzymes and measures of hepatic insulin sensitivity in 356 subjects (mean age 42 years, mean BMI 29.7 kg/m²) in whom liver fat and abdominal fat volumes were measured. IA and liver fat contents...

  16. The treatment of the case studies as a research tool. His contribution in the subfield of International Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Enrique Sánchez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the key role that case study methods have played in the study of international relations in the United States. Case studies in the International Relations subfield are not the unconnected, atheoretical, and idiographic studies that their critics decry. International Relations case studies follow an increasingly standardized and rigorous set of prescriptions and have, together with statistical and formal work, contributed to cumulatively improving understandings of world politics. The article discusses and reviews examples of case selection criteria (including least likely, least and most similar, and deviant cases; conceptual innovation; typological theories, explanatory typologies, qualitative comparative analysis, and fuzzy-set analysis; process tracing; and the integration of multiple methods.

  17. Nutritional quality of meals and snacks assessed by the Food Standards Agency nutrient profiling system in relation to overall diet quality, body mass index, and waist circumference in British adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Kentaro

    2017-09-13

    Studies examining meal and snack eating behaviors in relation to overall diet and health markers are limited, at least partly because there is no definitive consensus about what constitutes a snack, a meal, or an eating occasion. This cross-sectional study examined how nutritional quality of meals and snacks is associated with overall diet quality, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference. Based on 7-d weighed dietary record data, all eating occasions were divided into meals or snacks based on time (meals: 0600-1000, 1200-1500, and 1800-2100 h; snacks: others) or contribution to energy intake (EI) (meals: ≥15%; snacks: <15%) in 1451 British adults aged 19-64 years participating in the National Diet and Nutrition Survey. Nutritional quality of meals and snacks was assessed as the arithmetic EI-weighted means of the British Food Standards Agency (FSA) nutrient profiling system score of each food and beverage consumed, based on the contents of energy, saturated fatty acid, total sugar, sodium, fruits/vegetables/nuts, dietary fiber, and protein per 100 g. Irrespective of the definition of meals and snacks, higher FSA scores (lower nutritional quality) of both meals and snacks were associated with unfavorable profiles of individual components of overall diet, including lower intakes of fruits/vegetables/nuts and higher intakes of biscuits/cakes/pastries, total fat, and saturated fatty acid. The FSA scores of meals and snacks were also inversely associated with overall diet quality assessed by the healthy diet indicator (regression coefficient (β) = -0.22 to -0.17 and -0.06 to -0.03, respectively) and Mediterranean diet score (β = -0.25 to -0.19 and -0.08 to -0.05, respectively) in both sexes (P ≤ 0.005). However, the associations were stronger for meals, mainly due to their larger contribution to total EI (64% to 84%). After adjustment for potential confounders, only the FSA score of snacks based on EI contribution was positively associated with BMI

  18. Fungal–bacterial dynamics and their contribution to terrigenous carbon turnover in relation to organic matter quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Jenny; Zlatanovic, Sanja; Mutz, Michael; Premke, Katrin

    2017-01-01

    Ecological functions of fungal and bacterial decomposers vary with environmental conditions. However, the response of these decomposers to particulate organic matter (POM) quality, which varies widely in aquatic ecosystems, remains poorly understood. Here we investigated how POM pools of substrates of different qualities determine the relative contributions of aquatic fungi and bacteria to terrigenous carbon (C) turnover. To this end, surface sediments were incubated with different POM pools of algae and/or leaf litter. 13C stable-isotope measurements of C mineralization were combined with phospholipid analysis to link the metabolic activities and substrate preferences of fungal and bacterial heterotrophs to dynamics in their abundance. We found that the presence of labile POM greatly affected the dominance of bacteria over fungi within the degrader communities and stimulated the decomposition of beech litter primarily through an increase in metabolic activity. Our data indicated that fungi primarily contribute to terrigenous C turnover by providing litter C for the microbial loop, whereas bacteria determine whether the supplied C substrate is assimilated into biomass or recycled back into the atmosphere in relation to phosphate availability. Thus, this study provides a better understanding of the role of fungi and bacteria in terrestrial–aquatic C cycling in relation to environmental conditions. PMID:27983721

  19. Fungal-bacterial dynamics and their contribution to terrigenous carbon turnover in relation to organic matter quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Jenny; Zlatanovic, Sanja; Mutz, Michael; Premke, Katrin

    2017-02-01

    Ecological functions of fungal and bacterial decomposers vary with environmental conditions. However, the response of these decomposers to particulate organic matter (POM) quality, which varies widely in aquatic ecosystems, remains poorly understood. Here we investigated how POM pools of substrates of different qualities determine the relative contributions of aquatic fungi and bacteria to terrigenous carbon (C) turnover. To this end, surface sediments were incubated with different POM pools of algae and/or leaf litter. (13)C stable-isotope measurements of C mineralization were combined with phospholipid analysis to link the metabolic activities and substrate preferences of fungal and bacterial heterotrophs to dynamics in their abundance. We found that the presence of labile POM greatly affected the dominance of bacteria over fungi within the degrader communities and stimulated the decomposition of beech litter primarily through an increase in metabolic activity. Our data indicated that fungi primarily contribute to terrigenous C turnover by providing litter C for the microbial loop, whereas bacteria determine whether the supplied C substrate is assimilated into biomass or recycled back into the atmosphere in relation to phosphate availability. Thus, this study provides a better understanding of the role of fungi and bacteria in terrestrial-aquatic C cycling in relation to environmental conditions.

  20. Relative contributions of copper oxide nanoparticles and dissolved copper to Cu uptake kinetics of Gulf killifish (Fundulus grandis) embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chuanjia; Castellon, Benjamin T.; Matson, Cole W.; Aiken, George R.; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2017-01-01

    The toxicity of soluble metal-based nanomaterials may be due to the uptake of metals in both dissolved and nanoparticulate forms, but the relative contributions of these different forms to overall metal uptake rates under environmental conditions are not quantitatively defined. Here, we investigated the linkage between the dissolution rates of copper(II) oxide (CuO) nanoparticles (NPs) and their bioavailability to Gulf killifish (Fundulus grandis) embryos, with the aim of quantitatively delineating the relative contributions of nanoparticulate and dissolved species for Cu uptake. Gulf killifish embryos were exposed to dissolved Cu and CuO NP mixtures comprising a range of pH values (6.3–7.5) and three types of natural organic matter (NOM) isolates at various concentrations (0.1–10 mg-C L–1), resulting in a wide range of CuO NP dissolution rates that subsequently influenced Cu uptake. First-order dissolution rate constants of CuO NPs increased with increasing NOM concentration and for NOM isolates with higher aromaticity, as indicated by specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA), while Cu uptake rate constants of both dissolved Cu and CuO NP decreased with NOM concentration and aromaticity. As a result, the relative contribution of dissolved Cu and nanoparticulate CuO species for the overall Cu uptake rate was insensitive to NOM type or concentration but largely determined by the percentage of CuO that dissolved. These findings highlight SUVA and aromaticity as key NOM properties affecting the dissolution kinetics and bioavailability of soluble metal-based nanomaterials in organic-rich waters. These properties could be used in the incorporation of dissolution kinetics into predictive models for environmental risks of nanomaterials.

  1. [Magnesium for nutrient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Mieko

    2012-08-01

    Magnesium is essential nutrient. Here is magnesium for nutrient. Magnesium has a large number of biological or biochemical functions. It's distribution, absorption, deficiency, excess disorder, requirement, supply sources, and especially status and issue of magnesium intake in Japanese are reviewed.

  2. The DYX2 locus and neurochemical signaling genes contribute to speech sound disorder and related neurocognitive domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicher, J D; Stein, C M; Deng, F; Ciesla, A A; Powers, N R; Boada, R; Smith, S D; Pennington, B F; Iyengar, S K; Lewis, B A; Gruen, J R

    2015-04-01

    A major milestone of child development is the acquisition and use of speech and language. Communication disorders, including speech sound disorder (SSD), can impair a child's academic, social and behavioral development. Speech sound disorder is a complex, polygenic trait with a substantial genetic component. However, specific genes that contribute to SSD remain largely unknown. To identify associated genes, we assessed the association of the DYX2 dyslexia risk locus and markers in neurochemical signaling genes (e.g., nicotinic and dopaminergic) with SSD and related endophenotypes. We first performed separate primary associations in two independent samples - Cleveland SSD (210 affected and 257 unaffected individuals in 127 families) and Denver SSD (113 affected individuals and 106 unaffected individuals in 85 families) - and then combined results by meta-analysis. DYX2 markers, specifically those in the 3' untranslated region of DCDC2 (P = 1.43 × 10(-4) ), showed the strongest associations with phonological awareness. We also observed suggestive associations of dopaminergic-related genes ANKK1 (P = 1.02 × 10(-2) ) and DRD2 (P = 9.22 × 10(-3) ) and nicotinic-related genes CHRNA3 (P = 2.51 × 10(-3) ) and BDNF (P = 8.14 × 10(-3) ) with case-control status and articulation. Our results further implicate variation in putative regulatory regions in the DYX2 locus, particularly in DCDC2, influencing language and cognitive traits. The results also support previous studies implicating variation in dopaminergic and nicotinic neural signaling influencing human communication and cognitive development. Our findings expand the literature showing genetic factors (e.g., DYX2) contributing to multiple related, yet distinct neurocognitive domains (e.g., dyslexia, language impairment, and SSD). How these factors interactively yield different neurocognitive and language-related outcomes remains to be elucidated. © 2015 The Authors. Genes, Brain and Behavior published by

  3. Soluble organic nutrient fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert G. Qualls; Bruce L. Haines; Wayne Swank

    2014-01-01

    Our objectives in this study were (i) compare fluxes of the dissolved organic nutrients dissolved organic carbon (DOC), DON, and dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) in a clearcut area and an adjacent mature reference area. (ii) determine whether concentrations of dissolved organic nutrients or inorganic nutrients were greater in clearcut areas than in reference areas,...

  4. Scaling Dissolved Nutrient Removal in River Networks: A Comparative Modeling Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Sheng; Reisinger, Alexander J.; Tank, Jennifer L.; Baker, Michelle A.; Hall, Robert O.; Rosi, Emma J.; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2017-11-01

    Along the river network, water, sediment, and nutrients are transported, cycled, and altered by coupled hydrological and biogeochemical processes. Our current understanding of the rates and processes controlling the cycling and removal of dissolved inorganic nutrients in river networks is limited due to a lack of empirical measurements in large, (nonwadeable), rivers. The goal of this paper was to develop a coupled hydrological and biogeochemical process model to simulate nutrient uptake at the network scale during summer base flow conditions. The model was parameterized with literature values from headwater streams, and empirical measurements made in 15 rivers with varying hydrological, biological, and topographic characteristics, to simulate nutrient uptake at the network scale. We applied the coupled model to 15 catchments describing patterns in uptake for three different solutes to determine the role of rivers in network-scale nutrient cycling. Model simulation results, constrained by empirical data, suggested that rivers contributed proportionally more to nutrient removal than headwater streams given the fraction of their length represented in a network. In addition, variability of nutrient removal patterns among catchments was varied among solutes, and as expected, was influenced by nutrient concentration and discharge. Net ammonium uptake was not significantly correlated with any environmental descriptor. In contrast, net daily nitrate removal was linked to suspended chlorophyll a (an indicator of primary producers) and land use characteristics. Finally, suspended sediment characteristics and agricultural land use were correlated with net daily removal of soluble reactive phosphorus, likely reflecting abiotic sorption dynamics. Rivers are understudied relative to streams, and our model suggests that rivers can contribute more to network-scale nutrient removal than would be expected based upon their representative fraction of network channel length.

  5. Relative contributions of self-efficacy, self-regulation, and self-handicapping in predicting student procrastination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Kamden K; Steele, Misty R

    2011-12-01

    The relative contributions of self-efficacy, self-regulation, and self-handicapping student procrastination were explored. College undergraduate participants (N = 138; 40 men, 97 women, one not reporting sex) filled out the Procrastination Scale, the Self-Handicapping Scale-Short Form, and the Self-regulation and Self-handicapping scales of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire. A hierarchical regression of the above measures indicated that self-efficacy, self-regulation, and self-handicapping all predicted scores on the Procrastination Scale, but self-regulation fully accounted for the predictive power of self-efficacy. The results suggested self-regulation and self-handicapping predict procrastination independently. These findings are discussed in relation to the literature on the concept of "self-efficacy for self-regulation" and its use in the field of procrastination research.

  6. Relative contributions of geographic, socioeconomic, and lifestyle factors to quality of life, frailty, and mortality in elderly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Woo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To date, few studies address disparities in older populations specifically using frailty as one of the health outcomes and examining the relative contributions of individual and environmental factors to health outcomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a data set from a health survey of 4,000 people aged 65 years and over living in all regions of Hong Kong, we examined regional variations in self-rated health, frailty, and four-year mortality, and analyzed the relative contributions of lifestyle, socioeconomic status, and geographical location of residence to these outcomes using path analysis. We hypothesize that lifestyle, socioeconomic status, and regional characteristics directly and indirectly through interactions contribute to self-rated physical and psychological health, frailty, and four-year mortality. District variations directly affect self-rated physical health, and also exert an effect through socioeconomic position as well as lifestyle factors. Socioeconomic position in turn directly affects self-rated physical health, as well as indirectly through lifestyle factors. A similar pattern of interaction is observed for self-rated mental health, frailty, and mortality, although there are differences in different lifestyle factors and district associations. Lifestyle factors also directly affect physical and mental components of health, frailty, and mortality. The magnitude of direct district effect is comparable to those of lifestyle and socioeconomic position. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that district variations in health outcomes exist in the Hong Kong elderly population, and these variations result directly from district factors, and are also indirectly mediated through socioeconomic position as well as lifestyle. Provision and accessibility to health services are unlikely to play a significant role. Future studies on these district factors would be important in reducing health disparities in the older

  7. Non-symptom-related factors contributing to delay in seeking medical care by patients with heart failure: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravely, Shannon; Tamim, Hala; Smith, Judy; Daly, Tamara; Grace, Sherry L

    2011-09-01

    Delay in seeking timely medical care by patients with acute coronary syndrome and stroke has been well established in the literature, but less is known about delay in care-seeking behavior by patients with heart failure (HF). The purpose of this narrative review was to synthesize the literature regarding non-symptom-related factors that contribute to delay in seeking medical care for HF symptoms. A literature search of Scopus, Medline, and Pubmed was conducted for published articles from database inception to July 2009. Available evidence has shown that non-symptom-related factors, such as HF severity, HF history, age, and ethnocultural background, were related to delay in certain studies; however, null results have also been reported. Other non-symptom-related factors, such as male gender, initial contact with a primary care physician, arriving in the emergency department by means other than ambulance, and patient responses such as self-care, low anxiety, and hopelessness, may play a role in longer delay. Although this review identified several non-symptom-related factors that may be implicated in care-seeking delay, health care professionals should be vigilant in identifying all high-risk individuals and educating them about warning signs of HF. Moreover, access to outpatient chronic disease management programs that may have potential to reduce care-seeking delay behavior should be explored. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Transcriptomic effects-based monitoring for endocrine active chemicals: assessing relative contribution of treated wastewater to downstream pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinović-Weigelt, Dalma; Mehinto, Alvine C; Ankley, Gerald T; Denslow, Nancy D; Barber, Larry B; Lee, Kathy E; King, Ryan J; Schoenfuss, Heiko L; Schroeder, Anthony L; Villeneuve, Daniel L

    2014-02-18

    The present study investigated whether a combination of targeted analytical chemistry information with unsupervised, data-rich biological methodology (i.e., transcriptomics) could be utilized to evaluate relative contributions of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents to biological effects. The effects of WWTP effluents on fish exposed to ambient, receiving waters were studied at three locations with distinct WWTP and watershed characteristics. At each location, 4 d exposures of male fathead minnows to the WWTP effluent and upstream and downstream ambient waters were conducted. Transcriptomic analyses were performed on livers using 15,000 feature microarrays, followed by a canonical pathway and gene set enrichment analyses. Enrichment of gene sets indicative of teleost brain-pituitary-gonadal-hepatic (BPGH) axis function indicated that WWTPs serve as an important source of endocrine active chemicals (EACs) that affect the BPGH axis (e.g., cholesterol and steroid metabolism were altered). The results indicated that transcriptomics may even pinpoint pertinent adverse outcomes (i.e., liver vacuolization) and groups of chemicals that preselected chemical analytes may miss. Transcriptomic Effects-Based monitoring was capable of distinguishing sites, and it reflected chemical pollution gradients, thus holding promise for assessment of relative contributions of point sources to pollution and the efficacy of pollution remediation.

  9. Pichon Rivière's psychoanalytic contributions: Some comparisons with object relations and modern developments in psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharff, David E; Losso, Roberto; Setton, Lea

    2017-02-01

    Enrique Pichon Rivière's work, fundamental to Latin American and European psychoanalytic development, is largely unknown in English-language psychoanalysis. Pichon's central contribution, the link (el vinculo), describes relational bonds in all dimensions. People are born into, live in, and relate through links. Psychic structure is built of links that then influence external interaction. Links, expressed in mind, body and external action, continuously join internal and external worlds. Links have two axes: vertical axis links connect generations through unconscious transgenerational transmission; horizontal axis links connect persons to life partners, family, community and society. For Pichon, treatment constitutes a spiral process through which interpretation disrupts existent structures, promoting new emergent organizations at successively deeper levels. Psychic and link structures evolve over time unless repetitive cycles stunt growth. For Pichon, transference is constituted in the here-and-now-with-me because of the analytic link. Pichon also undertook family and group psychoanalysis where individuals become spokespersons for unconscious links and family secrets. He developed operative groups that apply psychoanalysis to both analytic and non-analytic tasks. After describing Pichon's major contributions, the paper compares Pichon Rivière's ideas with those of Klein, Fairbairn, Bion, Winnicott and Bowlby, and contemporary writers including Ogden, Kaës, and Ferro whose works echo Pichon Rivière's thought. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  10. Assessment of a relative contribution of terrestrial background radiation in the test field by using RADIAGEMTM 2000 portable survey meter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avdić Senada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is focused on the radiological investigation of terrestrial gamma radiation in the test field with soil samples from different minefields in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Measurements of ambient dose equivalent rate, commonly referred to as “air dose rate”, in the test field located in the Tuzla Canton, were performed by RADIAGEMTM 2000 portable survey meter, based on energy-compensated Geiger-Muller counter. Its performances were tested in the laboratory conditions with gamma point sources. Since all the samples in the test field were exposed to the same cosmic radiation, there was a possibility to assess a relative contribution of terrestrial gamma radiation due to soil samples of different composition. One set of measurements in the test field was performed with RADIAGEMTM 2000, at a height of about one meter above the ground and basic statistical parameters indicated that there was no significant difference of terrestrial gamma radiation from different soil samples. The other set of measurements was carried out with the same device placed on the ground in the test field. Processing of experimental data on terrestrial gamma radiation has shown that it was possible to make a difference between relative contributions of terrestrial gamma radiation from individual soil samples. The results of investigation could be useful for multiple purposes of public interest.

  11. Transcriptomic effects-based monitoring for endocrine active chemicals: Assessing relative contribution of treated wastewater to downstream pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinovic-Weigelt, Dalma; Mehinto, Alvine C.; Ankley, Gerald T.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Barber, Larry B.; Lee, Kathy E.; King, Ryan J.; Schoenfuss, Heiko L.; Schroeder, Anthony L.; Villeneuve, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated whether a combination of targeted analytical chemistry information with unsupervised, data-rich biological methodology (i.e., transcriptomics) could be utilized to evaluate relative contributions of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents to biological effects. The effects of WWTP effluents on fish exposed to ambient, receiving waters were studied at three locations with distinct WWTP and watershed characteristics. At each location, 4 d exposures of male fathead minnows to the WWTP effluent and upstream and downstream ambient waters were conducted. Transcriptomic analyses were performed on livers using 15 000 feature microarrays, followed by a canonical pathway and gene set enrichment analyses. Enrichment of gene sets indicative of teleost brain–pituitary–gonadal–hepatic (BPGH) axis function indicated that WWTPs serve as an important source of endocrine active chemicals (EACs) that affect the BPGH axis (e.g., cholesterol and steroid metabolism were altered). The results indicated that transcriptomics may even pinpoint pertinent adverse outcomes (i.e., liver vacuolization) and groups of chemicals that preselected chemical analytes may miss. Transcriptomic Effects-Based monitoring was capable of distinguishing sites, and it reflected chemical pollution gradients, thus holding promise for assessment of relative contributions of point sources to pollution and the efficacy of pollution remediation.

  12. Soil moisture and pH control relative contributions of fungi and bacteria to N2O production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huaihai; Mothapo, Nape V; Shi, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Fungal N(2)O production has been progressively recognized, but its controlling factors remain unclear. This study examined the impacts of soil moisture and pH on fungal and bacterial N(2)O production in two ecosystems, conventional farming and plantation forestry. Four treatments, antibiotic-free soil and soil amended with streptomycin, cycloheximide, or both were used to determine N(2)O production of fungi versus bacteria. Soil moisture and pH effects were assessed under 65-90 % water-filled pore space (WFPS) and pH 4.0-9.0, respectively. Irrespective of antibiotic treatments, soil N(2)O fluxes peaked at 85-90 % WFPS and pH 7.0 or 8.0, indicating that both fungi and bacteria preferred more anoxic and neutral or slightly alkaline conditions in producing N(2)O. However, compared with bacteria, fungi contributed more to N(2)O production under sub-anoxic and acidic conditions. Real-time polymerase chain reaction of 16S, ITS rDNA, and denitrifying genes for quantifications of bacteria, fungi, and denitrifying bacteria, respectively, showed that fungi were more abundant at acidic pH, whereas total and denitrifying bacteria favored neutral conditions. Such variations in the abundance appeared to be related to the pH effects on the relative fungal and bacterial contribution to N(2)O production.

  13. Nutrient and Anti nutrient Composition of Jams Prepared from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nutrient composition of prepared jams was higher than that of commercially available (control) one, though commercial jam rated highest in all sensory parameters investigated. Addition of carrot extract improved the â-carotene content and acceptability of prepared jams. Conclusion: The relatively high level of -carotene ...

  14. Contribution of the toxic advanced glycation end-products-receptor axis in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takino, Jun-Ichi; Nagamine, Kentaro; Hori, Takamitsu; Sakasai-Sakai, Akiko; Takeuchi, Masayoshi

    2015-10-18

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. The main etiologies of HCC are hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus (HCV), and non-hepatitis B/non-hepatitis C HCC (NBNC-HCC) has also been identified as an etiological factor. Although the incidence of HCV-related HCC in Japan has decreased slightly in recent years, that of NBNC-HCC has increased. The onset mechanism of NBNC-HCC, which has various etiologies, remains unclear; however, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a severe form of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, is known to be an important risk factor for NBNC-HCC. Among the different advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) formed by the Maillard reaction, glyceraldehyde-derived AGEs, the predominant components of toxic AGEs (TAGE), have been associated with NASH and NBNC-HCC, including NASH-related HCC. Furthermore, the expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) has been correlated with the malignant progression of HCC. Therefore, TAGE induce oxidative stress by binding with RAGE may, in turn, lead to adverse effects, such as fibrosis and malignant transformation, in hepatic stellate cells and tumor cells during NASH or NASH-related HCC progression. The aim of this review was to examine the contribution of the TAGE-RAGE axis in NASH-related HCC.

  15. Predicting Self-Rated Mental and Physical Health: The Contributions of Subjective Socioeconomic Status and Personal Relative Deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell J. Callan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lower subjective socioeconomic status (SSS and higher personal relative deprivation (PRD relate to poorer health. Both constructs concern people’s perceived relative social position, but they differ in their emphasis on the reference groups people use to determine their comparative disadvantage (national population vs. similar others and the importance of resentment that may arise from such adverse comparisons. We investigated the relative utility of SSS and PRD as predictors of self-rated physical and mental health (e.g., self-rated health, stress, health complaints. Across 6 studies, self-rated physical and mental health were on the whole better predicted by measures of PRD than by SSS while controlling for objective socioeconomic status (SES, with SSS rarely contributing unique variance over and above PRD and SES. Studies 4 to 6 discount the possibility that the superiority of PRD over SSS in predicting health is due to psychometric differences (e.g., reliability or response biases between the measures.

  16. Genetic contributions to age-related decline in executive function: a 10-year longitudinal study of COMT and BDNF polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk I Erickson

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variability in the dopaminergic and neurotrophic systems could contribute to age-related impairments in executive control and memory function. In this study we examined whether genetic polymorphisms for catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF were related to the trajectory of cognitive decline occurring over a 10-year period in older adults. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in the COMT (Val158/108Met gene affects the concentration of dopamine in the prefrontal cortex. In addition, a Val/Met substitution in the pro-domain for BDNF (Val66Met affects the regulated secretion and trafficking of BDNF with Met carriers showing reduced secretion and poorer cognitive function. We found that impairments over the 10-year span on a task-switching paradigm did not vary as a function of the COMT polymorphism. However, for the BDNF polymorphism the Met carriers performed worse than Val homozygotes at the first testing session but only the Val homozygotes demonstrated a significant reduction in performance over the 10-year span. Our results argue that the COMT polymorphism does not affect the trajectory of age-related executive control decline, whereas the Val/Val polymorphism for BDNF may promote faster rates of cognitive decay in old age. These results are discussed in relation to the role of BDNF in senescence and the transforming impact of the Met allele on cognitive function in old age.

  17. Relative contribution of biotic and abiotic factors to the population density of the cassava green mite, Mononychellus tanajoa (Acari: Tetranychidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rêgo, Adriano S; Teodoro, Adenir V; Maciel, Anilde G S; Sarmento, Renato A

    2013-08-01

    The cassava green mite, Mononychellus tanajoa, is a key pest of cassava, Manihot esculenta Crantz (Euphorbiaceae), and it may be kept in check by naturally occurring predatory mites of the family Phytoseiidae. In addition to predatory mites, abiotic factors may also contribute to regulate pest mite populations in the field. Here, we evaluated the population densities of both M. tanajoa and the generalist predatory mite Euseius ho DeLeon (Acari: Phytoseiidae) over the cultivation cycle (11 months) of cassava in four study sites located around the city of Miranda do Norte, Maranhão, Brazil. The abiotic variables rainfall, temperature and relative humidity were also recorded throughout the cultivation cycle of cassava. We determined the relative importance of biotic (density of E. ho) and abiotic (rainfall, temperature and relative humidity) factors to the density of M. tanajoa. The density of M. tanajoa increased whereas the density of E. ho remained constant throughout time. A hierarchical partitioning analysis revealed that most of the variance for the density of M. tanajoa was explained by rainfall and relative humidity followed by E. ho density and temperature. We conclude that abiotic factors, especially rainfall, were the main mechanisms driving M. tanajoa densities.

  18. Change in the relative contributions of habit and working memory facilitates serial reversal learning expertise in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassett, Thomas C; Hampton, Robert R

    2017-05-01

    Functionally distinct memory systems likely evolved in response to incompatible demands placed on learning by distinct environmental conditions. Working memory appears adapted, in part, for conditions that change frequently, making rapid acquisition and brief retention of information appropriate. In contrast, habits form gradually over many experiences, adapting organisms to contingencies of reinforcement that are stable over relatively long intervals. Serial reversal learning provides an opportunity to simultaneously examine the processes involved in adapting to rapidly changing and relatively stable contingencies. In serial reversal learning, selecting one of the two simultaneously presented stimuli is positively reinforced, while selection of the other is not. After a preference for the positive stimulus develops, the contingencies of reinforcement reverse. Naïve subjects adapt to such reversals gradually, perseverating in selection of the previously rewarded stimulus. Experts reverse rapidly according to a win-stay, lose-shift response pattern. We assessed whether a change in the relative control of choice by habit and working memory accounts for the development of serial reversal learning expertise. Across three experiments, we applied manipulations intended to attenuate the contribution of working memory but leave the contribution of habit intact. We contrasted performance following long and short intervals in Experiments 1 and 2, and we interposed a competing cognitive load between trials in Experiment 3. These manipulations slowed the acquisition of reversals in expert subjects, but not naïve subjects, indicating that serial reversal learning expertise is facilitated by a shift in the control of choice from passively acquired habit to actively maintained working memory.

  19. Critical source times for nutrient loss in agricultural catchment streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melland, Alice; Shore, Mairead; Mellander, Per-Erik; McDonald, Noeleen; Shortle, Ger; Murphy, Paul; Jordan, Phil

    2014-05-01

    Identifying periods of the year when there is a high risk of incidental nutrient loss from farms via runoff to streams underpins current nutrient management legislation in Europe. This research explored high-temporal resolution nutrient transfer patterns relative to the time that manure and fertiliser are prohibited from being spread (the mandatory spreading 'closed' period) in five Irish agricultural catchments. Catchment nutrient losses during the 12 week closed periods in 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2011-12 were compared with losses during the remainder of the year, and with losses in the two week 'shoulder' periods immediately before and after the closed period. The closed period losses were assumed to be residual from soil nutrient stores and the 'shoulder' periods were considered to also include incidental losses. Nutrient loss was measured at sub-hourly frequency as total phosphorus (P) and total oxidised nitrogen (mostly nitrate-N) fluxes in streamflow. The streamflow fluxes showed that the proportion of the annual nitrate-N loss occurring during the closed periods (33-61%) was high compared with the remainder of the year. Six to ten times more nitrate-N loss occurred in the two weeks after, compared with the two weeks before, the closed period. These two week 'shoulder' period losses were, on average, less than or equal to 2.5 kg nitrate-N/ha and 9% of total annual nitrate-N loss in streamflow. On average, 40-53% of the annual P loss occurred during the closed periods but in a runoff-prone catchment in a year with a wet summer, the closed period was the less risky period. Similar to nitrate-N, two to twenty times more P loss occurred in the two weeks after, compared with the two weeks before, the closed period. These shoulder period losses were, on average, less than or equal to 0.027 kg/ha and 4.2% of total annual P loss in streamflow. The proportion of the shoulder period loss that could be attributed to recently spread nutrients was not known but can be

  20. Waste water phytodepuration, macrophytes and microphytes nutrient retention; Rassegna di tecniche relative alla depurazione naturale delle acque. Utilizzo di macrofite e microfite nei sistemi di depurazione

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgana, Jose` Giancarlo; Corazzi, Giulio; Lestini, Marco; Naviglio, Lucia [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente

    1997-07-01

    The traditional systems of water depuration are often responsible of undesirable ecological problems. In fact, the oxidation of pollutants due to standard sewage treatments may induce the overproduction of nutrients. Therefore the wastewater effluents may cause the eutrofication of receiving water bodies. To avoid aftereffects on life conditions of aquatic organisms, nutrient retention based on microphytes and macrophytes abilities is often utilized after traditional sewage treatments. As a matter of fact, in many countries the phytodepuration basins or artificial wetlands have been designed to receive primary and/or secondary wastewater effluents or are used directly for depuration of wastewater of small towns and/or effluents of small industries. In this report they take into account the main biological features of the common techniques of natural water depuration.

  1. Induced Pluripotent-stem-cell Related Genes Contribute to De-differentiation in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Daisuke; Hasegawa, Takumi; Ueha, Takeshi; Iwata, Eiji; Harada, Risa; Sakakibara, Akiko; Kawamoto, Teruya; Minamikawa, Tsutomu; Sakai, Yoshitada; Komori, Takahide

    2017-03-01

    Cancer stem cells are suspected to contribute to malignancy in tumors. Hypoxia affects cell differentiation and induces stem-cell-like characteristics in malignancies. Induced pluripotency was demonstrated in mouse fibroblasts by reprogramming with four transcriptional factors: Oct3/4, Sox2, c-Myc, and Klf4. Conversely, oncogenic transformations frequently express transcriptional factors and Nanog. Therefore, cancer cells present some similarities with induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. We investigated the expression of iPS-related genes in vitro and in clinical samples to identify their relationships with hypoxia and tumorigenesis. Oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells were used to show that expression levels of Oct3/4, Sox2, and Nanog were significantly increased in hypoxic condition in vitro and in moderately- and poorly-differentiated samples. We propose that Oct3/4, Sox2 and Nanog are associated with tumor hypoxia characterized in oral SCC and that these factors may also contribute to the undifferentiated potency observed in oral SCC clinically. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  2. The relative contribution of genes operating in the S-methylmethionine cycle to methionine metabolism in Arabidopsis seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Hagai; Salmon, Asaf; Tietel, Zipora; Hacham, Yael; Amir, Rachel

    2017-05-01

    Enzymes operating in the S -methylmethionine cycle make a differential contribution to methionine synthesis in seeds. In addition, mutual effects exist between the S -methylmethionine cycle and the aspartate family pathway in seeds. Methionine, a sulfur-containing amino acid, is a key metabolite in plant cells. The previous lines of evidence proposed that the S-methylmethionine (SMM) cycle contributes to methionine synthesis in seeds where methionine that is produced in non-seed tissues is converted to SMM and then transported via the phloem into the seeds. However, the relative regulatory roles of the S-methyltransferases operating within this cycle in seeds are yet to be fully understood. In the current study, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis seeds with altered expression of three HOMOCYSTEINE S-METHYLTRANSFERASEs (HMTs) and METHIONINE S-METHYLTRANSFERASE (MMT), and profiled them for transcript and metabolic changes. The results revealed that AtHMT1 and AtHMT3, but not AtHMT2 and AtMMT, are the predominant enzymes operating in seeds as altered expression of these two genes affected the levels of methionine and SMM in transgenic seeds. Their manipulations resulted in adapted expression level of genes participating in methionine synthesis through the SMM and aspartate family pathways. Taken together, our findings provide new insights into the regulatory roles of the SMM cycle and the mutual effects existing between the two methionine biosynthesis pathways, highlighting the complexity of the metabolism of methionine and SMM in seeds.

  3. Experienced Poor Lighting Contributes to the Seasonal Fluctuations in Weight and Appetite That Relate to the Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Grimaldi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We tested which environmental, social, lifestyle, and health related factors of the individual contribute to the seasonal variations in mood and behavior and whether these influence the risks of the metabolic syndrome and major depressive disorder, both conditions having a high prevalence in industrialized populations. 5480 individuals, representative of the general population aged 30 and over in Finland, were assessed for metabolic syndrome using the ATP-III criteria, gave a self-report of seasonal variations in mood and behavior, and were interviewed for mood, anxiety, and alcohol use disorders using the DSM-IV criteria. The seasonal variations in mood and behavior have a metabolic factor composed of weight and appetite, and greater loadings on this factor increased the risk of metabolic syndrome (odds ratio of 1.18, 95% confidence interval of 1.10 to 1.26. Self-reports of lighting experienced as poor at home contributed to scores on the metabolic factor (t=4.20,P<.0001. Lighting conditions and their dynamics may serve as a measure for intervention in order to influence the seasonal metabolic signals and in the end to prevent the metabolic syndrome.

  4. Glycemic index and glycemic load in relation to food and nutrient intake and metabolic risk factors in a Dutch population 1-3

    OpenAIRE

    Du, H; de, A; Bakel, van, B.W.M.; Kallen, van der, C.J.H.; Blaak, E.E; Greevenbroek, van, M.M.J.; Jansen, E.H.J.M.; Nijpels, Giel; Stehouwer, C.D.A.; Dekker, J. M.; E.J.M. Feskens

    2008-01-01

    Background: Previous studies on the glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) reported inconsistent findings on their association with metabolic risk factors. This may partly have been due to differences in underlying dietary patterns. Objective: We aimed to examine the association of GI and GL with food and nutrient intake and with metabolic risk factors including blood glucose, insulin, lipids, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP). Design: The study entailed cross-sectional analys...

  5. Long-term changes in nutrients and mussel stocks are related to numbers of breeding eiders Somateria mollissima at a large Baltic colony.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Laursen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Baltic/Wadden Sea eider Somateria mollissima flyway population is decreasing, and this trend is also reflected in the large eider colony at Christiansø situated in the Baltic Sea. This colony showed a 15-fold increase from 1925 until the mid-1990's, followed by a rapid decline in recent years, although the causes of this trend remain unknown. Most birds from the colony winter in the Wadden Sea, from which environmental data and information on the size of the main diet, the mussel Mytilus edulis stock exists. We hypothesised that changes in nutrients and water temperature in the Wadden Sea had an effect on the ecosystem affecting the size of mussel stocks, the principal food item for eiders, thereby influencing the number of breeding eider in the Christiansø colony. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: A positive relationship between the amount of fertilizer used by farmers and the concentration of phosphorus in the Wadden Sea (with a time lag of one year allowed analysis of the predictions concerning effects of nutrients for the period 1925-2010. There was (1 increasing amounts of fertilizer used in agriculture and this increased the amount of nutrients in the marine environment thereby increasing the mussel stocks in the Wadden Sea. (2 The number of eiders at Christiansø increased when the amount of fertilizer increased. Finally (3 the number of eiders in the colony at Christiansø increased with the amount of mussel stocks in the Wadden Sea. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The trend in the number of eiders at Christiansø is representative for the entire flyway population, and since nutrient reduction in the marine environment occurs in most parts of Northwest Europe, we hypothesize that this environmental candidate parameter is involved in the overall regulation of the Baltic/Wadden Sea eider population during recent decades.

  6. Predator-Driven Nutrient Recycling in California Stream Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshaw, Robin G.; Palen, Wendy J.; Courcelles, Danielle M.; Finlay, Jacques C.

    2013-01-01

    Nutrient recycling by consumers in streams can influence ecosystem nutrient availability and the assemblage and growth of photoautotrophs. Stream fishes can play a large role in nutrient recycling, but contributions by other vertebrates to overall recycling rates remain poorly studied. In tributaries of the Pacific Northwest, coastal giant salamanders (Dicamptodon tenebrosus) occur at high densities alongside steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and are top aquatic predators. We surveyed the density and body size distributions of D. tenebrosus and O. mykiss in a California tributary stream, combined with a field study to determine mass-specific excretion rates of ammonium (N) and total dissolved phosphorus (P) for D. tenebrosus. We estimated O. mykiss excretion rates (N, P) by bioenergetics using field-collected data on the nutrient composition of O. mykiss diets from the same system. Despite lower abundance, D. tenebrosus biomass was 2.5 times higher than O. mykiss. Mass-specific excretion summed over 170 m of stream revealed that O. mykiss recycle 1.7 times more N, and 1.2 times more P than D. tenebrosus, and had a higher N:P ratio (8.7) than that of D. tenebrosus (6.0), or the two species combined (7.5). Through simulated trade-offs in biomass, we estimate that shifts from salamander biomass toward fish biomass have the potential to ease nutrient limitation in forested tributary streams. These results suggest that natural and anthropogenic heterogeneity in the relative abundance of these vertebrates and variation in the uptake rates across river networks can affect broad-scale patterns of nutrient limitation. PMID:23520520

  7. [Work related psychosocial factors and the risk of early disability pensioning: a contribution to assessing the need for rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragano, N; Schneider, L

    2011-02-01

    Predicting the risk of disability in injured or sick workers is important to adequately assess the need for prevention and rehabilitation. Work-related factors could modify the risk of disability in a sustainable manner, and assessment of these factors might contribute to better risk prediction. Using the example of psychosocial work factors, empirical studies examining the question whether those exposures predict forthcoming events of disability retirement were to be identified. The review was expected to help quantify disability risks related to specific psychosocial factors at work. A systematic review was conducted. 20 studies were found which studied associations between disability retirement and different aspects of the psychosocial work environment in a longitudinal design. Most studies found elevated disability risks in persons exposed to psychosocial factors at work. Important single factors were low control, monotonous work, work stress (job strain, effort-reward imbalance), a lack of social support, problems related to the organization of work and to leadership behaviours. There is evidence that psychosocial work factors influence the short- and long-term risk of disability pensioning. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Effect of nutrient enrichment on δ13CH4 and the methane production pathway in the Florida Everglades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, M. Elizabeth; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Bae, Hee-Sung; Ogram, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    Water Conservation Area 2A in the Florida Everglades is characterized by a nutrient gradient with high levels in the north from agricultural runoff and more oligotrophic conditions in the southern interior. Based on laboratory incubations and field studies, we found that the relative importance of methane (CH4) production mechanisms shifted along this gradient, with a greater contribution due to hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis at higher nutrient levels. The relative contributions of hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis were determined from laboratory experiments and verified with field results. In the lab the relative contributions of the two pathways were determined from the differences in CH4 production rates in soil collected from sites along the nutrient gradient that was incubated with and without an inhibitor of acetoclastic methanogenesis (methyl fluoride, CH3F). In the nutrient-poor soil, most of the CH4 was formed via acetate fermentation and only 25% came from hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. At the nutrient-impacted site CH4 was produced at fourfold higher rates and the proportion of CH4 produced via hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis increased to 50%. Isotopic fractionation factors for hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis were calculated from the soil incubations and applied to δ13C-CO2 and δ13C-CH4 measured in pore water from the same transect. The trend of increased hydrogenotrophic relative to acetoclastic CH4 production along the nutrient-impacted gradient was mirrored in the field data, which produced similar results to the lab incubation work, with up to 23% of the CH4 produced from hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis at the nutrient-poor site and nearly half at the nutrient-impacted site.

  9. PKA and ERK, but not PKC, in the amygdala contribute to pain-related synaptic plasticity and behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramsey Cara

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The laterocapsular division of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeLC has emerged as an important site of pain-related plasticity and pain modulation. Glutamate and neuropeptide receptors in the CeLC contribute to synaptic and behavioral changes in the arthritis pain model, but the intracellular signaling pathways remain to be determined. This study addressed the role of PKA, PKC, and ERK in the CeLC. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in all experiments. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of CeLC neurons were made in brain slices from normal rats and from rats with a kaolin/carrageenan-induced monoarthritis in the knee (6 h postinduction. Membrane-permeable inhibitors of PKA (KT5720, 1 μM; cAMPS-Rp, 10 μM and ERK (U0126, 1 μM activation inhibited synaptic plasticity in slices from arthritic rats but had no effect on normal transmission in control slices. A PKC inhibitor (GF109203x, 1 μM and an inactive structural analogue of U0126 (U0124, 1 μM had no effect. The NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic component was inhibited by KT5720 or U0126; their combined application had additive effects. U0126 did not inhibit synaptic facilitation by forskolin-induced PKA-activation. Administration of KT5720 (100 μM, concentration in microdialysis probe or U0126 (100 μM into the CeLC, but not striatum (placement control, inhibited audible and ultrasonic vocalizations and spinal reflexes of arthritic rats but had no effect in normal animals. GF109203x (100 μM and U0124 (100 μM did not affect pain behavior. The data suggest that in the amygdala PKA and ERK, but not PKC, contribute to pain-related synaptic facilitation and behavior by increasing NMDA receptor function through independent signaling pathways.

  10. Anthropogenic nutrient sources rival natural sources on small scales in the coastal waters of the Southern California Bight

    KAUST Repository

    Howard, Meredith D. A.

    2014-01-26

    Anthropogenic nutrients have been shown to provide significant sources of nitrogen (N) that have been linked to increased primary production and harmful algal blooms worldwide. There is a general perception that in upwelling regions, the flux of anthropogenic nutrient inputs is small relative to upwelling flux, and therefore anthropogenic inputs have relatively little effect on the productivity of coastal waters. To test the hypothesis that natural sources (e.g., upwelling) greatly exceed anthropogenic nutrient sources to the Southern California Bight (SCB), this study compared the source contributions of N from four major nutrient sources: (1) upwelling, (2) treated wastewater effluent discharged to ocean outfalls, (3) riverine runoff, and (4) atmospheric deposition. This comparison was made using large regional data sets combined with modeling on both regional and local scales. At the regional bight-wide spatial scale, upwelling was the largest source of N by an order of magnitude to effluent and two orders of magnitude to riverine runoff. However, at smaller spatial scales, more relevant to algal bloom development, natural and anthropogenic contributions were equivalent. In particular, wastewater effluent and upwelling contributed the same quantity of N in several subregions of the SCB. These findings contradict the currently held perception that in upwelling-dominated regions anthropogenic nutrient inputs are negligible, and suggest that anthropogenic nutrients, mainly wastewater effluent, can provide a significant source of nitrogen for nearshore productivity in Southern California coastal waters.

  11. Nutrients for the aging eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmussen HM

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Helen M Rasmussen,1 Elizabeth J Johnson2 1Educational Studies, Lesley University, Cambridge, MA, USA; 2Carotenoid and Health Laboratory, Jean Mayer US Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: The incidence of age-related eye diseases is expected to rise with the aging of the population. Oxidation and inflammation are implicated in the etiology of these diseases. There is evidence that dietary antioxidants and anti-inflammatories may provide benefit in decreasing the risk of age-related eye disease. Nutrients of interest are vitamins C and E, β-carotene, zinc, lutein, zeaxanthin, and the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. While a recent survey finds that among the baby boomers (45–65 years old, vision is the most important of the five senses, well over half of those surveyed were not aware of the important nutrients that play a key role in eye health. This is evident from a national survey that finds that intake of these key nutrients from dietary sources is below the recommendations or guidelines. Therefore, it is important to educate this population and to create an awareness of the nutrients and foods of particular interest in the prevention of age-related eye disease. Keywords: nutrition, aging, eye health

  12. The fate of riverine nutrients on Arctic shelves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Le Fouest

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Present and future levels of primary production (PP in the Arctic Ocean (AO depend on nutrient inputs to the photic zone via vertical mixing, upwelling and external sources. In this regard, the importance of horizontal river supply relative to oceanic processes is poorly constrained at the pan-Arctic scale. We compiled extensive historical (1954–2012 data on discharge and nutrient concentrations to estimate fluxes of nitrate, soluble reactive phosphate (SRP, silicate, dissolved organic carbon (DOC, dissolved organic nitrogen (DON, particulate organic nitrogen (PON and particulate organic carbon (POC from 9 large Arctic rivers and assess their potential impact on the biogeochemistry of shelf waters. Several key points can be emphasized from this analysis. The contribution of riverine nitrate to new PP (PPnew is very small at the regional scale (9 mol N may exceed the combined riverine supply of nitrate and ammonium (3.4 × 109 mol N. Nevertheless, overall nitrogen limitation of AO phytoplankton is expected to persist even when projected increases of riverine DON and nitrate supply are taken into account. This analysis underscores the need to better contrast oceanic nutrient supply processes with the composition and fate of changing riverine nutrient deliveries in future scenarios of plankton community structure, function and production in the coastal AO.

  13. Predicting College Success: The Relative Contributions of Five Social/Personality Factors, Five Cognitive/Learning Factors, and SAT Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Brenda

    2014-10-01

    To-date, studies have examined simultaneously the relative predictive powers of two or three factors on GPA. The present study examines the relative powers of five social/personality factors, five cognitive/learning factors, and SAT scores to predict freshmen and non-freshmen (sophomores, juniors, seniors) academic success (i.e., GPA). The results revealed many significant predictors of GPA for both freshmen and non-freshmen. However, subsequent regressions showed that only academic self-efficacy, epistemic belief of learning, and high-knowledge integration explained unique variance in GPA (19%-freshmen, 23.2%-non-freshmen). Further for freshmen, SAT scores explained an additional unique 10.6% variance after the influences attributed to these three predictors was removed whereas for non-freshmen, SAT scores failed to explain any additional variance. These results highlight the unique and important contributions of academic self-efficacy, epistemic belief of learning and high-knowledge integration to GPA beyond other previously-identified predictors.

  14. Explaining educational differences in leisure-time physical activity in Europe: the contribution of work-related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, T E; Sippola, R; Borodulin, K; Rahkonen, O; Kunst, A; Klumbiene, J; Regidor, E; Ekholm, O; Mackenbach, J; Prättälä, R

    2012-06-01

    Although educational differences in leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) exist across Europe, the independent effect of educational level on leisure-time physical activity has rarely been explored. This study examines the relative contribution of occupational class, employment status, and educational level to LTPA across 12 European countries. The data were obtained from 12 European health surveys conducted at the turn of the century and identified in the EUROTHINE project. All information was self-reported. Logistic regression was applied and relative inequality index (RII) was calculated. Analyses were limited to those in the prime working-age (age 30-59; total N=137,646) men and women. In all 12 European countries, LTPA was more common in the high-educated than in the low-educated. The association between education and LTPA remained mostly unchanged after adjusting for marital status, urbanization, and self-rated health. After further adjusting for occupational class and employment status, the educational differences in LTPA were only slightly attenuated. An inverse association was found between educational level and LTPA across almost all 12 European countries. Occupational class and employment status had only a modest effect on educational differences in LTPA in most of the examined countries, suggesting that education remains an important predictor of LTPA. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Inroads into Equestrian Safety: Rider-Reported Factors Contributing to Horse-Related Accidents and Near Misses on Australian Roads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kirrilly; Matthews, Chelsea

    2015-07-22

    Horse riding and horse-related interactions are inherently dangerous. When they occur on public roads, the risk profile of equestrian activities is complicated by interactions with other road users. Research has identified speed, proximity, visibility, conspicuity and mutual misunderstanding as factors contributing to accidents and near misses. However, little is known about their significance or incidence in Australia. To explore road safety issues amongst Australian equestrians, we conducted an online survey. More than half of all riders (52%) reported having experienced at least one accident or near miss in the 12 months prior to the survey. Whilst our findings confirm the factors identified overseas, we also identified issues around rider misunderstanding of road rules and driver misunderstanding of rider hand signals. Of particular concern, we also found reports of potentially dangerous rider-directed road rage. We identify several areas for potential safety intervention including (1) identifying equestrians as vulnerable road users and horses as sentient decision-making vehicles (2) harmonising laws regarding passing horses, (3) mandating personal protective equipment, (4) improving road signage, (5) comprehensive data collection, (6) developing mutual understanding amongst road-users, (7) safer road design and alternative riding spaces; and (8) increasing investment in horse-related safety initiatives.

  16. Inroads into Equestrian Safety: Rider-Reported Factors Contributing to Horse-Related Accidents and Near Misses on Australian Roads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirrilly Thompson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Horse riding and horse-related interactions are inherently dangerous. When they occur on public roads, the risk profile of equestrian activities is complicated by interactions with other road users. Research has identified speed, proximity, visibility, conspicuity and mutual misunderstanding as factors contributing to accidents and near misses. However, little is known about their significance or incidence in Australia. To explore road safety issues amongst Australian equestrians, we conducted an online survey. More than half of all riders (52% reported having experienced at least one accident or near miss in the 12 months prior to the survey. Whilst our findings confirm the factors identified overseas, we also identified issues around rider misunderstanding of road rules and driver misunderstanding of rider hand signals. Of particular concern, we also found reports of potentially dangerous rider-directed road rage. We identify several areas for potential safety intervention including (1 identifying equestrians as vulnerable road users and horses as sentient decision-making vehicles (2 harmonising laws regarding passing horses, (3 mandating personal protective equipment, (4 improving road signage, (5 comprehensive data collection, (6 developing mutual understanding amongst road-users, (7 safer road design and alternative riding spaces; and (8 increasing investment in horse-related safety initiatives.

  17. Use of point-of-sale data to assess food and nutrient quality in remote stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimblecombe, Julie; Liddle, Robyn; O'Dea, Kerin

    2013-07-01

    To examine the feasibility of using point-of-sale data to assess dietary quality of food sales in remote stores. A multi-site cross-sectional assessment of food and nutrient composition of food sales. Point-of-sale data were linked to Australian Food and Nutrient Data and compared across study sites and with nutrient requirements. Remote Aboriginal Australia. Six stores. Point-of-sale data were readily available and provided a low-cost, efficient and objective assessment of food and nutrient sales. Similar patterns in macronutrient distribution, food expenditure and key food sources of nutrients were observed across stores. In all stores, beverages, cereal and cereal products, and meat and meat products comprised approximately half of food sales (range 49–57 %). Fruit and vegetable sales comprised 10.4 (SD 1.9) % on average. Carbohydrate contributed 54.4 (SD 3.0) % to energy; protein 13.5 (SD 1.1) %; total sugars 28.9 (SD 4.3) %; and the contribution of total saturated fat to energy ranged from 11.0 to 14.4% across stores. Mg, Ca, K and fibre were limiting nutrients, and Na was four to five times higher than the midpoint of the average intake range. Relatively few foods were major sources of nutrients. Point-of-sale data enabled an assessment of dietary quality within stores and across stores with no burden on communities and at no cost, other than time required for analysis and reporting. Similar food spending patterns and nutrient profiles were observed across the six stores. This suggests potential in using point-of-sale data to monitor and evaluate dietary quality in remote Australian communities.

  18. An exploration of the factors that contribute to the success of African American professionals in STEM-related careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander Nealy, Yolande Kristine

    This study examined factors that contribute to the success of African American professionals in STEM careers. Data were collected through a survey from 40 participants and in-depth interviews with eight of them. The survey was used to explore the participants' educational experiences from elementary school through college and on their STEM-related careers, whereas the individual interviews were used to gain insights into their perspectives as STEM professionals. The results of this study indicate that most of these African American STEM professionals attributed their choice of a STEM career to early exposure to and positive experiences in science and mathematics mediated by teachers and/or parents. Furthermore, the positive experiences and success in science and mathematics continued in high school and college, further solidifying their choice of a STEM career. However, for almost half of the participants, attending a HBCU seems to have played an important role in their enjoyment of and success in a STEM major. HBCUs provided them with role models and the necessary support and encouragement to succeed in their pursuit of a STEM degree. The results of this study illustrate the various factors that play a role in preventing leakage in the minority STEM pipeline: K-12 experiences mediated by parents and teachers; support systems in college and the workplace mediated by counselors, professors, peers, and administrators; and policies that facilitate integration and the development of such support systems. This study contributes to the current body of knowledge on minorities in STEM by focusing on what works, instead of focusing on the deficit model and what does not work. It is hoped that these results help validate the efforts of those who work towards a more equitable representation of the STEM fields.

  19. Daily physical activity and its contribution to the health-related quality of life of ambulatory individuals with chronic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rand Debbie

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Participation in daily physical activity (PA post-stroke has not previously been investigated as a possible explanatory variable of health-related quality of life (HRQL. The aims were 1 to determine the contribution of daily PA to the HRQL of individuals with chronic stroke and 2 to assess the relationship between the functional ability of these individuals to the amount of daily PA. Methods The amount of daily PA of forty adults with chronic stroke (mean age 66.5 ± 9.6 years was monitored using two measures. Accelerometers (Actical were worn on the hip for three consecutive days in conjunction with a self-report questionnaire [the PA Scale for Individuals with Physical Disabilities (PASIPD]. The daily physical activity was measured as the mean total accelerometer activity counts/day and the PASIPD scores as the metabolic equivalent (MET hr/day. HRQL was assessed by the Physical and Mental composite scores of the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36 (SF-36 in addition to the functional ability of the participants. Correlation and regression analyses were performed. Results After controlling for the severity of the motor impairment, the amount of daily PA, as assessed by the PASIPD and accelerometers, was found to independently contribute to 10-12% of the variance of the Physical Composite Score of the SF-36. No significant relationship was found between PA and the Mental Composite Score of the SF-36.The functional ability of the participants was found to be correlated to the amount of daily PA (r = 0.33 - 0.67, p Conclusion The results suggest that daily PA is associated with better HRQL (as assessed by the Physical composite score of the SF-36 for people living with stroke. Daily PA should be encouraged to potentially increase HRQL. Accelerometers in conjunction with a self-report questionnaire may provide important measures of PA which can be monitored and modified, and potentially influence HRQL.

  20. Relative contributions of Vibrio polysaccharide and quorum sensing to the resistance of Vibrio cholerae to predation by heterotrophic protists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyang Sun

    Full Text Available Protozoan grazing is a major mortality factor faced by bacteria in the environment. Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the disease cholera, is a natural inhabitant of aquatic ecosystems, and its survival depends on its ability to respond to stresses, such as predation by heterotrophic protists. Previous results show that grazing pressure induces biofilm formation and enhances a smooth to rugose morphotypic shift, due to increased expression of Vibrio polysaccharide (VPS. In addition to negatively controlling vps genes, the global quorum sensing (QS regulator, HapR, plays a role in grazing resistance as the ΔhapR strain is efficiently consumed while the wild type (WT is not. Here, the relative and combined contributions of VPS and QS to grazing resistance were investigated by exposing VPS and HapR mutants and double mutants in VPS and HapR encoding genes at different phases of biofilm development to amoeboid and flagellate grazers. Data show that the WT biofilms were grazing resistant, the VPS mutants were less resistant than the WT strain, but more resistant than the QS mutant strain, and that QS contributes to grazing resistance mainly in mature biofilms. In addition, grazing effects on biofilms of mixed WT and QS mutant strains were investigated. The competitive fitness of each strain in mixed biofilms was determined by CFU and microscopy. Data show that protozoa selectively grazed the QS mutant in mixed biofilms, resulting in changes in the composition of the mixed community. A small proportion of QS mutant cells which comprised 4% of the mixed biofilm biovolume were embedded in grazing resistant WT microcolonies and shielded from predation, indicating the existence of associational protection in mixed biofilms.

  1. Understanding screen-related sedentary behavior and its contributing factors among school-aged children: a social-ecologic exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Meizi; Harris, Stewart; Piché, Leonard; Beynon, Charlene

    2009-01-01

    To explore the factors that contribute to children's screen-related sedentary (S-RS) behaviors. Elementary schools. A random sample of children in grades five and six and their parents. The outcome measure was children's S-RS activity level measured by a self-administered questionnaire. A full spectrum of potential contributing factors for children's S-RS behaviors was obtained through surveys. Multilevel linear regression methods were used to determine the associations between these factors and children's screen time (hours per day) and results were expressed as regression coefficients (g). Of 955 child-parent pairs in 14 participating schools, 508 pairs (53%) completed the surveys. At an intrapersonal level, protective factors included being a girl (g = -.71); belonging to a sports team inside (g = -.56) or outside (g = -.49) of school; having a negative attitude toward S-RS activities (g = -.13); and having a positive attitude toward physical activity (g = .48). At the interpersonal and social levels, parental leisure S-RS behaviors (g = .32) were positively associated, whereas strict parental rules on computer use (g = -.27) and family income (g = -.32) were inversely correlated with S-RS behavior. At the environmental level, the presence of TVs in children's bedrooms (g = .44) and owning videogame devices (g = .58) increased the risk of S-RS behaviors, whereas after school programs (g = - .86) and schools' participation in the Turn Off the Screen Week campaign (g = -.91) decreased the risk. Public health interventions should target multilevel factors, including increasing children's awareness, promoting parental involvement in healthy lifestyle pursuits, and creating less screenogenic environments.

  2. High-frequency monitoring of catchment nutrient exports reveals highly variable storm event responses and dynamic source zone activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaen, Phillip J.; Khamis, Kieran; Lloyd, Charlotte; Comer-Warner, Sophie; Ciocca, Francesco; Thomas, Rick M.; MacKenzie, A. Rob; Krause, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Storm events can drive highly variable behavior in catchment nutrient and water fluxes, yet short-term event dynamics are frequently missed by low-resolution sampling regimes. In addition, nutrient source zone contributions can vary significantly within and between storm events. Our inability to identify and characterize time-dynamic source zone contributions severely hampers the adequate design of land use management practices in order to control nutrient exports from agricultural landscapes. Here we utilize an 8 month high-frequency (hourly) time series of streamflow, nitrate (NO3-N), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and hydroclimatic variables for a headwater agricultural catchment. We identified 29 distinct storm events across the monitoring period. These events represented 31% of the time series and contributed disproportionately to nutrient loads (42% of NO3-N and 43% of DOC) relative to their duration. Regression analysis identified a small subset of hydroclimatological variables (notably precipitation intensity and antecedent conditions) as key drivers of nutrient dynamics during storm events. Hysteresis analysis of nutrient concentration-discharge relationships highlighted the dynamic activation of discrete NO3-N and DOC source zones, which varied on an event-specific basis. Our results highlight the benefits of high-frequency in situ monitoring for characterizing short-term nutrient fluxes and unraveling connections between hydroclimatological variability and river nutrient export and source zone activation under extreme flow conditions. These new process-based insights, which we summarize in a conceptual model, are fundamental to underpinning targeted management measures to reduce nutrient loading of surface waters.

  3. The global nutrient challenge. From science to public engagement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, M.A.; Howard, C.M. [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Bleeker, A. [Energy research Centre of the Netherlands, Petten (Netherlands); Datta, A. [United Nations Environment Programme, Nairobi (Kenya)

    2013-04-15

    Among the many environment and development challenges facing humanity, it is fair to say that nutrients do not currently feature so regularly in the newspapers, radio and television. The media tends to prefer easy single issues which affect our daily lives in a clear-cut way. The role of carbon in climate change is a good example. We all depend on climate. Burning fossil fuels makes more carbon dioxide, tending to change temperature and rainfall patterns, to which we can easily relate. The science is complex, but it is a simple message for the public to understand. It does not take long to think of several other easily grasped threats, like urban air pollution, poor drinking water, or even the occurrence of horsemeat in food chains. It is perhaps for these reasons that the role of nutrients in environmental change has received much less public attention. After all, nutrients - including nitrogen, phosphorus and many micronutrients - play multiple roles in our world; they affect many biogeochemical processes and they lead to a plethora of interacting threats. If we are not careful, we can quickly get buried in the complexity of the different ways in which our lives are affected by these elements. The outcome is that it can become hard to convey the science of global nutrient cycles in a way that the public can understand. These are points about which we have given substantial thought as we contributed to a recently launched report Our Nutrient World: The challenge to produce more food and energy with less pollution (Sutton et al., 2013). The report was commissioned by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and conducted by the Global Partnership on Nutrient Management in cooperation with the International Nitrogen Initiative. The commission was not to provide a full scientific assessment, but rather to develop a global overview of the challenges associated with nutrient management. Drawing on existing knowledge, the aim was to distill the nature of the

  4. UnLoadC3: Ensembles of climate change projections for two river catchment areas in Austria - Contributions to an overall uncertainty assessment framework for the modelling of water quantity and nutrient transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulla, Christoph; Hollosi, Brigitta; Schulz, Karsten; Schürz, Christoph; Mehdi, Bano; Ertl, Thomas; Pressl, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    The objective of UnLoadC3 is to examine the impacts of uncertainty - inherent in data and modelling - on projections of water flow and nutrient transport within two selected river catchment areas (Schwechat and Raab in Austria) under climate change conditions. To access future climate change, ensembles of climate projections from the EURO-CORDEX initiative - given on grids with a 12 km spacing - have been used. These ensembles have been driven by two RCPs (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5) used within the Fifth Assessment Report of the IPCC. In order to provide climate change projections on the required impact scales, statistical downscaling techniques as well as bias correction methods have been applied. Climate variables, such as minimum, maximum, mean temperature and precipitation totals given on a daily base were analyzed. This local scale daily information is entered into the water quality model SWAT, which simulates water balance, pertaining sediment- and nutrient-transport processes across the two considered river watersheds.

  5. Vascular Contributions in Alzheimer's Disease-Related Neuropathological Changes: First Autopsy Evidence from a South Asian Aging Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesinghe, Printha; Shankar, S K; Yasha, T C; Gorrie, Catherine; Amaratunga, Dhammika; Hulathduwa, Sanjayah; Kumara, K Sunil; Samarasinghe, Kamani; Suh, Yoo-Hun; Steinbusch, Harry W M; De Silva, K Ranil D

    2016-10-18

    Evidence from various consortia on vascular contributions has been inconsistent in determining the etiology of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). To investigate vascular risk factors and cerebrovascular pathologies associated in manifestation of AD-related neuropathological changes of an elderly population. Postmortem brain samples from 76 elderly subjects (≥50 years) were used to study genetic polymorphisms, intracranial atherosclerosis of the circle of Willis (IASCW), and microscopic infarcts in deep white matters. From this cohort, 50 brains (≥60 years) were subjected to neuropathological diagnosis using immunohistopathological techniques. Besides the association with age, the apolipoprotein E ɛ4 allele was significantly and strongly associated with Thal amyloid-β phases ≥1 [odds ratio (OR) = 6.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.37-33.45] and inversely with Braak neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) stages ≥III (0.02, 0.0-0.47). Illiterates showed a significant positive association for Braak NFT stages ≥IV (14.62, 1.21-176.73) and a significant negative association for microscopic infarcts (0.15, 0.03-0.71) in deep white matters. With respect to cerebrovascular pathologies, cerebral small vessel lesions (white matter hyperintensities and cerebral amyloid angiopathy) showed a higher degree of associations among them and with AD-related neuropathological changes (p pathology (IASCW), which showed a significant association only with Braak NFT stages ≥I (p = 0.050). These findings suggest that besides age, education, and genetic factors, other vascular risk factors were not associated with AD-related neuropathological changes and urge prompt actions be taken against cerebral small vessel diseases since evidence for effective prevention is still lacking.

  6. A Summary of NASA Related Contributions for the Remote Sensing of Evapotranspiration in Support of Water Management and Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toll, David; Doorn, Brad; Lawford, Rick; Anderson, Martha; Allen, Rick; Martin, Timothy; Wood, Eric; Ferguson, Craig

    2010-01-01

    The amount of evapotranspiration (ET) to the atmosphere can account for 60% or more of the water loss in many semi-arid locations, and can critically affect local economies tied to agriculture, recreation, hydroelectric power, ecosystems, and numerous other water-related areas. NASA supports many activities using satellite and Earth science data to more accurately and cost effectively estimate ET. NASA ET related work includes the research, development and application of techniques. The free and open access of NASA satellite data and products now permits a much wider application of ET mapping. Typically the NASA supported approaches ranges from large regional and continental ET mapping using MODIS (also with AIRS and CERES), GRACE (gravimetric water balance), geostationary (e.g., GOES and Meteosat for near continental sca|e), land surface modeling (i.e, Land Data Assimilation Systems) to fine scale mapping such as provided bvLandsatdata(water storage using gravimetric data over large areas and estimates ET indirectly. Also land surface modeling within the context of data assimilation and integration schemes provides the capability to integrate in situ, ancillary and satellite together to provide a spatially and synoptic estimates of ET also for use to provide for short-term ET predictions. We will summarize NASA related activities contributing to the improved estimation of ET for water management and agriculture with an emphasis on the Western U3.. This summary includes a description of ET projects in the Middle Rio Grande, Yakima, North Platte and other selected basins in the western US. We will also discuss plans to further address ET applications through working with the USDA and the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) to extend and evaluate western U.S. ET mapping to other parts of the U.S. and internationally.

  7. Event-related potentials associated with masked priming of test cues reveal multiple potential contributions to recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollams, Anna M; Taylor, Jason R; Karayanidis, Frini; Henson, Richard N

    2008-06-01

    The relationship between recognition memory and repetition priming remains unclear. Priming is believed to reflect increased processing fluency for previously studied items relative to new items. Manipulations that affect fluency can also affect the likelihood that participants will judge items as studied in recognition tasks. This attribution of fluency to memory has been related to the familiarity process, as distinct from the recollection process, that is assumed by dual-process models of recognition memory. To investigate the time courses and neural sources of fluency, familiarity, and recollection, we conducted an event-related potential (ERP) study of recognition memory using masked priming of test cues and a remember/know paradigm. During the recognition test, studied and unstudied words were preceded by a brief, masked word that was either the same or different. Participants decided quickly whether each item had been studied ("old" or "new"), and for items called old, indicated whether they "remembered" (R) the encoding event, or simply "knew" (K) the item had been studied. Masked priming increased the proportion of K, but not R, judgments. Priming also decreased response times for hits but not correct rejections (CRs). Four distinct ERP effects were found. A medial-frontal FN400 (300-500 msec) was associated with familiarity (R, K Hits > CRs) and a centro-parietal late positivity (500-800 msec) with recollection (R Hits > K Hits, CRs). A long-term repetition effect was found for studied items judged "new" (Misses > CRs) in the same time window as the FN400, but with a posterior distribution. Finally, a centrally distributed masked priming effect was visible between 150 and 250 msec and continued into the 300-500 msec time window, where it was topographically dissociable from the FN400. These results suggest that multiple neural signals are associated with repetition and potentially contribute to recognition memory.

  8. Nutrient offerings from the meals and snacks served in four daycare centers in Guatemala City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vossenaar, Marieke; Panday, Bindiya; Hamelinck, Victoria; Soto-Méndez, María José; Doak, Colleen M; Solomons, Noel W

    2011-05-01

    To assess the nutritional content and contribution to recommended nutrient intakes of the menu offerings in diverse daycare centers serving low-income urban families in Guatemala City. An observational study design was used to record all food and drink items offered to children attending four daycare centers on 5 different days of the week to represent a typical week (20 d). Direct recording of menus, weighing of ingredients used, and the preparation of dishes and drinks were undertaken. Estimated energy, macronutrients, and eight selected micronutrients were assessed and related to the Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization recommended nutrient intakes. Nutrient densities and critical densities were computed. The diet was also assessed separately by meal time. Top sources of energy and nutrients were identified. The quantity and quality of food items provided at the four daycare centers examined varied greatly. For some nutrients, the recommended nutrient intakes were already accounted for by the food consumed from the institutional fare. As expected, those centers with more meal times covered on their menus had a greater degree of coverage of requirements. Adequacy ratios were above 100% for eight, seven, three, and one of nine nutrients examined for centers A, B, C, and D, respectively. When intakes were compared using nutrient density, all significances were abolished across all nutrients of interest. The present descriptive analysis provides the basis for suggesting reforms at the specific centers and for understanding the generic challenges and opportunities across the system for low-income attendees in Guatemala City. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Chronic nutrient enrichment increases prevalence and severity of coral disease and bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Thurber, Rebecca L; Burkepile, Deron E; Fuchs, Corinne; Shantz, Andrew A; McMinds, Ryan; Zaneveld, Jesse R

    2014-02-01

    Nutrient loading is one of the strongest drivers of marine habitat degradation. Yet, the link between nutrients and disease epizootics in marine organisms is often tenuous and supported only by correlative data. Here, we present experimental evidence that chronic nutrient exposure leads to increases in both disease prevalence and severity and coral bleaching in scleractinian corals, the major habitat-forming organisms in tropical reefs. Over 3 years, from June 2009 to June 2012, we continuously exposed areas of a coral reef to elevated levels of nitrogen and phosphorus. At the termination of the enrichment, we surveyed over 1200 scleractinian corals for signs of disease or bleaching. Siderastrea siderea corals within enrichment plots had a twofold increase in both the prevalence and severity of disease compared with corals in unenriched control plots. In addition, elevated nutrient loading increased coral bleaching; Agaricia spp. of corals exposed to nutrients suffered a 3.5-fold increase in bleaching frequency relative to control corals, providing empirical support for a hypothesized link between nutrient loading and bleaching-induced coral declines. However, 1 year later, after nutrient enrichment had been terminated for 10 months, there were no differences in coral disease or coral bleaching prevalence between the previously enriched and control treatments. Given that our experimental enrichments were well within the ranges of ambient nutrient concentrations found on many degraded reefs worldwide, these data provide strong empirical support to the idea that coastal nutrient loading is one of the major factors contributing to the increasing levels of both coral disease and coral bleaching. Yet, these data also suggest that simple improvements to water quality may be an effective way to mitigate some coral disease epizootics and the corresponding loss of coral cover in the future. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Nutrient adequacy and its correlation in a sub-Himalayan region of West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmistha Bhattacherjee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nutrient adequacy is the level of intake of an essential nutrient in relation to the nutrient requirement for adequate health, which is expressed as the percentage of recommended dietary allowance. To develop an effective nationwide preventive program to combat malnutrition, it is necessary not only to assess the nature and magnitude of the problem of nutrient inadequacy but to identify factors affecting it especially at the household level. Objective: To estimate the prevalence of nutrient adequacy in a sample of households in a rural area of Darjeeling district and to find out the factors associated with nutrient adequacy. Materials and Methods: A community-based cross-sectional study was carried out from January 2014 to December 2014 in 821 households of Darjeeling district, India. The major dependent variable used in this study was the mean nutrient adequacy ratio of a household and the independent variables were number of family members, number of under-five children in the family, literacy of head of the family, literacy of the wife of the head of the family, income of the family, and percentage expenditure on food. Results: The prevalence of nutrient adequate households was found to be 35.3% among the study households. It was observed that the percentage expenditure on food had the highest contribution toward nutrient adequacy, followed by number of under-five children in the family and literacy of the wife of the head of the family. Undernutrition was found to be prevalent in 56.6% of the households. Conclusion: Majority of the study population had a diet less than the required amount and expectedly, undernutrition was also present in huge proportions.

  11. Contribution of targeted saliva screening for congenital CMV-related hearing loss in newborns who fail hearing screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari-Even Roth, Daphne; Lubin, Daniel; Kuint, Jacob; Teperberg-Oikawa, Michal; Mendelson, Ella; Strauss, Tzipora; Barkai, Galia

    2017-11-01

    We previously reported a 2.2% rate of infants born with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) due to congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infection identified by universal neonatal screen for cCMV using saliva. To evaluate the contribution of targeted saliva screening for cCMV to the detection of infants born with cCMV-related SNHL who failed universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS). We retrospectively reviewed the audiological and medical records of infants who failed UNHS and were tested for cCMV using saliva sample prior to discharge at Sheba Medical Center between 2014 and 2015. Positive cases were confirmed by urine sample. Two hundred (1%) of the 19 830 infants tested during the study period failed in-hospital hearing screening. A saliva specimen was obtained prior to discharge in 187 infants (93.5% of those who failed UNHS). In 178 infants saliva testing was performed at ≤21 days of chronological age and yielded results. cCMV infection was identified in 4/178 tested infants (2.25%, 95% CI 0.8% to 5.3%), of whom three were diagnosed with SNHL (1.7%, 95% CI 0.5% to 4.4%) and offered antiviral treatment. Two of the tested infants (1.12%, 95% CI 0.2% to 3.6%) were diagnosed with cCMV solely due to failure in UNHS. Occult central nervous system (CNS) symptoms of cCMV infection were detected in 2/4 infants following targeted investigation. Targeted cCMV screening in newborns who failed UNHS contributed to the early detection of infants born with cCMV-related isolated SNHL or with occult CNS symptoms who could potentially benefit from antiviral treatment. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Understanding the Relative Contributions of Lower-Level Word Processes, Higher-Level Processes, and Working Memory to Reading Comprehension Performance in Proficient Adult Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    Although a considerable amount of evidence has been amassed regarding the contributions of lower-level word processes, higher-level processes, and working memory to reading comprehension, little is known about the relationships among these sources of individual differences or their relative contributions to reading comprehension performance. This…

  13. Seasonal evolution of cholorophyll-a and cyanobacteria (Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus on the northeast continental shelf of the Gulf of Cádiz: relation to thermohaline and nutrients fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Anfuso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal evolution of nutrients, chlorophyll-a (chl-a and cyanobacteria (Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus on the northeast continental shelf of the Gulf of Cádiz was observed during four cruises in summer and autumn 2006 and winter and spring 2007. Samples were collected to determine the distribution of chl-a and cyanobacteria abundance and to analyse their coupling with thermohaline and chemical properties in the gulf region. Surface nutrient distributions showed clear seasonal variability. Maximum levels were recorded for the entire study region during winter due to winter mixing and the strong influence of the Guadalquivir River and Bay of Cádiz outflow. Maximum chl-a levels were reached during spring for the entire region and for the entire water column. Minimum values of chl-a were observed during summer, under prevailing oligotrophic conditions, and winter when in spite of relatively high nutrient concentrations, phytoplankton growth was probably light-limited. The distribution of both cyanobacteria populations also varied seasonally in association with the oceanographic conditions. Prochlorococcus maximum cell abundance was observed at the sea surface during the four cruises, except in the northern region during summer. However, Synechococcus showed a maximum concentration at the sea surface in autumn and winter and at the subsurface chlorophyll maximum in autumn and spring.

  14. Relative contribution of glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis to basal, glucagon- and nerve stimulation-dependent glucose output in the perfused liver from fed and fasted rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuers, U.; JUNGERMANN, K.

    1990-01-01

    The relative contribution to basal, glucagon- and nerve stimulation-enhanced glucose output of glycogenolysis (glucose output in the presence of the gluconeogenic inhibitor mercaptopicolinate) and gluconeogenesis (difference in glucose output in the absence and presence of the inhibitor) was

  15. Tropomyosin-related kinase B mediated signaling contributes to the induction of malignant phenotype of gallbladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Makoto; Onishi, Hideya; Ozono, Keigo; Yamasaki, Akio; Imaizumi, Akira; Kamakura, Sachiko; Nakano, Kenji; Oda, Yoshinao; Sumimoto, Hideki; Nakamura, Masafumi

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to demonstrate the clinical and biological significance of Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/Tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) signaling in gallbladder cancer (GBC) through a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments. TrkB expression was detected in 63 (91.3%) out of 69 surgically resected primary GBC specimens by immunohistochemistry. TrkB expression in the invasive front correlated with T factor (p=0.0391) and clinical staging (p=0.0391). Overall survival was lower in patients with high TrkB expression in the invasive front than in those with low TrkB expression (p=0.0363). In vitro experiment, we used five TrkB-expressing GBC cell lines with or without K-ras mutation. TrkB-mediated signaling increased proliferation and the invasiveness by inducing epithelial mesenchymal transition, and activating matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9. Inhibition of TrkB-mediated signaling also decreased hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), VEGF-C, and VEGF-D expression. In vivo experiment, inhibition of TrkB-mediated signaling suppressed tumorigenicity and tumor growth in GBC. These findings demonstrate that TrkB-mediated signaling contributes to the induction of malignant phenotypes (proliferation, invasiveness, angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, and tumorigenesis) in GBC, and could be a promising therapeutic target regardless of K-ras mutation status. PMID:28423707

  16. Computational model to investigate the relative contributions of different neuromuscular properties of tibialis anterior on force generated during ankle dorsiflexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Ariba; Poosapadi Arjunan, Sridhar; Kumar, Dinesh Kant

    2018-01-16

    This study describes a new model of the force generated by tibialis anterior muscle with three new features: single-fiber action potential, twitch force, and pennation angle. This model was used to investigate the relative effects and interaction of ten age-associated neuromuscular parameters. Regression analysis (significance level of 0.05) between the neuromuscular properties and corresponding simulated force produced at the footplate was performed. Standardized slope coefficients were computed to rank the effect of the parameters. The results show that reduction in the average firing rate is the reason for the sharp decline in the force and other factors, such as number of muscle fibers, specific force, pennation angle, and innervation ratio. The fast fiber ratio affects the simulated force through two significant interactions. This study has ranked the individual contributions of the neuromuscular factors to muscle strength decline of the TA and identified firing rate decline as the biggest cause followed by decrease in muscle fiber number and specific force. The strategy for strength preservation for the elderly should focus on improving firing rate. Graphical abstract Neuromuscular properties of Tibialis Anterior on force generated during ankle dorsiflexion.

  17. A site-related suitability analysis for the production of biomass as a contribution to sustainable regional land-use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Michael; Helms, Yvonne; Herberg, Alfred; Köppen, Antje; Kunzmann, Kathrin; Radtke, Dörte; Ross, Lutz; Itzerott, Sibylle

    2008-04-01

    The use of renewable energy in Europe offers the possibility of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and contributes to energy security and independence. With the reform of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) and a variety of recently introduced national directives supporting renewable energy sources in the European Union, the economic attractiveness of bioenergy production has distinctly increased. This article combines an economic evaluation of biomass production with site-related natural conditions of the Havelland region, situated in the north-east area of Germany. Two methods for evaluating site-specific potential biomass yields were compared. For three example biomass crops, evaluations of yield estimations at agricultural lots for site-optimized suitability (SOS) and conventional suitability (CS) were carried out. Both modelling approaches were compared. The results of the GIS modelling indicate that the financial support for increasing the use of renewable energy with the German feed-in system, called Erneuerbare-Energien-Gesetz (EEG), will possibly lead to an increased cultivation of crops with high biomass output. This monocultural orientation of farming practices and the negative effects on the ecosystem could act in opposition to other environmental initiatives of the EU. The outputs of the SOS analysis show that high biomass production could be integrated into environmental policy proposals. Therefore, new EU policy should take modified subsidies into consideration in order to avoid developing conflicts between small-scale changes in landscape ecosystems caused by large-scale transformations in energy policy.

  18. Explaining local-scale species distributions: relative contributions of spatial autocorrelation and landscape heterogeneity for an avian assemblage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Brady J; Zipkin, Elise F; Gardner, Beth; Blank, Peter J; Sauer, John R; Royle, J Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Understanding interactions between mobile species distributions and landcover characteristics remains an outstanding challenge in ecology. Multiple factors could explain species distributions including endogenous evolutionary traits leading to conspecific clustering and endogenous habitat features that support life history requirements. Birds are a useful taxon for examining hypotheses about the relative importance of these factors among species in a community. We developed a hierarchical Bayes approach to model the relationships between bird species occupancy and local landcover variables accounting for spatial autocorrelation, species similarities, and partial observability. We fit alternative occupancy models to detections of 90 bird species observed during repeat visits to 316 point-counts forming a 400-m grid throughout the Patuxent Wildlife Research Refuge in Maryland, USA. Models with landcover variables performed significantly better than our autologistic and null models, supporting the hypothesis that local landcover heterogeneity is important as an exogenous driver for species distributions. Conspecific clustering alone was a comparatively poor descriptor of local community composition, but there was evidence for spatial autocorrelation in all species. Considerable uncertainty remains whether landcover combined with spatial autocorrelation is most parsimonious for describing bird species distributions at a local scale. Spatial structuring may be weaker at intermediate scales within which dispersal is less frequent, information flows are localized, and landcover types become spatially diversified and therefore exhibit little aggregation. Examining such hypotheses across species assemblages contributes to our understanding of community-level associations with conspecifics and landscape composition.

  19. Relative contributions of external forcing factors to circulation and hydrographic properties in a micro-tidal bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seokjin; Kasai, Akihide

    2017-11-01

    The dominant external forcing factors influencing estuarine circulation differ among coastal environments. A three-dimensional regional circulation model was developed to estimate external influence indices and relative contributions of external forcing factors such as external oceanic forcing, surface heat flux, wind stress, and river discharge to circulation and hydrographic properties in Tango Bay, Japan. Model results show that in Tango Bay, where the Tsushima Warm Current passes offshore of the bay, under conditions of strong seasonal winds and river discharge, the water temperature and salinity are strongly influenced by surface heat flux and river discharge in the surface layer, respectively, while in the middle and bottom layers both are mainly controlled by open boundary conditions. The estuarine circulation is comparably influenced by all external forcing factors, the strong current, surface heat flux, wind stress, and river discharge. However, the influence degree of each forcing factor varies with temporal variations in external forcing factors as: the influence of open boundary conditions is higher in spring and early summer when the stronger current passes offshore of the bay, that of surface heat flux reflects the absolute value of surface heat flux, that of wind stress is higher in late fall and winter due to strong seasonal winds, and that of river discharge is higher in early spring due to snow-melting and summer and early fall due to flood events.

  20. Explaining local-scale species distributions: relative contributions of spatial autocorrelation and landscape heterogeneity for an avian assemblage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brady J Mattsson

    Full Text Available Understanding interactions between mobile species distributions and landcover characteristics remains an outstanding challenge in ecology. Multiple factors could explain species distributions including endogenous evolutionary traits leading to conspecific clustering and endogenous habitat features that support life history requirements. Birds are a useful taxon for examining hypotheses about the relative importance of these factors among species in a community. We developed a hierarchical Bayes approach to model the relationships between bird species occupancy and local landcover variables accounting for spatial autocorrelation, species similarities, and partial observability. We fit alternative occupancy models to detections of 90 bird species observed during repeat visits to 316 point-counts forming a 400-m grid throughout the Patuxent Wildlife Research Refuge in Maryland, USA. Models with landcover variables performed significantly better than our autologistic and null models, supporting the hypothesis that local landcover heterogeneity is important as an exogenous driver for species distributions. Conspecific clustering alone was a comparatively poor descriptor of local community composition, but there was evidence for spatial autocorrelation in all species. Considerable uncertainty remains whether landcover combined with spatial autocorrelation is most parsimonious for describing bird species distributions at a local scale. Spatial structuring may be weaker at intermediate scales within which dispersal is less frequent, information flows are localized, and landcover types become spatially diversified and therefore exhibit little aggregation. Examining such hypotheses across species assemblages contributes to our understanding of community-level associations with conspecifics and landscape composition.

  1. Intersectoral action for health equity as it relates to climate change in Canada: contributions from critical systems heuristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buse, Chris

    2013-12-01

    Intersectoral action (ISA) has been at the forefront of public health policy discussions since the 1970s. ISA incorporates a broader perspective of public health issues and coordinates efforts to address the social, political, economic and environmental contexts from which health determinants operate and are created. Despite being forwarded as a useful way to address and treat complex or 'wicked' problems, such policy issues are still often addressed within, rather than across, disciplinary silos and ISA has been documented to fail more often than it succeeds. This paper contributes to an understanding of ISA by outlining and applying critical systems heuristics (CSH) theory and methods. CSH theory and methods are described and discussed before applying them to the example of addressing climate change and health equity through public health practice. CSH thinking provides useful tools to engage stakeholders, question relations of power that may exist between collaborating partners, and move beyond power inequalities that guide ISA initiatives. CSH is a compelling framing that can improve an understanding of the collaborative relationships that are a prerequisite for engaging in ISA to address complex or 'wicked' policy problems such as climate change. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Mechanoelectric feedback does not contribute to the Frank-Starling relation in the rat and guinea pig heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Kelly

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mechanoelectric feedback (MEF is the process by which mechanical forces on the myocardium can alter its electrical properties. The effect can be large enough to induce ectopic beats or fibrillation. However, the role of MEF at physiological levels of mechanical stress is not clear. We have investigated alteration in action potential morphology in rat and guinea pig ventricle and in rat atrial tissue at levels of stretch near the plateau of the Frank-Starling curve. Stretch of >100 mm.Hg End Diastolic Left Ventricular Pressure (EDLVP or rapidly applied stretch (EDLVP increased by 25 mm.Hg within 100 ms often triggered ectopic beats in isolated rat and guinea-pig hearts. However, ventricular epicardial monophasic action potentials (MAPs recorded during stretch to EDLVP up to 30 mm. Hg showed no consistent changes in action potential duration (at APD20, APD50 or APD80 in either species. MAP recording detected APD prolongation with very small concentrations of 4-AP (10 μM, confirming the discrimination of the recording technique. In isolated rat atrial strips, no changes in intracellular action potential morphology or membrane potential were seen when stretched to levels producing an optimum increase in contractility. We conclude that alteration in action potential morphology with stretch does not contribute to the Frank-Starling relation in ventricle of rat or guinea-pig isolated heart, or in rat atrial tissue.

  3. Relative contributions of rod and cone bipolar cell inputs to AII amacrine cell light responses in the mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Ji-Jie; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad M; Gao, Fan; Bramblett, Debra E; Paul, David L; Wu, Samuel M

    2007-04-15

    AII amacrine cells (AIIACs) are crucial relay stations for rod-mediated signals in the mammalian retina and they receive synaptic inputs from depolarizing and hyperpolarizing bipolar cells (DBCs and HBCs) as well as from other amacrine cells. Using whole-cell voltage-clamp technique in conjunction with pharmacological tools, we found that the light-evoked current response of AIIACs in the mouse retina is almost completely mediated by two DBC synaptic inputs: a 6,7-dinitro-quinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX)-resistant component mediated by cone DBCs (DBC(C)s) through an electrical synapse, and a DNQX-sensitive component mediated by rod DBCs (DBC(R)s). This scheme is supported by AIIAC current responses recorded from two knockout mice. The dynamic range of the AIIAC light response in the Bhlhb4-/- mouse (which lacks DBC(R)s) resembles that of the DNQX-resistant component, and that of the connexin36 (Cx36)-/- mouse resembles the DNQX-sensitive component. By comparing the light responses of the DBC(C)s with the DNQX-resistant AIIAC component, and light responses of the DBC(R)s with the DNQX-sensitive AIIAC component, we obtained the input-output relations of the DBC(C)-->AIIAC electrical synapse and the DBC(R)-->AIIAC chemical synapse. Similar to other glutamatergic chemical synapses in the retina, the DBC(R)-->AIIAC synapse is non-linear. Its highest voltage gain (approximately 5) is found near the dark membrane potential, and it saturates for presynaptic signals larger than 5.5 mV. The DBC(C)-->AIIAC electrical synapse is approximately linear (voltage gain of 0.92), consistent with the linear junctional conductance found in retinal electrical synapses. Moreover, relative DBC(R) and DBC(C) contributions to the AIIAC response at various light intensity levels are determined.

  4. Using modelling to disentangle the relative contributions of zoonotic and anthroponotic transmission: the case of lassa fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Iacono, Giovanni; Cunningham, Andrew A; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth; Garry, Robert F; Grant, Donald S; Khan, Sheik Humarr; Leach, Melissa; Moses, Lina M; Schieffelin, John S; Shaffer, Jeffrey G; Webb, Colleen T; Wood, James L N

    2015-01-01

    Zoonotic infections, which transmit from animals to humans, form the majority of new human pathogens. Following zoonotic transmission, the pathogen may already have, or may acquire, the ability to transmit from human to human. With infections such as Lassa fever (LF), an often fatal, rodent-borne, hemorrhagic fever common in areas of West Africa, rodent-to-rodent, rodent-to-human, human-to-human and even human-to-rodent transmission patterns are possible. Indeed, large hospital-related outbreaks have been reported. Estimating the proportion of transmission due to human-to-human routes and related patterns (e.g. existence of super-spreaders), in these scenarios is challenging, but essential for planned interventions. Here, we make use of an innovative modeling approach to analyze data from published outbreaks and the number of LF hospitalized patients to Kenema Government Hospital in Sierra Leone to estimate the likely contribution of human-to-human transmission. The analyses show that almost [Formula: see text] of the cases at KGH are secondary cases arising from human-to-human transmission. However, we found much of this transmission is associated with a disproportionally large impact of a few individuals ('super-spreaders'), as we found only [Formula: see text] of human cases result in an effective reproduction number (i.e. the average number of secondary cases per infectious case) [Formula: see text], with a maximum value up to [Formula: see text]. This work explains the discrepancy between the sizes of reported LF outbreaks and a clinical perception that human-to-human transmission is low. Future assessment of risks of LF and infection control guidelines should take into account the potentially large impact of super-spreaders in human-to-human transmission. Our work highlights several neglected topics in LF research, the occurrence and nature of super-spreading events and aspects of social behavior in transmission and detection.

  5. Evaluating relative contribution of osmotolerance and tissue tolerance mechanisms toward salinity stress tolerance in three Brassica species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Koushik; Bose, Jayakumar; Shabala, Lana; Eyles, Alieta; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-10-01

    Three different species of Brassica, with differential salt sensitivity were used to understand physiological mechanisms of salt tolerance operating in these species and to evaluate the relative contribution of different strategies to cope with salt load. Brassica napus was the most tolerant species in terms of the overall performance, with Brassica juncea and Brassica oleracea being much more sensitive to salt stress with no obvious difference between them. While prominent reduction in net CO2 assimilation was observed in both sensitive species, physiological mechanisms beyond this reduction differed strongly. Brassica juncea plants possessed high osmotolerance and were able to maintain high transpiration rate but showed a significant reduction in leaf chlorophyll content and efficiency of leaf photochemistry. On the contrary, B. oleracea plants possessed the highest (among the three species) tissue tolerance but showed a very significant stomatal limitation of photosynthesis. Electrophysiological experiments revealed that the high tissue tolerance in B. oleracea was related to the ability of leaf mesophyll cells to maintain highly negative membrane potential in the presence of high apoplastic Na(+) . In addition to high osmotolerance, the most tolerant B. napus showed also lesser accumulation of toxic Na(+) and Cl(-) in the leaf, possessed moderate tissue tolerance and had a superior K(+) retention ability. Taken together, the results from this study indicate that the three Brassica species employ very different mechanisms to cope with salinity and, despite its overall sensitivity to salinity, B. oleracea could be recommended as a valuable 'donor' of tissue tolerance genes to confer this trait for marker-assisted breeding programs. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  6. Using modelling to disentangle the relative contributions of zoonotic and anthroponotic transmission: the case of lassa fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Lo Iacono

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zoonotic infections, which transmit from animals to humans, form the majority of new human pathogens. Following zoonotic transmission, the pathogen may already have, or may acquire, the ability to transmit from human to human. With infections such as Lassa fever (LF, an often fatal, rodent-borne, hemorrhagic fever common in areas of West Africa, rodent-to-rodent, rodent-to-human, human-to-human and even human-to-rodent transmission patterns are possible. Indeed, large hospital-related outbreaks have been reported. Estimating the proportion of transmission due to human-to-human routes and related patterns (e.g. existence of super-spreaders, in these scenarios is challenging, but essential for planned interventions.Here, we make use of an innovative modeling approach to analyze data from published outbreaks and the number of LF hospitalized patients to Kenema Government Hospital in Sierra Leone to estimate the likely contribution of human-to-human transmission. The analyses show that almost [Formula: see text] of the cases at KGH are secondary cases arising from human-to-human transmission. However, we found much of this transmission is associated with a disproportionally large impact of a few individuals ('super-spreaders', as we found only [Formula: see text] of human cases result in an effective reproduction number (i.e. the average number of secondary cases per infectious case [Formula: see text], with a maximum value up to [Formula: see text].This work explains the discrepancy between the sizes of reported LF outbreaks and a clinical perception that human-to-human transmission is low. Future assessment of risks of LF and infection control guidelines should take into account the potentially large impact of super-spreaders in human-to-human transmission. Our work highlights several neglected topics in LF research, the occurrence and nature of super-spreading events and aspects of social behavior in transmission and detection.

  7. Using Modelling to Disentangle the Relative Contributions of Zoonotic and Anthroponotic Transmission: The Case of Lassa Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Iacono, Giovanni; Cunningham, Andrew A.; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth; Garry, Robert F.; Grant, Donald S.; Khan, Sheik Humarr; Leach, Melissa; Moses, Lina M.; Schieffelin, John S.; Shaffer, Jeffrey G.; Webb, Colleen T.; Wood, James L. N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Zoonotic infections, which transmit from animals to humans, form the majority of new human pathogens. Following zoonotic transmission, the pathogen may already have, or may acquire, the ability to transmit from human to human. With infections such as Lassa fever (LF), an often fatal, rodent-borne, hemorrhagic fever common in areas of West Africa, rodent-to-rodent, rodent-to-human, human-to-human and even human-to-rodent transmission patterns are possible. Indeed, large hospital-related outbreaks have been reported. Estimating the proportion of transmission due to human-to-human routes and related patterns (e.g. existence of super-spreaders), in these scenarios is challenging, but essential for planned interventions. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we make use of an innovative modeling approach to analyze data from published outbreaks and the number of LF hospitalized patients to Kenema Government Hospital in Sierra Leone to estimate the likely contribution of human-to-human transmission. The analyses show that almost of the cases at KGH are secondary cases arising from human-to-human transmission. However, we found much of this transmission is associated with a disproportionally large impact of a few individuals (‘super-spreaders’), as we found only of human cases result in an effective reproduction number (i.e. the average number of secondary cases per infectious case) , with a maximum value up to . Conclusions/Significance This work explains the discrepancy between the sizes of reported LF outbreaks and a clinical perception that human-to-human transmission is low. Future assessment of risks of LF and infection control guidelines should take into account the potentially large impact of super-spreaders in human-to-human transmission. Our work highlights several neglected topics in LF research, the occurrence and nature of super-spreading events and aspects of social behavior in transmission and detection. PMID:25569707

  8. Foliar nutrient analysis of sugar maple decline: retrospective vector diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor R. Timmer; Yuanxin Teng

    1999-01-01

    Accuracy of traditional foiiar analysis of nutrient disorders in sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh) is limited by lack of validation and confounding by nutrient interactions. Vector nutrient diagnosis is relatively free of these problems. The technique is demonstrated retrospectively on four case studies. Diagnostic interpretations consistently...

  9. Essential Nutrients, Feed Classification and Nutrient Content of Feeds

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, John Burton, 1960-; Seay, William W.; Baker, Scott M., 1968-

    2005-01-01

    The cow-calf herd's primary source of nutrition is forages, but forages are variable in nutrient content. By knowing the nutrient content of their base forages, producers can then identify the deficient nutrients that need to be supplemented.

  10. Diagnosis of the nutrient compositional space of fruit crops

    OpenAIRE

    Parent, Léon-Étienne

    2011-01-01

    Tissue analysis is a useful tool for the nutrient management of fruit orchards. The mineral composition of diagnostic tissues expressed as nutrient concentration on a dry weight basis has long been used to assess the status of 'pure' nutrients. When nutrients are mixed and interact in plant tissues, their proportions or concentrations change relatively to each other as a result of synergism, antagonism, or neutrality, hence producing resonance within the closed space of tissue composition. Te...

  11. Processes and patterns of oceanic nutrient limitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C. M.; Mills, M. M.; Arrigo, K. R.; Berman-Frank, I.; Bopp, L.; Boyd, P. W.; Galbraith, E. D.; Geider, R. J.; Guieu, C.; Jaccard, S. L.; Jickells, T. D.; La Roche, J.; Lenton, T. M.; Mahowald, N. M.; Marañón, E.; Marinov, I.; Moore, J. K.; Nakatsuka, T.; Oschlies, A.; Saito, M. A.; Thingstad, T. F.; Tsuda, A.; Ulloa, O.

    2013-09-01

    Microbial activity is a fundamental component of oceanic nutrient cycles. Photosynthetic microbes, collectively termed phytoplankton, are responsible for the vast majority of primary production in marine waters. The availability of nutrients in the upper ocean frequently limits the activity and abundance of these organisms. Experimental data have revealed two broad regimes of phytoplankton nutrient limitation in the modern upper ocean. Nitrogen availability tends to limit productivity throughout much of the surface low-latitude ocean, where the supply of nutrients from the subsurface is relatively slow. In contrast, iron often limits productivity where subsurface nutrient supply is enhanced, including within the main oceanic upwelling regions of the Southern Ocean and the eastern equatorial Pacific. Phosphorus, vitamins and micronutrients other than iron may also (co-)limit marine phytoplankton. The spatial patterns and importance of co-limitation, however, remain unclear. Variability in the stoichiometries of nutrient supply and biological demand are key determinants of oceanic nutrient limitation. Deciphering the mechanisms that underpin this variability, and the consequences for marine microbes, will be a challenge. But such knowledge will be crucial for accurately predicting the consequences of ongoing anthropogenic perturbations to oceanic nutrient biogeochemistry.

  12. Mycorrhiza formation and nutrient concentration in leeks (¤Allium porrum¤) in relation to previous crop and cover crop management on high P soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, J.N.; Larsen, J.; Jakobsen, I.

    2005-01-01

    cover crops. Experiments on soils with moderate to high P content (26-50 mg kg(-1) bicarbonate-extractable P) showed that the previous crop influenced mycorrhiza formation, uptake of P, Zn, and Cu, and early growth of leek seedlings. A cover crop of black medic, established the previous autumn......An improved integration of mycorrhizas may increase the sustainability in plant production. Two strategies for increasing the soil inoculum potential of mycorrhizal fungi were investigated in field experiments with leeks: Pre-cropping with mycorrhizal main crops and pre-establishment of mycorrhizal...... or tillage treatments. Differences in colonization, nutrient uptake and plant growth diminished during the growing period and at the final harvest date, the effects on plant production disappeared. High soil P level or high soil inoculum level was most likely responsible for the limited response of increased...

  13. Biochar from Sugarcane Filtercake Reduces Soil CO2 Emissions Relative to Raw Residue and Improves Water Retention and Nutrient Availability in a Highly-Weathered Tropical Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eykelbosh, Angela Joy; Johnson, Mark S.; Santos de Queiroz, Edmar; Dalmagro, Higo José; Guimarães Couto, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    In Brazil, the degradation of nutrient-poor Ferralsols limits productivity and drives agricultural expansion into pristine areas. However, returning agricultural residues to the soil in a stabilized form may offer opportunities for maintaining or improving soil quality, even under conditions that typically promote carbon loss. We examined the use of biochar made from filtercake (a byproduct of sugarcane processing) on the physicochemical properties of a cultivated tropical soil. Filtercake was pyrolyzed at 575°C for 3 h yielding a biochar with increased surface area and porosity compared to the raw filtercake. Filtercake biochar was primarily composed of aromatic carbon, with some residual cellulose and hemicellulose. In a three-week laboratory incubation, CO2 effluxes from a highly weathered Ferralsol soil amended with 5% biochar (dry weight, d.w.) were roughly four-fold higher than the soil-only control, but 23-fold lower than CO2 effluxes from soil amended with 5% (d.w.) raw filtercake. We also applied vinasse, a carbon-rich liquid waste from bioethanol production typically utilized as a fertilizer on sugarcane soils, to filtercake- and biochar-amended soils. Total CO2 efflux from the biochar-amended soil in response to vinasse application was only 5% of the efflux when vinasse was applied to soil amended with raw filtercake. Furthermore, mixtures of 5 or 10% biochar (d.w.) in this highly weathered tropical soil significantly increased water retention within the plant-available range and also improved nutrient availability. Accordingly, application of sugarcane filtercake as biochar, with or without vinasse application, may better satisfy soil management objectives than filtercake applied to soils in its raw form, and may help to build soil carbon stocks in sugarcane-cultivating regions. PMID:24897522

  14. Biochar from sugarcane filtercake reduces soil CO2 emissions relative to raw residue and improves water retention and nutrient availability in a highly-weathered tropical soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Joy Eykelbosh

    Full Text Available In Brazil, the degradation of nutrient-poor Ferralsols limits productivity and drives agricultural expansion into pristine areas. However, returning agricultural residues to the soil in a stabilized form may offer opportunities for maintaining or improving soil quality, even under conditions that typically promote carbon loss. We examined the use of biochar made from filtercake (a byproduct of sugarcane processing on the physicochemical properties of a cultivated tropical soil. Filtercake was pyrolyzed at 575°C for 3 h yielding a biochar with increased surface area and porosity compared to the raw filtercake. Filtercake biochar was primarily composed of aromatic carbon, with some residual cellulose and hemicellulose. In a three-week laboratory incubation, CO2 effluxes from a highly weathered Ferralsol soil amended with 5% biochar (dry weight, d.w. were roughly four-fold higher than the soil-only control, but 23-fold lower than CO2 effluxes from soil amended with 5% (d.w. raw filtercake. We also applied vinasse, a carbon-rich liquid waste from bioethanol production typically utilized as a fertilizer on sugarcane soils, to filtercake- and biochar-amended soils. Total CO2 efflux from the biochar-amended soil in response to vinasse application was only 5% of the efflux when vinasse was applied to soil amended with raw filtercake. Furthermore, mixtures of 5 or 10% biochar (d.w. in this highly weathered tropical soil significantly increased water retention within the plant-available range and also improved nutrient availability. Accordingly, application of sugarcane filtercake as biochar, with or without vinasse application, may better satisfy soil management objectives than filtercake applied to soils in its raw form, and may help to build soil carbon stocks in sugarcane-cultivating regions.

  15. Periphytic biofilms: A promising nutrient utilization regulator in wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yonghong; Liu, Junzhuo; Rene, Eldon R

    2018-01-01

    Low nutrient utilization efficiency in agricultural ecosystems is the main cause of nonpoint source (NPS) pollution. Therefore, novel approaches should be explored to improve nutrient utilization in these ecosystems. Periphytic biofilms composed of microalgae, bacteria and other microbial organisms are ubiquitous and form a 'third phase' in artificial wetlands such as paddy fields. Periphytic biofilms play critical roles in nutrient transformation between the overlying water and soil/sediment, however, their contributions to nutrient utilization improvement and NPS pollution control have been largely underestimated. This mini review summarizes the contributions of periphytic biofilms to nutrient transformation processes, including assimilating and storing bioavailable nitrogen and phosphorus, fixing nitrogen, and activating occluded phosphorus. Future research should focus on augmenting the nitrogen fixing, phosphate solubilizing and phosphatase producing microorganisms in periphytic biofilms to improve nutrient utilization and thereby reduce NPS pollution production in artificial and natural wetland ecosystems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Partitioning Uncertainty In Aboveground Carbon Density Estimates: Relative Contributions From Lidar and Forest Inventory In The Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, P.; Keller, M. M.; Morton, D. C.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon accounting for REDD+ requires knowledge of deforestation, degradation, and associated changes in forest carbon stocks. Degradation is more difficult to detect than deforestation so SilvaCarbon, an US inter-agency effort, has set a priority to better characterize forest degradation effects on carbon loss. By combining information from forest inventory and lidar data products, impacts of deforestation, degradation, and associated changes in forest carbon stocks can be more accurately characterized across space. Our approach employs a hierarchical Bayesian modeling (HBM) framework where the assimilation of information from multiple sources is accomplished using a change of support (COS) technique. The COS formulation allows data from multiple spatial resolutions to be assimilated into an intermediate resolution. This approach is being applied in Paragominas, a jurisdiction in the eastern Brazilian Amazon with a high proportion of logged and burned degraded forests where political change has opened the way for REDD+. We build on a long history of research including our extensive studies of logging damage. Our primary objective is to quantify above-ground carbon stocks and corresponding uncertainty in a spatially explicit manner. A secondary objective is to quantify the relative contribution of lower level data products to the overall uncertainty, allowing for more focused subsequent data collection in the context of uncertainty reduction. This approach provides a mechanism to assimilate information from multiple sources to produce spatially-explicit maps of carbon stocks and changes with corresponding spatially explicit maps of uncertainty. Importantly, this approach also provides a mechanism that can be used to assess the value of information from specific data products.

  17. Analysis of the Relative Contribution of Phagocytosis, LC3-Associated Phagocytosis, and Canonical Autophagy During Helicobacter pylori Infection of Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deen, Nadia S; Gong, Lan; Naderer, Thomas; Devenish, Rodney J; Kwok, Terry

    2015-12-01

    Previous findings have suggested that Helicobacter pylori induces autophagic processes and subsequently takes refuge in autophagosomes, thereby contributing to persistent infection. Recently, a noncanonical form of autophagy, LC3 (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3)-associated phagocytosis (LAP), has been shown to be required for efficient clearance of some intracellular bacteria. Whether H. pylori infection induces LAP had not been examined previously. In this study, we determined the extent to which H. pylori infection induces canonical autophagy or LAP in macrophages, and the involvement of the H. pylori cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) with these processes. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy was used to analyze the formation of GFP-LC3 puncta and their colocalization with H. pylori. Transmission electron microscopy was used to detect the ultrastructure of H. pylori-containing compartments. The majority of intracellular bacteria (85-95%) were found in phagosomes that were LC3-negative, with a small proportion (4-14%) appearing "free" in the cytosol. Only a very small percentage (0.5-6%) of intracellular H. pylori was sequestered in autophagosomes. Furthermore, no statistically significant difference in the relative distribution of H. pylori in the various compartments was observed between wild-type and cagPAI-mutant bacteria. In macrophages, H. pylori infection does not induce LAP, but can induce canonical autophagy, which entraps a very small fraction of intracellular bacteria. We propose that this subpopulation of intracellular H. pylori might have escaped from phagosomes into the cytosol before being sequestered by autophagosomes. The cagPAI of H. pylori has only minor influence, if any, on the extent of these processes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Multiple interkingdom horizontal gene transfers in Pyrenophora and closely related species and their contributions to phytopathogenic lifestyles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-Fa Sun

    Full Text Available Many studies have reported horizontal gene transfer (HGT events from eukaryotes, especially fungi. However, only a few investigations summarized multiple interkingdom HGTs involving important phytopathogenic species of Pyrenophora and few have investigated the genetic contributions of HGTs to fungi. We investigated HGT events in P. teres and P. tritici-repentis and discovered that both species harbored 14 HGT genes derived from bacteria and plants, including 12 HGT genes that occurred in both species. One gene coding a leucine-rich repeat protein was present in both species of Pyrenophora and it may have been transferred from a host plant. The transfer of genes from a host plant to pathogenic fungi has been reported rarely and we discovered the first evidence for this transfer in phytopathogenic Pyrenophora. Two HGTs in Pyrenophora underwent subsequent duplications. Some HGT genes had homologs in a few other fungi, indicating relatively ancient transfer events. Functional analyses indicated that half of the HGT genes encoded extracellular proteins and these may have facilitated the infection of plants by Pyrenophora via interference with plant defense-response and the degradation of plant cell walls. Some other HGT genes appeared to participate in carbohydrate metabolism. Together, these functions implied that HGTs may have led to highly efficient mechanisms of infection as well as the utilization of host carbohydrates. Evolutionary analyses indicated that HGT genes experienced amelioration, purifying selection, and accelerated evolution. These appeared to constitute adaptations to the background genome of the recipient. The discovery of multiple interkingdom HGTs in Pyrenophora, their significance to infection, and their adaptive evolution, provided valuable insights into the evolutionary significance of interkingdom HGTs from multiple donors.

  19. Multiple interkingdom horizontal gene transfers in Pyrenophora and closely related species and their contributions to phytopathogenic lifestyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bao-Fa; Xiao, Jin-Hua; He, Shunmin; Liu, Li; Murphy, Robert W; Huang, Da-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have reported horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events from eukaryotes, especially fungi. However, only a few investigations summarized multiple interkingdom HGTs involving important phytopathogenic species of Pyrenophora and few have investigated the genetic contributions of HGTs to fungi. We investigated HGT events in P. teres and P. tritici-repentis and discovered that both species harbored 14 HGT genes derived from bacteria and plants, including 12 HGT genes that occurred in both species. One gene coding a leucine-rich repeat protein was present in both species of Pyrenophora and it may have been transferred from a host plant. The transfer of genes from a host plant to pathogenic fungi has been reported rarely and we discovered the first evidence for this transfer in phytopathogenic Pyrenophora. Two HGTs in Pyrenophora underwent subsequent duplications. Some HGT genes had homologs in a few other fungi, indicating relatively ancient transfer events. Functional analyses indicated that half of the HGT genes encoded extracellular proteins and these may have facilitated the infection of plants by Pyrenophora via interference with plant defense-response and the degradation of plant cell walls. Some other HGT genes appeared to participate in carbohydrate metabolism. Together, these functions implied that HGTs may have led to highly efficient mechanisms of infection as well as the utilization of host carbohydrates. Evolutionary analyses indicated that HGT genes experienced amelioration, purifying selection, and accelerated evolution. These appeared to constitute adaptations to the background genome of the recipient. The discovery of multiple interkingdom HGTs in Pyrenophora, their significance to infection, and their adaptive evolution, provided valuable insights into the evolutionary significance of interkingdom HGTs from multiple donors.

  20. The relative contributions of the homeostatic and circadian processes to sleep regulation under conditions of severe sleep restriction.

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    Paech, Gemma M; Ferguson, Sally A; Sargent, Charli; Kennaway, David J; Roach, Gregory D

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the relative contributions of the homeostatic and circadian processes on sleep regulation under conditions of severe sleep restriction. The 13-day laboratory based study consisted of 3 × 24-h baseline days (8 h sleep opportunity, 16 h wake) followed by 7 × 28-h forced desynchrony days (4.7 h sleep opportunity, 23.3 h wake). The study was conducted in a time isolation unit at the Centre for Sleep Research, University of South Australia. Fourteen healthy, nonsmoking males, aged 21.8 ± 3.8 (mean ± SD) years participated in the study. N/A. Sleep was measured using standard polysomnography. Core body temperature (CBT) was recorded continuously using a rectal thermistor. Each epoch of sleep was assigned a circadian phase based on the CBT data (6 × 60-degree bins) and an elapsed time into sleep episode (2 × 140-min intervals). The percentage of SWS decreased with elapsed time into the sleep episode. However, no change in the percentage of REM sleep was observed with sleep progression. Whilst there was a circadian modulation of REM sleep, the amplitude of the circadian variation was smaller than expected. Sleep efficiency remained high throughout the sleep episode and across all circadian phases. Previous forced desynchrony studies have demonstrated a strong circadian influence on sleep, in the absence of sleep restriction. The current study suggests that in the presence of high homeostatic pressure, the circadian modulation of sleep, in particular sleep efficiency and to a lesser extent, REM sleep, are reduced.

  1. Contribution of common genetic variants to obesity and obesity-related traits in mexican children and adults.

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    Paola León-Mimila

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several studies have identified multiple obesity-associated loci mainly in European populations. However, their contribution to obesity in other ethnicities such as Mexicans is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to examine 26 obesity-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in a sample of Mexican mestizos. METHODS: 9 SNPs in biological candidate genes showing replications (PPARG, ADRB3, ADRB2, LEPR, GNB3, UCP3, ADIPOQ, UCP2, and NR3C1, and 17 SNPs in or near genes associated with obesity in first, second and third wave GWAS (INSIG2, FTO, MC4R, TMEM18, FAIM2/BCDIN3, BDNF, SH2B1, GNPDA2, NEGR1, KCTD15, SEC16B/RASAL2, NPC1, SFRF10/ETV5, MAF, PRL, MTCH2, and PTER were genotyped in 1,156 unrelated Mexican-Mestizos including 683 cases (441 obese class I/II and 242 obese class III and 473 normal-weight controls. In a second stage we selected 12 of the SNPs showing nominal associations with obesity, to seek associations with quantitative obesity-related traits in 3 cohorts including 1,218 Mexican Mestizo children, 945 Mexican Mestizo adults, and 543 Indigenous Mexican adults. RESULTS: After adjusting for age, sex and admixture, significant associations with obesity were found for 6 genes in the case-control study (ADIPOQ, FTO, TMEM18, INSIG2, FAIM2/BCDIN3 and BDNF. In addition, SH2B1 was associated only with class I/II obesity and MC4R only with class III obesity. SNPs located at or near FAIM2/BCDIN3, TMEM18, INSIG2, GNPDA2 and SEC16B/RASAL2 were significantly associated with BMI and/or WC in the combined analysis of Mexican-mestizo children and adults, and FTO locus was significantly associated with increased BMI in Indigenous Mexican populations. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings replicate the association of 8 obesity-related SNPs with obesity risk in Mexican adults, and confirm the role of some of these SNPs in BMI in Mexican adults and children.

  2. Contribution of Common Genetic Variants to Obesity and Obesity-Related Traits in Mexican Children and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos-Comparán, Marisela; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; López-Contreras, Blanca; Gutiérrez-Vidal, Roxana; Vega-Badillo, Joel; Jacobo-Albavera, Leonor; Posadas-Romeros, Carlos; Canizalez-Román, Adrián; Río-Navarro, Blanca Del; Campos-Pérez, Francisco; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Background Several studies have identified multiple obesity-associated loci mainly in European populations. However, their contribution to obesity in other ethnicities such as Mexicans is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to examine 26 obesity-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in a sample of Mexican mestizos. Methods 9 SNPs in biological candidate genes showing replications (PPARG, ADRB3, ADRB2, LEPR, GNB3, UCP3, ADIPOQ, UCP2, and NR3C1), and 17 SNPs in or near genes associated with obesity in first, second and third wave GWAS (INSIG2, FTO, MC4R, TMEM18, FAIM2/BCDIN3, BDNF, SH2B1, GNPDA2, NEGR1, KCTD15, SEC16B/RASAL2, NPC1, SFRF10/ETV5, MAF, PRL, MTCH2, and PTER) were genotyped in 1,156 unrelated Mexican-Mestizos including 683 cases (441 obese class I/II and 242 obese class III) and 473 normal-weight controls. In a second stage we selected 12 of the SNPs showing nominal associations with obesity, to seek associations with quantitative obesity-related traits in 3 cohorts including 1,218 Mexican Mestizo children, 945 Mexican Mestizo adults, and 543 Indigenous Mexican adults. Results After adjusting for age, sex and admixture, significant associations with obesity were found for 6 genes in the case-control study (ADIPOQ, FTO, TMEM18, INSIG2, FAIM2/BCDIN3 and BDNF). In addition, SH2B1 was associated only with class I/II obesity and MC4R only with class III obesity. SNPs located at or near FAIM2/BCDIN3, TMEM18, INSIG2, GNPDA2 and SEC16B/RASAL2 were significantly associated with BMI and/or WC in the combined analysis of Mexican-mestizo children and adults, and FTO locus was significantly associated with increased BMI in Indigenous Mexican populations. Conclusions Our findings replicate the association of 8 obesity-related SNPs with obesity risk in Mexican adults, and confirm the role of some of these SNPs in BMI in Mexican adults and children. PMID:23950976

  3. The Nutritional Geometry of Resource Scarcity: Effects of Lean Seasons and Habitat Disturbance on Nutrient Intakes and Balancing in Wild Sifakas.

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    Mitchell T Irwin

    Full Text Available Animals experience spatial and temporal variation in food and nutrient supply, which may cause deviations from optimal nutrient intakes in both absolute amounts (meeting nutrient requirements and proportions (nutrient balancing. Recent research has used the geometric framework for nutrition to obtain an improved understanding of how animals respond to these nutritional constraints, among them free-ranging primates including spider monkeys and gorillas. We used this framework to examine macronutrient intakes and nutrient balancing in sifakas (Propithecus diadema at Tsinjoarivo, Madagascar, in order to quantify how these vary across seasons and across habitats with varying degrees of anthropogenic disturbance. Groups in intact habitat experience lean season decreases in frugivory, amounts of food ingested, and nutrient intakes, yet preserve remarkably constant proportions of dietary macronutrients, with the proportional contribution of protein to the diet being highly consistent. Sifakas in disturbed habitat