WorldWideScience

Sample records for relative flux calibration

  1. Heat flux microsensor measurements and calibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, James P.; Hager, Jon M.; Onishi, Shinzo; Diller, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    A new thin-film heat flux gage has been fabricated specifically for severe high temperature operation using platinum and platinum-10 percent rhodium for the thermocouple elements. Radiation calibrations of this gage were performed at the AEDC facility over the available heat flux range (approx. 1.0 - 1,000 W/cu cm). The gage output was linear with heat flux with a slight increase in sensitivity with increasing surface temperature. Survivability of gages was demonstrated in quench tests from 500 C into liquid nitrogen. Successful operation of gages to surface temperatures of 750 C has been achieved. No additional cooling of the gages is required because the gages are always at the same temperature as the substrate material. A video of oxyacetylene flame tests with real-time heat flux and temperature output is available.

  2. Calibration of Ocean Forcing with satellite Flux Estimates (COFFEE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Charlie; Jan, Dastugue; Jackie, May; Rowley, Clark; Smith, Scott; Spence, Peter; Gremes-Cordero, Silvia

    2016-04-01

    Predicting the evolution of ocean temperature in regional ocean models depends on estimates of surface heat fluxes and upper-ocean processes over the forecast period. Within the COFFEE project (Calibration of Ocean Forcing with satellite Flux Estimates, real-time satellite observations are used to estimate shortwave, longwave, sensible, and latent air-sea heat flux corrections to a background estimate from the prior day's regional or global model forecast. These satellite-corrected fluxes are used to prepare a corrected ocean hindcast and to estimate flux error covariances to project the heat flux corrections for a 3-5 day forecast. In this way, satellite remote sensing is applied to not only inform the initial ocean state but also to mitigate errors in surface heat flux and model representations affecting the distribution of heat in the upper ocean. While traditional assimilation of sea surface temperature (SST) observations re-centers ocean models at the start of each forecast cycle, COFFEE endeavors to appropriately partition and reduce among various surface heat flux and ocean dynamics sources. A suite of experiments in the southern California Current demonstrates a range of COFFEE capabilities, showing the impact on forecast error relative to a baseline three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) assimilation using operational global or regional atmospheric forcing. Experiment cases combine different levels of flux calibration with assimilation alternatives. The cases use the original fluxes, apply full satellite corrections during the forecast period, or extend hindcast corrections into the forecast period. Assimilation is either baseline 3DVAR or standard strong-constraint 4DVAR, with work proceeding to add a 4DVAR expanded to include a weak constraint treatment of the surface flux errors. Covariance of flux errors is estimated from the recent time series of forecast and calibrated flux terms. While the California Current examples are shown, the approach is

  3. Bayesian calibration of reactor neutron flux spectrum using activation detectors measurements: Application to CALIBAN reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartier, J.; Casoli, P.; Chappert, F.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present calibration methods in order to estimate reactor neutron flux spectrum and its uncertainties by using integral activation measurements. These techniques are performed using Bayesian and MCMC framework. These methods are applied to integral activation experiments in the cavity of the CALIBAN reactor. We estimate the neutron flux and its related uncertainties. The originality of this work is that these uncertainties take into account measurements uncertainties, cross-sections uncertainties and model error. In particular, our results give a very good approximation of the total flux and indicate that neutron flux from MCNP simulation for energies above about 5 MeV seems to overestimate the 'real flux'. (authors)

  4. Satellite-based Calibration of Heat Flux at the Ocean Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, C. N.; Dastugue, J. M.; May, J. C.; Rowley, C. D.; Smith, S. R.; Spence, P. L.; Gremes-Cordero, S.

    2016-02-01

    Model forecasts of upper ocean heat content and variability on diurnal to daily scales are highly dependent on estimates of heat flux through the air-sea interface. Satellite remote sensing is applied to not only inform the initial ocean state but also to mitigate errors in surface heat flux and model representations affecting the distribution of heat in the upper ocean. Traditional assimilation of sea surface temperature (SST) observations re-centers ocean models at the start of each forecast cycle. Subsequent evolution depends on estimates of surface heat fluxes and upper-ocean processes over the forecast period. The COFFEE project (Calibration of Ocean Forcing with satellite Flux Estimates) endeavors to correct ocean forecast bias through a responsive error partition among surface heat flux and ocean dynamics sources. A suite of experiments in the southern California Current demonstrates a range of COFFEE capabilities, showing the impact on forecast error relative to a baseline three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) assimilation using Navy operational global or regional atmospheric forcing. COFFEE addresses satellite-calibration of surface fluxes to estimate surface error covariances and links these to the ocean interior. Experiment cases combine different levels of flux calibration with different assimilation alternatives. The cases may use the original fluxes, apply full satellite corrections during the forecast period, or extend hindcast corrections into the forecast period. Assimilation is either baseline 3DVAR or standard strong-constraint 4DVAR, with work proceeding to add a 4DVAR expanded to include a weak constraint treatment of the surface flux errors. Covariance of flux errors is estimated from the recent time series of forecast and calibrated flux terms. While the California Current examples are shown, the approach is equally applicable to other regions. These approaches within a 3DVAR application are anticipated to be useful for global and larger

  5. Bayesian calibration of reactor neutron flux spectrum using activation detectors measurements: Application to CALIBAN reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartier, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Casoli, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives CEA, DAM, Valduc, F-21120 Is sur Tille (France); Chappert, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we present calibration methods in order to estimate reactor neutron flux spectrum and its uncertainties by using integral activation measurements. These techniques are performed using Bayesian and MCMC framework. These methods are applied to integral activation experiments in the cavity of the CALIBAN reactor. We estimate the neutron flux and its related uncertainties. The originality of this work is that these uncertainties take into account measurements uncertainties, cross-sections uncertainties and model error. In particular, our results give a very good approximation of the total flux and indicate that neutron flux from MCNP simulation for energies above about 5 MeV seems to overestimate the 'real flux'. (authors)

  6. Flux density calibration in diffuse optical tomographic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Samir Kumar; Rajan, Kanhirodan; Vasu, Ram M

    2013-02-01

    The solution of the forward equation that models the transport of light through a highly scattering tissue material in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) using the finite element method gives flux density (Φ) at the nodal points of the mesh. The experimentally measured flux (Umeasured) on the boundary over a finite surface area in a DOT system has to be corrected to account for the system transfer functions (R) of various building blocks of the measurement system. We present two methods to compensate for the perturbations caused by R and estimate true flux density (Φ) from Umeasuredcal. In the first approach, the measurement data with a homogeneous phantom (Umeasuredhomo) is used to calibrate the measurement system. The second scheme estimates the homogeneous phantom measurement using only the measurement from a heterogeneous phantom, thereby eliminating the necessity of a homogeneous phantom. This is done by statistically averaging the data (Umeasuredhetero) and redistributing it to the corresponding detector positions. The experiments carried out on tissue mimicking phantom with single and multiple inhomogeneities, human hand, and a pork tissue phantom demonstrate the robustness of the approach.

  7. Calibration of a distributed hydrology and land surface model using energy flux measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Andreas Dahl; Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Jensen, Karsten H.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we develop and test a calibration approach on a spatially distributed groundwater-surface water catchment model (MIKE SHE) coupled to a land surface model component with particular focus on the water and energy fluxes. The model is calibrated against time series of eddy flux measure...

  8. A flux calibration device for the SuperNova Integral Field Spectrograph (SNIFS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Simona; Aldering, Greg; Hoffmann, Akos; Kowalski, Marek; Kuesters, Daniel; Reif, Klaus; Rigault, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Observational cosmology employing optical surveys often require precise flux calibration. In this context we present SNIFS Calibration Apparatus (SCALA), a flux calibration system developed for the SuperNova Integral Field Spectrograph (SNIFS), operating at the University of Hawaii 2.2 m telescope. SCALA consists of a hexagonal array of 18 small parabolic mirrors distributed over the face of, and feeding parallel light to, the telescope entrance pupil. The mirrors are illuminated by integrating spheres and a wavelength-tunable (from UV to IR) light source, generating light beams with opening angles of 1°. These nearly parallel beams are flat and flux-calibrated at a subpercent level, enabling us to calibrate our "telescope + SNIFS system" at the required precision.

  9. Heat flux sensor calibration using noninteger system identification: Theory, experiment, and error analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardarein, Jean-Laurent; Battaglia, Jean-Luc; Loehle, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    This paper concerns the improvement of the calibration technique of null point calorimeters generally used in high enthalpy plasma flows. Based on the linearity assumption, this technique leads to calculate the impulse response that relates the heat flux at the tip of the sensor according to the temperature at the embedded thermocouple close to the heated surface. The noninteger system identification (NISI) procedure is applied. The NISI technique had been well described in previous study. The present work focuses on the accuracy of the identified system in terms of absorbed heat flux during the calibration experiment and of the estimated parameters in the model. The impulse response is thus calculated along with its associated standard deviation. Furthermore, this response is compared with that of the one-dimensional semi-infinite medium, which is classically used in practical applications. The asymptotic behavior of the identified system at the short times is analyzed for a better understanding of the noninteger identified system. Finally, the technique was applied to a new sensor geometry that has been developed particularly for high enthalpy plasma flows and it is shown that the method can be applied to any geometry suitable for a certain test configuration.

  10. Calibration of an estuarine sediment transport model to sediment fluxes as an intermediate step for simulation of geomorphic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganju, N.K.; Schoellhamer, D.H.

    2009-01-01

    Modeling geomorphic evolution in estuaries is necessary to model the fate of legacy contaminants in the bed sediment and the effect of climate change, watershed alterations, sea level rise, construction projects, and restoration efforts. Coupled hydrodynamic and sediment transport models used for this purpose typically are calibrated to water level, currents, and/or suspended-sediment concentrations. However, small errors in these tidal-timescale models can accumulate to cause major errors in geomorphic evolution, which may not be obvious. Here we present an intermediate step towards simulating decadal-timescale geomorphic change: calibration to estimated sediment fluxes (mass/time) at two cross-sections within an estuary. Accurate representation of sediment fluxes gives confidence in representation of sediment supply to and from the estuary during those periods. Several years of sediment flux data are available for the landward and seaward boundaries of Suisun Bay, California, the landward-most embayment of San Francisco Bay. Sediment flux observations suggest that episodic freshwater flows export sediment from Suisun Bay, while gravitational circulation during the dry season imports sediment from seaward sources. The Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS), a three-dimensional coupled hydrodynamic/sediment transport model, was adapted for Suisun Bay, for the purposes of hindcasting 19th and 20th century bathymetric change, and simulating geomorphic response to sea level rise and climatic variability in the 21st century. The sediment transport parameters were calibrated using the sediment flux data from 1997 (a relatively wet year) and 2004 (a relatively dry year). The remaining years of data (1998, 2002, 2003) were used for validation. The model represents the inter-annual and annual sediment flux variability, while net sediment import/export is accurately modeled for three of the five years. The use of sediment flux data for calibrating an estuarine geomorphic

  11. Neutron flux measurement and thermal power calibration of the IAN-R1 TRIGA reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarta Fuentes, Jose A.; Castiblanco Bohorquez, Luis A

    2008-10-29

    The IAN-R1 TRIGA reactor in Colombia was initially fueled with MTR-HEU enriched to 93% U-235, operated since 1965 at 10 kW, and was upgraded to 30 kW in 1980. General Atomics achieved in 1997 the conversion of HEU fuel to LEU fuel TRIGA type, and upgraded the reactor power to 100 kW. Since the IAN-R1 TRIGA reactor was in an extended shutdown during seven years, it was necessary to repeat some results of the commissioning test conducted in 1997. The thermal power calibration was carried out using the calorimetric method. The reactor was operated approximately at 20 kW during 3.5 hours, with manual power corrections since the automatic control system failed and with the forced refrigeration off. During the calorimetric experiment, the pool temperature was measured with a RTD which is installed near to the core. The dates were collected in intervals of 30 minutes. For establishing thermal power reactor, the water temperature versus the running were registered. For a calculated tank volume of 16 m{sup 3}, the tank constant calculated for the IAN-R1 TRIGA reactor is 0.0539 C/kW-hr. The reactor power determined was 19 kW. The core configuration is a rectangular grid plate that holds a combination of 4-rod and 3-rod clusters. The core contains 50 fuel rods with LEU fuel TRIGA (UZr H1.6) type enriched to 19.7%. The radial reflector consists of twenty graphite elements six of which are used for isotope production. The top an bottom reflectors are the cylindrical graphite end reflectors which are installed above and below of the active fuel section in each fuel rod. The spatial dependence of thermal neutron flux was measured axially in the 3-rod clusters 4C, 3D, 5E and in the 4F graphite element. The spatial distribution of the thermal neutron was determined using a self-powered detector and the absolute value of thermal neutron flux was determined by a gold activation detector. The (n, b- ) reaction is applied to determine the relative spatial distribution of thermal

  12. Sap Flux Scaled Transpiration in Ring-porous Tree Species: Assumptions, Pitfalls and Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, S. E.; Hultine, K. R.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    Thermal dissipation probes for measuring sap flow (Granier-type) at the whole tree and stand level are routinely used in forest ecology and site water balance studies. While the original empirical relationship used to calculate sap flow was reported as independent of wood anatomy (ring-porous, diffuse-porous, tracheid), it has been suggested that potentially large errors in sap flow calculations may occur when using the original calibration for ring-porous species, due to large radial trends in sap velocity and/or shallow sapwood depth. Despite these concerns, sap flux measurements have rarely been calibrated in ring-porous taxa. We used a simple technique to calibrate thermal dissipation sap flux measurements on ring-porous trees in the lab. Calibration measurements were conducted on five ring-porous species in the Salt Lake City, USA metropolitan area including Quercus gambelii (Gambel oak), Gleditsia triacanthos (Honey locust), Elaeagnus angustifolia (Russian olive), Sophora japonica (Japanese pagoda), and Celtis occidentalis (Common hackberry). Six stems per species of approximately 1 m in length were instrumented with heat dissipation probes to measure sap flux concurrently with gravimetric measurements of water flow through each stem. Safranin dye was pulled through the stems following flow rate measurements to determine sapwood area. As expected, nearly all the conducting sapwood area was limited to regions within the current year growth rings. Consequently, we found that the original Granier equation underestimated sap flux density for all species considered. Our results indicate that the use of thermal dissipation probes for measuring sap flow in ring-porous species should be independently calibrated, particularly when species- specific calibration data are not available. Ring-porous taxa are widely distributed and represent an important component of the regional water budgets of many temperate regions. Our results are important for evaluating plant water

  13. Calibration of aerodynamic roughness over the Tibetan Plateau with Ensemble Kalman Filter analysed heat flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Lee

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic roughness height (Zom is a key parameter required in several land surface hydrological models, since errors in heat flux estimation are largely dependent on optimization of this input. Despite its significance, it remains an uncertain parameter which is not readily determined. This is mostly because of non-linear relationship in Monin-Obukhov similarity (MOS equations and uncertainty of vertical characteristic of vegetation in a large scale. Previous studies often determined aerodynamic roughness using a minimization of cost function over MOS relationship or linear regression over it, traditional wind profile method, or remotely sensed vegetation index. However, these are complicated procedures that require a high accuracy for several other related parameters embedded in serveral equations including MOS. In order to simplify this procedure and reduce the number of parameters in need, this study suggests a new approach to extract aerodynamic roughness parameter from single or two heat flux measurements analyzed via Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF that affords non-linearity. So far, to our knowledge, no previous study has applied EnKF to aerodynamic roughness estimation, while the majority of data assimilation study have paid attention to updates of other land surface state variables such as soil moisture or land surface temperature. The approach of this study was applied to grassland in semi-arid Tibetan Plateau and maize on moderately wet condition in Italy. It was demonstrated that aerodynamic roughness parameter can be inversely tracked from heat flux EnKF final analysis. The aerodynamic roughness height estimated in this approach was consistent with eddy covariance method and literature value. Through a calibration of this parameter, this adjusted the sensible heat previously overestimated and latent heat flux previously underestimated by the original Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS model. It was considered that

  14. Millisecond resolution electron fluxes from the Cluster satellites: Calibrated EDI ambient electron data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Matthias; Rashev, Mikhail; Haaland, Stein

    2017-04-01

    The Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) onboard Cluster can measure 500 eV and 1 keV electron fluxes with high time resolution during passive operation phases in its Ambient Electron (AE) mode. Data from this mode is available in the Cluster Science Archive since October 2004 with a cadence of 16 Hz in the normal mode or 128 Hz for burst mode telemetry intervals. The fluxes are recorded at pitch angles of 0, 90, and 180 degrees. This paper describes the calibration and validation of these measurements. The high resolution AE data allow precise temporal and spatial diagnostics of magnetospheric boundaries and will be used for case studies and statistical studies of low energy electron fluxes in the near-Earth space. We show examples of applications.

  15. Flux-gate magnetometer spin axis offset calibration using the electron drift instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plaschke, Ferdinand; Nakamura, Rumi; Baumjohann, Wolfgang; Steller, Manfred; Magnes, Werner; Leinweber, Hannes K; Chutter, Mark; Vaith, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Spin-stabilization of spacecraft immensely supports the in-flight calibration of on-board flux-gate magnetometers (FGMs). From 12 calibration parameters in total, 8 can be easily obtained by spectral analysis. From the remaining 4, the spin axis offset is known to be particularly variable. It is usually determined by analysis of Alfvénic fluctuations that are embedded in the solar wind. In the absence of solar wind observations, the spin axis offset may be obtained by comparison of FGM and electron drift instrument (EDI) measurements. The aim of our study is to develop methods that are readily usable for routine FGM spin axis offset calibration with EDI. This paper represents a major step forward in this direction. We improve an existing method to determine FGM spin axis offsets from EDI time-of-flight measurements by providing it with a comprehensive error analysis. In addition, we introduce a new, complementary method that uses EDI beam direction data instead of time-of-flight data. Using Cluster data, we show that both methods yield similarly accurate results, which are comparable yet more stable than those from a commonly used solar wind-based method. (paper)

  16. A Study on Relative Radiometric Calibration without Calibration Field for YG-25

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Guo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available YG-25 is the first agility optical remote sensing satellite of China to acquire the sub-meter imagery of the earth. The side slither calibration technique is an on-orbit maneuver that has been used to flat-field image data acquired over the uniform calibration field. However, imaging to the single uniform calibration field cannot afford to calibrate the full dynamic response range of the sensor and reduces the efficiency. The paper proposes a new relative radiometric calibration method that a 90-degree yaw maneuver is performed over any non-uniform features of the Earth for YG-25. Meanwhile, we use an enhanced side slither image horizontal correction method based on line segment detector(LSDalgorithm to solve the side slither image over-shifted problem.The shifted results are compared with other horizontal correction method. The histogram match algorithm is used to calculate the relative gains of all detectors. The correctness and validity of the proposed method are validated by using the YG-25 on-board side slither data. The results prove that the mean streaking metrics of relative correction images of YG-25 is better 0.07%, the noticeable striping artifact and residual noise are removed, the calibration accuracy of side slither technique based on non-uniform features is superior to life image statistics of sensor's life span.

  17. Calibration of Relative Humidity Sensors using a Dew Point Generator

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Milo

    2010-01-01

    A relative humidity sensor can be calibrated using a dew point generator to continuously supply an air stream of known constant humidity and a temperature chamber to control the dew point and ambient temperature.

  18. Calibrating soil respiration measures with a dynamic flux apparatus using artificial soil media of varying porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Butnor; Kurt H. Johnsen

    2004-01-01

    Measurement of soil respiration to quantify ecosystem carbon cyclingrequires absolute, not relative, estimates of soil CO2 efflux. We describe a novel, automated efflux apparatus that can be used to test the accuracy of chamber-based soil respiration measurements by generating known CO2 fluxes. Artificial soil is supported...

  19. Calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greacen, E.L.; Correll, R.L.; Cunningham, R.B.; Johns, G.G.; Nicolls, K.D.

    1981-01-01

    Procedures common to different methods of calibration of neutron moisture meters are outlined and laboratory and field calibration methods compared. Gross errors which arise from faulty calibration techniques are described. The count rate can be affected by the dry bulk density of the soil, the volumetric content of constitutional hydrogen and other chemical components of the soil and soil solution. Calibration is further complicated by the fact that the neutron meter responds more strongly to the soil properties close to the detector and source. The differences in slope of calibration curves for different soils can be as much as 40%

  20. Relative spectral response calibration using Ti plasma lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, FEI; Congyuan, PAN; Qiang, ZENG; Qiuping, WANG; Xuewei, DU

    2018-04-01

    This work introduces the branching ratio (BR) method for determining relative spectral responses, which are needed routinely in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Neutral and singly ionized Ti lines in the 250–498 nm spectral range are investigated by measuring laser-induced micro plasma near a Ti plate and used to calculate the relative spectral response of an entire LIBS detection system. The results are compared with those of the conventional relative spectral response calibration method using a tungsten halogen lamp, and certain lines available for the BR method are selected. The study supports the common manner of using BRs to calibrate the detection system in LIBS setups.

  1. Inter-satellite calibration of FengYun 3 medium energy electron fluxes with POES electron measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Ni, Binbin; Xiang, Zheng; Zhang, Xianguo; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Gu, Xudong; Fu, Song; Cao, Xing; Zou, Zhengyang

    2018-05-01

    We perform an L-shell dependent inter-satellite calibration of FengYun 3 medium energy electron measurements with POES measurements based on rough orbital conjunctions within 5 min × 0.1 L × 0.5 MLT. By comparing electron flux data between the U.S. Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) and Chinese sun-synchronous satellites including FY-3B and FY-3C for a whole year of 2014, we attempt to remove less reliable data and evaluate systematic uncertainties associated with the FY-3B and FY-3C datasets, expecting to quantify the inter-satellite calibration factors for the 150-350 keV energy channel at L = 2-7. Compared to the POES data, the FY-3B and FY-3C data generally exhibit a similar trend of electron flux variations but more or less underestimate them within a factor of 5 for the medium electron energy 150-350 keV channel. Good consistency in the flux conjunctions after the inter-calibration procedures gives us certain confidence to generalize our method to calibrate electron flux measurements from various satellite instruments.

  2. Multi-model analysis of terrestrial carbon cycles in Japan: limitations and implications of model calibration using eddy flux observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ichii

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial biosphere models show large differences when simulating carbon and water cycles, and reducing these differences is a priority for developing more accurate estimates of the condition of terrestrial ecosystems and future climate change. To reduce uncertainties and improve the understanding of their carbon budgets, we investigated the utility of the eddy flux datasets to improve model simulations and reduce variabilities among multi-model outputs of terrestrial biosphere models in Japan. Using 9 terrestrial biosphere models (Support Vector Machine – based regressions, TOPS, CASA, VISIT, Biome-BGC, DAYCENT, SEIB, LPJ, and TRIFFID, we conducted two simulations: (1 point simulations at four eddy flux sites in Japan and (2 spatial simulations for Japan with a default model (based on original settings and a modified model (based on model parameter tuning using eddy flux data. Generally, models using default model settings showed large deviations in model outputs from observation with large model-by-model variability. However, after we calibrated the model parameters using eddy flux data (GPP, RE and NEP, most models successfully simulated seasonal variations in the carbon cycle, with less variability among models. We also found that interannual variations in the carbon cycle are mostly consistent among models and observations. Spatial analysis also showed a large reduction in the variability among model outputs. This study demonstrated that careful validation and calibration of models with available eddy flux data reduced model-by-model differences. Yet, site history, analysis of model structure changes, and more objective procedure of model calibration should be included in the further analysis.

  3. Multi-model analysis of terrestrial carbon cycles in Japan: limitations and implications of model calibration using eddy flux observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichii, K.; Suzuki, T.; Kato, T.; Ito, A.; Hajima, T.; Ueyama, M.; Sasai, T.; Hirata, R.; Saigusa, N.; Ohtani, Y.; Takagi, K.

    2010-07-01

    Terrestrial biosphere models show large differences when simulating carbon and water cycles, and reducing these differences is a priority for developing more accurate estimates of the condition of terrestrial ecosystems and future climate change. To reduce uncertainties and improve the understanding of their carbon budgets, we investigated the utility of the eddy flux datasets to improve model simulations and reduce variabilities among multi-model outputs of terrestrial biosphere models in Japan. Using 9 terrestrial biosphere models (Support Vector Machine - based regressions, TOPS, CASA, VISIT, Biome-BGC, DAYCENT, SEIB, LPJ, and TRIFFID), we conducted two simulations: (1) point simulations at four eddy flux sites in Japan and (2) spatial simulations for Japan with a default model (based on original settings) and a modified model (based on model parameter tuning using eddy flux data). Generally, models using default model settings showed large deviations in model outputs from observation with large model-by-model variability. However, after we calibrated the model parameters using eddy flux data (GPP, RE and NEP), most models successfully simulated seasonal variations in the carbon cycle, with less variability among models. We also found that interannual variations in the carbon cycle are mostly consistent among models and observations. Spatial analysis also showed a large reduction in the variability among model outputs. This study demonstrated that careful validation and calibration of models with available eddy flux data reduced model-by-model differences. Yet, site history, analysis of model structure changes, and more objective procedure of model calibration should be included in the further analysis.

  4. Inter-instrument calibration using magnetic field data from Flux Gate Magnetometer (FGM) and Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) onboard Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, R.; Plaschke, F.; Teubenbacher, R.; Giner, L.; Baumjohann, W.; Magnes, W.; Steller, M.; Torbert, R. B.; Vaith, H.; Chutter, M.; Fornaçon, K.-H.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Carr, C.

    2013-07-01

    We compare the magnetic field data obtained from the Flux-Gate Magnetometer (FGM) and the magnetic field data deduced from the gyration time of electrons measured by the Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) onboard Cluster to determine the spin axis offset of the FGM measurements. Data are used from orbits with their apogees in the magnetotail, when the magnetic field magnitude was between about 20 nT and 500 nT. Offset determination with the EDI-FGM comparison method is of particular interest for these orbits, because no data from solar wind are available in such orbits to apply the usual calibration methods using the Alfvén waves. In this paper, we examine the effects of the different measurement conditions, such as direction of the magnetic field relative to the spin plane and field magnitude in determining the FGM spin-axis offset, and also take into account the time-of-flight offset of the EDI measurements. It is shown that the method works best when the magnetic field magnitude is less than about 128 nT and when the magnetic field is aligned near the spin-axis direction. A remaining spin-axis offset of about 0.4 ~ 0.6 nT was observed between July and October 2003. Using multi-point multi-instrument measurements by Cluster we further demonstrate the importance of the accurate determination of the spin-axis offset when estimating the magnetic field gradient.

  5. Interinstrument calibration using magnetic field data from the flux-gate magnetometer (FGM) and electron drift instrument (EDI) onboard Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, R.; Plaschke, F.; Teubenbacher, R.; Giner, L.; Baumjohann, W.; Magnes, W.; Steller, M.; Torbert, R. B.; Vaith, H.; Chutter, M.; Fornaçon, K.-H.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Carr, C.

    2014-01-01

    We compare the magnetic field data obtained from the flux-gate magnetometer (FGM) and the magnetic field data deduced from the gyration time of electrons measured by the electron drift instrument (EDI) onboard Cluster to determine the spin-axis offset of the FGM measurements. Data are used from orbits with their apogees in the magnetotail, when the magnetic field magnitude was between about 20 and 500 nT. Offset determination with the EDI-FGM comparison method is of particular interest for these orbits, because no data from solar wind are available in such orbits to apply the usual calibration methods using the Alfvén waves. In this paper, we examine the effects of the different measurement conditions, such as direction of the magnetic field relative to the spin plane and field magnitude in determining the FGM spin-axis offset, and also take into account the time-of-flight offset of the EDI measurements. It is shown that the method works best when the magnetic field magnitude is less than about 128 nT and when the magnetic field is aligned near the spin-axis direction. A remaining spin-axis offset of about 0.4 ∼ 0.6 nT was observed for Cluster 1 between July and October 2003. Using multipoint multi-instrument measurements by Cluster we further demonstrate the importance of the accurate determination of the spin-axis offset when estimating the magnetic field gradient.

  6. Ground calibration of DREAMS-H relative humidity device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komu, M.; Genzer, M.; Nikkanen, T.; Schmidt, W.; Haukka, H.; Kemppinen, O.; Harri, A.-M.

    2014-04-01

    DREAMS (Dust Characterization, Risk Assessment and Environmental Analyzer on the Martian Surface) instrument suite is to be launched as part of ESA ExoMars 2016/Entry, Descent and Landing Demonstration Module (EDM). DREAMS consists of an environmental package for monitoring temperature, pressure, relative humidity, winds and dust opacity, as well as atmospheric electricity of Martian atmosphere. DREAMS instruments and scientific goals are described in [1]. Here we describe ground calibration of the relative humidity device, DREAMS-H, provided to DREAMS payload by Finnish Meteorological Institute and based on proprietary technology of Vaisala, Inc. Same kind of device is part of REMS instrument package onboard MSL Curiosity Rover [2][3].

  7. Volcanic fluxes of volatiles. Preliminary estimates based on rare gas and major volatile calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marty, B.

    1992-01-01

    New estimates for volatile fluxes into the atmosphere and hydrosphere through volcanism have been computed using the measured fluxes of 3 He in oceans and SO 2 in the atmosphere, and the ratios between the volatiles in Mid-Ocean Ridge basalts and in high temperature volcanic gases. These estimates have been checked using independent estimates of the volcanic fluxes. This method provides a reliable means of tracing volatile fluxes, although its precision is restricted by the limited amount of data currently available. (author). 19 refs, 1 tab

  8. Calculation of atmospheric neutrino flux using the interaction model calibrated with atmospheric muon data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, M.; Kajita, T.; Kasahara, K.; Midorikawa, S.; Sanuki, T.

    2007-01-01

    Using the 'modified DPMJET-III' model explained in the previous paper [T. Sanuki et al., preceding Article, Phys. Rev. D 75, 043005 (2007).], we calculate the atmospheric neutrino flux. The calculation scheme is almost the same as HKKM04 [M. Honda, T. Kajita, K. Kasahara, and S. Midorikawa, Phys. Rev. D 70, 043008 (2004).], but the usage of the 'virtual detector' is improved to reduce the error due to it. Then we study the uncertainty of the calculated atmospheric neutrino flux summarizing the uncertainties of individual components of the simulation. The uncertainty of K-production in the interaction model is estimated using other interaction models: FLUKA'97 and FRITIOF 7.02, and modifying them so that they also reproduce the atmospheric muon flux data correctly. The uncertainties of the flux ratio and zenith angle dependence of the atmospheric neutrino flux are also studied

  9. Calibrating the SHiP muon-flux using NA61/SHINE

    CERN Document Server

    Van Herwijnen, Eric; Korzenev, Alexander; Mermod, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    A major concern for the design of the SHiP experiment is the lack of a precise knowledge of the muon flux. This is a proposal to measure the expected muon flux in the SHiP experiment by installing a replica of the SHiP target in a 400 GeV proton beam in front of the NA61/SHINE spectrometer. We propose to do a first measurement in 2017.

  10. Calibration of remotely sensed, coarse resolution NDVI to CO2 fluxes in a sagebrush-steppe ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, B.K.; Johnson, D.A.; Laca, Emilio; Saliendra, Nicanor Z.; Gilmanov, T.G.; Reed, B.C.; Tieszen, L.L.; Worstell, B.B.

    2003-01-01

    The net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of carbon flux can be partitioned into gross primary productivity (GPP) and respiration (R). The contribution of remote sensing and modeling holds the potential to predict these components and map them spatially and temporally. This has obvious utility to quantify carbon sink and source relationships and to identify improved land management strategies for optimizing carbon sequestration. The objective of our study was to evaluate prediction of 14-day average daytime CO2 fluxes (Fday) and nighttime CO2 fluxes (Rn) using remote sensing and other data. Fday and Rn were measured with a Bowen ratio-energy balance (BREB) technique in a sagebrush (Artemisia spp.)-steppe ecosystem in northeast Idaho, USA, during 1996-1999. Micrometeorological variables aggregated across 14-day periods and time-integrated Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (iNDVI) were determined during four growing seasons (1996-1999) and used to predict Fday and Rn. We found that iNDVI was a strong predictor of Fday (R2 = 0.79, n = 66, P improved predictions of Fday (R2= 0.82, n = 66, P management strategies, carbon certification, and validation and calibration of carbon flux models. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Calibration of remotely sensed, coarse resolution NDVI to CO2 fluxes in a sagebrush–steppe ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Bruce K.; Johnson, Douglas A.; Laca, Emilio; Saliendra, Nicanor Z.; Gilmanov, Tagir G.; Reed, Bradley C.; Tieszen, Larry L.; Worstell, Bruce B.

    2003-01-01

    The net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of carbon flux can be partitioned into gross primary productivity (GPP) and respiration (R). The contribution of remote sensing and modeling holds the potential to predict these components and map them spatially and temporally. This has obvious utility to quantify carbon sink and source relationships and to identify improved land management strategies for optimizing carbon sequestration. The objective of our study was to evaluate prediction of 14-day average daytime CO2 fluxes (Fday) and nighttime CO2 fluxes (Rn) using remote sensing and other data. Fday and Rnwere measured with a Bowen ratio–energy balance (BREB) technique in a sagebrush (Artemisia spp.)–steppe ecosystem in northeast Idaho, USA, during 1996–1999. Micrometeorological variables aggregated across 14-day periods and time-integrated Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (iNDVI) were determined during four growing seasons (1996–1999) and used to predict Fday and Rn. We found that iNDVI was a strong predictor of Fday(R2=0.79, n=66, Pimproved predictions of Fday (R2=0.82, n=66, Pmanagement strategies, carbon certification, and validation and calibration of carbon flux models.

  12. Nimbus-7 Earth radiation budget calibration history. Part 2: The Earth flux channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, H. Lee; Hucek, Douglas Richard R.; Ardanuy, Philip E.; Hickey, John R.; Maschhoff, Robert H.; Penn, Lanning M.; Groveman, Brian S.; Vallette, Brenda J.

    1994-01-01

    Nine years (November 1978 to October 1987) of Nimbus-7 Earth radiation budget (ERB) products have shown that the global annual mean emitted longwave, absorbed shortwave, and net radiation were constant to within about + 0.5 W/sq m. Further, most of the small annual variations in the emitted longwave have been shown to be real. To obtain this measurement accuracy, the wide-field-of-view (WFOV) Earth-viewing channels 12 (0.2 to over 50 micrometers), 13 (0.2 to 3.8 micrometers), and 14 (0.7 to 2.8 micrometers) have been characterized in their satellite environment to account for signal variations not considered in the prelaunch calibration equations. Calibration adjustments have been derived for (1) extraterrestrial radiation incident on the detectors, (2) long-term degradation of the sensors, and (3) thermal perturbations within the ERB instrument. The first item is important in all the channels; the second, mainly in channels 13 and 14, and the third, only in channels 13 and 14. The Sun is used as a stable calibration source to monitor the long-term degradation of the various channels. Channel 12, which is reasonably stable to both thermal perturbations and sensor degradation, is used as a reference and calibration transfer agent for the drifting sensitivities of the filtered channels 13 and 14. Redundant calibration procedures were utilized. Laboratory studies complemented analyses of the satellite data. Two nearly independent models were derived to account for the thermal perturbations in channels 13 and 14. The global annual mean terrestrial shortwave and longwave signals proved stable enough to act as secondary calibration sources. Instantaneous measurements may still, at times, be in error by as much as a few Wm(exp -2), but the long-term averages are stable to within a fraction of a Wm(exp -2).

  13. Atmospheric gamma-ray observation with the BETS detectorfor calibrating atmospheric neutrino flux calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Kasahara, K.; Torii, S.; Tamura, T.; Tateyama, N.; Yoshida, K.; Yamagami, T.; Saito, Y.; Nishimura, J.; Murakami, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Komori, Y.; Honda, M.; Ohuchi, T.; Midorikawa, S.; Yuda, T.

    2002-01-01

    We observed atmospheric gamma-rays around 10 GeV at balloon altitudes (15~25 km) and at a mountain (2770 m a.s.l). The observed results were compared with Monte Carlo calculations to find that an interaction model (Lund Fritiof1.6) used in an old neutrino flux calculation was not good enough for describing the observed values. In stead, we found that two other nuclear interaction models, Lund Fritiof7.02 and dpmjet3.03, gave much better agreement with the observations. Our data will serve for examining nuclear interaction models and for deriving a reliable absolute atmospheric neutrino flux in the GeV region.

  14. Error Analysis of Relative Calibration for RCS Measurement on Ground Plane Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Peng-fei

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Ground plane range is a kind of outdoor Radar Cross Section (RCS test range used for static measurement of full-size or scaled targets. Starting from the characteristics of ground plane range, the impact of environments on targets and calibrators is analyzed during calibration in the RCS measurements. The error of relative calibration produced by the different illumination of target and calibrator is studied. The relative calibration technique used in ground plane range is to place the calibrator on a fixed and auxiliary pylon somewhere between the radar and the target under test. By considering the effect of ground reflection and antenna pattern, the relationship between the magnitude of echoes and the position of calibrator is discussed. According to the different distances between the calibrator and target, the difference between free space and ground plane range is studied and the error of relative calibration is calculated. Numerical simulation results are presented with useful conclusions. The relative calibration error varies with the position of calibrator, frequency and antenna beam width. In most case, set calibrator close to the target may keep the error under control.

  15. Nitrate fluxes to groundwater under citrus orchards in a Mediterranean climate: Observations, calibrated models, simulations and agro-hydrological conclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtzman, Daniel; Shapira, Roi H.; Bar-Tal, Asher; Fine, Pinchas; Russo, David

    2013-08-01

    Nitrate contamination of groundwater under land used for intensive-agriculture is probably the most worrisome agro-hydrological sustainability problem worldwide. Vadose-zone samples from 0 to 9 m depth under citrus orchards overlying an unconfined aquifer were analyzed for variables controlling water flow and the fate and transport of nitrogen fertilizers. Steady-state estimates of water and NO3-N fluxes to groundwater were found to vary spatially in the ranges of 90-330 mm yr- 1 and 50-220 kg ha- 1 yr- 1, respectively. Calibration of transient models to two selected vadose-zone profiles required limiting the concentration of NO3-N in the solution that is taken up by the roots to 30 mg L- 1. Results of an independent lysimeter experiment showed a similar nitrogen-uptake regime. Simulations of past conditions revealed a significant correlation between NO3-N flux to groundwater and the previous year's precipitation. Simulations of different nitrogen-application rates showed that using half of the nitrogen fertilizer added to the irrigation water by farmers would reduce average NO3-N flux to groundwater by 70%, decrease root nitrogen uptake by 20% and reduce the average pore water NO3-N concentration in the deep vadose zone to below the Israeli drinking water standard; hence this rate of nitrogen application was found to be agro-hydrologically sustainable. Beyond the investigation of nitrate fluxes to groundwater under citrus orchards and the interesting case-study aspects, this work demonstrates a methodology that enables skillful decisions concerning joint sustainability of both the water resource and agricultural production in a common environmental setting.

  16. SYSTEMATIC UNCERTAINTIES IN THE SPECTROSCOPIC MEASUREMENTS OF NEUTRON STAR MASSES AND RADII FROM THERMONUCLEAR X-RAY BURSTS. III. ABSOLUTE FLUX CALIBRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Güver, Tolga [Istanbul University, Science Faculty, Department of Astronomy and Space Sciences, Beyazıt, 34119, Istanbul (Turkey); Özel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Marshall, Herman [Center for Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Guainazzi, Matteo [European Space Astronomy Centre of ESA, P.O. Box 78, Villanueva de la Cañada, E-28691 Madrid (Spain); Díaz-Trigo, Maria [ESO, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany)

    2016-09-20

    Many techniques for measuring neutron star radii rely on absolute flux measurements in the X-rays. As a result, one of the fundamental uncertainties in these spectroscopic measurements arises from the absolute flux calibrations of the detectors being used. Using the stable X-ray burster, GS 1826–238, and its simultaneous observations by Chandra HETG/ACIS-S and RXTE /PCA as well as by XMM-Newton EPIC-pn and RXTE /PCA, we quantify the degree of uncertainty in the flux calibration by assessing the differences between the measured fluxes during bursts. We find that the RXTE /PCA and the Chandra gratings measurements agree with each other within their formal uncertainties, increasing our confidence in these flux measurements. In contrast, XMM-Newton EPIC-pn measures 14.0 ± 0.3% less flux than the RXTE /PCA. This is consistent with the previously reported discrepancy with the flux measurements of EPIC-pn, compared with EPIC MOS1, MOS2, and ACIS-S detectors. We also show that any intrinsic time-dependent systematic uncertainty that may exist in the calibration of the satellites has already been implicity taken into account in the neutron star radius measurements.

  17. HOOKED FLARE RIBBONS AND FLUX-ROPE-RELATED QSL FOOTPRINTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jie; Li, Hui [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008 (China); Gilchrist, Stuart A.; Aulanier, Guillaume; Schmieder, Brigitte; Pariat, Etienne, E-mail: nj.lihui@pmo.ac.cn [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Univ. Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France)

    2016-05-20

    We studied the magnetic topology of active region 12158 on 2014 September 10 and compared it with the observations before and early in the flare that begins at 17:21 UT (SOL2014-09-10T17:45:00). Our results show that the sigmoidal structure and flare ribbons of this active region observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory /Atmospheric Imaging Assembly can be well reproduced from a Grad–Rubin nonlinear force-free field extrapolation method. Various inverse-S- and inverse-J-shaped magnetic field lines, which surround a coronal flux rope, coincide with the sigmoid as observed in different extreme-ultraviolet wavelengths, including its multithreaded curved ends. Also, the observed distribution of surface currents in the magnetic polarity where it was not prescribed is well reproduced. This validates our numerical implementation and setup of the Grad–Rubin method. The modeled double inverse-J-shaped quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) footprints match the observed flare ribbons during the rising phase of the flare, including their hooked parts. The spiral-like shape of the latter may be related to a complex pre-eruptive flux rope with more than one turn of twist, as obtained in the model. These ribbon-associated flux-rope QSL footprints are consistent with the new standard flare model in 3D, with the presence of a hyperbolic flux tube located below an inverse-teardrop-shaped coronal QSL. This is a new step forward forecasting the locations of reconnection and ribbons in solar flares and the geometrical properties of eruptive flux ropes.

  18. HOOKED FLARE RIBBONS AND FLUX-ROPE-RELATED QSL FOOTPRINTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Jie; Li, Hui; Gilchrist, Stuart A.; Aulanier, Guillaume; Schmieder, Brigitte; Pariat, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    We studied the magnetic topology of active region 12158 on 2014 September 10 and compared it with the observations before and early in the flare that begins at 17:21 UT (SOL2014-09-10T17:45:00). Our results show that the sigmoidal structure and flare ribbons of this active region observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory /Atmospheric Imaging Assembly can be well reproduced from a Grad–Rubin nonlinear force-free field extrapolation method. Various inverse-S- and inverse-J-shaped magnetic field lines, which surround a coronal flux rope, coincide with the sigmoid as observed in different extreme-ultraviolet wavelengths, including its multithreaded curved ends. Also, the observed distribution of surface currents in the magnetic polarity where it was not prescribed is well reproduced. This validates our numerical implementation and setup of the Grad–Rubin method. The modeled double inverse-J-shaped quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) footprints match the observed flare ribbons during the rising phase of the flare, including their hooked parts. The spiral-like shape of the latter may be related to a complex pre-eruptive flux rope with more than one turn of twist, as obtained in the model. These ribbon-associated flux-rope QSL footprints are consistent with the new standard flare model in 3D, with the presence of a hyperbolic flux tube located below an inverse-teardrop-shaped coronal QSL. This is a new step forward forecasting the locations of reconnection and ribbons in solar flares and the geometrical properties of eruptive flux ropes.

  19. Calibration method of the pulsed X-ray relative sensitivity for ST401 plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Hongwei; Song Guzhou; Wang Kuilu

    2011-01-01

    The relative sensitivity calibration method of the pulsed X-ray in ST401 plastic scintillator is presented. Experimental relative sensitivity calibrations of the plastic scintillators of different thicknesses from 1 mm to 50 mm are accomplished on the 'Chenguang' pulsed X-ray source and a Co radioactive source, The uncertainty of the calibration data is evaluated, which can be treated as the experimental evidence for the relative sensitivity conversion of ST401 plastic scintillator. (authors)

  20. The causal relation between turbulent particle flux and density gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milligen, B. Ph. van; Martín de Aguilera, A.; Hidalgo, C. [CIEMAT - Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Avda. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Carreras, B. A. [BACV Solutions, 110 Mohawk Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); García, L.; Nicolau, J. H. [Universidad Carlos III, 28911 Leganés, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-07-15

    A technique for detecting the causal relationship between fluctuating signals is used to investigate the relation between flux and gradient in fusion plasmas. Both a resistive pressure gradient driven turbulence model and experimental Langmuir probe data from the TJ-II stellarator are studied. It is found that the maximum influence occurs at a finite time lag (non-instantaneous response) and that quasi-periodicities exist. Furthermore, the model results show very long range radial influences, extending over most of the investigated regions, possibly related to coupling effects associated with plasma self-organization. These results clearly show that transport in fusion plasmas is not local and instantaneous, as is sometimes assumed.

  1. Kinematic parameter calibration method for industrial robot manipulator using the relative position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, In Chul

    2008-01-01

    A new calibration method for industrial robot system calibration on a manufacturing floor is presented in this paper. To calibrate the robot system, a laser sensor to measure the distance between robot tool and measurement surface is attached to the robot end-effector and a grid is established in the floor. Given two position command pulses for a robot manipulator and using the position difference between two command pulses, the relative position measurement calibration method will find the real robot kinematic parameters. The procedures developed have been applied to an industrial robot. Finally, the effects of the models used to calibrate the robot are discussed. This calibration method represents an effective, low cost and feasible technique for the industrial robot calibration in lab. projects and industrial environments

  2. Relative effect of solder flux chemistry on the humidity related failures in electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdingovas, Vadimas; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose - This paper aims to investigate the effect of no-clean flux chemistry with various weak organic acids (WOAs) as activators on the corrosion reliability of electronics with emphasis on the hygroscopic nature of the residue. Design/methodology/approach - The hygroscopicity of flux residue...... in the impedance measurements were observed. Practical implications - The findings are attributed to the deliquescence RH of the WOA(s) in the flux and chemistry of water-layer formation. The results show the importance of WOA type in relation to its solubility and deliquescence RH on the corrosion reliability...

  3. Calibration and Quality Assurance of Flux Observations from a Small Research Aircraft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vellinga, O.S.; Dobosy, R.J.; Dumas, E.J.; Beniamino, G.; Elbers, J.A.; Hutjes, R.W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Small environmental research aircraft (ERA) are becoming more common for detailed studies of air–surface interactions. The Sky Arrow 650 ERA, used by multiple groups, is designed to minimize the complexity of high-precision airborne turbulent wind measurement. Its relative wind probe, of a nine-port

  4. Flux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    . FLUX betegner en flyden eller strømmen, dvs. dynamik. Forstår man livet som proces og udvikling i stedet for som ting og mekanik, får man et andet billede af det gode liv end det, som den velkendte vestlige mekanicisme lægger op til. Dynamisk forstået indebærer det gode liv den bedst mulige...... kanalisering af den flux eller energi, der strømmer igennem os og giver sig til kende i vore daglige aktiviteter. Skal vores tanker, handlinger, arbejde, samvær og politiske liv organiseres efter stramme og faste regelsæt, uden slinger i valsen? Eller skal de tværtimod forløbe ganske uhindret af regler og bånd...

  5. Alcohol calibration of tests measuring skills related to car driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongen, Stefan; Vuurman, Eric; Ramaekers, Jan; Vermeeren, Annemiek

    2014-06-01

    Medication and illicit drugs can have detrimental side effects which impair driving performance. A drug's impairing potential should be determined by well-validated, reliable, and sensitive tests and ideally be calibrated by benchmark drugs and doses. To date, no consensus has been reached on the issue of which psychometric tests are best suited for initial screening of a drug's driving impairment potential. The aim of this alcohol calibration study is to determine which performance tests are useful to measure drug-induced impairment. The effects of alcohol are used to compare the psychometric quality between tests and as benchmark to quantify performance changes in each test associated with potentially impairing drug effects. Twenty-four healthy volunteers participated in a double-blind, four-way crossover study. Treatments were placebo and three different doses of alcohol leading to blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) of 0.2, 0.5, and 0.8 g/L. Main effects of alcohol were found in most tests. Compared with placebo, performance in the Divided Attention Test (DAT) was significantly impaired after all alcohol doses and performance in the Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT) and the Balance Test was impaired with a BAC of 0.5 and 0.8 g/L. The largest effect sizes were found on postural balance with eyes open and mean reaction time in the divided attention and the psychomotor vigilance test. The preferable tests for initial screening are the DAT and the PVT, as these tests were most sensitive to the impairing effects of alcohol and being considerably valid in assessing potential driving impairment.

  6. The final power calibration of the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor for various configurations obtained from the measurements of the absolute average neutron flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Alexandre Fonseca Povoa da, E-mail: alexandre.povoa@mar.mil.br [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Bitelli, Ulysses d' Utra; Mura, Luiz Ernesto Credidio; Lima, Ana Cecilia de Souza; Betti, Flavio; Santos, Diogo Feliciano dos, E-mail: ubitelli@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The use of neutron activation foils is a widely spread technique applied to obtain nuclear parameters then comparing the results with those calculated using specific methodologies and available nuclear data. By irradiation of activation foils and subsequent measurement of its induced activity, it is possible to determine the neutron flux at the position of irradiation. The power level during operation of the reactor is a parameter which is directly proportional to the average neutron flux throughout the core. The objective of this work is to gather data from irradiation of gold foils symmetrically placed along a cylindrically configured core which presents only a small excess reactivity in order to derive the power generated throughout the spatial thermal and epithermal neutron flux distribution over the core of the IPEN/MB-01 Nuclear Reactor, eventually lending to a proper calibration of its nuclear channels. The foils are fixed in a Lucite plate then irradiated with and without cadmium sheaths so as to obtain the absolute thermal and epithermal neutron flux. The correlation between the average power neutron flux resulting from the gold foils irradiation, and the average power digitally indicated by the nuclear channel number 6, allows for the calibration of the nuclear channels of the reactor. The reactor power level obtained by thermal neutron flux mapping was (74.65 ± 2.45) watts to a mean counting per seconds of 37881 cps to nuclear channel number 10 a pulse detector, and 0.719.10{sup -5} ampere to nuclear linear channel number 6 (a non-compensated ionization chamber). (author)

  7. Coronal and heliospheric magnetic flux circulation and its relation to open solar flux evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Mike; Owens, Mathew J.; Imber, Suzanne M.; James, Matthew K.; Bunce, Emma J.; Yeoman, Timothy K.

    2017-06-01

    Solar cycle 24 is notable for three features that can be found in previous cycles but which have been unusually prominent: (1) sunspot activity was considerably greater in the northern/southern hemisphere during the rising/declining phase; (2) accumulation of open solar flux (OSF) during the rising phase was modest, but rapid in the early declining phase; (3) the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) tilt showed large fluctuations. We show that these features had a major influence on the progression of the cycle. All flux emergence causes a rise then a fall in OSF, but only OSF with foot points in opposing hemispheres progresses the solar cycle via the evolution of the polar fields. Emergence in one hemisphere, or symmetric emergence without some form of foot point exchange across the heliographic equator, causes poleward migrating fields of both polarities in one or both (respectively) hemispheres which temporarily enhance OSF but do not advance the polar field cycle. The heliospheric field observed near Mercury and Earth reflects the asymmetries in emergence. Using magnetograms, we find evidence that the poleward magnetic flux transport (of both polarities) is modulated by the HCS tilt, revealing an effect on OSF loss rate. The declining phase rise in OSF was caused by strong emergence in the southern hemisphere with an anomalously low HCS tilt. This implies the recent fall in the southern polar field will be sustained and that the peak OSF has limited implications for the polar field at the next sunspot minimum and hence for the amplitude of cycle 25.type="synopsis">type="main">Plain Language SummaryThere is growing interest in being able to predict the evolution in solar conditions on a better basis than past experience, which is necessarily limited. Two of the key features of the solar magnetic cycle are that the polar fields reverse just after the peak of each sunspot cycle and that the polar field that has accumulated by the time of each sunspot minimum is a good

  8. Increased particle flux to the deep ocean related to monsoons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, R.R.; Ittekkot, V.; Manganini, S.J.; Ramaswamy, V.; Haake, B.; Degens, E.T.; Desai, B.N.; Honjo, S.

    . To assess the impact of monsoon-driven processes on the downward particle flux variations in the open ocean we deployed three moored arrays consisting of six time-series sediment traps at selected locations in the western, central and eastern parts...

  9. Emergence of Twisted Magnetic Flux Related Sigmoidal Brightening ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    We have examined the morphological properties of a sigmoid associated with an SXR. (soft X ray) flare. The sigmoid is cospatial with the EUV (extreme ultra violet) images and in the optical part lies along an S shaped Hα filament. The photoheliogram shows flux emergence within an existing δ type sunspot which has.

  10. Calibration of CR-39 for radon-related parameters using sealed cup technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abo-Elmagd, M.; Daif, M. M.

    2010-01-01

    Effective radium content, mass and areal radon exhalation rates of soil and rock samples are important radon-related parameters and can be used as a better indicator of radon risk. A sealed cup fitted to a CR-39 detector and to the sample under measurement is an advantageous passive device for the measurement of these parameters. The main factors affecting the results are the detector calibration factor and the sample weight. The results of an active technique (Lucas cell) and the CR-39 detector have been found to be correlated resulting in a reliable detector calibration factor. The result illustrates the dependence of the CR-39 calibration factor with the sample weight which is difficult to use in practice, because each sample weight has its own calibration factor of CR-39. It is reported to demonstrate the advantage of a back diffusion correction. After correcting the results for back diffusion effects, one obtains an approximately constant calibration factor for the sample volumes up to one-third the total sealed cup volume. For this condition the calibration factor is equal to 0.237 track cm -2 per Bq m -3 d with about 1% uncertainty. (authors)

  11. Confidence-Accuracy Calibration in Absolute and Relative Face Recognition Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Nathan; Brewer, Neil

    2004-01-01

    Confidence-accuracy (CA) calibration was examined for absolute and relative face recognition judgments as well as for recognition judgments from groups of stimuli presented simultaneously or sequentially (i.e., simultaneous or sequential mini-lineups). When the effect of difficulty was controlled, absolute and relative judgments produced…

  12. Calibrated Tully-fisher Relations For Improved Photometric Estimates Of Disk Rotation Velocities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyes, Reinabelle; Mandelbaum, R.; Gunn, J. E.; Pizagno II, Jim

    We present calibrated scaling relations (also referred to as Tully-Fisher relations or TFRs) between rotation velocity and photometric quantities-- absolute magnitude, stellar mass, and synthetic magnitude (a linear combination of absolute magnitude and color)-- of disk galaxies at z 0.1. First, we

  13. Heat flux from magmatic hydrothermal systems related to availability of fluid recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, M. C.; Rowland, J.V.; Chiodini, G.; Rissmann, C.F.; Bloomberg, S.; Hernandez, P.A.; Mazot, A.; Viveiros, F.; Werner, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    Magmatic hydrothermal systems are of increasing interest as a renewable energy source. Surface heat flux indicates system resource potential, and can be inferred from soil CO2 flux measurements and fumarole gas chemistry. Here we compile and reanalyze results from previous CO2 flux surveys worldwide to compare heat flux from a variety of magma-hydrothermal areas. We infer that availability of water to recharge magmatic hydrothermal systems is correlated with heat flux. Recharge availability is in turn governed by permeability, structure, lithology, rainfall, topography, and perhaps unsurprisingly, proximity to a large supply of water such as the ocean. The relationship between recharge and heat flux interpreted by this study is consistent with recent numerical modeling that relates hydrothermal system heat output to rainfall catchment area. This result highlights the importance of recharge as a consideration when evaluating hydrothermal systems for electricity generation, and the utility of CO2 flux as a resource evaluation tool.

  14. Energy fluxes and their relations within energy plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grazzini, Giuseppe; Milazzo, Adriano

    2007-01-01

    Analysing how energy is delivered from its primary sources to final users, it may be seen that the evolution of technology, driven by economic considerations, has mainly rewarded those systems that have intense energy fluxes through their main sections. On the other hand, renewable energy sources are prevented from being widespread by their low energy density. If a high energy flux is a recognized target for energy use, one may try to characterise the various devices encountered along the energy path according to the concentration obtained of the energy flow. In this way, apart from measuring the energy loss suffered within a given device, it can be decided if this loss is adequate with respect to the gain in terms of energy density

  15. New Submersed Chamber for Calibration of Relative Humidity Instruments at HMI/FSB-LPM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sestan, D.; Zvizdic, D.; Sariri, K.

    2018-02-01

    This paper gives a detailed description of a new chamber designed for calibration of relative humidity (RH) instruments at Laboratory for Process Measurement (HMI/FSB-LPM). To the present time, the calibrations of RH instruments at the HMI/FSB-LPM were done by comparison method using a climatic chamber of large volume and calibrated dew point hygrometer with an additional thermometer. Since 2010, HMI/FSB-LPM in cooperation with Centre for Metrology and Accreditation in Finland (MIKES) developed the two primary dew point generators which cover the dew point temperature range between - 70 {°}C and 60 {°}C. In order to utilize these facilities for calibrations of the RH instruments, the new chamber was designed, manufactured and installed in the existing system, aiming to extend its range and reduce the related calibration uncertainties. The chamber construction allows its use in a thermostatic bath of larger volume as well as in the climatic chambers. In the scope of this paper, performances of the new chamber were tested while it was submersed in a thermostated bath. The chamber can simultaneously accommodate up to three RH sensors. In order to keep the design of the chamber simple, only cylindrical RH sensors detachable from display units can be calibrated. Possible optimizations are also discussed, and improvements in the design proposed. By using the new chamber, HMI/FSB-LPM reduced the expanded calibration uncertainties (level of confidence 95 %, coverage factor k=2) from 0.6 %rh to 0.25 %rh at 30 %rh (23 {°}C), and from 0.8 %rh to 0.53 %rh at 70 %rh (23 {°}C).

  16. A Review on Microdialysis Calibration Methods: the Theory and Current Related Efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kho, Chun Min; Enche Ab Rahim, Siti Kartini; Ahmad, Zainal Arifin; Abdullah, Norazharuddin Shah

    2017-07-01

    Microdialysis is a sampling technique first introduced in the late 1950s. Although this technique was originally designed to study endogenous compounds in animal brain, it is later modified to be used in other organs. Additionally, microdialysis is not only able to collect unbound concentration of compounds from tissue sites; this technique can also be used to deliver exogenous compounds to a designated area. Due to its versatility, microdialysis technique is widely employed in a number of areas, including biomedical research. However, for most in vivo studies, the concentration of substance obtained directly from the microdialysis technique does not accurately describe the concentration of the substance on-site. In order to relate the results collected from microdialysis to the actual in vivo condition, a calibration method is required. To date, various microdialysis calibration methods have been reported, with each method being capable to provide valuable insights of the technique itself and its applications. This paper aims to provide a critical review on various calibration methods used in microdialysis applications, inclusive of a detailed description of the microdialysis technique itself to start with. It is expected that this article shall review in detail, the various calibration methods employed, present examples of work related to each calibration method including clinical efforts, plus the advantages and disadvantages of each of the methods.

  17. Using Flux Site Observations to Calibrate Root System Architecture Stencils for Water Uptake of Plant Functional Types in Land Surface Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouda, M.

    2017-12-01

    Root system architecture (RSA) can significantly affect plant access to water, total transpiration, as well as its partitioning by soil depth, with implications for surface heat, water, and carbon budgets. Despite recent advances in land surface model (LSM) descriptions of plant hydraulics, RSA has not been included because of its three-dimensional complexity, which makes RSA modelling generally too computationally costly. This work builds upon the recently introduced "RSA stencil," a process-based 1D layered model that captures the dynamic shifts in water potential gradients of 3D RSA in response to heterogeneous soil moisture profiles. In validations using root systems calibrated to the rooting profiles of four plant functional types (PFT) of the Community Land Model, the RSA stencil predicts plant water potentials within 2% of the outputs of full 3D models, despite its trivial computational cost. In transient simulations, the RSA stencil yields improved predictions of water uptake and soil moisture profiles compared to a 1D model based on root fraction alone. Here I show how the RSA stencil can be calibrated to time-series observations of soil moisture and transpiration to yield a water uptake PFT definition for use in terrestrial models. This model-data integration exercise aims to improve LSM predictions of soil moisture dynamics and, under water-limiting conditions, surface fluxes. These improvements can be expected to significantly impact predictions of downstream variables, including surface fluxes, climate-vegetation feedbacks and soil nutrient cycling.

  18. Weak Lensing Calibrated M-T Scaling Relation of Galaxy Groups in the COSMOS Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kettula, K.; Finoguenov, A.; Massey, R.; Rhodes, J.; Hoekstra, H.; Taylor, J.; Spinelli, P.; Tanaka, M.; Ilbert, O.; Capak, P.; McCracken, H.; Koekemoer, A.

    2013-01-01

    The scaling between X-ray observables and mass for galaxy clusters and groups is instrumental for cluster-based cosmology and an important probe for the thermodynamics of the intracluster gas. We calibrate a scaling relation between the weak lensing mass and X-ray spectroscopic temperature for 10

  19. Anomalies and other concerns related to the critical heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groeneveld, D.C., E-mail: thermal@magma.ca [Researcher Emeritus, Chalk River Laboratories, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd, Chalk River (Canada) and University of Ottawa, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ottawa (Canada)

    2011-11-15

    This paper summarizes various unusual trends in the critical heat flux (CHF) that have been observed experimentally in tubes or bundle subassemblies. They include the following: Bullet Occurrence of a minimum in the CHF vs. quality (X) curve at high flows - leading to an initial upstream CHF occurrence in uniformly heated channels. This phenomenon has been observed at high flows in both water and Freon. Bullet Occurrence of a limiting quality region on the CHF vs. X curve where the CHF drops by 30-90% for a nearly constant quality. This is thought to correspond to the boundary between the entrainment controlled and the deposition controlled region and causes problems for prediction methods of the form CHF = f(X). Bullet Impact of flow obstructions on the occurrence of upstream CHF and the limiting quality region. The additional mixing by grid spacers or bundle appendages results in a more homogeneous phase distribution, and diminishes the effects of flow regime/heat transfer regime transitions responsible for some of the unusual CHF trends, and results in a more gradually decreasing CHF vs. X curve. Bullet Absence of a CHF temperature excursion at high flows and high qualities - this is found to be caused by a change in slope of the transition boiling part of the boiling curve from a negative value (usual trend that results in a temperature excursion) to a positive slope. Bullet Gradual disappearance of the sharp temperature excursion at CHF when increasing the pressure towards and beyond the critical pressure - no drastic change is observed in the axial temperature distribution of a heated tube experiencing CHF when, for constant mass flux and inlet temperature, the pressure is gradually increased from subcritical to supercritical. Bullet CHF fluid-to-fluid modelling: differences in CHF trends at certain conditions between refrigerants and water at equivalent conditions. The mechanisms responsible for these trends and the implications for bundle geometries are

  20. Anomalies and other concerns related to the critical heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groeneveld, D.C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes various unusual trends in the critical heat flux (CHF) that have been observed experimentally in tubes. They include the following: Occurrence of a minimum in the CHF vs. quality (X) curve at high flows - leading to an initial upstream CHF occurrence in uniformly heated tubes. This phenomenon has been observed at high flows in both water and Freon. Occurrence of a limiting quality region on the CHF vs. X curve where the CHF drops by 30 - 90% for a nearly constant quality. This is thought to correspond to the boundary between the entrainment-controlled and the deposition-controlled region and causes problems for prediction methods of the form CHF=f(X). Impact of flow obstructions on the occurrence of upstream CHF and the limiting quality region. The additional mixing by grid spacers or bundle appendages results in a more homogeneous phase distribution, thus diminishing the effects of flow regime/heat transfer regime transitions responsible for the above unusual CHF trends. This will lead to a more gradually decreasing CHF vs. X curve. Absence of a CHF temperature excursion at high flows and high qualities - this is found to be caused by a change in slope of the transition boiling part of the boiling curve from a negative value (usual trend that results in a dryout temperature excursion) to a positive slope. Gradual disappearance of the sharp temperature excursion at CHF when increasing the pressure towards and beyond the critical pressure - no drastic change is observed in the shape of the axial temperature distribution of a heated tube experiencing CHF or heat transfer deterioration, when, for constant mass flux and inlet temperature, the pressure is gradually increased from subcritical to supercritical. CHF fluid-to-fluid modeling: differences in CHF behavior at certain conditions between refrigerants and water at equivalent conditions. The mechanisms responsible for these trends and the implications for predicting CHF for bundle geometries

  1. Study on calibration of neutron efficiency and relative photo-yield of plastic scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Taiping; Zhang Chuanfei; Li Rurong; Zhang Jianhua; Luo Xiaobing; Xia Yijun; Yang Zhihua

    2002-01-01

    A method used for the calibration of neutron efficiency and the relative photo yield of plastic scintillator is studied. T(p, n) and D(d, n) reactions are used as neutron resources. The neutron efficiencies and the relative photo yields of plastic scintillators 1421 (40 mm in diameter and 5 mm in thickness) and determined in the neutron energy range of 0.655-5 MeV

  2. Least square methods and covariance matrix applied to the relative efficiency calibration of a Ge(Li) detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraldo, L.P.; Smith, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    The methodology of covariance matrix and square methods have been applied in the relative efficiency calibration for a Ge(Li) detector apllied in the relative efficiency calibration for a Ge(Li) detector. Procedures employed to generate, manipulate and test covariance matrices which serve to properly represent uncertainties of experimental data are discussed. Calibration data fitting using least square methods has been performed for a particular experimental data set. (author) [pt

  3. MAPPING THE GALAXY COLOR–REDSHIFT RELATION: OPTIMAL PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT CALIBRATION STRATEGIES FOR COSMOLOGY SURVEYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masters, Daniel; Steinhardt, Charles; Faisst, Andreas [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Capak, Peter [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stern, Daniel; Rhodes, Jason [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Ilbert, Olivier [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire dAstrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388, Marseille (France); Salvato, Mara [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Schmidt, Samuel [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Longo, Giuseppe [Department of Physics, University Federico II, via Cinthia 6, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Paltani, Stephane; Coupon, Jean [Department of Astronomy, University of Geneva ch. dcogia 16, CH-1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Mobasher, Bahram [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Hoekstra, Henk [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA, Leiden (Netherlands); Hildebrandt, Hendrik [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Universität Bonn, Auf dem H’´ugel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Speagle, Josh [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, 60 Garden Street, MS 46, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kalinich, Adam [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Brodwin, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Brescia, Massimo; Cavuoti, Stefano [Astronomical Observatory of Capodimonte—INAF, via Moiariello 16, I-80131, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-11-01

    Calibrating the photometric redshifts of ≳10{sup 9} galaxies for upcoming weak lensing cosmology experiments is a major challenge for the astrophysics community. The path to obtaining the required spectroscopic redshifts for training and calibration is daunting, given the anticipated depths of the surveys and the difficulty in obtaining secure redshifts for some faint galaxy populations. Here we present an analysis of the problem based on the self-organizing map, a method of mapping the distribution of data in a high-dimensional space and projecting it onto a lower-dimensional representation. We apply this method to existing photometric data from the COSMOS survey selected to approximate the anticipated Euclid weak lensing sample, enabling us to robustly map the empirical distribution of galaxies in the multidimensional color space defined by the expected Euclid filters. Mapping this multicolor distribution lets us determine where—in galaxy color space—redshifts from current spectroscopic surveys exist and where they are systematically missing. Crucially, the method lets us determine whether a spectroscopic training sample is representative of the full photometric space occupied by the galaxies in a survey. We explore optimal sampling techniques and estimate the additional spectroscopy needed to map out the color–redshift relation, finding that sampling the galaxy distribution in color space in a systematic way can efficiently meet the calibration requirements. While the analysis presented here focuses on the Euclid survey, similar analysis can be applied to other surveys facing the same calibration challenge, such as DES, LSST, and WFIRST.

  4. Calibrating MMS Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux Measurements and Characterizing 3D Electric Field Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, J. R.; Torbert, R. B.; Vaith, H.; Argall, M. R.; Li, G.; Chen, L. J.; Ergun, R. E.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Marklund, G. T.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Russell, C. T.; Magnes, W.; Le Contel, O.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    The electron drift instruments (EDIs) onboard each MMS spacecraft are designed with large geometric factors (~0.01cm2 str) to facilitate detection of weak (~100 nA) electron beams fired and received by the two gun-detector units (GDUs) when EDI is in its "electric field mode" to determine the local electric and magnetic fields. A consequence of the large geometric factor is that "ambient mode" electron flux measurements (500 eV electrons having 0°, 90°, or 180° pitch angle) can vary depending on the orientation of the EDI instrument with respect to the magnetic field, a nonphysical effect that requires a correction. Here, we present determinations of the θ- and ø-dependent correction factors for the eight EDI GDUs, where θ (ø) is the polar (azimuthal) angle between the GDU symmetry axis and the local magnetic field direction, and compare the corrected fluxes with those measured by the fast plasma instrument (FPI). Using these corrected, high time resolution (~1,000 samples per second) ambient electron fluxes, combined with the unprecedentedly high resolution 3D electric field measurements taken by the spin-plane and axial double probes (SDP and ADP), we are equipped to accurately detect electron-scale current layers and electric field waves associated with the non-Maxwellian (anisotropic and agyrotropic) particle distribution functions predicted to exist in the reconnection diffusion region. We compare initial observations of the diffusion region with distributions and wave analysis from PIC simulations of asymmetric reconnection applicable for modeling reconnection at the Earth's magnetopause, where MMS will begin Science Phase 1 as of September 1, 2015.

  5. A redetermination of the Barnes-Evans relation for surface flux in the V band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, J.A.; Poe, C.H.

    1984-01-01

    Paying especial attention to the errors, we have redetermined the relation between visual flux at the star and color for stars with measured angular diameters. For stars cooler than the sun this is given both as a group of four polynomials in (V-R) for various parts of the range (V-R) >or approx.0.2, which start to recognize the fine structure in the flux-color relation, and as a straight line fitted to the data for 0,7 ≤ (V-R) ≤ 2.5. For stars hotter than the sun we give a table of surface flux vs. spectral type and (B-I) color. For stars later than the sun this flux-color relation is still defined almost entirely by giants. The conclusion that visual surface flux is a single function of (V-R) for all luminosity classes remains weak because of the small number of dwarfs and supergiants with angular diameters, likely systematic errors in the angular diameters of supergiants and the relatively large errors of individual angular diameters. The flux-color relation is combined with independent scales of bolometric corrections to give effective temperatures. We find that our results agree moderately well with those of Code et al. (1976), on which they are primarily based, for the hotter stars. However, they imply significant revisions of both the temperature and bolometric-correction scales for cool stars. 94 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs. (author)

  6. Estimating regional methane surface fluxes: the relative importance of surface and GOSAT mole fraction measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fraser

    2013-06-01

    posterior methane fluxes by incorporating them into GEOS-Chem and sampling the model at the location and time of surface CH4 measurements from the AGAGE (Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment network and column XCH4 measurements from TCCON (Total Carbon Column Observing Network. The posterior fluxes modestly improve the model agreement with AGAGE and TCCON data relative to prior fluxes, with the correlation coefficients (r2 increasing by a mean of 0.04 (range: −0.17 to 0.23 and the biases decreasing by a mean of 0.4 ppb (range: −8.9 to 8.4 ppb.

  7. Calibration factor or calibration coefficient?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meghzifene, A.; Shortt, K.R.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The IAEA/WHO network of SSDLs was set up in order to establish links between SSDL members and the international measurement system. At the end of 2001, there were 73 network members in 63 Member States. The SSDL network members provide calibration services to end-users at the national or regional level. The results of the calibrations are summarized in a document called calibration report or calibration certificate. The IAEA has been using the term calibration certificate and will continue using the same terminology. The most important information in a calibration certificate is a list of calibration factors and their related uncertainties that apply to the calibrated instrument for the well-defined irradiation and ambient conditions. The IAEA has recently decided to change the term calibration factor to calibration coefficient, to be fully in line with ISO [ISO 31-0], which recommends the use of the term coefficient when it links two quantities A and B (equation 1) that have different dimensions. The term factor should only be used for k when it is used to link the terms A and B that have the same dimensions A=k.B. However, in a typical calibration, an ion chamber is calibrated in terms of a physical quantity such as air kerma, dose to water, ambient dose equivalent, etc. If the chamber is calibrated together with its electrometer, then the calibration refers to the physical quantity to be measured per electrometer unit reading. In this case, the terms referred have different dimensions. The adoption by the Agency of the term coefficient to express the results of calibrations is consistent with the 'International vocabulary of basic and general terms in metrology' prepared jointly by the BIPM, IEC, ISO, OIML and other organizations. The BIPM has changed from factor to coefficient. The authors believe that this is more than just a matter of semantics and recommend that the SSDL network members adopt this change in terminology. (author)

  8. MODIS Aqua Optical Throughput Degradation Impact on Relative Spectral Response and Calibration on Ocean Color Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shihyan; Meister, Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    Since Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Aqua's launch in 2002, the radiometric system gains of the reflective solar bands have been degrading, indicating changes in the systems optical throughput. To estimate the optical throughput degradation, the electronic gain changes were estimated and removed from the measured system gain. The derived optical throughput degradation shows a rate that is much faster in the shorter wavelengths than the longer wavelengths. The wavelength-dependent optical throughput degradation modulated the relative spectral response (RSR) of the bands. In addition, the optical degradation is also scan angle-dependent due to large changes in response versus the scan angle over time. We estimated the modulated RSR as a function of time and scan angles and its impacts on sensor radiometric calibration for the ocean science. Our results show that the calibration bias could be up to 1.8 % for band 8 (412 nm) due to its larger out-of-band response. For the other ocean bands, the calibration biases are much smaller with magnitudes at least one order smaller.

  9. Calibration of the nuclear power channels for the cylindrical configuration of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor obtained from the measurements of the spatial neutron flux distribution in the reactor core through the irradiation of gold foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitelli, Ulysses d' Utra; Silva, Alexandre F. Povoa da; Mura, Luiz Ernesto Credidio; Aredes, Vitor Ottoni Garcia; Santos, Diogo Feliciano dos, E-mail: ubitelli@ipen.br, E-mail: alexpovoa@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The activation foil is one of the most used techniques to obtain and compare nuclear parameters from the nuclear data libraries, given by a gamma spectrometry system. Through the measurements of activity induced in the foils, it is possible to determine the neutron flux profile exactly where it has been irradiated. The power level operation of the reactor is a parameter directly proportional to the average neutron flux in the core. The objective of this work is to obtain, for a cylindrical configuration, the power generation through a spatial thermal neutron flux distribution in the core of IPEN/MB-01 Reactor, by irradiating gold foils positioned symmetrically into the core. They are put in a Lucite plate which will not interfere in the analysis of the neutron flux, because of its low microscopic absorption cross section for the analyzed neutrons. The foils are irradiated with and without cadmium covered small plates, to obtain the thermal and epithermal neutron flux, through specific equations. The correlation between the average power neutron flux, as a result of the foil's irradiation, and the average power digital neutron flux of the nuclear power channels, allows the calibration of the nuclear channels of the reactor. This same correlation was done in 2008 with the reactor in a rectangular configuration, which resulted in a specific calibration of the power level operation. This calibration cannot be used in the cylindrical configuration, because the nuclear parameters could change, which may lead to a different neutron profile. Furthermore, the precise knowledge of the power neutron flux in the core also validates the mathematics used to calculate the power neutron flux. (author)

  10. Calibration and validation processes for relative humidity measurement by a Hygrochron iButton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Mirim; Patton, Raymond; Mahar, Trevor; Ireland, Angus; Swan, Paul; Chow, Chin Moi

    2017-10-01

    Accurate relative humidity (RH) measurement is demanded in studies of thermal comfort. Thermal discomfort occurs when the near-to-skin temperature or RH is outside of the thermal comfort zone. The Hygrochron, a small wireless device which measures both temperature and RH, would be suitable and convenient in exercise or sleep studies. However, the RH measurement has not been validated. This paper has three parts. Part 1: In evaluating the sensor surface for RH detection, four Hygrochrons were placed on a wet paper towel. Two were placed on the towel with the protruding surface facing up and the other two facing down. The results showed that the Hygrochron with the protruding side was the sensor surface for detecting RH. Part 2: Twenty-seven Hygrochrons were calibrated in a humidity calibration chamber at a RH range from 40 to 90% at a constant temperature from 32 to 37°C. The mean bias was -1.08% between the Hygrochrons and the calibration chamber. The Hygrochron overestimated RH at the lower range (40-60%) and underestimated RH at the higher range (80-90%). The application of individual regression equations to each Hygrochron improved accuracy and reduced the mean bias to -0.002%. However, one Hygrochron showed outlier values that may be due to a manufacturing defect. Part 3: The reproducibility of Hygrochron for RH measurements was tested twice at the same condition of 35°C over a three-month interval. The intra-class coefficient was 0.996 to 1.000 with non-significant differences in the mean RH between test and re-test results (p=0.159). Hygrochrons are valid for RH measurements which show high reproducibility. It is recommended that Hygrochrons be calibrated over a range of desired RH and temperature prior to use to improve accuracy and detect any manufacturing defects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Gap-related trapped magnetic flux dependence between single and combined bulk superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Z.; Miki, M.; Felder, B.; Tsuzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.; Uetake, T.; Izumi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Rectangular YBCO bulks to realize a compact combination. → The gap effect was added to consider in the trapped flux density mapping. → The trapped-flux dependence between single and combined bulks is gap related. → It is possible to estimate the total magnetic flux of bulk combinations. - Abstract: Aiming at examining the trapped-flux dependence between single and combined bulk superconductors for field-pole applications, three rectangular Y 1.65 Ba 2 Cu 3 O 7-x (YBCO) bulks with a possibly compact combination were employed to investigate the trapped-flux characteristics of single and combined bulks with a field-cooling magnetization (FCM) method. A gap-related dependence was found between them. At lower gaps of 1 mm and 5 mm, the peak trapped fields and total magnetic flux of combined bulks are both smaller than the additive values of each single bulk, which can be ascribed to the demagnetization influences of the field around the bulk generated by the adjacent ones. While, at larger gaps like 10 mm, the situation becomes reversed. The combined bulks can attain bigger peak trapped fields as well as total magnetic flux, which indicates that the magnetic field by the bulk combination can reach higher gaps, thanks to the bigger magnetic energy compared with the single bulk. The presented results show that, on one hand, it is possible to estimate the total trapped magnetic flux of combined bulks by an approximate additive method of each single bulk while considering a demagnetization factor; on the other hand, it also means that the performance of combined bulks will be superior to the addition of each single bulk at larger gaps, thus preferable for large-scaled magnet applications.

  12. Gap-related trapped magnetic flux dependence between single and combined bulk superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Z., E-mail: zgdeng@gmail.co [Laboratory of Applied Physics, Department of Marine Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan); Miki, M.; Felder, B.; Tsuzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.; Uetake, T.; Izumi, M. [Laboratory of Applied Physics, Department of Marine Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: {yields} Rectangular YBCO bulks to realize a compact combination. {yields} The gap effect was added to consider in the trapped flux density mapping. {yields} The trapped-flux dependence between single and combined bulks is gap related. {yields} It is possible to estimate the total magnetic flux of bulk combinations. - Abstract: Aiming at examining the trapped-flux dependence between single and combined bulk superconductors for field-pole applications, three rectangular Y{sub 1.65}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} (YBCO) bulks with a possibly compact combination were employed to investigate the trapped-flux characteristics of single and combined bulks with a field-cooling magnetization (FCM) method. A gap-related dependence was found between them. At lower gaps of 1 mm and 5 mm, the peak trapped fields and total magnetic flux of combined bulks are both smaller than the additive values of each single bulk, which can be ascribed to the demagnetization influences of the field around the bulk generated by the adjacent ones. While, at larger gaps like 10 mm, the situation becomes reversed. The combined bulks can attain bigger peak trapped fields as well as total magnetic flux, which indicates that the magnetic field by the bulk combination can reach higher gaps, thanks to the bigger magnetic energy compared with the single bulk. The presented results show that, on one hand, it is possible to estimate the total trapped magnetic flux of combined bulks by an approximate additive method of each single bulk while considering a demagnetization factor; on the other hand, it also means that the performance of combined bulks will be superior to the addition of each single bulk at larger gaps, thus preferable for large-scaled magnet applications.

  13. Illumination technique for the relative calibration of the ASTRI SST-2M camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodeghiero, Gabriele; Catalano, Osvaldo; Segreto, Alberto; De Caprio, Vincenzo; Giro, Enrico; Lessio, Luigi; Conconi, Paolo; Canestrari, Rodolfo

    2014-01-01

    We present a new illumination technique for the camera relative gain calibration of the ASTRI SST-2M Cherenkov telescope. The camera illumination is achieved by means of an optical fiber that diffuses the light inside a protective PMMA window above the focal plane. We report the encouraging results of the development tests carried out on two PMMA window prototypes illuminated by a standard optical fiber. We checked also the reliability of the method by a series of ray tracing simulations for different scattering models and PMMA window shapes finding good agreement with experimental results

  14. Illumination technique for the relative calibration of the ASTRI SST-2M camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodeghiero, Gabriele, E-mail: gabriele.rodeghiero@studenti.unipd.it [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, 35100 PD (Italy); Catalano, Osvaldo; Segreto, Alberto [INAF IASF Palermo, Via Ugo La Malfa 153, 90146 PA (Italy); De Caprio, Vincenzo [INAF OACN, Salita Moiariello, 16, 80131 Napoli, NA (Italy); Giro, Enrico; Lessio, Luigi [INAF OAPD, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, 35100 PD (Italy); Conconi, Paolo; Canestrari, Rodolfo [INAF OAB, Via E. Bianchi 46, 23807 Merate, LC (Italy)

    2014-11-11

    We present a new illumination technique for the camera relative gain calibration of the ASTRI SST-2M Cherenkov telescope. The camera illumination is achieved by means of an optical fiber that diffuses the light inside a protective PMMA window above the focal plane. We report the encouraging results of the development tests carried out on two PMMA window prototypes illuminated by a standard optical fiber. We checked also the reliability of the method by a series of ray tracing simulations for different scattering models and PMMA window shapes finding good agreement with experimental results.

  15. A FIRST ATTEMPT TO CALIBRATE THE BARYONIC TULLY-FISHER RELATION WITH GAS-DOMINATED GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, D. V.; McGaugh, S. S.; Swaters, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    We calibrate the baryonic Tully-Fisher (BTF) relation using a sample of gas-dominated galaxies. These determine the absolute scale of the baryonic mass-rotation speed relation independent of the choice of stellar mass estimator. We find a BTF slope of 3.94 ± 0.07 (random) ±0.08 (systematic) and a zero point of 1.79 ± 0.26 (random) ±0.25 (systematic). We apply this relation to estimate the stellar masses of star-dominated galaxies. This procedure reproduces the trend of mass-to-light ratio with color predicted by population synthesis models. The normalization is also correct, consistent with empirical estimates of the initial mass function used in such models.

  16. Testing and ground calibration of DREAMS-H relative humidity device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genzer, Maria; Hieta, Maria; Nikkanen, Timo; Schmidt, Walter; Kemppinen, Osku; Harri, Ari-Matti; Haukka, Harri

    2015-04-01

    DREAMS (Dust Characterization, Risk Assessment and Environmental Analyzer on the Martian Surface) instrument suite is to be launched as part of the ESA ExoMars 2016/Schiaparelli lander. DREAMS consists of an environmental package for monitoring temperature, pressure, relative humidity, winds and dust opacity, as well as atmospheric electricity of Martian atmosphere. The DREAMS instruments and scientific goals are described in [1]. Here we describe testing and ground calibration of the relative humidity device, DREAMS-H, provided to the DREAMS payload by the Finnish Meteorological Institute and based on proprietary technology of Vaisala, Inc. The same kind of device is part of the REMS instrument package onboard MSL Curiosity Rover [2][3]. DREAMS-H is based on Vaisala Humicap® technology adapted for use in Martian environment by the Finnish Meteorological Institute. The device is very small and lightweighed, with total mass less than 20 g and consuming only 15 mW of power. The Humicap® sensor heads contain an active polymer film that changes its capacitance as function of relative humidity, with 0% to 100% RH measurement range. The dynamic range of the device gets smaller with sensor temperature, being in -70°C approximately 30% of the dynamic range in 0°C [3]. Good-quality relative humidity measurements require knowing the temperature of the environment in which relative humidity is measured. An important part of DREAMS-H calibration was temperature calibration of Vaisala Thermocap® temperature sensors used for housekeeping temperature measurements of the DREAMS-H device. For this, several temperature points in the desired operational range were measured with 0.1°C accuracy traceable to national standards. The main part of humidity calibration of DREAMS-H flight models was done in subzero temperatures in a humidity generator of the Finnish Center of Metrology and Accreditation (MIKES). Several relative humidity points ranging from almost dry to almost wet

  17. Gap-related trapped magnetic flux dependence between single and combined bulk superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Z.; Miki, M.; Felder, B.; Tsuzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.; Uetake, T.; Izumi, M.

    2011-05-01

    Aiming at examining the trapped-flux dependence between single and combined bulk superconductors for field-pole applications, three rectangular Y 1.65Ba 2Cu 3O 7-x (YBCO) bulks with a possibly compact combination were employed to investigate the trapped-flux characteristics of single and combined bulks with a field-cooling magnetization (FCM) method. A gap-related dependence was found between them. At lower gaps of 1 mm and 5 mm, the peak trapped fields and total magnetic flux of combined bulks are both smaller than the additive values of each single bulk, which can be ascribed to the demagnetization influences of the field around the bulk generated by the adjacent ones. While, at larger gaps like 10 mm, the situation becomes reversed. The combined bulks can attain bigger peak trapped fields as well as total magnetic flux, which indicates that the magnetic field by the bulk combination can reach higher gaps, thanks to the bigger magnetic energy compared with the single bulk. The presented results show that, on one hand, it is possible to estimate the total trapped magnetic flux of combined bulks by an approximate additive method of each single bulk while considering a demagnetization factor; on the other hand, it also means that the performance of combined bulks will be superior to the addition of each single bulk at larger gaps, thus preferable for large-scaled magnet applications.

  18. Single-point relative process using Laser-Doppler velocimetry for calibration of flow sensors at temperatures above 100 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    Due to technical difficulties, the calibration of flow sensors of heat meters above 100 C cannot be performed by the gravimetric standard method. A novel method using a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) was therefore developed, based on the gravimetric method below 100 C and on Reynolds' similarity law. This method allows a turbine meter to be calibrated as a secondary flowrate standard with a relative uncertainty below 0,2% for temperatures of up to 180 C. (orig.) [de

  19. Source-to-incident flux relation for a tokamak fusion test reactor blanket module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imel, G.R.

    1982-01-01

    The source-to-incident 14-MeV flux relation for a blanket module on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor is derived. It is shown that assumptions can be made that allow an analytical expression to be derived, using point kernel methods. In addition, the effect of a nonuniform source distribution is derived, again by relatively simple point kernel methods. It is thought that the methodology developed is valid for a variety of blanket modules on tokamak reactors

  20. Reference neutron radiations. Part 2: Calibration fundamentals of radiation protection devices related to the basic quantities characterizing the radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    ISO 8529 consists of the following parts, under the general title Reference neutron radiations: Part 1: Characteristics and methods of production; Part 2: Calibration fundamentals of radiation protection devices related to the basic quantities characterizing the radiation field; Part 3: Calibration of area and personal dosimeters and determination of response as a function of energy and angle of incidence. This Part 2. of ISO 8529 takes as its starting point the neutron sources described in ISO 8529-1. It specifies the procedures to be used for realizing the calibration conditions of radiation protection devices in neutron fields produced by these calibration sources, with particular emphasis on the corrections for extraneous effects (e.g., the neutrons scattered from the walls of the calibration room). In this part of ISO 8529, particular emphasis is placed on calibrations using radionuclide sources (clauses 4 to 6) due to their widespread application, with less details given on the use of accelerator and reactor sources (8.2 and 8.3). This part of ISO 8529 then leads to ISO 8529-3 which gives conversion coefficients and the general rules and procedures for calibration

  1. Relative measurement of the fluxes of thermal, resonant and rapid neutrons in reactor G1; Mesures relatives des flux thermique, resonnant et rapide dans le reacteur G1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carle, R.; Mazancourt, T. de [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1957-07-01

    We sought to determine the behavior of the thermal, resonant and rapid neutron fluxes in the multiplier-reflector transition region, in the two principal directions of the system. We have also measured the variation of these different fluxes in the body of the multiplier medium in a canal filled with graphite and in an empty canal. The results are given in the form of curves representing: - the variation of the ratio of the thermal flux to the rapid flux in axial and radial transitions - the behavior of the thermal and resonant fluxes and the variation of their ratio in the same regions. (author) [French] Nous avons cherche a determiner le comportement des differents flux, thermique, resonnant et rapide a la transition milieu multiplicateur-reflecteur dans les deux directions principales du reseau. Nous avons egalement mesure la variation de ces differents flux au sein du milieu multiplicateur dans un canal rempli de graphite et dans un canal vide. Les resultats sont donnes sous forme de courbe representant: - La variation du rapport du flux thermique au flux rapide aux transitions axiale et radiale - L'allure des flux thermique et resonnant et la variation de leur rapport dans les memes regions. (auteur)

  2. Relative measurement of the fluxes of thermal, resonant and rapid neutrons in reactor G1; Mesures relatives des flux thermique, resonnant et rapide dans le reacteur G1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carle, R; Mazancourt, T de [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1957-07-01

    We sought to determine the behavior of the thermal, resonant and rapid neutron fluxes in the multiplier-reflector transition region, in the two principal directions of the system. We have also measured the variation of these different fluxes in the body of the multiplier medium in a canal filled with graphite and in an empty canal. The results are given in the form of curves representing: - the variation of the ratio of the thermal flux to the rapid flux in axial and radial transitions - the behavior of the thermal and resonant fluxes and the variation of their ratio in the same regions. (author) [French] Nous avons cherche a determiner le comportement des differents flux, thermique, resonnant et rapide a la transition milieu multiplicateur-reflecteur dans les deux directions principales du reseau. Nous avons egalement mesure la variation de ces differents flux au sein du milieu multiplicateur dans un canal rempli de graphite et dans un canal vide. Les resultats sont donnes sous forme de courbe representant: - La variation du rapport du flux thermique au flux rapide aux transitions axiale et radiale - L'allure des flux thermique et resonnant et la variation de leur rapport dans les memes regions. (auteur)

  3. Calibration of Relative Humidity Devices in Low-pressure, Low-temperature CO2 Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genzer, Maria; Polkko, Jouni; Nikkanen, Timo; Hieta, Maria; Harri, Ari-Matti

    2017-04-01

    Calibration of relative humidity devices requires in minimum two humidity points - dry (0%RH) and (near)saturation (95-100%RH) - over the expected operational temperature and pressure range of the device. In terrestrial applications these are relatively easy to achieve using for example N2 gas as dry medium, and water vapor saturation chambers for producing saturation and intermediate humidity points. But for example in applications intended for meteorological measurements on Mars there is a need to achieve at least dry and saturation points in low-temperature, low-pressure CO2 environment. We have developed a custom-made, small, relatively low-cost calibration chamber able to produce both dry points and saturation points in Martian range pressure CO2, in temperatures down to -70°C. The system utilizes a commercially available temperature chamber for temperature control, vacuum vessels and pumps. The main pressure vessel with the devices under test inside is placed inside the temperature chamber, and the pressure inside is controlled by pumps and manual valves and monitored with a commercial pressure reference with calibration traceable to national standards. Air, CO2, or if needed another gas like N2, is used for filling the vessel until the desired pressure is achieved. Another pressure vessel with a dedicated pressure pump is used as the saturation chamber. This vessel is placed in the room outside the temperature chamber, partly filled with water and used for achieving saturated water vapor in room-temperature low-pressure environment. The saturation chamber is connected to the main pressure vessel via valves. In this system dry point, low-pressure CO2 environment is achieved by filling the main pressure vessel with dry CO2 gas until the desired pressure is achieved. A constant flow of gas is maintained with the pump and valves and monitored with the pressure reference. The saturation point is then achieved by adding some water vapor from the saturation

  4. Calibrated Tully-fisher Relations For Improved Photometric Estimates Of Disk Rotation Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Reinabelle; Mandelbaum, R.; Gunn, J. E.; Pizagno, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present calibrated scaling relations (also referred to as Tully-Fisher relations or TFRs) between rotation velocity and photometric quantities-- absolute magnitude, stellar mass, and synthetic magnitude (a linear combination of absolute magnitude and color)-- of disk galaxies at z 0.1. First, we selected a parent disk sample of 170,000 galaxies from SDSS DR7, with redshifts between 0.02 and 0.10 and r band absolute magnitudes between -18.0 and -22.5. Then, we constructed a child disk sample of 189 galaxies that span the parameter space-- in absolute magnitude, color, and disk size-- covered by the parent sample, and for which we have obtained kinematic data. Long-slit spectroscopy were obtained from the Dual Imaging Spectrograph (DIS) at the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m for 99 galaxies, and from Pizagno et al. (2007) for 95 galaxies (five have repeat observations). We find the best photometric estimator of disk rotation velocity to be a synthetic magnitude with a color correction that is consistent with the Bell et al. (2003) color-based stellar mass ratio. The improved rotation velocity estimates have a wide range of scientific applications, and in particular, in combination with weak lensing measurements, they enable us to constrain the ratio of optical-to-virial velocity in disk galaxies.

  5. Texas flexible pavements and overlays : calibration plans for M-E models and related software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    This five-year project was initiated to collect materials and pavement performance data on a minimum of 100 highway test sections around the State of Texas, incorporating flexible pavements and overlays. Besides being used to calibrate and validate m...

  6. The calibration of the WISE W1 and W2 Tully-Fisher relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neill, J. D.; Seibert, Mark; Scowcroft, Victoria; Tully, R. Brent; Courtois, Hélène; Sorce, Jenny G.; Jarrett, T. H.; Masci, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    In order to explore local large-scale structures and velocity fields, accurate galaxy distance measures are needed. We now extend the well-tested recipe for calibrating the correlation between galaxy rotation rates and luminosities—capable of providing such distance measures—to the all-sky, space-based imaging data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) W1 (3.4 μm) and W2 (4.6 μm) filters. We find a correlation of line width to absolute magnitude (known as the Tully-Fisher relation, TFR) of M W1 b,i,k,a =−20.35−9.56(log W mx i −2.5) (0.54 mag rms) and M W2 b,i,k,a =−19.76−9.74(log W mx i −2.5) (0.56 mag rms) from 310 galaxies in 13 clusters. We update the I-band TFR using a sample 9% larger than in Tully and Courtois. We derive M I b,i,k =−21.34−8.95(log W mx i −2.5) (0.46 mag rms). The WISE TFRs show evidence of curvature. Quadratic fits give M W1 b,i,k,a =−20.48−8.36(log W mx i −2.5)+3.60(log W mx i −2.5) 2 (0.52 mag rms) and M W2 b,i,k,a =−19.91−8.40(log W mx i −2.5)+4.32(log W mx i −2.5) 2 (0.55 mag rms). We apply an I-band –WISE color correction to lower the scatter and derive M C W1 =−20.22−9.12(log W mx i −2.5) and M C W2 =−19.63−9.11(log W mx i −2.5) (both 0.46 mag rms). Using our three independent TFRs (W1 curved, W2 curved, and I band), we calibrate the UNION2 Type Ia supernova sample distance scale and derive H 0 = 74.4 ± 1.4(stat) ± 2.4(sys) km s –1 Mpc –1 with 4% total error.

  7. SCALA: In situ calibration for integral field spectrographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, S.; Küsters, D.; Kowalski, M.; Aldering, G.; Antilogus, P.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Barbary, K.; Baugh, D.; Bongard, S.; Boone, K.; Buton, C.; Chen, J.; Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Dixon, S.; Fagrelius, P.; Feindt, U.; Fouchez, D.; Gangler, E.; Hayden, B.; Hillebrandt, W.; Hoffmann, A.; Kim, A. G.; Leget, P.-F.; McKay, L.; Nordin, J.; Pain, R.; Pécontal, E.; Pereira, R.; Perlmutter, S.; Rabinowitz, D.; Reif, K.; Rigault, M.; Rubin, D.; Runge, K.; Saunders, C.; Smadja, G.; Suzuki, N.; Taubenberger, S.; Tao, C.; Thomas, R. C.; Nearby Supernova Factory

    2017-11-01

    Aims: The scientific yield of current and future optical surveys is increasingly limited by systematic uncertainties in the flux calibration. This is the case for type Ia supernova (SN Ia) cosmology programs, where an improved calibration directly translates into improved cosmological constraints. Current methodology rests on models of stars. Here we aim to obtain flux calibration that is traceable to state-of-the-art detector-based calibration. Methods: We present the SNIFS Calibration Apparatus (SCALA), a color (relative) flux calibration system developed for the SuperNova integral field spectrograph (SNIFS), operating at the University of Hawaii 2.2 m (UH 88) telescope. Results: By comparing the color trend of the illumination generated by SCALA during two commissioning runs, and to previous laboratory measurements, we show that we can determine the light emitted by SCALA with a long-term repeatability better than 1%. We describe the calibration procedure necessary to control for system aging. We present measurements of the SNIFS throughput as estimated by SCALA observations. Conclusions: The SCALA calibration unit is now fully deployed at the UH 88 telescope, and with it color-calibration between 4000 Å and 9000 Å is stable at the percent level over a one-year baseline.

  8. Relationships between Microbial Activities and Subduction-related Outgassing and Volatile Flux at Aleutian Arc Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.; Lopez, T. M.; Fischer, T. P.; Schrenk, M. O.

    2016-12-01

    Subduction-related processes, including the movement and alteration of carbon compounds, are an important component of global geochemical cycles. Actively degassing volcanoes of the Aleutian Island arc offer interesting opportunities to not only characterize the composition and abundance of volatiles, but also to identify the origin of the discharging gases (e.g. mantle, organic matter, or carbonates). Taking this approach a step further, microbial activities in and around volcanic fumarole areas may impact the composition and flux of reduced volcanic gases, either through their modification or their assimilation into fixed biomass. Microbiological studies of these systems can be used to develop predictive models to complement those based upon geochemical data while providing greater understanding of the causal relationships between microbial populations and their environment, and ultimately refine estimates of volcanic outgassing. Coupled fumarole soil and gas samples were collected from several Aleutian Island volcanoes in 2015 (Gareloi, Kanaga, Kiska, Little Sitkin) and 2016 (Okmok, Resheschnoi). DNA was extracted from the soil and used to describe microbial community composition, while gas samples were analyzed through chromatography and mass spectrometry. Preliminary data suggests a relationship between the abundance of specific groups of prokaryotes known to metabolize reduced gases, such as sulfur-oxidizers and methanotrophs, and the abundances of the degassing volatiles, including sulfur dioxide and methane. Ongoing studies aimed at investigating the relationship between the genomic composition of the fumarolic microbial community and the physical and chemical properties of the soil (i.e. mineralogy, bulk geochemistry, nutrient concentration, gas flux, and environmental measurements) are underway. These data will be used to evaluate the potential for microbial communities to remove volcanic carbon and store it as biomass, or to modify the volatile carbon

  9. The Complete Calibration of the Color–Redshift Relation (C3R2) Survey: Survey Overview and Data Release 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masters, Daniel C. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stern, Daniel K.; Rhodes, Jason D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Cohen, Judith G. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Capak, Peter L. [Spitzer Science Center, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Castander, Francisco J. [Institut de Ciències de lEspai (ICE, IEEC/CSIC), E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Paltani, Stéphane [Department of Astronomy, University of Geneva, Ch. dEcogia 16, 1290 Versoix (Switzerland)

    2017-06-01

    A key goal of the Stage IV dark energy experiments Euclid , LSST, and WFIRST is to measure the growth of structure with cosmic time from weak lensing analysis over large regions of the sky. Weak lensing cosmology will be challenging: in addition to highly accurate galaxy shape measurements, statistically robust and accurate photometric redshift (photo- z ) estimates for billions of faint galaxies will be needed in order to reconstruct the three-dimensional matter distribution. Here we present an overview of and initial results from the Complete Calibration of the Color–Redshift Relation (C3R2) survey, which is designed specifically to calibrate the empirical galaxy color–redshift relation to the Euclid depth. These redshifts will also be important for the calibrations of LSST and WFIRST . The C3R2 survey is obtaining multiplexed observations with Keck (DEIMOS, LRIS, and MOSFIRE), the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC; OSIRIS), and the Very Large Telescope (VLT; FORS2 and KMOS) of a targeted sample of galaxies that are most important for the redshift calibration. We focus spectroscopic efforts on undersampled regions of galaxy color space identified in previous work in order to minimize the number of spectroscopic redshifts needed to map the color–redshift relation to the required accuracy. We present the C3R2 survey strategy and initial results, including the 1283 high-confidence redshifts obtained in the 2016A semester and released as Data Release 1.

  10. The Complete Calibration of the Color–Redshift Relation (C3R2) Survey: Survey Overview and Data Release 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masters, Daniel C.; Stern, Daniel K.; Rhodes, Jason D.; Cohen, Judith G.; Capak, Peter L.; Castander, Francisco J.; Paltani, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    A key goal of the Stage IV dark energy experiments Euclid , LSST, and WFIRST is to measure the growth of structure with cosmic time from weak lensing analysis over large regions of the sky. Weak lensing cosmology will be challenging: in addition to highly accurate galaxy shape measurements, statistically robust and accurate photometric redshift (photo- z ) estimates for billions of faint galaxies will be needed in order to reconstruct the three-dimensional matter distribution. Here we present an overview of and initial results from the Complete Calibration of the Color–Redshift Relation (C3R2) survey, which is designed specifically to calibrate the empirical galaxy color–redshift relation to the Euclid depth. These redshifts will also be important for the calibrations of LSST and WFIRST . The C3R2 survey is obtaining multiplexed observations with Keck (DEIMOS, LRIS, and MOSFIRE), the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC; OSIRIS), and the Very Large Telescope (VLT; FORS2 and KMOS) of a targeted sample of galaxies that are most important for the redshift calibration. We focus spectroscopic efforts on undersampled regions of galaxy color space identified in previous work in order to minimize the number of spectroscopic redshifts needed to map the color–redshift relation to the required accuracy. We present the C3R2 survey strategy and initial results, including the 1283 high-confidence redshifts obtained in the 2016A semester and released as Data Release 1.

  11. Calibration of the nuclear power channels of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor obtained from the measurements of the spatial thermal neutron flux distribution in the reactor core through the irradiation of infinitely diluted gold foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, Lucas Batista

    2008-01-01

    Several nuclear parameters are obtained through the gamma spectrometry of targets irradiated in a research reactor core and this is the case of the activation foils which make possible, through the measurements of the activity induced, to determine the neutron flux in the place where they had been irradiated. The power level operation of the reactor is a parameter directly proportional to the average neutron flux in the core. This work aims to get the power operation of the reactor through of spatial neutron flux distribution in the core of IPEN/MB-01 reactor by the irradiation of infinitely diluted gold foils and prudently located in its interior. These foils were made in the form of metallic alloy in concentration levels such that the phenomena of flux disturbance, as the self-shielding factors to neutrons become worthless. These activation foils has only 1% of dispersed gold atoms in an aluminium matrix content of 99% of this element. The irradiations of foils have been carried through with and without cadmium plate. The total correlation between the average thermal neutron flux obtained by irradiation of infinitely diluted activation foils and the average digital value of current of the nuclear power channels 5 and 6 (non-compensated ionization chambers - CINC), allow the calibration of the nuclear channels of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor. (author)

  12. Sediment Equilibrium and Diffusive Fluxes in Relation to Phosphorus Dynamics in the Turbid Minnesota River

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    James, William F

    2009-01-01

    ...) concentration in large river systems. However, in-stream processes such as equilibrium P flux from suspended sediment and diffusive P flux from deposited sediment stored in river channels may also play a role in soluble P control...

  13. Reference radiation fields - Simulated workplace neutron fields - Part 2: Calibration fundamentals related to the basic quantities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    ISO 8529-1, ISO 8529-2 and ISO 8529-3, deal with the production, characterization and use of neutron fields for the calibration of personal dosimeters and area survey meters. These International Standards describe reference radiations with neutron energy spectra that are well defined and well suited for use in the calibration laboratory. However, the neutron spectra commonly encountered in routine radiation protection situations are, in many cases, quite different from those produced by the sources specified in the International Standards. Since personal neutron dosimeters, and to a lesser extent survey meters, are generally quite energy dependent in their dose equivalent response, it might not be possible to achieve an appropriate calibration for a device that is used in a workplace where the neutron energy spectrum and angular distribution differ significantly from those of the reference radiation used for calibration. ISO 8529-1 describes four radionuclide based neutron reference radiations in detail. This part of ISO 12789 includes the specification of neutron reference radiations that were developed to closely resemble radiation that is encountered in practice

  14. Relative measurement of the fluxes of thermal, resonant and rapid neutrons in reactor G1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carle, R.; Mazancourt, T. de

    1957-01-01

    We sought to determine the behavior of the thermal, resonant and rapid neutron fluxes in the multiplier-reflector transition region, in the two principal directions of the system. We have also measured the variation of these different fluxes in the body of the multiplier medium in a canal filled with graphite and in an empty canal. The results are given in the form of curves representing: - the variation of the ratio of the thermal flux to the rapid flux in axial and radial transitions - the behavior of the thermal and resonant fluxes and the variation of their ratio in the same regions. (author) [fr

  15. A Revised Calibration Function and Results for the Phoenix Mission TECP Relative Humidity Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zent, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    The original calibration function of the R(sub H) sensor on the Phoenix Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Sensor (TECP) has been revised in order to extend the range of the valid calibration, and to improve accuracy. The original function returned non-physical R(sub H) values at the lowest temperatures. To resolve this, and because the original calibration was performed against a pair of hygrometers that measured frost point (T(sub f)), the revised calibration equation is also cast in terms of frost point. Because of the complexity of maintaining very low temperatures and high R(sub H) in the laboratory, no calibration data exists at T is greater than 203K. However, sensor response during the mission was smooth and continuous down to 181 K. Therefore we have opted to include flight data in the calibration data set; selection was limited to data acquired during periods when the atmosphere is known to have been saturated. T(sub f) remained below 210 K throughout the mission(P is greater than 0.75 Pa). R(sub H), conversely, ranged from 1 to well under 0.01 diurnally, due to approximately 50 K temperature variations. To first order, both vapor pressure and its variance are greater during daylight hours. Variance in overnight humidity is almost entirely explained by temperature, while atmospheric turbulence contributes substantial variance to daytime humidity. Likewise, data gathered with the TECP aloft reflect higher H2O abundances than at the surface, as well as greater variance. There is evidence for saturation of the atmosphere overnight throughout much of the mission. In virtually every overnight observation, once the atmosphere cooled to T(sub f), water vapor begins to decrease, and tracks air temperature. There is no evidence for substantial decreases in water vapor prior to saturation, as expected for adsorptive exchange. Likewise, there is no evidence of local control of vapor by phases such as perchlorate hydrates hydrated minerals. The daytime average H2O

  16. Method of Relative Magnitudes for Calculating Magnetic Fluxes in Electrical Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg A.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The article presents the study results of the model of an asynchronous electric motor carried out by the author within the framework of the Priorities Research Program “Research and development in the priority areas of development of Russia’s scientific and technical complex for 2014–2020”. Materials and Methods: A model of an idealized asynchronous machine (with sinusoidal distribution of magnetic induction in air gap is used in vector control systems. It is impossible to create windings for this machine. The basis of the new calculation approach was the Conductivity of Teeth Contours Method, developed at the Electrical Machines Chair of the Moscow Power Engineering Institute (MPEI. Unlike this method, the author used not absolute values, but relative magnitudes of magnetic fluxes. This solution fundamentally improved the method’s capabilities. The relative magnitudes of the magnetic fluxes of the teeth contours do not required the additional consideration for exact structure of magnetic field of tooth and adjacent slots. These structures are identical for all the teeth of the machine and differ only in magnitude. The purpose of the calculations was not traditional harmonic analysis of magnetic induction distribution in air gap of machine, but a refinement of the equations of electric machine model. The vector control researchers used only the cos(θ function as a value of mutual magnetic coupling coefficient between the windings. Results: The author has developed a way to take into account the design of the windings of a real machine by using imaginary measuring winding with the same winding design as a real phase winding. The imaginary winding can be placed in the position of any machine windings. The calculation of the relative magnetic fluxes of this winding helped to estimate the real values of the magnetic coupling coefficients between the windings, and find the correction functions for the model of an idealized

  17. On flux integrals for generalized Melvin solution related to simple finite-dimensional Lie algebra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivashchuk, V.D. [VNIIMS, Center for Gravitation and Fundamental Metrology, Moscow (Russian Federation); Peoples' Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University), Institute of Gravitation and Cosmology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-10-15

    A generalized Melvin solution for an arbitrary simple finite-dimensional Lie algebra G is considered. The solution contains a metric, n Abelian 2-forms and n scalar fields, where n is the rank of G. It is governed by a set of n moduli functions H{sub s}(z) obeying n ordinary differential equations with certain boundary conditions imposed. It was conjectured earlier that these functions should be polynomials - the so-called fluxbrane polynomials. These polynomials depend upon integration constants q{sub s}, s = 1,.., n. In the case when the conjecture on the polynomial structure for the Lie algebra G is satisfied, it is proved that 2-form flux integrals Φ{sup s} over a proper 2d submanifold are finite and obey the relations q{sub s} Φ{sup s} = 4πn{sub s}h{sub s}, where the h{sub s} > 0 are certain constants (related to dilatonic coupling vectors) and the n{sub s} are powers of the polynomials, which are components of a twice dual Weyl vector in the basis of simple (co-)roots, s = 1,.., n. The main relations of the paper are valid for a solution corresponding to a finite-dimensional semi-simple Lie algebra G. Examples of polynomials and fluxes for the Lie algebras A{sub 1}, A{sub 2}, A{sub 3}, C{sub 2}, G{sub 2} and A{sub 1} + A{sub 1} are presented. (orig.)

  18. In situ investigation of helium fuzz growth on tungsten in relation to ion flux, fluence, surface temperature and ion energy using infrared imaging in PSI-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Möller, S; Kachko, O; Rasinski, M; Kreter, A; Linsmeier, Ch

    2017-01-01

    Tungsten is a candidate material for plasma-facing components in nuclear fusion reactors. In operation it will face temperatures >800 K together with an influx of helium ions. Previously, the evolution of special surface nanostructures called fuzz was found under these conditions in a limited window of surface temperature, ion flux and ion energy. Fuzz potentially leads to lower heat load tolerances, enhanced erosion and dust formation, hence should be avoided in a fusion reactor. Here the fuzz growth is reinvestigated in situ during its growth by considering its impact on the surfaces infrared emissivity at 4 μ m wavelength with an infrared camera in the linear plasma device PSI-2. A hole in the surface serves as an emissivity reference to calibrate fuzz thickness versus infrared emissivity. Among new data on the above mentioned relations, a lower fuzz growth threshold of 815 ± 24 K is found. Fuzz is seen to grow on rough and polished surfaces and even on the hole’s side walls alike. Literature scalings for thickness, flux and time relations of the fuzz growth rate could not be reproduced, but for the temperature scaling a good agreement to the Arrhenius equation was found. (paper)

  19. The relation between radio flux density and ionizing ultra-violet flux for HII regions and supernova remnants in the Large Magellanic cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipović M.D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a comparison between the Parkes radio surveys (Filipović et al 1995 and Vacuum Ultra-Violet (VUV surveys (Smith et al. 1987 of the Large Magellanic Clouds (LMC. We have found 72 sources in common in the LMC which are known HII regions (52 and supernova remnants (SNRs (19. Some of these radio sources are associated with two or more UV stellar associations. A comparison of the radio flux densities and ionizing UV flux for HII regions shows a very good correlation, as expected from theory. Many of the Magellanic Clouds (MCs SNRs are embedded in HII regions, so there is also a relation between radio and UV which we attribute to the surrounding HII regions.

  20. Quasi-biennial periodicity in the solar neutrino flux and its relation to the solar structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1981-01-01

    By analysing the observed results on the neutrino flux from the Sun for the years 1970-1978, it is shown that the production rate of the neutrinos at the central core of the Sun had been varying with a period almost equal to 26 months for these years. This so-called 'quasi-biennial' periodicity in this rate suggests that the physical state of the central core of the Sun must have been modulated with this period through the variation of physical parameters as temperature and the chemial composition at the central core of the Sun. An idea to interpret this observed periodicity is thus proposed by taking the variations of these parameters into consideration. Some supporting evidence on this periodicity can be found on the variations of the solar activity as the relative sunspot numbers and the equatorial rotation speed of the Sun. (orig.)

  1. Significant Features of Warm Season Water Vapor Flux Related to Heavy Rainfall and Draught in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Koji; Iseri, Yoshihiko; Jinno, Kenji

    2009-11-01

    In this study, our objective is to reveal complicated relationships between spatial water vapor inflow patterns and heavy rainfall activities in Kyushu located in the western part of Japan, using the outcomes of pattern recognition of water vapor inflow, based on the Self-Organizing Map. Consequently, it could be confirmed that water vapor inflow patterns control the distribution and the frequency of heavy rainfall depending on the direction of their fluxes and the intensity of Precipitable water. Historically serious flood disasters in South Kyushu in 1993 were characterized by high frequency of the water vapor inflow patterns linking to heavy rainfall. On the other hand, severe draught in 1994 was characterized by inactive frontal activity that do not related to heavy rainfall.

  2. Role of land use change in landslide-related sediment fluxes in tropical mountain regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guns, M.; Vanacker, V.; Demoulin, A.

    2012-04-01

    Tropical mountain regions are characterised by high denudation rates. Landslides are known to be recurrent phenomena in active mountain belts, but their contribution to the overall sedimentary fluxes is not yet well known. Previous studies on sedimentary cascades have mostly focused on natural environments, without considering the impact of human and/or anthropogenic disturbances on sedimentary budgets. In our work, we hypothesise that human-induced land use change might alter the sediment cascade through shifts in the landslide magnitude-frequency relationship. We have tested this assumption in the Virgen Yacu catchment (approximately 11km2), in the Ecuadorian Cordillera Occidental. Landslide inventories and land use maps were established based on a series of sequential aerial photos (1963, 1977, 1984 and 1989), a HR Landsat image (2001) and a VHR WorldView2 image (2010). Aerial photographs were ortho-rectified, and coregistred with the WorldView2 satellite image. Field campaigns were realised in 2010 and 2011 to collect field-based data on landslide type and geometry (depth, width and length). This allowed us to establish an empirical relationship between landslide area and volume, which was then applied to the landslide inventories to estimate landslide-related sediment production rates for various time periods. The contribution of landslides to the overall sediment flux of the catchment was estimated by comparing the landslide-related sediment production to the total sediment yield. The empirical landslide area-volume relationship established here for the Ecuadorian Andes is similar to that derived for the Himalayas. It suggests that landslides are the main source of sediment in this mountainous catchment. First calculations indicate that human-induced land use change alters the magnitude-frequency relationship through strong increase of small landslides.

  3. Calibration issues for neutron diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadler, G.J.; Adams, J.M.; Barnes, C.W.

    1997-01-01

    The performance of diagnostic systems are limited by their weakest constituents, including their calibration issues. Neutron diagnostics are notorious for problems encountered while determining their absolute calibrations, due mainly to the nature of the neutron transport problem. In order to facilitate the determination of an accurate and precise calibration, the diagnostic design should be such as to minimize the scattered neutron flux. ITER will use a comprehensive set of neutron diagnostics--comprising radial and vertical neutron cameras, neutron spectrometers, a neutron activation system and internal and external fission chambers--to provide accurate measurements of fusion power and power densities as a function of time. The calibration of such an important diagnostic system merits careful consideration. Some thoughts have already been given to this subject during the conceptual design phase in relation to the time-integrated neutron activation and time-dependent neutron yield monitors. However, no overall calibration strategy has been worked out so far. This paper represents a first attempt to address this vital issue. Experience gained from present large tokamaks (JET, TFTR and JT60U) and proposals for ITER are reviewed. The need to use a 14-MeV neutron generator as opposed to radioactive sources for in-situ calibration of D-T diagnostics will be stressed. It is clear that the overall absolute determination of fusion power will have to rely on a combination of nuclear measuring techniques, for which the provision of accurate and independent calibrations will constitute an ongoing process as ITER moves from one phase of operation to the next

  4. SCALPLO - a universal program for plotting flux output from SCALE modules and related programs. User's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hersman, A.; Leege, P.F.A. de; Hoogenboom, J.E.

    1992-04-01

    The FORTRAN-77 program SCALPLO is being developed to make an easy and quick graphic survey of flux and/or power data calculated with SCALE modules or other core calculation or shielding codes. The basic plot functions it can perform are one- and two-dimensional plots of flux or power distributions and flux energy spectra. More specifically it can produce plots of the flux distribution in a one-dimensional geometry for one or more energy groups in one figure. It can also plot the flux distribution along a cut through a two- or three-dimensional geometry along one of the coordinate axes and it can plot a two-dimensional view of the flux distribution of a two-dimensional geometry or of a plane cut through a three-dimensional geometry. The same can be done for the power distribution in a system. Furthermore SCALPLO can plot the particle flux spectrum as a function of energy, either as group fluxes or as group fluxes per unit energy or per unit lethargy. (orig./HP)

  5. Modeling rainfall infiltration on hillslopes using Flux-concentration relation and time compression approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Chen, Li; Yu, Zhongbo

    2018-02-01

    Rainfall infiltration on hillslopes is an important issue in hydrology, which is related to many environmental problems, such as flood, soil erosion, and nutrient and contaminant transport. This study aimed to improve the quantification of infiltration on hillslopes under both steady and unsteady rainfalls. Starting from Darcy's law, an analytical integral infiltrability equation was derived for hillslope infiltration by use of the flux-concentration relation. Based on this equation, a simple scaling relation linking the infiltration times on hillslopes and horizontal planes was obtained which is applicable for both small and large times and can be used to simplify the solution procedure of hillslope infiltration. The infiltrability equation also improved the estimation of ponding time for infiltration under rainfall conditions. For infiltration after ponding, the time compression approximation (TCA) was applied together with the infiltrability equation. To improve the computational efficiency, the analytical integral infiltrability equation was approximated with a two-term power-like function by nonlinear regression. Procedures of applying this approach to both steady and unsteady rainfall conditions were proposed. To evaluate the performance of the new approach, it was compared with the Green-Ampt model for sloping surfaces by Chen and Young (2006) and Richards' equation. The proposed model outperformed the sloping Green-Ampt, and both ponding time and infiltration predictions agreed well with the solutions of Richards' equation for various soil textures, slope angles, initial water contents, and rainfall intensities for both steady and unsteady rainfalls.

  6. Effect of relative position of the control rods in the power calibration of the running chains of the RP-10 nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuniga, Agustin; Arrieta, Rolando

    2014-01-01

    The monitoring of the thermal power levels of an experimental nuclear reactor, such as the RP-10 reactor is performed by current levels reported by the driving chains and their correlation with the power. The calibration curves for each channel will depend on the neutron distribution observed for the corresponding configuration. One way to modify this configuration is positioning the control rods that can be chosen according to the convenience of providing greater neutron flux in a given irradiation position. This article shows this variation, and consequently the current power curves corresponding thereto. We have chosen two relative positions of the control rods (BC1 and BC2), the first is the one that favors the production of radioisotopes (PPR) (Case 1) and the second favors the use of neutron activation (NAA) (Case 2). The used method was based on the record of the current (up camera, M4) by the acquisition system (SAD) of the reactor and the power from the digital reading of nitrogen 16, which was previously calibrated by thermal balance. The results for the nuclear configuration 30, M4 chain up were: Case 1: I M4 (A) = 2.95 x 10 -6 x P (MW) + 1.45 x 10 -6 R 2 = 9.99 x 10 -1 and Case 2: I M4 (A) = 2.39 x 10 -6 x P (MW) + 5.73 x 10 -7 , R 2 = 9.97 x 10 -1 . The dispersions of the data are in the order of 10 % for low power (under 2 MW), decreasing as the power rises to under 3 % (for values greater than 3 MW). (authors).

  7. Mechanics of log calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waller, W.C.; Cram, M.E.; Hall, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    For any measurement to have meaning, it must be related to generally accepted standard units by a valid and specified system of comparison. To calibrate well-logging tools, sensing systems are designed which produce consistent and repeatable indications over the range for which the tool was intended. The basics of calibration theory, procedures, and calibration record presentations are reviewed. Calibrations for induction, electrical, radioactivity, and sonic logging tools will be discussed. The authors' intent is to provide an understanding of the sources of errors, of the way errors are minimized in the calibration process, and of the significance of changes in recorded calibration data

  8. A Development of the Calibration Tool Applied on Analog I/O Modules for Safety-related Controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong-Kyun; Yun, Dong-Hwa; Lee, Myeong-Kyun; Yoo, Kwan-Woo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop the calibration tool for analog input/output(I/O) modules. Those modules are components in POSAFE-Q which is a programmable logic controller(PLC) that has been developed for the evaluation of safety-related. In this paper, performance improvement of analog I/O modules is presented by developing and applying the calibration tool for each channel in analog I/O modules. With this tool, the input signal to an analog input module and the output signal from an analog output module are able to be satisfied with a reference value of sensor type and an accuracy of all modules. With RS-232 communication, the manual calibration tool is developed for analog I/O modules of an existing and up-to-date version in POSAFE-Q PLC. As a result of applying this tool, the converted value is performant for a type of input sensor and an accuracy of analog I/O modules

  9. Uncertainty characterization of HOAPS 3.3 latent heat-flux-related parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liman, Julian; Schröder, Marc; Fennig, Karsten; Andersson, Axel; Hollmann, Rainer

    2018-03-01

    Latent heat flux (LHF) is one of the main contributors to the global energy budget. As the density of in situ LHF measurements over the global oceans is generally poor, the potential of remotely sensed LHF for meteorological applications is enormous. However, to date none of the available satellite products have included estimates of systematic, random, and sampling uncertainties, all of which are essential for assessing their quality. Here, the challenge is taken on by matching LHF-related pixel-level data of the Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite (HOAPS) climatology (version 3.3) to in situ measurements originating from a high-quality data archive of buoys and selected ships. Assuming the ground reference to be bias-free, this allows for deriving instantaneous systematic uncertainties as a function of four atmospheric predictor variables. The approach is regionally independent and therefore overcomes the issue of sparse in situ data densities over large oceanic areas. Likewise, random uncertainties are derived, which include not only a retrieval component but also contributions from in situ measurement noise and the collocation procedure. A recently published random uncertainty decomposition approach is applied to isolate the random retrieval uncertainty of all LHF-related HOAPS parameters. It makes use of two combinations of independent data triplets of both satellite and in situ data, which are analysed in terms of their pairwise variances of differences. Instantaneous uncertainties are finally aggregated, allowing for uncertainty characterizations on monthly to multi-annual timescales. Results show that systematic LHF uncertainties range between 15 and 50 W m-2 with a global mean of 25 W m-2. Local maxima are mainly found over the subtropical ocean basins as well as along the western boundary currents. Investigations indicate that contributions from qa (U) to the overall LHF uncertainty are on the order of 60 % (25 %). From an

  10. THE MASS OF KOI-94d AND A RELATION FOR PLANET RADIUS, MASS, AND INCIDENT FLUX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, Lauren M.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Kolbl, Rea; Rowe, Jason F.; Howell, Steve B.; Howard, Andrew W.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Miller, Neil; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Seager, Sara; Fischer, Debra A.; Adams, Elisabeth R.; Dupree, Andrea K.; Johnson, John Asher; Horch, Elliott P.; Everett, Mark E.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2013-01-01

    We measure the mass of a modestly irradiated giant planet, KOI-94d. We wish to determine whether this planet, which is in a 22 day orbit and receives 2700 times as much incident flux as Jupiter, is as dense as Jupiter or rarefied like inflated hot Jupiters. KOI-94 also hosts at least three smaller transiting planets, all of which were detected by the Kepler mission. With 26 radial velocities of KOI-94 from the W. M. Keck Observatory and a simultaneous fit to the Kepler light curve, we measure the mass of the giant planet and determine that it is not inflated. Support for the planetary interpretation of the other three candidates comes from gravitational interactions through transit timing variations, the statistical robustness of multi-planet systems against false positives, and several lines of evidence that no other star resides within the photometric aperture. We report the properties of KOI-94b (M P = 10.5 ± 4.6 M ⊕ , R P = 1.71 ± 0.16 R ⊕ , P = 3.74 days), KOI-94c (M P = 15.6 +5.7 -15.6 M ⊕ , R P = 4.32 ± 0.41 R ⊕ , P = 10.4 days), KOI-94d (M P = 106 ± 11 M ⊕ , R P = 11.27 ± 1.06 R ⊕ , P = 22.3 days), and KOI-94e (M P = 35 +18 -28 M ⊕ , R P = 6.56 ± 0.62 R ⊕ , P = 54.3 days). The radial velocity analyses of KOI-94b and KOI-94e offer marginal (>2σ) mass detections, whereas the observations of KOI-94c offer only an upper limit to its mass. Using the KOI-94 system and other planets with published values for both mass and radius (138 exoplanets total, including 35 with M P ⊕ ), we establish two fundamental planes for exoplanets that relate their mass, incident flux, and radius from a few Earth masses up to 13 Jupiter masses: (R P /R ⊕ ) = 1.78(M P /M ⊕ ) 0.53 (F/erg s –1 cm –2 ) –0.03 for M P ⊕ , and R P /R ⊕ = 2.45(M P /M ⊕ ) –0.039 (F/erg s –1 cm –2 ) 0.094 for M P > 150 M ⊕ . These equations can be used to predict the radius or mass of a planet.

  11. Spatial and stress-related variation in benthic microbial gas flux in northeastern Alberta wetlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciborowski, J.; Gardner Costa, J.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of oil sands process material (OSPM) on the sediment microbial respiration in newly constructed wetlands located in northeastern Alberta. The sediment gas flux in 10 wetlands with various sediment characteristics and ages was studied. Analyses of variance (ANOVA) were used to contrast the mean wetland production of methane (CH 4 ) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) with season, wetland status, wetland age, and wetland zones. The study showed that CH 4 was significantly higher in reference wetlands than in OSPM-impacted wetlands. A significant relationship between the status and zone of the wetland was observed for CH 4 fluxes in reference wetlands. CH 4 fluxes were higher in the non-vegetated zones of reference wetlands than in the vegetated zones of reference wetlands. CO 2 fluxes were low and not significantly different in any of the studied sites. Results indicated that the wetlands contributed little atmospheric carbon.

  12. Sensible Heat Flux Related to Variations in Atmospheric Turbulence Kinetic Energy on a Sandy Beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    production, turbulent transport by pressure fluctuations, dissipation and flux divergence . The TKE budget as explained by Srivastava and Sarthi (2002...generation of turbulence. Term 3 is flux divergence , which describes the differential transport of TKE by turbulent eddies. Term 4, dissipation, is a sink...the time series data to align all signals to the same time base. Winds were rotated into a shore-normal frame of reference. All data outside of T

  13. Relative efficiency calibration between two silicon drift detectors performed with a monochromatized X-ray generator over the 0.1-1.5 keV range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, S.; Boubault, F.

    2018-03-01

    In this article, we present the first X-ray calibration performed over the 0.1-1.5 keV spectral range by means of a soft X-ray Manson source and the monochromator SYMPAX. This monochromator, based on a classical Rowland geometry, presents the novelty to be able to board simultaneously two detectors and move them under vacuum in front of the exit slit of the monochromatizing stage. This provides the great advantage to perform radiometric measurements of the monochromatic X-ray photon flux with one reference detector while calibrating another X-ray detector. To achieve this, at least one secondary standard must be operated with SYMPAX. This paper presents thereby an efficiency transfer experiment between a secondary standard silicon drift detector (SDD), previously calibrated on BESSY II synchrotron Facility, and another one ("unknown" SDD), devoted to be used permanently with SYMPAX. The associated calibration process is described as well as corresponding results. Comparison with calibrated measurements performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) Radiometric Laboratory shows a very good agreement between the secondary standard and the unknown SDD.

  14. T2K off-axis near detector νμ flux measurement and absolute momentum scale calibration of the off-axis near detector tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaszczyk, F.

    2011-09-01

    In this thesis we present the results from the ν μ energy spectrum measurement at T2K's near detector and T2K's near detector tracker absolute momentum scale calibration. First we review the main historical steps and the current state of the art of neutrino physics as well as the theoretical framework required to understand the thesis physics analyses presented later on. In particular we focus on the neutrino oscillation parametrization and the neutrino-matter interaction models. We then describe T2K, an off-axis long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment in Japan which consists of a muon neutrino beam sent from J-PARC to Super- Kamiokande, with a magnetized near detector located at 280 m from the neutrino production site. T2K's main goals are measuring the last unknown angle of the PMNS matrix θ 13 through the search of ν e appearance in the ν μ beam and measuring precisely the atmospheric parameters through muon neutrino disappearance. We briefly describe the detectors, in particular the near detector tracker and its performance. We then present the analyses tools, such as the reconstruction techniques used and how the neutrino charged current interaction events needed for the energy spectrum measurement are selected. The main goal of the thesis, the muon neutrino energy spectrum measurement done with the first T2K data is explained next. We give the motivations for such measurement, the results obtained with the first T2K data sample, and the different systematic errors studied. Finally, the absolute momentum scale calibration of T2K's near detector tractor, done through the reconstruction of the neutral kaon invariant mass, is explained. (author)

  15. Crustal tracers in the atmosphere and ocean: Relating their concentrations, fluxes, and ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qin

    Crustal tracers are important sources of key limiting nutrients (e.g., iron) in remote ocean regions where they have a large impact on global biogeochemical cycles. However, the atmospheric delivery of bio-available iron to oceans via mineral dust aerosol deposition is poorly constrained. This dissertation aims to improve understanding and model representation of oceanic dust deposition and to provide soluble iron flux maps by testing observations of crustal tracer concentrations and solubilities against predictions from two conceptual solubility models. First, we assemble a database of ocean surface dissolved Al and incorporate Al cycling into the global Biogeochemical Elemental Cycling (BEC) model. The observed Al concentrations show clear basin-scale differences that are useful for constraining dust deposition. The dynamic mixed layer depth and Al residence time in the BEC model significantly improve the simulated dissolved Al field. Some of the remaining model-data discrepancies appear related to the neglect of aerosol size, age, and air mass characteristics in estimating tracer solubility. Next, we develop the Mass-Age Tracking method (MAT) to efficiently and accurately estimate the mass-weighted age of tracers. We apply MAT to four sizes of desert dust aerosol and simulate, for the first time, global distributions of aerosol age in the atmosphere and at deposition. These dust size and age distributions at deposition, together with independent information on air mass acidity, allow us to test two simple yet plausible models for predicting the dissolution of mineral dust iron and aluminum during atmospheric transport. These models represent aerosol solubility as controlled (1) by a diffusive process leaching nutrients from the dust into equilibrium with the liquid water coating or (2) by a process that continually dissolves nutrients in proportion to the particle surface area. The surface-controlled model better captures the spatial pattern of observed

  16. Critical flux determination by flux-stepping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Søren; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2010-01-01

    In membrane filtration related scientific literature, often step-by-step determined critical fluxes are reported. Using a dynamic microfiltration device, it is shown that critical fluxes determined from two different flux-stepping methods are dependent upon operational parameters such as step...... length, step height, and.flux start level. Filtrating 8 kg/m(3) yeast cell suspensions by a vibrating 0.45 x 10(-6) m pore size microfiltration hollow fiber module, critical fluxes from 5.6 x 10(-6) to 1.2 x 10(-5) m/s have been measured using various step lengths from 300 to 1200 seconds. Thus......, such values are more or less useless in itself as critical flux predictors, and constant flux verification experiments have to be conducted to check if the determined critical fluxes call predict sustainable flux regimes. However, it is shown that using the step-by-step predicted critical fluxes as start...

  17. Calibrated Tully-Fisher relations for improved estimates of disc rotation velocities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyes, R.; Mandelbaum, R.; Gunn, J. E.; Pizagno II, Jim; Lackner, C. N.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we derive scaling relations between photometric observable quantities and disc galaxy rotation velocity V-rot or Tully-Fisher relations (TFRs). Our methodology is dictated by our purpose of obtaining purely photometric, minimal-scatter estimators of V-rot applicable to large galaxy

  18. Changed Relation between Solar 10.7-cm Radio Flux and some ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The time series of monthly average values of sunspot numbers SSN, 10.7 cm flux ... This radio emission comes from the higher part of the chromosphere and .... work elements on the solar surface on one hand and spots on the other hand ... size, their magnetic fields were less composite and characterized by the greater life-.

  19. Observational calibration of the projection factor of Cepheids. IV. Period-projection factor relation of Galactic and Magellanic Cloud Cepheids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallenne, A.; Kervella, P.; Mérand, A.; Pietrzyński, G.; Gieren, W.; Nardetto, N.; Trahin, B.

    2017-11-01

    Context. The Baade-Wesselink (BW) method, which combines linear and angular diameter variations, is the most common method to determine the distances to pulsating stars. However, the projection factor, p-factor, used to convert radial velocities into pulsation velocities, is still poorly calibrated. This parameter is critical on the use of this technique, and often leads to 5-10% uncertainties on the derived distances. Aims: We focus on empirically measuring the p-factor of a homogeneous sample of 29 LMC and 10 SMC Cepheids for which an accurate average distances were estimated from eclipsing binary systems. Methods: We used the SPIPS algorithm, which is an implementation of the BW technique. Unlike other conventional methods, SPIPS combines all observables, i.e. radial velocities, multi-band photometry and interferometry into a consistent physical modelling to estimate the parameters of the stars. The large number and their redundancy insure its robustness and improves the statistical precision. Results: We successfully estimated the p-factor of several Magellanic Cloud Cepheids. Combined with our previous Galactic results, we find the following P-p relation: -0.08± 0.04(log P-1.18) + 1.24± 0.02. We find no evidence of a metallicity dependent p-factor. We also derive a new calibration of the period-radius relation, log R = 0.684± 0.007(log P-0.517) + 1.489± 0.002, with an intrinsic dispersion of 0.020. We detect an infrared excess for all stars at 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm, which might be the signature of circumstellar dust. We measure a mean offset of Δm3.6 = 0.057 ± 0.006 mag and Δm4.5 = 0.065 ± 0.008 mag. Conclusions: We provide a new P-p relation based on a multi-wavelength fit that can be used for the distance scale calibration from the BW method. The dispersion is due to the LMC and SMC width we took into account because individual Cepheids distances are unknown. The new P-R relation has a small intrinsic dispersion: 4.5% in radius. This precision will

  20. A new scanning system for alpha decay events as calibration sources for range-energy relation in nuclear emulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, J.; Kinbara, S.; Mishina, A.; Nakazawa, K.; Soe, M. K.; Theint, A. M. M.; Tint, K. T.

    2017-03-01

    A new scanning system named "Vertex picker" has been developed to rapid collect alpha decay events, which are calibration sources for the range-energy relation in nuclear emulsion. A computer-controlled optical microscope scans emulsion layers exhaustively, and a high-speed and high-resolution camera takes their micrographs. A dedicated image processing picks out vertex-like shapes. Practical operations of alpha decay search were demonstrated by emulsion sheets of the KEK-PS E373 experiment. Alpha decays of nearly 28 events were detected in eye-check work on a PC monitor per hour. This yield is nearly 20 times more effective than that by the conventional eye-scan method. The speed and quality is acceptable for the coming new experiment, J-PARC E07.

  1. A new scanning system for alpha decay events as calibration sources for range-energy relation in nuclear emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, J.; Kinbara, S.; Mishina, A.; Nakazawa, K.; Soe, M.K.; Theint, A.M.M.; Tint, K.T.

    2017-01-01

    A new scanning system named “Vertex picker” has been developed to rapid collect alpha decay events, which are calibration sources for the range-energy relation in nuclear emulsion. A computer-controlled optical microscope scans emulsion layers exhaustively, and a high-speed and high-resolution camera takes their micrographs. A dedicated image processing picks out vertex-like shapes. Practical operations of alpha decay search were demonstrated by emulsion sheets of the KEK-PS E373 experiment. Alpha decays of nearly 28 events were detected in eye-check work on a PC monitor per hour. This yield is nearly 20 times more effective than that by the conventional eye-scan method. The speed and quality is acceptable for the coming new experiment, J-PARC E07.

  2. Inter-Laboratory Comparison for Calibration of Relative Humidity Devices Among Accredited Laboratories in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, F.; Khairuddin, S.; Othman, H.

    2017-01-01

    An inter-laboratory comparison in relative humidity measurements among accredited laboratories has been coordinated by the National Metrology Institute of Malaysia. It was carried out to determine the performance of the participating laboratories. The objective of the comparison was to acknowledge the participating laboratories competencies and to verify the level of accuracies declared in their scope of accreditation, in accordance with the MS ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation. The measurement parameter involved was relative humidity for the range of 30-90 %rh at a nominal temperature of 50°C. Eight accredited laboratories participated in the inter-laboratory comparison. Two units of artifacts have been circulated among the participants as the transfer standards.

  3. Relation between gamma-ray emission, radio bursts, and proton fluxes from solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fomichev, V.V.; Chertok, I.M.

    1985-01-01

    Data on solar gamma-ray flares, including 24 flares with gamma-ray lines, recorded up to June 1982, are analyzed. It is shown that from the point of view of radio emission the differences between flares with and without gamma-ray lines has a purely quantitative character: the former are accompanied by the most intense microwave bursts. Meter type II bursts are not a distinctive feature of flares with gamma-ray lines. Pulsed flares, regardless of the presence or absence of gamma-ray lines, are not accompanied by significant proton fluxes at the earth. On the whole, contrary to the popular opinion in the literature, flares with gamma-ray lines do not display a deficit of proton flux in interplanetary space in comparison with similar flares without gamma-ray lines. The results of quantitative diagnostics of proton flares based on radio bursts are not at variance with the presence of flares without detectable gamma-ray emission in lines but with a pronounced increase in the proton flux at the earth. 23 references

  4. Relations between fluxes and concentrations of Na in cell suspensions of Acer pseudoplatanus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennarun, A.-M.

    1978-01-01

    Taking in account the data provided by preliminary compartmental analysis, the net influxes of 24 Na measured in Acer cells after a short loading period (45 minutes) followed by a short wash (1 minute) represent the influx across the plasmalemma (phi sub(0c)) and, after a long loading period (4 hours) followed by a long wash (2 hours) represent the quasi-steady influx from the external solution to the vacuole (phi sub(0v). At flux equilibrium and when the external Na concentration is high enough, the other unidirectional fluxes - phi sub(c0), phi sub(cv) and phi sub(vc) - can be determined from these measurements. This method was used to study the variation of Na flux in terms of the external concentrations and the resulting internal concentrations. The kinetics obtained confirm the active nature of the efflux phi sub(vc) across the tonoplast according to the conclusions given by the application of the USSING-TEORELL criterion to the results of compartmental analysis. On the contrary, they suggest a passive character for the efflux phi sub(c0) accross the plasmalemma which could be considered as active according to the USSING-TEORELL criterion. The contradiction could be eliminated by taking into consideration the important underestimation of the Na activity coefficient in the cytoplasm, due to the neglecting of water binding [fr

  5. Bursts of Pc 1-2 related to flux transfer events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnoldy, R.L.; Cahill, L.J. Jr.; Engebretson, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    Instances of sporadic reconnection of geomagnetic and interplanetary magnetic field lines have been measured by space-craft passing through the dayside magnetopause region (Russell and Elphic 1979; Rijnbeek et al. 1984). The ionospheric signature of the reconnection events (flux transfer events) is a topic of current interest in that if one is evident then ground magnetic field data can be used to monitor the rate of dayside reconnection and conditions under which it occurs in a manner not possible with rapidly moving spacecraft. The proposed ground magnetic signature of a flux transfer event (FTE) is a large amplitude one-cycle Pc 5 (150-600 second period) pulse produced by a large vortex of ionospheric Hall current generated by the field-aligned current in the helical flux tube that has reconnected (Lee 1986). The intent of this article is to provide further data on the possible ground magnetic signatures of FTE (Lanzerotti el al. 1986) as measured by the induction antennas that the University of New Hampshire and the University of Minnesota have operated at high latitudes in the Antarctic and Greenland. With a high-frequency cut-off of 5 hertz, the induction magnetometers can measure Pc 1-2 waves (0.1-5.0 hertz) which cannot be seen by fluxgate instruments. Indeed, Pc 1-2 waves are frequently observed on the ground coincident with the Pc 5 FTE signature which provides some interesting new perspectives on these events

  6. Calibration uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Kaj; Anglov, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Methods recommended by the International Standardization Organisation and Eurachem are not satisfactory for the correct estimation of calibration uncertainty. A novel approach is introduced and tested on actual calibration data for the determination of Pb by ICP-AES. The improved calibration...

  7. Calibration of Flick standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thalmann, Ruedi; Spiller, Jürg; Küng, Alain; Jusko, Otto

    2012-01-01

    Flick standards or magnification standards are widely used for an efficient and functional calibration of the sensitivity of form measuring instruments. The results of a recent measurement comparison have shown to be partially unsatisfactory and revealed problems related to the calibration of these standards. In this paper the influence factors for the calibration of Flick standards using roundness measurement instruments are discussed in detail, in particular the bandwidth of the measurement chain, residual form errors of the device under test, profile distortions due to the diameter of the probing element and questions related to the definition of the measurand. The different contributions are estimated using simulations and are experimentally verified. Also alternative methods to calibrate Flick standards are investigated. Finally the practical limitations of Flick standard calibration are shown and the usability of Flick standards both to calibrate the sensitivity of roundness instruments and to check the filter function of such instruments is analysed. (paper)

  8. Physical measurements at the RA reactor related to VISA-2, e. Measurements of flux and reactivity during RA reactor operation and exploitation; Fizicka merenja na reaktoru RA u vezi projekta VISA-2, e. Pracenje fluksa i reaktivnosti u toku eksploatacije reaktora RA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markovic, H [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-05-15

    This report includes the following: characteristics of neutron flux in vertical experimental channels of the RA reactor; characteristics of neutron flux in VISA-2 channels; reactivity changes in the reactor during VISA-2 irradiation including calibration of control rods.

  9. Assessing River Low-Flow Uncertainties Related to Hydrological Model Calibration and Structure under Climate Change Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélanie Trudel

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Low-flow is the flow of water in a river during prolonged dry weather. This paper investigated the uncertainty originating from hydrological model calibration and structure in low-flow simulations under climate change conditions. Two hydrological models of contrasting complexity, GR4J and SWAT, were applied to four sub-watersheds of the Yamaska River, Canada. The two models were calibrated using seven different objective functions including the Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient (NSEQ and six other objective functions more related to low flows. The uncertainty in the model parameters was evaluated using a PARAmeter SOLutions procedure (PARASOL. Twelve climate projections from different combinations of General Circulation Models (GCMs and Regional Circulation Models (RCMs were used to simulate low-flow indices in a reference (1970–2000 and future (2040–2070 horizon. Results indicate that the NSEQ objective function does not properly represent low-flow indices for either model. The NSE objective function applied to the log of the flows shows the lowest total variance for all sub-watersheds. In addition, these hydrological models should be used with care for low-flow studies, since they both show some inconsistent results. The uncertainty is higher for SWAT than for GR4J. With GR4J, the uncertainties in the simulations for the 7Q2 index (the 7-day low-flow value with a 2-year return period are lower for the future period than for the reference period. This can be explained by the analysis of hydrological processes. In the future horizon, a significant worsening of low-flow conditions was projected.

  10. Nuclear energy - Reference beta-particle radiation - Part 2: Calibration fundamentals related to basic quantities characterizing the radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    ISO 6980 consists of the following parts, under the general title Nuclear energy - Reference beta-particle radiation: Part 1: Method of production; Part 2: Calibration fundamentals related to basic quantities characterizing the radiation field; Part 3: Calibration of area and personal dosimeters and determination of their response as a function of energy and angle of incidence. This part 2 of ISO 6980 specifies methods for the measurement of the directional absorbed-dose rate in a tissue-equivalent slab phantom in the ISO 6980 reference beta-particle radiation fields. The energy range of the beta-particle-emitting isotopes covered by these reference radiations is 0.066 to 3.54 MeV (maximum energy). Radiation energies outside this range are beyond the scope of this standard. While measurements in a reference geometry (depth of 0.07 mm at perpendicular incidence in a tissue-equivalent slab phantom) with a reference class extrapolation chamber are dealt with in detail, the use of other measurement systems and measurements in other geometries are also described, although in less detail. The ambient dose equivalent, H*(10) as used for area monitoring of strongly penetrating radiation, is not an appropriate quantity for any beta radiation, even for that penetrating a 10 mm thick layer of ICRU tissue (i.e. E max > 2 MeV). If adequate protection is provided at 0.07 mm, only rarely will one be concerned with other depths, for example 3 mm. This document is geared towards organizations wishing to establish reference-class dosimetry capabilities for beta particles, and serves as a guide to the performance of dosimetry with the reference class extrapolation chamber for beta-particle dosimetry in other fields. Guidance is also provided on the statement of measurement uncertainties

  11. Age-related changes in brain hemodynamics; A calibrated MRI study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Vis, J B; Hendrikse, J; Bhogal, A

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging signal changes in response to stimuli have been used to evaluate age-related changes in neuronal activity. Contradictory results from these types of experiments have been attributed to differences in cerebral blood....... A dual-echo pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling (ASL) sequence was performed during normocapnic, hypercapnic, and hyperoxic breathing challenges. Whole brain and regional gray matter values of CBF, ASL cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR), BOLD CVR, oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and CMRO2 were...... calculated. RESULTS: Whole brain CBF was 49 ± 14 and 40 ± 9 ml/100 g/min in young and older subjects respectively (P brain, in the frontal...

  12. Calibrated Tully-Fisher relations for improved estimates of disc rotation velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, R.; Mandelbaum, R.; Gunn, J. E.; Pizagno, J.; Lackner, C. N.

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, we derive scaling relations between photometric observable quantities and disc galaxy rotation velocity Vrot or Tully-Fisher relations (TFRs). Our methodology is dictated by our purpose of obtaining purely photometric, minimal-scatter estimators of Vrot applicable to large galaxy samples from imaging surveys. To achieve this goal, we have constructed a sample of 189 disc galaxies at redshifts z < 0.1 with long-slit Hα spectroscopy from Pizagno et al. and new observations. By construction, this sample is a fair subsample of a large, well-defined parent disc sample of ˜170 000 galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS DR7). The optimal photometric estimator of Vrot we find is stellar mass M★ from Bell et al., based on the linear combination of a luminosity and a colour. Assuming a Kroupa initial mass function (IMF), we find: log [V80/(km s-1)] = (2.142 ± 0.004) + (0.278 ± 0.010)[log (M★/M⊙) - 10.10], where V80 is the rotation velocity measured at the radius R80 containing 80 per cent of the i-band galaxy light. This relation has an intrinsic Gaussian scatter ? dex and a measured scatter σmeas= 0.056 dex in log V80. For a fixed IMF, we find that the dynamical-to-stellar mass ratios within R80, (Mdyn/M★)(R80), decrease from approximately 10 to 3, as stellar mass increases from M★≈ 109 to 1011 M⊙. At a fixed stellar mass, (Mdyn/M★)(R80) increases with disc size, so that it correlates more tightly with stellar surface density than with stellar mass or disc size alone. We interpret the observed variation in (Mdyn/M★)(R80) with disc size as a reflection of the fact that disc size dictates the radius at which Mdyn/M★ is measured, and consequently, the fraction of the dark matter 'seen' by the gas at that radius. For the lowest M★ galaxies, we find a positive correlation between TFR residuals and disc sizes, indicating that the total density profile is dominated by dark matter on these scales. For the

  13. Calibration of RB reactor power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotic, O.; Markovic, H.; Ninkovic, M.; Strugar, P.; Dimitrijevic, Z.; Takac, S.; Stefanovic, D.; Kocic, A.; Vranic, S.

    1976-09-01

    The first and only calibration of RB reactor power was done in 1962, and the obtained calibration ratio was used irrespective of the lattice pitch and core configuration. Since the RB reactor is being prepared for operation at higher power levels it was indispensable to reexamine the calibration ratio, estimate its dependence on the lattice pitch, critical level of heavy water and thickness of the side reflector. It was necessary to verify the reliability of control and dosimetry instruments, and establish neutron and gamma dose dependence on reactor power. Two series of experiments were done in June 1976. First series was devoted to tests of control and dosimetry instrumentation and measurements of radiation in the RB reactor building dependent on reactor power. Second series covered measurement of thermal and epithermal neuron fluxes in the reactor core and calculation of reactor power. Four different reactor cores were chosen for these experiments. Reactor pitches were 8, 8√2, and 16 cm with 40, 52 and 82 fuel channels containing 2% enriched fuel. Obtained results and analysis of these results are presented in this document with conclusions related to reactor safe operation

  14. Existence of a time-dependent heat flux-related ponderomotive effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schamel, H.; Sack, C.

    1980-01-01

    The existence of a new ponderomotive effect associated with high-frequency waves is pointed out. It originates when time-dependency, mean velocities, or divergent heat fluxes are involved and it supplements the two effects known previously, namely, the ponderomotive force and fake heating. Two proofs are presented; the first is obtained by establishing the momentum equations generalized by including radiation effects and the second by solving the quasi-linear-type diffusion equation explicitly. For a time-dependent wave packet the solution exhibits a new contribution in terms of an integral over previous states. Owing to this term, the plasma has a memory which leads to a breaking of the time symmetry of the plasma response. The range, influenced by the localized wave packet, expands during the course of time due to streamers emanating from the wave active region. Perturbations, among which is the heat flux, are carried to remote positions and, consequently, the region accessible to wave heating is increased. The density dip appears to be less pronounced at the center, and its generation and decay are delayed. The analysis includes a self-consistent action of high-frequency waves as well as the case of traveling wave packets. In order to establish the existence of this new effect, the analytical results are compared with recent microwave experiments. The possibility of generating fast particles by this new ponderomotive effect is emphasized

  15. Observation of the thunderstorm-related ground cosmic ray flux variations by ARGO-YBJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, B.; Bernardini, P.; Bi, X. J.; Cao, Z.; Catalanotti, S.; Chen, S. Z.; Chen, T. L.; Cui, S. W.; Dai, B. Z.; D'Amone, A.; Danzengluobu; De Mitri, I.; D'Ettorre Piazzoli, B.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Sciascio, G.; Feng, C. F.; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Zhenyong; Gao, W.; Gou, Q. B.; Guo, Y. Q.; He, H. H.; Hu, Haibing; Hu, Hongbo; Iacovacci, M.; Iuppa, R.; Jia, H. Y.; Labaciren; Li, H. J.; Liu, C.; Liu, J.; Liu, M. Y.; Lu, H.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, X. H.; Mancarella, G.; Mari, S. M.; Marsella, G.; Mastroianni, S.; Montini, P.; Ning, C. C.; Perrone, L.; Pistilli, P.; Salvini, P.; Santonico, R.; Shen, P. R.; Sheng, X. D.; Shi, F.; Surdo, A.; Tan, Y. H.; Vallania, P.; Vernetto, S.; Vigorito, C.; Wang, H.; Wu, C. Y.; Wu, H. R.; Xue, L.; Yang, Q. Y.; Yang, X. C.; Yao, Z. G.; Yuan, A. F.; Zha, M.; Zhang, H. M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, J.; Zhaxiciren; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X. X.; Zhu, F. R.; Zhu, Q. Q.; D'Alessandro, F.; ARGO-YBJ Collaboration

    2018-02-01

    A correlation between the secondary cosmic ray flux and the near-earth electric field intensity, measured during thunderstorms, has been found by analyzing the data of the ARGO-YBJ experiment, a full coverage air shower array located at the Yangbajing Cosmic Ray Laboratory (4300 m a. s. l., Tibet, China). The counting rates of showers with different particle multiplicities (m =1 , 2, 3, and ≥4 ) have been found to be strongly dependent upon the intensity and polarity of the electric field measured during the course of 15 thunderstorms. In negative electric fields (i.e., accelerating negative charges downwards), the counting rates increase with increasing electric field strength. In positive fields, the rates decrease with field intensity until a certain value of the field EFmin (whose value depends on the event multiplicity), above which the rates begin increasing. By using Monte Carlo simulations, we found that this peculiar behavior can be well described by the presence of an electric field in a layer of thickness of a few hundred meters in the atmosphere above the detector, which accelerates/decelerates the secondary shower particles of opposite charge, modifying the number of particles with energy exceeding the detector threshold. These results, for the first time to our knowledge, give a consistent explanation for the origin of the variation of the electron/positron flux observed for decades by high altitude cosmic ray detectors during thunderstorms.

  16. Relating hyporheic fluxes, residence times, and redox-sensitive biogeochemical processes upstream of beaver dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Martin A.; Lautz, Laura; Hare, Danielle K.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Small dams enhance the development of patchy microenvironments along stream corridors by trapping sediment and creating complex streambed morphologies. This patchiness drives intricate hyporheic flux patterns that govern the exchange of O2 and redox-sensitive solutes between the water column and the stream bed. We used multiple tracer techniques, naturally occurring and injected, to evaluate hyporheic flow dynamics and associated biogeochemical cycling and microbial reactivity around 2 beaver dams in Wyoming (USA). High-resolution fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing was used to collect temperature data over 9 vertical streambed profiles and to generate comprehensive vertical flux maps using 1-dimensional (1-D) heat-transport modeling. Coincident with these locations, vertical profiles of hyporheic water were collected every week and analyzed for dissolved O2, pH, dissolved organic C, and several conservative and redox-sensitive solutes. In addition, hyporheic and net stream aerobic microbial reactivity were analyzed with a constant-rate injection of the biologically sensitive resazurin (Raz) smart tracer. The combined results revealed a heterogeneous system with rates of downwelling hyporheic flow organized by morphologic unit and tightly coupled to the redox conditions of the subsurface. Principal component analysis was used to summarize the variability of all redox-sensitive species, and results indicated that hyporheic water varied from oxic-stream-like to anoxic-reduced in direct response to the hydrodynamic conditions and associated residence times. The anaerobic transition threshold predicted by the mean O2 Damko

  17. Impact of SPECT corrections on 3D-dosimetry for liver transarterial radioembolization using the patient relative calibration methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacilio, Massimiliano, E-mail: mpacilio@scamilloforlanini.rm.it; Basile, Chiara [Department of Medical Physics, Azienda Ospedaliera San Camillo Forlanini, Rome 00152 (Italy); Ferrari, Mahila; Botta, Francesca; Cremonesi, Marta [Department of Medical Physics, Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Milan 20141 (Italy); Chiesa, Carlo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Istituto Nazionale Tumori IRCCS Foundation, Milan 20133 (Italy); Lorenzon, Leda; Becci, Domenico [Postgraduate School of Medical Physics, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Rome 00185 (Italy); Mira, Marta [Post graduate Health Physics School, University of Milan, Milan 20122 (Italy); Torres, Leonel Alberto; Vergara Gil, Alex [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Clinical Research Division of the Center of Isotopes (DIC-CENTIS), Havana 11100 (Cuba); Coca Perez, Marco [Department of PET-CT and Nuclear Medicine, Imaging Center Medscan-Concepciòn, Concepciòn 4070061 (Chile); Ljungberg, Michael [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, University of Lund, Lund 22100 (Sweden); Pani, Roberto [Department of Medico-surgical Sciences and Biotecnologies, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Rome 00185 (Italy)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: Many centers aim to plan liver transarterial radioembolization (TARE) with dosimetry, even without CT-based attenuation correction (AC), or with unoptimized scatter correction (SC) methods. This work investigates the impact of presence vs absence of such corrections, and limited spatial resolution, on 3D dosimetry for TARE. Methods: Three voxelized phantoms were derived from CT images of real patients with different body sizes. Simulations of {sup 99m}Tc-SPECT projections were performed with the SIMIND code, assuming three activity distributions in the liver: uniform, inside a “liver’s segment,” or distributing multiple uptaking nodules (“nonuniform liver”), with a tumoral liver/healthy parenchyma ratio of 5:1. Projection data were reconstructed by a commercial workstation, with OSEM protocol not specifically optimized for dosimetry (spatial resolution of 12.6 mm), with/without SC (optimized, or with parameters predefined by the manufacturer; dual energy window), and with/without AC. Activity in voxels was calculated by a relative calibration, assuming identical microspheres and {sup 99m}Tc-SPECT counts spatial distribution. 3D dose distributions were calculated by convolution with {sup 90}Y voxel S-values, assuming permanent trapping of microspheres. Cumulative dose-volume histograms in lesions and healthy parenchyma from different reconstructions were compared with those obtained from the reference biodistribution (the “gold standard,” GS), assessing differences for D95%, D70%, and D50% (i.e., minimum value of the absorbed dose to a percentage of the irradiated volume). γ tool analysis with tolerance of 3%/13 mm was used to evaluate the agreement between GS and simulated cases. The influence of deep-breathing was studied, blurring the reference biodistributions with a 3D anisotropic gaussian kernel, and performing the simulations once again. Results: Differences of the dosimetric indicators were noticeable in some cases, always negative

  18. Study of variation of materials patients room's door related of neutron flux iradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmalasari, Yuliana Dian; Suparmi, A.; Sardjono, Y.

    2017-08-01

    The treatment chamber of patients has been simulating with MCNPX Code. Optimation of simulation design of Irradiation chamber is corresponding to ISO standards for 30 MeV cyclotron generator. The simulation has used the variation of door's materials that was applied at treatment room's door. The variation of materials was Stainless Steel 202 and Pb, the thickness Pb and stainless steel 202 with the thickness were 2 cm, respectively. Neutron flux that was radiated to stainless steel 202 in the sequence was 3.34195 × 105 n . Cm-2 s-1 and 8.41568 × 104 n . Cm-2 s-1, while for Pb was 4.01349 × 105 n . Cm-2 s-1 and 2.58058 × 104 n . Cm-2 s-1. The further, neutron flux that was radiated to Pb and stainless steel 202 with the thickness were 4 cm in sequence was 4.00601 × 105 n . Cm-2 s-1 and 1.71713 × 104 n . Cm-2 s-1 for Pb, while for SS 202 was 3.09925 × 105 n . Cm-2 s-1. From this ratio we concluded that material Pb absorbed higher neutron flux than material Stainless Steel 202. On the other hand, the cost of Pb was more expensive than Stainless Steel 202. In addition, the material Stainless Steel 202 was obtaine more easily than the material Pb. There fore to overcome the economics problem, can try to build the door with stainless still 202 sheet and Pb sheet together. The further, the neutron dose with 2 cm of thickness was 7.69603 × 10-2 Gy and 2.10623 × 10-2 Gy for SS 202, while for Pb was 4.19444 × 10-2 Gy and 1.50581 × 10-2 Gy. While the neutron dose with 4 cm of thickness for SS 202 was 9.39602 × 10-2 Gy and for Pb was 4.46541 × 10-2 Gy and 1.50502 × 10-2 Gy. We recommend that this simulation should be further optimized.

  19. Review of issues relating to enhancement of critical heat flux in nuclear reactors - 15220

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, S.M.K.; Chowdhury, M.A.Z.; Sarkar, M.A.R.

    2015-01-01

    Critical heat flux (CHF) is manifested by sharp reduction in heat transfer coefficient and a drastic rise in fuel rod surface temperature, which may lead to failure of the fuel cladding and is of immense importance in reactor design and operation. In this paper, the existing literature on CHF is studied and analyzed. Different modeling techniques such as geometry modeling and fluid modeling are highlighted. CHF enhancement techniques such as swirl flow, porous coating, nano-fluids or mechanical vibrations are analyzed and their suitability for different applications is discussed. The advances in prediction methods for tubes and rod bundles are also presented. CHF correlations and their applications have been compiled to estimate the CHF for fluids other than water or other geometries. Finally, future research needs are identified and presented. (authors)

  20. Miniaturized heat flux sensor for high enthalpy plasma flow characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardarein, Jean-Laurent; Battaglia, Jean-Luc; Lohlec, Stefan; Jullien, Pierre; Van Ootegemd, Bruno; Couzie, Jacques; Lasserre, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    An improved miniaturized heat flux sensor is presented aiming at measuring extreme heat fluxes of plasma wind tunnel flows. The sensor concept is based on an in-depth thermocouple measurement with a miniaturized design and an advanced calibration approach. Moreover, a better spatial estimation of the heat flux profile along the flow cross section is realized with this improved small sensor design. Based on the linearity assumption, the heat flux is determined using the impulse response of the sensor relating the heat flux to the temperature of the embedded thermocouple. The non-integer system identification (NISI) procedure is applied that allows a calculation of the impulse response from transient calibration measurements with a known heat flux of a laser source. The results show that the new sensor leads to radially highly resolved heat flux measurement for a flow with only a few centimetres in diameter, the so far not understood non-symmetric heat flux profiles do not occur with the new sensor design. It is shown that this former effect is not a physical effect of the flow, but a drawback of the classical sensor design. (authors)

  1. Relative and Absolute Calibration of a Multihead Camera System with Oblique and Nadir Looking Cameras for a Uas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeyer, F.; Schima, R.; Grenzdörffer, G.

    2013-08-01

    Numerous unmanned aerial systems (UAS) are currently flooding the market. For the most diverse applications UAVs are special designed and used. Micro and mini UAS (maximum take-off weight up to 5 kg) are of particular interest, because legal restrictions are still manageable but also the payload capacities are sufficient for many imaging sensors. Currently a camera system with four oblique and one nadir looking cameras is under development at the Chair for Geodesy and Geoinformatics. The so-called "Four Vision" camera system was successfully built and tested in the air. A MD4-1000 UAS from microdrones is used as a carrier system. Light weight industrial cameras are used and controlled by a central computer. For further photogrammetric image processing, each individual camera, as well as all the cameras together have to be calibrated. This paper focuses on the determination of the relative orientation between the cameras with the „Australis" software and will give an overview of the results and experiences of test flights.

  2. RELATIVE AND ABSOLUTE CALIBRATION OF A MULTIHEAD CAMERA SYSTEM WITH OBLIQUE AND NADIR LOOKING CAMERAS FOR A UAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Niemeyer

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerous unmanned aerial systems (UAS are currently flooding the market. For the most diverse applications UAVs are special designed and used. Micro and mini UAS (maximum take-off weight up to 5 kg are of particular interest, because legal restrictions are still manageable but also the payload capacities are sufficient for many imaging sensors. Currently a camera system with four oblique and one nadir looking cameras is under development at the Chair for Geodesy and Geoinformatics. The so-called "Four Vision" camera system was successfully built and tested in the air. A MD4-1000 UAS from microdrones is used as a carrier system. Light weight industrial cameras are used and controlled by a central computer. For further photogrammetric image processing, each individual camera, as well as all the cameras together have to be calibrated. This paper focuses on the determination of the relative orientation between the cameras with the „Australis“ software and will give an overview of the results and experiences of test flights.

  3. A calibration of the stellar mass fundamental plane at z ∼ 0.5 using the micro-lensing-induced flux ratio anomalies of macro-lensed quasars , ,

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schechter, Paul L.; Pooley, David; Blackburne, Jeffrey A.; Wambsganss, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    We measure the stellar mass surface densities of early-type galaxies by observing the micro-lensing of macro-lensed quasars caused by individual stars, including stellar remnants, brown dwarfs, and red dwarfs too faint to produce photometric or spectroscopic signatures. Instead of observing multiple micro-lensing events in a single system, we combine single-epoch X-ray snapshots of 10 quadruple systems, and compare the measured relative magnifications for the images with those computed from macro-models. We use these to normalize a stellar mass fundamental plane constructed using a Salpeter initial mass function with a low-mass cutoff of 0.1 M ☉ and treat the zeropoint of the surface mass density as a free parameter. Our method measures the graininess of the gravitational potential produced by individual stars, in contrast to methods that decompose a smooth total gravitational potential into two smooth components, one stellar and one dark. We find the median likelihood value for the normalization factor F by which the Salpeter stellar masses must be multiplied is 1.23, with a one sigma confidence range, dominated by small number statistics, of 0.77

  4. Relative linkages of peatland methane and carbon dioxide fluxes with climatic, environmental and ecological parameters and their inter-comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Tirtha; Hommeltenberg, Janina; Roy, Avipsa; De Roo, Frederik; Mauder, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Although methane (CH4) is the second most important greenhouse gas (GHG) after CO2, about 80% of its global production is biogenic (wetlands, enteric fermentation and water disposal from animals) contrary to major anthropogenic sources of most other GHGs. Although on a shorter time scale, global emissions of methane are greater (10 year time frame) or about 80% (20 year time frame) of those of carbon dioxide in terms of their influence on global warming, methane emissions have been studied much less than CO2 emissions. Lakes, reservoirs and wetlands are estimated to contribute about 15-40% to the global methane source budget, which is higher than total oceanic CH4 emission. Half of the world's wetlands are represented by peatlands which cover 3% of the global total land area. Peatlands have a thick water-logged organic soil layer (peat) made up of dead and decaying plant material. Moreover, they are carbon rich, containing twice as much stock as the entire forest biomass of the world (550 Gt carbon). When disturbed, they can become significant sources of greenhouse gas emissions. The organic carbon exposed to air due to various mechanisms can release CH4 or CO2 in the atmosphere. Thus the nature of vegetation cover, radiation environment, wind turbulence, soil characteristics, water table depth etc. are expected to be important forcings that influence the emission of CH4 or CO2 in the shorter time scale. However, long term climate change can also influence these governing factors themselves over a larger time scale, which in turn can influence the wetland GHG emissions. Thus developing a predictive framework and long term source appropriation for wetland CH4 or CO2 warrants an identification of the major environmental forcings on the CH4 or CO2 flux. In the present work, we use a simple and systematic data-analytics approach to determine the relative linkages of different climate and environmental variables with the canopy level half-hourly CH4 or CO2 fluxes over a

  5. Determination of aerosol optical properties for retrieval of water-leaving radiance at Roodeplaat dam relating to calibration and validation of Sentinel 2 And 3

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Faniso, Zimbini

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available in the atmosphere. Aerosols are the strongest variables in the atmosphere by playing a major role in generating unwanted signal. Field campaign took place at Roodeplaat dam (Pretoria) relating to calibration and validation of Sentinel 2 and Sentinel 3 satellites...

  6. Heat flux microsensor measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, J. P.; Hager, J. M.; Onishi, S.; Diller, T. E.

    1992-01-01

    A thin-film heat flux sensor has been fabricated on a stainless steel substrate. The thermocouple elements of the heat flux sensor were nickel and nichrome, and the temperature resistance sensor was platinum. The completed heat flux microsensor was calibrated at the AEDC radiation facility. The gage output was linear with heat flux with no apparent temperature effect on sensitivity. The gage was used for heat flux measurements at the NASA Langley Vitiated Air Test Facility. Vitiated air was expanded to Mach 3.0 and hydrogen fuel was injected. Measurements were made on the wall of a diverging duct downstream of the injector during all stages of the hydrogen combustion tests. Because the wall and the gage were not actively cooled, the wall temperature reached over 1000 C (1900 F) during the most severe test.

  7. Field calibration of cup anemometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt Paulsen, Uwe; Mortensen, Niels Gylling; Hansen, Jens Carsten

    2007-01-01

    A field calibration method and results are described along with the experience gained with the method. The cup anemometers to be calibrated are mounted in a row on a 10-m high rig and calibrated in the free wind against a reference cup anemometer. The method has been reported [1] to improve...... the statistical bias on the data relative to calibrations carried out in a wind tunnel. The methodology is sufficiently accurate for calibration of cup anemometers used for wind resource assessments and provides a simple, reliable and cost-effective solution to cup anemometer calibration, especially suited...

  8. An Improved Photometric Calibration of the Sloan Digital SkySurvey Imaging Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Schlegel, David J.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Barentine, J.C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Brewington, Howard J.; Gunn, JamesE.; Harvanek, Michael; Hogg, David W.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Johnston, David; Kent, Stephen M.; Kleinman, S.J.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; Neilsen Jr., Eric H.; Nitta, Atsuko; Loomis, Craig; Lupton,Robert H.; Roweis, Sam; Snedden, Stephanie A.; Strauss, Michael A.; Tucker, Douglas L.

    2007-09-30

    We present an algorithm to photometrically calibrate widefield optical imaging surveys, that simultaneously solves for thecalibration parameters and relative stellar fluxes using overlappingobservations. The algorithm decouples the problem of "relative"calibrations from that of "absolute" calibrations; the absolutecalibration is reduced to determining a few numbers for the entiresurvey. We pay special attention to the spatial structure of thecalibration errors, allowing one to isolate particular error modes indownstream analyses. Applying this to the SloanDigital Sky Survey imagingdata, we achieve ~;1 percent relative calibration errors across 8500sq.deg/ in griz; the errors are ~;2 percent for the u band. These errorsare dominated by unmodelled atmospheric variations at Apache PointObservatory. These calibrations, dubbed ubercalibration, are now publicwith SDSS Data Release 6, and will be a part of subsequent SDSS datareleases.

  9. Performance of the air2stream model that relates air and stream water temperatures depends on the calibration method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Adam P.; Napiorkowski, Jaroslaw J.

    2018-06-01

    A number of physical or data-driven models have been proposed to evaluate stream water temperatures based on hydrological and meteorological observations. However, physical models require a large amount of information that is frequently unavailable, while data-based models ignore the physical processes. Recently the air2stream model has been proposed as an intermediate alternative that is based on physical heat budget processes, but it is so simplified that the model may be applied like data-driven ones. However, the price for simplicity is the need to calibrate eight parameters that, although have some physical meaning, cannot be measured or evaluated a priori. As a result, applicability and performance of the air2stream model for a particular stream relies on the efficiency of the calibration method. The original air2stream model uses an inefficient 20-year old approach called Particle Swarm Optimization with inertia weight. This study aims at finding an effective and robust calibration method for the air2stream model. Twelve different optimization algorithms are examined on six different streams from northern USA (states of Washington, Oregon and New York), Poland and Switzerland, located in both high mountains, hilly and lowland areas. It is found that the performance of the air2stream model depends significantly on the calibration method. Two algorithms lead to the best results for each considered stream. The air2stream model, calibrated with the chosen optimization methods, performs favorably against classical streamwater temperature models. The MATLAB code of the air2stream model and the chosen calibration procedure (CoBiDE) are available as Supplementary Material on the Journal of Hydrology web page.

  10. Relative humidity effects on water vapour fluxes measured with closed-path eddy-covariance systems with short sampling lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fratini, Gerardo; Ibrom, Andreas; Arriga, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    It has been formerly recognised that increasing relative humidity in the sampling line of closed-path eddy-covariance systems leads to increasing attenuation of water vapour turbulent fluctuations, resulting in strong latent heat flux losses. This occurrence has been analyzed for very long (50 m...... from eddy-covariance systems featuring short (4 m) and very short (1 m) sampling lines running at the same clover field and show that relative humidity effects persist also for these setups, and should not be neglected. Starting from the work of Ibrom and co-workers, we propose a mixed method...... and correction method proposed here is deemed applicable to closed-path systems featuring a broad range of sampling lines, and indeed applicable also to passive gases as a special case. The methods described in this paper are incorporated, as processing options, in the free and open-source eddy...

  11. Calibration of Solar Radio Spectrometer of the Purple Mountain Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, LU; Si-ming, LIU; Qi-wu, SONG; Zong-jun, NING

    2015-10-01

    Calibration is a basic and important job in solar radio spectral observations. It not only deduces the solar radio flux as an important physical quantity for solar observations, but also deducts the flat field of the radio spectrometer to display the radio spectrogram clearly. In this paper, we first introduce the basic method of calibration based on the data of the solar radio spectrometer of Purple Mountain Observatory. We then analyze the variation of the calibration coefficients, and give the calibrated results for a few flares. These results are compared with those of the Nobeyama solar radio polarimeter and the hard X-ray observations of the RHESSI (Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager) satellite, it is shown that these results are consistent with the characteristics of typical solar flare light curves. In particular, the analysis on the correlation between the variation of radio flux and the variation of hard X-ray flux in the pulsing phase of a flare indicates that these observations can be used to study the relevant radiation mechanism, as well as the related energy release and particle acceleration processes.

  12. The radiation metrology network related to the field of mammography: implementation and uncertainty analysis of the calibration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, J. G. P.; de Almeida, C. E.

    2001-09-01

    It is recognized by the international guidelines that it is necessary to offer calibration services for mammography beams in order to improve the quality of clinical diagnosis. Major efforts have been made by several laboratories in order to establish an appropriate and traceable calibration infrastructure and to provide the basis for a quality control programme in mammography. The contribution of the radiation metrology network to the users of mammography is reviewed in this work. Also steps required for the implementation of a mammography calibration system using a constant potential x-ray and a clinical mammography x-ray machine are presented. The various qualities of mammography radiation discussed in this work are in accordance with the IEC 61674 and the AAPM recommendations. They are at present available at several primary standard dosimetry laboratories (PSDLs), namely the PTB, NIST and BEV and a few secondary standard dosimetry laboratories (SSDLs) such as at the University of Wisconsin and at the IAEA's SSDL. We discuss the uncertainties involved in all steps of the calibration chain in accord with the ISO recommendations.

  13. Estimates of the temperature flux-temperature gradient relation above a sea floor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cimatoribus, A.; van Haren, H.

    2016-01-01

    The relation between the ux of temperature (or buoyancy), the verti-cal temperature gradient and the height above the bottom, is investigatedin an oceanographic context, using high-resolution temperature measure-ments. The model for the evolution of a strati?ed layer by Balmforthet al. (1998) is

  14. Lidar to lidar calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Garcia, Sergio; Villanueva, Héctor

    This report presents the result of the lidar to lidar calibration performed for ground-based lidar. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference lidar wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding...... lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from the reference lidar measurements are given for information only....

  15. Safety evaluation report related to operation of Fast Flux Test Facility. Supplement No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    This supplement provides (1) the staff's evaluation of additional information received since issuance of the Safety Evaluation Report regarding previously identified uncompleted review items, (2) a discussion of comments made by the ACRS in its report of November 8, 1978, and (3) the staff's evaluation of additional or revised information related to new or old issues that have arisen since the issuance of the Safety Evaluation Report

  16. Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect and X-ray Scaling Relations from Weak-Lensing Mass Calibration of 32 SPT Selected Galaxy Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, J.P.; et al.

    2017-11-14

    Uncertainty in the mass-observable scaling relations is currently the limiting factor for galaxy cluster based cosmology. Weak gravitational lensing can provide a direct mass calibration and reduce the mass uncertainty. We present new ground-based weak lensing observations of 19 South Pole Telescope (SPT) selected clusters and combine them with previously reported space-based observations of 13 galaxy clusters to constrain the cluster mass scaling relations with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE), the cluster gas mass $M_\\mathrm{gas}$, and $Y_\\mathrm{X}$, the product of $M_\\mathrm{gas}$ and X-ray temperature. We extend a previously used framework for the analysis of scaling relations and cosmological constraints obtained from SPT-selected clusters to make use of weak lensing information. We introduce a new approach to estimate the effective average redshift distribution of background galaxies and quantify a number of systematic errors affecting the weak lensing modelling. These errors include a calibration of the bias incurred by fitting a Navarro-Frenk-White profile to the reduced shear using $N$-body simulations. We blind the analysis to avoid confirmation bias. We are able to limit the systematic uncertainties to 6.4% in cluster mass (68% confidence). Our constraints on the mass-X-ray observable scaling relations parameters are consistent with those obtained by earlier studies, and our constraints for the mass-SZE scaling relation are consistent with the the simulation-based prior used in the most recent SPT-SZ cosmology analysis. We can now replace the external mass calibration priors used in previous SPT-SZ cosmology studies with a direct, internal calibration obtained on the same clusters.

  17. Determination of endogenous inflammation-related lipid mediators in ischemic stroke rats using background subtracting calibration curves by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Zhong, Qisheng; Mo, Canlong; Zhang, Hao; Zhou, Ting; Tan, Wen

    2017-11-01

    Accurate and reliable quantification of endogenous lipid mediators in complex biological samples is a daunting challenge. In this study, a robust and direct endogenous quantitative method using background subtracting calibration curves by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was first developed for the determination of endogenous lipid mediators in ischemic stroke rats. Absolute quantification without surrogate matrix could be achieved by using background subtracting calibration curves, which were corrected and verified from standard curves constructed on original matrix. The recoveries of this method were in the range of 50.3-98.3%, the precision with the relative standard deviation was less than 13.8%, and the accuracy with the relative error was within ± 15.0%. In addition, background subtracting calibration curves were further verified by validation factors ranging from 90.3 to 110.9%. This validated method has been successfully applied to the analysis of seven endogenous inflammation-related lipid mediators in the brain tissues of ischemic stroke rats. The results indicated that prostaglandins as inflammatory factors and some lipid mediators with neuroprotective effects increased apparently (p endogenous compounds in the complex biological samples. Graphical abstract The analysis procedure of determining endogenous inflammation-related lipid mediators using BSCC by LC-MS/MS.

  18. Calibration of thermoluminiscent materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bos, A.J.J.

    1989-07-01

    In this report the relation between exposure and absorbed radiation dose in various materials is represented, on the base of recent data. With the help of this a calibration procedure for thermoluminescent materials, adapted to the IRI radiation standard is still the exposure in rontgen. In switching to the air kerma standard the calibration procedure will have to be adapted. (author). 6 refs.; 4 tabs

  19. A calibration facility for radon fluxmeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xianjie; Qiu Shoukang; Zhou Jianliang; Liu Chunkui; Pan Jialin; Yang Mingli

    1998-01-01

    Calibration facilities for radon fluxmeter with three kinds of different emanation medium have been developed. The stability of radon flux is 5%, 9% (RSD) respectively. The uniformity of radon flux is 4.5%, 8.5% (RSD) respectively. These specifications fulfill the calibration requirement for radon fluxmeter. The determination of radon flux of facility takes full account of eliminating the main error source-attenuation effect (including leakage and back diffusion etc.): not only prevent attenuation and make a relevant correction. Therefore the accuracy of determination is assured. The calibration, intercomparison of radon flux meter and the quantitatively evaluation on the measurement method of radon flux are made to be possible by the successful establishment of this facility. (author)

  20. Syringe shape and positioning relative to efficiency volume inside dose calibrators and its role in nuclear medicine quality assurance programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, J.A.M.; Carrasco, M.F.; Lencart, J.; Bastos, A.L.

    2009-01-01

    A careful analysis of geometry and source positioning influence in the activity measurement outcome of a nuclear medicine dose calibrator is presented for 99m Tc. The implementation of a quasi-point source apparent activity curve measurement is proposed for an accurate correction of the activity inside several syringes, and compared with a theoretical geometric efficiency model. Additionally, new geometrical parameters are proposed to test and verify the correct positioning of the syringes as part of acceptance testing and quality control procedures.

  1. SCALPLO - a universal program for plotting flux output from SCALE modules and related programs. User`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hersman, A; Leege, P F.A. de; Hoogenboom, J E

    1992-04-01

    The FORTRAN-77 program SCALPLO is being developed to make an easy and quick graphic survey of flux and/or power data calculated with SCALE modules or other core calculation or shielding codes. The basic plot functions it can perform are one- and two-dimensional plots of flux or power distributions and flux energy spectra. More specifically it can produce plots of the flux distribution in a one-dimensional geometry for one or more energy groups in one figure. It can also plot the flux distribution along a cut through a two- or three-dimensional geometry along one of the coordinate axes and it can plot a two-dimensional view of the flux distribution of a two-dimensional geometry or of a plane cut through a three-dimensional geometry. The same can be done for the power distribution in a system. Furthermore SCALPLO can plot the particle flux spectrum as a function of energy, either as group fluxes or as group fluxes per unit energy or per unit lethargy. (orig./HP).

  2. Relation of sortable silt grain-size to deep-sea current speeds: Calibration of the 'Mud Current Meter'

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCave, I. N.; Thornalley, D. J. R.; Hall, I. R.

    2017-09-01

    Fine grain-size parameters have been used for inference of palaeoflow speeds of near-bottom currents in the deep-sea. The basic idea stems from observations of varying sediment size parameters on a continental margin with a gradient from slower flow speeds at shallower depths to faster at deeper. In the deep-sea, size-sorting occurs during deposition after benthic storm resuspension events. At flow speeds below 10-15 cm s-1 mean grain-size in the terrigenous non-cohesive 'sortable silt' range (denoted by SS bar , mean of 10-63 μm) is controlled by selective deposition, whereas above that range removal of finer material by winnowing is also argued to play a role. A calibration of the SS bar grain-size flow speed proxy based on sediment samples taken adjacent to sites of long-term current meters set within 100 m of the sea bed for more than a year is presented here. Grain-size has been measured by either Sedigraph or Coulter Counter, in some cases both, between which there is an excellent correlation for SS bar (r = 0.96). Size-speed data indicate calibration relationships with an overall sensitivity of 1.36 ± 0.19 cm s-1/μm. A calibration line comprising 12 points including 9 from the Iceland overflow region is well defined, but at least two other smaller groups (Weddell/Scotia Sea and NW Atlantic continental rise/Rockall Trough) are fitted by sub-parallel lines with a smaller constant. This suggests a possible influence of the calibre of material supplied to the site of deposition (not the initial source supply) which, if depleted in very coarse silt (31-63 μm), would limit SS bar to smaller values for a given speed than with a broader size-spectrum supply. Local calibrations, or a core-top grain-size and local flow speed, are thus necessary to infer absolute speeds from grain-size. The trend of the calibrations diverges markedly from the slope of experimental critical erosion and deposition flow speeds versus grain-size, making it unlikely that the SS bar (or

  3. Increasing organic C and N fluxes from a northern Boreal river basin - monitoring and modelling suggest climate related controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepistö, A.; Futter, M.; Kortelainen, P.

    2012-04-01

    Increasing trends in total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations in lakes and streams across northern Europe and North America have been reported. Various hypotheses including enhanced decomposition of organic soils, changes in hydrology and flow paths, decreased acid deposition and land use changes have been put forward to explain the widespread occurrence of this phenomenon. Both observational and modelling studies are needed to identify the most important drivers and relevant processes controlling observed trends in TOC concentrations. Typically, TOC concentrations in Finnish rivers and lakes are high. The Simojoki river basin (3160 km2) is located in the northern Boreal zone of Finland and experiences low, declining sulphate deposition and limited other human impacts. Forest harvest, land drainage and ditch maintenance are the main land management activities in the catchment. Long-term changes (30-40 years) and seasonal trends of total organic nitrogen (TON) and carbon (TOC) concentrations and fluxes in the Simojoki river system were studied. Concentrations of TOC and TON increased particularly during high flows. TOC concentrations are slowly but continuously increasing, fluctuating between droughts and wet periods. The highest concentrations were detected in 1998-2000 during a period of very high flows, after the drought period 1994-1997. Trends in concentrations of TOC and TON in Simojoki were not linked to declines in sulphate deposition but were more related to trends in climate and hydrology. The autumn season is particularly sensitive to climate change impacts. The INCA-C model was applied to simulate TOC dynamics in the catchment. Model results showed that climate change driven patterns in runoff and soil moisture and soil temperature were more important than temporal patterns of sulphate deposition and land management in controlling surface water TOC concentrations. The possible factors behind changes of TOC and TON concentrations and increasing fluxes to

  4. Instrumentation calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, D.A.

    1976-08-01

    Procedures for the calibration of different types of laboratory equipment are described. Provisions for maintaining the integrity of reference and working standards traceable back to a national standard are discussed. Methods of validation and certification methods are included. An appendix lists available publications and services of national standardizing agencies

  5. Problems related to the use of annihilation radiation for precision energy calibration of Ge(Li) detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fransson, K.; Nilsson, A.; Raedt, J. de; Rensfelt, K.G.

    1976-03-01

    The energy of positron annihilation radiation emanating from several materials was measured, using recently established energies of the 198 Au and 192 Ir γ-rays for calibration. Corrections for the binding energy of positrons and electrons were applied. A peak fitting routine was used which took into account both the background step under the peak, and the possibility that only a part of the detector contains charge-carrier traps. The electron rest mass energy (corrected for binding energies) could be reproduced to within +- 10 eV, in some well-behaved metals even to within +- 5 eV. (Auth.)

  6. Syringe shape and positioning relative to efficiency volume inside dose calibrators and its role in nuclear medicine quality assurance programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, J.A.M. [Servico de Fisica Medica, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200072 Porto (Portugal); Centro de Investigacao, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200072 Porto (Portugal)], E-mail: a.miranda@portugalmail.pt; Carrasco, M.F. [Servico de Fisica Medica, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200072 Porto (Portugal); Centro de Investigacao, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200072 Porto (Portugal); Lencart, J. [Servico de Fisica Medica, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200072 Porto (Portugal); Bastos, A.L. [Servico de Medicina Nuclear, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200072 Porto (Portugal)

    2009-06-15

    A careful analysis of geometry and source positioning influence in the activity measurement outcome of a nuclear medicine dose calibrator is presented for {sup 99m}Tc. The implementation of a quasi-point source apparent activity curve measurement is proposed for an accurate correction of the activity inside several syringes, and compared with a theoretical geometric efficiency model. Additionally, new geometrical parameters are proposed to test and verify the correct positioning of the syringes as part of acceptance testing and quality control procedures.

  7. Monitoring of dose rates and radiation flux density in working rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajtor, S.N.

    1980-01-01

    The problems of determining the neutron field characteristics (dose equivalent rate and flux density) in relation to the environmental monitoring by radiation protection services. The measurement devices used for measuring dose equivalent rate and neutron flux density RUS-U8 multi-purpose scintillation radiometer and RUP-1 multi-purpose transportable radiometer as well as measurement technique are described. Recommendations are given for checking measuring devices calibration, registering measurement results [ru

  8. Spectrophotometric calibration system for DECam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheault, J.-P.; DePoy, D. L.; Marshall, J. L.; Prochaska, T.; Allen, R.; Wise, J.; Martin, E.; Williams, P.

    2012-09-01

    We describe a spectrophotometric calibration system that is being implemented as part of the DES DECam project at the Blanco 4 meter at CTIO. Our calibration system uses a 1nm wide tunable source to measure the instrumental response function of the telescope optics and detector from 300nm up to 1100nm. This calibration will be performed regularly to monitor any change in the transmission function of the telescope during the 5 year survey. The system consists of a monochromator based tunable light source that provides illumination on a dome flat that is monitored by calibrated photodiodes that allow us to measure the telescope throughput as a function of wavelength. Our system has a peak output power of 2 mW, equivalent to a flux of approximately 800 photons/s/pixel on DECam.

  9. Total belowground carbon flux in subalpine forests is related to leaf area index, soil nitrogen, and tree height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Erin Michele; Ryan, Michael G.; Bradford, John B.; Hawbaker, Todd J.; Birdsey, R.

    2016-01-01

    In forests, total belowground carbon (C) flux (TBCF) is a large component of the C budget and represents a critical pathway for delivery of plant C to soil. Reducing uncertainty around regional estimates of forest C cycling may be aided by incorporating knowledge of controls over soil respiration and TBCF. Photosynthesis, and presumably TBCF, declines with advancing tree size and age, and photosynthesis increases yet C partitioning to TBCF decreases in response to high soil fertility. We hypothesized that these causal relationships would result in predictable patterns of TBCF, and partitioning of C to TBCF, with natural variability in leaf area index (LAI), soil nitrogen (N), and tree height in subalpine forests in the Rocky Mountains, USA. Using three consecutive years of soil respiration data collected from 22 0.38-ha locations across three 1-km2 subalpine forested landscapes, we tested three hypotheses: (1) annual soil respiration and TBCF will show a hump-shaped relationship with LAI; (2) variability in TBCF unexplained by LAI will be related to soil nitrogen (N); and (3) partitioning of C to TBCF (relative to woody growth) will decline with increasing soil N and tree height. We found partial support for Hypothesis 1 and full support for Hypotheses 2 and 3. TBCF, but not soil respiration, was explained by LAI and soil N patterns (r2 = 0.49), and the ratio of annual TBCF to TBCF plus aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) was related to soil N and tree height (r2 = 0.72). Thus, forest C partitioning to TBCF can vary even within the same forest type and region, and approaches that assume a constant fraction of TBCF relative to ANPP may be missing some of this variability. These relationships can aid with estimates of forest soil respiration and TBCF across landscapes, using spatially explicit forest data such as national inventories or remotely sensed data products.

  10. Temporal variations in plutonium and americium inventories in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea and their relation to vertical particulate flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, S.W.; Noshkin, V.E.; La Rosa, J.; Gastaud, J.

    1999-01-01

    Temporal changes in 239+240 Pu and 241 Am inventories in the western Mediterranean have been examined by making high resolution water column sampling and direct measurements of the vertical flux of particle-bound transuranics using time-series sediment traps. Water column profiles of both radionuclides showed well-defined sub-surface maxima ( 239+240 Pu between 100-400 m; 241 Am at 100-200 m and 800 m). Time-series measurements of 239+240 Pu indicated a shift in the depth of the subsurface maxima which appeared to be related to a change in depth of the core of low-salinity Levantine Intermediate Water. Total water column inventories for the western basin compared with total fallout inventories for the same area show that by 1990, approximately 56% of the 239+240 Pu and 20% of the 241 Am deposited in the basin still resided in the water column. Time-series measurements of the downward flux of particulate 239+240 Pu and 241 Am compared with transuranic removal rates derived from observed total water column inventory differences over time, show that particles sinking out of deep waters (1000-2000 m) could account for 26-72% of the computed total annual 239+240 Pu loss and virtually all of the 241 Am removal from the water column. Computed upper water column (0-200) residence times were 20-30 y for 239+240 Pu and 5-10 y for 241 Am in the open waters of the northwestern Mediterranean. A comparison with data for the north Pacific Ocean indicate that 239+240 Pu residence times are shorter and those for 241 Am much longer in open waters of the northeast Pacific. 241 Am/ 239+240 Pu activity ratios in unfiltered sea water from the western Mediterranean which are six times lower than those in the north Pacific indicate the existence of a mechanism for enhanced scavenging and removal of 241 Am from Mediterranean waters. It is proposed that frequent atmospheric inputs of aluminosilicate particles transported by Saharan dust events could enhance geochemical scavenging and

  11. SDSS-IV/MaNGA: SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC CALIBRATION TECHNIQUE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Renbin; Sánchez-Gallego, José R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, 505 Rose St., Lexington, KY 40506-0057 (United States); Tremonti, Christy; Bershady, Matthew A.; Eigenbrot, Arthur; Wake, David A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Winsconsin-Madison, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706-1582 (United States); Law, David R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Schlegel, David J. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720-8160 (United States); Bundy, Kevin [Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Drory, Niv [McDonald Observatory, Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); MacDonald, Nicholas [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Blanc, Guillermo A. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Camino el Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Blanton, Michael R.; Hogg, David W. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Cherinka, Brian [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H4 (Canada); Gunn, James E. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Harding, Paul [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Sánchez, Sebastian F., E-mail: yanrenbin@uky.edu [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-264, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); and others

    2016-01-15

    Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA), one of three core programs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-IV, is an integral-field spectroscopic survey of roughly 10,000 nearby galaxies. It employs dithered observations using 17 hexagonal bundles of 2″ fibers to obtain resolved spectroscopy over a wide wavelength range of 3600–10300 Å. To map the internal variations within each galaxy, we need to perform accurate spectral surface photometry, which is to calibrate the specific intensity at every spatial location sampled by each individual aperture element of the integral field unit. The calibration must correct only for the flux loss due to atmospheric throughput and the instrument response, but not for losses due to the finite geometry of the fiber aperture. This requires the use of standard star measurements to strictly separate these two flux loss factors (throughput versus geometry), a difficult challenge with standard single-fiber spectroscopy techniques due to various practical limitations. Therefore, we developed a technique for spectral surface photometry using multiple small fiber-bundles targeting standard stars simultaneously with galaxy observations. We discuss the principles of our approach and how they compare to previous efforts, and we demonstrate the precision and accuracy achieved. MaNGA's relative calibration between the wavelengths of Hα and Hβ has an rms of 1.7%, while that between [N ii] λ6583 and [O ii] λ3727 has an rms of 4.7%. Using extinction-corrected star formation rates and gas-phase metallicities as an illustration, this level of precision guarantees that flux calibration errors will be sub-dominant when estimating these quantities. The absolute calibration is better than 5% for more than 89% of MaNGA's wavelength range.

  12. SDSS-IV/MaNGA: SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC CALIBRATION TECHNIQUE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Renbin; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Tremonti, Christy; Bershady, Matthew A.; Eigenbrot, Arthur; Wake, David A.; Law, David R.; Schlegel, David J.; Bundy, Kevin; Drory, Niv; MacDonald, Nicholas; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Hogg, David W.; Cherinka, Brian; Gunn, James E.; Harding, Paul; Sánchez, Sebastian F.

    2016-01-01

    Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA), one of three core programs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-IV, is an integral-field spectroscopic survey of roughly 10,000 nearby galaxies. It employs dithered observations using 17 hexagonal bundles of 2″ fibers to obtain resolved spectroscopy over a wide wavelength range of 3600–10300 Å. To map the internal variations within each galaxy, we need to perform accurate spectral surface photometry, which is to calibrate the specific intensity at every spatial location sampled by each individual aperture element of the integral field unit. The calibration must correct only for the flux loss due to atmospheric throughput and the instrument response, but not for losses due to the finite geometry of the fiber aperture. This requires the use of standard star measurements to strictly separate these two flux loss factors (throughput versus geometry), a difficult challenge with standard single-fiber spectroscopy techniques due to various practical limitations. Therefore, we developed a technique for spectral surface photometry using multiple small fiber-bundles targeting standard stars simultaneously with galaxy observations. We discuss the principles of our approach and how they compare to previous efforts, and we demonstrate the precision and accuracy achieved. MaNGA's relative calibration between the wavelengths of Hα and Hβ has an rms of 1.7%, while that between [N ii] λ6583 and [O ii] λ3727 has an rms of 4.7%. Using extinction-corrected star formation rates and gas-phase metallicities as an illustration, this level of precision guarantees that flux calibration errors will be sub-dominant when estimating these quantities. The absolute calibration is better than 5% for more than 89% of MaNGA's wavelength range

  13. Analysis of thermal power calibration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagar, T.; Ravnik, M.; Persic, A.

    2000-01-01

    The methods for determining fuel element burnup have recently become interesting because of activities related to the shipment of highly enriched fuel elements back to the United States for final disposal before 2009. The most common and practical method for determining fuel element burnup in research reactors is reactor calculation. Experience has shown that burnup calculations become complicated and biased with uncertainties if a long period of reactor operation must be reproduced. Besides this, accuracy of calculated burnup is always limited with accuracy of reactor power calibration, since burnup calculation is based on calculated power density distribution, which is usually expressed in terms of power released per fuel element and normalised to the reactor power It is obvious that reactor thermal power calibration is very important for precise fuel element burnup calculation. Calculated fuel element burnup is linearly dependent on the thermal reactor power. The reactor power level may be determined from measured absolute thermal flux distribution across the core in the horizontal and vertical planes. Flux distributions are measured with activation of cadmium covered and bare foils irradiated by the steady reactor power. But it should be realised that this method is time consuming and not accurate. This method is practical only for zero power reactors and is in practice very seldom performed for other reactors (e.g. for TRIGA reactor in Ljubljana absolute thermal flux distribution was not performed since reactor reconstruction in 1991). In case of power reactors and research reactors in which a temperature rise across the core is produced and measured than a heat balance method is the most common and accurate method of determining the power output of the core. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the accuracy of calorimetric reactor power calibration method and to analyse the influence of control rod position on nuclear detector reading for TRIGA reactors

  14. Ozone Effects on Fruit Productivity and Photosynthetic Response of Two Tomato Cultivars in Relation to Stomatal Fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Gerosa

    Full Text Available An Open-Top Chamber experiment on two tomato cultivars (cv. Oxheart and cv. San Marzano was carried out in Curno (Northern Italy between June and September 2007. Two ozone treatments were applied for a 3.5 months period: Non-Filtered OTC (NF-OTC, 95% of ambient ozone and Charcoal-Filtered OTC (CF-OTC, 50% of ambient ozone. Diurnal cycles of porometry measurements were performed during the season and allowed to draw a stomatal conductance model for each cultivar in order to calculate the ozone stomatal fluxes taken up by plants. Assessments on fruits yield were performed during the season, taking into account the number of fruits, their fresh weight and their marketability. In addition, measurements on the chlorophyll fluorescence of photosystems were carried out to assess possible negative effects on photosynthetic efficiency. Despite the two cultivars absorbed a similar ozone stomatal dose during the season (with an 8% difference, their responses to ozone treatments were totally divergent in relation to both fruits yield and photosynthetic efficiency. Plants of cv. Oxheart grown in NF-OTCs showed significant yield loss in the total weight of fruits (-35.9% which is exclusively related to a decrease in the number of fruits produced (-35.7% of total fruits; -30.6% of marketable fruits, since mean fresh weight of fruits remained unaffected. Moreover the same plants displayed low values (in comparison to CF-OTCs plants of the photosynthetic efficiency index (PIabs during the most intense period of ozone stress (July occurred in the flowering stage of plants and at the beginning of fructification. Plants of the cv. San Marzano had an opposite response behaviour with an increase of the mean fresh weight of fruits in plants grown in NF-OTC (even if not statistically significant and no difference in the number of fruits produced and in the values of photosynthetic efficiency.

  15. Influence of the current-phase relation on the critical-current-applied-magnetic-flux dependence in parallel-connected Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, W.; Van Duzer, T.

    1976-01-01

    The form of the current-phase relations for the Josephson junctions is shown to have a significant influence on the relation I/sub c/(theta/sub a/) between critical current and applied flux for two junctions connected in parallel in a superconducting circuit. The observed one-flux-quantum periodicity and inversion symmetry of the I/sub c/(theta/sub a/) relation are shown to result from the fact that the current-phase, i-phi, relations of the junctions satisfy i (phi+2mπ) =i (phi) and i (-phi) =-i (phi), respectively. It is also shown that if the current-phase relations for the two junctions are different, an asymmetry appears in the I/sub c/(theta/sub a/)

  16. Carbon Dioxide and Methane Flux Related to Forest Type and Managed and Unmanaged Conditions in the Great Dismal Swamp, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutenberg, L. W.; Krauss, K.; Qu, J. J.; Hogan, D. M.; Zhu, Z.; Xu, C.

    2017-12-01

    The Great Dismal Swamp in Virginia and North Carolina, USA, has been greatly impacted by human use and management for the last few hundred years through logging, ditching, and draining. Today, the once dominant cedar, cypress and pocosin forest types are fragmented due to logging and environmental change. Maple-gum forest has taken over more than half the remaining area of the swamp ecosystem, which is now a National Wildlife Refuge and State Park. The peat soils and biomass store a vast quantity of carbon compared with the size of the refuge, but this store is threatened by fire and drying. This study looks at three of the main forest types in the GDS— maple-sweet gum, tall pine pocosin, and Atlantic white cedar— in terms of their carbon dioxide and methane soil flux. Using static chambers to sample soil gas flux in locally representative sites, we found that cedar sites showed a higher carbon dioxide flux rate as the soil temperature increased than maple sites, and the rate of carbon dioxide flux decreased as soil moisture increased faster in cedar sites than in maple sites. Methane flux increased as temperature increased for pocosin, but decreased with temperature for cedar and maple. All of the methane fluxes increased as soil moisture increased. Cedar average carbon dioxide flux was statistically significantly different from both maple and pocosin. These results show that soil carbon gas flux depends on soil moisture and temperature, which are factors that are changing due to human actions, as well as on forest type, which is also the result of human activity. Some of these variables may be adjustable by the managers of the land. Variables other than forest type, temperature and soil moisture/inundation may also play a role in influencing soil flux, such as stand age, tree height, composition of the peat and nutrient availability, and source of moisture as some sites are more influenced by groundwater from ditches and some more by rainfall depending on the

  17. Portable compact multifunction IR calibrator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyatt, C.L.; Jacobsen, L.; Steed, A.

    1988-01-01

    A compact portable multifunction calibrator designed for future sensor systems is described which enables a linearity calibration for all detectors simultaneously using a near small-area source, a high-resolution mapping of the focal plane with 10 microrad setability and with a blur of less than 100 microrad, system spectral response calibration (radiometer) using a Michelson interferometer source, relative spectral response (spectrometer) using high-temperature external commercial blackbody simulators, and an absolute calibration using an internal low-temperature extended-area source. 5 references

  18. C3R2 - Complete Calibration of the Color-Redshift Relation: Keck spectroscopy to train photometric redshifts for Euclid and WFIRST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Daniel; C3R2 Team

    2017-01-01

    A primary objective of both WFIRST and Euclid is to provide a 3D map of the distribution of matter across a significant fraction of the universe from the weak lensing shear field, but to do so requires robust distances to billions of galaxies. I will report on a multi-semester program, expected to total approximately 40 nights with Keck over the next two years. This program, supporting both the NASA PCOS and COR science goals, will obtain the necessary galaxy spectroscopy to calibrate the color-redshift relation for the Euclid mission, and make significant progress towards the WFIRST requirements. The program, called C3R2 or Complete Calibration of the Color-Redshift Relation, already encompasses 10 allocated nights of NASA Keck Key Strategic Mission Support (PI D. Stern), 12 allocated nights from Caltech (PI J. Cohen), 3 allocated nights from the University of Hawaii (PI D. Sanders), and 1.5 allocated nights from UC-Riverside (PI B. Mobasher). We are also pursuing opportunities at additional 8- to 10-meter class telescopes, including Magellan, VLT and GCT. I will present the motivation for this program, the plans, and current results.

  19. Complete Calibration of the Color-Redshift Relation (C3R2): A Critical Foundation for Weak Lensing Cosmology with Euclid and WFIRST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Daniel C.; Stern, Daniel; Cohen, Judy; Capak, Peter

    2018-01-01

    A primary objective of both WFIRST and Euclid is to provide a 3D map of the distribution of matter across a significant fraction of the universe from the weak lensing shear field. Doing so will require accurate redshifts to the billions of galaxies that comprise the weak lensing samples of these surveys; achieving the required accuracy is a “tall pole” challenge for both missions. Here we present the ongoing Complete Calibration of the Color-Redshift Relation (C3R2) survey, designed specifically to calibrate the empirical galaxy color-redshift relation to Euclid depth. C3R2 is an ambitious Keck spectroscopy program, with a survey design based on a machine learning technique that allows us to optimally select the most important galaxies to sample the full range of galaxy colors. C3R2 is a multi-center program with time from all the primary Keck partners (Caltech, UC, Hawaii, and NASA), with a total of 34.5 Keck nights allocated to this project. Data Release 1, including 1283 high-confidence spectroscopic redshifts, is published as Masters, Stern, Cohen, Capak, et al. (2017), and we are currently completing Data Release 2, which will include >2000 additional high-confidence spectroscopic redshifts (Masters et al., in prep.). We will discuss current results and prospects for the survey going forward.

  20. The infrared flux method and its use for study of α Boo, μ Her and β Dra; relation to the Vega 1.2-5 μm infrared excess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackwell, D.E.; Booth, A.J.; Petford, A.D.; Leggett, S.K.; Mountain, C.M.; Selby, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    The effective temperatures of α Boo, μ Her, and β Dra are determined using the infrared flux method. The determinations are based on the high-quality spectrophotometric data obtained from an aircraft by previous authors, the new infrared calibration of Vega obtained from observations made at Tenerife between 1979 and 1983, the use of a Reticon spectrometer to determine the integrated fluxes in the region 370-950 nm, and the use of model atmospheres constructed with the previously developed MARCS code. (author)

  1. New calibration technique for KCD-based megavoltage imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samant, Sanjiv S.; Zheng, Wei; DiBianca, Frank A.; Zeman, Herbert D.; Laughter, Joseph S.

    1999-05-01

    In megavoltage imaging, current commercial electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs), despite having the advantage of immediate digital imaging over film, suffer from poor image contrast and spatial resolution. The feasibility of using a kinestatic charge detector (KCD) as an EPID to provide superior image contrast and spatial resolution for portal imaging has already been demonstrated in a previous paper. The KCD system had the additional advantage of requiring an extremely low dose per acquired image, allowing for superior imaging to be reconstructed form a single linac pulse per image pixel. The KCD based images utilized a dose of two orders of magnitude less that for EPIDs and film. Compared with the current commercial EPIDs and film, the prototype KCD system exhibited promising image qualities, despite being handicapped by the use of a relatively simple image calibration technique, and the performance limits of medical linacs on the maximum linac pulse frequency and energy flux per pulse delivered. This image calibration technique fixed relative image pixel values based on a linear interpolation of extrema provided by an air-water calibration, and accounted only for channel-to-channel variations. The counterpart of this for area detectors is the standard flat fielding method. A comprehensive calibration protocol has been developed. The new technique additionally corrects for geometric distortions due to variations in the scan velocity, and timing artifacts caused by mis-synchronization between the linear accelerator and the data acquisition system (DAS). The role of variations in energy flux (2 - 3%) on imaging is demonstrated to be not significant for the images considered. The methodology is presented, and the results are discussed for simulated images. It also allows for significant improvements in the signal-to- noise ratio (SNR) by increasing the dose using multiple images without having to increase the linac pulse frequency or energy flux per pulse. The

  2. Comprehensive analysis of proton range uncertainties related to patient stopping-power-ratio estimation using the stoichiometric calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Zhu, X. Ronald; Park, Peter C.; Titt, Uwe; Mohan, Radhe; Virshup, Gary; Clayton, James E.; Dong, Lei

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze factors affecting proton stopping-power-ratio (SPR) estimations and range uncertainties in proton therapy planning using the standard stoichiometric calibration. The SPR uncertainties were grouped into five categories according to their origins and then estimated based on previously published reports or measurements. For the first time, the impact of tissue composition variations on SPR estimation was assessed and the uncertainty estimates of each category were determined for low-density (lung), soft, and high-density (bone) tissues. A composite, 95th percentile water-equivalent-thickness uncertainty was calculated from multiple beam directions in 15 patients with various types of cancer undergoing proton therapy. The SPR uncertainties (1σ) were quite different (ranging from 1.6% to 5.0%) in different tissue groups, although the final combined uncertainty (95th percentile) for different treatment sites was fairly consistent at 3.0-3.4%, primarily because soft tissue is the dominant tissue type in the human body. The dominant contributing factor for uncertainties in soft tissues was the degeneracy of Hounsfield numbers in the presence of tissue composition variations. To reduce the overall uncertainties in SPR estimation, the use of dual-energy computed tomography is suggested. The values recommended in this study based on typical treatment sites and a small group of patients roughly agree with the commonly referenced value (3.5%) used for margin design. By using tissue-specific range uncertainties, one could estimate the beam-specific range margin by accounting for different types and amounts of tissues along a beam, which may allow for customization of range uncertainty for each beam direction.

  3. Water to atmosphere fluxes of 131I in relation with alkyl-iodide compounds from the Seine Estuary (France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connan, Olivier; Tessier, Emmanuel; Maro, Denis; Amouroux, David; Hebert, Didier; Rozet, Marianne; Voiseux, Claire; Solier, Luc

    2008-01-01

    This study presents an original work on measurements of stable and radioactive iodinated species in the Seine estuary (France), with estimates fluxes of volatile gaseous species from water to the atmosphere. Various iodinated compounds were identified in water and air in particular 131 I in water, what is unusual. Concentrations and behaviour of iodinated elements in the Seine estuary seem similar to what has been observed in other European estuaries. MeI (Methyl Iodide) and Total Volatile Iodine (TVI) fluxes from water to air vary between 392 and 13949 pmol m -2 d -1 and between 1279 and 16484 pmol m -2 d -1 , respectively. Water to air flux of TVI for the Seine river was estimated in the range 4-46 kg y -1 . Measurements of 131 I in water varying between 0.4 and 11.9 Bq m -3 . Fluxes of 131 I from water to atmosphere are in the range 2.4 x 10 5 -1.3 x 10 7 Bq y -1 , close to an annual discharge of 131 I by a nuclear reactor

  4. The MUSCLES Treasury Survey. IV. Scaling Relations for Ultraviolet, Ca II K, and Energetic Particle Fluxes from M Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngblood, Allison; France, Kevin; Loyd, R. O. Parke; Brown, Alexander; Mason, James P.; Schneider, P. Christian; Tilley, Matt A.; Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Buccino, Andrea; Froning, Cynthia S.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Linsky, Jeffrey; Mauas, Pablo J. D.; Redfield, Seth; Kowalski, Adam; Miguel, Yamila; Newton, Elisabeth R.; Rugheimer, Sarah; Segura, Antígona; Roberge, Aki; Vieytes, Mariela

    2017-07-01

    Characterizing the UV spectral energy distribution (SED) of an exoplanet host star is critically important for assessing its planet’s potential habitability, particularly for M dwarfs, as they are prime targets for current and near-term exoplanet characterization efforts and atmospheric models predict that their UV radiation can produce photochemistry on habitable zone planets different from that on Earth. To derive ground-based proxies for UV emission for use when Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations are unavailable, we have assembled a sample of 15 early to mid-M dwarfs observed by HST and compared their nonsimultaneous UV and optical spectra. We find that the equivalent width of the chromospheric Ca II K line at 3933 Å, when corrected for spectral type, can be used to estimate the stellar surface flux in ultraviolet emission lines, including H I Lyα. In addition, we address another potential driver of habitability: energetic particle fluxes associated with flares. We present a new technique for estimating soft X-ray and >10 MeV proton flux during far-UV emission line flares (Si IV and He II) by assuming solar-like energy partitions. We analyze several flares from the M4 dwarf GJ 876 observed with HST and Chandra as part of the MUSCLES Treasury Survey and find that habitable zone planets orbiting GJ 876 are impacted by large Carrington-like flares with peak soft X-ray fluxes ≥10-3 W m-2 and possible proton fluxes ˜102-103 pfu, approximately four orders of magnitude more frequently than modern-day Earth.

  5. The MUSCLES Treasury Survey. IV. Scaling Relations for Ultraviolet, Ca ii K, and Energetic Particle Fluxes from M Dwarfs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngblood, Allison; France, Kevin; Loyd, R. O. Parke; Mason, James P. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, 600 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Brown, Alexander [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Schneider, P. Christian [European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESA/ESTEC), Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands); Tilley, Matt A. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington, Box 351310, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Kowalski, Adam [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 2000 Colorado Ave., Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Buccino, Andrea; Mauas, Pablo J. D. [Dpto. de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (FCEN), Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Froning, Cynthia S. [Department of Astronomy/McDonald Observatory, C1400, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Hawley, Suzanne L. [Astronomy Department, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Linsky, Jeffrey [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Redfield, Seth [Astronomy Department and Van Vleck Observatory, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT 06459 (United States); Miguel, Yamila [Observatoire de la Cote d’Azur, Boulevard de l’Observatoire, CS 34229 F-06304 NICE Cedex 4 (France); Newton, Elisabeth R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Rugheimer, Sarah, E-mail: allison.youngblood@colorado.edu [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of St. Andrews, Irvine Building, North Street, St. Andrews, KY16 9AL (United Kingdom); and others

    2017-07-01

    Characterizing the UV spectral energy distribution (SED) of an exoplanet host star is critically important for assessing its planet’s potential habitability, particularly for M dwarfs, as they are prime targets for current and near-term exoplanet characterization efforts and atmospheric models predict that their UV radiation can produce photochemistry on habitable zone planets different from that on Earth. To derive ground-based proxies for UV emission for use when Hubble Space Telescope ( HST ) observations are unavailable, we have assembled a sample of 15 early to mid-M dwarfs observed by HST and compared their nonsimultaneous UV and optical spectra. We find that the equivalent width of the chromospheric Ca ii K line at 3933 Å, when corrected for spectral type, can be used to estimate the stellar surface flux in ultraviolet emission lines, including H i Ly α . In addition, we address another potential driver of habitability: energetic particle fluxes associated with flares. We present a new technique for estimating soft X-ray and >10 MeV proton flux during far-UV emission line flares (Si iv and He ii) by assuming solar-like energy partitions. We analyze several flares from the M4 dwarf GJ 876 observed with HST and Chandra as part of the MUSCLES Treasury Survey and find that habitable zone planets orbiting GJ 876 are impacted by large Carrington-like flares with peak soft X-ray fluxes ≥10{sup −3} W m{sup −2} and possible proton fluxes ∼10{sup 2}–10{sup 3} pfu, approximately four orders of magnitude more frequently than modern-day Earth.

  6. The MUSCLES Treasury Survey. IV. Scaling Relations for Ultraviolet, Ca ii K, and Energetic Particle Fluxes from M Dwarfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngblood, Allison; France, Kevin; Loyd, R. O. Parke; Mason, James P.; Brown, Alexander; Schneider, P. Christian; Tilley, Matt A.; Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Kowalski, Adam; Buccino, Andrea; Mauas, Pablo J. D.; Froning, Cynthia S.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Linsky, Jeffrey; Redfield, Seth; Miguel, Yamila; Newton, Elisabeth R.; Rugheimer, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Characterizing the UV spectral energy distribution (SED) of an exoplanet host star is critically important for assessing its planet’s potential habitability, particularly for M dwarfs, as they are prime targets for current and near-term exoplanet characterization efforts and atmospheric models predict that their UV radiation can produce photochemistry on habitable zone planets different from that on Earth. To derive ground-based proxies for UV emission for use when Hubble Space Telescope ( HST ) observations are unavailable, we have assembled a sample of 15 early to mid-M dwarfs observed by HST and compared their nonsimultaneous UV and optical spectra. We find that the equivalent width of the chromospheric Ca ii K line at 3933 Å, when corrected for spectral type, can be used to estimate the stellar surface flux in ultraviolet emission lines, including H i Ly α . In addition, we address another potential driver of habitability: energetic particle fluxes associated with flares. We present a new technique for estimating soft X-ray and >10 MeV proton flux during far-UV emission line flares (Si iv and He ii) by assuming solar-like energy partitions. We analyze several flares from the M4 dwarf GJ 876 observed with HST and Chandra as part of the MUSCLES Treasury Survey and find that habitable zone planets orbiting GJ 876 are impacted by large Carrington-like flares with peak soft X-ray fluxes ≥10 −3 W m −2 and possible proton fluxes ∼10 2 –10 3 pfu, approximately four orders of magnitude more frequently than modern-day Earth.

  7. Changes of soil carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide fluxes in relation to land use/cover management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooch, Yahya; Moghimian, Negar; Bayranvand, Mohammad; Alberti, Giorgio

    2016-06-01

    Conversions of land use/cover are associated with changes in soil properties and biogeochemical cycling, with implications for carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and trace gas fluxes. In an attempt to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the significance of different land uses (Alnus subcordata plantation, Taxodium distichum plantation, agriculture, and deforested areas) on soil features and on the dynamics of greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes at local scale, this study was carried out in Mazandaran province, northern Iran. Sixteen samples per land use, from the top 10 cm of soil, were taken, from which bulk density, texture, water content, pH, organic C, total N, microbial biomass of C and N, and earthworm density/biomass were determined. In addition, the seasonal changes in the fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) were monitored over a year. Our results indicated that the different land uses were different in terms of soil properties and GHG fluxes. Even though the amount of the GHG varied widely during the year, the highest CO2 and CH4 fluxes (0.32 mg CO2 m(-2) day(-1) and 0.11 mg CH4 m(-2) day(-1), respectively) were recorded in the deforested areas. N2O flux was higher in Alnus plantation (0.18 mg N2O m(-2) day(-1)) and deforested areas (0.17 mg N2O m(-2) day(-1)) than at agriculture site (0.05 mg N2O m(-2) day(-1)) and Taxodium plantation (0.03 mg N2O m(-2) day(-1)). This study demonstrated strong impacts of land use change on soil-atmosphere trace gas exchanges and provides useful observational constraints for top-down and bottom-up biogeochemistry models.

  8. The Schmidt hammer as a relative-age dating tool and its potential for calibrated-age dating in Holocene glaciated environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakesby, Richard A.; Matthews, John A.; Owen, Geraint

    2006-11-01

    The Schmidt hammer is a relatively cheap, portable, sturdy instrument with proven value over the last two decades or so in rapidly dating coarse inorganic deposits of diverse origins. Early views were that its dating role was limited to distinguishing recently exposed from much older. Typically, either a few sites of possibly different ages or occasional older surfaces amongst many young sites were studied. More recently, calibration curves based on individual R-value means from small numbers (2-4) of sites of known ages have been used to estimate the ages of undated sites. We present Schmidt hammer rebound ( R-) values from 28 'Little Ice Age' (and younger), 23 Preboreal and 7 Younger Dryas glaciated surfaces in southern Norway in order, first, to test rigorously the robustness of the instrument as a relative-age dating tool. Despite being obtained from different surfaces (moraines, glaciofluvial deposits and bedrock) and varied metamorphic lithologies, the R-value overall means and 95% confidence intervals for the 'Little Ice Age', Preboreal and Younger Dryas age categories (respectively, 60.0±1.6, 41.6±1.4 and 34.2±2.0) are statistically significantly different. Only two outlying sites in the two younger age categories have overlapping confidence intervals, demonstrating remarkable robustness in differentiating early- and late-Holocene surfaces. The distinction between Preboreal and Younger Dryas sites (with terminal dates factors, including some previously considered critical (instrument wear, operator bias, initial rock surface texture), which emerge either as less important than previously argued or as relatively unimportant, together with others previously unreported (e.g. long-term changes in lichen, soil, snow and vegetation covers). Third, we investigate the potential for calibrated-age dating by applying exploratory, linear rates of R-value decline to selected combinations of sites. The results suggest that error limits of ca ±700 to ±1600 years

  9. Self-Calibration of CMB Polarimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Precision measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation, especially experiments seeking to detect the odd-parity "B-modes", have far-reaching implications for cosmology. To detect the B-modes generated during inflation the flux response and polarization angle of these experiments must be calibrated to exquisite precision. While suitable flux calibration sources abound, polarization angle calibrators are deficient in many respects. Man-made polarized sources are often not located in the antenna's far-field, have spectral properties that are radically different from the CMB's, are cumbersome to implement and may be inherently unstable over the (long) duration these searches require to detect the faint signature of the inflationary epoch. Astrophysical sources suffer from time, frequency and spatial variability, are not visible from all CMB observatories, and none are understood with sufficient accuracy to calibrate future CMB polarimeters seeking to probe inflationary energy scales of ~1000 TeV. CMB TB and EB modes, expected to identically vanish in the standard cosmological model, can be used to calibrate CMB polarimeters. By enforcing the observed EB and TB power spectra to be consistent with zero, CMB polarimeters can be calibrated to levels not possible with man-made or astrophysical sources. All of this can be accomplished without any loss of observing time using a calibration source which is spectrally identical to the CMB B-modes. The calibration procedure outlined here can be used for any CMB polarimeter.

  10. Relating Radiative Fluxes on Arctic Sea Ice Area Using Arctic Observation and Reanalysis Integrated System (ArORIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sledd, A.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.

    2017-12-01

    With Arctic sea ice declining rapidly and Arctic temperatures rising faster than the rest of the globe, a better understanding of the Arctic climate, and ice cover-radiation feedbacks in particular, is needed. Here we present the Arctic Observation and Reanalysis Integrated System (ArORIS), a dataset of integrated products to facilitate studying the Arctic using satellite, reanalysis, and in-situ datasets. The data include cloud properties, radiative fluxes, aerosols, meteorology, precipitation, and surface properties, to name just a few. Each dataset has uniform grid-spacing, time-averaging and naming conventions for ease of use between products. One intended use of ArORIS is to assess Arctic radiation and moisture budgets. Following that goal, we use observations from ArORIS - CERES-EBAF radiative fluxes and NSIDC sea ice fraction and area to quantify relationships between the Arctic energy balance and surface properties. We find a discernable difference between energy budgets for years with high and low September sea ice areas. Surface fluxes are especially responsive to the September sea ice minimum in months both leading up to September and the months following. In particular, longwave fluxes at the surface show increased sensitivity in the months preceding September. Using a single-layer model of solar radiation we also investigate the individual responses of surface and planetary albedos to changes in sea ice area. By partitioning the planetary albedo into surface and atmospheric contributions, we find that the atmospheric contribution to planetary albedo is less sensitive to changes in sea ice area than the surface contribution. Further comparisons between observations and reanalyses can be made using the available datasets in ArORIS.

  11. Calibration of multivariate scatter plots for exploratory analysis of relations within and between sets of variables in genomic research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graffelman, J.; Eeuwijk, van F.A.

    2005-01-01

    The scatter plot is a well known and easily applicable graphical tool to explore relationships between two quantitative variables. For the exploration of relations between multiple variables, generalisations of the scatter plot are useful. We present an overview of multivariate scatter plots

  12. The evaluation of the diet/disease relation in the EPIC study: considerations for the calibration and the disease models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrari, Pietro; Day, Nicholas E; Boshuizen, Hendriek C

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: International multicentre studies on diet and cancer are relatively new in epidemiological research. They offer a series of challenging methodological issues for the evaluation of the association between dietary exposure and disease outcomes, which can both be quite heterogeneous acro...

  13. Seasonal and annual variation in planktonic foraminiferal fluxes including warm period related El Niño in the northwestern North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroyanagi, A.; Kawahata, H.; Nishi, H.; Honda, M. C.

    2007-12-01

    Planktonic foraminifera provide a record of the upper ocean environment through their species assemblage and individual tests. To investigate the relationship between foraminifera and oceanographic conditions and the impact of El Niño on foraminifera, we analyzed foraminiferal fluxes and relative abundances by using sediment trap samples collected biweekly at three sites in the northwestern North Pacific: Site 40N (39 °60'N, 165 °00'E), Site KNOT (43 °58'N, 155 °03'E), and Site 50N (50 °01'N, 165 °02'E) from 1998- 2001, a period that included an El Niño effect. Based on foraminiferal production and assemblage composition, we divided the sampling duration into several periods during which certain characteristic oceanographic properties were observed. These sampling periods were classified into five types (I-V) based upon four factors: 1) the predominant foraminiferal group, 2) total foraminiferal fluxes (TFFs), 3) organic matter (OM) fluxes, and 4) hydrographic conditions, which included sea surface temperature (SST) and thermal structure. Our results suggest that seasonal changes in foraminifera were closely related to water mass properties in addition to SST. If species compositions were the same, then water mass properties were the most important factors affecting the seasonal variation of foraminiferal abundance in the northwestern North Pacific. Although one of the major controlling factors for foraminiferal fluxes is food availability, the controlling factors for each type (types I-V) are different because of specific oceanographic situations, such as phytoplankton blooms, which result in an excess food supply for foraminifera. At Site KNOT in 1998, SST was remarkably high because of El Niño, and high surface temperatures and weak winds would have lowered nutrient supply and intensified water column stratification, resulting in the relatively low fluxes of total foraminifera, N. pachyderma, and G. bulloides, and the high fluxes of N. dutertrei that

  14. Intercomparison of the means of calibration relating to the measuring assemblies used in the refuelling of motor vehicles with liquefied petroleum gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvert, L.; Verdonck, J.

    1982-09-01

    The calibration systems of all member countries equipped to calibrate road-side pumps delivering liquified petroleum gas (LPG) were included in the intercomparison - double water displacement gauge (F) - simple water displacement gauge (D) - ''bombola'' (I) - master meter (UK). The comparison was made with a pipe prover (piston) which circulated between the participating laboratories. The results have shown that only the simple water displacement gauge and the pipe prover have adequate properties for the metrological calibration.

  15. Cross Calibration of the GPS Constellation CXD Proton Data With GOES EPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Matthew R.; Sullivan, John P.; Morley, Steven K.; Rodriguez, Juan V.

    2018-03-01

    Accurate proton flux measurements of the near-Earth environment are essential to the understanding of many phenomena which have a direct impact on our lives. Currently, there is only a small set of satellites capable of performing these measurements which makes certain studies and analyses difficult. This paper details the capabilities of the Combined X-ray Dosimeter (CXD), flown on 21 satellites of the Global Positioning System constellation, as it relates to proton measurements. We present a cross calibration of the CXD with the Energetic Particle Sensor (EPS) onboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. By utilizing Solar Energetic Particle Events when both sets of satellites were operational we have orders of magnitude in flux and energy to compare against. Robust statistical analyses show that the CXD and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite flux calculations are similar and that for proton energies >30 MeV the CXD fluxes are on average within 20% of EPS. Although the CXD has a response to protons as low as 6 MeV, the sensitivity at energies below 20 MeV is reduced and so flux comparisons of these are generally worse. Integral flux values >10 MeV are typically within 40% of EPS. These calibrated CXD data sets will give researchers capabilities to study solar proton access to the inner magnetosphere down to L 4 near the equatorial plane at high temporal cadence.

  16. Flux cutting in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, A M

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes experiments and theories of flux cutting in superconductors. The use of the flux line picture in free space is discussed. In superconductors cutting can either be by means of flux at an angle to other layers of flux, as in longitudinal current experiments, or due to shearing of the vortex lattice as in grain boundaries in YBCO. Experiments on longitudinal currents can be interpreted in terms of flux rings penetrating axial lines. More physical models of flux cutting are discussed but all predict much larger flux cutting forces than are observed. Also, cutting is occurring at angles between vortices of about one millidegree which is hard to explain. The double critical state model and its developments are discussed in relation to experiments on crossed and rotating fields. A new experiment suggested by Clem gives more direct information. It shows that an elliptical yield surface of the critical state works well, but none of the theoretical proposals for determining the direction of E are universally applicable. It appears that, as soon as any flux flow takes place, cutting also occurs. The conclusion is that new theories are required. (perspective)

  17. Optimal, Reliability-Based Code Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2002-01-01

    Reliability based code calibration is considered in this paper. It is described how the results of FORM based reliability analysis may be related to the partial safety factors and characteristic values. The code calibration problem is presented in a decision theoretical form and it is discussed how...... of reliability based code calibration of LRFD based design codes....

  18. Rainfall partitioning and related hydrochemical fluxes in a diverse and in a mono specific (Phenakospermum guyannense) secondary vegetation stand in eastern Amazonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölscher, D; Sá, T D A; Möller, R F; Denich, M; Fölster, H

    1998-04-01

    Rainfall partitioning into throughfall and stemflow was studied in a diverse and in a mono specific stand of secondary vegetation in Eastern Amazonia. The nutrient concentrations in the water were analysed in order to quantify the related hydrochemical fluxes. Secondary vegetation forms the fallow in the local shifting cultivation system and is usually dominated by shrubs and trees. Phenakospermum guyannense (Strelitziaceae), a banana-like herb, is one of the predominant non-woody species. The study was conducted during an 18-month period in a 2.5-year-old relatively species-rich stand and a 10-year-old stand dominated by P. guyannense. In a year with 1956 mm of rainfall 65% (1281 mm) of this quantity reached the soil as throughfall in the diverse stand and 38% (743 mm) in the mono specific stand. Stemflow was estimated to be 23% and 41% respectively. P. guyannense and Banara guianensis (Flacourtiaceae), a tree species, were causing these high funnelling effects. In the young diverse stand B. guianensis had a stemflow of more than 200 l year -1 and P. guyannense had a median flux of 77 l year -1 per pseudostem. In the older stand the taller plants of P.␣guyannense collected 644 l year -1 per pseudostem on the median. The reason for these high values could be the banana-like growth form of P. guyannense and the crown morphology of B. guianensis, which has inclined branches. The low proportion of throughfall and the high stemflow values differ from all previous studies in Amazonian primary forests. The proximity to the Atlantic Ocean strongly influenced the nutrient fluxes via rainfall at our study site. This becomes obvious from the high Na and Cl fluxes with rainfall (19.7 kg Na ha -1 year -1 , 37.2 kg Cl ha -1 year -1 ) which were approximately equal to the Na and Cl fluxes with the sum of throughfall and stemflow for both stands. K fluxes in throughfall and stemflow in both stands were higher than in rainfall by a factor of 8. The high K

  19. Calibration of multivariate scatter plots for exploratory analysis of relations within and between sets of variables in genomic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffelman, Jan; van Eeuwijk, Fred

    2005-12-01

    The scatter plot is a well known and easily applicable graphical tool to explore relationships between two quantitative variables. For the exploration of relations between multiple variables, generalisations of the scatter plot are useful. We present an overview of multivariate scatter plots focussing on the following situations. Firstly, we look at a scatter plot for portraying relations between quantitative variables within one data matrix. Secondly, we discuss a similar plot for the case of qualitative variables. Thirdly, we describe scatter plots for the relationships between two sets of variables where we focus on correlations. Finally, we treat plots of the relationships between multiple response and predictor variables, focussing on the matrix of regression coefficients. We will present both known and new results, where an important original contribution concerns a procedure for the inclusion of scales for the variables in multivariate scatter plots. We provide software for drawing such scales. We illustrate the construction and interpretation of the plots by means of examples on data collected in a genomic research program on taste in tomato.

  20. Flux quanta, magnetic field lines, merging – some sub-microscale relations of interest in space plasma physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Treumann

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We clarify the notion of magnetic field lines in plasma by referring to sub-microscale (quantum mechanical particle dynamics. It is demonstrated that magnetic field lines in a field of strength B carry single magnetic flux quanta Φ0=h/e. The radius of a field line in the given magnetic field B is calculated. It is shown that such field lines can merge and annihilate only over the length ℓ∥ of their strictly anti-parallel sections, for which case we estimate the power generated. The length ℓ∥ becomes a function of the inclination angle θ of the two merging magnetic flux tubes (field lines. Merging is possible only in the interval 12πθ≤π. This provides a sub-microscopic basis for "component reconnection" in classical macro-scale reconnection. We also find that the magnetic diffusion coefficient in plasma appears in quanta D0m=eΦ0/me=h/me. This lets us conclude that the bulk perpendicular plasma resistivity is limited and cannot be less than η0⊥=μ0eΦ0/me=μ0h/me~10−9 Ohm m. This resistance is an invariant.

  1. Ozone uptake (flux) as it relates to ozone-induced foliar symptoms of Prunus serotina and Populus maximowizii x trichocarpa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orendovici-Best, T.; Skelly, J.M.; Davis, D.D.; Ferdinand, J.A.; Savage, J.E.; Stevenson, R.E.

    2008-01-01

    Field studies were conducted during 2003 and 2004 from early June to the end of August, at 20 sites of lower or higher elevation within north-central Pennsylvania, using seedlings of black cherry (Prunus serotina, Ehrh.) and ramets of hybrid poplar (Populus maximowizii x trichocarpa). A linear model was developed to estimate the influence of local environmental conditions on stomatal conductance. The most significant factors explaining stomatal variance were tree species, air temperature, leaf vapor pressure deficit, elevation, and time of day. Overall, environmental factors explained less than 35% of the variation in stomatal conductance. Ozone did not affect gas exchange rates in either poplar or cherry. Ozone-induced foliar injury was positively correlated with cumulative ozone exposures, expressed as SUM40. Overall, the amount of foliar injury was better correlated to a flux-based approach rather than to an exposure-based approach. More severe foliar injuries were observed on plants growing at higher elevations. - Within heterogeneous environments, ozone flux does not completely explain the variation observed in ozone-induced visible injury

  2. Relation between nonlinear or 'not-linear' characteristics in nuclear kinetics and noise analysis of neutron flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, H.

    1975-01-01

    The 'not-linear' or '2nd-class-nonlinear' characteristics in nuclear reactor kinetics with the feedback effect in the high-power operation and induce the increase in the amplitude of the neutron flux noise, specially in the very low frequency region. The fundamental behaviour of 'not-linear' characteristics and its effect for the reactor noise was investigated. Application of the reactor noise analysis technique to power reactors has not been successful because of unknown large disagreement between the result of the conventional theoretical analysis and the experimental facts. When the cause of this discrepancy is clear, reactor noise analysis techniques can be effectively applied to instrumentation, control, monitoring and diagnosis of power reactors. (author)

  3. On the fine structure of medium energy electron fluxes in the auroral zone and related effects in the ionospheric D-region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Hargreaves

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This study is based on measurements of trapped and precipitated electrons of energy >30 keV and >100 keV observed by polar orbiting environmental satellites during overpasses of the imaging riometer at Kilpisjärvi, Finland. The satellites are in sun-synchronous orbits of about 850 km altitude, recording the electron fluxes at 2-s time resolution. The riometer measures the radiowave absorption at 38.2 MHz, showing the spatial pattern within a 240 km field of view. The analysis has focussed on two areas. Having found a close correlation between the radiowave absorption and the medium-energy electron fluxes during satellite overpasses, empirical relationships are derived, enabling one quantity to be predicted from the other for three sectors of local time. It is shown that small-scale variations observed during a pass are essentially spatial rather than temporal. Other properties, such as the spectra and the relation between precipitated and trapped components, are also considered in the light of the theory of pitch angle scattering by VLF waves. It is found that the properties and behaviour depend strongly on the time of day. In the noon sector, the precipitated and trapped fluxes are highly correlated through a square law relationship.

  4. Pressures Detector Calibration and Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2156315

    2016-01-01

    This is report of my first and second projects (of 3) in NA61. I did data taking and analysis in order to do calibration of pressure detectors and verified it. I analyzed the data by ROOT software using the C ++ programming language. The first part of my project was determination of calibration factor of pressure sensors. Based on that result, I examined the relation between pressure drop, gas flow rate of in paper filter and its diameter.

  5. Mercury Continuous Emmission Monitor Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster; Joseph Rovani

    2009-03-12

    /mass spectrometry (ID/ICP/MS) performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD. The outputs of mercury calibrators are compared to one another using a nesting procedure which allows direct comparison of one calibrator with another at specific concentrations and eliminates analyzer variability effects. The qualification portion of the EPA interim traceability protocol requires the vendors to define calibrator performance as affected by variables such as pressure, temperature, line voltage, and shipping. In 2007 WRI developed and conducted a series of simplified qualification experiments to determine actual calibrator performance related to the variables defined in the qualification portion of the interim protocol.

  6. Sonar gas flux estimation by bubble insonification: application to methane bubble flux from seep areas in the outer Laptev Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifer, Ira; Chernykh, Denis; Shakhova, Natalia; Semiletov, Igor

    2017-06-01

    Sonar surveys provide an effective mechanism for mapping seabed methane flux emissions, with Arctic submerged permafrost seepage having great potential to significantly affect climate. We created in situ engineered bubble plumes from 40 m depth with fluxes spanning 0.019 to 1.1 L s-1 to derive the in situ calibration curve (Q(σ)). These nonlinear curves related flux (Q) to sonar return (σ) for a multibeam echosounder (MBES) and a single-beam echosounder (SBES) for a range of depths. The analysis demonstrated significant multiple bubble acoustic scattering - precluding the use of a theoretical approach to derive Q(σ) from the product of the bubble σ(r) and the bubble size distribution where r is bubble radius. The bubble plume σ occurrence probability distribution function (Ψ(σ)) with respect to Q found Ψ(σ) for weak σ well described by a power law that likely correlated with small-bubble dispersion and was strongly depth dependent. Ψ(σ) for strong σ was largely depth independent, consistent with bubble plume behavior where large bubbles in a plume remain in a focused core. Ψ(σ) was bimodal for all but the weakest plumes. Q(σ) was applied to sonar observations of natural arctic Laptev Sea seepage after accounting for volumetric change with numerical bubble plume simulations. Simulations addressed different depths and gases between calibration and seep plumes. Total mass fluxes (Qm) were 5.56, 42.73, and 4.88 mmol s-1 for MBES data with good to reasonable agreement (4-37 %) between the SBES and MBES systems. The seepage flux occurrence probability distribution function (Ψ(Q)) was bimodal, with weak Ψ(Q) in each seep area well described by a power law, suggesting primarily minor bubble plumes. The seepage-mapped spatial patterns suggested subsurface geologic control attributing methane fluxes to the current state of subsea permafrost.

  7. Nitrous oxide emissions from cropland: a procedure for calibrating the DayCent biogeochemical model using inverse modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Rashad; Fienen, Michael N.; Parkin, Timothy B.; Anex, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    DayCent is a biogeochemical model of intermediate complexity widely used to simulate greenhouse gases (GHG), soil organic carbon and nutrients in crop, grassland, forest and savannah ecosystems. Although this model has been applied to a wide range of ecosystems, it is still typically parameterized through a traditional “trial and error” approach and has not been calibrated using statistical inverse modelling (i.e. algorithmic parameter estimation). The aim of this study is to establish and demonstrate a procedure for calibration of DayCent to improve estimation of GHG emissions. We coupled DayCent with the parameter estimation (PEST) software for inverse modelling. The PEST software can be used for calibration through regularized inversion as well as model sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. The DayCent model was analysed and calibrated using N2O flux data collected over 2 years at the Iowa State University Agronomy and Agricultural Engineering Research Farms, Boone, IA. Crop year 2003 data were used for model calibration and 2004 data were used for validation. The optimization of DayCent model parameters using PEST significantly reduced model residuals relative to the default DayCent parameter values. Parameter estimation improved the model performance by reducing the sum of weighted squared residual difference between measured and modelled outputs by up to 67 %. For the calibration period, simulation with the default model parameter values underestimated mean daily N2O flux by 98 %. After parameter estimation, the model underestimated the mean daily fluxes by 35 %. During the validation period, the calibrated model reduced sum of weighted squared residuals by 20 % relative to the default simulation. Sensitivity analysis performed provides important insights into the model structure providing guidance for model improvement.

  8. Calibration of hydrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorefice, Salvatore; Malengo, Andrea

    2006-10-01

    After a brief description of the different methods employed in periodic calibration of hydrometers used in most cases to measure the density of liquids in the range between 500 kg m-3 and 2000 kg m-3, particular emphasis is given to the multipoint procedure based on hydrostatic weighing, known as well as Cuckow's method. The features of the calibration apparatus and the procedure used at the INRiM (formerly IMGC-CNR) density laboratory have been considered to assess all relevant contributions involved in the calibration of different kinds of hydrometers. The uncertainty is strongly dependent on the kind of hydrometer; in particular, the results highlight the importance of the density of the reference buoyant liquid, the temperature of calibration and the skill of operator in the reading of the scale in the whole assessment of the uncertainty. It is also interesting to realize that for high-resolution hydrometers (division of 0.1 kg m-3), the uncertainty contribution of the density of the reference liquid is the main source of the total uncertainty, but its importance falls under about 50% for hydrometers with a division of 0.5 kg m-3 and becomes somewhat negligible for hydrometers with a division of 1 kg m-3, for which the reading uncertainty is the predominant part of the total uncertainty. At present the best INRiM result is obtained with commercially available hydrometers having a scale division of 0.1 kg m-3, for which the relative uncertainty is about 12 × 10-6.

  9. Is reduced benthic flux related to the Diporeia decline? Analysis of spring blooms and whiting events in Lake Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, James M.; Rudstam, Lars G.; Crabtree, Darran L.; Walsh, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    Benthic monitoring by USGS off the southern shore of Lake Ontario from October 1993 to October 1995 provides a detailed view of the early stages of the decline of the native amphipod Diporeia. A loss of the 1994 and 1995 year classes of Diporeia preceded the disappearance of the native amphipod at sites near Oswego and Rochester at depths from 55 to 130 m. In succeeding years, Diporeia populations continued to decline in Lake Ontario and were nearly extirpated by 2008. Explanations for Diporeia 's decline in the Great Lakes include several hypotheses often linked to the introduction and expansion of exotic zebra and quagga mussels (Dreissena sp.). We compare the timeline of the Diporeia decline in Lake Ontario with trends in two sources of organic matter to the sediments — spring diatom blooms and late summer whiting events. The 1994–95 decline of Diporeia coincided with localized dreissenid effects on phytoplankton in the nearshore and a year (April 1994 to May 1995) of decreased flux of organic carbon recorded by sediment traps moored offshore of Oswego. Later declines of profundal (> 90 m) Diporeia populations in 2003 were poorly associated with trends in spring algal blooms and late summer whiting events. Lake Ontario/Diporeia/Dreissena/remote sensing.

  10. Carbon gas fluxes in re-established wetlands on organic soils differ relative to plant community and hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robin L.

    2011-01-01

    We measured CO2 and CH4 fluxes for 6 years following permanent flooding of an agriculturally managed organic soil at two water depths (~25 and ~55 cm standing water) in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California, as part of research studying C dynamics in re-established wetlands. Flooding rapidly reduced gaseous C losses, and radiocarbon data showed that this, in part, was due to reduced oxidation of "old" C preserved in the organic soils. Both CO2 and CH4 emissions from the water surface increased during the first few growing seasons, concomitant with emergent marsh establishment, and thereafter appeared to stabilize according to plant communities. Areas of emergent marsh vegetation in the shallower wetland had greater net CO2 influx (-485 mg Cm-1 h-1), and lower CH4 emissions (11.5 mg Cm-2 h-1), than in the deeper wetland (-381 and 14.1 mg Cm-2 h-1, respectively). Areas with submerged and floating vegetation in the deeper wetland had CH4 emissions similar to emergent vegetation (11.9 and 12.6 mg Cm-2 h-1, respectively), despite lower net CO2 influx (-102 gC m-2 h-1). Measurements of plant moderated net CO2 influx and CH4 efflux indicated greatest potential reduction of greenhouse gases in the more shallowly flooded wetland.

  11. Calibration and validation of the relative differenced Normalized Burn Ratio (RdNBR) to three measures of fire severity in the Sierra Nevada and Klamath Mountains, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.D.; Knapp, E.E.; Key, C.H.; Skinner, C.N.; Isbell, C.J.; Creasy, R.M.; Sherlock, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    isolating fire effects to individual vegetation strata when fire effects are mixed. We conclude that the models presented here and in Miller and Thode ([Miller, J.D. & Thode, A.E., (2007). Quantifying burn severity in a heterogeneous landscape with a relative version of the delta Normalized Burn Ratio (dNBR). Remote Sensing of Environment, 109, 66-80.]) can produce fire severity classifications (using either CBI, or percent change in canopy cover or basal area) that are of similar accuracy in fires not used in the original calibration process, at least in conifer dominated vegetation types in Mediterranean-climate California.

  12. Stefan-Maxwell Relations and Heat Flux with Anisotropic Transport Coefficients for Ionized Gases in a Magnetic Field with Application to the Problem of Ambipolar Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnichenko, A. V.; Marov, M. Ya.

    2018-01-01

    The defining relations for the thermodynamic diffusion and heat fluxes in a multicomponent, partially ionized gas mixture in an external electromagnetic field have been obtained by the methods of the kinetic theory. Generalized Stefan-Maxwell relations and algebraic equations for anisotropic transport coefficients (the multicomponent diffusion, thermal diffusion, electric and thermoelectric conductivity coefficients as well as the thermal diffusion ratios) associated with diffusion-thermal processes have been derived. The defining second-order equations are derived by the Chapman-Enskog procedure using Sonine polynomial expansions. The modified Stefan-Maxwell relations are used for the description of ambipolar diffusion in the Earth's ionospheric plasma (in the F region) composed of electrons, ions of many species, and neutral particles in a strong electromagnetic field.

  13. Recommended inorganic chemicals for calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, J.R.; Greenberg, R.R.; Pratt, K.W.; Rains, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    All analytical techniques depend on the use of calibration chemicals to relate analyte concentration to an instrumental parameter. A fundamental component in the preparation of calibration solutions is the weighing of a pure chemical or metal before preparing a solution standard. The analyst must be assured that the purity, stoichiometry, and assay of the chemical are known. These terms have different meanings, and each has an important influence. This report is intended to assist the analyst in the selection and use of chemical standards for instrumental calibration. Purity, stoichiometry, and preparation of solutions for different purposes are discussed, and a critical evaluation of the best materials available for each element is presented for use in preparing solutions or calibration standards. Information on the chemical form, source, purity, drying, and appropriate precautions is given. In some cases, multiple sources or chemical forms are available. Certain radioactive elements, the transuranic elements, and the noble gases are not considered

  14. Are optical indices good proxies of seasonal changes in carbon fluxes and stress-related physiological status in a beech forest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestola, E; Scartazza, A; Di Baccio, D; Castagna, A; Ranieri, A; Cammarano, M; Mazzenga, F; Matteucci, G; Calfapietra, C

    2018-01-15

    This study investigates the functionality of a Mediterranean-mountain beech forest in Central Italy using simultaneous determinations of optical measurements, carbon (C) fluxes, leaf eco-physiological and biochemical traits during two growing seasons (2014-2015). Meteorological variables showed significant differences between the two growing seasons, highlighting a heat stress coupled with a reduced water availability in mid-summer 2015. As a result, a different C sink capacity of the forest was observed between the two years of study, due to the differences in stressful conditions and the related plant physiological status. Spectral indices related to vegetation (VIs, classified in structural, chlorophyll and carotenoid indices) were computed at top canopy level and used to track CO 2 fluxes and physiological changes. Optical indices related to structure (EVI 2, RDVI, DVI and MCARI 1) were found to better track Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) variations for 2014, while indices related to chlorophylls (SR red edge, CL red edge, MTCI and DR) provided better results for 2015. This suggests that when environmental conditions are not limiting for forest sink capacity, structural parameters are more strictly connected to C uptake, while under stress conditions indices related to functional features (e.g., chlorophyll content) become more relevant. Chlorophyll indices calculated with red edge bands (SR red edge, NDVI red edge, DR, CL red edge) resulted to be highly correlated with leaf nitrogen content (R 2 >0.70), while weaker, although significant, correlations were found with chlorophyll content. Carotenoid indices (PRI and PSRI) were strongly correlated with both chlorophylls and carotenoids content, suggesting that these indices are good proxies of the shifting pigment composition related to changes in soil moisture, heat stress and senescence. Our work suggests the importance of integrating different methods as a successful approach to understand how changing climatic

  15. Giant magnon solution and dispersion relation in string theory in AdS3×S3×T4 with mixed flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoare, B.; Stepanchuk, A.; Tseytlin, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    We address the question of the exact form of the dispersion relation for light-cone string excitations in string theory in AdS 3 ×S 3 ×T 4 with mixed R–R and NS–NS 3-form fluxes. The analogy with string theory in AdS 5 ×S 5 suggests that in addition to the data provided by the perturbative near-BMN expansion and symmetry algebra considerations there is another source of information for the dispersion relation – the semiclassical giant magnon solution. In earlier work in (arXiv:1303.1037) and (arXiv:1304.4099) we found that the symmetry algebra constraints, which are consistent with a perturbative expansion, do not completely determine the form of the dispersion relation. The aim of the present paper is to fix the dispersion relation by constructing a generalisation of the known dyonic giant magnon soliton on S 3 to the presence of a non-zero NS–NS flux described by a WZ term in the string action (with coefficient q). We find that the angular momentum of this soliton gets shifted by a term linear in world-sheet momentum p. We also discuss the symmetry algebra of the string light-cone S-matrix and show that the exact dispersion relation, which should have the correct perturbative BMN and semiclassical giant magnon limits, should also contain such a linear momentum term. The simplicity of the resulting bound-state picture provides a strong argument in favour of this dispersion relation

  16. SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF DATA FOR RADIOCARBON CALIBRATION : AN UPDATE TO THE INTERNATIONAL CALIBRATION (INTCAL) CRITERIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimer, Paula J.; Bard, Edouard; Bayliss, Alex; Beck, J. Warren; Blackwell, Paul G.; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Brown, David M.; Buck, Caitlin E.; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Friedrich, Michael; Grootes, Pieter M.; Guilderson, Thomas P.; Haflidason, Haflidi; Hajdas, Irka; Hatte, Christine; Heaton, Timothy J.; Hogg, Alan G.; Hughen, Konrad A.; Kaiser, K. Felix; Kromer, Bernd; Manning, Sturt W.; Reimer, Ron W.; Richards, David A.; Scott, E. Marian; Southon, John R.; Turney, Christian S. M.; van der Plicht, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    High-quality data from appropriate archives are needed for the continuing improvement of radiocarbon calibration curves. We discuss here the basic assumptions behind C-14 dating that necessitate calibration and the relative strengths and weaknesses of archives from which calibration data are

  17. DECal: A Spectrophotometric Calibration System For DECam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheault, Jean-Philippe; DePoy, D. L.; Marshall, J. L.; Prochaska, T.; Allen, R.; Wise, J.; Martin, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present preliminary results for a spectrophotometric calibration system that is being implemented as part of the DES DECam project at the Blanco 4 meter at CTIO. Our calibration system uses a 2nm wide tunable source to measure the instrumental response function of the telescope from 300nm up to 1100nm. This calibration will be performed regularly to monitor any change in the transmission function. The system consists of a monochromator based tunable light source that provides illumination on a dome flat that is monitored by calibrated photodiodes and allow us to measure the throughput as a function of wavelength. Our system has an output power of 2 mW, equivalent to a flux of approximately 800 photons/s/pixel on DECam. Preliminary results of the measure of the throughput of the telescope will be presented.

  18. Radionuclide calibrators performance evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora Ramirez, E.; Zeledon Fonseca, P.; Jimenez Cordero, M.

    2008-01-01

    Radionuclide calibrators are used to estimate accurately activity prior to administration to a patient, so it is very important that this equipment meets its performance requirements. The purpose of this paper is to compare the commercially available 'Calicheck' (Calcorp. Inc), used to assess linearity, versus the well-known source decay method, and also to show our results after performing several recommended quality control tests. The parameters that we wanted to evaluate were carried on using the Capintec CRC-15R and CRC-15 β radionuclide calibrators. The evaluated tests were: high voltage, display, zero adjust, background, reproducibility, source constancy, accuracy, precision and linearity. The first six tests were evaluated on the daily practice, here we analyzed the 2007 recorded data; and the last three were evaluated once a year. During the daily evaluation both calibrators performance were satisfactory comparing with the manufacture's requirements. The accuracy test show result within the ± 10% allowed for a field instrument. Precision performance is within the ± 1 % allowed. On the other hand, the linearity test shows that using the source decay method the relative coefficient is 0.9998, for both equipment and using the Calicheck the relative coefficient is 0.997. However, looking the percentage of error, during the 'Calicheck' test, its range goes from 0.0 % up to -25.35%, and using the source decay method, the range goes from 0.0 % up to -31.05 %, taking into account both instruments. Checking the 'Calicheck' results we can see that the results varying randomly, but using the source decay method the percentage of error increase as the source activity decrease. We conclude that both devices meet its manufactures requirements, in the case of the linearity using the decay method, decreasing the activity source, increasing the percentage of error, this may happen because of the equipment age. (author)

  19. Mercury CEM Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Schabron; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson

    2008-02-29

    outputs of mercury generators are compared to one another using a nesting procedure which allows direct comparison of one generator with another and eliminates analyzer variability effects. The qualification portion of the EPA interim traceability protocol requires the vendors to define generator performance as affected by variables such as pressure, temperature, line voltage, and shipping. WRI is focusing efforts to determine actual generator performance related to the variables defined in the qualification portion of the interim protocol. The protocol will then be further revised by EPA based on what can actually be achieved with the generators. Another focus of the study is to evaluate approaches for field verification of generator performance. Upcoming work includes evaluation of oxidized mercury calibration generators, for which a separate protocol will be prepared by EPA. In addition, the variability of the spectrometers/analyzers under various environmental conditions needs to be defined and understood better. A main objective of the current work is to provide data on the performance and capabilities of elemental mercury generator/calibration systems for the development of realistic NIST traceability protocols for mercury vapor standards for continuous emission CEM calibration. This work is providing a direct contribution to the enablement of continuous emissions monitoring at coal-fired power plants in conformance with the CAMR. EPA Specification 12 states that mercury CEMs must be calibrated with NIST-traceable standards (Federal Register 2005). The initial draft of an elemental mercury generator traceability protocol was circulated by EPA in May 2007 for comment, and an interim protocol was issued in August 2007 (EPA 2007). Initially it was assumed that the calibration and implementation of mercury CEMs would be relatively simple, and implementation would follow the implementation of the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} monitoring, and

  20. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waugh, C. J., E-mail: cjwaugh@mit.edu; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Rosenberg, M. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule.

  1. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, C J; Rosenberg, M J; Zylstra, A B; Frenje, J A; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Sangster, T C; Stoeckl, C

    2015-05-01

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule.

  2. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waugh, C. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2015-01-01

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule

  3. CALIBRATING UV STAR FORMATION RATES FOR DWARF GALAXIES FROM STARBIRDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Mitchell, Noah P. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street, S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E., E-mail: kmcquinn@astro.umn.edu [Raytheon Company, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Integrating our knowledge of star formation (SF) traced by observations at different wavelengths is essential for correctly interpreting and comparing SF activity in a variety of systems and environments. This study compares extinction corrected integrated ultraviolet (UV) emission from resolved galaxies with color–magnitude diagram (CMD) based star formation rates (SFRs) derived from resolved stellar populations and CMD fitting techniques in 19 nearby starburst and post-starburst dwarf galaxies. The data sets are from the panchromatic Starburst Irregular Dwarf Survey and include deep legacy GALEX UV imaging, Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging, and Spitzer MIPS imaging. For the majority of the sample, the integrated near-UV fluxes predicted from the CMD-based SFRs—using four different models—agree with the measured, extinction corrected, integrated near-UV fluxes from GALEX images, but the far-UV (FUV) predicted fluxes do not. Furthermore, we find a systematic deviation between the SFRs based on integrated FUV luminosities and existing scaling relations, and the SFRs based on the resolved stellar populations. This offset is not driven by different SF timescales, variations in SFRs, UV attenuation, nor stochastic effects. This first comparison between CMD-based SFRs and an integrated FUV emission SFR indicator suggests that the most likely cause of the discrepancy is the theoretical FUV–SFR calibration from stellar evolutionary libraries and/or stellar atmospheric models. We present an empirical calibration of the FUV-based SFR relation for dwarf galaxies, with uncertainties, which is ∼53% larger than previous relations.

  4. Meromorphic flux compactification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damian, Cesar [Departamento de Ingeniería Mecánica, Universidad de Guanajuato,Carretera Salamanca-Valle de Santiago Km 3.5+1.8 Comunidad de Palo Blanco,Salamanca (Mexico); Loaiza-Brito, Oscar [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Guanajuato,Loma del Bosque No. 103 Col. Lomas del Campestre C.P 37150 León, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2017-04-26

    We present exact solutions of four-dimensional Einstein’s equations related to Minkoswki vacuum constructed from Type IIB string theory with non-trivial fluxes. Following https://www.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP02(2015)187; https://www.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP02(2015)188 we study a non-trivial flux compactification on a fibered product by a four-dimensional torus and a two-dimensional sphere punctured by 5- and 7-branes. By considering only 3-form fluxes and the dilaton, as functions on the internal sphere coordinates, we show that these solutions correspond to a family of supersymmetric solutions constructed by the use of G-theory. Meromorphicity on functions constructed in terms of fluxes and warping factors guarantees that flux and 5-brane contributions to the scalar curvature vanish while fulfilling stringent constraints as tadpole cancelation and Bianchi identities. Different Einstein’s solutions are shown to be related by U-dualities. We present three supersymmetric non-trivial Minkowski vacuum solutions and compute the corresponding soft terms. We also construct a non-supersymmetric solution and study its stability.

  5. Meromorphic flux compactification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damian, Cesar; Loaiza-Brito, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    We present exact solutions of four-dimensional Einstein’s equations related to Minkoswki vacuum constructed from Type IIB string theory with non-trivial fluxes. Following https://www.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP02(2015)187; https://www.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP02(2015)188 we study a non-trivial flux compactification on a fibered product by a four-dimensional torus and a two-dimensional sphere punctured by 5- and 7-branes. By considering only 3-form fluxes and the dilaton, as functions on the internal sphere coordinates, we show that these solutions correspond to a family of supersymmetric solutions constructed by the use of G-theory. Meromorphicity on functions constructed in terms of fluxes and warping factors guarantees that flux and 5-brane contributions to the scalar curvature vanish while fulfilling stringent constraints as tadpole cancelation and Bianchi identities. Different Einstein’s solutions are shown to be related by U-dualities. We present three supersymmetric non-trivial Minkowski vacuum solutions and compute the corresponding soft terms. We also construct a non-supersymmetric solution and study its stability.

  6. Estimation of sensible and latent heat flux from natural sparse vegetation surfaces using surface renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, N.; Martínez-Cob, A.

    2001-12-01

    This paper reports a study undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of the surface renewal method to accurately estimate long-term evaporation from the playa and margins of an endorreic salty lagoon (Gallocanta lagoon, Spain) under semiarid conditions. High-frequency temperature readings were taken for two time lags ( r) and three measurement heights ( z) in order to get surface renewal sensible heat flux ( HSR) values. These values were compared against eddy covariance sensible heat flux ( HEC) values for a calibration period (25-30 July 2000). Error analysis statistics (index of agreement, IA; root mean square error, RMSE; and systematic mean square error, MSEs) showed that the agreement between HSR and HEC improved as measurement height decreased and time lag increased. Calibration factors α were obtained for all analyzed cases. The best results were obtained for the z=0.9 m ( r=0.75 s) case for which α=1.0 was observed. In this case, uncertainty was about 10% in terms of relative error ( RE). Latent heat flux values were obtained by solving the energy balance equation for both the surface renewal ( LESR) and the eddy covariance ( LEEC) methods, using HSR and HEC, respectively, and measurements of net radiation and soil heat flux. For the calibration period, error analysis statistics for LESR were quite similar to those for HSR, although errors were mostly at random. LESR uncertainty was less than 9%. Calibration factors were applied for a validation data subset (30 July-4 August 2000) for which meteorological conditions were somewhat different (higher temperatures and wind speed and lower solar and net radiation). Error analysis statistics for both HSR and LESR were quite good for all cases showing the goodness of the calibration factors. Nevertheless, the results obtained for the z=0.9 m ( r=0.75 s) case were still the best ones.

  7. Synthesis Polarimetry Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moellenbrock, George

    2017-10-01

    Synthesis instrumental polarization calibration fundamentals for both linear (ALMA) and circular (EVLA) feed bases are reviewed, with special attention to the calibration heuristics supported in CASA. Practical problems affecting modern instruments are also discussed.

  8. Planck 2013 results. VIII. HFI photometric calibration and mapmaking

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Armitage-Caplan, C; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bertincourt, B; Bielewicz, P; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bridges, M; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chen, X; Chiang, L -Y; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Filliard, C; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Lellouch, E; Leonardi, R; Leroy, C; Lesgourgues, J; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Maurin, L; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Moreno, R; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rusholme, B; Santos, D; Savini, G; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sureau, F; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Techene, S; Terenzi, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the processing applied to the HFI cleaned time-ordered data to produce photometrically calibrated maps. HFI observes the sky over a broad range of frequencies, from 100 to 857 GHz. To get the best accuracy on the calibration on such a large range, two different photometric calibration schemes have to be used. The 545 and 857 \\GHz\\ data are calibrated using Uranus and Neptune flux density measurements, compared with models of their atmospheric emissions to calibrate the data. The lower frequencies (below 353 GHz) are calibrated using the cosmological microwave background dipole.One of the components of this anisotropy results from the orbital motion of the satellite in the Solar System, and is therefore time-variable. Photometric calibration is thus tightly linked to mapmaking, which also addresses low frequency noise removal. The 2013 released HFI data show some evidence for apparent gain variations of the HFI bolometers' detection chain. These variations were identified by comparing obse...

  9. ORNL calibrations facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.D.; Gupton, E.D.; Lane, B.H.; Miller, J.H.; Nichols, S.W.

    1982-08-01

    The ORNL Calibrations Facility is operated by the Instrumentation Group of the Industrial Safety and Applied Health Physics Division. Its primary purpose is to maintain radiation calibration standards for calibration of ORNL health physics instruments and personnel dosimeters. This report includes a discussion of the radioactive sources and ancillary equipment in use and a step-by-step procedure for calibration of those survey instruments and personnel dosimeters in routine use at ORNL

  10. The CHEOPS calibration bench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildi, F.; Chazelas, B.; Deline, A.; Sarajlic, M.; Sordet, M.

    2017-09-01

    CHEOPS is an ESA Class S Mission aiming at the characterization of exoplanets through the precise measurement of their radius, using the transit method [1]. To achieve this goal, the payload is designed to be a high precision "absolute" photometer, looking at one star at a time. It will be able to cover la large fraction of the sky by repointing. Its launch is expected at the end of 2017 [2, this conference]. CHEOPS' main science is the measure of the transit of exoplanets of radius ranging from 1 to 6 Earth radii orbiting bright stars. The required photometric stability to reach this goal is of 20 ppm in 6 hours for a 9th magnitude star. The CHEOPS' only instrument is a Ritchey-Chretien style telescope with 300 mm effective aperture diameter, which provides a defocussed image of the target star on a single frame-transfer backside illuminated CCD detector cooled to -40°C and stabilized within 10 mK [2]. CHEOPS being in a LEO, it is equipped with a high performance baffle. The spacecraft platform provides a pointing stability of < 2 arcsec rms. This relatively modest pointing performance makes high quality flat-fielding necessary In the rest of this article we will refer to the only CHEOPS instrument simply as "CHEOP" Its behavior will be calibrated thoroughly on the ground and only a small subset of the calibrations can be redone in flight. The main focuses of the calibrations are the photonic gain stability and sensibility to the environment variations and the Flat field that has to be known at a precision better than 0.1%.

  11. Updates on the Performance and Calibration of HST/STIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Sean A.; Monroe, TalaWanda R.; Ogaz, Sara; Branton, Doug; Carlberg, Joleen K.; Debes, John H.; Jedrzejewski, Robert I.; Proffitt, Charles R.; Riley, Allyssa; Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Sonnentrucker, Paule; Walborn, Nolan R.; Welty, Daniel

    2018-06-01

    The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has been in orbit for 21 years and continues to produce high quality scientific results using a diverse complement of operating modes. These include spatially resolved spectroscopy in the UV and optical, high spatial resolution echelle spectroscopy in the UV, and solar-blind imaging in the UV. In addition, STIS possesses unique visible-light coronagraphic modes that keep the instrument at the forefront of exoplanet and debris-disk research. As the instrument's characteristics evolve over its lifetime, the instrument team at the Space Telescope Science Institute monitors its performance and works towards improving the quality of its data products. Here we present updates on the status of the STIS CCD and FUV & NUV MAMA detectors, as well as changes to the CalSTIS reduction pipeline. We also discuss progress toward the recalibration of the E140M/1425 echelle mode. The E140M grating blaze function shapes have changed since flux calibration was carried out following SM4, which limits the relative photometric flux accuracy of some spectral orders up to 5-10% at the edges. In Cycle 25 a special calibration program was executed to obtain updated sensitivity curves for the E140M/1425 setting.

  12. Neutron activation procedures used for the calibration of a nitrogen-16 reactor power monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jester, W.A.; Daubenspeck, T.

    2000-01-01

    Personnel from the Pennsylvania State University's Breazeale Nuclear Reactor assisted NRC (Nuclear Research Corporation) personnel in calibrating a new MSL/ 16 N Nitrogen-16 Monitor. Neutron flux calibration procedures utilized and the results obtained for the production of a nitrogen-16 source of known activity for a BGO detector calibration are described. (author)

  13. Soil organic matter dynamics and CO2 fluxes in relation to landscape scale processes: linking process understanding to regional scale carbon mass-balances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oost, Kristof; Nadeu, Elisabet; Wiaux, François; Wang, Zhengang; Stevens, François; Vanclooster, Marnik; Tran, Anh; Bogaert, Patrick; Doetterl, Sebastian; Lambot, Sébastien; Van wesemael, Bas

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we synthesize the main outcomes of a collaborative project (2009-2014) initiated at the UCL (Belgium). The main objective of the project was to increase our understanding of soil organic matter dynamics in complex landscapes and use this to improve predictions of regional scale soil carbon balances. In a first phase, the project characterized the emergent spatial variability in soil organic matter storage and key soil properties at the regional scale. Based on the integration of remote sensing, geomorphological and soil analysis techniques, we quantified the temporal and spatial variability of soil carbon stock and pool distribution at the local and regional scales. This work showed a linkage between lateral fluxes of C in relation with sediment transport and the spatial variation in carbon storage at multiple spatial scales. In a second phase, the project focused on characterizing key controlling factors and process interactions at the catena scale. In-situ experiments of soil CO2 respiration showed that the soil carbon response at the catena scale was spatially heterogeneous and was mainly controlled by the catenary variation of soil physical attributes (soil moisture, temperature, C quality). The hillslope scale characterization relied on advanced hydrogeophysical techniques such as GPR (Ground Penetrating Radar), EMI (Electromagnetic induction), ERT (Electrical Resistivity Tomography), and geophysical inversion and data mining tools. Finally, we report on the integration of these insights into a coupled and spatially explicit model and its application. Simulations showed that C stocks and redistribution of mass and energy fluxes are closely coupled, they induce structured spatial and temporal patterns with non negligible attached uncertainties. We discuss the main outcomes of these activities in relation to sink-source behavior and relevance of erosion processes for larger-scale C budgets.

  14. Analysis of the impact of climate change on groundwater related hydrological fluxes: a multi-model approach including different downscaling methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Stoll

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Climate change related modifications in the spatio-temporal distribution of precipitation and evapotranspiration will have an impact on groundwater resources. This study presents a modelling approach exploiting the advantages of integrated hydrological modelling and a broad climate model basis. We applied the integrated MIKE SHE model on a perialpine, small catchment in northern Switzerland near Zurich. To examine the impact of climate change we forced the hydrological model with data from eight GCM-RCM combinations showing systematic biases which are corrected by three different statistical downscaling methods, not only for precipitation but also for the variables that govern potential evapotranspiration. The downscaling methods are evaluated in a split sample test and the sensitivity of the downscaling procedure on the hydrological fluxes is analyzed. The RCMs resulted in very different projections of potential evapotranspiration and, especially, precipitation. All three downscaling methods reduced the differences between the predictions of the RCMs and all corrected predictions showed no future groundwater stress which can be related to an expected increase in precipitation during winter. It turned out that especially the timing of the precipitation and thus recharge is very important for the future development of the groundwater levels. However, the simulation experiments revealed the weaknesses of the downscaling methods which directly influence the predicted hydrological fluxes, and thus also the predicted groundwater levels. The downscaling process is identified as an important source of uncertainty in hydrological impact studies, which has to be accounted for. Therefore it is strongly recommended to test different downscaling methods by using verification data before applying them to climate model data.

  15. Calibration of RB reactor power; Kalibrisanje snage reaktora RB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotic, O; Markovic, H; Ninkovic, M; Strugar, P; Dimitrijevic, Z; Takac, S; Stefanovic, D; Kocic, A; Vranic, S [Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1976-09-15

    The first and only calibration of RB reactor power was done in 1962, and the obtained calibration ratio was used irrespective of the lattice pitch and core configuration. Since the RB reactor is being prepared for operation at higher power levels it was indispensable to reexamine the calibration ratio, estimate its dependence on the lattice pitch, critical level of heavy water and thickness of the side reflector. It was necessary to verify the reliability of control and dosimetry instruments, and establish neutron and gamma dose dependence on reactor power. Two series of experiments were done in June 1976. First series was devoted to tests of control and dosimetry instrumentation and measurements of radiation in the RB reactor building dependent on reactor power. Second series covered measurement of thermal and epithermal neuron fluxes in the reactor core and calculation of reactor power. Four different reactor cores were chosen for these experiments. Reactor pitches were 8, 8{radical}2, and 16 cm with 40, 52 and 82 fuel channels containing 2% enriched fuel. Obtained results and analysis of these results are presented in this document with conclusions related to reactor safe operation.

  16. Calibrating AIS images using the surface as a reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. O.; Roberts, D. A.; Shipman, H. M.; Adams, J. B.; Willis, S. C.; Gillespie, A. R.

    1987-01-01

    A method of evaluating the initial assumptions and uncertainties of the physical connection between Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) image data and laboratory/field spectrometer data was tested. The Tuscon AIS-2 image connects to lab reference spectra by an alignment to the image spectral endmembers through a system gain and offset for each band. Images were calibrated to reflectance so as to transform the image into a measure that is independent of the solar radiant flux. This transformation also makes the image spectra directly comparable to data from lab and field spectrometers. A method was tested for calibrating AIS images using the surface as a reference. The surface heterogeneity is defined by lab/field spectral measurements. It was found that the Tuscon AIS-2 image is consistent with each of the initial hypotheses: (1) that the AIS-2 instrument calibration is nearly linear; (2) the spectral variance is caused by sub-pixel mixtures of spectrally distinct materials and shade, and (3) that sub-pixel mixtures can be treated as linear mixtures of pure endmembers. It was also found that the image can be characterized by relatively few endmembers using the AIS-2 spectra.

  17. Flux and permanence of risk perceptions: Tourists' perception of the relative and absolute risk for various destinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Katharina; Larsen, Svein

    2016-12-01

    The present investigation is a cross-sectional, multi-national, quantitative, and quasi-experimental comparison of tourists' risk perceptions regarding different destinations throughout the past decade. Over 10,000 tourists to Norway from 89 different countries filled in a questionnaire rating the perceived risk for various destinations. Data were collected during 2004, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2015 and allow for a comparison of perceived risk across time, place and nationality. Results show that while absolute risk judgments for different destinations fluctuate somewhat over the years, relative risk judgments remain constant. Findings also reveal a "home-is-safer-then-abroad-bias" with tourists consistently perceiving their home country among the safest destinations. The current investigation is rare because it looks at more than one destination at a time. Insights gained from the present findings diverge from what would have been concluded from employing case studies, that is, looking at one destination at a time. © 2016 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology published by Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Tank calibration; Arqueacao de tanques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Ana [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    This work relates the analysis of the norms ISO (International Organization for Standardization) for calibration of vertical cylindrical tanks used in fiscal measurement, established on Joint Regulation no 1 of June 19, 2000 between the ANP (National Agency of Petroleum) and the INMETRO (National Institute of Metrology, Normalization and Industrial Quality). In this work a comparison between norms ISO and norms published by the API (American Petroleum Institute) and the IP (Institute of Petroleum) up to 2001 was made. It was concluded that norms ISO are wider than norms API, IP, and INMETRO methods in the calibration of vertical cylindrical tanks. (author)

  19. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marriner, John

    2012-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  20. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriner, John; /Fermilab

    2012-06-29

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  1. Modelling radiocesium fluxes in forest ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, G.; Kliashtorin, A.; Mamikhin, S.; Shcheglov, A.; Rafferty, B.; Dvornik, A.; Zhuchenko, T.; Kuchma, N.

    1996-01-01

    Monitoring of radiocesium inventories and fluxes has been carried out in forest ecosystems in Ukraine, Belarus and Ireland to determine distributions and rates of migration. This information has been used to construct and calibrate mathematical models which are being used to predict the likely longevity of contamination of forests and forest products such as timber following the Chernobyl accident

  2. Reliability-Based Code Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, M.H.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2003-01-01

    The present paper addresses fundamental concepts of reliability based code calibration. First basic principles of structural reliability theory are introduced and it is shown how the results of FORM based reliability analysis may be related to partial safety factors and characteristic values....... Thereafter the code calibration problem is presented in its principal decision theoretical form and it is discussed how acceptable levels of failure probability (or target reliabilities) may be established. Furthermore suggested values for acceptable annual failure probabilities are given for ultimate...... and serviceability limit states. Finally the paper describes the Joint Committee on Structural Safety (JCSS) recommended procedure - CodeCal - for the practical implementation of reliability based code calibration of LRFD based design codes....

  3. XRD alignment, calibration and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davy, L.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The quality of any diffractometer system is very much dependent on the alignment, calibration and performance. The three subjects are very much related. Firstly, you must know how to carry out the full diffractometer alignment. XRD alignment is easy once you know how. The presentation will show you step by step to carry out the full alignment. Secondly, you need to know how to calibrate the diffractometer system. The presentation will show you how to calibrate the goniometer, detector etc. Thirdly, to prove the system is working within the manufacturer specification. The presentation will show you how to carry out the resolution, reproducibility and linearity test. Copyright (2002) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  4. Quality Management and Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkus, Henk G.

    Good specification of a product’s performance requires adequate characterization of relevant properties. Particulate products are usually characterized by some PSD, shape or porosity parameter(s). For proper characterization, adequate sampling, dispersion, and measurement procedures should be available or developed and skilful personnel should use appropriate, well-calibrated/qualified equipment. The characterization should be executed, in agreement with customers, in a wellorganized laboratory. All related aspects should be laid down in a quality handbook. The laboratory should provide proof for its capability to perform the characterization of stated products and/or reference materials within stated confidence limits. This can be done either by internal validation and audits or by external GLP accreditation.

  5. Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Yordanova, Ginka

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...

  6. Calibration of Avent Wind IRIS SN 01030167

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for a two-beam nacelle based lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement un...

  7. FTIR Calibration Methods and Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Gaetan

    Over the past 10 years, several space-borne FTIR missions were launched for atmospheric research, environmental monitoring and meteorology. One can think of the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) launched by the European Space Agency, the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) launched by the Canadian Space Agency, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) launched by NASA and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) launched by Eumetsat in Europe. Others are near to be launched, namely the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) from the Integrated Program Of- fice in the United States and the Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation (TANSO) from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. Moreover, several missions under definition foresee the use of this technology as sensor, e.g. Meteosat Third Generation (MTG), Eumetsat Polar System (EPS) and the Premier mission, one of the six candidates of the next ESA Earth Explorer Core Mission. In order to produce good quality products, calibration is essential. Calibrated data is the output of three main sub-systems that are tightly coupled: the instrument, the calibration targets and the level 1B processor. Calibration requirements must be carefully defined and propagated to each sub-system. Often, they are carried out by different parties which add to the complexity. Under budget and schedule pressure, some aspects are sometimes neglected and jeopardized final quality. For space-borne FTIR, level 1B outputs are spectra that are radiometrically, spectrally calibrated and geolocated. Radiometric calibration means to assign an intensity value in units to the y-axis. Spectral calibration means to assign to the x-axis the proper frequency value in units. Finally, geolocated means to assign a target position over the earth geoid i.e. longitude, latitude and altitude. This paper will present calibration methods and issues related to space-borne FTIR missions, e.g. two

  8. Coupling between SW monsoon-related surface and deep ocean processes as discerned from continuous particle flux measurements and correlated satellite data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rixen, T.; Haake, B.; Ittekkot, V.; Guptha, M.V.S.; Nair, R.R.; Schlussel, P.

    . The particle flux in the eastern Arabian Sea is as high as in the central Arabian Sea but is influenced by a weaker upwelling system along the Indian Coast. The observed interannual variability in the pattern of particle fluxes during the SW monsoons is most...

  9. Using MCNP for in-core instrument calibration in CANDU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, D.C. [Point Lepreau Generating Station, NB Power, Lepreau, New Brunswick (Canada); Anghel, V.N.P.; Sur, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The calibration of in-core instruments is important for safe and economical CANDU operation. However, in-core detectors are not normally suited to bench calibration procedures. This paper describes the use and validation of detailed neutron transport calculations for the purpose of calibrating the response of in-core neutron flux detectors. The Monte-Carlo transport code, MCNP, was used to model the thermal neutron flux distribution in the region around self-powered in-core flux detectors (ICFDs), and in the vicinity of the calandria edge. The ICFD model was used to evaluate the reduction in signal of a given detector (the 'detector shading factor') due to neutron absorption in surrounding materials, detectors, and lead-cables. The calandria edge model was used to infer the accuracy of the calandria edge position from flux scans performed by AECL's traveling flux detector (TFD) system. The MCNP results were checked against experimental results on ICFDs, and also against shading factors computed by other means. The use of improved in-core detector calibration factors obtained by this new methodology will improve the accuracy of spatial flux control performance in CANDU-6 reactors. The accurate determination of TFD based calandria edge position is useful in the quantitative measurement of changes in in-core component dimensions and position due to aging, such as pressure tube sag. (author)

  10. RF impedance measurement calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, P.J.; Song, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    The intent of this note is not to explain all of the available calibration methods in detail. Instead, we will focus on the calibration methods of interest for RF impedance coupling measurements and attempt to explain: (1). The standards and measurements necessary for the various calibration techniques. (2). The advantages and disadvantages of each technique. (3). The mathematical manipulations that need to be applied to the measured standards and devices. (4). An outline of the steps needed for writing a calibration routine that operated from a remote computer. For further details of the various techniques presented in this note, the reader should consult the references

  11. The AMMA-CATCH Gourma observatory site in Mali: Relating climatic variations to changes in vegetation, surface hydrology, fluxes and natural resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougin, E.; Hiernaux, P.; Kergoat, L.; Grippa, M.; de Rosnay, P.; Timouk, F.; Le Dantec, V.; Demarez, V.; Lavenu, F.; Arjounin, M.; Lebel, T.; Soumaguel, N.; Ceschia, E.; Mougenot, B.; Baup, F.; Frappart, F.; Frison, P. L.; Gardelle, J.; Gruhier, C.; Jarlan, L.; Mangiarotti, S.; Sanou, B.; Tracol, Y.; Guichard, F.; Trichon, V.; Diarra, L.; Soumaré, A.; Koité, M.; Dembélé, F.; Lloyd, C.; Hanan, N. P.; Damesin, C.; Delon, C.; Serça, D.; Galy-Lacaux, C.; Seghieri, J.; Becerra, S.; Dia, H.; Gangneron, F.; Mazzega, P.

    2009-08-01

    SummaryThe Gourma site in Mali is one of the three instrumented meso-scale sites deployed in West-Africa as part of the African Monsoon Multi-disciplinary Analysis (AMMA) project. Located both in the Sahelian zone sensu stricto, and in the Saharo-Sahelian transition zone, the Gourma meso-scale window is the northernmost site of the AMMA-CATCH observatory reached by the West African Monsoon. The experimental strategy includes deployment of a variety of instruments, from local to meso-scale, dedicated to monitoring and documentation of the major variables characterizing the climate forcing, and the spatio-temporal variability of surface processes and state variables such as vegetation mass, leaf area index (LAI), soil moisture and surface fluxes. This paper describes the Gourma site, its associated instrumental network and the research activities that have been carried out since 1984. In the AMMA project, emphasis is put on the relations between climate, vegetation and surface fluxes. However, the Gourma site is also important for development and validation of satellite products, mainly due to the existence of large and relatively homogeneous surfaces. The social dimension of the water resource uses and governance is also briefly analyzed, relying on field enquiry and interviews. The climate of the Gourma region is semi-arid, daytime air temperatures are always high and annual rainfall amounts exhibit strong inter-annual and seasonal variations. Measurements sites organized along a north-south transect reveal sharp gradients in surface albedo, net radiation, vegetation production, and distribution of plant functional types. However, at any point along the gradient, surface energy budget, soil moisture and vegetation growth contrast between two main types of soil surfaces and hydrologic systems. On the one hand, sandy soils with high water infiltration rates and limited run-off support almost continuous herbaceous vegetation with scattered woody plants. On the other

  12. Bayesian calibration : past achievements and future challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christen, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    Due to variations of the radiocarbon content in the biosphere over time, radiocarbon determinations need to be calibrated to obtain calendar years. Over the past decade a series of researchers have investigated the possibility of using Bayesian statistics to calibrate radiocarbon determinations, the main feature being the inclusion of contextual information into the calibration process. This allows for a coherent calibration of groups of determinations arising from related contexts (stratigraphical layers, peat cores, cultural events, ect.). Moreover, the 'related contexts' are also dated, and not only the material radiocarbon dated itself. We review Bayesian Calibration and state some of its current challenges like: software development, prior specification, robustness, etc. (author). 14 refs., 4 figs

  13. Efficient Calibration of Distributed Catchment Models Using Perceptual Understanding and Hydrologic Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, C.; Wagener, T.; Freer, J. E.; Duffy, C.; Han, D.

    2015-12-01

    Distributed models offer the potential to resolve catchment systems in more detail, and therefore simulate the hydrological impacts of spatial changes in catchment forcing (e.g. landscape change). Such models may contain a large number of model parameters which are computationally expensive to calibrate. Even when calibration is possible, insufficient data can result in model parameter and structural equifinality. In order to help reduce the space of feasible models and supplement traditional outlet discharge calibration data, semi-quantitative information (e.g. knowledge of relative groundwater levels), may also be used to identify behavioural models when applied to constrain spatially distributed predictions of states and fluxes. The challenge is to combine these different sources of information together to identify a behavioural region of state-space, and efficiently search a large, complex parameter space to identify behavioural parameter sets that produce predictions that fall within this behavioural region. Here we present a methodology to incorporate different sources of data to efficiently calibrate distributed catchment models. Metrics of model performance may be derived from multiple sources of data (e.g. perceptual understanding and measured or regionalised hydrologic signatures). For each metric, an interval or inequality is used to define the behaviour of the catchment system, accounting for data uncertainties. These intervals are then combined to produce a hyper-volume in state space. The state space is then recast as a multi-objective optimisation problem, and the Borg MOEA is applied to first find, and then populate the hyper-volume, thereby identifying acceptable model parameter sets. We apply the methodology to calibrate the PIHM model at Plynlimon, UK by incorporating perceptual and hydrologic data into the calibration problem. Furthermore, we explore how to improve calibration efficiency through search initialisation from shorter model runs.

  14. Post - SM4 Flux Calibration of the STIS Echelle Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostroem, Azalee; Aloisi, A.; Bohlin, R. C.; Proffitt, C. R.; Osten, R. A.; Lennon, D.

    2010-07-01

    Like all STIS spectroscopic modes, STIS echelle modes show a wavelength dependent decline in detector sensitivity with time. The echelle sensitivity is further affected by a time-dependent shift in the blaze function. To better correct the effects of the echelle sensitivity loss and the blaze function changes, we derive new baselines for echelle sensitivities from post-HST Servicing Mission 4 observations of the standard star G191-B2B. We present how these baseline sensitivities compare to pre-failure trends.

  15. Calibration of moisture monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez, R.L.

    1979-02-01

    A method for calibrating an aluminum oxide hygrometer against an optical chilled mirror dew-point hygrometer has been established. A theoretical cross-point line of dew points from both hygrometers and a maximum moisture content of 10 ppM/sub v/ are used to define an area for calibrating the sensor probes of the aluminum oxide hygrometer

  16. Site Calibration report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Vesth, Allan

    The report describes site calibration measurements carried out on a site in Denmark. The measurements are carried out in accordance to Ref. [1]. The site calibration is carried out before a power performance measurement on a given turbine to clarify the influence from the terrain on the ratio...

  17. Topics in Statistical Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    Natural cubic spline speed di st 110 B.2 The calibrate function The most basic calibration problem, the one often encountered in more advanced ...0040-1706, 1537-2723. A. M. Mood, F. A. Graybill, and D. C. Boes. Introduction to the Theory of Statistics. McGraw-Hill, Auckland , U.A, 1974. ISBN

  18. Hydrothermal replacement of biogenic and abiogenic aragonite by Mg-carbonates - Relation between textural control on effective element fluxes and resulting carbonate phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Laura; Müller, Thomas; Dohmen, Ralf; Immenhauser, Adrian; Putlitz, Benita

    2017-01-01

    Dolomitization, i.e., the secondary replacement of calcite or aragonite (CaCO3) by dolomite (CaMg[CO3]2), is one of the most volumetrically important carbonate diagenetic processes. It occurs under near surface and shallow burial conditions and can significantly modify rock properties through changes in porosity and permeability. Dolomitization fronts are directly coupled to fluid pathways, which may be related to the initial porosity/permeability of the precursor limestone, an existing fault network or secondary porosity/permeability created through the replacement reaction. In this study, the textural control on the replacement of biogenic and abiogenic aragonite by Mg-carbonates, that are typical precursor phases in the dolomitization process, was experimentally studied under hydrothermal conditions. Aragonite samples with different textural and microstructural properties exhibiting a compact (inorganic aragonite single crystal), an intermediate (bivalve shell of Arctica islandica) and open porous structure (skeleton of coral Porites sp.) were reacted with a solution of 0.9 M MgCl2 and 0.015 M SrCl2 at 200 °C. The replacement of aragonite by a Ca-bearing magnesite and a Mg-Ca carbonate of non-stoichiometric dolomitic composition takes place via a dissolution-precipitation process and leads to the formation of a porous reaction front that progressively replaces the aragonite precursor. The reaction leads to the development of porosity within the reaction front and distinctive microstructures such as gaps and cavities at the reaction interface. The newly formed reaction rim consists of chemically distinct phases separated by sharp boundaries. It was found that the number of phases and their chemical variation decreases with increasing initial porosity and reactive surface area. This observation is explained by variations in effective element fluxes that result in differential chemical gradients in the fluid within the pore space of the reaction rim. Observed

  19. Vessel calibration for accurate material accountancy at RRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Yuu; Ono, Sawako; Iwamoto, Tomonori

    2004-01-01

    RRP has a 800t·Upr capacity a year to re-process, where would be handled a large amount of nuclear materials as solution. A large scale plant like RRP will require accurate materials accountancy system, so that the vessel calibration with high-precision is very important as initial vessel calibration before operation. In order to obtain the calibration curve, it is needed well-known each the increment volume related with liquid height. Then we performed at least 2 or 3 times run with water for vessel calibration and careful evaluation for the calibration data should be needed. We performed vessel calibration overall 210 vessels, and the calibration of 81 vessels including IAT and OAT were held under presence of JSGO and IAEA inspectors taking into account importance on the material accountancy. This paper describes outline of the initial vessel calibration and calibration results based on back pressure measurement with dip tubes. (author)

  20. Sandia WIPP calibration traceability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuhen, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dean, T.A. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes the work performed to establish calibration traceability for the instrumentation used by Sandia National Laboratories at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during testing from 1980-1985. Identifying the calibration traceability is an important part of establishing a pedigree for the data and is part of the qualification of existing data. In general, the requirement states that the calibration of Measuring and Test equipment must have a valid relationship to nationally recognized standards or the basis for the calibration must be documented. Sandia recognized that just establishing calibration traceability would not necessarily mean that all QA requirements were met during the certification of test instrumentation. To address this concern, the assessment was expanded to include various activities.

  1. The GERDA calibration system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudis, Laura; Froborg, Francis; Tarka, Michael; Bruch, Tobias; Ferella, Alfredo [Physik-Institut, Universitaet Zuerich (Switzerland); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    A system with three identical custom made units is used for the energy calibration of the GERDA Ge diodes. To perform a calibration the {sup 228}Th sources are lowered from the parking positions at the top of the cryostat. Their positions are measured by two independent modules. One, the incremental encoder, counts the holes in the perforated steel band holding the sources, the other measures the drive shaft's angular position even if not powered. The system can be controlled remotely by a Labview program. The calibration data is analyzed by an iterative calibration algorithm determining the calibration functions for different energy reconstruction algorithms and the resolution of several peaks in the {sup 228}Th spectrum is determined. A Monte Carlo simulation using the GERDA simulation software MAGE has been performed to determine the background induced by the sources in the parking positions.

  2. Sandia WIPP calibration traceability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuhen, M.D.; Dean, T.A.

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes the work performed to establish calibration traceability for the instrumentation used by Sandia National Laboratories at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during testing from 1980-1985. Identifying the calibration traceability is an important part of establishing a pedigree for the data and is part of the qualification of existing data. In general, the requirement states that the calibration of Measuring and Test equipment must have a valid relationship to nationally recognized standards or the basis for the calibration must be documented. Sandia recognized that just establishing calibration traceability would not necessarily mean that all QA requirements were met during the certification of test instrumentation. To address this concern, the assessment was expanded to include various activities

  3. Measurements for the energy calibration of the TANSY neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozdowicz, K.; Hoek, M.; Aronsson, D.

    1990-05-01

    The report describes measurements performed for the energy calibration of the TANSY neutron detectors (two arrays of 16 detectors each one). The calibration procedure determines four calibration parameters for each detector. Results of the calibration measurements are given and test measurements are presented. A relation of the neutron detector calibration parameters to producer's data for the photomulipliers is analysed. Also the tests necessary during normal operation of the TANSY neutron spectrometer are elaborated (passive and active tests). A method how to quickly get the calibration parameters for a spare detector in an array of the neutron detectors is included

  4. Three-Dimensional Evolution of Flux-Rope CMEs and Its Relation to the Local Orientation of the Heliospheric Current Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isavnin, A.; Vourlidas, A.; Kilpua, E. K. J.

    2014-06-01

    Flux ropes ejected from the Sun may change their geometrical orientation during their evolution, which directly affects their geoeffectiveness. Therefore, it is crucial to understand how solar flux ropes evolve in the heliosphere to improve our space-weather forecasting tools. We present a follow-up study of the concepts described by Isavnin, Vourlidas, and Kilpua ( Solar Phys. 284, 203, 2013). We analyze 14 coronal mass ejections (CMEs), with clear flux-rope signatures, observed during the decay of Solar Cycle 23 and rise of Solar Cycle 24. First, we estimate initial orientations of the flux ropes at the origin using extreme-ultraviolet observations of post-eruption arcades and/or eruptive prominences. Then we reconstruct multi-viewpoint coronagraph observations of the CMEs from ≈ 2 to 30 R⊙ with a three-dimensional geometric representation of a flux rope to determine their geometrical parameters. Finally, we propagate the flux ropes from ≈ 30 R⊙ to 1 AU through MHD-simulated background solar wind while using in-situ measurements at 1 AU of the associated magnetic cloud as a constraint for the propagation technique. This methodology allows us to estimate the flux-rope orientation all the way from the Sun to 1 AU. We find that while the flux-ropes' deflection occurs predominantly below 30 R⊙, a significant amount of deflection and rotation happens between 30 R⊙ and 1 AU. We compare the flux-rope orientation to the local orientation of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). We find that slow flux ropes tend to align with the streams of slow solar wind in the inner heliosphere. During the solar-cycle minimum the slow solar-wind channel as well as the HCS usually occupy the area in the vicinity of the solar equatorial plane, which in the past led researchers to the hypothesis that flux ropes align with the HCS. Our results show that exceptions from this rule are explained by interaction with the Parker-spiraled background magnetic field, which dominates

  5. On the calibration methods for neutron moisture gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostol, I.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental calibration methods for devices using neutron sources to measure the water content in subsurface soil and other samples are investigated. Neutron flux density is evaluated by means of the two and three group diffusion and Fermi age theories. The correction criteria for the calibration curves are presented. The agreement of the theoretical curves with the determined experimental data may be considered as excellent. (author)

  6. RODDRP - A FORTRAN program for use in control rod calibration by the rod drop method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, W.E.

    1972-01-01

    The different methods to measure reactivity which are applicable to control rod calibration are discussed. They include: 1) the positive period method, 2) the rod drop method, 3) the source-jerk method, 4) the rod oscillation method, and 5) the pulsed neutron method. The instrument setup used at WSU for rod drop measurements is presented. To speed up the analysis of power fall-off trace, a FORTRAN IV program called RODDRP was written to simultaneously solve the in-hour equation and relative neutron flux. The procedure for calculating the worth of the rod that produced the power trace is given. The reactivity for each time relative flux point is obtained. Conclusions about the status of the equipment are made

  7. The Vertical Flux Method (VFM) for regional estimates of temporally and spatially varying nitrate fluxes in unsaturated zone and groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, C. T.; Liao, L.; Nolan, B. T.; Juckem, P. F.; Ransom, K.; Harter, T.

    2017-12-01

    Process-based modeling of regional NO3- fluxes to groundwater is critical for understanding and managing water quality. Measurements of atmospheric tracers of groundwater age and dissolved-gas indicators of denitrification progress have potential to improve estimates of NO3- reactive transport processes. This presentation introduces a regionalized version of a vertical flux method (VFM) that uses simple mathematical estimates of advective-dispersive reactive transport with regularization procedures to calibrate estimated tracer concentrations to observed equivalents. The calibrated VFM provides estimates of chemical, hydrologic and reaction parameters (source concentration time series, recharge, effective porosity, dispersivity, reaction rate coefficients) and derived values (e.g. mean unsaturated zone travel time, eventual depth of the NO3- front) for individual wells. Statistical learning methods are used to extrapolate parameters and predictions from wells to continuous areas. The regional VFM was applied to 473 well samples in central-eastern Wisconsin. Chemical measurements included O2, NO3-, N2 from denitrification, and atmospheric tracers of groundwater age including carbon-14, chlorofluorocarbons, tritium, and triogiogenic helium. VFM results were consistent with observed chemistry, and calibrated parameters were in-line with independent estimates. Results indicated that (1) unsaturated zone travel times were a substantial portion of the transit time to wells and streams (2) fractions of N leached to groundwater have changed over time, with increasing fractions from manure and decreasing fractions from fertilizer, and (3) under current practices and conditions, 60% of the shallow aquifer will eventually be affected by NO3- contamination. Based on GIS coverages of variables related to soils, land use and hydrology, the VFM results at individual wells were extrapolated regionally using boosted regression trees, a statistical learning approach, that related

  8. Calibration-free optical chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGrandpre, Michael D.

    2006-04-11

    An apparatus and method for taking absorbance-based chemical measurements are described. In a specific embodiment, an indicator-based pCO2 (partial pressure of CO2) sensor displays sensor-to-sensor reproducibility and measurement stability. These qualities are achieved by: 1) renewing the sensing solution, 2) allowing the sensing solution to reach equilibrium with the analyte, and 3) calculating the response from a ratio of the indicator solution absorbances which are determined relative to a blank solution. Careful solution preparation, wavelength calibration, and stray light rejection also contribute to this calibration-free system. Three pCO2 sensors were calibrated and each had response curves which were essentially identical within the uncertainty of the calibration. Long-term laboratory and field studies showed the response had no drift over extended periods (months). The theoretical response, determined from thermodynamic characterization of the indicator solution, also predicted the observed calibration-free performance.

  9. Systems and methods of eye tracking calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Methods and systems to facilitate eye tracking control calibration are provided. One or more objects are displayed on a display of a device, where the one or more objects are associated with a function unrelated to a calculation of one or more calibration parameters. The one or more calibration...... parameters relate to a calibration of a calculation of gaze information of a user of the device, where the gaze information indicates where the user is looking. While the one or more objects are displayed, eye movement information associated with the user is determined, which indicates eye movement of one...... or more eye features associated with at least one eye of the user. The eye movement information is associated with a first object location of the one or more objects. The one or more calibration parameters are calculated based on the first object location being associated with the eye movement information....

  10. Comparison of surface energy fluxes with satellite-derived surface energy flux estimates from a shrub-steppe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkham, R.R.

    1993-12-01

    This thesis relates the components of the surface energy balance (i.e., net radiation, sensible and latent heat flux densities, soil heat flow) to remotely sensed data for native vegetation in a semi-arid environment. Thematic mapper data from Landsat 4 and 5 were used to estimate net radiation, sensible heat flux (H), and vegetation amount. Several sources of ground truth were employed. They included soil water balance using the neutron thermalization method and weighing lysimeters, and the measurement of energy fluxes with the Bowen ratio energy balance (BREB) technique. Sensible and latent heat flux were measured at four sites on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site using a weighing lysimeter and/or BREB stations. The objective was to calibrate an aerodynamic transport equation that related H to radiant surface temperature. The transport equation was then used with Landsat thermal data to generate estimates of H and compare these estimates against H values obtained with BREB/lysimeters at the time of overflight. Landsat and surface meteorologic data were used to estimate the radiation budget terms at the surface. Landsat estimates of short-wave radiation reflected from the surface correlate well with reflected radiation measured using inverted Eppley pyranometers. Correlation of net radiation estimates determined from satellite data, pyranometer, air temperature, and vapor pressure compared to net radiometer values obtained at time of overflight were excellent for a single image, but decrease for multiple images. Soil heat flux, G T , is a major component of the energy balance in arid systems and G T generally decreases as vegetation cover increases. Normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) values generated from Landsat thermatic mapper data were representative of field observations of the presence of green vegetation, but it was not possible to determine a single relationship between NDVI and G T for all sites

  11. Regional-scale geostatistical inverse modeling of North American CO2 fluxes: a synthetic data study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Michalak

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A series of synthetic data experiments is performed to investigate the ability of a regional atmospheric inversion to estimate grid-scale CO2 fluxes during the growing season over North America. The inversions are performed within a geostatistical framework without the use of any prior flux estimates or auxiliary variables, in order to focus on the atmospheric constraint provided by the nine towers collecting continuous, calibrated CO2 measurements in 2004. Using synthetic measurements and their associated concentration footprints, flux and model-data mismatch covariance parameters are first optimized, and then fluxes and their uncertainties are estimated at three different temporal resolutions. These temporal resolutions, which include a four-day average, a four-day-average diurnal cycle with 3-hourly increments, and 3-hourly fluxes, are chosen to help assess the impact of temporal aggregation errors on the estimated fluxes and covariance parameters. Estimating fluxes at a temporal resolution that can adjust the diurnal variability is found to be critical both for recovering covariance parameters directly from the atmospheric data, and for inferring accurate ecoregion-scale fluxes. Accounting for both spatial and temporal a priori covariance in the flux distribution is also found to be necessary for recovering accurate a posteriori uncertainty bounds on the estimated fluxes. Overall, the results suggest that even a fairly sparse network of 9 towers collecting continuous CO2 measurements across the continent, used with no auxiliary information or prior estimates of the flux distribution in time or space, can be used to infer relatively accurate monthly ecoregion scale CO2 surface fluxes over North America within estimated uncertainty bounds. Simulated random transport error is shown to decrease the quality of flux estimates in under-constrained areas at the ecoregion scale, although the uncertainty bounds remain realistic. While these synthetic

  12. Modeling of phosphorus fluxes produced by wild fires at watershed scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyjasik, M.; Hernandez, M.; Shaw, N.; Baker, M.; Fowles, M. T.; Cisney, T. A.; Jex, A. P.; Moisen, G.

    2017-12-01

    River runoff is one of the controlling processes in the terrestrial phosphorus cycle. Phosphorus is often a limiting factor in fresh water. One of the factors that has not been studied and modeled in detail is phosporus flux produced from forest wild fires. Phosphate released by weathering is quickly absorbed in soils. Forest wild fires expose barren soils to intensive erosion, thus releasing relatively large fluxes of phosphorus. Measurements from three control burn sites were used to correlate erosion with phosphorus fluxes. These results were used to model phosphorus fluxes from burned watersheds during a five year long period after fires occurred. Erosion in our model is simulated using a combination of two models: the WEPP (USDA Water Erosion Prediction Project) and the GeoWEPP (GIS-based Water Erosion Prediction Project). Erosion produced from forest disturbances is predicted for any watershed using hydrologic, soil, and meteorological data unique to the individual watersheds or individual slopes. The erosion results are modified for different textural soil classes and slope angles to model fluxes of phosphorus. The results of these models are calibrated using measured concentrations of phosphorus for three watersheds located in the Interior Western United States. The results will help the United States Forest Service manage phosporus fluxes in national forests.

  13. Compact radiometric microwave calibrator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fixsen, D. J.; Wollack, E. J.; Kogut, A.; Limon, M.; Mirel, P.; Singal, J.; Fixsen, S. M.

    2006-01-01

    The calibration methods for the ARCADE II instrument are described and the accuracy estimated. The Steelcast coated aluminum cones which comprise the calibrator have a low reflection while maintaining 94% of the absorber volume within 5 mK of the base temperature (modeled). The calibrator demonstrates an absorber with the active part less than one wavelength thick and only marginally larger than the mouth of the largest horn and yet black (less than -40 dB or 0.01% reflection) over five octaves in frequency

  14. Calibration of optically trapped nanotools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carberry, D M; Simpson, S H; Grieve, J A; Hanna, S; Miles, M J [H H Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Wang, Y; Schaefer, H; Steinhart, M [Institute for Chemistry, University of Osnabrueck, Osnabrueck (Germany); Bowman, R; Gibson, G M; Padgett, M J, E-mail: m.j.miles@bristol.ac.uk [SUPA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Science Road, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-30

    Holographically trapped nanotools can be used in a novel form of force microscopy. By measuring the displacement of the tool in the optical traps, the contact force experienced by the probe can be inferred. In the following paper we experimentally demonstrate the calibration of such a device and show that its behaviour is independent of small changes in the relative position of the optical traps. Furthermore, we explore more general aspects of the thermal motion of the tool.

  15. Measurements at the RA Reactor related to the VISA-2 project - Part 2, Measurement of neutron flux in VISA-2 channels; Fizicka merenja na reaktoru RA u vezi projekta VISA-2 - II deo, Merenje fluksa neutrona u kanalima VISA - 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markovic, H [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1962-07-15

    This report describes the task concerned with measurements of neutron flux in four experimental channels, called VISA-2 channels. All the channels are made of aluminium tubes, one is sealed to prevent contact of foils with heavy water, and are placed in the regular reactor lattice next to the central experimental channel VK-5. Measuring results, i.e. absolute values of neutron flux and flux distribution are needed for realisation of the VISA-2 project. Measurements of neutron flux are done by activation method. Activation foils are placed in cylindrical aluminium tubes specially prepared for this purpose and placed in VISA-2 channels. Foils are irradiated simultaneously for 5 hours at reactor power of 150 kW. Neutron flux distribution is determined by measuring the relative activity of cobalt foils. [Serbo-Croat] Ovaj izvestaj opisuje merenja neutronskog fluksa u cetiri eksperimentalna kanala VISA-2. Svi VISA-2 kanali nacinjeni su od aluminijuma, jedan je hermeticki zatvoren da folije koje se ozacuju ne dodju ukontakt sa teskom vodom i svi su smesteni neposredno pored centralnog eksperimentalnog kanala VK-5. Rezultati merenja, odnosno apsolutne vrednosti neutronskog fluksa i reposdele fluksa potrebni su za realizaciju projekta VISA-2. Mrerenja neutronskog fluksa izvreseno je aktivacionom tehnikom. Aktivacione folije smestene su u prethodno napravljene aluminijumske cevcice. Folije su ozracivane istovremeno pri snazi od 150 kW pe casova. Raspodela neutronskog fluksa odredjena je merenjem relativne aktivnosti folija od kobalta.

  16. Notes on neutron flux measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcala Ruiz, F.

    1984-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to get an useful guide to carry out topical neutron flux measurements. Although the foil activation technique is used in the majority of the cases, other techniques, such as those based on fission chambers and self-powered neutron detectors, are also shown. Special interest is given to the description and application of corrections on the measurement of relative and absolute induced activities by several types of detectors (scintillators, G-M and gas proportional counters). The thermal arid epithermal neutron fluxes, as determined in this work, are conventional or effective (West cots fluxes), which are extensively used by the reactor experimentalists; however, we also give some expressions where they are related to the integrated neutron fluxes, which are used in neutron calculations. (Author) 16 refs

  17. Advancing Absolute Calibration for JWST and Other Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieke, George; Bohlin, Ralph; Boyajian, Tabetha; Carey, Sean; Casagrande, Luca; Deustua, Susana; Gordon, Karl; Kraemer, Kathleen; Marengo, Massimo; Schlawin, Everett; Su, Kate; Sloan, Greg; Volk, Kevin

    2017-10-01

    We propose to exploit the unique optical stability of the Spitzer telescope, along with that of IRAC, to (1) transfer the accurate absolute calibration obtained with MSX on very bright stars directly to two reference stars within the dynamic range of the JWST imagers (and of other modern instrumentation); (2) establish a second accurate absolute calibration based on the absolutely calibrated spectrum of the sun, transferred onto the astronomical system via alpha Cen A; and (3) provide accurate infrared measurements for the 11 (of 15) highest priority stars with no such data but with accurate interferometrically measured diameters, allowing us to optimize determinations of effective temperatures using the infrared flux method and thus to extend the accurate absolute calibration spectrally. This program is integral to plans for an accurate absolute calibration of JWST and will also provide a valuable Spitzer legacy.

  18. Air Data Calibration Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility is for low altitude subsonic altimeter system calibrations of air vehicles. Mission is a direct support of the AFFTC mission. Postflight data merge is...

  19. SRHA calibration curve

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — an UV calibration curve for SRHA quantitation. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Chang, X., and D. Bouchard. Surfactant-Wrapped Multiwalled...

  20. BES online calibration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Bingyun; Li Xiaonan; Zhu Kejun; Zhang Jiawen; Gong Mingyu

    2003-01-01

    We constructed BES (Beijing Spectrometer) online calibration system to ensure the coherence of readout electronic channels due to huge data volume in high energy physics experiment. This paper describes the structure of hardware and software, and its characteristic and function

  1. Calibrated Properties Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlers, C.F.; Liu, H.H.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Calibrated Properties Model that provides calibrated parameter sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This work was performed in accordance with the AMR Development Plan for U0035 Calibrated Properties Model REV00 (CRWMS M and O 1999c). These calibrated property sets include matrix and fracture parameters for the UZ Flow and Transport Model (UZ Model), drift seepage models, drift-scale and mountain-scale coupled-processes models, and Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) models as well as Performance Assessment (PA) and other participating national laboratories and government agencies. These process models provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic and thermal-loading conditions

  2. Calibrated Properties Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlers, C.; Liu, H.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Calibrated Properties Model that provides calibrated parameter sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This work was performed in accordance with the ''AMR Development Plan for U0035 Calibrated Properties Model REV00. These calibrated property sets include matrix and fracture parameters for the UZ Flow and Transport Model (UZ Model), drift seepage models, drift-scale and mountain-scale coupled-processes models, and Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) models as well as Performance Assessment (PA) and other participating national laboratories and government agencies. These process models provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic and thermal-loading conditions

  3. SPOTS Calibration Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patterson E.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The results are presented using the procedure outlined by the Standardisation Project for Optical Techniques of Strain measurement to calibrate a digital image correlation system. The process involves comparing the experimental data obtained with the optical measurement system to the theoretical values for a specially designed specimen. The standard states the criteria which must be met in order to achieve successful calibration, in addition to quantifying the measurement uncertainty in the system. The system was evaluated at three different displacement load levels, generating strain ranges from 289 µstrain to 2110 µstrain. At the 289 µstrain range, the calibration uncertainty was found to be 14.1 µstrain, and at the 2110 µstrain range it was found to be 28.9 µstrain. This calibration procedure was performed without painting a speckle pattern on the surface of the metal. Instead, the specimen surface was prepared using different grades of grit paper to produce the desired texture.

  4. Scanner calibration revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pozhitkov Alexander E

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calibration of a microarray scanner is critical for accurate interpretation of microarray results. Shi et al. (BMC Bioinformatics, 2005, 6, Art. No. S11 Suppl. 2. reported usage of a Full Moon BioSystems slide for calibration. Inspired by the Shi et al. work, we have calibrated microarray scanners in our previous research. We were puzzled however, that most of the signal intensities from a biological sample fell below the sensitivity threshold level determined by the calibration slide. This conundrum led us to re-investigate the quality of calibration provided by the Full Moon BioSystems slide as well as the accuracy of the analysis performed by Shi et al. Methods Signal intensities were recorded on three different microarray scanners at various photomultiplier gain levels using the same calibration slide from Full Moon BioSystems. Data analysis was conducted on raw signal intensities without normalization or transformation of any kind. Weighted least-squares method was used to fit the data. Results We found that initial analysis performed by Shi et al. did not take into account autofluorescence of the Full Moon BioSystems slide, which led to a grossly distorted microarray scanner response. Our analysis revealed that a power-law function, which is explicitly accounting for the slide autofluorescence, perfectly described a relationship between signal intensities and fluorophore quantities. Conclusions Microarray scanners respond in a much less distorted fashion than was reported by Shi et al. Full Moon BioSystems calibration slides are inadequate for performing calibration. We recommend against using these slides.

  5. Calibrating nacelle lidars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtney, M.

    2013-01-15

    Nacelle mounted, forward looking wind lidars are beginning to be used to provide reference wind speed measurements for the power performance testing of wind turbines. In such applications, a formal calibration procedure with a corresponding uncertainty assessment will be necessary. This report presents four concepts for performing such a nacelle lidar calibration. Of the four methods, two are found to be immediately relevant and are pursued in some detail. The first of these is a line of sight calibration method in which both lines of sight (for a two beam lidar) are individually calibrated by accurately aligning the beam to pass close to a reference wind speed sensor. A testing procedure is presented, reporting requirements outlined and the uncertainty of the method analysed. It is seen that the main limitation of the line of sight calibration method is the time required to obtain a representative distribution of radial wind speeds. An alternative method is to place the nacelle lidar on the ground and incline the beams upwards to bisect a mast equipped with reference instrumentation at a known height and range. This method will be easier and faster to implement and execute but the beam inclination introduces extra uncertainties. A procedure for conducting such a calibration is presented and initial indications of the uncertainties given. A discussion of the merits and weaknesses of the two methods is given together with some proposals for the next important steps to be taken in this work. (Author)

  6. Magnetic-flux pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.; Elleman, D. D.; Whitmore, F. C. (Inventor)

    1966-01-01

    A magnetic flux pump is described for increasing the intensity of a magnetic field by transferring flux from one location to the magnetic field. The device includes a pair of communicating cavities formed in a block of superconducting material, and a piston for displacing the trapped magnetic flux into the secondary cavity producing a field having an intense flux density.

  7. Radon flux measurement methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielson, K.K.; Rogers, V.C.

    1984-01-01

    Five methods for measuring radon fluxes are evaluated: the accumulator can, a small charcoal sampler, a large-area charcoal sampler, the ''Big Louie'' charcoal sampler, and the charcoal tent sampler. An experimental comparison of the five flux measurement techniques was also conducted. Excellent agreement was obtained between the measured radon fluxes and fluxes predicted from radium and emanation measurements

  8. Calibration and evaluation of neutron moisturemeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Zhangxiong; Hu Jiangchao; Sun Laiyan; Wang Huaihui; Wu Weixue

    1992-02-01

    Factors influencing the calibration curve of neutron moisture meter, such as soil type, texture, volume weight and depth, were studied. When the soil bulk density water content is between 15% to 45%, the calibration curve is approximately a straight line, and the intercept and slope are only influenced by the above factors. The growing plants also influence the calibration curve slightly. The measuring error for top soil (< 20 cm) is larger. The relative error between neutron method and weighing method is about 8%. The neutron method has many advantages such as non-interfering, simple, fast and non-time-delay

  9. Calibration of Ground-based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for the given Ground-based Lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement...... uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from wind vanes...

  10. Infrared stereo calibration for unmanned ground vehicle navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harguess, Josh; Strange, Shawn

    2014-06-01

    The problem of calibrating two color cameras as a stereo pair has been heavily researched and many off-the-shelf software packages, such as Robot Operating System and OpenCV, include calibration routines that work in most cases. However, the problem of calibrating two infrared (IR) cameras for the purposes of sensor fusion and point could generation is relatively new and many challenges exist. We present a comparison of color camera and IR camera stereo calibration using data from an unmanned ground vehicle. There are two main challenges in IR stereo calibration; the calibration board (material, design, etc.) and the accuracy of calibration pattern detection. We present our analysis of these challenges along with our IR stereo calibration methodology. Finally, we present our results both visually and analytically with computed reprojection errors.

  11. Calibration of reference KAP-meters at SSDL and cross calibration of clinical KAP-meters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetland, Per O.; Friberg, Eva G.; Oevreboe, Kirsti M.; Bjerke, Hans H.

    2009-01-01

    In the summer of 2007 the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL) in Norway established a calibration service for reference air-kerma product meter (KAP-meter). The air-kerma area product, PKA, is a dosimetric quantity that can be directly related to the patient dose and used for risk assessment associated with different x-ray examinations. The calibration of reference KAP-meters at the SSDL gives important information on parameters influencing the calibration factor for different types of KAP-meters. The use of reference KAP-meters calibrated at the SSDL is an easy and reliable way to calibrate or verify the PKA indicated by the x-ray equipment out in the clinics. Material and methods. Twelve KAP-meters were calibrated at the SSDL by use of the substitution method at five diagnostic radiation qualities (RQRs). Results. The calibration factors varied from 0.94 to 1.18. The energy response of the individual KAP-meters varied by a total of 20% between the different RQRs and the typical chamber transmission factors ranged from 0.78 to 0.91. Discussion. It is important to use a calibrated reference KAP-meter and a harmonised calibration method in the PKA calibration in hospitals. The obtained uncertainty in the PKA readings is comparable with other calibration methods if the information in the calibration certificate is correct used, corrections are made and proper positioning of the KAP-chamber is performed. This will ensure a reliable estimate of the patient dose and a proper optimisation of conventional x-ray examinations and interventional procedures

  12. Calibration and performance of a stirred benthic chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholtz-ten Brink, M. R.; Gust, G.; Chavis, D.

    1989-07-01

    The physical and chemical boundary layer parameters characteristic for a benthic chamber were cross-calibrated by the use of two methods in the laboratory: (1) flush-mounted hot-film sensors, which measure the friction velocity u ∗, and (2) the alabaster dissolution technique, which measures the equivalent film thickness z. Tests of five stirring devices were made, using both techniques, to improve the stirring mechanism in the MANOP Lander flux chambers. The stirring device that was finally implemented consisted of four rods and produced spatially averaged friction velocities u ∗ ranging from 0.1 to 0.5 cm s -1 (i.e. mean film thickness z from 500 to 180 μm) when running at speeds from 3 to 9 rpm. The friction velocity field at the sediment surface is related to the rpm of the stirring device and the penetration depth of the chamber into the sediments; combinations of both can create z and u ∗ inside the chamber that duplicate those of many natural environments. The log-log calibration relationship found between u ∗ and transfer coefficients K' also provides a means to predict the mass-transfer resistance of solutes at the sediment-water interface from measurements of mean bottom stress.

  13. Monte Carlo efficiency calibration of a neutron generator-based total-body irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shypailo, R.J.; Ellis, K.J.

    2009-01-01

    Many body composition measurement systems are calibrated against a single-sized reference phantom. Prompt-gamma neutron activation (PGNA) provides the only direct measure of total body nitrogen (TBN), an index of the body's lean tissue mass. In PGNA systems, body size influences neutron flux attenuation, induced gamma signal distribution, and counting efficiency. Thus, calibration based on a single-sized phantom could result in inaccurate TBN values. We used Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP-5; Los Alamos National Laboratory) in order to map a system's response to the range of body weights (65-160 kg) and body fat distributions (25-60%) in obese humans. Calibration curves were constructed to derive body-size correction factors relative to a standard reference phantom, providing customized adjustments to account for differences in body habitus of obese adults. The use of MCNP-generated calibration curves should allow for a better estimate of the true changes in lean tissue mass that many occur during intervention programs focused only on weight loss. (author)

  14. Calibration with near-continuous spectral measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Aalborg; Rasmussen, Michael; Madsen, Henrik

    2001-01-01

    In chemometrics traditional calibration in case of spectral measurements express a quantity of interest (e.g. a concentration) as a linear combination of the spectral measurements at a number of wavelengths. Often the spectral measurements are performed at a large number of wavelengths and in thi...... by an example in which the octane number of gasoline is related to near infrared spectral measurements. The performance is found to be much better that for the traditional calibration methods....

  15. Automated intraoperative calibration for prostate cancer brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuiran Chen, Thomas; Heffter, Tamas; Lasso, Andras; Pinter, Csaba; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Burdette, E. Clif; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate cancer brachytherapy relies on an accurate spatial registration between the implant needles and the TRUS image, called ''calibration''. The authors propose a new device and a fast, automatic method to calibrate the brachytherapy system in the operating room, with instant error feedback. Methods: A device was CAD-designed and precision-engineered, which mechanically couples a calibration phantom with an exact replica of the standard brachytherapy template. From real-time TRUS images acquired from the calibration device and processed by the calibration system, the coordinate transformation between the brachytherapy template and the TRUS images was computed automatically. The system instantly generated a report of the target reconstruction accuracy based on the current calibration outcome. Results: Four types of validation tests were conducted. First, 50 independent, real-time calibration trials yielded an average of 0.57 ± 0.13 mm line reconstruction error (LRE) relative to ground truth. Second, the averaged LRE was 0.37 ± 0.25 mm relative to ground truth in tests with six different commercial TRUS scanners operating at similar imaging settings. Furthermore, testing with five different commercial stepper systems yielded an average of 0.29 ± 0.16 mm LRE relative to ground truth. Finally, the system achieved an average of 0.56 ± 0.27 mm target registration error (TRE) relative to ground truth in needle insertion tests through the template in a water tank. Conclusions: The proposed automatic, intraoperative calibration system for prostate cancer brachytherapy has achieved high accuracy, precision, and robustness.

  16. LED-based Photometric Stereo: Modeling, Calibration and Numerical Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quéau, Yvain; Durix, Bastien; Wu, Tao

    2018-01-01

    We conduct a thorough study of photometric stereo under nearby point light source illumination, from modeling to numerical solution, through calibration. In the classical formulation of photometric stereo, the luminous fluxes are assumed to be directional, which is very difficult to achieve in pr...

  17. Technical Note: Calibration and validation of geophysical observation models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salama, M.S.; van der Velde, R.; van der Woerd, H.J.; Kromkamp, J.C.; Philippart, C.J.M.; Joseph, A.T.; O'Neill, P.E.; Lang, R.H.; Gish, T.; Werdell, P.J.; Su, Z.

    2012-01-01

    We present a method to calibrate and validate observational models that interrelate remotely sensed energy fluxes to geophysical variables of land and water surfaces. Coincident sets of remote sensing observation of visible and microwave radiations and geophysical data are assembled and subdivided

  18. POLCAL - POLARIMETRIC RADAR CALIBRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanzyl, J.

    1994-01-01

    Calibration of polarimetric radar systems is a field of research in which great progress has been made over the last few years. POLCAL (Polarimetric Radar Calibration) is a software tool intended to assist in the calibration of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems. In particular, POLCAL calibrates Stokes matrix format data produced as the standard product by the NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) airborne imaging synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR). POLCAL was designed to be used in conjunction with data collected by the NASA/JPL AIRSAR system. AIRSAR is a multifrequency (6 cm, 24 cm, and 68 cm wavelength), fully polarimetric SAR system which produces 12 x 12 km imagery at 10 m resolution. AIRSTAR was designed as a testbed for NASA's Spaceborne Imaging Radar program. While the images produced after 1991 are thought to be calibrated (phase calibrated, cross-talk removed, channel imbalance removed, and absolutely calibrated), POLCAL can and should still be used to check the accuracy of the calibration and to correct it if necessary. Version 4.0 of POLCAL is an upgrade of POLCAL version 2.0 released to AIRSAR investigators in June, 1990. New options in version 4.0 include automatic absolute calibration of 89/90 data, distributed target analysis, calibration of nearby scenes with calibration parameters from a scene with corner reflectors, altitude or roll angle corrections, and calibration of errors introduced by known topography. Many sources of error can lead to false conclusions about the nature of scatterers on the surface. Errors in the phase relationship between polarization channels result in incorrect synthesis of polarization states. Cross-talk, caused by imperfections in the radar antenna itself, can also lead to error. POLCAL reduces cross-talk and corrects phase calibration without the use of ground calibration equipment. Removing the antenna patterns during SAR processing also forms a very important part of the calibration of SAR data. Errors in the

  19. Vibration transducer calibration techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkley, D. J.

    1980-09-01

    Techniques for the calibration of vibration transducers used in the Aeronautical Quality Assurance Directorate of the British Ministry of Defence are presented. Following a review of the types of measurements necessary in the calibration of vibration transducers, the performance requirements of vibration transducers, which can be used to measure acceleration, velocity or vibration amplitude, are discussed, with particular attention given to the piezoelectric accelerometer. Techniques for the accurate measurement of sinusoidal vibration amplitude in reference-grade transducers are then considered, including the use of a position sensitive photocell and the use of a Michelson laser interferometer. Means of comparing the output of working-grade accelerometers with that of previously calibrated reference-grade devices are then outlined, with attention given to a method employing a capacitance bridge technique and a method to be used at temperatures between -50 and 200 C. Automatic calibration procedures developed to speed up the calibration process are outlined, and future possible extensions of system software are indicated.

  20. Calibration Under Uncertainty.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2005-03-01

    This report is a white paper summarizing the literature and different approaches to the problem of calibrating computer model parameters in the face of model uncertainty. Model calibration is often formulated as finding the parameters that minimize the squared difference between the model-computed data (the predicted data) and the actual experimental data. This approach does not allow for explicit treatment of uncertainty or error in the model itself: the model is considered the %22true%22 deterministic representation of reality. While this approach does have utility, it is far from an accurate mathematical treatment of the true model calibration problem in which both the computed data and experimental data have error bars. This year, we examined methods to perform calibration accounting for the error in both the computer model and the data, as well as improving our understanding of its meaning for model predictability. We call this approach Calibration under Uncertainty (CUU). This talk presents our current thinking on CUU. We outline some current approaches in the literature, and discuss the Bayesian approach to CUU in detail.

  1. Calibration of ITER Instant Power Neutron Monitors: Recommended Scenario of Experiments at the Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, A. A.; Deryabina, N. A.; Markovskij, D. V.

    2017-12-01

    Instant power is a key parameter of the ITER. Its monitoring with an accuracy of a few percent is an urgent and challenging aspect of neutron diagnostics. In a series of works published in Problems of Atomic Science and Technology, Series: Thermonuclear Fusion under a common title, the step-by-step neutronics analysis was given to substantiate a calibration technique for the DT and DD modes of the ITER. A Gauss quadrature scheme, optimal for processing "expensive" experiments, is used for numerical integration of 235U and 238U detector responses to the point sources of 14-MeV neutrons. This approach allows controlling the integration accuracy in relation to the number of coordinate mesh points and thus minimizing the number of irradiations at the given uncertainty of the full monitor response. In the previous works, responses of the divertor and blanket monitors to the isotropic point sources of DT and DD neutrons in the plasma profile and to the models of real sources were calculated within the ITER model using the MCNP code. The neutronics analyses have allowed formulating the basic principles of calibration that are optimal for having the maximum accuracy at the minimum duration of in situ experiments at the reactor. In this work, scenarios of the preliminary and basic experimental ITER runs are suggested on the basis of those principles. It is proposed to calibrate the monitors only with DT neutrons and use correction factors to the DT mode calibration for the DD mode. It is reasonable to perform full calibration only with 235U chambers and calibrate 238U chambers by responses of the 235U chambers during reactor operation (cross-calibration). The divertor monitor can be calibrated using both direct measurement of responses at the Gauss positions of a point source and simplified techniques based on the concepts of equivalent ring sources and inverse response distributions, which will considerably reduce the amount of measurements. It is shown that the monitor

  2. Model Calibration in Watershed Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Koray K.; Vrugt, Jasper A.; Gupta, Hoshin V.; Sorooshian, Soroosh

    2009-01-01

    Hydrologic models use relatively simple mathematical equations to conceptualize and aggregate the complex, spatially distributed, and highly interrelated water, energy, and vegetation processes in a watershed. A consequence of process aggregation is that the model parameters often do not represent directly measurable entities and must, therefore, be estimated using measurements of the system inputs and outputs. During this process, known as model calibration, the parameters are adjusted so that the behavior of the model approximates, as closely and consistently as possible, the observed response of the hydrologic system over some historical period of time. This Chapter reviews the current state-of-the-art of model calibration in watershed hydrology with special emphasis on our own contributions in the last few decades. We discuss the historical background that has led to current perspectives, and review different approaches for manual and automatic single- and multi-objective parameter estimation. In particular, we highlight the recent developments in the calibration of distributed hydrologic models using parameter dimensionality reduction sampling, parameter regularization and parallel computing.

  3. Ibis ground calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, A.J.; Barlow, E.J.; Tikkanen, T.; Bazzano, A.; Del Santo, M.; Ubertini, P.; Blondel, C.; Laurent, P.; Lebrun, F.; Di Cocco, G.; Malaguti, E.; Gabriele, M.; La Rosa, G.; Segreto, A.; Quadrini, E.; Volkmer, R.

    2003-01-01

    We present an overview of results obtained from IBIS ground calibrations. The spectral and spatial characteristics of the detector planes and surrounding passive materials have been determined through a series of calibration campaigns. Measurements of pixel gain, energy resolution, detection uniformity, efficiency and imaging capability are presented. The key results obtained from the ground calibration have been: - optimization of the instrument tunable parameters, - determination of energy linearity for all detection modes, - determination of energy resolution as a function of energy through the range 20 keV - 3 MeV, - demonstration of imaging capability in each mode, - measurement of intrinsic detector non-uniformity and understanding of the effects of passive materials surrounding the detector plane, and - discovery (and closure) of various leakage paths through the passive shielding system

  4. Gamma counter calibration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for the calibration of a gamma radiation measurement instrument to be used over any of a number of different absolute energy ranges. The method includes the steps of adjusting the overall signal gain associated with pulses which are derived from detected gamma rays, until the instrument is calibrated for a particular absolute energy range; then storing parameter settings corresponding to the adjusted overall signal gain, and repeating the process for other desired absolute energy ranges. The stored settings can be subsequently retrieved and reapplied so that test measurements can be made using a selected one of the absolute energy ranges. Means are provided for adjusting the overall signal gain and a specific technique is disclosed for making coarse, then fine adjustments to the signal gain, for rapid convergence of the required calibration settings. (C.F.)

  5. Individual dosimetry and calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefert, M.; Nielsen, M.

    1996-01-01

    In 1995 both the Individual Dosimetry and Calibration Sections worked under the condition of a status quo and concentrated fully on the routine part of their work. Nevertheless, the machine for printing the bar code which will be glued onto the film holder and hence identify the people when entering into high radiation areas was put into operation and most of the holders were equipped with the new identification. As far as the Calibration Section is concerned the project of the new source control system that is realized by the Technical Support Section was somewhat accelerated

  6. Radiation Calibration Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omondi, C.

    2017-01-01

    KEBS Radiation Dosimetry mandate are: Custodian of Kenya Standards on Ionizing radiation, Ensure traceability to International System (SI ) and Calibration radiation equipment. RAF 8/040 on Radioisotope applications for troubleshooting and optimizing industrial process established Radiotracer Laboratory objective is to introduce and implement radiotracer technique for problem solving of industrial challenges. Gamma ray scanning technique applied is to Locate blockages, Locate liquid in vapor lines, Locate areas of lost refractory or lining in a pipe and Measure flowing densities. Equipment used for diagnostic and radiation protection must be calibrated to ensure Accuracy and Traceability

  7. Calibrating Legal Judgments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Schauer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective to study the notion and essence of legal judgments calibration the possibilities of using it in the lawenforcement activity to explore the expenses and advantages of using it. Methods dialectic approach to the cognition of social phenomena which enables to analyze them in historical development and functioning in the context of the integrity of objective and subjective factors it determined the choice of the following research methods formallegal comparative legal sociological methods of cognitive psychology and philosophy. Results In ordinary life people who assess other peoplersaquos judgments typically take into account the other judgments of those they are assessing in order to calibrate the judgment presently being assessed. The restaurant and hotel rating website TripAdvisor is exemplary because it facilitates calibration by providing access to a raterrsaquos previous ratings. Such information allows a user to see whether a particular rating comes from a rater who is enthusiastic about every place she patronizes or instead from someone who is incessantly hard to please. And even when less systematized as in assessing a letter of recommendation or college transcript calibration by recourse to the decisional history of those whose judgments are being assessed is ubiquitous. Yet despite the ubiquity and utility of such calibration the legal system seems perversely to reject it. Appellate courts do not openly adjust their standard of review based on the previous judgments of the judge whose decision they are reviewing nor do judges in reviewing legislative or administrative decisions magistrates in evaluating search warrant representations or jurors in assessing witness perception. In most legal domains calibration by reference to the prior decisions of the reviewee is invisible either because it does not exist or because reviewing bodies are unwilling to admit using what they in fact know and employ. Scientific novelty for the first

  8. Calibration of scanning Lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Courtney, Michael

    This report describes the tests carried out on a scanning lidar at the DTU Test Station for large wind turbines, Høvsøre. The tests were divided in two parts. In the first part, the purpose was to obtain wind speed calibrations at two heights against two cup anemometers mounted on a mast. Additio......This report describes the tests carried out on a scanning lidar at the DTU Test Station for large wind turbines, Høvsøre. The tests were divided in two parts. In the first part, the purpose was to obtain wind speed calibrations at two heights against two cup anemometers mounted on a mast...

  9. Calibration artefacts in radio interferometry - III. Phase-only calibration and primary beam correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobler, T. L.; Stewart, A. J.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Kenyon, J. S.; Smirnov, O. M.

    2016-09-01

    This is the third installment in a series of papers in which we investigate calibration artefacts. Calibration artefacts (also known as ghosts or spurious sources) are created when we calibrate with an incomplete model. In the first two papers of this series, we developed a mathematical framework which enabled us to study the ghosting mechanism itself. An interesting concomitant of the second paper was that ghosts appear in symmetrical pairs. This could possibly account for spurious symmetrization. Spurious symmetrization refers to the appearance of a spurious source (the antighost) symmetrically opposite an unmodelled source around a modelled source. The analysis in the first two papers indicates that the antighost is usually very faint, in particular, when a large number of antennas are used. This suggests that spurious symmetrization will mainly occur at an almost undetectable flux level. In this paper, we show that phase-only calibration produces an antighost that is N-times (where N denotes the number of antennas in the array) as bright as the one produced by phase and amplitude calibration and that this already bright ghost can be further amplified by the primary beam correction.

  10. P fluxes and exotic branes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardo, Davide M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”,Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Riccioni, Fabio [INFN - Sezione di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”,Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Risoli, Stefano [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”,Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”,Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2016-12-21

    We consider the N=1 superpotential generated in type-II orientifold models by non-geometric fluxes. In particular, we focus on the family of P fluxes, that are related by T-duality transformations to the S-dual of the Q flux. We determine the general rule that transforms a given flux in this family under a single T-duality transformation. This rule allows to derive a complete expression for the superpotential for both the IIA and the IIB theory for the particular case of a T{sup 6}/[ℤ{sub 2}×ℤ{sub 2}] orientifold. We then consider how these fluxes modify the generalised Bianchi identities. In particular, we derive a fully consistent set of quadratic constraints coming from the NS-NS Bianchi identities. On the other hand, the P flux Bianchi identities induce tadpoles, and we determine a set of exotic branes that can be consistently included in order to cancel them. This is achieved by determining a universal transformation rule under T-duality satisfied by all the branes in string theory.

  11. P fluxes and exotic branes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardo, Davide M.; Riccioni, Fabio; Risoli, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    We consider the N=1 superpotential generated in type-II orientifold models by non-geometric fluxes. In particular, we focus on the family of P fluxes, that are related by T-duality transformations to the S-dual of the Q flux. We determine the general rule that transforms a given flux in this family under a single T-duality transformation. This rule allows to derive a complete expression for the superpotential for both the IIA and the IIB theory for the particular case of a T 6 /[ℤ 2 ×ℤ 2 ] orientifold. We then consider how these fluxes modify the generalised Bianchi identities. In particular, we derive a fully consistent set of quadratic constraints coming from the NS-NS Bianchi identities. On the other hand, the P flux Bianchi identities induce tadpoles, and we determine a set of exotic branes that can be consistently included in order to cancel them. This is achieved by determining a universal transformation rule under T-duality satisfied by all the branes in string theory.

  12. Construction of calibration curve for accountancy tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Takayuki; Goto, Yoshiki; Nidaira, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    Tanks are equipped in a reprocessing plant for accounting solution of nuclear material. The careful measurement of volume in tanks is very important to implement rigorous accounting of nuclear material. The calibration curve relating the volume and level of solution needs to be constructed, where the level is determined by differential pressure of dip tubes. Several calibration curves are usually employed, but it's not explicitly decided how many segment are used, where to select segment, or what should be the degree of polynomial curve. These parameters, i.e., segment and degree of polynomial curve are mutually interrelated to give the better performance of calibration curve. Here we present the construction technique of giving optimum calibration curves and their characteristics. (author)

  13. HPS instrument calibration laboratory accreditation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, F.X; Eisenhower, E.H.; Swinth, K.L.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an accurate overview of the development and structure of the program established by the Health Physics Society (HPS) for accrediting instrument calibration laboratories relative to their ability to accurately calibrate portable health physics instrumentation. The purpose of the program is to provide radiation protection professionals more meaningful direct and indirect access to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) national standards, thus introducing a means for improving the uniformity, accuracy, and quality of ionizing radiation field measurements. The process is designed to recognize and document the continuing capability of each accredited laboratory to accurately perform instrument calibration. There is no intent to monitor the laboratory to the extent that each calibration can be guaranteed by the program; this responsibility rests solely with the accredited laboratory.

  14. Calibrating page sized Gafchromic EBT3 films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crijns, W.; Maes, F.; Heide, U. A. van der; Van den Heuvel, F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department ESAT/PSI-Medical Image Computing, Medical Imaging Research Center, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: The purpose is the development of a novel calibration method for dosimetry with Gafchromic EBT3 films. The method should be applicable for pretreatment verification of volumetric modulated arc, and intensity modulated radiotherapy. Because the exposed area on film can be large for such treatments, lateral scan errors must be taken into account. The correction for the lateral scan effect is obtained from the calibration data itself. Methods: In this work, the film measurements were modeled using their relative scan values (Transmittance, T). Inside the transmittance domain a linear combination and a parabolic lateral scan correction described the observed transmittance values. The linear combination model, combined a monomer transmittance state (T{sub 0}) and a polymer transmittance state (T{sub {infinity}}) of the film. The dose domain was associated with the observed effects in the transmittance domain through a rational calibration function. On the calibration film only simple static fields were applied and page sized films were used for calibration and measurements (treatment verification). Four different calibration setups were considered and compared with respect to dose estimation accuracy. The first (I) used a calibration table from 32 regions of interest (ROIs) spread on 4 calibration films, the second (II) used 16 ROIs spread on 2 calibration films, the third (III), and fourth (IV) used 8 ROIs spread on a single calibration film. The calibration tables of the setups I, II, and IV contained eight dose levels delivered to different positions on the films, while for setup III only four dose levels were applied. Validation was performed by irradiating film strips with known doses at two different time points over the course of a week. Accuracy of the dose response and the lateral effect correction was estimated using the dose difference and the root mean squared error (RMSE), respectively. Results: A calibration based on two films was the optimal

  15. Calibrating page sized Gafchromic EBT3 films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crijns, W.; Maes, F.; Heide, U. A. van der; Van den Heuvel, F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose is the development of a novel calibration method for dosimetry with Gafchromic EBT3 films. The method should be applicable for pretreatment verification of volumetric modulated arc, and intensity modulated radiotherapy. Because the exposed area on film can be large for such treatments, lateral scan errors must be taken into account. The correction for the lateral scan effect is obtained from the calibration data itself. Methods: In this work, the film measurements were modeled using their relative scan values (Transmittance, T). Inside the transmittance domain a linear combination and a parabolic lateral scan correction described the observed transmittance values. The linear combination model, combined a monomer transmittance state (T 0 ) and a polymer transmittance state (T ∞ ) of the film. The dose domain was associated with the observed effects in the transmittance domain through a rational calibration function. On the calibration film only simple static fields were applied and page sized films were used for calibration and measurements (treatment verification). Four different calibration setups were considered and compared with respect to dose estimation accuracy. The first (I) used a calibration table from 32 regions of interest (ROIs) spread on 4 calibration films, the second (II) used 16 ROIs spread on 2 calibration films, the third (III), and fourth (IV) used 8 ROIs spread on a single calibration film. The calibration tables of the setups I, II, and IV contained eight dose levels delivered to different positions on the films, while for setup III only four dose levels were applied. Validation was performed by irradiating film strips with known doses at two different time points over the course of a week. Accuracy of the dose response and the lateral effect correction was estimated using the dose difference and the root mean squared error (RMSE), respectively. Results: A calibration based on two films was the optimal balance between

  16. Carbon dioxide, water vapour and energy fluxes over a semi ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    42

    of energy fluxes showed dominance of latent heat fluxes over sensible heat flux. .... for measurement of air temperature, rainfall, relative humidity, wind speed etc. ... within the radius of 100 m around the tower by using plant canopy analyzer ..... 2001), similar mechanisms might operate in our study resulting in flux deficit.

  17. Non-geometric fluxes and mixed-symmetry potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E.A.; Penas, V.A.; Riccioni, F.; Risoli, S.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the relation between generalised fluxes and mixed-symmetry potentials. We refer to the fluxes that cannot be described even locally in the framework of supergravity as ‘non-geometric’. We first consider the NS fluxes, and point out that the non-geometric R flux is dual to a mixed-symmetry

  18. e-Calibrations: using the Internet to deliver calibration services in real time at lower cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desrosiers, Marc; Nagy, Vitaly; Puhl, James; Glenn, Robert; Densock, Robert; Stieren, David; Lang, Brian; Kamlowski, Andreas; Maier, Diether; Heiss, Arthur

    2002-01-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is expanding into a new frontier in the delivery of measurement services. The Internet will be employed to provide industry with electronic traceability to national standards. This is a radical departure from the traditional modes of traceability and presents many new challenges. The traditional mail-based calibration service relies on sending artifacts to the user, who then mails them back to NIST for evaluation. The new service will deliver calibration results to the industry customer on-demand, in real-time, at a lower cost. The calibration results can be incorporated rapidly into the production process to ensure the highest quality manufacturing. The service would provide the US radiation processing industry with a direct link to the NIST calibration facilities and its expertise, and provide an interactive feedback process between industrial processing and the national measurement standard. Moreover, an Internet calibration system should contribute to the removal of measurement-related trade barriers

  19. Monitoring the latent and sensible heat fluxes in vineyard by applying the energy balance model METRIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. González-Piqueras

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring of the energy fluxes over vineyard applying the one source energy balance model METRIC (Allen et al., 2007b are shown in this work. This model is considered operaive because it uses an internalized calibration method derived from the selection of two extreme pixels in the scene, from the minimum ET values such as the bare soil to a maximum that corresponds to full cover active vegetation. The model provides the maps of net radiation (Rn, soil heat flux (G, sensible heat (H, latent heat (LE, evapotranspiration (ET and crop coefficient (Kc. The flux values have been validated with a flux tower installed in the plot, providing a RMSE for instantaneous fluxes of 43 W m2, 33 W m2, 55 W m2 y 40 W m2 on Rn, G, H and LE. In relative terms are 8%, 29%, 21% and 20% respectively. The RMSE at daily scale for the ET is 0.58 mm day-1, with a value in the crop coefficient for the mid stage of 0.42±0.08. These results allow considering the model adequate for crop monitoring and irrigation purposes in vineyard. The values obtained have been compared to other studies over vineyard and with alternative energy balance models showing similar results.

  20. Clustering of Emerging Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzmaikin, A.

    1997-01-01

    Observations show that newly emerging flux tends to appear on the Solar surface at sites where there is flux already. This results in clustering of solar activity. Standard dynamo theories do not predict this effect.

  1. ECAL Energy Flow Calibration

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    My talk will be covering my work as a whole over the course of the semester. The focus will be on using energy flow calibration in ECAL to check the precision of the corrections made by the light monitoring system used to account for transparency loss within ECAL crystals due to radiation damage over time.

  2. Calibration with Absolute Shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øjelund, Henrik; Madsen, Henrik; Thyregod, Poul

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, penalized regression using the L-1 norm on the estimated parameters is proposed for chemometric je calibration. The algorithm is of the lasso type, introduced by Tibshirani in 1996 as a linear regression method with bound on the absolute length of the parameters, but a modification...

  3. Calibration bench of flowmeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremond, J.; Da Costa, D.; Calvet, A.; Vieuxmaire, C.

    1966-01-01

    This equipment is devoted to the comparison of signals from two turbines installed in the Cabri experimental loop. The signal is compared to the standard turbine. The characteristics and the performance of the calibration bench are presented. (A.L.B.)

  4. Calibration of farmer dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, S.S.; Anwar, K.; Arshed, W.; Mubarak, M.A.; Orfi, S.D.

    1984-08-01

    The Farmer Dosemeters of Atomic Energy Medical Centre (AEMC) Jamshoro were calibrated in the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL) at PINSTECH, using the NPL Secondary Standard Therapy level X-ray exposure meter. The results are presented in this report. (authors)

  5. Physiotherapy ultrasound calibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gledhill, M.

    1996-01-01

    Calibration of physiotherapy ultrasound equipment has long been a problem. Numerous surveys around the world over the past 20 years have all found that only a low percentage of the units tested had an output within 30% of that indicatd. In New Zealand, a survey carried out by the NRL in 1985 found that only 24% had an output, at the maximum setting, within + or - 20% of that indicated. The present performance Standard for new equipment (NZS 3200.2.5:1992) requires that the measured output should not deviate from that indicated by more than + or - 30 %. This may be tightened to + or - 20% in the next few years. Any calibration is only as good as the calibration equipment. Some force balances can be tested with small weights to simulate the force exerted by an ultrasound beam, but with others this is not possible. For such balances, testing may only be feasible with a calibrated source which could be used like a transfer standard. (author). 4 refs., 3 figs

  6. NVLAP calibration laboratory program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cigler, J.L.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the progress up to April 1993 in the development of the Calibration Laboratories Accreditation Program within the framework of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

  7. NVLAP calibration laboratory program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cigler, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the progress up to April 1993 in the development of the Calibration Laboratories Accreditation Program within the framework of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

  8. Gamma ray calibration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosauer, P.J.; Flaherty, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    This invention is in the field of gamma ray inspection devices for tubular products and the like employing an improved calibrating block which prevents the sensing system from being overloaded when no tubular product is present, and also provides the operator with a means for visually detecting the presence of wall thicknesses which are less than a required minimum. (author)

  9. Muon flux measurement with silicon detectors in the CERN neutrino beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heijne, E.H.M.

    1983-01-01

    The neutrino beam installations at the CERN SPS accelerator are described, with emphasis on the beam monitoring systems. Especially the muon flux measurement system is considered in detail, and the calibration procedure and systematic aspects of the measurements are discussed. An introduction is given to the use of silicon semiconductor detectors and their related electronics. Other special chapters concern non-linear phenomena in the silicon detectors, radiation damage in silicon detectors, energy loss and energy deposition in silicon and a review of energy loss phenomena for high energy muons in matter. (orig.)

  10. A reference system for the measurement of low-strength magnetic flux density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorillo, F.; Durin, G.F.; Rocchino, L.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic flux density standards traceable to the SI units have been developed at IEN-INRIM, by which dissemination for general measurement and testing activities can be pursued. The reference system covers a range of values extending from μ 0 H∼1T to μ 0 H∼10μT and is centered on the use of NMR magnetometers, calibrated coils, and stable current sources. The relative measuring uncertainty of the system is shown to increases with decreasing the field strength value and it is estimated to range between a few 10 -6 and some 10 -3

  11. PLEIADES ABSOLUTE CALIBRATION : INFLIGHT CALIBRATION SITES AND METHODOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lachérade

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In-flight calibration of space sensors once in orbit is a decisive step to be able to fulfil the mission objectives. This article presents the methods of the in-flight absolute calibration processed during the commissioning phase. Four In-flight calibration methods are used: absolute calibration, cross-calibration with reference sensors such as PARASOL or MERIS, multi-temporal monitoring and inter-bands calibration. These algorithms are based on acquisitions over natural targets such as African deserts, Antarctic sites, La Crau (Automatic calibration station and Oceans (Calibration over molecular scattering or also new extra-terrestrial sites such as the Moon and selected stars. After an overview of the instrument and a description of the calibration sites, it is pointed out how each method is able to address one or several aspects of the calibration. We focus on how these methods complete each other in their operational use, and how they help building a coherent set of information that addresses all aspects of in-orbit calibration. Finally, we present the perspectives that the high level of agility of PLEIADES offers for the improvement of its calibration and a better characterization of the calibration sites.

  12. Analysis of low energy neutral hydrogen fluxes using an electron cyclotron resonance heated discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, B.L.

    1989-01-01

    This dissertation describes the design, construction, and proof-of-principle verification of a neutral hydrogen flux detection system, based on an ECRH discharge as the neutral flux ionizer. The significant features of the ionizer are its small size and simultaneous excitation of the ECRH mode using a 30 MHz RF driver and relatively small static magnetic fields. Demonstrated is the ability of the ECRH ionizer to ionize ∼ 900 eV neutral hydrogen fluxes with subsequent detection in a high resolution energy analyzer. A versatile calibration technique is applied to determine the ionizer efficiency, which additionally gives a variety of elastic scattering and charge exchange cross section results. Also described are the details of a new low energy beam-target interaction research facility, along with the basic techniques required to calibrate many of the system components. The facility has potential applications in areas such as fundamental cross section measurement, plasma diagnostics, beam-plasma interactions, and further beam-target research. 111 refs., 82 figs

  13. Mercury CEM Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani; Susan S. Sorini

    2007-03-31

    The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005, requires that calibration of mercury continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The traceability protocol will be written by EPA. Traceability will be based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging from about 2-40 ug/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ID ICP/MS) through a chain of analyses linking the calibration unit in the power plant to the NIST ID ICP/MS. Prior to this project, NIST did not provide a recommended mercury vapor pressure equation or list mercury vapor pressure in its vapor pressure database. The NIST Physical and Chemical Properties Division in Boulder, Colorado was subcontracted under this project to study the issue in detail and to recommend a mercury vapor pressure equation that the vendors of mercury vapor pressure calibration units can use to calculate the elemental mercury vapor concentration in an equilibrium chamber at a particular temperature. As part of this study, a preliminary evaluation of calibration units from five vendors was made. The work was performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD and Joe Rovani from WRI who traveled to NIST as a Visiting Scientist.

  14. Sensors for Metering Heat Flux Area Density and Metrological Equipment for the Heat Flux Density Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronin, D. O.

    2018-04-01

    The demand in measuring and studies of heat conduction of various media is very urgent now. This article considers the problem of heat conduction monitoring and measurement in various media and materials in any industries and branches of science as well as metrological support of the heat flux measurement equipment. The main study objects are both the sensors manufactured and facilities onto which these sensors will be installed: different cladding structures of the buildings, awnings, rocket fairings, boiler units, internal combustion engines. The Company develops and manufactures different types of heat flux sensors: thermocouple, thin-film, heterogeneous gradient as well as metrological equipment for the gauging calibration of the heat flux density measurement. The calibration shall be performed using both referencing method in the unit and by fixed setting of the heat flux in the unit. To manufacture heterogeneous heat flux gradient sensors (HHFGS) the Company developed and designed a number of units: diffusion welding unit, HHFGS cutting unit. Rather good quality HHFGS prototypes were obtained. At this stage the factory tests on the equipment for the heat flux density measurement equipment are planned. A high-sensitivity heat flux sensor was produced, now it is tested at the Construction Physics Research Institute (Moscow). It became possible to create thin-film heat flux sensors with the sensitivity not worse than that of the sensors manufactured by Captec Company (France). The Company has sufficient premises to supply the market with a wide range of sensors, to master new sensor manufacture technologies which will enable their application range.

  15. Updates from the AmeriFlux Management Project Tech Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biraud, S.; Chan, S.; Dengel, S.; Polonik, P.; Hanson, C. V.; Billesbach, D. P.; Torn, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    The goal of AmeriFlux is to develop a network of long-term flux sites for quantifying and understanding the role of the terrestrial biosphere in global climate and environmental change. The AmeriFlux Management Program (AMP) Tech Team at LBNL strengthens the AmeriFlux Network by (1) standardizing operational practices, (2) developing calibration and maintenance routines, and (3) setting clear data quality goals. In this poster we will present results and recent progress in three areas: IRGA intercomparison experiment in cooperation with UC Davis, and main manufacturers of sensors used in the AmeriFlux network (LI-COR, Picarro, and Campbell Scientific). Gill sonic anemometers characterization in collaboration with John Frank and Bill Massman (US Forest Service) following the discovery of a significant firmware problem in commonly used Gill Sonic anemometer, Unmanned aerial systems (UAS), and sensors systematically used at AmeriFlux sites to improve site characterization.

  16. Low-cost programmable pulse generator for particle telescope calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez, S; Seisdedos, M; Meziat, D; Carbajo, M; Medina, J; Bronchalo, E; Peral, L D; Rodríguez-Pacheco, J

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we present a new calibration system for particle telescopes including multipulse generator and digital controller. The calibration system generates synchronized pulses of variable height for every detector channel on the telescope. The control system is based on a commercial microcontroller linked to a personal computer through an RS-232 bidirectional line. The aim of the device is to perform laboratory calibration of multi-detector telescopes prior to calibration at accelerator. This task includes evaluation of linearity and resolution of each detector channel, as well as coincidence logic. The heights of the pulses sent to the detectors are obtained by Monte Carlo simulation of telescope response to a particle flux of any desired geometry and composition.

  17. Relation of Chlorophyll Fluorescence Sensitive Reflectance Ratios to Carbon FluxMeasurements ofMontanne Grassland and Norway Spruce Forest Ecosystems in the Temperate Zone

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ač, Alexander; Malenovský, Z.; Urban, Otmar; Hanuš, Jan; Zitová, Martina; Navrátil, M.; Vráblová, M.; Olejníčková, Julie; Špunda, V.; Marek, Michal V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2012, č. 2012 (2012), s. 1-13 ISSN 1537-744X R&D Projects: GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D1/70/08; GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D1/93/07; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010007; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Chlorophyll fluorescence * carbon flux * forest ecosystems * Norway Spruce * temperate zone Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2012

  18. Method and apparatus for calibrating spectrophotometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreutelkamp, F.H.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of calibrating spectrophotometers by placing one or more filters in the light path of the spectrophotometer and measuring the amount of radiation by means of a detector. The present invention furthermore relates to an apparatus to be used with such a method.

  19. Geometric calibration of ERS satellite SAR images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Johan Jacob; Madsen, Søren Nørvang

    2001-01-01

    Geometric calibration of the European Remote Sensing (ERS) Satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) slant range images is important in relation to mapping areas without ground reference points and also in relation to automated processing. The relevant SAR system parameters are discussed...

  20. Individual dosimetry and calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, T.

    1997-01-01

    In 1996, the Dosimetry and Calibration Section was, as in previous years, mainly engaged in routine tasks: the distribution of over 6000 dosimeters (with a total of more than 10,000 films) every two months and the calibration of about 900 fixed and mobile instruments used in the radiation survey sections of RP group. These tasks were, thanks to an experienced team, well mastered. Special efforts had to be made in a number of areas to modernize the service or to keep it in line with new prescriptions. The Individual Dosimetry Service had to assure that CERN's contracting firms comply with the prescriptions in the Radiation Safety Manual (1996) that had been inspired by the Swiss Ordinance of 1994: Companies must file for authorizations with the Swiss Federal Office for Public Health requiring that in every company an 'Expert in Radiation Protection' be nominated and subsequently trained. CERN's Individual Dosimetry Service is accredited by the Swiss Federal Authorities and works closely together with other, similar services on a rigorous quality assurance programme. Within this framework, CERN was mandated to organize this year the annual Swiss 'Intercomparison of Dosimeters'. All ten accredited dosimetry services - among others those of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Villigen and of the four Swiss nuclear power stations - sent dosimeters to CERN, where they were irradiated in CERN's calibration facility with precise photon doses. After return to their origin they were processed and evaluated. The results were communicated to CERN and were compared with the originally given doses. A report on the results was subsequently prepared and submitted to the Swiss 'Group of Experts on Personal Dosimetry'. Reference monitors for photon and neutron radiation were brought to standard laboratories to assure the traceability of CERN's calibration service to the fundamental quantities. For photon radiation, a set of ionization chambers was calibrated in the reference field

  1. Including sugar cane in the agro-ecosystem model ORCHIDEE-STICS: calibration and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valade, A.; Vuichard, N.; Ciais, P.; Viovy, N.

    2011-12-01

    Sugarcane is currently the most efficient bioenergy crop with regards to the energy produced per hectare. With approximately half the global bioethanol production in 2005, and a devoted land area expected to expand globally in the years to come, sugar cane is at the heart of the biofuel debate. Dynamic global vegetation models coupled with agronomical models are powerful and novel tools to tackle many of the environmental issues related to biofuels if they are carefully calibrated and validated against field observations. Here we adapt the agro-terrestrial model ORCHIDEE-STICS for sugar cane simulations. Observation data of LAI are used to evaluate the sensitivity of the model to parameters of nitrogen absorption and phenology, which are calibrated in a systematic way for six sites in Australia and La Reunion. We find that the optimal set of parameters is highly dependent on the sites' characteristics and that the model can reproduce satisfactorily the evolution of LAI. This careful calibration of ORCHIDEE-STICS for sugar cane biomass production for different locations and technical itineraries provides a strong basis for further analysis of the impacts of bioenergy-related land use change on carbon cycle budgets. As a next step, a sensitivity analysis is carried out to estimate the uncertainty of the model in biomass and carbon flux simulation due to its parameterization.

  2. A Review of Sensor Calibration Monitoring for Calibration Interval Extension in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Bond, Leonard J.; Hashemian, Hash; Shumaker, Brent; Cummins, Dara

    2012-08-31

    Currently in the United States, periodic sensor recalibration is required for all safety-related sensors, typically occurring at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration in some plants. Online monitoring can be employed to identify those sensors that require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors that need it. International application of calibration monitoring, such as at the Sizewell B plant in United Kingdom, has shown that sensors may operate for eight years, or longer, within calibration tolerances. This issue is expected to also be important as the United States looks to the next generation of reactor designs (such as small modular reactors and advanced concepts), given the anticipated longer refueling cycles, proposed advanced sensors, and digital instrumentation and control systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) accepted the general concept of online monitoring for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no U.S. plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This report presents a state-of-the-art assessment of online calibration monitoring in the nuclear power industry, including sensors, calibration practice, and online monitoring algorithms. This assessment identifies key research needs and gaps that prohibit integration of the NRC-approved online calibration monitoring system in the U.S. nuclear industry. Several needs are identified, including the quantification of uncertainty in online calibration assessment; accurate determination of calibration acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and assessment of the feasibility of using virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors in order to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity. Understanding the degradation of sensors and the impact of this degradation on signals is key to

  3. Using Flux Information at Surface Water Boundaries to Improve a Groundwater Flow and Transport Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Genereux, David

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the performance of a groundwater flow and solute transport model when different combinations of hydraulic head, seepage flux, and chloride concentration data were used in calibration of the model...

  4. Oxygen in the Southern Ocean From Argo Floats: Determination of Processes Driving Air-Sea Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushinsky, Seth M.; Gray, Alison R.; Johnson, Kenneth S.; Sarmiento, Jorge L.

    2017-11-01

    The Southern Ocean is of outsized significance to the global oxygen and carbon cycles with relatively poor measurement coverage due to harsh winters and seasonal ice cover. In this study, we use recent advances in the parameterization of air-sea oxygen fluxes to analyze 9 years of oxygen data from a recalibrated Argo oxygen data set and from air-calibrated oxygen floats deployed as part of the Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observations and Modeling (SOCCOM) project. From this combined data set of 150 floats, we find a total Southern Ocean oxygen sink of -183 ± 80 Tmol yr-1 (positive to the atmosphere), greater than prior estimates. The uptake occurs primarily in the Polar-Frontal Antarctic Zone (PAZ, -94 ± 30 Tmol O2 yr-1) and Seasonal Ice Zone (SIZ, -111 ± 9.3 Tmol O2 yr-1). This flux is driven by wintertime ventilation, with a large portion of the flux in the SIZ passing through regions with fractional sea ice. The Subtropical Zone (STZ) is seasonally driven by thermal fluxes and exhibits a net outgassing of 47 ± 29 Tmol O2 yr-1 that is likely driven by biological production. The Subantarctic Zone (SAZ) uptake is -25 ± 12 Tmol O2 yr-1. Total oxygen fluxes were separated into a thermal and nonthermal component. The nonthermal flux is correlated with net primary production and mixed layer depth in the STZ, SAZ, and PAZ, but not in the SIZ where seasonal sea ice slows the air-sea gas flux response to the entrainment of deep, low-oxygen waters.

  5. MAVEN SEP Calibrated Data Bundle

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The maven.sep.calibrated Level 2 Science Data Bundle contains fully calibrated SEP data, as well as the raw count data from which they are derived, and ancillary...

  6. Ultrasonic calibration assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Ultrasonic transducers for in-service inspection of nuclear reactor vessels have several problems associated with them which this invention seeks to overcome. The first is that of calibration or referencing a zero start point for the vertical axis of transducer movement to locate a weld defect. The second is that of verifying the positioning (vertically or at a predetermined angle). Thirdly there is the problem of ascertaining the speed per unit distance in the operating medium of the transducer beam prior to the actual inspection. The apparatus described is a calibration assembly which includes a fixed, generally spherical body having a surface for reflecting an ultrasonic beam from one of the transducers which can be moved until the reflection from the spherical body is the highest amplitude return signal indicating radial alignment from the body. (U.K.)

  7. Travelling gradient thermocouple calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broomfield, G.H.

    1975-01-01

    A short discussion of the origins of the thermocouple EMF is used to re-introduce the idea that the Peltier and Thompson effects are indistinguishable from one another. Thermocouples may be viewed as devices which generate an EMF at junctions or as integrators of EMF's developed in thermal gradients. The thermal gradient view is considered the more appropriate, because of its better accord with theory and behaviour, the correct approach to calibration, and investigation of service effects is immediately obvious. Inhomogeneities arise in thermocouples during manufacture and in service. The results of travelling gradient measurements are used to show that such effects are revealed with a resolution which depends on the length of the gradient although they may be masked during simple immersion calibration. Proposed tests on thermocouples irradiated in a nuclear reactor are discussed

  8. New calibration and some predictions of the scaling relations between the mass of supermassive black holes and the properties of the host galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, E.; Fallarino, M. T.; Feoli, A.

    2013-10-01

    We present a new determination of the slope and normalization of three popular scaling laws between the mass of supermassive black holes and stellar velocity dispersion, bulge mass and kinetic energy of the host galaxies. To this aim we have collected 72 objects taken from three different samples and we have used three fitting methods applying the statistical analysis also to the subset of early type galaxies and spirals separately. We find that the relation involving kinetic energy has a slightly better χ2 and linear correlation coefficient than the other two laws. Furthermore, its Hertzsprung-Russell-like behavior is confirmed by the location of young and old galaxies in two different parts of the diagram. A test of its predictive power with the two giant galaxies NGC 3842 and NGC 4889 shows that the mass of the black hole inferred using the kinetic energy law is the closest to the experimental value. The subset of early type galaxies satisfies the theoretical models regarding the black hole mass vs stellar velocity dispersion relation, better than the full sample. Tables 1 and 7 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. Mesoscale hybrid calibration artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Hy D.; Claudet, Andre A.; Oliver, Andrew D.

    2010-09-07

    A mesoscale calibration artifact, also called a hybrid artifact, suitable for hybrid dimensional measurement and the method for make the artifact. The hybrid artifact has structural characteristics that make it suitable for dimensional measurement in both vision-based systems and touch-probe-based systems. The hybrid artifact employs the intersection of bulk-micromachined planes to fabricate edges that are sharp to the nanometer level and intersecting planes with crystal-lattice-defined angles.

  10. Calibration of germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjurman, B.; Erlandsson, B.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes problems concerning the calibration of germanium detectors for the measurement of gamma-radiation from environmental samples. It also contains a brief description of some ways of reducing the uncertainties concerning the activity determination. These uncertainties have many sources, such as counting statistics, full energy peak efficiency determination, density correction and radionuclide specific-coincidence effects, when environmental samples are investigated at close source-to-detector distances

  11. GRS vs. OMS Calibration in LISA Pathfinder Data Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshksar, Neda; Ferraioli, Luigi; Mance, Davor; Zweifel, Peter; Giardini, Domenico; Ten Pierick, Jan

    2017-01-01

    On board LISA Pathfinder spacecraft the test mass displacement along the main measurement axis is sensed in two different ways: optically and electrostatically. We have monitored the relative calibration between the two measurements during the mission science phase. The trend sensitivity of the relative calibration has been computed for different physical parameters, such as temperature, magnetic field, test mass bias voltage and current. (paper)

  12. GRS vs. OMS Calibration in LISA Pathfinder Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshksar, Neda; Ferraioli, Luigi; Mance, Davor; ten Pierick, Jan; Zweifel, Peter; Giardini, Domenico; ">LISA Pathfinder colaboration, relative calibration between the two measurements during the mission science phase. The trend sensitivity of the relative calibration has been computed for different physical parameters, such as temperature, magnetic field, test mass bias voltage and current.

  13. State of the art: two-phase flow calibration techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanley, M.L.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear community faces a particularly difficult problem relating to the calibration of instrumentation in a two-phase flow steam/water environment. The rationale of the approach to water reactor safety questions in the United States demands that accurate measurements of mass flows in a decompressing two-phase flow be made. An accurate measurement dictates an accurate calibration. This paper addresses three questions relating to the state of the art in two-phase calibration: (1) What do we mean by calibration. (2) What is done now. (3) What should be done

  14. Observation models in radiocarbon calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.D.; Nicholls, G.K.

    2001-01-01

    The observation model underlying any calibration process dictates the precise mathematical details of the calibration calculations. Accordingly it is important that an appropriate observation model is used. Here this is illustrated with reference to the use of reservoir offsets where the standard calibration approach is based on a different model to that which the practitioners clearly believe is being applied. This sort of error can give rise to significantly erroneous calibration results. (author). 12 refs., 1 fig

  15. Dosimetry and Calibration Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, T.

    1998-01-01

    The two tasks of the Dosimetry and Calibration Section at CERN are the Individual Dosimetry Service which assures the personal monitoring of about 5000 persons potentially exposed to ionizing radiation at CERN, and the Calibration Laboratory which verifies all the instruments and monitors. This equipment is used by the sections of the RP Group for assuring radiation protection around CERN's accelerators, and by the Environmental Section of TISTE. In addition, nearly 250 electronic and 300 quartz fibre dosimeters, employed in operational dosimetry, are calibrated at least once a year. The Individual Dosimetry Service uses an extended database (INDOS) which contains information about all the individual doses ever received at CERN. For most of 1997 it was operated without the support of a database administrator as the technician who had assured this work retired. The Software Support Section of TIS-TE took over the technical responsibility of the database, but in view of the many other tasks of this Section and the lack of personnel, only a few interventions for solving immediate problems were possible

  16. Calibrated Properties Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghezzehej, T.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this model report is to document the calibrated properties model that provides calibrated property sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models (UZ models). The calibration of the property sets is performed through inverse modeling. This work followed, and was planned in, ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Sections 1.2.6 and 2.1.1.6). Direct inputs to this model report were derived from the following upstream analysis and model reports: ''Analysis of Hydrologic Properties Data'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170038]); ''Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169855]); ''Simulation of Net Infiltration for Present-Day and Potential Future Climates'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170007]); ''Geologic Framework Model'' (GFM2000) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170029]). Additionally, this model report incorporates errata of the previous version and closure of the Key Technical Issue agreement TSPAI 3.26 (Section 6.2.2 and Appendix B), and it is revised for improved transparency

  17. STUDY OF CALIBRATION OF SOLAR RADIO SPECTROMETERS AND THE QUIET-SUN RADIO EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Chengming; Yan, Yihua; Tan, Baolin; Fu, Qijun; Liu, Yuying [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road A20, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Xu, Guirong [Hubei Key Laboratory for Heavy Rain Monitoring and Warning Research, Institute of Heavy Rain, China Meteorological Administration, Wuhan 430205 (China)

    2015-07-20

    This work presents a systematic investigation of the influence of weather conditions on the calibration errors by using Gaussian fitness, least chi-square linear fitness, and wavelet transform to analyze the calibration coefficients from observations of the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometers (at frequency bands of 1.0–2.0 GHz, 2.6–3.8 GHz, and 5.2–7.6 GHz) during 1997–2007. We found that calibration coefficients are influenced by the local air temperature. Considering the temperature correction, the calibration error will reduce by about 10%–20% at 2800 MHz. Based on the above investigation and the calibration corrections, we further study the radio emission of the quiet Sun by using an appropriate hybrid model of the quiet-Sun atmosphere. The results indicate that the numerical flux of the hybrid model is much closer to the observation flux than that of other ones.

  18. Calibration of the Herschel SPIRE Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    OpenAIRE

    Swinyard, Bruce; Polehampton, E. T.; Hopwood, R.; Valtchanov, I.; Lu, N.; Fulton, T.; Benielli, D.; Imhof, P.; Marchili, N.; Baluteau, J.- P.; Bendo, G. J.; Ferlet, M.; Griffin, Matthew Jason; Lim, T. L.; Makiwa, G.

    2014-01-01

    The Herschel Spectral and Photometric REceiver (SPIRE) instrument consists of an imaging photometric camera and an imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS), both operating over a frequency range of ∼450–1550 GHz. In this paper, we briefly review the FTS design, operation, and data reduction, and describe in detail the approach taken to relative calibration (removal of instrument signatures) and absolute calibration against standard astronomical sources. The calibration scheme assumes a sp...

  19. Development of heat flux sensors for turbine airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, William H.; Cyr, Marcia A.; Strange, Richard R.

    1985-10-01

    The objectives of this program are to develop heat flux sensors suitable for installation in hot section airfoils of advanced aircraft turbine engines and to experimentally verify the operation of these heat flux sensors in a cylinder in a cross flow experiment. Embedded thermocouple and Gardon gauge sensors were developed and fabricated into both blades and vanes. These were then calibrated using a quartz lamp bank heat source and finally subjected to thermal cycle and thermal soak testing. These sensors were also fabricated into cylindrical test pieces and tested in a burner exhaust to verify heat flux measurements produced by these sensors. The results of the cylinder in cross flow tests are given.

  20. Development of heat flux sensors for turbine airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, William H.; Cyr, Marcia A.; Strange, Richard R.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives of this program are to develop heat flux sensors suitable for installation in hot section airfoils of advanced aircraft turbine engines and to experimentally verify the operation of these heat flux sensors in a cylinder in a cross flow experiment. Embedded thermocouple and Gardon gauge sensors were developed and fabricated into both blades and vanes. These were then calibrated using a quartz lamp bank heat source and finally subjected to thermal cycle and thermal soak testing. These sensors were also fabricated into cylindrical test pieces and tested in a burner exhaust to verify heat flux measurements produced by these sensors. The results of the cylinder in cross flow tests are given.

  1. Flux flow and flux dynamics in high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, L.H.; Turchinskaya, M.; Swartzendruber, L.J.; Roitburd, A.; Lundy, D.; Ritter, J.; Kaiser, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    Because high temperature superconductors, including BYCO and BSSCO, are type 2 superconductors with relatively low H(sub c 1) values and high H(sub c 2) values, they will be in a critical state for many of their applications. In the critical state, with the applied field between H(sub c 1) and H(sub c 2), flux lines have penetrated the material and can form a flux lattice and can be pinned by structural defects, chemical inhomogeneities, and impurities. A detailed knowledge of how flux penetrates the material and its behavior under the influence of applied fields and current flow, and the effect of material processing on these properties, is required in order to apply, and to improve the properties of these superconductors. When the applied field is changed rapidly, the time dependence of flux change can be divided into three regions, an initial region which occurs very rapidly, a second region in which the magnetization has a 1n(t) behavior, and a saturation region at very long times. A critical field is defined for depinning, H(sub c,p) as that field at which the hysteresis loop changes from irreversible to reversible. As a function of temperature, it is found that H(sub c,p) is well described by a power law with an exponent between 1.5 and 2.5. The behavior of H(sub c,p) for various materials and its relationship to flux flow and flux dynamics are discussed

  2. Calibration of triaxial fluxgate gradiometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vcelak, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The description of simple and fast calibration procedures used for double-probe triaxial fluxgate gradiometer is provided in this paper. The calibration procedure consists of three basic steps. In the first step both probes are calibrated independently in order to reach constant total field reading in every position. Both probes are numerically aligned in the second step in order that the gradient reading is zero in homogenous magnetic field. The third step consists of periodic drift calibration during measurement. The results and detailed description of each calibration step are presented and discussed in the paper. The gradiometer is finally verified during the detection of the metal object in the measuring grid

  3. Primary calibration in acoustics metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milhomem, T A Bacelar; Soares, Z M Defilippo

    2015-01-01

    SI unit in acoustics is realized by the reciprocity calibrations of laboratory standard microphones in pressure field, free field and diffuse field. Calibrations in pressure field and in free field are already consolidated and the Inmetro already done them. Calibration in diffuse field is not yet consolidated, however, some national metrology institutes, including Inmetro, are conducting researches on this subject. This paper presents the reciprocity calibration, the results of Inmetro in recent key comparisons and the research that is being developed for the implementation of reciprocity calibration in diffuse field

  4. Simulation and sensitivity analysis of carbon storage and fluxes in the New Jersey Pinelands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zewei Miao; Richard G. Lathrop; Ming Xu; Inga P. La Puma; Kenneth L. Clark; John Hom; Nicholas Skowronski; Steve. Van Tuyl

    2011-01-01

    A major challenge in modeling the carbon dynamics of vegetation communities is the proper parameterization and calibration of eco-physiological variables that are critical determinants of the ecosystem process-based model behavior. In this study, we improved and calibrated a biochemical process-based WxBGC model by using in situ AmeriFlux eddy covariance tower...

  5. The atomic hydrogen flux during microcrystalline silicon solar cell deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanden, van de M.C.M.; Dingemans, G.; van den Donker, M.N.; Hrunski, D.; Gordijn, A.; Kessels, W.M.M.

    2009-01-01

    Etch product detection by in situ optical emission spectroscopy is used to detect the phase transition from amorphous to microcrystalline silicon. In this contribution it is demonstrated that a calibrated version of this technique can be used to determine the absolute hydrogen flux under

  6. Compact neutron flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhavi, V.; Phatak, P.R.; Bahadur, C.; Bayala, A.K.; Jakati, R.K.; Sathian, V.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A compact size neutron flux monitor has been developed incorporating standard boards developed for smart radiation monitors. The sensitivity of the monitors is 0.4cps/nV. It has been tested up to 2075 nV flux with standard neutron sources. It shows convincing results even in high flux areas like 6m away from the accelerator in RMC (Parel) for 106/107 nV. These monitors have a focal and remote display, alarm function with potential free contacts for centralized control and additional provision of connectivity via RS485/Ethernet. This paper describes the construction, working and results of the above flux monitor

  7. Topology of magnetic flux ropes and formation of fossil flux transfer events and boundary layer plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L. C.; Ma, Z. W.; Fu, Z. F.; Otto, A.

    1993-01-01

    A mechanism for the formation of fossil flux transfer events and the low-level boundary layer within the framework of multiple X-line reconnection is proposed. Attention is given to conditions for which the bulk of magnetic flux in a flux rope of finite extent has a simple magnetic topology, where the four possible connections of magnetic field lines are: IMF to MSP, MSP to IMF, IMF to IMF, and MSP to MSP. For a sufficient relative shift of the X lines, magnetic flux may enter a flux rope from the magnetosphere and exit into the magnetosphere. This process leads to the formation of magnetic flux ropes which contain a considerable amount of magnetosheath plasma on closed magnetospheric field lines. This process is discussed as a possible explanation for the formation of fossil flux transfer events in the magnetosphere and the formation of the low-latitude boundary layer.

  8. Optical performance evaluation of a solar furnace by measuring the highly concentrated solar flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyunjin; Chai, Kwankyo; Kim, Jongkyu; Lee, Sangnam; Yoon, Hwanki; Yu, Changkyun; Kang, Yongheack

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated optical performance of a solar furnace in the KIER (Korea Institute of Energy Research) by measuring the highly concentrated solar flux with the flux mapping method. We presented and analyzed optical performance in terms of concentrated solar flux distribution and power distribution. We investigated concentration ratio, stagnation temperature, total power, and concentration accuracy with help of a modeling code based on the ray tracing method and thereby compared with other solar furnaces. We also discussed flux changes by shutter opening angles and by position adjustment of reflector facets. In the course of flux analysis, we provided a better understanding of reference flux measurement for calibration, reflectivity measurement with a portable reflectometer, shadowing area consideration for effective irradiation, as well as accuracy and repeatability of flux measurements. The results in the present study will help proper utilization of a solar furnace by facilitating comparison between flux measurements at different conditions and flux estimation during operation

  9. Self-calibration of Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Brian G.; Shimon, Meir; Yadav, Amit P. S.

    2013-01-01

    Precision measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation, especially experiments seeking to detect the odd-parity "B-modes," have far-reaching implications for cosmology. To detect the B-modes generated during inflation, the flux response and polarization angle of these experiments must be calibrated to exquisite precision. While suitable flux calibration sources abound, polarization angle calibrators are deficient in many respects. Man-made polarized sources are often not located in the antenna's far-field, have spectral properties that are radically different from the CMB's, are cumbersome to implement, and may be inherently unstable over the (long) duration these searches require to detect the faint signature of the inflationary epoch. Astrophysical sources suffer from time, frequency, and spatial variability, are not visible from all CMB observatories, and none are understood with sufficient accuracy to calibrate future CMB polarimeters seeking to probe inflationary energy scales of 1015 GeV. Both man-made and astrophysical sources require dedicated observations which detract from the amount of integration time usable for detection of the inflationary B-modes. CMB TB and EB modes, expected to identically vanish in the standard cosmological model, can be used to calibrate CMB polarimeters. By enforcing the observed EB and TB power spectra to be consistent with zero, CMB polarimeters can be calibrated to levels not possible with man-made or astrophysical sources. All of this can be accomplished for any polarimeter without any loss of observing time using a calibration source which is spectrally identical to the CMB B-modes.

  10. Direct intensity calibration of X-ray grazing-incidence microscopes with home-lab source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaran; Xie, Qing; Chen, Zhiqiang; Xin, Qiuqi; Wang, Xin; Mu, Baozhong; Wang, Zhanshan; Liu, Shenye; Ding, Yongkun

    2018-01-01

    Direct intensity calibration of X-ray grazing-incidence microscopes is urgently needed in quantitative studies of X-ray emission from laser plasma sources in inertial confinement fusion. The existing calibration methods for single reflecting mirrors, crystals, gratings, filters, and X-ray detectors are not applicable for such X-ray microscopes due to the specific optical structure and the restrictions of object-image relation. This article presents a reliable and efficient method that can be performed using a divergent X-ray source and an energy dispersive Si-PIN (silicon positive-intrinsic-negative) detector in an ordinary X-ray laboratory. The transmission theory of X-ray flux in imaging diagnostics is introduced, and the quantities to be measured are defined. The calibration method is verified by a W/Si multilayer-coated Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope with a field of view of ˜95 μm at 17.48 keV. The mirror reflectance curve in the 1D coordinate is drawn with a peak value of 20.9% and an uncertainty of ˜6.0%.

  11. All-weather calibration of wide-field optical and NIR surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, David L. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Saha, Abhijit; Claver, Jenna; Claver, Chuck [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85718 (United States); Axelrod, T. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85718 (United States); DePoy, Darren [Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Ivezić, Željko; Jones, Lynne [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Smith, R. Chris [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Stubbs, Christopher W., E-mail: daveb@slac.stanford.edu [Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The science goals for ground-based large-area surveys, such as the Dark Energy Survey, Pan-STARRS, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, require calibration of broadband photometry that is stable in time and uniform over the sky to precisions of a percent or better. This performance will need to be achieved with data taken over the course of many years, and often in less than ideal conditions. This paper describes a strategy to achieve precise internal calibration of imaging survey data taken in less than 'photometric' conditions, and reports results of an observational study of the techniques needed to implement this strategy. We find that images of celestial fields used in this case study with stellar densities ∼1 arcmin{sup –2} and taken through cloudless skies can be calibrated with relative precision ∼0.5% (reproducibility). We report measurements of spatial structure functions of cloud absorption observed over a range of atmospheric conditions, and find it possible to achieve photometric measurements that are reproducible to 1% in images that were taken through cloud layers that transmit as little as 25% of the incident optical flux (1.5 magnitudes of extinction). We find, however, that photometric precision below 1% is impeded by the thinnest detectable cloud layers. We comment on implications of these results for the observing strategies of future surveys.

  12. CALIBRATED HYDRODYNAMIC MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sezar Gülbaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The land development and increase in urbanization in a watershed affect water quantityand water quality. On one hand, urbanization provokes the adjustment of geomorphicstructure of the streams, ultimately raises peak flow rate which causes flood; on theother hand, it diminishes water quality which results in an increase in Total SuspendedSolid (TSS. Consequently, sediment accumulation in downstream of urban areas isobserved which is not preferred for longer life of dams. In order to overcome thesediment accumulation problem in dams, the amount of TSS in streams and inwatersheds should be taken under control. Low Impact Development (LID is a BestManagement Practice (BMP which may be used for this purpose. It is a land planningand engineering design method which is applied in managing storm water runoff inorder to reduce flooding as well as simultaneously improve water quality. LID includestechniques to predict suspended solid loads in surface runoff generated over imperviousurban surfaces. In this study, the impact of LID-BMPs on surface runoff and TSS isinvestigated by employing a calibrated hydrodynamic model for Sazlidere Watershedwhich is located in Istanbul, Turkey. For this purpose, a calibrated hydrodynamicmodel was developed by using Environmental Protection Agency Storm WaterManagement Model (EPA SWMM. For model calibration and validation, we set up arain gauge and a flow meter into the field and obtain rainfall and flow rate data. Andthen, we select several LID types such as retention basins, vegetative swales andpermeable pavement and we obtain their influence on peak flow rate and pollutantbuildup and washoff for TSS. Consequently, we observe the possible effects ofLID on surface runoff and TSS in Sazlidere Watershed.

  13. Self-calibrating interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nussmeier, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    A self-calibrating interferometer is disclosed which forms therein a pair of Michelson interferometers with one beam length of each Michelson interferometer being controlled by a common phase shifter. The transfer function measured from the phase shifter to either of a pair of detectors is sinusoidal with a full cycle for each half wavelength of phase shifter travel. The phase difference between these two sinusoidal detector outputs represents the optical phase difference between a path of known distance and a path of unknown distance

  14. Incision and Landsliding Lead to Coupled Increase in Sediment Flux and Grain Size Export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roda-Boluda, D. C.; Brooke, S.; D'Arcy, M. K.; Whittaker, A. C.; Armitage, J. J.

    2017-12-01

    The rates and grain sizes of sediment fluxes modulate the dynamics and timing of landscape response to tectonics, and dictate the depositional patterns of sediment in basins. Over the last decades, we have gained a good quantitative understanding on how sediment flux and grain size may affect incision and basin stratigraphy. However, we comparably still have limited knowledge on how these variables change with varying tectonic rates. To address this question, we have studied 152 catchments along 8 normal fault-bounded ranges in southern Italy, which are affected by varying fault slip rates and experiencing a transient response to tectonics. Using a data set of 38 new and published 10Be erosion rates, we calibrate a sediment flux predictive equation (BQART), in order to estimate catchment sediment fluxes. We demonstrate that long-term sediment flux is governed by fault slip rates and the tectonically-controlled transient incision, and that sediment flux estimates from the BQART, steady-state assumptions, and incised volumes are highly correlated. This is supported by our 10Be erosion rates, which are controlled by fault slip and incision rates, and the associated landsliding. Based on a new landslide inventory, we show that erosion rate differences are likely due to differences in incision-related landslide activity across these catchments, and that landslides are a major component of sediment fluxes. From a data set of >13000 grain size counts on hillslope grain size supply and fluvial sediment at catchment outlets, we observe that landslides deliver material 20-200% coarser than other sediment sources, and that this coarse supply has an impact on the grain size distributions being exported from the catchments. Combining our sediment flux and grain size data sets, we are able to show that for our catchments, and potentially also for any areas that respond to changes in climate or tectonics via enhanced landsliding, sediment flux and grain size export increase

  15. Impact of missing attenuation and scatter corrections on 99m Tc-MAA SPECT 3D dosimetry for liver radioembolization using the patient relative calibration methodology: A retrospective investigation on clinical images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, Francesca; Ferrari, Mahila; Chiesa, Carlo; Vitali, Sara; Guerriero, Francesco; Nile, Maria Chiara De; Mira, Marta; Lorenzon, Leda; Pacilio, Massimiliano; Cremonesi, Marta

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the clinical implication of performing pre-treatment dosimetry for 90 Y-microspheres liver radioembolization on 99m Tc-MAA SPECT images reconstructed without attenuation or scatter correction and quantified with the patient relative calibration methodology. Twenty-five patients treated with SIR-Spheres ® at Istituto Europeo di Oncologia and 31 patients treated with TheraSphere ® at Istituto Nazionale Tumori were considered. For each acquired 99m Tc-MAA SPECT, four reconstructions were performed: with attenuation and scatter correction (AC_SC), only attenuation (AC_NoSC), only scatter (NoAC_SC) and without corrections (NoAC_NoSC). Absorbed dose maps were calculated from the activity maps, quantified applying the patient relative calibration to the SPECT images. Whole Liver (WL) and Tumor (T) regions were drawn on CT images. Injected Liver (IL) region was defined including the voxels receiving absorbed dose >3.8 Gy/GBq. Whole Healthy Liver (WHL) and Healthy Injected Liver (HIL) regions were obtained as WHL = WL - T and HIL = IL - T. Average absorbed dose to WHL and HIL were calculated, and the injection activity was derived following each Institute's procedure. The values obtained from AC_NoSC, NoAC_SC and NoAC_NoSC images were compared to the reference value suggested by AC_SC images using Bland-Altman analysis and Wilcoxon paired test (5% significance threshold). Absorbed-dose maps were compared to the reference map (AC_SC) in global terms using the Voxel Normalized Mean Square Error (%VNMSE), and at voxel level by calculating for each voxel the normalized difference with the reference value. The uncertainty affecting absorbed dose at voxel level was accounted for in the comparison; to this purpose, the voxel counts fluctuation due to Poisson and reconstruction noise was estimated from SPECT images of a water phantom acquired and reconstructed as patient images. NoAC_SC images lead to activity prescriptions not significantly different from the

  16. Application of composite small calibration objects in traffic accident scene photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; Xu, Hongguo; Tan, Lidong

    2015-01-01

    In order to address the difficulty of arranging large calibration objects and the low measurement accuracy of small calibration objects in traffic accident scene photogrammetry, a photogrammetric method based on a composite of small calibration objects is proposed. Several small calibration objects are placed around the traffic accident scene, and the coordinate system of the composite calibration object is given based on one of them. By maintaining the relative position and coplanar relationship of the small calibration objects, the local coordinate system of each small calibration object is transformed into the coordinate system of the composite calibration object. The two-dimensional direct linear transformation method is improved based on minimizing the reprojection error of the calibration points of all objects. A rectified image is obtained using the nonlinear optimization method. The increased accuracy of traffic accident scene photogrammetry using a composite small calibration object is demonstrated through the analysis of field experiments and case studies.

  17. Application of composite small calibration objects in traffic accident scene photogrammetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Chen

    Full Text Available In order to address the difficulty of arranging large calibration objects and the low measurement accuracy of small calibration objects in traffic accident scene photogrammetry, a photogrammetric method based on a composite of small calibration objects is proposed. Several small calibration objects are placed around the traffic accident scene, and the coordinate system of the composite calibration object is given based on one of them. By maintaining the relative position and coplanar relationship of the small calibration objects, the local coordinate system of each small calibration object is transformed into the coordinate system of the composite calibration object. The two-dimensional direct linear transformation method is improved based on minimizing the reprojection error of the calibration points of all objects. A rectified image is obtained using the nonlinear optimization method. The increased accuracy of traffic accident scene photogrammetry using a composite small calibration object is demonstrated through the analysis of field experiments and case studies.

  18. Calibration of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost charged particle tracking device of the ATLAS Inner Detector. The TRT has about 300,000 straws, each of which is a proportional drift tube with a diameter of 4 mm. For a precise measurement of the trajectory of a charged particle (track), the relation between the measured time of the start of the signal and the distance of closest approach between the track and the anode wire needs to be calibrated. In this note, we present the calibration of the TRT detector during the first year of 7 TeV collision data-taking.

  19. A new measurement-while-drilling gamma ray log calibrator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisner, J.; Brooks, A.; Wisniewski, W.

    1985-01-01

    Many of the present methods of calibration for both wireline and MWD gamma ray detectors use a point source at a fixed distance from the detector. MWD calibration errors are introduced from scattering effects, from spectral differences, from position sensitivity and form lack of cylindrical geometry. A new method has been developed at Exploration Logging INc. (EXLOG) that eliminates these errors. The method uses a wrap-around or annular calibrator, referenced to the University of Houston gamma ray API pit. The new calibrator is designed to simulate the API pit's gamma ray emission spectrum with a finite amount of natural source material in the annular shape. Because of the thickness of steel between the MWD gamma ray detector and the formation, there is theoretical necessity for spectral matching. A simple theoretical approach was used to calibrate the new calibrator. Spectral matching allows a closer approximation to wireline logs and makes it possible to estimate the relative spectral content of a formation

  20. Hydrometer calibration by hydrostatic weighing with automated liquid surface positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilera, Jesus; Wright, John D; Bean, Vern E

    2008-01-01

    We describe an automated apparatus for calibrating hydrometers by hydrostatic weighing (Cuckow's method) in tridecane, a liquid of known, stable density, and with a relatively low surface tension and contact angle against glass. The apparatus uses a laser light sheet and a laser power meter to position the tridecane surface at the hydrometer scale mark to be calibrated with an uncertainty of 0.08 mm. The calibration results have an expanded uncertainty (with a coverage factor of 2) of 100 parts in 10 6 or less of the liquid density. We validated the apparatus by comparisons using water, toluene, tridecane and trichloroethylene, and found agreement within 40 parts in 10 6 or less. The new calibration method is consistent with earlier, manual calibrations performed by NIST. When customers use calibrated hydrometers, they may encounter uncertainties of 370 parts in 10 6 or larger due to surface tension, contact angle and temperature effects

  1. Hydrometer calibration by hydrostatic weighing with automated liquid surface positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Jesus; Wright, John D.; Bean, Vern E.

    2008-01-01

    We describe an automated apparatus for calibrating hydrometers by hydrostatic weighing (Cuckow's method) in tridecane, a liquid of known, stable density, and with a relatively low surface tension and contact angle against glass. The apparatus uses a laser light sheet and a laser power meter to position the tridecane surface at the hydrometer scale mark to be calibrated with an uncertainty of 0.08 mm. The calibration results have an expanded uncertainty (with a coverage factor of 2) of 100 parts in 106 or less of the liquid density. We validated the apparatus by comparisons using water, toluene, tridecane and trichloroethylene, and found agreement within 40 parts in 106 or less. The new calibration method is consistent with earlier, manual calibrations performed by NIST. When customers use calibrated hydrometers, they may encounter uncertainties of 370 parts in 106 or larger due to surface tension, contact angle and temperature effects.

  2. Calibration of a Modified Californium Shuffler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, E.T.; Armstrong, F.; Oldham, R.; Ceo, R.; Williams, N.

    1995-01-01

    A californium shuffler originally designed to assay hollow cylindrical pieces of UA1 has been modified to assay solid cylinders. Calibration standards were characterized via chemical analysis of the molten UA1 taken during casting of the standards. The melt samples yielded much more reliable characterization data than drill samples taken from standards after the standards had solidified. By normalizing one well-characterized calibration curve to several standards at different enrichments, a relatively small number of standards was required to develop an enrichment-dependent calibration. The precision of this shuffler is 0.65%, and the typical random and systematic uncertainties are 0.53% and 0.73%, respectively, for a six minute assay of an ingot containing approximately 700 grams of 235 U. This paper will discuss (1) the discrepancies encountered when UA1 standards were characterized via melt samples versus drill samples, (2) a calibration methodology employing a small number of standards, and (3) a comparison of results from a previously unused shuffler with an existing shuffler. A small number of UA1 standards have been characterized using samples from the homogeneous molten state and have yielded enrichment-dependent and enrichment-independent calibration curves on two different shufflers

  3. The calibrated laparoscopic Heller myotomy with fundoplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Martino, Natale; Marano, Luigi; Torelli, Francesco; Schettino, Michele; Porfidia, Raffaele; Reda, Gianmarco; Grassia, Michele; Petrillo, Marianna; Braccio, Bartolomeo

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is the most common primary esophageal motor disorder. Laparoscopic Heller's myotomy combined with fundoplication represents the treatment of choice for this disease, achieving good results in about 90% of patients. However, about 10% of treated patients refer persistent or recurrent dysphagia. Many Authors showed that this failure rate is related to inadequate myotomy. To verify, from experimental to clinical study, the modifications induced by Heller's myotomy of the esophago- gastric junction on LES pressure (LES-P profile, using a computerized manometric system. From 2002 to 2010 105 patients with achalasia underwent laparoscopic calibrated Heller myotomy followed by antireflux surgery. The calibrated Heller myotomy was extended for at least 2.5 cm on the esophagus and for 3 cm on the gastric side. Each step was evaluated by intraoperative manometry. Moreover, intraoperative manometry and endoscopy were used to calibrate the fundoplication. The preoperative mean LES-P was 37.73 ± 12.21. After esophageal and gastric myotomy the mean pressure drop was 21.3% and 91.9%, respectively. No mortality was reported. Laparoscopic calibrated Heller myotomy with fundoplication achieves a good outcome in the surgical treatment of achalasia. The use of intraoperative manometry enables an adequate calibration of myotomy, being effective in the evaluation of the complete pressure drop, avoiding too long esophageal myotomy and, especially, too short gastric myotomy, that may be the cause of surgical failure.

  4. Comparison of infusion pumps calibration methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Elsa; Godinho, Isabel; do Céu Ferreira, Maria; Furtado, Andreia; Lucas, Peter; Silva, Claudia

    2017-12-01

    Nowadays, several types of infusion pump are commonly used for drug delivery, such as syringe pumps and peristaltic pumps. These instruments present different measuring features and capacities according to their use and therapeutic application. In order to ensure the metrological traceability of these flow and volume measuring equipment, it is necessary to use suitable calibration methods and standards. Two different calibration methods can be used to determine the flow error of infusion pumps. One is the gravimetric method, considered as a primary method, commonly used by National Metrology Institutes. The other calibration method, a secondary method, relies on an infusion device analyser (IDA) and is typically used by hospital maintenance offices. The suitability of the IDA calibration method was assessed by testing several infusion instruments at different flow rates using the gravimetric method. In addition, a measurement comparison between Portuguese Accredited Laboratories and hospital maintenance offices was performed under the coordination of the Portuguese Institute for Quality, the National Metrology Institute. The obtained results were directly related to the used calibration method and are presented in this paper. This work has been developed in the framework of the EURAMET projects EMRP MeDD and EMPIR 15SIP03.

  5. Calibration of areal surface topography measuring instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seewig, J.; Eifler, M.

    2017-06-01

    The ISO standards which are related to the calibration of areal surface topography measuring instruments are the ISO 25178-6xx series which defines the relevant metrological characteristics for the calibration of different measuring principles and the ISO 25178-7xx series which defines the actual calibration procedures. As the field of areal measurement is however not yet fully standardized, there are still open questions to be addressed which are subject to current research. Based on this, selected research results of the authors in this area are presented. This includes the design and fabrication of areal material measures. For this topic, two examples are presented with the direct laser writing of a stepless material measure for the calibration of the height axis which is based on the Abbott- Curve and the manufacturing of a Siemens star for the determination of the lateral resolution limit. Based on these results, as well a new definition for the resolution criterion, the small scale fidelity, which is still under discussion, is presented. Additionally, a software solution for automated calibration procedures is outlined.

  6. Dosimetry and Calibration Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, T.

    1999-01-01

    The Dosimetry and Calibration Section fulfils two tasks within CERN's Radiation Protection Group: the Individual Dosimetry Service monitors more than 5000 persons potentially exposed to ionizing radiation on the CERN sites, and the Calibration Laboratory verifies throughout the year, at regular intervals, over 1000 instruments, monitors, and electronic dosimeters used by RP Group. The establishment of a Quality Assurance System for the Individual Dosimetry Service, a requirement of the new Swiss Ordinance for personal dosimetry, put a considerable workload on the section. Together with an external consultant it was decided to identify and then describe the different 'processes' of the routine work performed in the dosimetry service. The resulting Quality Manual was submitted to the Federal Office for Public Health in Bern in autumn. The CERN Individual Dosimetry Service will eventually be officially endorsed after a successful technical test in March 1999. On the technical side, the introduction of an automatic development machine for gamma films was very successful. It processes the dosimetric films without an operator being present, and its built-in regeneration mechanism keeps the concentration of the processing chemicals at a constant level

  7. Piezoelectric trace vapor calibrator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verkouteren, R. Michael; Gillen, Greg; Taylor, David W.

    2006-01-01

    The design and performance of a vapor generator for calibration and testing of trace chemical sensors are described. The device utilizes piezoelectric ink-jet nozzles to dispense and vaporize precisely known amounts of analyte solutions as monodisperse droplets onto a hot ceramic surface, where the generated vapors are mixed with air before exiting the device. Injected droplets are monitored by microscope with strobed illumination, and the reproducibility of droplet volumes is optimized by adjustment of piezoelectric wave form parameters. Complete vaporization of the droplets occurs only across a 10 deg. C window within the transition boiling regime of the solvent, and the minimum and maximum rates of trace analyte that may be injected and evaporated are determined by thermodynamic principles and empirical observations of droplet formation and stability. By varying solution concentrations, droplet injection rates, air flow, and the number of active nozzles, the system is designed to deliver--on demand--continuous vapor concentrations across more than six orders of magnitude (nominally 290 fg/l to 1.05 μg/l). Vapor pulses containing femtogram to microgram quantities of analyte may also be generated. Calibrated ranges of three explosive vapors at ng/l levels were generated by the device and directly measured by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). These data demonstrate expected linear trends within the limited working range of the IMS detector and also exhibit subtle nonlinear behavior from the IMS measurement process

  8. A Simple Accelerometer Calibrator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salam, R A; Islamy, M R F; Khairurrijal; Munir, M M; Latief, H; Irsyam, M

    2016-01-01

    High possibility of earthquake could lead to the high number of victims caused by it. It also can cause other hazards such as tsunami, landslide, etc. In that case it requires a system that can examine the earthquake occurrence. Some possible system to detect earthquake is by creating a vibration sensor system using accelerometer. However, the output of the system is usually put in the form of acceleration data. Therefore, a calibrator system for accelerometer to sense the vibration is needed. In this study, a simple accelerometer calibrator has been developed using 12 V DC motor, optocoupler, Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) and AVR 328 microcontroller as controller system. The system uses the Pulse Wave Modulation (PWM) form microcontroller to control the motor rotational speed as response to vibration frequency. The frequency of vibration was read by optocoupler and then those data was used as feedback to the system. The results show that the systems could control the rotational speed and the vibration frequencies in accordance with the defined PWM. (paper)

  9. Primary cosmic ray flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanev, Todor

    2001-05-01

    We discuss the primary cosmic ray flux from the point of view of particle interactions and production of atmospheric neutrinos. The overall normalization of the cosmic ray flux and its time variations and site dependence are major ingredients of the atmospheric neutrino predictions and the basis for the derivation of the neutrino oscillation parameters.

  10. The JCMT Transient Survey: Data Reduction and Calibration Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mairs, Steve; Lane, James [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, V8P 1A1 (Canada); Johnstone, Doug; Kirk, Helen [NRC Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Lacaille, Kevin; Chapman, Scott [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, B3H 4R2 (Canada); Bower, Geoffrey C. [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 645 N. A‘ohōkū Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Bell, Graham S.; Graves, Sarah, E-mail: smairs@uvic.ca [East Asian Observatory, 660 North A‘ohōkū Place, University Park, Hilo, Hawaii 96720 (United States); Collaboration: JCMT Transient Team

    2017-07-01

    Though there has been a significant amount of work investigating the early stages of low-mass star formation in recent years, the evolution of the mass assembly rate onto the central protostar remains largely unconstrained. Examining in depth the variation in this rate is critical to understanding the physics of star formation. Instabilities in the outer and inner circumstellar disk can lead to episodic outbursts. Observing these brightness variations at infrared or submillimeter wavelengths constrains the current accretion models. The JCMT Transient Survey is a three-year project dedicated to studying the continuum variability of deeply embedded protostars in eight nearby star-forming regions at a one-month cadence. We use the SCUBA-2 instrument to simultaneously observe these regions at wavelengths of 450 and 850 μ m. In this paper, we present the data reduction techniques, image alignment procedures, and relative flux calibration methods for 850 μ m data. We compare the properties and locations of bright, compact emission sources fitted with Gaussians over time. Doing so, we achieve a spatial alignment of better than 1″ between the repeated observations and an uncertainty of 2%–3% in the relative peak brightness of significant, localized emission. This combination of imaging performance is unprecedented in ground-based, single-dish submillimeter observations. Finally, we identify a few sources that show possible and confirmed brightness variations. These sources will be closely monitored and presented in further detail in additional studies throughout the duration of the survey.

  11. The JCMT Transient Survey: Data Reduction and Calibration Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mairs, Steve; Lane, James; Johnstone, Doug; Kirk, Helen; Lacaille, Kevin; Chapman, Scott; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Bell, Graham S.; Graves, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Though there has been a significant amount of work investigating the early stages of low-mass star formation in recent years, the evolution of the mass assembly rate onto the central protostar remains largely unconstrained. Examining in depth the variation in this rate is critical to understanding the physics of star formation. Instabilities in the outer and inner circumstellar disk can lead to episodic outbursts. Observing these brightness variations at infrared or submillimeter wavelengths constrains the current accretion models. The JCMT Transient Survey is a three-year project dedicated to studying the continuum variability of deeply embedded protostars in eight nearby star-forming regions at a one-month cadence. We use the SCUBA-2 instrument to simultaneously observe these regions at wavelengths of 450 and 850 μ m. In this paper, we present the data reduction techniques, image alignment procedures, and relative flux calibration methods for 850 μ m data. We compare the properties and locations of bright, compact emission sources fitted with Gaussians over time. Doing so, we achieve a spatial alignment of better than 1″ between the repeated observations and an uncertainty of 2%–3% in the relative peak brightness of significant, localized emission. This combination of imaging performance is unprecedented in ground-based, single-dish submillimeter observations. Finally, we identify a few sources that show possible and confirmed brightness variations. These sources will be closely monitored and presented in further detail in additional studies throughout the duration of the survey.

  12. Partitioning of net carbon dioxide flux measured by automatic transparent chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyukarev, EA

    2018-03-01

    Mathematical model was developed for describing carbon dioxide fluxes at open sedge-sphagnum fen during growing season. The model was calibrated using the results of observations from automatic transparent chamber and it allows us to estimate autotrophic, heterotrophic and ecosystem respiration fluxes, gross and net primary vegetation production, and the net carbon balance.

  13. Comparative proteomics of chloroplasts envelopes from bundle sheath and mesophyll chloroplasts reveals novel membrane proteins with a possible role in C4-related metabolite fluxes and development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana eManandhar-Shrestha

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available As the world population grows, our need for food increases drastically. Limited amounts of arable land lead to a competition between food and fuel crops, while changes in the global climate may impact future crop yields. Thus, a second green revolution will need a better understanding of the processes essential for plant growth and development. One approach toward the solution of this problem is to better understand regulatory and transport processes in C4 plants. C4 plants display an up to 10-fold higher apparent CO2 assimilation and higher yields while maintaining high water use efficiency. This requires differential regulation of mesophyll (M and bundle sheath (BS chloroplast development as well as higher metabolic fluxes of photosynthetic intermediates between cells and across chloroplast envelopes. While previous analyses of overall chloroplast membranes have yielded significant insight, our comparative proteomics approach using enriched BS and M chloroplast envelopes of Zea mays allowed us to identify 37 proteins of unknown function that have not been seen in these earlier studies. We identified 280 proteins, 84% of which are known/predicted to be present in chloroplasts (cp. 74% have a known or predicted membrane association. 21 membrane proteins were 2-15 times more abundant in BS cells, while 36 proteins were more abundant in M cp envelopes. These proteins could represent additional candidates of proteins essential for development or metabolite transport processes in C4 plants. RT-PCR confirmed differential expression of thirteen candidate genes. Cp association was confirmed using GFP labeling. Genes for a PIC-like protein and an ER-AP-like protein show an early transient increase in gene expression during the transition to light. In addition, PIC gene expression is increased in the immature part of the leaf and was lower in the fully developed parts of the leaf, suggesting a need for/incorporation of the protein during chloroplast

  14. Dust Absorption and the Ultraviolet Luminosity Density at z ~ 3 as Calibrated by Local Starburst Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurer, Gerhardt R.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Calzetti, Daniela

    1999-08-01

    We refine a technique to measure the absorption-corrected ultraviolet (UV) luminosity of starburst galaxies using rest-frame UV quantities alone and apply it to Lyman-limit U dropouts at z~3 found in the Hubble Deep Field (HDF). The method is based on an observed correlation between the ratio of far-infrared (FIR) to UV fluxes with spectral slope β (a UV color). A simple fit to this relation allows the UV flux absorbed by dust and reprocessed to the FIR to be calculated, and hence the dust-free UV luminosity to be determined. International Ultraviolet Explorer spectra and Infrared Astronomical Satellite fluxes of local starbursts are used to calibrate the FFIR/F1600 versus β relation in terms of A1600 (the dust absorption at 1600 Å) and the transformation from broadband photometric color to β. Both calibrations are almost completely independent of theoretical stellar-population models. We show that the recent marginal and nondetections of HDF U dropouts at radio and submillimeter wavelengths are consistent with their assumed starburst nature and our calculated A1600. This is also true of recent observations of the ratio of optical emission-line flux to UV flux density in the brightest U dropouts. This latter ratio turns out not to be a good indicator of dust extinction. In U dropouts, absolute magnitude M1600,0 correlates with β: brighter galaxies are redder, as is observed to be the case for local starburst galaxies. This suggests that a mass-metallicity relationship is already in place at z~3. The absorption-corrected UV luminosity function of U dropouts extends up to M1600,0~-24 AB mag, corresponding to a star formation rate ~200 \\Mscrsolar yr-1 (H0=50 km s-1 Mpc-3 and q0=0.5 are assumed throughout). The absorption-corrected UV luminosity density at z~3 is ρ1600,0>=1.4×1027 ergs-1 Hz-1 Mpc-1. It is still a lower limit since completeness corrections have not been done and because only galaxies with A1600dropouts. The luminosity-weighted mean dust

  15. Calibration of Nuclear Track Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukovic, J.B; Antanasijevic, R.; Novakovic, V.; Tasic, M.

    1998-01-01

    In this work we compare some of our preliminary results relating to the calibration Nuclear Track Detectors (NTD) with corresponding results obtained from other participants at the First International Intercomparison of Image Analyzers (III 97/98). Thirteen laboratories from Algeria, China, Czech Rep., France. Germany, Greece, Hungary, India, Italy, Mexico, Saudi Arabia, Slovenia and Yugoslavia participated in the III A 97/98. The NTD was 'Tustrack', Bristol. This type of CR-39 detector was etched by the organizer (J.Paltarey of al, Atomic Energy Research Institute, HPD, Budapest, Hungary). Etching condition was: 6N NaOH, 70 0C . Seven series detectors were exposed with the sources: B(n,a)Li, Am-241, Pu-Be(n,p), Radon and Am-Cm-Pu. Following parameters of exposed detectors were measured: track density of different sorts of tracks (circular, elliptical, track overlapping, their diameters, major and minor axis and other). (authors)

  16. In-situ Calibration of Ground -based Lidar instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva Yankova, Ginka; Villanueva, Héctor

    This report presents the result of the lidar in-situ calibration performed at DTU’s test site for large wind turbine at Østerild, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided by mea...

  17. Calibrating the Truax Rough Rider seed drill for restoration plantings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loren St. John; Brent Cornforth; Boyd Simonson; Dan Ogle; Derek Tilley

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this technical note is to provide a step-by-step approach to calibrating the Truax Rough Rider range drill, a relatively new, state-of-the-art rangeland drill. To achieve the desired outcome of a seeding project, an important step following proper weed control and seedbed preparation is the calibration of the seeding equipment to ensure the recommended...

  18. Calibration of Avent Wind IRIS SN. WI01030176

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yordanova, Ginka; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the result of the lidar calibration performed for a two-beam nacelle based lidar at DTU’s test site for large wind turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference wind speed measurements with measurement un...

  19. Calibrating the sqHIMMELI v1.0 wetland methane emission model with hierarchical modeling and adaptive MCMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susiluoto, Jouni; Raivonen, Maarit; Backman, Leif; Laine, Marko; Makela, Jarmo; Peltola, Olli; Vesala, Timo; Aalto, Tuula

    2018-03-01

    Estimating methane (CH4) emissions from natural wetlands is complex, and the estimates contain large uncertainties. The models used for the task are typically heavily parameterized and the parameter values are not well known. In this study, we perform a Bayesian model calibration for a new wetland CH4 emission model to improve the quality of the predictions and to understand the limitations of such models.The detailed process model that we analyze contains descriptions for CH4 production from anaerobic respiration, CH4 oxidation, and gas transportation by diffusion, ebullition, and the aerenchyma cells of vascular plants. The processes are controlled by several tunable parameters. We use a hierarchical statistical model to describe the parameters and obtain the posterior distributions of the parameters and uncertainties in the processes with adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), importance resampling, and time series analysis techniques. For the estimation, the analysis utilizes measurement data from the Siikaneva flux measurement site in southern Finland. The uncertainties related to the parameters and the modeled processes are described quantitatively. At the process level, the flux measurement data are able to constrain the CH4 production processes, methane oxidation, and the different gas transport processes. The posterior covariance structures explain how the parameters and the processes are related. Additionally, the flux and flux component uncertainties are analyzed both at the annual and daily levels. The parameter posterior densities obtained provide information regarding importance of the different processes, which is also useful for development of wetland methane emission models other than the square root HelsinkI Model of MEthane buiLd-up and emIssion for peatlands (sqHIMMELI). The hierarchical modeling allows us to assess the effects of some of the parameters on an annual basis. The results of the calibration and the cross validation suggest that

  20. On chromatic and geometrical calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folm-Hansen, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    The main subject of the present thesis is different methods for the geometrical and chromatic calibration of cameras in various environments. For the monochromatic issues of the calibration we present the acquisition of monochrome images, the classic monochrome aberrations and the various sources...... the correct interpolation method is described. For the chromatic issues of calibration we present the acquisition of colour and multi-spectral images, the chromatic aberrations and the various lens/camera based non-uniformities of the illumination of the image plane. It is described how the monochromatic...... to design calibration targets for both geometrical and chromatic calibration are described. We present some possible systematical errors on the detection of the objects in the calibration targets, if viewed in a non orthogonal angle, if the intensities are uneven or if the image blurring is uneven. Finally...

  1. Development of portable flow calibrator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Kiyomitsu; Iijima, Nobuo

    1995-01-01

    In the nuclear facilities, air sniffer system is often utilized to evaluate atmospheric concentration of radioactivity in the working environment. The system collects airborne dust on the filter during some sampling period. In this method, total air flow during the sampling period is an important parameter to evaluate the radioactivity concentration correctly. Therefore, calibration for the flow meter of air sniffer system must be done periodically according to Japan Industry Standards (JIS). As we have had to available device to calibrate the flow meter in the working area, we had to remove the flow meters from the installed place and carry them to another place where calibration can be made. This work required a great deal of labor. Now we have developed a portable flow calibrator for air sniffer system which enables us to make in-site calibration of the flow meter in the working area more easily. This report describes the outline of portable flow calibrator and it's experimental results. (author)

  2. Nuclear fuel technology - Tank calibration and volume determination for nuclear materials accountancy - Part 2: Data standardization for tank calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of the volume and height of liquid in a process accountancy tank are often made in order to estimate or verify the tank's calibration or volume measurement equation. The calibration equation relates the response of the tank's measurement system to some independent measure of tank volume. The ultimate purpose of the calibration exercise is to estimate the tank's volume measurement equation (the inverse of the calibration equation), which relates tank volume to measurement system response. In this part of ISO 18213, it is assumed that the primary measurement-system response variable is liquid height and that the primary measure of liquid content is volume. This part of ISO 18213 presents procedures for standardizing a set of calibration data to a fixed set of reference conditions so as to minimize the effect of variations in ambient conditions that occur during the measurement process. The procedures presented herein apply generally to measurements of liquid height and volume obtained for the purpose of calibrating a tank (i.e. calibrating a tank's measurement system). When used in connection with other parts of ISO 18213, these procedures apply specifically to tanks equipped with bubbler probe systems for measuring liquid content. The standardization algorithms presented herein can be profitably applied when only estimates of ambient conditions, such as temperature, are available. However, the most reliable results are obtained when relevant ambient conditions are measured for each measurement of volume and liquid height in a set of calibration data. Information is provided on scope, physical principles, data required, calibration data, dimensional changes in the tank, multiple calibration runs and results on standardized calibration data. Four annexes inform about density of water, buoyancy corrections for mass determination, determination of tank heel volume and statistical method for aligning data from several calibration runs. A bibliography is

  3. Field calibration of optical sensors for measuring suspended sediment concentration in the western Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Guillén

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The water turbidity measured with optical methods (transmittance and backscattering is usually expressed as beam attenuation coefficient (BAC or formazin turbidity units (FTU. The transformation of these units to volumetric suspended sediment concentration (SSC units is not straightforward, and accurate calibrations are required in order to obtain valuable information on suspended sediment distributions and fluxes. In this paper, data from field calibrations between BAC, FTU and SSC are presented and best-fit calibration curves are shown. These calibrations represent an average from different marine environments of the western Mediterranean (from estuary to continental slope. However, the general curves can only be applied for descriptive or semi-quantitative purposes. Comparison of turbidity measurements using the same sensor with different calibration ranges shows the advantage of simultaneously combining two instruments calibrated in different ranges when significant changes in suspended sediment concentrations are expected.

  4. SURF Model Calibration Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-10

    SURF and SURFplus are high explosive reactive burn models for shock initiation and propagation of detonation waves. They are engineering models motivated by the ignition & growth concept of high spots and for SURFplus a second slow reaction for the energy release from carbon clustering. A key feature of the SURF model is that there is a partial decoupling between model parameters and detonation properties. This enables reduced sets of independent parameters to be calibrated sequentially for the initiation and propagation regimes. Here we focus on a methodology for tting the initiation parameters to Pop plot data based on 1-D simulations to compute a numerical Pop plot. In addition, the strategy for tting the remaining parameters for the propagation regime and failure diameter is discussed.

  5. Reducing the Variance of Intrinsic Camera Calibration Results in the ROS Camera_Calibration Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Geoffrey Nelson

    The intrinsic calibration of a camera is the process in which the internal optical and geometric characteristics of the camera are determined. If accurate intrinsic parameters of a camera are known, the ray in 3D space that every point in the image lies on can be determined. Pairing with another camera allows for the position of the points in the image to be calculated by intersection of the rays. Accurate intrinsics also allow for the position and orientation of a camera relative to some world coordinate system to be calculated. These two reasons for having accurate intrinsic calibration for a camera are especially important in the field of industrial robotics where 3D cameras are frequently mounted on the ends of manipulators. In the ROS (Robot Operating System) ecosystem, the camera_calibration package is the default standard for intrinsic camera calibration. Several researchers from the Industrial Robotics & Automation division at Southwest Research Institute have noted that this package results in large variances in the intrinsic parameters of the camera when calibrating across multiple attempts. There are also open issues on this matter in their public repository that have not been addressed by the developers. In this thesis, we confirm that the camera_calibration package does indeed return different results across multiple attempts, test out several possible hypothesizes as to why, identify the reason, and provide simple solution to fix the cause of the issue.

  6. Calibration of Nanopositioning Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Tan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Accuracy is one of the most important criteria for the performance evaluation of micro- and nanorobots or systems. Nanopositioning stages are used to achieve the high positioning resolution and accuracy for a wide and growing scope of applications. However, their positioning accuracy and repeatability are not well known and difficult to guarantee, which induces many drawbacks for many applications. For example, in the mechanical characterisation of biological samples, it is difficult to perform several cycles in a repeatable way so as not to induce negative influences on the study. It also prevents one from controlling accurately a tool with respect to a sample without adding additional sensors for closed loop control. This paper aims at quantifying the positioning repeatability and accuracy based on the ISO 9283:1998 standard, and analyzing factors influencing positioning accuracy onto a case study of 1-DoF (Degree-of-Freedom nanopositioning stage. The influence of thermal drift is notably quantified. Performances improvement of the nanopositioning stage are then investigated through robot calibration (i.e., open-loop approach. Two models (static and adaptive models are proposed to compensate for both geometric errors and thermal drift. Validation experiments are conducted over a long period (several days showing that the accuracy of the stage is improved from typical micrometer range to 400 nm using the static model and even down to 100 nm using the adaptive model. In addition, we extend the 1-DoF calibration to multi-DoF with a case study of a 2-DoF nanopositioning robot. Results demonstrate that the model efficiently improved the 2D accuracy from 1400 nm to 200 nm.

  7. Radiological Calibration and Standards Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — PNNL maintains a state-of-the-art Radiological Calibration and Standards Laboratory on the Hanford Site at Richland, Washington. Laboratory staff provide expertise...

  8. CERN radiation protection (RP) calibration facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozzi, Fabio

    2016-04-14

    Radiation protection calibration facilities are essential to ensure the correct operation of radiation protection instrumentation. Calibrations are performed in specific radiation fields according to the type of instrument to be calibrated: neutrons, photons, X-rays, beta and alpha particles. Some of the instruments are also tested in mixed radiation fields as often encountered close to high-energy particle accelerators. Moreover, calibration facilities are of great importance to evaluate the performance of prototype detectors; testing and measuring the response of a prototype detector to well-known and -characterized radiation fields contributes to improving and optimizing its design and capabilities. The CERN Radiation Protection group is in charge of performing the regular calibrations of all CERN radiation protection devices; these include operational and passive dosimeters, neutron and photon survey-meters, and fixed radiation detectors to monitor the ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), inside CERN accelerators and at the CERN borders. A new state-of-the-art radiation protection calibration facility was designed, constructed and commissioned following the related ISO recommendations to replace the previous ageing (more than 30 years old) laboratory. In fact, the new laboratory aims also at the official accreditation according to the ISO standards in order to be able to release certified calibrations. Four radiation fields are provided: neutrons, photons and beta sources and an X-ray generator. Its construction did not only involve a pure civil engineering work; many radiation protection studies were performed to provide a facility that could answer the CERN calibration needs and fulfill all related safety requirements. Monte Carlo simulations have been confirmed to be a valuable tool for the optimization of the building design, the radiation protection aspects, e.g. shielding, and, as consequence, the overall cost. After the source and irradiator installation

  9. Investigation of a Fiber Optic Strain Sensing (FOSS) Distributed Load Calibration Methodology

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FOSS is a relatively newer technology that needs to be explored for application to load calibration and loads monitoring efforts. Load calibration opportunities are...

  10. BXS Re-calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, J.

    2010-01-01

    Early in the commissioning it was noticed by Cecile Limborg that the calibration of the BXS spectrometer magnet seemed to be different from the strength of the BX01/BX02 magnets. First the BX01/BX02 currents were adjusted to 135 MeV and the beam energy was adjusted to make the horizontal orbit flat. Then BX01/BX02 magnets were switched off and BXS was adjusted to make the horizontal orbit in the spectrometer line flat, without changing the energy of the beam. The result was that about 140-141 MeV were required on the BXS magnet. This measurement was repeated several times by others with the same results. It was not clear what was causing the error: magnet strength or layout. A position error of about 19 mm of the BXS magnet could explain the difference. Because there was a significant misalignment of the vacuum chamber in the BXS line, the alignment of the whole spectrometer line was checked. The vacuum chamber was corrected, but the magnets were found to be in the proper alignment. So we were left with one (or conceivably two) magnet calibration errors. Because BXS is a wedged shaped magnet, the bend angle depends on the horizontal position of the incoming beam. As mentioned, an offset of the beam position of 19 mm would increase or decrease the bend angle roughly by the ratio of 135/141. The figure of 19 mm is special and caused a considerable confusion during the design and measurement of the BXS magnet. This is best illustrated in Figure 1 which was taken out of the BXS Traveler document. The distance between the horizontal midplanes of the poles and the apex of the beam path was chosen to be 19 mm so the beam is close to the good field region throughout its entire path. Thus it seemed possible that there was an error that resulted in the beam not being on this trajectory, or conversely, that the magnetic measurements were done on the wrong trajectory and the magnet was then mis-calibrated. Mechanical measurements of the vacuum chamber made in the tunnel

  11. Flux frequency analysis of seasonally dry ecosystem fluxes in two unique biomes of Sonora Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verduzco, V. S.; Yepez, E. A.; Robles-Morua, A.; Garatuza, J.; Rodriguez, J. C.; Watts, C.

    2013-05-01

    Complex dynamics from the interactions of ecosystems processes makes difficult to model the behavior of ecosystems fluxes of carbon and water in response to the variation of environmental and biological drivers. Although process oriented ecosystem models are critical tools for studying land-atmosphere fluxes, its validity depends on the appropriate parameterization of equations describing temporal and spatial changes of model state variables and their interactions. This constraint often leads to discrepancies between model simulations and observed data that reduce models reliability especially in arid and semiarid ecosystems. In the semiarid north western Mexico, ecosystem processes are fundamentally controlled by the seasonality of water and the intermittence of rain pulses which are conditions that require calibration of specific fitting functions to describe the response of ecosystem variables (i.e. NEE, GPP, ET, respiration) to these wetting and drying periods. The goal is to find functions that describe the magnitude of ecosystem fluxes during individual rain pulses and the seasonality of the ecosystem. Relaying on five years of eddy covariance flux data of a tropical dry forest and a subtropical shrubland we present a flux frequency analysis that describe the variation of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 to highlight the relevance of pulse driven dynamics controlling this flux. Preliminary results of flux frequency analysis of NEE indicate that these ecosystems are strongly controlled by the frequency distribution of rain. Also, the output of fitting functions for NEE, GPP, ET and respiration using semi-empirical functions applied at specific rain pulses compared with season-long statistically generated simulations do not agree. Seasonality and the intrinsic nature of individual pulses have different effects on ecosystem flux responses. This suggests that relationships between the nature of seasonality and individual pulses can help improve the

  12. Corrigendum to “Relative humidity effects on water vapour fluxes measured with closed-path eddy-covariance systems with short sampling lines” [Agric. Forest Meteorol. 165 (2012) 53–63

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fratini, Gerardo; Ibrom, Andreas; Arriga, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    It has been formerly recognised that increasing relative humidity in the sampling line of closed-path eddy-covariance systems leads to increasing attenuation of water vapour turbulent fluctuations, resulting in strong latent heat flux losses. This occurrence has been analyzed for very long (50 m...... from eddy-covariance systems featuring short (4 m) and very short (1 m) sampling lines running at the same clover field and show that relative humidity effects persist also for these setups, and should not be neglected. Starting from the work of Ibrom and co-workers, we propose a mixed method...... and correction method proposed here is deemed applicable to closed-path systems featuring a broad range of sampling lines, and indeed applicable also to passive gases as a special case. The methods described in this paper are incorporated, as processing options, in the free and open-source eddy...

  13. Automatic multi-camera calibration for deployable positioning systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, Maria; Karlsson, Mikael; Rudner, Staffan

    2012-06-01

    Surveillance with automated positioning and tracking of subjects and vehicles in 3D is desired in many defence and security applications. Camera systems with stereo or multiple cameras are often used for 3D positioning. In such systems, accurate camera calibration is needed to obtain a reliable 3D position estimate. There is also a need for automated camera calibration to facilitate fast deployment of semi-mobile multi-camera 3D positioning systems. In this paper we investigate a method for automatic calibration of the extrinsic camera parameters (relative camera pose and orientation) of a multi-camera positioning system. It is based on estimation of the essential matrix between each camera pair using the 5-point method for intrinsically calibrated cameras. The method is compared to a manual calibration method using real HD video data from a field trial with a multicamera positioning system. The method is also evaluated on simulated data from a stereo camera model. The results show that the reprojection error of the automated camera calibration method is close to or smaller than the error for the manual calibration method and that the automated calibration method can replace the manual calibration.

  14. Multivariate calibration applied to the quantitative analysis of infrared spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haaland, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    Multivariate calibration methods are very useful for improving the precision, accuracy, and reliability of quantitative spectral analyses. Spectroscopists can more effectively use these sophisticated statistical tools if they have a qualitative understanding of the techniques involved. A qualitative picture of the factor analysis multivariate calibration methods of partial least squares (PLS) and principal component regression (PCR) is presented using infrared calibrations based upon spectra of phosphosilicate glass thin films on silicon wafers. Comparisons of the relative prediction abilities of four different multivariate calibration methods are given based on Monte Carlo simulations of spectral calibration and prediction data. The success of multivariate spectral calibrations is demonstrated for several quantitative infrared studies. The infrared absorption and emission spectra of thin-film dielectrics used in the manufacture of microelectronic devices demonstrate rapid, nondestructive at-line and in-situ analyses using PLS calibrations. Finally, the application of multivariate spectral calibrations to reagentless analysis of blood is presented. We have found that the determination of glucose in whole blood taken from diabetics can be precisely monitored from the PLS calibration of either mind- or near-infrared spectra of the blood. Progress toward the non-invasive determination of glucose levels in diabetics is an ultimate goal of this research. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Terrestrial water fluxes dominated by transpiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasechko, Scott; Sharp, Zachary D; Gibson, John J; Birks, S Jean; Yi, Yi; Fawcett, Peter J

    2013-04-18

    Renewable fresh water over continents has input from precipitation and losses to the atmosphere through evaporation and transpiration. Global-scale estimates of transpiration from climate models are poorly constrained owing to large uncertainties in stomatal conductance and the lack of catchment-scale measurements required for model calibration, resulting in a range of predictions spanning 20 to 65 per cent of total terrestrial evapotranspiration (14,000 to 41,000 km(3) per year) (refs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5). Here we use the distinct isotope effects of transpiration and evaporation to show that transpiration is by far the largest water flux from Earth's continents, representing 80 to 90 per cent of terrestrial evapotranspiration. On the basis of our analysis of a global data set of large lakes and rivers, we conclude that transpiration recycles 62,000 ± 8,000 km(3) of water per year to the atmosphere, using half of all solar energy absorbed by land surfaces in the process. We also calculate CO2 uptake by terrestrial vegetation by connecting transpiration losses to carbon assimilation using water-use efficiency ratios of plants, and show the global gross primary productivity to be 129 ± 32 gigatonnes of carbon per year, which agrees, within the uncertainty, with previous estimates. The dominance of transpiration water fluxes in continental evapotranspiration suggests that, from the point of view of water resource forecasting, climate model development should prioritize improvements in simulations of biological fluxes rather than physical (evaporation) fluxes.

  16. Improving calibration accuracy in gel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldham, M.; McJury, M.; Webb, S.; Baustert, I.B.; Leach, M.O.

    1998-01-01

    A new method of calibrating gel dosimeters (applicable to both Fricke and polyacrylamide gels) is presented which has intrinsically higher accuracy than current methods, and requires less gel. Two test-tubes of gel (inner diameter 2.5 cm, length 20 cm) are irradiated separately with a 10x10cm 2 field end-on in a water bath, such that the characteristic depth-dose curve is recorded in the gel. The calibration is then determined by fitting the depth-dose measured in water, against the measured change in relaxivity with depth in the gel. Increased accuracy is achieved in this simple depth-dose geometry by averaging the relaxivity at each depth. A large number of calibration data points, each with relatively high accuracy, are obtained. Calibration data over the full range of dose (1.6-10 Gy) is obtained by irradiating one test-tube to 10 Gy at dose maximum (D max ), and the other to 4.5 Gy at D max . The new calibration method is compared with a 'standard method' where five identical test-tubes of gel were irradiated to different known doses between 2 and 10 Gy. The percentage uncertainties in the slope and intercept of the calibration fit are found to be lower with the new method by a factor of about 4 and 10 respectively, when compared with the standard method and with published values. The gel was found to respond linearly within the error bars up to doses of 7 Gy, with a slope of 0.233±0.001 s -1 Gy -1 and an intercept of 1.106±0.005 Gy. For higher doses, nonlinear behaviour was observed. (author)

  17. Going beyond the stationary flux towers to assess the interactions of land use and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakir, Dan; Rohatyn, shani; Ramati, Efrat; Tatrinov, Fedor; Rotenberg, Eyal

    2017-04-01

    Networks of permanent, stationary flux towers that allows continuous canopy-scale measurements over annual time-scales have revolutionized the study of the contemporary carbon cycle over the past two decades. However, this approach is limited in addressing questions related to dynamic changes in land use, vegetation types, disturbance, and their interactions with variations in environmental conditions. Using mobile laboratory for measuring CO2, water, energy, COS, and VOC fluxes, permitted us to extend our stationary flux tower measurements across many sites, but also limited measurements to short-time campaigns (days to weeks). To overcome this limitation, we adopted an empirical approach (often used in remote sensing) and used state of the art campaign-based ecosystem flux measurements to 'calibrate' local meteorological data available on continuous basis, to estimate annual-scale carbon, water, and energy budgets. Using this approach, we investigated the interactions of land use change (afforestation) and climate (humid Mediterranean to semi-arid, 730 to 300 mm in annual precipitation) on the ecosystem fluxes. The results showed that across this climatic range, afforestation increased ET markedly more in the wet (+200 mm yr-1 or 30% of P) than in the dry end (+58 mm yr-1 or 19% of P). Similarly, increase in carbon sequestration (NEE) associated with forestation was greater in the wet sites (+460 gC m-2 yr-1) than in the dry sites (+30 gC m-2 yr-1). In contrast, ecosystem net-radiation (Rn) and sensible heat flux (H) increased due to afforestation much more in the dry sites than in the wet sites ( 47 vs. 27 and 49 vs. 17 Wm-2, respectively). COS and VOC fluxes were also measured but reported separately. The results provided quantitative assessment of shifts in the tradeoffs associated with afforestation in this region, between the hydrological and energy-budget 'costs', vs. carbon sequestration and other ecosystem services, (e.g, surface cooling, erosion

  18. Exposure-rate calibration using large-area calibration pads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, E.F.

    1988-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology established the Technical Measurements Center (TMC) at the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) in Grand Junction, Colorado, to standardize, calibrate, and compare measurements made in support of DOE remedial action programs. A set of large-area, radioelement-enriched concrete pads was constructed by the DOE in 1978 at the Walker Field Airport in Grand Junction for use as calibration standards for airborne gamma-ray spectrometer systems. The use of these pads was investigated by the TMC as potential calibration standards for portable scintillometers employed in measuring gamma-ray exposure rates at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) project sites. Data acquired on the pads using a pressurized ionization chamber (PIC) and three scintillometers are presented as an illustration of an instrumental calibration. Conclusions and recommended calibration procedures are discussed, based on the results of these data

  19. Measurements at the RA Reactor related to the VISA-2 project - Part 1, Start-up of the RA reactor and measurement of new RA reactor core parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovic, H.

    1962-07-01

    The objective of the measurements was determining the neutron flux in the RA reactor core. Since the number of fuel channels is increased from 56 to 68 within the VISA-2 project, it was necessary to attain criticality of the RA reactor and measure the neutron flux properties. The 'program of RA reactor start-up' has been prepared separately and it is included in this report. Measurements were divided in two phases. First phase was measuring of the neutron flux after the criticality was achieved but at zero power. During phase two measurements were repeated at several power levels, at equilibrium xenon poisoning. This report includes experimental data of flux distributions and absolute values of the thermal and fast neutron flux in the RA reactor experimental channels and values of cadmium ratio for determining the neutron epithermal flux. Data related to calibration of regulatory rods for cold un poisoned core are included [sr

  20. The energy dependence of photon-flux and efficiency in the NRF measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agar, Osman [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Karamanoglu Mehmetbey University, Department of Physics, 70100 Karaman (Turkey); Gayer, Udo; Merter, Laura; Pai, Haridas; Pietralla, Norbert; Ries, Philipp; Romig, Christopher; Werner, Volker; Schillling, Marcel; Zweidinger, Markus [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The calibration of the detector efficiency and the photon-flux distribution play an important role during the analysis of nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements. The nucleus {sup 11}B is a frequently used calibration target with well-known photo-excitation cross sections. The product of photon flux and efficiency is determined exploiting γ-ray transitions of the {sup 11}B monitoring target. Photon-flux calibrations from numerous measurements at the superconducting Darmstadt electron linear accelerator (S-DALINAC) are carried out up to the neutron separation threshold, in order to obtain a system check of influences of absorbers on the flux, and to check against different GEANT models as well as parametrizations of the Schiff formula.

  1. Continuous magnetic flux pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.; Elleman, D. D.; Whitmore, F. C. (Inventor)

    1966-01-01

    A method and means for altering the intensity of a magnetic field by transposing flux from one location to the location desired fro the magnetic field are examined. The device described includes a pair of communicating cavities formed in a block of superconducting material, is dimensioned to be insertable into one of the cavities and to substantially fill the cavity. Magnetic flux is first trapped in the cavities by establishing a magnetic field while the superconducting material is above the critical temperature at which it goes superconducting. Thereafter, the temperature of the material is reduced below the critical value, and then the exciting magnetic field may be removed. By varying the ratios of the areas of the two cavities, it is possible to produce a field having much greater flux density in the second, smaller cavity, into which the flux transposed.

  2. Flux in Tallinn

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Rahvusvahelise elektroonilise kunsti sümpoosioni ISEA2004 klubiõhtu "Flux in Tallinn" klubis Bon Bon. Eestit esindasid Ropotator, Ars Intel Inc., Urmas Puhkan, Joel Tammik, Taavi Tulev (pseud. Wochtzchee). Klubiõhtu koordinaator Andres Lõo

  3. Flux shunts for undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyer, E.; Chin, J.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

    1993-05-01

    Undulators for high-performance applications in synchrotron-radiation sources and periodic magnetic structures for free-electron lasers have stringent requirements on the curvature of the electron's average trajectory. Undulators using the permanent magnet hybrid configuration often have fields in their central region that produce a curved trajectory caused by local, ambient magnetic fields such as those of the earth. The 4.6 m long Advanced Light Source (ALS) undulators use flux shunts to reduce this effect. These flux shunts are magnetic linkages of very high permeability material connecting the two steel beams that support the magnetic structures. The shunts reduce the scalar potential difference between the supporting beams and carry substantial flux that would normally appear in the undulator gap. Magnetic design, mechanical configuration of the flux shunts and magnetic measurements of their effect on the ALS undulators are described

  4. High-frequency measurements of aeolian saltation flux: Field-based methodology and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Raleigh L.; Kok, Jasper F.; Hugenholtz, Chris H.; Barchyn, Thomas E.; Chamecki, Marcelo; Ellis, Jean T.

    2018-02-01

    Aeolian transport of sand and dust is driven by turbulent winds that fluctuate over a broad range of temporal and spatial scales. However, commonly used aeolian transport models do not explicitly account for such fluctuations, likely contributing to substantial discrepancies between models and measurements. Underlying this problem is the absence of accurate sand flux measurements at the short time scales at which wind speed fluctuates. Here, we draw on extensive field measurements of aeolian saltation to develop a methodology for generating high-frequency (up to 25 Hz) time series of total (vertically-integrated) saltation flux, namely by calibrating high-frequency (HF) particle counts to low-frequency (LF) flux measurements. The methodology follows four steps: (1) fit exponential curves to vertical profiles of saltation flux from LF saltation traps, (2) determine empirical calibration factors through comparison of LF exponential fits to HF number counts over concurrent time intervals, (3) apply these calibration factors to subsamples of the saltation count time series to obtain HF height-specific saltation fluxes, and (4) aggregate the calibrated HF height-specific saltation fluxes into estimates of total saltation fluxes. When coupled to high-frequency measurements of wind velocity, this methodology offers new opportunities for understanding how aeolian saltation dynamics respond to variability in driving winds over time scales from tens of milliseconds to days.

  5. Neutron flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Naotaka.

    1993-01-01

    The device of the present invention greatly saves an analog processing section such as an analog filter and an analog processing circuit. That is, the device of the present invention comprises (1) a neutron flux detection means for detecting neutron fluxed in the reactor, (2) a digital filter means for dividing signals corresponding to the detected neutron fluxes into predetermined frequency band regions, (3) a calculation processing means for applying a calculation processing corresponding to the frequency band regions to the neutron flux detection signals divided by the digital filter means. With such a constitution, since the neutron detection signals are processed by the digital filter means, the accuracy is improved and the change for the property of the filter is facilitated. Further, when a neutron flux level is obtained, a calculation processing corresponding to the frequency band region can be conducted without the analog processing circuit. Accordingly, maintenance and accuracy are improved by greatly decreasing the number of parts. Further, since problems inherent to the analog circuit are solved, neutron fluxes are monitored at high reliability. (I.S.)

  6. Neutron flux monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimazu, Yoichiro.

    1995-01-01

    In a neutron flux monitoring device, there are disposed a neutron flux measuring means for outputting signals in accordance with the intensity of neutron fluxes, a calculation means for calculating a self power density spectrum at a frequency band suitable to an object to be measured based on the output of the neutron flux measuring means, an alarm set value generation means for outputting an alarm set value as a comparative reference, and an alarm judging means for comparing the alarm set value with the outputted value of the calculation means to judge requirement of generating an alarm and generate an alarm in accordance with the result of the judgement. Namely, the time-series of neutron flux signals is put to fourier transformation for a predetermined period of time by the calculation means, and from each of square sums for real number component and imaginary number component for each of the frequencies, a self power density spectrum in the frequency band suitable to the object to be measured is calculated. Then, when the set reference value is exceeded, an alarm is generated. This can reliably prevent generation of erroneous alarm due to neutron flux noises and can accurately generate an alarm at an appropriate time. (N.H.)

  7. LANL MTI calibration team experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Steven C.; Atkins, William H.; Clodius, William B.; Little, Cynthia K.; Christensen, R. Wynn

    2004-01-01

    The Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) was designed as an imaging radiometer with absolute calibration requirements established by Department of Energy (DOE) mission goals. Particular emphasis was given to water surface temperature retrieval using two mid wave and three long wave infrared spectral bands, the fundamental requirement was a surface temperature determination of 1K at the 68% confidence level. For the ten solar reflective bands a one-sigma radiometric performance goal of 3% was established. In order to address these technical challenges a calibration facility was constructed containing newly designed sources that were calibrated at NIST. Additionally, the design of the payload and its onboard calibration system supported post launch maintenance and update of the ground calibration. The on-orbit calibration philosophy also included vicarious techniques using ocean buoys, playas and other instrumented sites; these became increasingly important subsequent to an electrical failure which disabled the onboard calibration system. This paper offers various relevant lessons learned in the eight-year process of reducing to practice the calibration capability required by the scientific mission. The discussion presented will include observations pertinent to operational and procedural issues as well as hardware experiences; the validity of some of the initial assumptions will also be explored.

  8. Field calibration of cup anemometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, L.; Jensen, G.; Hansen, A.

    2001-01-01

    An outdoor calibration facility for cup anemometers, where the signals from 10 anemometers of which at least one is a reference can be can be recorded simultaneously, has been established. The results are discussed with special emphasis on the statisticalsignificance of the calibration expressions...

  9. Cobalt source calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizvi, H.M.

    1999-01-01

    The data obtained from these tests determine the dose rate of the two cobalt sources in SRTC. Building 774-A houses one of these sources while the other resides in room C-067 of Building 773-A. The data from this experiment shows the following: (1) The dose rate of the No.2 cobalt source in Building 774-A measured 1.073 x 10 5 rad/h (June 17, 1999). The dose rate of the Shepherd Model 109 Gamma cobalt source in Building 773-A measured 9.27 x 10 5 rad/h (June 25, 1999). These rates come from placing the graduated cylinder containing the dosimeter solution in the center of the irradiation chamber. (2) Two calibration tests in the 774-A source placed the graduated cylinder with the dosimeter solution approximately 1.5 inches off center in the axial direction. This movement of the sample reduced the measured dose rate 0.92% from 1.083 x 10 5 rad/h to 1.073 x 10 5 rad/h. and (3) A similar test in the cobalt source in 773-A placed the graduated cylinder approximately 2.0 inches off center in the axial direction. This change in position reduced the measured dose rate by 10.34% from 1.036 x 10 6 to 9.27 x 10 5 . This testing used chemical dosimetry to measure the dose rate of a radioactive source. In this method, one determines the dose by the chemical change that takes place in the dosimeter. For this calibration experiment, the author used a Fricke (ferrous ammonium sulfate) dosimeter. This solution works well for dose rates to 10 7 rad/h. During irradiation of the Fricke dosimeter solution the Fe 2+ ions ionize to Fe 3+ . When this occurs, the solution acquires a slightly darker tint (not visible to the human eye). To determine the magnitude of the change in Fe ions, one places the solution in an UV-VIS Spectrophotometer. The UV-VIS Spectrophotometer measures the absorbency of the solution. Dividing the absorbency by the total time (in minutes) of exposure yields the dose rate

  10. Summary of KOMPSAT-5 Calibration and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, D.; Jeong, H.; Lee, S.; Kim, B.

    2013-12-01

    Korean Multi-Purpose Satellite 5 (KOMPSAT-5), equipped with high resolution X-band (9.66 GHz) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), is planning to be launched on August 22, 2013. With the satellite's primary mission objective being providing Geographical Information System (GIS), Ocean monitoring and Land management, and Disaster and ENvironment monitoring (GOLDEN), it is expected that its applications for scientific research on geographical processes will be extensive. In order to meet its mission objective, the KOMPSAT-5 will provide three different kinds of SAR imaging modes; High Resolution Mode (1 m resolution, 5 km swath), Standard Mode (3 m resolution, 30 km swath), and Wide Swath Mode (20 m resolution, 100 km swath). The KOMPSAT-5 will be operated in a 550 km sun-synchronous, dawn- dusk orbit with a 28-day ground repeat cycle providing valuable image information on Earth surface day-or-night and even in bad weather condition. After successful launch of the satellite, it will go through Launch and Early Operation (LEOP) and In-Orbit Testing (IOT) period about for 6 months to carry out various tests on satellite bus and payload systems. The satellite bus system will be tested during the first 3 weeks after the launch focusing on the Attitude and Orbit Control Subsystem (AOCS) and Integrated GPS Occultation Receiver (IGOR) calibration. With the completion of bus system test, the SAR payload system will be calibrated during initial In-Flight check period (11 weeks) by the joint effort of Thales Alenia Space Italy (TAS-I) and Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI). The pointing and relative calibration will be carried out during this period by analyzing the doppler frequency and antenna beam pattern of reflected microwave signal from selected regions with uniform backscattering coefficients (e.g. Amazon rainforest). A dedicated SAR calibration, called primary calibration, will be allocated at the end of LEOP for 12 weeks to perform thorough calibration activities

  11. Liquid Krypton Calorimeter Calibration Software

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, Christina Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    Calibration of the liquid krypton calorimeter (LKr) of the NA62 experiment is managed by a set of standalone programs, or an online calibration driver. These programs are similar to those used by NA48, but have been updated to utilize classes and translated to C++ while maintaining a common functionality. A set of classes developed to handle communication with hardware was used to develop the three standalone programs as well as the main driver program for online calibration between bursts. The main calibration driver has been designed to respond to run control commands and receive burst data, both transmitted via DIM. In order to facilitate the process of reading in calibration parameters, a serializable class has been introduced, allowing the replacement of standard text files with XML configuration files.

  12. Permanently calibrated interpolating time counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jachna, Z; Szplet, R; Kwiatkowski, P; Różyc, K

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new architecture of an integrated time interval counter that provides its permanent calibration in the background. Time interval measurement and the calibration procedure are based on the use of a two-stage interpolation method and parallel processing of measurement and calibration data. The parallel processing is achieved by a doubling of two-stage interpolators in measurement channels of the counter, and by an appropriate extension of control logic. Such modification allows the updating of transfer characteristics of interpolators without the need to break a theoretically infinite measurement session. We describe the principle of permanent calibration, its implementation and influence on the quality of the counter. The precision of the presented counter is kept at a constant level (below 20 ps) despite significant changes in the ambient temperature (from −10 to 60 °C), which can cause a sevenfold decrease in the precision of the counter with a traditional calibration procedure. (paper)

  13. TIME CALIBRATED OSCILLOSCOPE SWEEP CIRCUIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, V.L.; Carstensen, H.K.

    1959-11-24

    An improved time calibrated sweep circuit is presented, which extends the range of usefulness of conventional oscilloscopes as utilized for time calibrated display applications in accordance with U. S. Patent No. 2,832,002. Principal novelty resides in the provision of a pair of separate signal paths, each of which is phase and amplitude adjustable, to connect a high-frequency calibration oscillator to the output of a sawtooth generator also connected to the respective horizontal deflection plates of an oscilloscope cathode ray tube. The amplitude and phase of the calibration oscillator signals in the two signal paths are adjusted to balance out feedthrough currents capacitively coupled at high frequencies of the calibration oscillator from each horizontal deflection plate to the vertical plates of the cathode ray tube.

  14. DSM-flux: A new technology for reliable Combined Sewer Overflow discharge monitoring with low uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maté Marín, Ainhoa; Rivière, Nicolas; Lipeme Kouyi, Gislain

    2018-06-01

    In the past ten years, governments from the European Union have been encouraged to collect volume and quality data for all the effluent overflows from separated stormwater and combined sewer systems that result in a significant environmental impact on receiving water bodies. Methods to monitor and control these flows require improvements, particularly for complex Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) structures. The DSM-flux (Device for Stormwater and combined sewer flows Monitoring and the control of pollutant fluxes) is a new pre-designed and pre-calibrated channel that provides appropriate hydraulic conditions suitable for measurement of overflow rates and volumes by means of one water level gauge. In this paper, a stage-discharge relation for the DSM-flux is obtained experimentally and validated for multiple inflow hydraulic configurations. Uncertainties in CSO discharges and volumes are estimated within the Guide to the expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) framework. Whatever the upstream hydraulic conditions are, relative uncertainties are lower than 15% and 2% for the investigated discharges and volumes, respectively. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Heisenberg groups and noncommutative fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freed, Daniel S.; Moore, Gregory W.; Segal, Graeme

    2007-01-01

    We develop a group-theoretical approach to the formulation of generalized abelian gauge theories, such as those appearing in string theory and M-theory. We explore several applications of this approach. First, we show that there is an uncertainty relation which obstructs simultaneous measurement of electric and magnetic flux when torsion fluxes are included. Next, we show how to define the Hilbert space of a self-dual field. The Hilbert space is Z 2 -graded and we show that, in general, self-dual theories (including the RR fields of string theory) have fermionic sectors. We indicate how rational conformal field theories associated to the two-dimensional Gaussian model generalize to (4k+2)-dimensional conformal field theories. When our ideas are applied to the RR fields of string theory we learn that it is impossible to measure the K-theory class of a RR field. Only the reduction modulo torsion can be measured

  16. Absolute flux scale for radioastronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V.P.; Stankevich, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    The authors propose and provide support for a new absolute flux scale for radio astronomy, which is not encumbered with the inadequacies of the previous scales. In constructing it the method of relative spectra was used (a powerful tool for choosing reference spectra). A review is given of previous flux scales. The authors compare the AIS scale with the scale they propose. Both scales are based on absolute measurements by the ''artificial moon'' method, and they are practically coincident in the range from 0.96 to 6 GHz. At frequencies above 6 GHz, 0.96 GHz, the AIS scale is overestimated because of incorrect extrapolation of the spectra of the primary and secondary standards. The major results which have emerged from this review of absolute scales in radio astronomy are summarized

  17. Calibrating the Cryogenian

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, F. A.; Schmitz, M. D.; Crowley, J. L.; Haam, E.; Huybers, P.; Cohen, P. A.; Johnston, D. T.

    2009-12-01

    The IGCP 512 sub-commission on the Neoproterozoic is currently discussing criteria for the definition of the Cryogenian period. Herein we provide new U/Pb ID-TIMS ages and carbon and oxygen isotope data from Fifteenmile and Mt. Harper Groups in the Yukon Territory that inform the basis for the placement of the basal Cryogenian “golden spike”. Our U/Pb ages are from volcanic tuffs interbedded within glaciogenic, fossiliferous, and carbonate strata. With the current lack of Neoproterozoic index fossils and the paucity of radiogenic age constraints, chemo-stratigraphic correlations are particularly important for tuning the Neoproterozoic timescale. In an effort to move beyond conventional 'wiggle matching', chemostratigraphic correlations are determined using a new statistical method1, which indicates that the resulting chemo-stratigraphic correlations are statistically significant. These results permit us to refine and integrate Neoproterozoic climate, microfossil, and geochemical proxy records both regionally and globally. The newly calibrated microfossil record points to a eukaryotic radiation roughly coincident with the Bitter Springs isotopic stage and a barren interval between the Sturtian and Marinoan glaciations. 1 Haam, E. & Huybers, P., 2009, A test for the presence of covariance between time-uncertain series of data with applications to the Dongge Cave speleothem and atmospheric radiocarbon records, Paleoceanography, in press.

  18. Inferring near surface soil temperature time series from different land uses to quantify the variation of heat fluxes into a shallow aquifer in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupfersberger, Hans; Rock, Gerhard; Draxler, Johannes C.

    2017-09-01

    Different land uses exert a strong spatially distributed and temporal varying signal of heat fluxes from the surface in or out of the ground. In this paper we show an approach to quantify the heat fluxes into a groundwater body differentiating between near surface soil temperatures under grass, forest, asphalt, agriculture and surface water bodies and heat fluxes from subsurface structures like heated basements or sewage pipes. Based on observed time series of near surface soil temperatures we establish individual parameters (e.g. shift, moving average) of a simple empirical function that relates air temperature to soil temperature. This procedure is useful since air temperature time series are readily available and the complex energy flux processes at the soil atmosphere interface do not need to be described in detail. To quantify the heat flux from heated subsurface structures that have lesser depths to the groundwater table the 1D heat conduction module SoilTemp is developed. Based on soil temperature time series observed at different depths in a research lysimeter heat conduction and heat storage capacity values are calibrated disregarding their dependence on the water content. With SoilTemp the strong interaction between time series of groundwater temperature and groundwater level, near surface soil temperatures and the basement temperatures in heated buildings could be evaluated showing the dynamic nature of thermal gradients. The heat fluxes from urban areas are calculated considering the land use patterns within a spatial unit by mixing the heat fluxes from basements with those under grass and asphalt. The heat fluxes from sewage pipes and of sewage leakage are shown to be negligible for evaluated pipe diameters and sewage discharges. The developed methodology will allow to parameterize the upper boundary of heat transport models and to differentiate between the heat fluxes from different surface usages and their dynamics into the subsurface.

  19. Spatially Distributed, Coupled Modeling of Plant Growth, Nitrogen and Water Fluxes in an Alpine Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, K.

    2001-12-01

    terrain, as well as large differences in land use management and practice. Spatially distributed inputs to the model were derived from remote sensing data, digital maps and interpolated site measurements. Management related parameters were estimated by comparing model results with satellite measurements. A site specific model calibration was not carried out. Despite the large heterogeneities of the growing conditions within the catchment and the avoidance of a site specific model calibration, the model results show very good agreement with field measurements.

  20. Initial absolute calibration factors for some neutron sensitive self-powered detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroon, J.

    1975-01-01

    Self-powered flux detectors have found extensive use as monitoring devices in PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) cores and CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) type power reactors. The detectors measure fuel power distributions and indicate trip parameters for reactor control and safety requirements. Both applications demand accurate absolute initial calibration factors. Experimental results obtained in calibrating some neutron sensitive self-powered detectors is presented. (author)

  1. Direct calibration of PICKY-designed microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Pamela C

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few microarrays have been quantitatively calibrated to identify optimal hybridization conditions because it is difficult to precisely determine the hybridization characteristics of a microarray using biologically variable cDNA samples. Results Using synthesized samples with known concentrations of specific oligonucleotides, a series of microarray experiments was conducted to evaluate microarrays designed by PICKY, an oligo microarray design software tool, and to test a direct microarray calibration method based on the PICKY-predicted, thermodynamically closest nontarget information. The complete set of microarray experiment results is archived in the GEO database with series accession number GSE14717. Additional data files and Perl programs described in this paper can be obtained from the website http://www.complex.iastate.edu under the PICKY Download area. Conclusion PICKY-designed microarray probes are highly reliable over a wide range of hybridization temperatures and sample concentrations. The microarray calibration method reported here allows researchers to experimentally optimize their hybridization conditions. Because this method is straightforward, uses existing microarrays and relatively inexpensive synthesized samples, it can be used by any lab that uses microarrays designed by PICKY. In addition, other microarrays can be reanalyzed by PICKY to obtain the thermodynamically closest nontarget information for calibration.

  2. Can we relate respiration rates of bark and wood with tissue nitrogen concentrations and branch-level CO2 fluxes across woody species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, A. S.; Wright, I.; Cernusak, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    Respiration from above-ground woody tissue is generally responsible for 5-15% of ecosystem respiration (~ 30% of total above-ground respiration). The CO2 respired by branches comes from both the sapwood and the living layers within the bark, but because there is considerable movement of respired CO2 within woody tissues (e.g. in the transpiration stream), and because the bark can present a considerable barrier to CO2 diffusion, it can be difficult to interpret measured CO2 efflux from intact branches in relation to the respiration rates of the component tissues, and to relative mass allocation to each. In this study we investigated these issues in 15 evergreen tree and shrub species native to the Sydney area in eastern Australia. We measured CO2 efflux and light-dependent refixation of respired CO2 in photosynthetic bark from the exterior surfaces of branches (0.5-1.5 cm in diameter), and measured the tissue-specific respiration rates of the bark and wood from those same branches. We also measured the nitrogen content and tissue density of the wood and bark to determine: 1) Among species, what is the relationship between %N and tissue respiration? 2) How is photosynthetic refixation of CO2 related to respiration and %N in the bark and underlying wood? and 3) What is the relationship between branch CO2 efflux and the respiration rates of the underlying wood and bark that make up the branch? Across the 15 species %N was a better predictor of respiration in wood than in bark. CO2 efflux measured from the exterior of the stem in the dark was positively correlated with photosynthetic refixation and explained ~40% of the variation in rates of refixation. Refixation rates were not strongly related to bark or wood %N. Differences among species in CO2 efflux rates were not well explained by differences in bark or wood %N and there was a stronger relationship between bark respiration and CO2 efflux than between wood respiration and CO2 efflux. These results suggest that the

  3. The Open Flux Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, J. A.; Caplan, R. M.; Downs, C.; Riley, P.; Mikic, Z.; Lionello, R.; Henney, C. J.; Arge, C. N.; Liu, Y.; Derosa, M. L.; Yeates, A.; Owens, M. J.

    2017-10-01

    The heliospheric magnetic field is of pivotal importance in solar and space physics. The field is rooted in the Sun’s photosphere, where it has been observed for many years. Global maps of the solar magnetic field based on full-disk magnetograms are commonly used as boundary conditions for coronal and solar wind models. Two primary observational constraints on the models are (1) the open field regions in the model should approximately correspond to coronal holes (CHs) observed in emission and (2) the magnitude of the open magnetic flux in the model should match that inferred from in situ spacecraft measurements. In this study, we calculate both magnetohydrodynamic and potential field source surface solutions using 14 different magnetic maps produced from five different types of observatory magnetograms, for the time period surrounding 2010 July. We have found that for all of the model/map combinations, models that have CH areas close to observations underestimate the interplanetary magnetic flux, or, conversely, for models to match the interplanetary flux, the modeled open field regions are larger than CHs observed in EUV emission. In an alternative approach, we estimate the open magnetic flux entirely from solar observations by combining automatically detected CHs for Carrington rotation 2098 with observatory synoptic magnetic maps. This approach also underestimates the interplanetary magnetic flux. Our results imply that either typical observatory maps underestimate the Sun’s magnetic flux, or a significant portion of the open magnetic flux is not rooted in regions that are obviously dark in EUV and X-ray emission.

  4. The Open Flux Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linker, J. A.; Caplan, R. M.; Downs, C.; Riley, P.; Mikic, Z.; Lionello, R. [Predictive Science Inc., 9990 Mesa Rim Road, Suite 170, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Henney, C. J. [Air Force Research Lab/Space Vehicles Directorate, 3550 Aberdeen Avenue SE, Kirtland AFB, NM (United States); Arge, C. N. [Science and Exploration Directorate, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Liu, Y. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Derosa, M. L. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street B/252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Yeates, A. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Owens, M. J., E-mail: linkerj@predsci.com [Space and Atmospheric Electricity Group, Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Earley Gate, P.O. Box 243, Reading RG6 6BB (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-10

    The heliospheric magnetic field is of pivotal importance in solar and space physics. The field is rooted in the Sun’s photosphere, where it has been observed for many years. Global maps of the solar magnetic field based on full-disk magnetograms are commonly used as boundary conditions for coronal and solar wind models. Two primary observational constraints on the models are (1) the open field regions in the model should approximately correspond to coronal holes (CHs) observed in emission and (2) the magnitude of the open magnetic flux in the model should match that inferred from in situ spacecraft measurements. In this study, we calculate both magnetohydrodynamic and potential field source surface solutions using 14 different magnetic maps produced from five different types of observatory magnetograms, for the time period surrounding 2010 July. We have found that for all of the model/map combinations, models that have CH areas close to observations underestimate the interplanetary magnetic flux, or, conversely, for models to match the interplanetary flux, the modeled open field regions are larger than CHs observed in EUV emission. In an alternative approach, we estimate the open magnetic flux entirely from solar observations by combining automatically detected CHs for Carrington rotation 2098 with observatory synoptic magnetic maps. This approach also underestimates the interplanetary magnetic flux. Our results imply that either typical observatory maps underestimate the Sun’s magnetic flux, or a significant portion of the open magnetic flux is not rooted in regions that are obviously dark in EUV and X-ray emission.

  5. A single model procedure for estimating tank calibration equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebetrau, A.M.

    1997-10-01

    A fundamental component of any accountability system for nuclear materials is a tank calibration equation that relates the height of liquid in a tank to its volume. Tank volume calibration equations are typically determined from pairs of height and volume measurements taken in a series of calibration runs. After raw calibration data are standardized to a fixed set of reference conditions, the calibration equation is typically fit by dividing the data into several segments--corresponding to regions in the tank--and independently fitting the data for each segment. The estimates obtained for individual segments must then be combined to obtain an estimate of the entire calibration function. This process is tedious and time-consuming. Moreover, uncertainty estimates may be misleading because it is difficult to properly model run-to-run variability and between-segment correlation. In this paper, the authors describe a model whose parameters can be estimated simultaneously for all segments of the calibration data, thereby eliminating the need for segment-by-segment estimation. The essence of the proposed model is to define a suitable polynomial to fit to each segment and then extend its definition to the domain of the entire calibration function, so that it (the entire calibration function) can be expressed as the sum of these extended polynomials. The model provides defensible estimates of between-run variability and yields a proper treatment of between-segment correlations. A portable software package, called TANCS, has been developed to facilitate the acquisition, standardization, and analysis of tank calibration data. The TANCS package was used for the calculations in an example presented to illustrate the unified modeling approach described in this paper. With TANCS, a trial calibration function can be estimated and evaluated in a matter of minutes

  6. CALIBRATION PROCEDURES ON OBLIQUE CAMERA SETUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kemper

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Beside the creation of virtual animated 3D City models, analysis for homeland security and city planning, the accurately determination of geometric features out of oblique imagery is an important task today. Due to the huge number of single images the reduction of control points force to make use of direct referencing devices. This causes a precise camera-calibration and additional adjustment procedures. This paper aims to show the workflow of the various calibration steps and will present examples of the calibration flight with the final 3D City model. In difference to most other software, the oblique cameras are used not as co-registered sensors in relation to the nadir one, all camera images enter the AT process as single pre-oriented data. This enables a better post calibration in order to detect variations in the single camera calibration and other mechanical effects. The shown sensor (Oblique Imager is based o 5 Phase One cameras were the nadir one has 80 MPIX equipped with a 50 mm lens while the oblique ones capture images with 50 MPix using 80 mm lenses. The cameras are mounted robust inside a housing to protect this against physical and thermal deformations. The sensor head hosts also an IMU which is connected to a POS AV GNSS Receiver. The sensor is stabilized by a gyro-mount which creates floating Antenna –IMU lever arms. They had to be registered together with the Raw GNSS-IMU Data. The camera calibration procedure was performed based on a special calibration flight with 351 shoots of all 5 cameras and registered the GPS/IMU data. This specific mission was designed in two different altitudes with additional cross lines on each flying heights. The five images from each exposure positions have no overlaps but in the block there are many overlaps resulting in up to 200 measurements per points. On each photo there were in average 110 well distributed measured points which is a satisfying number for the camera calibration. In a first

  7. USE OF PELTIER COOLERS AS SOIL HEAT FLUX TRANSDUCERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, H.L.; Campbell, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    Peltier coolers were modified and calibrated to serve as soil heat flux transducers. The modification was to fill their interiors with epoxy. The average calibration constant on 21 units was 13. 6 plus or minus 0. 8 kW m** minus **2 V** minus **1 at 20 degree C. This sensitivity is about eight times that of the two thermopile transducers with which comparisons were made. The thermal conductivity of the Peltier cooler transducers was 0. 4 W m** minus **1 degree C** minus **1, which is comparable to that of dry soil.

  8. Calibration of the Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyvoloski, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the flow calibration analysis work is to provide Performance Assessment (PA) with the calibrated site-scale saturated zone (SZ) flow model that will be used to make radionuclide transport calculations. As such, it is one of the most important models developed in the Yucca Mountain project. This model will be a culmination of much of our knowledge of the SZ flow system. The objective of this study is to provide a defensible site-scale SZ flow and transport model that can be used for assessing total system performance. A defensible model would include geologic and hydrologic data that are used to form the hydrogeologic framework model; also, it would include hydrochemical information to infer transport pathways, in-situ permeability measurements, and water level and head measurements. In addition, the model should include information on major model sensitivities. Especially important are those that affect calibration, the direction of transport pathways, and travel times. Finally, if warranted, alternative calibrations representing different conceptual models should be included. To obtain a defensible model, all available data should be used (or at least considered) to obtain a calibrated model. The site-scale SZ model was calibrated using measured and model-generated water levels and hydraulic head data, specific discharge calculations, and flux comparisons along several of the boundaries. Model validity was established by comparing model-generated permeabilities with the permeability data from field and laboratory tests; by comparing fluid pathlines obtained from the SZ flow model with those inferred from hydrochemical data; and by comparing the upward gradient generated with the model with that observed in the field. This analysis is governed by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) Development Plan ''Calibration of the Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model'' (CRWMS M and O 1999a)

  9. Flux Pinning in Superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Teruo

    2007-01-01

    The book covers the flux pinning mechanisms and properties and the electromagnetic phenomena caused by the flux pinning common for metallic, high-Tc and MgB2 superconductors. The condensation energy interaction known for normal precipitates or grain boundaries and the kinetic energy interaction proposed for artificial Nb pins in Nb-Ti, etc., are introduced for the pinning mechanism. Summation theories to derive the critical current density are discussed in detail. Irreversible magnetization and AC loss caused by the flux pinning are also discussed. The loss originally stems from the ohmic dissipation of normal electrons in the normal core driven by the electric field induced by the flux motion. The readers will learn why the resultant loss is of hysteresis type in spite of such mechanism. The influence of the flux pinning on the vortex phase diagram in high Tc superconductors is discussed, and the dependencies of the irreversibility field are also described on other quantities such as anisotropy of supercondu...

  10. A fresnoite-structure-related mixed valent titanium(III/IV) chlorosilicate, Ba{sub 3}Ti{sub 2}Si{sub 4}O{sub 14}Cl: A flux crystal growth route to Ti(III) containing oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeysinghe, Dileka; Smith, Mark D.; Loye, Hans-Conrad zur, E-mail: zurloye@mailbox.sc.edu

    2017-06-15

    Single crystals of mixed valent barium titanium(III/IV) chlorosilicate, Ba{sub 3}Ti{sub 2}Si{sub 4}O{sub 14}Cl{sub 0.91}O{sub 0.09}, were grown in a high temperature molten chloride flux involving an in situ reduction step. The fresnoite structure related Ba{sub 3}Ti{sub 2}Si{sub 4}O{sub 14}Cl{sub 0.91}O{sub 0.09} crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4/mbm with lattice parameters of a=8.6717(2) Å, c=18.6492(5) Å. The title compound exhibits a 3D structure consisting of 2D layers of fused Ti{sub 2}O{sub 9} and Si{sub 4}O{sub 12} groups and 2D layers of fused Ti{sub 2}O{sub 9}Cl{sub 2} and Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} groups that are linked via barium atoms. The in situ reduction of Ti(IV) to Ti(III) is achieved via the addition of metallic Mg to the flux to function as the reducing agent. The temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility shows simple paramagnetism above 100 K. There is a discontinuity in the susceptibility data below 100 K, which might be due to a structural change that takes place resulting in charge ordering. - Graphical abstract: The fresnoite structure related novel reduced barium titanium chlorosilicate, Ba{sub 3}Ti{sub 2}Si{sub 4}O{sub 14}Cl{sub 0.91}O{sub 0.09}, were synthesized via flux method. An in situ reduction of Ti(IV) to Ti(III) achieved using Mg metal. The 3D structure consists 2D layers of fused Ti{sub 2}O{sub 9} and Si{sub 4}O{sub 12} and 2D layers of fused Ti{sub 2}O{sub 9}Cl{sub 2} and Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} connected via barium atoms. Compound shows simple paramagnetism above 100 K. - Highlights: • The fresnoite related Ba{sub 3}Ti{sub 2}Si{sub 4}O{sub 14}Cl{sub 0.91}O{sub 0.09} were grown via molten flux method. • The in situ reduction of Ti(IV) to Ti(III) is achieved using metallic Mg. • 2D layers of Ti{sub 2}O{sub 9} and Si{sub 4}O{sub 12} and Ti{sub 2}O{sub 9}Cl{sub 2} and Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} connect via Ba atoms. • The magnetic susceptibility shows simple paramagnetism above 100 K.

  11. Gravimetric gas determinations for volume calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, P.W.

    1991-01-01

    Gravimetric measurements of gases is one of the methods available for calibrating gas volumes. By inputting a known quantity of gas and measuring the resulting pressure and temperature, the system volume can be calculated using gas law principles. Historically, this method has been less accurate due to the difficulty in the mass determination. This difficulty comes from several sources. Two examples are the large tare weight of the gas container relative to the weight of gas and the external volume of the gas container relative to the standards. The application of a gravimetric gas determination to tank volume calibrations at the savannah River Site is discussed. Mass determinations on a 25,00 gram gas container were such that a 1500 gram quantity of gas was routinely determined to within ±0.2 gram at the 99% confidence level. In this paper the weighting design and the methods used to address the difficulties of the mass determination are detailed

  12. Comparison between Evapotranspiration Fluxes Assessment Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casola, A.; Longobardi, A.; Villani, P.

    2009-11-01

    Knowledge of hydrological processes acting in the water balance is determinant for a rational water resources management plan. Among these, the water losses as vapour, in the form of evapotranspiration, play an important role in the water balance and the heat transfers between the land surface and the atmosphere. Mass and energy interactions between soil, atmosphere and vegetation, in fact, influence all hydrological processes modificating rainfall interception, infiltration, evapotraspiration, surface runoff and groundwater recharge.A numbers of methods have been developed in scientific literature for modelling evapotranspiration. They can be divided in three main groups: i) traditional meteorological models, ii) energy fluxes balance models, considering interaction between vegetation and the atmosphere, and iii) remote sensing based models. The present analysis preliminary performs a study of fluxes directions and an evaluation of energy balance closure in a typical Mediterranean short vegetation area, using data series recorded from an eddy covariance station, located in the Campania region, Southern Italy. The analysis was performed on different seasons of the year with the aim to assess climatic forcing features impact on fluxes balance, to evaluate the smaller imbalance and to highlight influencing factors and sampling errors on balance closure. The present study also concerns evapotranspiration fluxes assessment at the point scale. Evapotranspiration is evaluated both from empirical relationships (Penmann-Montheit, Penmann F AO, Prestley&Taylor) calibrated with measured energy fluxes at mentioned experimental site, and from measured latent heat data scaled by the latent heat of vaporization. These results are compared with traditional and reliable well known models at the plot scale (Coutagne, Turc, Thorthwaite).

  13. Intersatellite Calibration of Microwave Radiometers for GPM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilheit, T. T.

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the GPM mission is to measure precipitation globally with high temporal resolution by using a constellation of satellites logically united by the GPM Core Satellite which will be in a non-sunsynchronous, medium inclination orbit. The usefulness of the combined product depends on the consistency of precipitation retrievals from the various microwave radiometers. The calibration requirements for this consistency are quite daunting requiring a multi-layered approach. The radiometers can vary considerably in their frequencies, view angles, polarizations and spatial resolutions depending on their primary application and other constraints. The planned parametric algorithms will correct for the varying viewing parameters, but they are still vulnerable to calibration errors, both relative and absolute. The GPM Intersatellite Calibration Working Group (aka X-CAL) will adjust the calibration of all the radiometers to a common consensus standard for the GPM Level 1C product to be used in precipitation retrievals. Finally, each Precipitation Algorithm Working Group must have its own strategy for removing the residual errors. If the final adjustments are small, the credibility of the precipitation retrievals will be enhanced. Before intercomparing, the radiometers must be self consistent on a scan-wise and orbit-wise basis. Pre-screening for this consistency constitutes the first step in the intercomparison. The radiometers are then compared pair-wise with the microwave radiometer (GMI) on the GPM Core Satellite. Two distinct approaches are used for sake of cross-checking the results. On the one hand, nearly simultaneous observations are collected at the cross-over points of the orbits and the observations of one are converted to virtual observations of the other using a radiative transfer model to permit comparisons. The complementary approach collects histograms of brightness temperature from each instrument. In each case a model is needed to translate the

  14. Variable transformation of calibration equations for radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yoichi

    2005-01-01

    For radiation dosimetry, dosimetric equipment must be calibrated by using known doses. The calibration is done to determine an equation that relates the absorbed dose to a physically measurable quantity. Since the calibration equation is accompanied by unavoidable uncertainties, the doses estimated with such equations suffer from inherent uncertainties. We presented mathematical formulation of the calibration when the calibration relation is either linear or nonlinear. We also derived equations for the uncertainty of the estimated dose as a function of the uncertainties of the parameters in the equations and the measured physical quantity. We showed that a dosimeter with a linear calibration equation with zero dose-offset enables us to perform relative dosimetry without calibration data. Furthermore, a linear equation justifies useful data manipulations such as rescaling the dose and changing the dose-offset for comparing dose distributions. Considering that some dosimeters exhibit linear response with a large dose-offset or often nonlinear response, we proposed variable transformations of the measured physical quantity, namely, linear- and log-transformation methods. The proposed methods were tested with Kodak X-Omat V radiographic film and BANG (registered) polymer gel dosimeter. We demonstrated that the variable transformation methods could lead to linear equations with zero dose-offset and could reduce the uncertainty of the estimated dose

  15. X-ray calibration qualities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    Since the recent publication of IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 374 ''Calibration of Dosimeters Used in Radiotheraphy'', there have been a number of queries about the origin of, and the rationale behind, the X-ray qualities recommended for calibration purposes. The simple answer is that these are the qualities derived at the UK National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in 1971 for calibration of therapy-level dosimeters and which are still in use for that purpose. As some SSDLs may have difficulties in adopting these exact combinations of kV and filtration. This paper discusses the basic ideas involved, and how to go about deriving a different series of qualities

  16. Generalized drift-flux correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, K.; Young, M.Y.; Hochreiter, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    A one-dimensional drift-flux model with five conservation equations is frequently employed in major computer codes, such as TRAC-PD2, and in simulator codes. In this method, the relative velocity between liquid and vapor phases, or slip ratio, is given by correlations, rather than by direct solution of the phasic momentum equations, as in the case of the two-fluid model used in TRAC-PF1. The correlations for churn-turbulent bubbly flow and slug flow regimes were given in terms of drift velocities by Zuber and Findlay. For the annular flow regime, the drift velocity correlations were developed by Ishii et al., using interphasic force balances. Another approach is to define the drift velocity so that flooding and liquid hold-up conditions are properly simulated, as reported here. The generalized correlation is used to reanalyze the MB-2 test data for two-phase flow in a large-diameter pipe. The results are applied to the generalized drift flux velocity, whose relationship to the other correlations is discussed. Finally, the generalized drift flux correlation is implemented in TRAC-PD2. Flow reversal from countercurrent to cocurrent flow is computed in small-diameter U-shaped tubes and is compared with the flooding curve

  17. The relation between reconnected flux, the parallel electric field, and the reconnection rate in a three-dimensional kinetic simulation of magnetic reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendel, D. E.; Olson, D. K.; Hesse, M.; Kuznetsova, M.; Adrian, M. L.; Aunai, N.; Karimabadi, H.; Daughton, W.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the distribution of parallel electric fields and their relationship to the location and rate of magnetic reconnection in a large particle-in-cell simulation of 3D turbulent magnetic reconnection with open boundary conditions. The simulation's guide field geometry inhibits the formation of simple topological features such as null points. Therefore, we derive the location of potential changes in magnetic connectivity by finding the field lines that experience a large relative change between their endpoints, i.e., the quasi-separatrix layer. We find a good correspondence between the locus of changes in magnetic connectivity or the quasi-separatrix layer and the map of large gradients in the integrated parallel electric field (or quasi-potential). Furthermore, we investigate the distribution of the parallel electric field along the reconnecting field lines. We find the reconnection rate is controlled by only the low-amplitude, zeroth and first–order trends in the parallel electric field while the contribution from fluctuations of the parallel electric field, such as electron holes, is negligible. The results impact the determination of reconnection sites and reconnection rates in models and in situ spacecraft observations of 3D turbulent reconnection. It is difficult through direct observation to isolate the loci of the reconnection parallel electric field amidst the large amplitude fluctuations. However, we demonstrate that a positive slope of the running sum of the parallel electric field along the field line as a function of field line length indicates where reconnection is occurring along the field line

  18. Model calibration for building energy efficiency simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustafaraj, Giorgio; Marini, Dashamir; Costa, Andrea; Keane, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Developing a 3D model relating to building architecture, occupancy and HVAC operation. • Two calibration stages developed, final model providing accurate results. • Using an onsite weather station for generating the weather data file in EnergyPlus. • Predicting thermal behaviour of underfloor heating, heat pump and natural ventilation. • Monthly energy saving opportunities related to heat pump of 20–27% was identified. - Abstract: This research work deals with an Environmental Research Institute (ERI) building where an underfloor heating system and natural ventilation are the main systems used to maintain comfort condition throughout 80% of the building areas. Firstly, this work involved developing a 3D model relating to building architecture, occupancy and HVAC operation. Secondly, the calibration methodology, which consists of two levels, was then applied in order to insure accuracy and reduce the likelihood of errors. To further improve the accuracy of calibration a historical weather data file related to year 2011, was created from the on-site local weather station of ERI building. After applying the second level of calibration process, the values of Mean bias Error (MBE) and Cumulative Variation of Root Mean Squared Error (CV(RMSE)) on hourly based analysis for heat pump electricity consumption varied within the following ranges: (MBE) hourly from −5.6% to 7.5% and CV(RMSE) hourly from 7.3% to 25.1%. Finally, the building was simulated with EnergyPlus to identify further possibilities of energy savings supplied by a water to water heat pump to underfloor heating system. It found that electricity consumption savings from the heat pump can vary between 20% and 27% on monthly bases

  19. Neutron flux enhancement in the NRAD reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, A.A.; Heidel, C.C.; Imel, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    In 1987 a series of experiments were conducted at the NRAD reactor facility at Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W) to investigate the possibility of increasing the thermal neutron content at the end of the reactor's east beam tube through the use of hydrogenous flux traps. It was desired to increase the thermal flux for a series of experiments to be performed in the east radiography cell, in which the enhanced flux was required in a relatively small volume. Hence, it was feasible to attempt to focus the cross section of the beam to a smaller area. Two flux traps were constructed from unborated polypropylene and tested to determine their effectiveness. Both traps were open to the entire cross-sectional area of the neutron beam (as it emerges from the wall and enters the beam room). The sides then converged such that at the end of the trap the beam would be 'focused' to a greater intensity. The differences in the two flux traps were primarily in length, and hence angle to the beam as the inlet and outlet cross-sectional areas were held constant. The experiments have contributed to the design of a flux trap in which a thermal flux of nearly 10 9 was obtained, with an enhancement of 6.61

  20. Neutron flux monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Yasushi; Mitsubori, Minehisa; Ohashi, Kazunori.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a neutron flux monitoring device for preventing occurrence of erroneous reactor scram caused by the elevation of the indication of a start region monitor (SRM) due to a factor different from actual increase of neutron fluxes. Namely, judgement based on measured values obtained by a pulse counting method and a judgment based on measured values obtained by a Cambel method are combined. A logic of switching neutron flux measuring method to be used for monitoring, namely, switching to an intermediate region when both of the judgements are valid is adopted. Then, even if the indication value is elevated based on the Cambel method with no increase of the counter rate in a neutron source region, the switching to the intermediate region is not conducted. As a result, erroneous reactor scram such as 'shorter reactor period' can be avoided. (I.S.)

  1. Results of L3 BGO calorimeter calibration using an RFQ accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Chaturvedi, U K; Gataullin, M; Gratta, Giorgio; Kirkby, D; Lu, W; Newman, H; Shvorob, A V; Tully, C; Zhu, R

    2000-01-01

    A novel calibration system based on a radiofrequency-quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been installed in the L3 experiment. Radiative capture of 1.85 MeV protons from the RFQ accelerator in a lithium target produces a flux of 17.6 MeV photons which are used to calibrate 11000 crystals of the L3 BGO calorimeter. In this paper we present results of the RFQ run taken in November 1997. A calibration precision of 0.6% was reached in the barrel of the L3 BGO calorimeter, and 0.7% in the BGO endcaps. (8 refs).

  2. Atmospheric neutrino fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, M.; Kasahara, K.; Hidaka, K.; Midorikawa, S.

    1990-02-01

    A detailed Monte Carlo simulation of neutrino fluxes of atmospheric origin is made taking into account the muon polarization effect on neutrinos from muon decay. We calculate the fluxes with energies above 3 MeV for future experiments. There still remains a significant discrepancy between the calculated (ν e +antiν e )/(ν μ +antiν μ ) ratio and that observed by the Kamiokande group. However, the ratio evaluated at the Frejus site shows a good agreement with the data. (author)

  3. O3 flux-related responsiveness of photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal conductance of adult Fagus sylvatica to experimentally enhanced free-air O3 exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löw, M; Häberle, K-H; Warren, C R; Matyssek, R

    2007-03-01

    Knowledge of responses of photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal conductance to cumulative ozone uptake (COU) is still scarce, and this is particularly the case for adult trees. The effect of ozone (O(3)) exposure on trees was examined with 60-year-old beech trees (FAGUS SYLVATICA) at a forest site of southern Germany. Trees were exposed to the ambient O(3) regime (1 x O(3)) or an experimentally elevated twice-ambient O(3) regime (2 x O(3)). The elevated 2 x O (3) regime was provided by means of a free-air O(3) canopy exposure system. The hypotheses were tested that (1) gas exchange is negatively affected by O(3) and (2) the effects of O(3) are dose-dependent and thus the sizes of differences between treatments are positively related to COU. Gas exchange (light-saturated CO(2) uptake rate A(max), stomatal conductance g (s), maximum rate of carboxylation Vc (max), ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate turnover limited rate of photosynthesis J (max), CO(2) compensation point CP, apparent quantum yield of net CO(2) uptake AQ, carboxylation efficiency CE, day- and nighttime respiration) and chlorophyll fluorescence (electron transfer rate, ETR) were measured IN SITU on attached sun and shade leaves. Measurements were made periodically throughout the growing seasons of 2003 (an exceptionally dry year) and 2004 (a year with average rainfall). In 2004 Vc(max), J(max), and CE were lower in trees receiving 2 x O(3) compared with the ambient O(3) regime (1 x O(3)). Treatment differences in Vc (max), J (max), CE were rather small in 2004 (i.e., parameter levels were lower by 10 - 30 % in 2 x O(3) than 1 x O(3)) and not significant in 2003. In 2004 COU was positively correlated with the difference between treatments in A (max), g (s), and ETR (i.e., consistent with the dose-dependence of O(3)'s deleterious effects). However, in 2003, differences in A(max), g (s), and ETR between the two O(3) regimes were smaller at the end of the dry summer 2003 (i.e., when COU was greatest). The

  4. The measurement of thermal neutron constants of the soil; application to the calibration of neutron moisture gauges and to the pedological study of soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couchat, P.; Marcesse, J.; Carre, C.; Le Ho, J.

    1975-01-01

    The neutronic method for measuring the water content of soils is more and more used by agronomists, hydrogeologists and pedologists. On the other hand the studies on the phenomena of slowing down and diffusion process have shown a narrow relation between the thermal absorption (Σ(a)) and diffusion (Σ(d)) constants and the thermal flux developed in the soil around a fast neutron source like Am-Be. Two original applications of the direct measurement of Σ(a) and Σ(d) are then presented. The method described consists in the measurement, in a cube of graphite with Am-Be source in the middle, on one side of the perturbation of the thermal flux, obtained by the introduction of 300g of soil, and on the other side of the transmitted thermal flux measured through the same sample of soil, on a side of the cube. After calibrating the device, these two parameters give Σ(a) and Σ(d) which are easily introduced in the calibration equation of neutron moisture gauge. Also these two values are useful for the pedologists because Σ(d) is connected to clay content in the soil and Σ(a) is connected to the type of clay by the way of rare earth contents [fr

  5. Advances in the Surface Renewal Flux Measurement Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapland, T. M.; McElrone, A.; Paw U, K. T.; Snyder, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    The measurement of ecosystem-scale energy and mass fluxes between the planetary surface and the atmosphere is crucial for understanding geophysical processes. Surface renewal is a flux measurement technique based on analyzing the turbulent coherent structures that interact with the surface. It is a less expensive technique because it does not require fast-response velocity measurements, but only a fast-response scalar measurement. It is therefore also a useful tool for the study of the global cycling of trace gases. Currently, surface renewal requires calibration against another flux measurement technique, such as eddy covariance, to account for the linear bias of its measurements. We present two advances in the surface renewal theory and methodology that bring the technique closer to becoming a fully independent flux measurement method. The first advance develops the theory of turbulent coherent structure transport associated with the different scales of coherent structures. A novel method was developed for identifying the scalar change rate within structures at different scales. Our results suggest that for canopies less than one meter in height, the second smallest coherent structure scale dominates the energy and mass flux process. Using the method for resolving the scalar exchange rate of the second smallest coherent structure scale, calibration is unnecessary for surface renewal measurements over short canopies. This study forms the foundation for analysis over more complex surfaces. The second advance is a sensor frequency response correction for measuring the sensible heat flux via surface renewal. Inexpensive fine-wire thermocouples are frequently used to record high frequency temperature data in the surface renewal technique. The sensible heat flux is used in conjunction with net radiation and ground heat flux measurements to determine the latent heat flux as the energy balance residual. The robust thermocouples commonly used in field experiments

  6. Field calibration of cup anemometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristensen, L.; Jensen, G.; Hansen, A.; Kirkegaard, P.

    2001-01-01

    An outdoor calibration facility for cup anemometers, where the signals from 10 anemometers of which at least one is a reference can be recorded simultaneously, has been established. The results are discussed with special emphasis on the statistical significance of the calibration expressions. It is concluded that the method has the advantage that many anemometers can be calibrated accurately with a minimum of work and cost. The obvious disadvantage is that the calibration of a set of anemometers may take more than one month in order to have wind speeds covering a sufficiently large magnitude range in a wind direction sector where we can be sure that the instruments are exposed to identical, simultaneous wind flows. Another main conclusion is that statistical uncertainty must be carefully evaluated since the individual 10 minute wind-speed averages are not statistically independent. (au)

  7. Calibration of radiation monitoring instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    Radiation protection is dependent on good radiation monitoring, and properly calibrated instruments are essential for this work. Simple procedures for periodically checking and recalibrating different kinds of radiation monitoring instruments are shown in this training film

  8. Calibration of "Babyline" RP instruments

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

      If you have old RP instrumentation of the “Babyline” type, as shown in the photo, please contact the Radiation Protection Group (Joffrey Germa, 73171) to have the instrument checked and calibrated. Thank you. Radiation Protection Group

  9. Calibration of radiation monitoring instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1974-12-31

    Radiation protection is dependent on good radiation monitoring, and properly calibrated instruments are essential for this work. Simple procedures for periodically checking and recalibrating different kinds of radiation monitoring instruments are shown in this training film

  10. Photometric Calibration of Consumer Video Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suggs, Robert; Swift, Wesley, Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Equipment and techniques have been developed to implement a method of photometric calibration of consumer video cameras for imaging of objects that are sufficiently narrow or sufficiently distant to be optically equivalent to point or line sources. Heretofore, it has been difficult to calibrate consumer video cameras, especially in cases of image saturation, because they exhibit nonlinear responses with dynamic ranges much smaller than those of scientific-grade video cameras. The present method not only takes this difficulty in stride but also makes it possible to extend effective dynamic ranges to several powers of ten beyond saturation levels. The method will likely be primarily useful in astronomical photometry. There are also potential commercial applications in medical and industrial imaging of point or line sources in the presence of saturation.This development was prompted by the need to measure brightnesses of debris in amateur video images of the breakup of the Space Shuttle Columbia. The purpose of these measurements is to use the brightness values to estimate relative masses of debris objects. In most of the images, the brightness of the main body of Columbia was found to exceed the dynamic ranges of the cameras. A similar problem arose a few years ago in the analysis of video images of Leonid meteors. The present method is a refined version of the calibration method developed to solve the Leonid calibration problem. In this method, one performs an endto- end calibration of the entire imaging system, including not only the imaging optics and imaging photodetector array but also analog tape recording and playback equipment (if used) and any frame grabber or other analog-to-digital converter (if used). To automatically incorporate the effects of nonlinearity and any other distortions into the calibration, the calibration images are processed in precisely the same manner as are the images of meteors, space-shuttle debris, or other objects that one seeks to

  11. Rotary mode system initial instrument calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johns, B.R.

    1994-01-01

    The attached report contains the vendor calibration procedures used for the initial instrument calibration of the rotary core sampling equipment. The procedures are from approved vendor information files

  12. Flux of Cadmium through Euphausiids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benayoun, G.; Fowler, S.W.; Oregioni, B.

    1976-01-01

    Flux of the heavy metal cadmium through the euphausiid Meganyctiphanes norvegica was examined. Radiotracer experiments showed that cadmium can be accumulated either directly from water or through the food chain. When comparing equilibrium cadmium concentration factors based on stable element measurements with those obtained from radiotracer experiments, it is evident that exchange between cadmium in the water and that in euphausiid tissue is a relatively slow process, indicating that, in the long term, ingestion of cadmium will probably be the more important route for the accumulation of this metal. Approximately 10% of cadmium ingested by euphausiids was incorporated into internal tissues when the food source was radioactive Artemia. After 1 month cadmium, accumulated directly from water, was found to be most concentrated in the viscera with lesser amounts in eyes, exoskeleton and muscle, respectively. Use of a simple model, based on the assumption that cadmium taken in by the organism must equal cadmium released plus that accumulated in tissue, allowed assessment of the relative importance of various metabolic parameters in controlling the cadmium flux through euphausiids. Fecal pellets, due to their relatively high rate of production and high cadmium content, accounted for 84% of the total cadmium flux through M. norvegica. Comparisons of stable cadmium concentrations in natural euphausiid food and the organism's resultant fecal pellets indicate that the cadmium concentration in ingested material was increased nearly 5-fold during its passage through the euphausiid. From comparisons of all routes by which cadmium can be released from M. norvegica to the water column, it is concluded that fecal pellet deposition represents the principal mechanism effecting the downward vertical transport of cadmium by this species. (author)

  13. 14 MeV calibration of JET neutron detectors—phase 1: calibration and characterization of the neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batistoni, P.; Popovichev, S.; Cufar, A.; Ghani, Z.; Giacomelli, L.; Jednorog, S.; Klix, A.; Lilley, S.; Laszynska, E.; Loreti, S.; Packer, L.; Peacock, A.; Pillon, M.; Price, R.; Rebai, M.; Rigamonti, D.; Roberts, N.; Tardocchi, M.; Thomas, D.; Contributors, JET

    2018-02-01

    In view of the planned DT operations at JET, a calibration of the JET neutron monitors at 14 MeV neutron energy is needed using a 14 MeV neutron generator deployed inside the vacuum vessel by the JET remote handling system. The target accuracy of this calibration is  ±10% as also required by ITER, where a precise neutron yield measurement is important, e.g. for tritium accountancy. To achieve this accuracy, the 14 MeV neutron generator selected as the calibration source has been fully characterised and calibrated prior to the in-vessel calibration of the JET monitors. This paper describes the measurements performed using different types of neutron detectors, spectrometers, calibrated long counters and activation foils which allowed us to obtain the neutron emission rate and the anisotropy of the neutron generator, i.e. the neutron flux and energy spectrum dependence on emission angle, and to derive the absolute emission rate in 4π sr. The use of high resolution diamond spectrometers made it possible to resolve the complex features of the neutron energy spectra resulting from the mixed D/T beam ions reacting with the D/T nuclei present in the neutron generator target. As the neutron generator is not a stable neutron source, several monitoring detectors were attached to it by means of an ad hoc mechanical structure to continuously monitor the neutron emission rate during the in-vessel calibration. These monitoring detectors, two diamond diodes and activation foils, have been calibrated in terms of neutrons/counts within  ±5% total uncertainty. A neutron source routine has been developed, able to produce the neutron spectra resulting from all possible reactions occurring with the D/T ions in the beam impinging on the Ti D/T target. The neutron energy spectra calculated by combining the source routine with a MCNP model of the neutron generator have been validated by the measurements. These numerical tools will be key in analysing the results from the in

  14. Systematic Calibration for a Backpacked Spherical Photogrammetry Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, J. Y.; Su, B. W.; Hsiao, K. W.; Jhan, J. P.

    2016-06-01

    A spherical camera can observe the environment for almost 720 degrees' field of view in one shoot, which is useful for augmented reality, environment documentation, or mobile mapping applications. This paper aims to develop a spherical photogrammetry imaging system for the purpose of 3D measurement through a backpacked mobile mapping system (MMS). The used equipment contains a Ladybug-5 spherical camera, a tactical grade positioning and orientation system (POS), i.e. SPAN-CPT, and an odometer, etc. This research aims to directly apply photogrammetric space intersection technique for 3D mapping from a spherical image stereo-pair. For this purpose, several systematic calibration procedures are required, including lens distortion calibration, relative orientation calibration, boresight calibration for direct georeferencing, and spherical image calibration. The lens distortion is serious on the ladybug-5 camera's original 6 images. Meanwhile, for spherical image mosaicking from these original 6 images, we propose the use of their relative orientation and correct their lens distortion at the same time. However, the constructed spherical image still contains systematic error, which will reduce the 3D measurement accuracy. Later for direct georeferencing purpose, we need to establish a ground control field for boresight/lever-arm calibration. Then, we can apply the calibrated parameters to obtain the exterior orientation parameters (EOPs) of all spherical images. In the end, the 3D positioning accuracy after space intersection will be evaluated, including EOPs obtained by structure from motion method.

  15. A Synthesis of VIIRS Solar and Lunar Calibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eplee, Robert E.; Turpie, Kevin R.; Meister, Gerhard; Patt, Frederick S.; Fireman, Gwyn F.; Franz, Bryan A.; McClain, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA VIIRS Ocean Science Team (VOST) has developed two independent calibrations of the SNPP VIIRS moderate resolution reflective solar bands using solar diffuser and lunar observations through June 2013. Fits to the solar calibration time series show mean residuals per band of 0.078-0.10%. There are apparent residual lunar libration correlations in the lunar calibration time series that are not accounted for by the ROLO photometric model of the Moon. Fits to the lunar time series that account for residual librations show mean residuals per band of 0.071-0.17%. Comparison of the solar and lunar time series shows that the relative differences in the two calibrations are 0.12-0.31%. Relative uncertainties in the VIIRS solar and lunar calibration time series are comparable to those achieved for SeaWiFS, Aqua MODIS, and Terra MODIS. Intercomparison of the VIIRS lunar time series with those from SeaWiFS, Aqua MODIS, and Terra MODIS shows that the scatter in the VIIRS lunar observations is consistent with that observed for the heritage instruments. Based on these analyses, the VOST has derived a calibration lookup table for VIIRS ocean color data based on fits to the solar calibration time series.

  16. The KLOE online calibration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasqualucci, E.; Alexander, G.; Aloisio, A.

    2001-01-01

    Based on all the features of the KLOE online software, the online calibration system performs current calibration quality checking in real time and starts automatically new calibration procedures when needed. A calibration manager process controls the system, implementing the interface to the online system, receiving information from the run control and translating its state transitions to a separate state machine. It acts as a 'calibration run controller' and performs failure recovery when requested by a set of process checkers. The core of the system is a multi-threaded OO histogram server that receives histogramming commands by remote processes and operates on local ROOT histograms. A client library and C, fortran and C++ application interface libraries allow the user to connect and define his own histogram or read histograms owned by others using an book-like interface. Several calibration processes running in parallel in a distributed, multiplatform environment can fill the same histograms, allowing fast external information check. A monitor thread allow remote browsing for visual inspection. Pre-filtered data are read in non-privileged spy mode from the data acquisition system via the Kloe Integrated Dataflow. The main characteristics of the system are presented

  17. Neutron flux distribution forecasting device of reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uematsu, Hitoshi

    1991-01-01

    A neutron flux distribution is forecast by using current data obtained from a reactor. That is, the device of the present invention comprises (1) a neutron flux monitor disposed in various positions in the reactor, (2) a forecasting means for calculating and forecasting a one-dimensional neutron flux distribution relative to imaginable events by using data obtained from the neutron flux monitor and physical models, and (3) a display means for displaying the results forecast in the forecasting means to a reactor operation console. Since the forecast values for the one-dimensional neutron flux distribution relative to the imaginable events are calculated in the device of the present invention by using data obtained from the neutron flux monitor and the physical models, the data as a base of the calculation are new and the period for calculating the forecast values can be shortened. Accordingly, although there is a worry of providing some errors in the forecast values, they can be utilized sufficiently as reference data. As a result, the reactor can be operated more appropriately. (I.N.)

  18. Radiation flux measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corte, E.; Maitra, P.

    1977-01-01

    A radiation flux measuring device is described which employs a differential pair of transistors, the output of which is maintained constant, connected to a radiation detector. Means connected to the differential pair produce a signal representing the log of the a-c component of the radiation detector, thereby providing a signal representing the true root mean square logarithmic output. 3 claims, 2 figures

  19. Soluble organic nutrient fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert G. Qualls; Bruce L. Haines; Wayne Swank

    2014-01-01

    Our objectives in this study were (i) compare fluxes of the dissolved organic nutrients dissolved organic carbon (DOC), DON, and dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) in a clearcut area and an adjacent mature reference area. (ii) determine whether concentrations of dissolved organic nutrients or inorganic nutrients were greater in clearcut areas than in reference areas,...

  20. Flux vacua and supermanifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassi, Pietro Antonio [CERN, Theory Unit, CH-1211 Geneva, 23 (Switzerland); Marescotti, Matteo [Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica, Universita di Torino, Via Giuria 1, I-10125, Turin (Italy)

    2007-01-15

    As been recently pointed out, physically relevant models derived from string theory require the presence of non-vanishing form fluxes besides the usual geometrical constraints. In the case of NS-NS fluxes, the Generalized Complex Geometry encodes these informations in a beautiful geometrical structure. On the other hand, the R-R fluxes call for supergeometry as the underlying mathematical framework. In this context, we analyze the possibility of constructing interesting supermanifolds recasting the geometrical data and RR fluxes. To characterize these supermanifolds we have been guided by the fact topological strings on supermanifolds require the super-Ricci flatness of the target space. This can be achieved by adding to a given bosonic manifold enough anticommuting coordinates and new constraints on the bosonic sub-manifold. We study these constraints at the linear and non-linear level for a pure geometrical setting and in the presence of p-form field strengths. We find that certain spaces admit several super-extensions and we give a parameterization in a simple case of d bosonic coordinates and two fermionic coordinates. In addition, we comment on the role of the RR field in the construction of the super-metric. We give several examples based on supergroup manifolds and coset supermanifolds.

  1. Flux vacua and supermanifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassi, Pietro Antonio; Marescotti, Matteo

    2007-01-01

    As been recently pointed out, physically relevant models derived from string theory require the presence of non-vanishing form fluxes besides the usual geometrical constraints. In the case of NS-NS fluxes, the Generalized Complex Geometry encodes these informations in a beautiful geometrical structure. On the other hand, the R-R fluxes call for supergeometry as the underlying mathematical framework. In this context, we analyze the possibility of constructing interesting supermanifolds recasting the geometrical data and RR fluxes. To characterize these supermanifolds we have been guided by the fact topological strings on supermanifolds require the super-Ricci flatness of the target space. This can be achieved by adding to a given bosonic manifold enough anticommuting coordinates and new constraints on the bosonic sub-manifold. We study these constraints at the linear and non-linear level for a pure geometrical setting and in the presence of p-form field strengths. We find that certain spaces admit several super-extensions and we give a parameterization in a simple case of d bosonic coordinates and two fermionic coordinates. In addition, we comment on the role of the RR field in the construction of the super-metric. We give several examples based on supergroup manifolds and coset supermanifolds

  2. Atmospheric neutrino fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    The atmospheric neutrino fluxes, which are responsible for the main background in proton decay experiments, have been calculated by two independent methods. There are discrepancies between the two sets of results regarding latitude effects and up-down asymmetries, especially for neutrino energies Esub(ν) < 1 GeV. (author)

  3. Flux scaling: Ultimate regime

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Flux scaling: Ultimate regime. With the Nusselt number and the mixing length scales, we get the Nusselt number and Reynolds number (w'd/ν) scalings: and or. and. scaling expected to occur at extremely high Ra Rayleigh-Benard convection. Get the ultimate regime ...

  4. Variability of the Lyman alpha flux with solar activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lean, J.L.; Skumanich, A.

    1983-01-01

    A three-component model of the solar chromosphere, developed from ground based observations of the Ca II K chromospheric emission, is used to calculate the variability of the Lyman alpha flux between 1969 and 1980. The Lyman alpha flux at solar minimum is required in the model and is taken as 2.32 x 10 11 photons/cm 2 /s. This value occurred during 1975 as well as in 1976 near the commencement of solar cycle 21. The model predicts that the Lyman alpha flux increases to as much as 5 x 10 11 photons/cm 2 /s at the maximum of the solar cycle. The ratio of the average fluxes for December 1979 (cycle maximum) and July 1976 (cycle minimum) is 1.9. During solar maximum the 27-day solar rotation is shown to cause the Lyman alpha flux to vary by as much as 40% or as little as 5%. The model also shows that the Lyman alpha flux varies over intermediate time periods of 2 to 3 years, as well as over the 11-year sunspot cycle. We conclude that, unlike the sunspot number and the 10.7-cm radio flux, the Lyman alpha flux had a variability that was approximately the same during each of the past three cycles. Lyman alpha fluxes calculated by the model are consistent with measurements of the Lyman alpha flux made by 11 of a total of 14 rocket experiments conducted during the period 1969--1980. The model explains satisfactorily the absolute magnitude, long-term trends, and the cycle variability seen in the Lyman alpha irradiances by the OSO 5 satellite experiment. The 27-day variability observed by the AE-E satellite experiment is well reproduced. However, the magntidue of the AE-E 1 Lyman alpha irradiances are higher than the model calculations by between 40% and 80%. We suggest that the assumed calibration of the AE-E irradiances is in error

  5. Influence of rainfall observation network on model calibration and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bárdossy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective in this study is to investigate the influence of the spatial resolution of the rainfall input on the model calibration and application. The analysis is carried out by varying the distribution of the raingauge network. A meso-scale catchment located in southwest Germany has been selected for this study. First, the semi-distributed HBV model is calibrated with the precipitation interpolated from the available observed rainfall of the different raingauge networks. An automatic calibration method based on the combinatorial optimization algorithm simulated annealing is applied. The performance of the hydrological model is analyzed as a function of the raingauge density. Secondly, the calibrated model is validated using interpolated precipitation from the same raingauge density used for the calibration as well as interpolated precipitation based on networks of reduced and increased raingauge density. Lastly, the effect of missing rainfall data is investigated by using a multiple linear regression approach for filling in the missing measurements. The model, calibrated with the complete set of observed data, is then run in the validation period using the above described precipitation field. The simulated hydrographs obtained in the above described three sets of experiments are analyzed through the comparisons of the computed Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient and several goodness-of-fit indexes. The results show that the model using different raingauge networks might need re-calibration of the model parameters, specifically model calibrated on relatively sparse precipitation information might perform well on dense precipitation information while model calibrated on dense precipitation information fails on sparse precipitation information. Also, the model calibrated with the complete set of observed precipitation and run with incomplete observed data associated with the data estimated using multiple linear regressions, at the locations treated as

  6. Heat flux solarimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartarelli, A.; Vera, S.; Cyrulies, E. [Instituto de Desarrollo Humano, Univ. Nac. de Gral. Sarmiento (IDH, UNGS), Los Polvorines (Argentina); Echarri, R. [Instituto de Desarrollo Humano, Univ. Nac. de Gral. Sarmiento (IDH, UNGS), Los Polvorines (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Samson, I. [INTEC (Instituto Tecnologico Santo Domingo), Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic)

    2010-12-15

    The solarimeter presented in this work is easy to assemble. It is calibrated and its performance is validated by means of Hottel's method. Finally, the curves obtained with this solarimeter are compared to the ones obtained with a commercial solarimeter. This device is based on the evaluation of the heat flow in a metal rod. In consequence, measurements are not affected by ambient temperature variations. On the other hand, there is a linear relationship between the temperatures measured at the rod ends and the incident radiation, as can be concluded both from the theory of its operation and the calibration lines obtained. The results obtained from the global irradiance measurements in the area of Los Polvorines (Buenos Aires Province), together with a preliminary evaluation of the solarimeter's response time, are presented in this work. (author)

  7. Framework for Flux Qubit Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fei; Kamal, Archana; Krantz, Philip; Campbell, Daniel; Kim, David; Yoder, Jonilyn; Orlando, Terry; Gustavsson, Simon; Oliver, William; Engineering Quantum Systems Team

    A qubit design for higher performance relies on the understanding of how various qubit properties are related to design parameters. We construct a framework for understanding the qubit design in the flux regime. We explore different parameter regimes, looking for features desirable for certain purpose in the context of quantum computing. This research was funded by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) via MIT Lincoln Laboratory under Air Force Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0002.

  8. THE TOPOLOGY OF CANONICAL FLUX TUBES IN FLARED JET GEOMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavine, Eric Sander; You, Setthivoine, E-mail: Slavine2@uw.edu, E-mail: syou@aa.washington.edu [University of Washington, 4000 15th Street, NE Aeronautics and Astronautics 211 Guggenheim Hall, Box 352400, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2017-01-20

    Magnetized plasma jets are generally modeled as magnetic flux tubes filled with flowing plasma governed by magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). We outline here a more fundamental approach based on flux tubes of canonical vorticity, where canonical vorticity is defined as the circulation of the species’ canonical momentum. This approach extends the concept of magnetic flux tube evolution to include the effects of finite particle momentum and enables visualization of the topology of plasma jets in regimes beyond MHD. A flared, current-carrying magnetic flux tube in an ion-electron plasma with finite ion momentum is thus equivalent to either a pair of electron and ion flow flux tubes, a pair of electron and ion canonical momentum flux tubes, or a pair of electron and ion canonical vorticity flux tubes. We examine the morphology of all these flux tubes for increasing electrical currents, different radial current profiles, different electron Mach numbers, and a fixed, flared, axisymmetric magnetic geometry. Calculations of gauge-invariant relative canonical helicities track the evolution of magnetic, cross, and kinetic helicities in the system, and show that ion flow fields can unwind to compensate for an increasing magnetic twist. The results demonstrate that including a species’ finite momentum can result in a very long collimated canonical vorticity flux tube even if the magnetic flux tube is flared. With finite momentum, particle density gradients must be normal to canonical vorticities, not to magnetic fields, so observations of collimated astrophysical jets could be images of canonical vorticity flux tubes instead of magnetic flux tubes.

  9. Lidar to lidar calibration of Ground-based Lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Garcia, Sergio; Courtney, Michael

    This report presents the result of the lidar to lidar calibration performed for ground-based lidar. Calibration is here understood as the establishment of a relation between the reference lidar wind speed measurements with measurement uncertainties provided by measurement standard and corresponding...... lidar wind speed indications with associated measurement uncertainties. The lidar calibration concerns the 10 minute mean wind speed measurements. The comparison of the lidar measurements of the wind direction with that from the reference lidar measurements are given for information only....

  10. Calibration of radon-222 detectors using closed circuit radium-226 sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perna, Allan Felipe Nunes; Paschuk, Sergei Anatolyevich; Correa, Janine Nicolosi; Del Claro, Flavia

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the calibration of the Radon-222 detectors used by the Laboratories specializing in measuring natural radiation from this gas. The research was conducted in collaboration between UTFPR, CDTN/CNEN, UFRN and IRD/CNEN. During the calibration the detectors were exposed in isolated chambers with radioactive calibrated sources. The calibration procedure was supported with four instant radon monitors AlphaGUARD (SAPHYMO Co.) responsible for radon activity measurements in the experimental chamber. The calibration procedure resulted an equation that relates the number of tracks found in solid-state detector CR-39 (Track-Etch detector) with the concentration of radon in the atmosphere. Obtained results are compatible with previously performed calibration at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS, Japan) using high activity levels of radon in air. Present results of calibration give the possibility to expand the calibration curve of CR-39 for medium and low activity levels of radon. (author)

  11. LONG-TERM CALIBRATION STABILITY OF A RADIO ASTRONOMICAL PHASED ARRAY FEED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmer, Michael; Jeffs, Brian D.; Warnick, Karl F. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2013-01-01

    There are many challenges associated with the implementation of a phased array feed for radio astronomy applications. Among these is the need to have an adequate set of calibration measurements so that reliable beamformers can be computed. Changes in the operating environment and temporal gain drift in the electronics contribute to calibration drift, which affects the beamformer performance. We will show that calibration measurements are relatively stable over a 5 day period and may remain so for up to 70 days or longer. We have incorporated the use of a calibration update system that has the potential to refresh a set of old calibrators, specifically correcting for electronic gain drift. However, the long-term variations that are present with fresh, current calibrators are greater than the degradation due to using an old calibration set, suggesting that, at this time, there is not a need for sophisticated calibration update systems or algorithms.

  12. Surface renewal: an advanced micrometeorological method for measuring and processing field-scale energy flux density data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElrone, Andrew J; Shapland, Thomas M; Calderon, Arturo; Fitzmaurice, Li; Paw U, Kyaw Tha; Snyder, Richard L

    2013-12-12

    Advanced micrometeorological methods have become increasingly important in soil, crop, and environmental sciences. For many scientists without formal training in atmospheric science, these techniques are relatively inaccessible. Surface renewal and other flux measurement methods require an understanding of boundary layer meteorology and extensive training in instrumentation and multiple data management programs. To improve accessibility of these techniques, we describe the underlying theory of surface renewal measurements, demonstrate how to set up a field station for surface renewal with eddy covariance calibration, and utilize our open-source turnkey data logger program to perform flux data acquisition and processing. The new turnkey program returns to the user a simple data table with the corrected fluxes and quality control parameters, and eliminates the need for researchers to shuttle between multiple processing programs to obtain the final flux data. An example of data generated from these measurements demonstrates how crop water use is measured with this technique. The output information is useful to growers for making irrigation decisions in a variety of agricultural ecosystems. These stations are currently deployed in numerous field experiments by researchers in our group and the California Department of Water Resources in the following crops: rice, wine and raisin grape vineyards, alfalfa, almond, walnut, peach, lemon, avocado, and corn.

  13. Control rod calibration including the rod coupling effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilard, R.; Nelson, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    In a reactor containing more than one control rod, which includes all reactors licensed in the United States, there will be a 'coupling' or 'shadowing' of control rod flux at the location of a control rod as a result of the flux depression caused by another control rod. It was decided to investigate this phenomenon further, and eventually to put calibration table data or formulae in a small computer in the control room, so once could insert the positions of the three control rods and receive the excess reactivity without referring to separate tables. For this to be accomplished, a 'three control- rod reactivity function' would be used which would include the flux coupling between the rods. The function is design and measured data was fitted into it to determine the calibration constants. The input data for fitting the trial functions consisted of 254 data points, each consisting of the position of the reg, shim, and transient rods, and the total excess reactivity. (About 200 of these points were 'critical balance points', that is the rod positions for which reactor was critical, and the remainder were determined by positive period measurements.) Although this may be unrealistic from a physical viewpoint, the function derived gave a very accurate recalculation of the input data, and thus would faithfully give the excess reactivity for any possible combination of the locations of the three control rods. The next step, incorporation of the three-rod function into the minicomputer, will be pursued in the summer and fall of 1984

  14. Investigation on calibration parameter of mammography calibration facilities at MINT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asmaliza Hashim; Wan Hazlinda Ismail; Md Saion Salikin; Muhammad Jamal Md Isa; Azuhar Ripin; Norriza Mohd Isa

    2004-01-01

    A mammography calibration facility has been established in the Medical Physics Laboratory, Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT). The calibration facility is established at the national level mainly to provide calibration services for radiation measuring test instruments or test tools used in quality assurance programme in mammography, which is being implemented in Malaysia. One of the accepted parameters that determine the quality of a radiation beam is the homogeneity coefficient. It is determined from the values of the 1 st and 2 nd Half Value Layer (HVL). In this paper, the consistency of the mammography machine beam qualities that is available in MINT, is investigated and presented. For calibration purposes, five radiation qualities namely 23, 25, 28, 30 and 35 kV, selectable from the control panel of the X-ray machine is used. Important parameters that are set for this calibration facility are exposure time, tube current, focal spot to detector distance (FDD) and beam size at specific distance. The values of homogeneity coefficient of this laboratory for the past few years tip to now be presented in this paper. Backscatter radiations are also considered in this investigation. (Author)

  15. Variable Acceleration Force Calibration System (VACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhew, Ray D.; Parker, Peter A.; Johnson, Thomas H.; Landman, Drew

    2014-01-01

    Conventionally, force balances have been calibrated manually, using a complex system of free hanging precision weights, bell cranks, and/or other mechanical components. Conventional methods may provide sufficient accuracy in some instances, but are often quite complex and labor-intensive, requiring three to four man-weeks to complete each full calibration. To ensure accuracy, gravity-based loading is typically utilized. However, this often causes difficulty when applying loads in three simultaneous, orthogonal axes. A complex system of levers, cranks, and cables must be used, introducing increased sources of systematic error, and significantly increasing the time and labor intensity required to complete the calibration. One aspect of the VACS is a method wherein the mass utilized for calibration is held constant, and the acceleration is changed to thereby generate relatively large forces with relatively small test masses. Multiple forces can be applied to a force balance without changing the test mass, and dynamic forces can be applied by rotation or oscillating acceleration. If rotational motion is utilized, a mass is rigidly attached to a force balance, and the mass is exposed to a rotational field. A large force can be applied by utilizing a large rotational velocity. A centrifuge or rotating table can be used to create the rotational field, and fixtures can be utilized to position the force balance. The acceleration may also be linear. For example, a table that moves linearly and accelerates in a sinusoidal manner may also be utilized. The test mass does not have to move in a path that is parallel to the ground, and no re-leveling is therefore required. Balance deflection corrections may be applied passively by monitoring the orientation of the force balance with a three-axis accelerometer package. Deflections are measured during each test run, and adjustments with respect to the true applied load can be made during the post-processing stage. This paper will

  16. Bedload transport measurements with impact plate geophones in two Austrian mountain streams (Fischbach and Ruetz): system calibration, grain size estimation, and environmental signal pick-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickenmann, Dieter; Fritschi, Bruno

    2017-10-01

    The Swiss plate geophone system is a bedload surrogate measuring technique that has been installed in more than 20 streams, primarily in the European Alps. Here we report about calibration measurements performed in two mountain streams in Austria. The Fischbach and Ruetz gravel-bed streams are characterized by important runoff and bedload transport during the snowmelt season. A total of 31 (Fischbach) and 21 (Ruetz) direct bedload samples were obtained during a 6-year period. Using the number of geophone impulses and total transported bedload mass for each measurement to derive a calibration function results in a strong linear relation for the Fischbach, whereas there is only a poor linear calibration relation for the Ruetz measurements. Instead, using geophone impulse rates and bedload transport rates indicates that two power law relations best represent the Fischbach data, depending on transport intensity; for lower transport intensities, the same power law relation is also in reasonable agreement with the Ruetz data. These results are compared with data and findings from other field sites and flume studies. We further show that the observed coarsening of the grain size distribution with increasing bedload flux can be qualitatively reproduced from the geophone signal, when using the impulse counts along with amplitude information. Finally, we discuss implausible geophone impulse counts that were recorded during periods with smaller discharges without any bedload transport, and that are likely caused by vehicle movement very near to the measuring sites.

  17. Design of a flux buffer based on the flux shuttle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershenson, M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the design considerations for a flux buffer based on the flux-shuttle concept. Particular attention is given to the issues of flux popping, stability of operation and saturation levels for a large input. Modulation techniques used in order to minimize 1/f noise, in addition to offsets are also analyzed. Advantages over conventional approaches using a SQUID for a flux buffer are discussed. Results of computer simulations are presented

  18. Two laboratory methods for the calibration of GPS speed meters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Yin; Sun, Qiao; Du, Lei; Yu, Mei; Bai, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The set-ups of two calibration systems are presented to investigate calibration methods of GPS speed meters. The GPS speed meter calibrated is a special type of high accuracy speed meter for vehicles which uses Doppler demodulation of GPS signals to calculate the measured speed of a moving target. Three experiments are performed: including simulated calibration, field-test signal replay calibration, and in-field test comparison with an optical speed meter. The experiments are conducted at specific speeds in the range of 40–180 km h −1 with the same GPS speed meter as the device under calibration. The evaluation of measurement results validates both methods for calibrating GPS speed meters. The relative deviations between the measurement results of the GPS-based high accuracy speed meter and those of the optical speed meter are analyzed, and the equivalent uncertainty of the comparison is evaluated. The comparison results justify the utilization of GPS speed meters as reference equipment if no fewer than seven satellites are available. This study contributes to the widespread use of GPS-based high accuracy speed meters as legal reference equipment in traffic speed metrology. (paper)

  19. Calibration of a rotating accelerometer gravity gradiometer using centrifugal gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mingbiao; Cai, Tijing

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to calibrate scale factors and equivalent zero biases of a rotating accelerometer gravity gradiometer (RAGG). We calibrate scale factors by determining the relationship between the centrifugal gradient excitation and RAGG response. Compared with calibration by changing the gravitational gradient excitation, this method does not need test masses and is easier to implement. The equivalent zero biases are superpositions of self-gradients and the intrinsic zero biases of the RAGG. A self-gradient is the gravitational gradient produced by surrounding masses, and it correlates well with the RAGG attitude angle. We propose a self-gradient model that includes self-gradients and the intrinsic zero biases of the RAGG. The self-gradient model is a function of the RAGG attitude, and it includes parameters related to surrounding masses. The calibration of equivalent zero biases determines the parameters of the self-gradient model. We provide detailed procedures and mathematical formulations for calibrating scale factors and parameters in the self-gradient model. A RAGG physical simulation system substitutes for the actual RAGG in the calibration and validation experiments. Four point masses simulate four types of surrounding masses producing self-gradients. Validation experiments show that the self-gradients predicted by the self-gradient model are consistent with those from the outputs of the RAGG physical simulation system, suggesting that the presented calibration method is valid.

  20. Calibration techniques and results for the Portsmouth Cf shuffler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, J.C.; Wines, K.M.

    1993-01-01

    As environmental concerns over radioactive waste disposal continue to rise, the importance of Californium shufflers as a versatile waste monitoring and segregation instrument also continue to increase. The extent to which different amounts and types of materials can be measured by the shuffler is directly related to the extent of its calibration. As shufflers become more common place and their waste management uses also rise, the importance of a wide ranging and thorough calibration becomes critical. This paper presents the techniques used at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant for calibrating the shuffler to detect levels of U-235 in radioactive waste. While the calibration techniques are similar to those used by Los Alamos, the standards that were used were constructed somewhat differently so that geometric effects are maximized. Also presented are shuffler transmission measurements that are used to determine the matrix type and the corresponding calibration. A discussion of the calibration data is given. This discussion includes specific aspects of the calibration such as overall range, high end limits, and poly shielding range and usefulness