WorldWideScience

Sample records for relative density contrast

  1. Relation between size of contrast meter and radiographic density difference for radiographic test aluminium welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senda, Tomio; Hirayama, Kazuo; Masaoka, Naotoshi; Fujita, Minoru.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of contrast meter with difference surface area (5.0 mm x 5.0 mm, 10.0 mm x 10.0 mm, 15.0 mm x 15.0 mm, 30.0 mm x 30.0 mm) and separated type on radiographic density difference (Δ D) were investigated for radiographic test of aluminum welds. It was found that the effect of scattered radiation on contrast meter represented highest at test specimen thickness of 20 mm, and Δ D was constant as the size was increased from 10.0 mm x 10.0 mm to 15.0 mm x 15.0 mm for aluminum contrast meter. For this reason, a proposal of the contrast meter with 10.0 mm x 10.0 mm (surface area) has made to replace (15.0 mm x 15 mm) at amendment of JIS Z 3105. (auth.)

  2. Study of optimal X-ray exposure conditions in consideration of bone mineral density. Relation between bone mineral density and image contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Yuji

    2003-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) increases through infancy and adolescence, reaching a maximum at 20-30 years of age. Thereafter, BMD gradually decreases with age in both sexes. The image contrast of radiographs of bones varies with the change in BMD owing to the changes in the X-ray absorption of bone. The image contrast of bone generally is higher in the young adult than in the older adult. To examine the relation between BMD and image visibility, we carried out the following experiments. We measured the image contrast of radiographs of a lumbar vertebra phantom in which BMD was equivalent to the average BMD for each developmental period. We examined image visibility at various levels of imaging contrast using the Howlett chart. The results indicated that differences in BMD affect the image contrast of radiographs, and, consequently, image visibility. It was also found that image visibility in the young adult was higher than that in the older adult. The findings showed that, in digital radiography of young adults with high BMD, X-ray exposure can be decreased according the ratio of improvement in image visibility. (author)

  3. Relationship Between Collateral Status, Contrast Transit, and Contrast Density in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Hiroyuki; Bivard, Andrew; Lin, Longting; Spratt, Neil J; Miteff, Ferdinand; Parsons, Mark W; Levi, Christopher R

    2016-03-01

    Collateral circulation is recognized to influence the life expectancy of the ischemic penumbra in acute ischemic stroke. The best method to quantify collateral status on acute imaging is uncertain. We aimed to determine the relationship between visual collateral status, quantitative collateral assessments, baseline computed tomographic perfusion measures, and tissue outcomes on follow-up imaging. Sixty-six consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke clinically eligible for recanalization therapy and with M1 or M2 middle cerebral artery occlusion were evaluated. We compared the visual collateral scoring with measures of contrast peak time delay and contrast peak density. We also compared these measures for their ability to predict perfusion lesion and infarct core volumes, final infarct, and infarct growth. Shorter contrast peak time delay (P=0.041) and higher contrast peak density (P=0.002) were associated with good collateral status. Shorter contrast peak time delay correlated with higher contrast peak density (β=-4.413; P=0.037). In logistic regression analysis after adjustment for age, sex, onset-computed tomographic time, and occlusion site, higher contrast peak density was independently associated with good collateral status (P=0.009). Multiple regression analysis showed that higher contrast peak density was an independent predictor of smaller perfusion lesion volume (P=0.029), smaller ischemic core volume (P=0.044), smaller follow-up infarct volume (P=0.005), and smaller infarct growth volume (P=0.010). Visual collateral status, contrast peak density, and contrast peak time delay were inter-related, and good collateral status was strongly associated with contrast peak density. Contrast peak density in collateral vessel may be an important factor in tissue fate in acute ischemic stroke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Density contrast indicators in cosmological dust models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    contrast, which may or may not be monotonically increasing with time. We also find that monotonic- ity seems to be related to the initial conditions of the model, which may be of potential interest in connection with debates regarding gravitational entropy and the arrow of time. 1. Introduction. An important question in ...

  5. The video densitometric analysis of the radiographic density and contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Young Sun; Lee, Sang Rae

    1992-01-01

    Generally the patient's absorb dose and readability of radiograms are affected by the exposure time and kVp of which are related with the radiographic density and contrast. The investigator carried studies to know the adequate level of exposure time and kVp to obtain the better readability of radiograms. In these studies dried human mandible with each other by video densitometry among various combination sets of the exposure time, such as, 5, 6, 8, 12, 15, 19, 24, 30, 38, 48 and 60, and varing level of kVp, such as 60, 65, 70, 80 and 90 respectively. The obtained results were as follows: 1. As exposure time and kVp were increased, radiographic density of radiograms was increased. 2. The subject contrast was increased where aluminum step wedge was thin and reduced in the reversed condition. As the thin aluminum step wedge, subject contrast was increased at the condition of lower kilovoltage than that of higher kilovoltage. 3. In the case of non-contrast was increased in the lower kilovoltage with the longer exposure time and the higher kiovoltage with the shorter exposure time. 4. At the condition of short exposure time, bitter readability of each reading item was obtained with the increment of the kilovoltage but at the opposite condition increasing exposure time worsened readability of radiograms.Since X-ray machine in the current dental clinics is fixed between the range of 60-70 kVp and 10 mA, good radiograms can be obtained by varied exposure time. But according to the conclusion of these studies, better radiograms can be obtained by using filtered high kVp and then the absorb dose to patient and exposure time can be reduced.

  6. Moho Density Contrast in Central Eurasia from GOCE Gravity Gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Eshagh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Seismic data are primarily used in studies of the Earth’s inner structure. Since large parts of the world are not yet sufficiently covered by seismic surveys, products from the Earth’s satellite observation systems have more often been used for this purpose in recent years. In this study we use the gravity-gradient data derived from the Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE, the elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM and other global datasets to determine the Moho density contrast at the study area which comprises most of the Eurasian plate (including parts of surrounding continental and oceanic tectonic plates. A regional Moho recovery is realized by solving the Vening Meinesz-Moritz’s (VMM inverse problem of isostasy and a seismic crustal model is applied to constrain the gravimetric solution. Our results reveal that the Moho density contrast reaches minima along the mid-oceanic rift zones and maxima under the continental crust. This spatial pattern closely agrees with that seen in the CRUST1.0 seismic crustal model as well as in the KTH1.0 gravimetric-seismic Moho model. However, these results differ considerably from some previously published gravimetric studies. In particular, we demonstrate that there is no significant spatial correlation between the Moho density contrast and Moho deepening under major orogens of Himalaya and Tibet. In fact, the Moho density contrast under most of the continental crustal structure is typically much more uniform.

  7. Characteristic density contrasts in the evolution of superclusters. The case of A2142 supercluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramann, Mirt; Einasto, Maret; Heinämäki, Pekka; Teerikorpi, Pekka; Saar, Enn; Nurmi, Pasi; Einasto, Jaan

    2015-09-01

    Context. The formation and evolution of the cosmic web in which galaxy superclusters are the largest relatively isolated objects is governed by a gravitational attraction of dark matter and antigravity of dark energy (cosmological constant). Aims: We study the characteristic density contrasts in the spherical collapse model for several epochs in the supercluster evolution and their dynamical state. Methods: We analysed the density contrasts for the turnaround, future collapse, and zero gravity in different ΛCDM models and applied them to study the dynamical state of the supercluster A2142 with an almost spherical main body, making it a suitable test object to apply a model that assumes sphericity. Results: We present characteristic density contrasts in the spherical collapse model for different cosmological parameters. The analysis of the supercluster A2142 shows that its high-density core has already started to collapse. The zero-gravity line outlines the outer region of the main body of the supercluster. In the course of future evolution, the supercluster may split into several collapsing systems. Conclusions: The various density contrasts presented in our study and applied to the supercluster A2142 offer a promising way to characterise the dynamical state and expected future evolution of galaxy superclusters.

  8. Vibronic coupling density and related concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tohru; Uejima, Motoyuki; Iwahara, Naoya; Haruta, Naoki; Shizu, Katsuyuki; Tanaka, Kazuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Vibronic coupling density is derived from a general point of view as a one-electron property density. Related concepts as well as their applications are presented. Linear and nonlinear vibronic coupling density and related concepts, orbital vibronic coupling density, reduced vibronic coupling density, atomic vibronic coupling constant, and effective vibronic coupling density, illustrate the origin of vibronic couplings and enable us to design novel functional molecules or to elucidate chemical reactions. Transition dipole moment density is defined as an example of the one-electron property density. Vibronic coupling density and transition dipole moment density open a way to design light-emitting molecules with high efficiency.

  9. Improvements in gastric diagnosis by using high density contrast media with low viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toischer, H.P.

    1983-01-01

    In a retrospective clinical study, 150 unselected double contrast examinations of the stomach using conventional contrast media (100 g/100 ml barium sulphate) were compared with a similar number of examinations using a high density contrast medium of flow viscosity (250 g/100 ml barium sulphate). The high density contrast medium was distinctly better for demonstrating detail of the gastric mucosa. The uneveness of coating and instability of the older high density contrast media was observed in 15.5% of cases and, in no instance, did this make it impossible to reach a diagnosis. (orig.) [de

  10. Contrasting cue-density effects in causal and prediction judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadillo, Miguel A; Musca, Serban C; Blanco, Fernando; Matute, Helena

    2011-02-01

    Many theories of contingency learning assume (either explicitly or implicitly) that predicting whether an outcome will occur should be easier than making a causal judgment. Previous research suggests that outcome predictions would depart from normative standards less often than causal judgments, which is consistent with the idea that the latter are based on more numerous and complex processes. However, only indirect evidence exists for this view. The experiment presented here specifically addresses this issue by allowing for a fair comparison of causal judgments and outcome predictions, both collected at the same stage with identical rating scales. Cue density, a parameter known to affect judgments, is manipulated in a contingency learning paradigm. The results show that, if anything, the cue-density bias is stronger in outcome predictions than in causal judgments. These results contradict key assumptions of many influential theories of contingency learning.

  11. The relation between herbivore density and relative resource ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relation between kudu density and the relative density of habitat patches in each landscape was significant, with exponential models producing more significant statistics than linear models. Regressions of resource density against animal density are useful to understand 'carrying capacity' for wild herbivores, and ...

  12. Verification of the high density after contrast enhancement in the 2nd week in cerebroischemic lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, T; Kanno, T; Sano, H; Katada, Kazuhiro; Futimoto, K [Fujita Gakuen Univ., Toyoake, Aichi (Japan). School of Medicine

    1978-12-01

    To determine the indication, it is necessary to make clear the relation among the Stage (time and course), the Strength, the Pathogenesis, and the Effects of the operation in these diseases (SSPE relation). In this report, we focused on the High Density of CT after the contrast enhancement in the cases of ischemic lesions (the High Density was named ''Ribbon H. D.''). Seventeen cases of Ribbon H. D. in fresh infarctions were verified concerning the time of the appearance of the H. D., the features of its location and nature, and the histological findings. The results were as follows: The Ribbon H. D. appeared in the early stage of infarctions, and had its peak density at the end of the 2nd week after the onset. The Ribbon H. D. was mostly located along the cortical line, showing a ribbon-like band. The Ribbon H. D. did not appear in the sharply demarcated coagulation necrosis in the early stage or in the defined Low Density (L. D.) in the late stage of infarctions. Although the Ribbon H. D. shows the extravasation of contrast media, it does not necessarily show the existence of the hemorrhagic infarction. Some part of the Ribbon H. D. changes to a well-defined L. D. and the rest of the part becomes relative isodensity in the late stage. This change corresponds to the change in the incomplete necrosis which is afterwards divided into a resolution with a cystic cavity and the glial replacement in the late stage. In conclusion, it is possible to understand that the Ribbon H. D. corresponds to the lesion of an incomplete necrosis, with neovascularization, in the early stage of infarctions. Therefore, in addition to the present indication of a by-pass operation (TIA, RIND), this incomplete necrosis (Ribbon H. D.), its surrounding area and just before the appearance of the Ribbon H. D. might be another indication of the operation.

  13. Correlation between blood and lymphatic vessel density and results of contrast-enhanced spectral mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczynska, Elzbieta; Niemiec, Joanna; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Adamczyk, Agnieszka; Walasek, Tomasz; Ryś, Janusz; Sas-Korczyńska, Beata

    2015-09-01

    Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) is a novel technique used for detection of tumour vascularity by imaging the moment in which contrast, delivered to the lesion by blood vessels, leaks out of them, and flows out through lymphatic vessels. In our study, we included 174 women for whom spectral mammography was performed for diagnostic purposes. The relationship between enhancement in CESM and blood vessel density (BVD), lymphatic vessel density (LVD) or the percentage of fields with at least one lymphatic vessel (distribution of podoplanin-positive vessels - DPV) and other related parameters was assessed in 55 cases. BVD, LVD and DPV were assessed immunohistochemically, applying podoplanin and CD31/CD34 as markers of lymphatic and blood vessels, respectively. The sensitivity (in detection of malignant lesions) of CESM was 100%, while its specificity - 39%. We found a significant positive correlation between the intensity of enhancement in CESM and BVD (p = 0.007, r = 0.357) and a negative correlation between the intensity of enhancement in CESM and DPV (p = 0.003, r = -0.390). Lesions with the highest enhancement in CESM showed a high number of blood vessels and a low number of lymphatics. 1) CESM is a method characterized by high sensitivity and acceptable specificity; 2) the correlation between CESM results and blood/lymphatic vessel density confirms its utility in detection of tissue angiogenesis and/or lymphangiogenesis.

  14. Density contrast across the Moho beneath the Indian shield: Implications for isostasy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Himangshu; Mangalampally, Ravi Kumar; Tiwari, Virendra Mani; Singh, Arun; Chadha, Rajender Kumar; Davuluri, Srinagesh

    2018-04-01

    Knowledge of isostasy provides insights into how excess (or deficit) of mass on and within the lithosphere is maintained over different time scales, and also helps decipher the vertical dynamics. In continental regions, isostasy is primarily manifested as a crustal root, the extent of which is defined by the lithospheric strength and the density contrast at the Moho. In this study, we briefly review the methodology for extracting the density contrast across the Moho using the amplitudes of the P-to-s converted and free-surface reverberating phases in a receiver function (RF). We test the efficacy of this technique by applying it on synthetic and real data from 10 broadband seismic stations sited on diverse tectonic provinces in the Indian shield. We determine the density contrast after parameterizing the shear-wave velocity structure beneath the stations using the nearest neighbourhood algorithm. We find considerable variation in the density contrast across the Moho beneath the stations (0.4-0.65 gm/cc). This is explained in terms of isostatic compensation, incorporating the existing estimates of lithospheric strength (Te). Crustal roots computed using the estimated Te and the deduced density contrast substantiate the crustal thickness values inferred through RF analysis, and vice versa. This illustrates isostasy as a combination of variation in density contrast and Te. The density contrasts and crustal thicknesses inferred from RF analysis explain well the isostatic compensation mechanism in different regions. However, unusually large density contrasts (∼0.6 gm/cc) corresponding to elevated regions are intriguing and warrant further investigations. Our observation of varied density contrasts at the Moho in a Precambrian continental setting is interesting and raises a question about the existence of such situations in other parts of the world.

  15. Intravenous contrast injection significantly affects bone mineral density measured on CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pompe, Esther; Willemink, Martin J.; Dijkhuis, Gawein R.; Verhaar, Harald J. J.; Mohamed Hoesein, Firdaus A A; de Jong, Pim A.

    OBJECTIVE: The objective is to evaluate the effect of intravenous contrast media on bone mineral density (BMD) assessment by comparing unenhanced and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) examinations performed for other indications. METHODS: One hundred and fifty-two patients (99 without and

  16. Number and density discrimination rely on a common metric: Similar psychophysical effects of size, contrast, and divided attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibber, Marc S; Greenwood, John A; Dakin, Steven C

    2012-06-04

    While observers are adept at judging the density of elements (e.g., in a random-dot image), it has recently been proposed that they also have an independent visual sense of number. To test the independence of number and density discrimination, we examined the effects of manipulating stimulus structure (patch size, element size, contrast, and contrast-polarity) and available attentional resources on both judgments. Five observers made a series of two-alternative, forced-choice discriminations based on the relative numerosity/density of two simultaneously presented patches containing 16-1,024 Gaussian blobs. Mismatches of patch size and element size (across reference and test) led to bias and reduced sensitivity in both tasks, whereas manipulations of contrast and contrast-polarity had varied effects on observers, implying differing strategies. Nonetheless, the effects reported were consistent across density and number judgments, the only exception being when luminance cues were made available. Finally, density and number judgment were similarly impaired by attentional load in a dual-task experiment. These results are consistent with a common underlying metric to density and number judgments, with the caveat that additional cues may be exploited when they are available.

  17. Regions of low density in the contrast-enhanced pituitary gland: normal and pathologic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambers, E.F.; Turski, P.A.; LaMasters, D.; Newton, T.H.

    1982-01-01

    The incidence of low-density regions in the contrast-enhanced pituitary gland and the possible causes of these regions were investigated by a retrospective review of computed tomographic (CT) scans of the head in 50 patients and autopsy specimens of the pituitary in 100 other patients. It was found that focal areas of low density within the contrast enhanced pituitary gland can be caused by various normal and pathologic conditions such as pituitary microadenomas, pars intermedia cysts, foci of metastasis, infarcts, epidermoid cysts, and abscesses. Although most focal low-density regions probably represent pituitary microadenomas, careful clinical correlation is needed to establish a diagnosis

  18. Evaluation of changes in vertebral body density following administration of contrast medium during routine CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janicek, M.; Bruna, J.; Stenhova, H.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility is discussed of depicting changes in the density of spongiosis of the vertebral body in normal patients after intravenous administration of a bolus of 40 ml 60% Diazetrizoate in the course of a routine CT examination. The average increase in density immediately after the administration of the contrast medium is 12 H (8%), in the course of 10 minutes is reduced to 5 H (4%) against the initial values in native examination. These average changes are statistically significant, in individual patients, however, the increase in density following the administration of a contrast medium fluctuates considerably (from 0.7% to 10%). Only systematic comparison with various pathological conditions will make it possible to assess the possibilities of the evaluation of the structure of the vertebral body in routine CT with the administration of a contrast medium into the blood flow. (author)

  19. 10% low density corn-oil emulsion oral contrast agent for abdominal computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Kyou; Chon, Dong Kwon; Han, Young Min; Kim, Chong Soo; Sohn, Myung Hee; Song, Ho Young; Choi, Ki Chul

    1990-01-01

    CT of the gastrointestinal tract is commonly performed after administration of a high-density diluted iodinated oral contrast material. However, because if inadequate mixing of the contrast material with the gastrointestinal contents, pseudotumor and poor mucosal visualization are frequently shown on abdominal CT. To overcome these problem, 10% corn oil emulsion (COE) is tested as an alternative oral contrast agent in 40 patients. We analyse patients tolerance, gastric mucosal visualization and discrimination of pancreas from the duodenal C-loop to 10% COE in 40 patients compared with those obtained from 35 patients, who was received high-density diluted iodinated oral contrast agent (gastrografin). The results are as follows : 1. Patients' tolerance to 10% COE is similar to that to conventional oral contrast agent. 2. Image of the gastric mucosa from patients receiving 10% COE is superior to that receiving oral contrast agent. 3. The discrimination between pancreatic head from duodenal C-loop is better in patients receiving 10% COE than in patients receiving conventional oral contrast agent. 4. In patients receiving 10% COE, differentiation of cystic masses from intestinal loops is sometimes difficult. The results of this study indicate that 10% COE may be useful oral contrast agent for optimal visualization of gastric mucosa and pancreatico-duodenal discrimination on abdominal CT

  20. Smart density: A more accurate method of measuring rural residential density for health-related research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Peter M; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda; Gibson, Lucinda; Beach, Michael L; Beauregard, Sandy; Dalton, Madeline A

    2010-02-12

    Studies involving the built environment have typically relied on US Census data to measure residential density. However, census geographic units are often unsuited to health-related research, especially in rural areas where development is clustered and discontinuous. We evaluated the accuracy of both standard census methods and alternative GIS-based methods to measure rural density. We compared residential density (units/acre) in 335 Vermont school neighborhoods using conventional census geographic units (tract, block group and block) with two GIS buffer measures: a 1-kilometer (km) circle around the school and a 1-km circle intersected with a 100-meter (m) road-network buffer. The accuracy of each method was validated against the actual residential density for each neighborhood based on the Vermont e911 database, which provides an exact geo-location for all residential structures in the state. Standard census measures underestimate residential density in rural areas. In addition, the degree of error is inconsistent so even the relative rank of neighborhood densities varies across census measures. Census measures explain only 61% to 66% of the variation in actual residential density. In contrast, GIS buffer measures explain approximately 90% of the variation. Combining a 1-km circle with a road-network buffer provides the closest approximation of actual residential density. Residential density based on census units can mask clusters of development in rural areas and distort associations between residential density and health-related behaviors and outcomes. GIS-defined buffers, including a 1-km circle and a road-network buffer, can be used in conjunction with census data to obtain a more accurate measure of residential density.

  1. Smart density: a more accurate method of measuring rural residential density for health-related research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibson Lucinda

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies involving the built environment have typically relied on US Census data to measure residential density. However, census geographic units are often unsuited to health-related research, especially in rural areas where development is clustered and discontinuous. Objective We evaluated the accuracy of both standard census methods and alternative GIS-based methods to measure rural density. Methods We compared residential density (units/acre in 335 Vermont school neighborhoods using conventional census geographic units (tract, block group and block with two GIS buffer measures: a 1-kilometer (km circle around the school and a 1-km circle intersected with a 100-meter (m road-network buffer. The accuracy of each method was validated against the actual residential density for each neighborhood based on the Vermont e911 database, which provides an exact geo-location for all residential structures in the state. Results Standard census measures underestimate residential density in rural areas. In addition, the degree of error is inconsistent so even the relative rank of neighborhood densities varies across census measures. Census measures explain only 61% to 66% of the variation in actual residential density. In contrast, GIS buffer measures explain approximately 90% of the variation. Combining a 1-km circle with a road-network buffer provides the closest approximation of actual residential density. Conclusion Residential density based on census units can mask clusters of development in rural areas and distort associations between residential density and health-related behaviors and outcomes. GIS-defined buffers, including a 1-km circle and a road-network buffer, can be used in conjunction with census data to obtain a more accurate measure of residential density.

  2. Inversion of gravity and gravity gradiometry data for density contrast surfaces using Cauchy-type integrals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhdanov, Michael; Cai, Hongzhu

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new method of modeling and inversion of potential field data generated by a density contrast surface. Our method is based on 3D Cauchy-type integral representation of the potential fields. Traditionally, potential fields are calculated using volume integrals of the domains occupied...

  3. Radiologic diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux. Comparison of barium and low-density contrast medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fransson, S.G.; Soekjer, H.; Johansson, K.E.; Tibbling, L.

    It has been proposed that the high density of ordinary barium suspension may complicate the radiologic diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux. For this reason P-contrast was developed (Ferring AB); a contrast medium with the same density as water (1 g/cm/sup 3/). A comparison of P-contrast and barium (Mixobar Ventrikel 400 mg/ml) was performed in 82 patients. All patients were examined with both contrast media and the findings were compared with those at reflux test at manometry, endoscopy and 24-hour pH monitoring. Another 40 patients and 15 symptom-free controls were examined with two different amounts of barium, 100 ml and 200 ml, to study if the radiologic diagnosis of reflux varied with the volume of contrast medium administered. P-contrast was found to have no advantages over barium for the diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux. The outcome of the radiologic examination was not influenced by the different volumes of barium used.

  4. Abnormal myocardial capillary density in apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can be assessed by myocardial contrast echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Jeonggeun; Cho, In-Jeong; Shim, Chi-Young; Ha, Jong-Won; Jang, Yangsoo; Chung, Namsik; Rim, Se-Joong

    2010-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia and dysfunction can occur in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) because of the high muscle-to-blood ratio, even without significant coronary artery disease. Microbubbles reside only in the intravascular space and myocardial video-intensity during systole results mostly from microbubbles within capillaries. The hypothesis explored in the present study was that an abnormal capillary density in apical HCM (ApHCM) can be demonstrated using myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE). The 56 patients were investigated (31 males, age 58±9 years; 33 ApHCM, 9 hypertensive left ventricular hypertrophy [LVH], 14 controls). MCE was performed with low-mechanical-index power modulation imaging. Tissue Doppler imaging to assess myocardial contractile function was obtained at the mitral annulus (S'), and 99m Tc-MIBI single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was also performed. All ApHCM patients exhibited perfusion defects at the hypertrophied segments in the systolic phase during MCE, whereas SPECT showed normal or rather increased perfusion at those sites. The cyclic variation of video-intensity was exaggerated in ApHCM when compared with the LVH or control group (% of [systolic video-intensity]/[diastolic video-intensity]: 33.0±12.3%, 88.3±19.2% and 79.4±13.9%, respectively [P<0.05]). Concurrently, MCE cyclic variation and perfusion defect size were related to decreased S' (P<0.05 for all). A perfusion defect at the hypertrophied segment, representing abnormal myocardial capillary density, was observed in ApHCM patients during MCE. The extent of MCE cyclic variation and the perfusion defect size both correlate with decreased myocardial contractile property in ApHCM. (author)

  5. 3D depth-to-basement and density contrast estimates using gravity and borehole data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, V. C.; Martins, C. M.; Silva, J. B.

    2009-05-01

    We present a gravity inversion method for simultaneously estimating the 3D basement relief of a sedimentary basin and the parameters defining the parabolic decay of the density contrast with depth in a sedimentary pack assuming the prior knowledge about the basement depth at a few points. The sedimentary pack is approximated by a grid of 3D vertical prisms juxtaposed in both horizontal directions, x and y, of a right-handed coordinate system. The prisms' thicknesses represent the depths to the basement and are the parameters to be estimated from the gravity data. To produce stable depth-to-basement estimates we impose smoothness on the basement depths through minimization of the spatial derivatives of the parameters in the x and y directions. To estimate the parameters defining the parabolic decay of the density contrast with depth we mapped a functional containing prior information about the basement depths at a few points. We apply our method to synthetic data from a simulated complex 3D basement relief with two sedimentary sections having distinct parabolic laws describing the density contrast variation with depth. Our method retrieves the true parameters of the parabolic law of density contrast decay with depth and produces good estimates of the basement relief if the number and the distribution of boreholes are sufficient. We also applied our method to real gravity data from the onshore and part of the shallow offshore Almada Basin, on Brazil's northeastern coast. The estimated 3D Almada's basement shows geologic structures that cannot be easily inferred just from the inspection of the gravity anomaly. The estimated Almada relief presents steep borders evidencing the presence of gravity faults. Also, we note the existence of three terraces separating two local subbasins. These geologic features are consistent with Almada's geodynamic origin (the Mesozoic breakup of Gondwana and the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean) and they are important in understanding

  6. Wood density variations of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. under contrasting climate conditions in southwestern Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke van der Maaten-Theunissen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed inter-annual variations in ring width and maximumwood density of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. at different altitudes in Baden-Württemberg, southwestern Germany, to determine the climate response of these parameters under contrasting climate conditions. In addition, we compared maximum, average and minimum wood density between sites. Bootstrapped correlation coefficients of ring width and maximum wood density with monthly temperature and precipitation, revealed a different climate sensitivity of both parameters. Ring width showed strong correlations with climate variables in the previous year and in the first half of the growingseason. Further, a negative relationship with summer temperature was observed at the low-altitude sites. Maximum wood density correlated best with temperature during the growing season, whereby strongest correlations were found between September temperature and maximum wood density at the high-altitude sites. Observed differences in maximum, average and minimum wood density are suggested to relate to the local climate; with lower temperature and higher water availability having a negative effect on wood density.

  7. Wood density variations of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. under contrasting climate conditions in southwestern Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke van der Maaten-Theunissen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed inter-annual variations in ring width and maximum wood density of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. at different altitudes in Baden-Württemberg, southwestern Germany, to determine the climate response of these parameters under contrasting climate conditions. In addition, we compared maximum, average and minimum wood density between sites. Bootstrapped correlation coefficients of ring width and maximum wood density with monthly temperature and precipitation, revealed a different climate sensitivity of both parameters. Ring width showed strong correlations with climate variables in the previous year and in the first half of the growing season. Further, a negative relationship with summer temperature was observed at the low-altitude sites. Maximum wood density correlated best with temperature during the growing season, whereby strongest correlations were found between September temperature and maximum wood density at the high-altitude sites. Observed differences in maximum, average and minimum wood density are suggested to relate to the local climate; with lower temperatures and higher water availability having a negative effect on wood density

  8. High seed dispersal ability of Pinus canariensis in stands of contrasting density inferred from genotypic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unai López de Heredia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: Models that combine parentage analysis from molecular data with spatial information of seeds and seedlings provide a framework to describe and identify the factors involved in seed dispersal and recruitment of forest species. In the present study we used a spatially explicit method (the gene shadow model in order to assess primary and effective dispersal in Pinus canariensis. Area of study: Pinus canariensis is endemic to the Canary Islands (Spain. Sampling sites were a high density forest in southern slopes of Tenerife and a low density stand in South Gran Canaria. Materials and methods: We fitted models based on parentage analysis from seeds and seedlings collected in two sites with contrasting stand density, and then compared the resulting dispersal distributions. Main results: The results showed that: 1 P. canariensis has a remarkable dispersal ability compared to other pine species; 2 there is no discordance between primary and effective dispersals, suggesting limited secondary dispersal by animals and lack of Janzen-Connell effect; and 3 low stand densities enhance the extent of seed dispersal, which was higher in the low density stand. Research highlights: The efficient dispersal mechanism of P. canariensis by wind inferred by the gene shadow model is congruent with indirect measures of gene flow, and has utility in reconstructing past demographic events and in predicting future distribution ranges for the species.

  9. Differential controls on soil carbon density and mineralization among contrasting forest types in a temperate forest ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Ye-Ming; Wang, Juan; Sun, Xiao-Lu; Tang, Zuo-Xin; Zhou, Zhi-Yong; Sun, Osbert Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the controls on soil carbon dynamics is crucial for modeling responses of ecosystem carbon balance to global change, yet few studies provide explicit knowledge on the direct and indirect effects of forest stands on soil carbon via microbial processes. We investigated tree species, soil, and site factors in relation to soil carbon density and mineralization in a temperate forest of central China. We found that soil microbial biomass and community structure, extracellular enzyme activities, and most of the site factors studied varied significantly across contrasting forest types, and that the associations between activities of soil extracellular enzymes and microbial community structure appeared to be weak and inconsistent across forest types, implicating complex mechanisms in the microbial regulation of soil carbon metabolism in relation to tree species. Overall, variations in soil carbon density and mineralization are predominantly accounted for by shared effects of tree species, soil, microclimate, and microbial traits rather than the individual effects of the four categories of factors. Our findings point to differential controls on soil carbon density and mineralization among contrasting forest types and highlight the challenge to incorporate microbial processes for constraining soil carbon dynamics in global carbon cycle models. PMID:26925871

  10. In vitro experiments for the development of a high density (HD) barium sulfate contrast medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J.

    1986-01-01

    In vitro experiments with the high-density (HD) barium meal Falibaryt HD are described. Several charges of BaSO 4 were tested together with certain additives influencing dispersion, stability of the suspension, flowability, surface tension etc. Particle size spectra were measured by the manufacturer, VEB Fahlberg-List. With a simple PVC test plate containing several grooves simulating small details (areae gastricae) the diagnostic capabilities of the HD contrast medium were evaluated in an in vitro test. The developed barium meal Falibaryt HD is in its physical and chemical parameters comparable with Prontobario-HD, one of the best HD barium meals. (author)

  11. Intravenous contrast injection significantly affects bone mineral density measured on CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pompe, Esther; Willemink, Martin J.; Dijkhuis, Gawein R.; Verhaar, Harald J.J.; Hoesein, Firdaus A.A.M.; Jong, Pim A. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Internal Medicine-Geriatrics, Postbus 85500, Postbox: E.03.511, GA, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-09-05

    The objective is to evaluate the effect of intravenous contrast media on bone mineral density (BMD) assessment by comparing unenhanced and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) examinations performed for other indications. One hundred and fifty-two patients (99 without and 53 with malignant neoplasm) who underwent both unenhanced and two contrast-enhanced (arterial and portal venous phase) abdominal CT examinations in a single session between June 2011 and July 2013 were included. BMD was evaluated on the three examinations as CT-attenuation values in Hounsfield Units (HU) in the first lumbar vertebra (L1). CT-attenuation values were significantly higher in both contrast-enhanced phases, compared to the unenhanced phase (p < 0.01). In patients without malignancies, mean ± standard deviation (SD) HU-values increased from 128.8 ± 48.6 HU for the unenhanced phase to 142.3 ± 47.2 HU for the arterial phase and 147.0 ± 47.4 HU for the portal phase (p < 0.01). In patients with malignancies, HU-values increased from 112.1 ± 38.1 HU to 126.2 ± 38.4 HU and 130.1 ± 37.3 HU (p < 0.02), respectively. With different thresholds to define osteoporosis, measurements in the arterial and portal phase resulted in 7-25 % false negatives. Our study showed that intravenous contrast injection substantially affects BMD-assessment on CT and taking this into account may improve routine assessment of low BMD in nonquantitative CT. (orig.)

  12. Intravenous contrast injection significantly affects bone mineral density measured on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pompe, Esther; Willemink, Martin J.; Dijkhuis, Gawein R.; Verhaar, Harald J.J.; Hoesein, Firdaus A.A.M.; Jong, Pim A. de

    2015-01-01

    The objective is to evaluate the effect of intravenous contrast media on bone mineral density (BMD) assessment by comparing unenhanced and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) examinations performed for other indications. One hundred and fifty-two patients (99 without and 53 with malignant neoplasm) who underwent both unenhanced and two contrast-enhanced (arterial and portal venous phase) abdominal CT examinations in a single session between June 2011 and July 2013 were included. BMD was evaluated on the three examinations as CT-attenuation values in Hounsfield Units (HU) in the first lumbar vertebra (L1). CT-attenuation values were significantly higher in both contrast-enhanced phases, compared to the unenhanced phase (p < 0.01). In patients without malignancies, mean ± standard deviation (SD) HU-values increased from 128.8 ± 48.6 HU for the unenhanced phase to 142.3 ± 47.2 HU for the arterial phase and 147.0 ± 47.4 HU for the portal phase (p < 0.01). In patients with malignancies, HU-values increased from 112.1 ± 38.1 HU to 126.2 ± 38.4 HU and 130.1 ± 37.3 HU (p < 0.02), respectively. With different thresholds to define osteoporosis, measurements in the arterial and portal phase resulted in 7-25 % false negatives. Our study showed that intravenous contrast injection substantially affects BMD-assessment on CT and taking this into account may improve routine assessment of low BMD in nonquantitative CT. (orig.)

  13. A verification of the high density after contrast enhancement in the 2nd week in cerebroischemic lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Taichiro; Kanno, Tetsuo; Sano, Hirotoshi; Katada, Kazuhiro; Fujimoto, Kazuo

    1978-01-01

    To determine the indication, it is necessary to make clear the relation among the Stage (time and course), the Strength, the Pathogenesis, and the Effects of the operation in these diseases (SSPE relation). In this report, we focused on the High Density of CT after the contrast enhancement in the cases of ischemic lesions (the High Density was named ''Ribbon H. D.''). Seventeen cases of Ribbon H. D. in fresh infarctions were verified concerning the time of the appearance of the H. D., the features of its location and nature, and the histological findings. The results were as follows: The Ribbon H. D. appeared in the early stage of infarctions, and had its peak density at the end of the 2nd week after the onset. The Ribbon H. D. was mostly located along the cortical line, showing a ribbon-like band. The Ribbon H. D. did not appear in the sharply demarcated coagulation necrosis in the early stage or in the defined Low Density (L. D.) in the late stage of infarctions. Although the Ribbon H. D. shows the extravasation of contrast media, it does not necessarily show the existence of the hemorrhagic infarction. Some part of the Ribbon H. D. changes to a well-defined L. D. and the rest of the part becomes relative isodensity in the late stage. This change corresponds to the change in the incomplete necrosis which is afterwards divided into a resolution with a cystic cavity and the glial replacement in the late stage. In conclusion, it is possible to understand that the Ribbon H. D. corresponds to the lesion of an incomplete necrosis, with neovascularization, in the early stage of infarctions. Therefore, in addition to the present indication of a by-pass operation (TIA, RIND), this incomplete necrosis (Ribbon H. D.), its surrounding area and just before the appearance of the Ribbon H. D. might be another indication of the operation. (author)

  14. Performance of 12 DIR algorithms in low-contrast regions for mass and density conserving deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, U. J.; Supple, J. R.; Franich, R. D.; Taylor, M. L.; Smith, R.; Kron, T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Deformable image registration (DIR) has become a key tool for adaptive radiotherapy to account for inter- and intrafraction organ deformation. Of contemporary interest, the application to deformable dose accumulation requires accurate deformation even in low contrast regions where dose gradients may exist within near-uniform tissues. One expects high-contrast features to generally be deformed more accurately by DIR algorithms. The authors systematically assess the accuracy of 12 DIR algorithms and quantitatively examine, in particular, low-contrast regions, where accuracy has not previously been established.Methods: This work investigates DIR algorithms in three dimensions using deformable gel (DEFGEL) [U. J. Yeo, M. L. Taylor, L. Dunn, R. L. Smith, T. Kron, and R. D. Franich, “A novel methodology for 3D deformable dosimetry,” Med. Phys. 39, 2203–2213 (2012)], for application to mass- and density-conserving deformations. CT images of DEFGEL phantoms with 16 fiducial markers (FMs) implanted were acquired in deformed and undeformed states for three different representative deformation geometries. Nonrigid image registration was performed using 12 common algorithms in the public domain. The optimum parameter setup was identified for each algorithm and each was tested for deformation accuracy in three scenarios: (I) original images of the DEFGEL with 16 FMs; (II) images with eight of the FMs mathematically erased; and (III) images with all FMs mathematically erased. The deformation vector fields obtained for scenarios II and III were then applied to the original images containing all 16 FMs. The locations of the FMs estimated by the algorithms were compared to actual locations determined by CT imaging. The accuracy of the algorithms was assessed by evaluation of three-dimensional vectors between true marker locations and predicted marker locations.Results: The mean magnitude of 16 error vectors per sample ranged from 0.3 to 3.7, 1.0 to 6.3, and 1.3 to 7

  15. Individual and age-related variation in chromatic contrast adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Sarah L.; Werner, John S.; Webster, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Precortical color channels are tuned primarily to the LvsM (stimulation of L and M cones varied, but S cone stimulation held constant) or SvsLM (stimulation of S cones varied, but L and M cone stimulation held constant) cone-opponent (cardinal) axes, but appear elaborated in the cortex to form higher-order mechanisms tuned to both cardinal and intermediate directions. One source of evidence for these higher-order mechanisms has been the selectivity of color contrast adaptation for noncardinal directions, yet the degree of this selectivity has varied widely across the small sample of observers tested in previous studies. This study explored the possible bases for this variation, and in particular tested whether it reflected age-related changes in the distribution or tuning of color mechanisms. Observers included 15 younger (18–22 years of age) and 15 older individuals (66–82), who adapted to temporal modulations along one of four chromatic axes (two cardinal and two intermediate axes) and then matched the hue and contrast of test stimuli lying along eight different directions in the equiluminant plane. All observers exhibited aftereffects that were selective for both the cardinal and intermediate directions, although selectivity was weaker for the intermediate axes. The degree of selectivity increased with the magnitude of adaptation for all axes, and thus adaptation strength alone may account for much of the variance in selectivity among observers. Older observers showed a stronger magnitude of adaptation thus, surprisingly, more conspicuous evidence for higher-order mechanisms. For both age groups the aftereffects were well predicted by response changes in chromatic channels with linear spectral sensitivities, and there was no evidence for weakened channel tuning with aging. The results suggest that higher-order mechanisms may become more exposed in observers or conditions in which the strength of adaptation is greater, and that both chromatic contrast

  16. Probing ultrafast dynamics of solid-density plasma generated by high-contrast intense laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Kamalesh; Blackman, David R.; Shaikh, Moniruzzaman; Lad, Amit D.; Sarkar, Deep; Dey, Indranuj; Robinson, Alex P. L.; Pasley, John; Ravindra Kumar, G.

    2018-01-01

    We present ultrafast dynamics of solid-density plasma created by high-contrast (picosecond contrast ˜10-9), high-intensity (˜4 × 1018 W/cm2) laser pulses using time-resolved pump-probe Doppler spectrometry. Experiments show a rapid rise in blue-shift at early time delay (2-4.3 ps) followed by a rapid fall (4.3-8.3 ps) and then a slow rise in blue-shift at later time delays (>8.3 ps). Simulations show that the early-time observations, specifically the absence of any red-shifting of the reflected probe, can only be reproduced if the front surface is unperturbed by the laser pre-pulse at the moment that the high intensity pulse arrives. A flexible diagnostic which is capable of diagnosing the presence of low-levels of pre-plasma formation would be useful for potential applications in laser-produced proton and ion production, such as cancer therapy and security imaging.

  17. The density-salinity relation of standard seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hannes; Seitz, Steffen; Hassel, Egon; Wolf, Henning

    2018-01-01

    The determination of salinity by means of electrical conductivity relies on stable salt proportions in the North Atlantic Ocean, because standard seawater, which is required for salinometer calibration, is produced from water of the North Atlantic. To verify the long-term stability of the standard seawater composition, it was proposed to perform measurements of the standard seawater density. Since the density is sensitive to all salt components, a density measurement can detect any change in the composition. A conversion of the density values to salinity can be performed by means of a density-salinity relation. To use such a relation with a target uncertainty in salinity comparable to that in salinity obtained from conductivity measurements, a density measurement with an uncertainty of 2 g m-3 is mandatory. We present a new density-salinity relation based on such accurate density measurements. The substitution measurement method used is described and density corrections for uniform isotopic and chemical compositions are reported. The comparison of densities calculated using the new relation with those calculated using the present reference equations of state TEOS-10 suggests that the density accuracy of TEOS-10 (as well as that of EOS-80) has been overestimated, as the accuracy of some of its underlying density measurements had been overestimated. The new density-salinity relation may be used to verify the stable composition of standard seawater by means of routine density measurements.

  18. Indication-related dosing for magnetic resonance contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuh, W.T.C.; Parker, J.R.; Carvlin, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    This presentation reviews the issue of contrast media dosing and imaging protocols for the optimal MR imaging detection and characterization of pathology. The cumulative clinical experience gained in performing contrast-enhanced MR examinations with gadolinium chelates indicates that a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight provides safe and effective enhancement of most CNS pathology. Doses lower than 0.1 mmol/kg have been shown to be inadequate for delineating all but selected types of CNS pathology, such as masses with a high lesion to background ratio on post-contrast images (acoustic neuromas) or lesions located in areas in which the normal tissue very rapidly takes up contrast agent (e. g. microadenomas in the pituitary gland). Recent clinical studies have suggested a role for high dose gadolinium administration (up to 0.3 mmol/kg) for the optimal detection and delineation of cerebral metastases or other small or poorly enhancing lesions. Differences in the histopathologic characteristics (capillary permeability, vascularity, location, size) of specific diseased tissues may require varying doses or even a different contrast agent to be used for optimal imaging results. As new MR contrast agents and new scanning techniques are introduced, the specific diagnostic question posed will likely determine the choice of pulse sequence, contrast agent and dose used. (orig.)

  19. HIV-related ocular microangiopathic syndrome and color contrast sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, S A; Hammel, G; Bogner, J R; Kronawitter, U; Berninger, T; Goebel, F D

    1994-06-01

    Color vision deficits in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease were reported, and a retinal pathogenic mechanism was proposed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of color vision deficits with HIV-related retinal microangiopathy. A computer graphics system was used to measure protan, deutan, and tritan color contrast sensitivity (CCS) thresholds in 60 HIV-infected patients. Retinal microangiopathy was measured by counting the number of cotton-wool spots, and conjunctival blood-flow sludging was determined. Additional predictors were CD4+ count, age, time on aerosolized pentamidine, time on zidovudine, and Walter Reed staging. The relative influence of each predictor was calculated by stepwise multiple regression analysis (inclusion criterion; incremental P value = < 0.05) using data for the right eyes (RE). The results were validated by using data for the left eyes (LE) and both eyes (BE). The only included predictors in multiple regression analyses for the RE were number of cotton-wool spots (tritan: R = .70; deutan: R = .46; and protan: R = .58; P < .0001 for all axes) and age (tritan: increment of R [Ri] = .05, P = .002; deutan: Ri = .10, P = .004; and protan: Ri = .05, P = .002). The predictors time on zidovudine (Ri = .05, P = .002) and Walter Reed staging (Ri = .03, P = .01) were additionally included in multiple regression analysis for tritan LE. The results for deutan LE were comparable to those for the RE. In the analysis for protan LE, the only included predictor was number of cotton-wool spots. In the analyses for BE, no further predictors were included. The predictors Walter Reed staging and CD4+ count showed a significant association with all three criteria in univariate analysis. Additionally, tritan CCS was significantly associated with conjunctival blood-flow sludging. CCS deficits in patients with HIV disease are primarily associated with the number of cotton

  20. Low density contrast agents for x-ray phase contrast imaging: the use of ambient air for x-ray angiography of excised murine liver tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laperle, Christopher M; Wintermeyer, Philip; Derdak, Zoltan; Wands, Jack R; Hamilton, Theron J; Walker, Evan J; Diebold, Gerald; Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Shi, Daxin; Anastasio, Mark A

    2008-01-01

    We report a new preparative method for providing contrast through reduction in electron density that is uniquely suited for propagation-based differential x-ray phase contrast imaging. The method, which results in an air or fluid filled vasculature, makes possible visualization of the smallest microvessels, roughly down to 15 μm, in an excised murine liver, while preserving the tissue for subsequent histological workup. We show the utility of spatial frequency filtering for increasing the visibility of minute features characteristic of phase contrast imaging, and the capability of tomographic reconstruction to reveal microvessel structure and three-dimensional visualization of the sample. The effect of water evaporation from livers during x-ray imaging on the visibility of blood vessels is delineated. The deformed vascular tree in a cancerous murine liver is imaged.

  1. Influence of Contrast Media on Bone Mineral Density (BMD) Measurements from Routine Contrast-Enhanced MDCT Datasets using a Phantom-less BMD Measurement Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toelly, Andrea; Bardach, Constanze; Weber, Michael; Gong, Rui; Lai, Yanbo; Wang, Pei; Guo, Yulin; Kirschke, Jan; Baum, Thomas; Gruber, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Aim  To evaluate the differences in phantom-less bone mineral density (BMD) measurements in contrast-enhanced routine MDCT scans at different contrast phases, and to develop an algorithm for calculating a reliable BMD value. Materials and Methods  112 postmenopausal women from the age of 40 to 77 years (mean age: 57.31 years; SD 9.61) who underwent a clinically indicated MDCT scan, consisting of an unenhanced, an arterial, and a venous phase, were included. A retrospective analysis of the BMD values of the Th12 to L4 vertebrae in each phase was performed using a commercially available phantom-less measurement tool. Results  The mean BMD value in the unenhanced MDCT scans was 79.76 mg/cm³ (SD 31.20), in the arterial phase it was 85.09 mg/cm³ (SD 31.61), and in the venous phase it was 86.18 mg/cm³ (SD 31.30). A significant difference (p Influence of Contrast Media on Bone Mineral Density (BMD) Measurements from Routine Contrast-Enhanced MDCT Datasets using a Phantom-less BMD Measurement Tool. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2017; 189: 537 - 543. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. STRAIGHTENING THE DENSITY-DISPLACEMENT RELATION WITH A LOGARITHMIC TRANSFORM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falck, Bridget L.; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A.; Lavaux, Guilhem; Szalay, Alexander S.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the use of a logarithmic density variable in estimating the Lagrangian displacement field motivated by the success of a logarithmic transformation in restoring information to the matter power spectrum. The logarithmic relation is an extension of the linear relation, motivated by the continuity equation, in which the density field is assumed to be proportional to the divergence of the displacement field; we compare the linear and logarithmic relations by measuring both of these fields directly in a cosmological N-body simulation. The relative success of the logarithmic and linear relations depends on the scale at which the density field is smoothed. Thus we explore several ways of measuring the density field, including Cloud-In-Cell smoothing, adaptive smoothing, and the (scale-independent) Delaunay tessellation, and we use both a Fourier-space and a geometrical tessellation approach to measuring the divergence. We find that the relation between the divergence of the displacement field and the density is significantly tighter and straighter with a logarithmic density variable, especially at low redshifts and for very small (∼2 h –1 Mpc) smoothing scales. We find that the grid-based methods are more reliable than the tessellation-based method of calculating both the density and the divergence fields, though in both cases the logarithmic relation works better in the appropriate regime, which corresponds to nonlinear scales for the grid-based methods and low densities for the tessellation-based method.

  3. Organic carbon characteristics in density fractions of soils with contrasting mineralogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeasmin, Sabina; Singh, Balwant; Johnston, Cliff T.; Sparks, Donald L.

    2017-12-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the role of minerals in the preservation of organic carbon (OC) in different soil types. Sequential density fractionation was done to isolate particulate organic matter (POM, 2.6 g cm-3) from four soils, i.e., a Ferralsol, a Luvisol, a Vertisol and a Solonetz. Organic matter (OM) in the density fractions was characterised using diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy in the original states (i.e., without any chemical pre-treatment), and after 6% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and 10% hydrofluoric acid (HF) treatments. The NaOCl oxidation resistant fraction was considered as a relatively stable pool of OC and the HF soluble fraction was presumed as the mineral bound OC. Phyllosilicate-dominated soils, i.e., Vertisol, Luvisol and Solonetz, contained a greater proportion of POM than Fe and Al oxide-dominated Ferralsol. Wider C:N ratio and lower δ13C and δ15N in POM suggest the dominance of labile OC in this fraction and this was also supported by a greater proportion of NaOCl oxidised OC in the same fraction that was enriched with aliphatic C. The sequential density fractionation method effectively isolated OM into three distinct groups in the soils: (i) OM associated with Fe and Al oxides (>1.8 g cm-3 in the Ferralsol); (ii) OM associated with phyllosilicates (1.8-2.6 g cm-3) and (iii) OM associated with quartz and feldspar (>2.6 g cm-3) in the other three soils. Greater oxidation resistance, and more dissolution of OC during the HF treatment in the Fe and Al oxides dominated fractions suggest a greater potential of these minerals to protect OC from oxidative degradation as compared to the phyllosilicates, and quartz and feldspar matrices. OM associated with Fe and Al oxides was predominantly aromatic and carboxylate C. Decreased C:N ratio in the NaOCl oxidation resistant OM and HF soluble OM of phyllosilicates, and quartz and feldspars dominant fractions

  4. MDCT appearance of the appendix: how does the low-density barium sulfate oral contrast agent affect it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghmai, Vahid; Aghaei-Lasboo, Anahita; Brandwein, Warren M; Tochetto, Sandra; Mafi, John N; Miller, Frank H; Nikolaidis, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We compared the effect of low-density barium sulfate neutral oral contrast agent on the diameter of normal appendix and its luminal content versus that of water on multidetector-row CT. CT scans of 24 patients who had been imaged on two separate occasions for the evaluation of pancreatic pathology, once with water and subsequently with low-density barium sulfate as the neutral oral contrast agent were evaluated (total of 48 scans). Studies were randomized and reviewed in consensus on a workstation in the stack mode by two radiologists blinded to the type of oral contrast. The appendix was measured at baseline and 10 days later to obtain an average diameter. Results of the water and low-density barium sulfate groups were compared using paired t test. Contents of the appendiceal lumen were also noted (gas, fluid, mixed, and collapsed appendix). The average diameter of the appendix for scans obtained with water and low-density barium sulfate was 4.09 ± 0.87 mm (median, 4.22 mm; range, 2.50-5.65 mm) and 4.13 ± 0.93 mm (median, 4 mm, range, 2.2-5.65 mm), respectively. This difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.69). There was no statistically significant difference in the appendiceal content when water or low-density barium sulfate were used as oral contrast (χ (2) = 4.25, P = 0.89). Low-density barium sulfate does not affect appendiceal content or diameter and, therefore, should not adversely affect evaluation of the appendix on multidetector row CT.

  5. Non-invasive prediction of hemodynamically significant coronary artery stenoses by contrast density difference in coronary CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hell, Michaela M., E-mail: michaela.hell@uk-erlangen.de [Department of Cardiology, University of Erlangen (Germany); Dey, Damini [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Biomedical Imaging Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Taper Building, Room A238, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Marwan, Mohamed; Achenbach, Stephan; Schmid, Jasmin; Schuhbaeck, Annika [Department of Cardiology, University of Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Overestimation of coronary lesions by coronary computed tomography angiography and subsequent unnecessary invasive coronary angiography and revascularization is a concern. • Differences in plaque characteristics and contrast density difference between hemodynamically significant and non-significant stenoses, as defined by invasive fractional flow reserve, were assessed. • At a threshold of ≥24%, contrast density difference predicted hemodynamically significant lesions with a specificity of 75%, sensitivity of 33%, PPV of 35% and NPV of 73%. • The determination of contrast density difference required less time than transluminal attenuation gradient measurement. - Abstract: Objectives: Coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) allows the detection of obstructive coronary artery disease. However, its ability to predict the hemodynamic significance of stenoses is limited. We assessed differences in plaque characteristics and contrast density difference between hemodynamically significant and non-significant stenoses, as defined by invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR). Methods: Lesion characteristics of 59 consecutive patients (72 lesions) in whom invasive FFR was performed in at least one coronary artery with moderate to high-grade stenoses in coronary CTA were evaluated by two experienced readers. Coronary CTA data sets were acquired on a second-generation dual-source CT scanner using retrospectively ECG-gated spiral acquisition or prospectively ECG-triggered axial acquisition mode. Plaque volume and composition (non-calcified, calcified), remodeling index as well as contrast density difference (defined as the percentage decline in luminal CT attenuation/cross-sectional area over the lesion) were assessed using a semi-automatic software tool (Autoplaq). Additionally, the transluminal attenuation gradient (defined as the linear regression coefficient between intraluminal CT attenuation and length from the ostium) was determined

  6. Correlations Between the Gradient of Contrast Density, Evaluated by Cardio CT, and Functional Significance of Coronary Artery Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orzan Marius

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Assessment of the hemodynamic significance of a coronary artery stenosis is a challenging task, being extremely important for the establishment of indication for revascularization in atherosclerotic coronary artery stenosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of a new marker reflecting the functional significance of a coronary artery stenosis, represented by the attenuation degree of contrast density along the stenosis by Coronary CT.

  7. Development of a new high density (HD) barium meal (Falibaryt HD) for double contrast investigation of the stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietze, R.

    1986-01-01

    During the development of a new double contrast barium meal barium sulfate preparations with various densities, additives and particle size distributions were tested. Phantoms made of leather, rubber and the opened stomachs of cows and pigs were used. A HD bariumsulfate suspension (200 - 250% W/V) of low viscosity and suitable grain size spectrum containing additives improving the adherence (e.g. natrium citrate) showed the best quality parameters for an optimal imaging of the fine mucosal relief. (author)

  8. Nanocrystal core high-density lipoproteins: a multimodality contrast agent platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cormode, David P.; Skajaa, Torjus; van Schooneveld, Matti M.; Koole, Rolf; Jarzyna, Peter; Lobatto, Mark E.; Calcagno, Claudia; Barazza, Alessandra; Gordon, Ronald E.; Zanzonico, Pat; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2008-01-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) is an important natural nanoparticle that may be modified for biomedical imaging purposes. Here we developed a novel technique to create unique multimodality HDL mimicking nanoparticles by incorporation of gold, iron oxide, or quantum dot nanocrystals for computed

  9. A multi-wavelength, high-contrast contact radiography system for the study of low-density aerogel foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opachich, Y. P., E-mail: opachiyp@nv.doe.gov; Koch, J. A.; Haugh, M. J.; Romano, E.; Lee, J. J.; Huffman, E.; Weber, F. A. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Bowers, J. W. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Benedetti, L. R.; Wilson, M.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Baumann, T. F.; Lenhardt, J. M.; Cook, A.; Arsenlis, A.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    A multi-wavelength, high contrast contact radiography system has been developed to characterize density variations in ultra-low density aerogel foams. These foams are used to generate a ramped pressure drive in materials strength experiments at the National Ignition Facility and require precision characterization in order to reduce errors in measurements. The system was used to characterize density variations in carbon and silicon based aerogels to ∼10.3% accuracy with ∼30 μm spatial resolution. The system description, performance, and measurement results collected using a 17.8 mg/cc carbon based JX–6 (C{sub 20}H{sub 30}) aerogel are discussed in this manuscript.

  10. Contrasting ozone sensitivity in related evergreen and deciduous shrubs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calatayud, Vicent; Marco, Francisco; Cervero, Julia; Sanchez-Pena, Gerardo; Sanz, Maria Jose

    2010-01-01

    Plant responses to enhanced ozone levels have been studied in two pairs of evergreen-deciduous species (Pistacia terebinthus vs. P. lentiscus; Viburnum lantana vs. V. tinus) in Open Top Chambers. Ozone induced widespread visible injury, significantly reduced CO 2 assimilation and stomatal conductance (g s ), impaired Rubisco efficiency and regeneration capacity (V c,max, J max ) and altered fluorescence parameters only in the deciduous species. Differences in stomatal conductance could not explain the observed differences in sensitivity. In control plants, deciduous species showed higher superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity than their evergreen counterparts, suggesting metabolic differences that could make them more prone to redox imbalances. Ozone induced increases in SOD and/or peroxidase activities in all the species, but only evergreens were able to cope with the oxidative stress. The relevancy of these results for the effective ozone flux approach and for the current ozone Critical Levels is also discussed. - Mediterranean evergreen shrubs have a constitutively higher capacity to tolerate ozone stress than their deciduous relatives.

  11. Contrasting ozone sensitivity in related evergreen and deciduous shrubs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calatayud, Vicent, E-mail: vicent@ceam.e [Fundacion CEAM, c/ Charles R. Darwin 14, Parque Tecnologico, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Marco, Francisco; Cervero, Julia [Fundacion CEAM, c/ Charles R. Darwin 14, Parque Tecnologico, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Sanchez-Pena, Gerardo [SPCAN, Dir. Gral. de Medio Natural y Politica Forestal, Ministerio de Medio Ambiente, y Medio Rural y Marino, Rios Rosas 24, 28003 Madrid (Spain); Sanz, Maria Jose [Fundacion CEAM, c/ Charles R. Darwin 14, Parque Tecnologico, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    Plant responses to enhanced ozone levels have been studied in two pairs of evergreen-deciduous species (Pistacia terebinthus vs. P. lentiscus; Viburnum lantana vs. V. tinus) in Open Top Chambers. Ozone induced widespread visible injury, significantly reduced CO{sub 2} assimilation and stomatal conductance (g{sub s}), impaired Rubisco efficiency and regeneration capacity (V{sub c,max,}J{sub max}) and altered fluorescence parameters only in the deciduous species. Differences in stomatal conductance could not explain the observed differences in sensitivity. In control plants, deciduous species showed higher superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity than their evergreen counterparts, suggesting metabolic differences that could make them more prone to redox imbalances. Ozone induced increases in SOD and/or peroxidase activities in all the species, but only evergreens were able to cope with the oxidative stress. The relevancy of these results for the effective ozone flux approach and for the current ozone Critical Levels is also discussed. - Mediterranean evergreen shrubs have a constitutively higher capacity to tolerate ozone stress than their deciduous relatives.

  12. Correlation Between Contrast Time-Density Time on Digital Subtraction Angiography and Flow: An in Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunozzi, Denise; Shakur, Sophia F; Ismail, Rahim; Linninger, Andreas; Hsu, Chih-Yang; Charbel, Fady T; Alaraj, Ali

    2018-02-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) provides an excellent anatomic characterization of cerebral vasculature, but hemodynamic assessment is often qualitative and subjective. Various clinical algorithms have been produced to semiquantify flow from the data obtained from DSA, but few have tested them against reliable flow values. An arched flow model was created and injected with contrast material. Seventeen injections were acquired in anterior-posterior and lateral DSA projections, and 4 injections were acquired in oblique projection. Image intensity change over the angiogram cycle of each DSA run was analyzed through a custom MATLAB code. Time-density plots obtained were divided into 3 components (time-density times, TDTs): TDT 10%-100% (time needed for contrast material to change image intensity from 10% to 100%), TDT 100%-10% (time needed for contrast material to change image intensity from 100% to 10%), and TDT 25%-25% (time needed for contrast material to change from 25% image intensity to 25%). Time-density index (TDI) was defined as model cross-sectional area to TDT ratio, and it was measured against different flow rates. TDI 10%-100% , TDI 100%-10% , and TDI 25%-25% all correlated significantly with flow (P < 0.001). TDI 10%-100% , TDI 100%-10% , and TDI 25%-25% showed, respectively, a correlation coefficient of 0.91, 0.91, and 0.97 in the anterior-posterior DSA projections (P < 0.001). In the lateral DSA projection, TDI 100%-10% showed a weaker correlation (r = 0.57; P = 0.03). Also in the oblique DSA projection, TDIs correlated significantly with flow. TDI on DSA correlates significantly with flow. Although in vitro studies might overlook conditions that occur in patients, this method appears to correlate with the flow and could offer a semiquantitative method to evaluate the cerebral blood flow. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Contrasting extremes in water-related stresses determine species survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomeus, R. P.; Witte, J. P. M.; van Bodegom, P. M.; van Dam, J. C.; Aerts, R.

    2012-04-01

    In temperate climates, soil moisture, in concert with nutrient availability and soil acidity, is the most important environmental filter in determining local plant species composition, as it determines the availability of both oxygen and water to plant roots. These resources are indispensable for meeting the physiological demands of plants. Especially the occurrence of both excessive dry and wet moisture conditions at a particular site has strong implications for the survival of species, because plants need traits that allow them to respond to such counteracting conditions. However, adapting to one stress may go at the cost of the other, i.e. there exists a trade-off in the tolerance for wet conditions and the tolerance for dry conditions. Until now, both large-scale (global) and plot-scale effects of soil moisture conditions on plant species composition have mostly been investigated through indirect environmental measures, which do not include the key soil physical and plant physiological processes in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Moreover, researchers only determined effects of one of the water-related stresses, i.e. either oxygen or drought stress. In order to quantify both oxygen and drought stress with causal measures, we focused on interacting meteorological, soil physical, microbial, and plant physiological processes in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. We simulated these plant stresses with a novel, process-based approach, incorporating in detail the interacting processes in the soil-plant-atmosphere interface. High variability and extremes in resource availability can be highly detrimental to plant species ('you can only die once'). We show that co-occurrence of oxygen and drought stress reduces the percentage of specialists within a vegetation plot. The percentage of non-specialists within a vegetation plot, however, decreases significantly with increasing stress as long as only one of the stresses prevails, but increases significantly with an

  14. Annual Screening Mammogram and its Relation to Breast Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabek EAS

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Current national screening programs totally depend on mammographic evaluation. After increased incidence of breast cancer in women under the age of 35, mammography sensitivity in now a question. Several factors added to decrease sensitivity of mammography, such as increased density in older age groups and increased aggressiveness of tumour biology. All these factors will change the reliability of the screening program. The study is a retrospective study conducted at Ain Shams University. Method: 138 patients diagnosed with cancer breast underwent both mammography and sonography to determine percentage of patient with more than one focus, age and density distribution breast cancer in the affected patient and accuracy of both mammography and US. Results: By studying this population, we found that around 61,44% have areas of density ranging from dense breast, heterogenous density or scattered density. These areas of density render the mammography a less sensitive tool as its sensitivity fall to 34.09%, while that of US was 77.27%. Conclusion: As breast cancer is prevalent in younger population, also with increased density in older population who are relatively insensitive to mammography, we recommended the use of Automated Breast Ultrasound (ABUS in the national screening program.

  15. CT of the pancreas with a fat-density oral contrast medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raptopoulos, V.; Davidoff, A.; Davis, M.A.; Coolbaugh, B.L.; Smith, E.H.

    1987-01-01

    Visualization of the head of the pancreas on CT was evaluated in three groups, each consisting of 100 patients without pancreatic pathology who received a fat-density oral preparation. The corn oil emulsion was tolerated well by the patients and allowed consistently superior discrimination of the head of the pancreas from the duodenal C-loop as compared to the other two control groups. A score was developed for the CT discrimination of duodenum from pancreas. The average score for corn oil emulsion was .94, as opposed to .74 for the high-density agents and .76 for patients who did not receive any oral preparation. Until further experience is acquired, the authors do not recommend the use of corn oil in patients thought to have pancreatic pseudocysts or abscesses. In addition, the use of fat-containing oral agents may be contraindicated in patients with acute pancreatitis. For routine CT evaluation of the pancreas and upper abdomen, the authors consider corn oil emulsion superior to the other oral regimens

  16. Towards the Moho depth and Moho density contrast along with their uncertainties from seismic and satellite gravity observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrehdary, M.; Sjöberg, L. E.; Bagherbandi, M.; Sampietro, D.

    2017-12-01

    We present a combined method for estimating a new global Moho model named KTH15C, containing Moho depth and Moho density contrast (or shortly Moho parameters), from a combination of global models of gravity (GOCO05S), topography (DTM2006) and seismic information (CRUST1.0 and MDN07) to a resolution of 1° × 1° based on a solution of Vening Meinesz-Moritz' inverse problem of isostasy. This paper also aims modelling of the observation standard errors propagated from the Vening Meinesz-Moritz and CRUST1.0 models in estimating the uncertainty of the final Moho model. The numerical results yield Moho depths ranging from 6.5 to 70.3 km, and the estimated Moho density contrasts ranging from 21 to 650 kg/m3, respectively. Moreover, test computations display that in most areas estimated uncertainties in the parameters are less than 3 km and 50 kg/m3, respectively, but they reach to more significant values under Gulf of Mexico, Chile, Eastern Mediterranean, Timor sea and parts of polar regions. Comparing the Moho depths estimated by KTH15C and those derived by KTH11C, GEMMA2012C, CRUST1.0, KTH14C, CRUST14 and GEMMA1.0 models shows that KTH15C agree fairly well with CRUST1.0 but rather poor with other models. The Moho density contrasts estimated by KTH15C and those of the KTH11C, KTH14C and VMM model agree to 112, 31 and 61 kg/m3 in RMS. The regional numerical studies show that the RMS differences between KTH15C and Moho depths from seismic information yields fits of 2 to 4 km in South and North America, Africa, Europe, Asia, Australia and Antarctica, respectively.

  17. Relative floral density of an invasive plant affects pollinator foraging behaviour on a native plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Marie Iler

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between invasive and native plants for pollinators vary from competition to facilitation of pollination of native plants. Theory predicts that relative floral densities should account for some of this variation in outcomes, with facilitation at low floral densities and competition at high floral densities of the invader. We tested this prediction by quantifying pollination and female reproductive success of a native herb, Geranium maculatum, in three experimental arrays that varied in floral density of the invasive shrub Lonicera maackii: control (no L. maackii, low floral density of L. maackii, and high floral density of L. maackii. A low density of L. maackii flowers was associated with an increase in pollinator visitation rate to G. maculatum flowers and an increase in conspecific pollen deposition compared to controls and high density arrays. Increased visitation rates were not associated with an increase in the number of visitors to low density arrays, suggesting instead that a behavioural switch in visitation within the array accounted for increased pollen deposition. In contrast, the only evidence of competition in high density arrays was a shorter duration of visits to G. maculatum flowers relative to the other treatments. The number of seeds per flower did not vary among treatments, although trends in seeds per flower were consistent with patterns of pollinator foraging behaviour. Given increased pollinator visits and pollen deposition at a low density of the invader, our study indicates that complete eradication of invasives as a management or restoration technique may have unintended negative consequences for pollination of native plants.

  18. Spinning solutions in general relativity with infinite central density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammer, P. D.

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents general relativistic numerical simulations of uniformly rotating polytropes. Equations are developed using MSQI coordinates, but taking a logarithm of the radial coordinate. The result is relatively simple elliptical differential equations. Due to the logarithmic scale, we can resolve solutions with near-singular mass distributions near their center, while the solution domain extends many orders of magnitude larger than the radius of the distribution (to connect with flat space-time). Rotating solutions are found with very high central energy densities for a range of adiabatic exponents. Analytically, assuming the pressure is proportional to the energy density (which is true for polytropes in the limit of large energy density), we determine the small radius behavior of the metric potentials and energy density. This small radius behavior agrees well with the small radius behavior of large central density numerical results, lending confidence to our numerical approach. We compare results with rotating solutions available in the literature, which show good agreement. We study the stability of spherical solutions: instability sets in at the first maximum in mass versus central energy density; this is also consistent with results in the literature, and further lends confidence to the numerical approach.

  19. The relation between food price, energy density and diet quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margareta Bolarić

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Low energy density diet, high in fruits and vegetables, is related to lower obesity risk and to better health status, but is more expensive. High energy density diet, high in added sugar and fats, is more affordable, but is related to higher obesity and chronic diseases risk. The aim of this study was to report prices according to energy density (low vs. high of food items and to show how food affordability could affect food choice and consumers’ health. Data was collected for 137 raw and processed foods from three purchase sites in Zagreb (one representative for supermarket, one smaller shop and green market. Results showed that low energy density food is more expensive than high energy density food (for example, the price of 1000 kcal from green zucchini (15 kcal/100 g is 124.20 kn while the price of 1000 kcal from sour cream (138 kcal/100 g is 13.99 kn. Food energy price was significantly different (p<0.05 between food groups with highest price for vegetable products (159.04 ± 36.18 kn/1000 kcal and raw vegetables (97.90 ± 50.13 kn/1000 kcal and lowest for fats (8.49 ± 1.22 kn/1000 kcal and cereals and products (5.66 ± 0.76 kn/1000 kcal. Negative correlation (Spearman r=-0.72, p<0.0001 was observed for energy density (kcal/100 g and price of 1000 kcal. Therefore, it is advisable to develop strategies in order to reduce price of low energy density food and encourage its intake since it would improve diet quality, which could lead to better costumers’ health.

  20. Nutrient density of beverages in relation to climate impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Smedman

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The food chain contributes to a substantial part of greenhouse gas (GHG emissions and growing evidence points to the urgent need to reduce GHGs emissions worldwide. Among suggestions were proposals to alter food consumption patterns by replacing animal foods with more plant-based foods. However, the nutritional dimensions of changing consumption patterns to lower GHG emissions still remains relatively unexplored. This study is the first to estimate the composite nutrient density, expressed as percentage of Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR for 21 essential nutrients, in relation to cost in GHG emissions of the production from a life cycle perspective, expressed in grams of CO2-equivalents, using an index called the Nutrient Density to Climate Impact (NDCI index. The NDCI index was calculated for milk, soft drink, orange juice, beer, wine, bottled carbonated water, soy drink, and oat drink. Due to low-nutrient density, the NDCI index was 0 for carbonated water, soft drink, and beer and below 0.1 for red wine and oat drink. The NDCI index was similar for orange juice (0.28 and soy drink (0.25. Due to a very high-nutrient density, the NDCI index for milk was substantially higher (0.54 than for the other beverages. Future discussion on how changes in food consumption patterns might help avert climate change need to take both GHG emission and nutrient density of foods and beverages into account.

  1. Dispersal patterns of red foxes relative to population density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Stephen H.; Sargeant, Alan B.

    1993-01-01

    Factors affecting red fox (Vulpes vulpes) dispersal patterns are poorly understood but warranted investigation because of the role of dispersal in rebuilding depleted populations and transmission of diseases. We examined dispersal patterns of red foxes in North Dakota based on recoveries of 363 of 854 foxes tagged as pups and relative to fox density. Foxes were recovered up to 8.6 years after tagging; 79% were trapped or shot. Straight-line distances between tagging and recovery locations ranged from 0 to 302 km. Mean recovery distances increased with age and were greater for males than females, but longest individual recovery distances were by females. Dispersal distances were not related to population density for males (P = 0.36) or females (P = 0.96). The proportion of males recovered that dispersed was inversely related to population density (r = -0.94; n = 5; P = 0.02), but not the proportion of females (r = -0.49; n = 5; P = 0.40). Dispersal directions were not uniform for either males (P = 0.003) or females (P = 0.006); littermates tended to disperse in similar directions (P = 0.09). A 4-lane interstate highway altered dispersal directions (P = 0.001). Dispersal is a strong innate behavior of red foxes (especially males) that results in many individuals of both sexes traveling far from natal areas. Because dispersal distance was unaffected by fox density, populations can be rebuilt and diseases transmitted long distances regardless of fox abundance.

  2. Correlation of double-contrast high-density barium enema, colonoscopy, and histology in children with special attention to disparities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stringer, D.A.; Sherman, P.M.; Jakowenko, N.

    1986-01-01

    Colonscopic and double-contrast high-density barium enema (DCBE) findings were correlated in 68 patients (39 boys and 29 girls) aged 6 months to 18 years (mean 11.6 years) evaluated over a 24-month period. There was excellent correlation in 53 patients (78.0%) and good correlation in another 3 (4.4%) who had identical diagnoses and only slightly differing extent of disease reported. In 2 of these, DCBE showed more extensive disease, confirmed histologically in 1. Distal colitis seen on colonoscopy as reddening and neovascularity was missed on DCBE in 6 patients. Colonoscopy and DEBE failed to show a polyp in 1 patient each. One patient who had a normal DCBE and colonoscopy demonstrated a histological abnormality, and 1 patient with an abnormality on histology and DCBE was normal on colonscopy. A disparity resulted from the time between procedures in 1 patient and observer error in another. This high correlation is far better than any previously reported in children, supporting the use of high-density barium sulfate and double-contrast barium enemas in pediatric patients. (orig.)

  3. Ambiguities and symmetry relations associated with fermionic tensor densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallabona, G.; Battistel, O. A.

    2004-01-01

    We consider the consistent evaluation of perturbative (divergent) Green functions associated with fermionic tensor densities and the derivation of symmetry relations for them. We show that, in spite of current algebra methods being not applicable, it is possible to derive symmetry properties analogous to the Ward identities of vector and axial-vector densities. The proposed method, which is applicable to any previously chosen order of perturbative calculation, gives the same results as those of current algebra when such a tool is applicable. By using a very general calculational strategy, concerning the manipulations and calculations involving divergent Feynman integrals, we evaluate the purely fermionic two-point functions containing tensor vertices and derive their symmetry properties. The present investigation is the first step in the study and characterization of possible anomalies involving fermionic tensor densities, particularly in purely fermionic three-point functions

  4. Relating saturation capacity to charge density in strong cation exchangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinebach, Fabian; Coquebert de Neuville, Bertrand; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2017-07-21

    In this work the relation between physical and chemical resin characteristics and the total amount of adsorbed protein (saturation capacity) for ion-exchange resins is discussed. Eleven different packing materials with a sulfo-functionalization and one multimodal resin were analyzed in terms of their porosity, pore size distribution, ligand density and binding capacity. By specifying the ligand density and binding capacity by the total and accessible surface area, two different groups of resins were identified: Below a ligand density of approx. 2.5μmol/m 2 area the ligand density controls the saturation capacity, while above this limit the accessible surface area becomes the limiting factor. This results in a maximum protein uptake of around 2.5mg/m 2 of accessible surface area. The obtained results allow estimating the saturation capacity from independent resin characteristics like the saturation capacity mainly depends on "library data" such as the accessible and total surface area and the charge density. Hence these results give an insight into the fundamentals of protein adsorption and help to find suitable resins, thus limiting the experimental effort in early process development stages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Can pre-operative contrast-enhanced dynamic MR imaging for prostate cancer predict microvessel density in prostatectomy specimens?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter [Department of Oncological Diagnostics and Therapy, German Cancer Research Center, University Hospital Mannheim, Ruprecht Karls University, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse 3, 72076, Tuebingen (Germany); Merkle, Jonas; Kaick, Gerhard van [Department of Oncological Diagnostics and Therapy, German Cancer Research Center, University Hospital Mannheim, Ruprecht Karls University, Heidelberg (Germany); Grobholz, Rainer [Department of Pathology, University Hospital Mannheim, Ruprecht Karls University, Heidelberg (Germany); Jaeger, Tim; Michel, Maurice Stephan [Department of Urology, University Hospital Mannheim, Ruprecht Karls University, Heidelberg (Germany); Werner, Axel; Rabe, Jan [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Mannheim, Ruprecht Karls University, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE MRI) parameters with microvessel density (MVD) in prostate carcinoma. Twenty-eight patients with biopsy-proven prostate carcinoma were examined by endorectal MRI including multiplanar T2- and T1-weighted spin-echo and dynamic T1-weighted turbo-FLASH MRI during and after intravenous Gd-DTPA administration. Microvessels were stained on surgical specimens using a CD31 monoclonal antibody. The MVD was quantified in hot spots by counting (MVC) and determining the area fraction by morphometry (MVAF). The DCE MRI data were analyzed using an open pharmacokinetic two-compartment model. In corresponding anatomic locations the time shift ({delta}t) between the beginning of signal enhancement of cancer and adjacent normal prostatic tissue, the degree of contrast enhancement and the contrast exchange rate constant (k{sub 21}) were calculated. The MVC and MVAF were elevated in carcinoma (p<0.001 and p=0.002, respectively) and correlated to k{sub 21} (r=0.62, p<0.001 and r=0.80, p<0.001, respectively). k{sub 21}-values of carcinoma were significantly higher compared with normal peripheral but not central zone tissue. {delta}t was longer in high compared with low-grade tumors (p=0.025). The DCE MRI can provide important information about individual MVD in prostate cancer, which may be helpful for guiding biopsy and assessing individual prognosis. (orig.)

  6. Different patterns of oviposition learning in two closely related ectoparasitoid wasps with contrasting reproductive strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasakawa, Kôji; Uchijima, Kenta; Shibao, Harunobu; Shimada, Masakazu

    2013-02-01

    Many parasitoid wasps learn host-associated cues and use them in subsequent host-searching behavior. This associative learning, namely "oviposition learning," has been investigated in many studies. However, few studies have compared multiple species, and no comparative study has previously been conducted on ectoparasitoid species. We compared the effects of oviposition learning on host preference and offspring sex ratio in two closely related ectoparasitoid wasps with contrasting reproductive strategies, Anisopteromalus calandrae (r-strategist) and its sibling species (K-strategist). Using two bruchine hosts, Callosobruchus chinensis and Callosobruchus maculatus larvae infesting the cowpea Vigna unguiculata, oviposition choice experiments were performed at high and low host densities. In both species, no conspicuous effect on the offspring sex ratio was detected, but effects on host preference were found to differ between the species. In A. calandrae, the effects were detected only at high host density, suggesting that oviposition learning plays a role in host discrimination from a short distance but not from a long distance. In the sibling species, those effects were not detected in any of the cases, suggesting the absence of oviposition learning. These results are compatible with those of previous comparative studies of endoparasitoid wasps in that few lifetime oviposition experiences and/or low reward per foraging decision result in low or absent oviposition learning ability. This finding may indicate that ecological traits contributing to learning ability are similar between endoparasitoid and ectoparasitoid wasps. Thus, our species comparison of ectoparasitoids provides another model system for investigating learning and memory dynamics in parasitoid wasps.

  7. On the link between column density distribution and density scaling relation in star formation regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltchev, Todor; Donkov, Sava; Stanchev, Orlin

    2017-07-01

    We present a method to derive the density scaling relation ∝ L^{-α} in regions of star formation or in their turbulent vicinities from straightforward binning of the column-density distribution (N-pdf). The outcome of the method is studied for three types of N-pdf: power law (7/5≤α≤5/3), lognormal (0.7≲α≲1.4) and combination of lognormals. In the last case, the method of Stanchev et al. (2015) was also applied for comparison and a very weak (or close to zero) correlation was found. We conclude that the considered `binning approach' reflects rather the local morphology of the N-pdf with no reference to the physical conditions in a considered region. The rough consistency of the derived slopes with the widely adopted Larson's (1981) value α˜1.1 is suggested to support claims that the density-size relation in molecular clouds is indeed an artifact of the observed N-pdf.

  8. Relation between obesity and bone mineral density and vertebral fractures in Korean postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyong-Chol; Shin, Dong-Hyuk; Lee, Sei-Young; Im, Jee-Aee; Lee, Duk-Chul

    2010-11-01

    The traditional belief that obesity is protective against osteoporosis has been questioned. Recent epidemiologic studies show that body fat itself may be a risk factor for osteoporosis and bone fractures. Accumulating evidence suggests that metabolic syndrome and the individual components of metabolic syndrome such as hypertension, increased triglycerides, and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol are also risk factors for low bone mineral density. Using a cross sectional study design, we evaluated the associations between obesity or metabolic syndrome and bone mineral density (BMD) or vertebral fracture. A total of 907 postmenopausal healthy female subjects, aged 60-79 years, were recruited from woman hospitals in Seoul, South Korea. BMD, vetebral fracture, bone markers, and body composition including body weight, body mass index (BMI), percentage body fat, and waist circumference were measured. After adjusting for age, smoking status, alcohol consumption, total calcium intake, and total energy intake, waist circumference was negatively related to BMD of all sites (lumbar BMD p = 0.037, all sites of femur BMD p related to BMD of all sites (p related to femoral trochanter BMD (p = 0.0366) and was lower in the control group than the fracture group (p = 0.011). In contrast to the effect favorable body weight on bone mineral density, high percentage body fat and waist circumference are related to low BMD and a vertebral fracture. Some components of metabolic syndrome were related to BMD and a vertebral fracture.

  9. A comparison of shock-cloud and wind-cloud interactions: effect of increased cloud density contrast on cloud evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, K. J. A.; Pittard, J. M.

    2018-05-01

    The similarities, or otherwise, of a shock or wind interacting with a cloud of density contrast χ = 10 were explored in a previous paper. Here, we investigate such interactions with clouds of higher density contrast. We compare the adiabatic hydrodynamic interaction of a Mach 10 shock with a spherical cloud of χ = 103 with that of a cloud embedded in a wind with identical parameters to the post-shock flow. We find that initially there are only minor morphological differences between the shock-cloud and wind-cloud interactions, compared to when χ = 10. However, once the transmitted shock exits the cloud, the development of a turbulent wake and fragmentation of the cloud differs between the two simulations. On increasing the wind Mach number, we note the development of a thin, smooth tail of cloud material, which is then disrupted by the fragmentation of the cloud core and subsequent `mass-loading' of the flow. We find that the normalized cloud mixing time (tmix) is shorter at higher χ. However, a strong Mach number dependence on tmix and the normalized cloud drag time, t_{drag}^' }, is not observed. Mach-number-dependent values of tmix and t_{drag}^' } from comparable shock-cloud interactions converge towards the Mach-number-independent time-scales of the wind-cloud simulations. We find that high χ clouds can be accelerated up to 80-90 per cent of the wind velocity and travel large distances before being significantly mixed. However, complete mixing is not achieved in our simulations and at late times the flow remains perturbed.

  10. Online traffic flow model applying dynamic flow-density relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.

    2002-01-01

    This dissertation describes a new approach of the online traffic flow modelling based on the hydrodynamic traffic flow model and an online process to adapt the flow-density relation dynamically. The new modelling approach was tested based on the real traffic situations in various homogeneous motorway sections and a motorway section with ramps and gave encouraging simulation results. This work is composed of two parts: first the analysis of traffic flow characteristics and second the development of a new online traffic flow model applying these characteristics. For homogeneous motorway sections traffic flow is classified into six different traffic states with different characteristics. Delimitation criteria were developed to separate these states. The hysteresis phenomena were analysed during the transitions between these traffic states. The traffic states and the transitions are represented on a states diagram with the flow axis and the density axis. For motorway sections with ramps the complicated traffic flow is simplified and classified into three traffic states depending on the propagation of congestion. The traffic states are represented on a phase diagram with the upstream demand axis and the interaction strength axis which was defined in this research. The states diagram and the phase diagram provide a basis for the development of the dynamic flow-density relation. The first-order hydrodynamic traffic flow model was programmed according to the cell-transmission scheme extended by the modification of flow dependent sending/receiving functions, the classification of cells and the determination strategy for the flow-density relation in the cells. The unreasonable results of macroscopic traffic flow models, which may occur in the first and last cells in certain conditions are alleviated by applying buffer cells between the traffic data and the model. The sending/receiving functions of the cells are determined dynamically based on the classification of the

  11. Relations among several nuclear and electronic density functional reactivity indexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrent-Sucarrat, Miquel; Luis, Josep M.; Duran, Miquel; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro; Solà, Miquel

    2003-11-01

    An expansion of the energy functional in terms of the total number of electrons and the normal coordinates within the canonical ensemble is presented. A comparison of this expansion with the expansion of the energy in terms of the total number of electrons and the external potential leads to new relations among common density functional reactivity descriptors. The formulas obtained provide explicit links between important quantities related to the chemical reactivity of a system. In particular, the relation between the nuclear and the electronic Fukui functions is recovered. The connection between the derivatives of the electronic energy and the nuclear repulsion energy with respect to the external potential offers a proof for the "Quantum Chemical le Chatelier Principle." Finally, the nuclear linear response function is defined and the relation of this function with the electronic linear response function is given.

  12. CO2 laser imaging heterodyne and phase contrast interferometer for density profile and fluctuation measurements in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, K.; Michael, C.; Akiyama, T.; Kawahata, K.; Ito, Y.; Vyacheslavov, L.N.; Sanin, A.L.; Okajima, S.

    2007-01-01

    A CO 2 laser heterodyne imaging interferometer (CO 2 HI) and a CO 2 laser phase contrast imaging interferometer (CO 2 PCI) were installed in LHD. The purpose of CO 2 HI is to measure electron density profile at high density (>1x10 20 m -3 ), where the existing far infrared laser (wavelength 118.9 μm) interferometer suffers from fringe jump due to the reduction of signal intensity caused by refraction. In the beginning of 10th LHD experimental campaign (2006-2007), sixty three three of CO 2 HI with 10 channels of YAG HI for vibration compensation, and in the later of 10th LHD experimental campaign. Eighty one channels CO 2 HI and 15 channels YAG HI became available. The purpose of CO 2 PCI is to measure turbulent fluctuation, which can contribute to the energy and particle transport. In order to get local fluctuation information, magnetic shear technique was applied with use of 48 (6 by 8) channel two dimensional detector. (author)

  13. Evaluation of alcohol outlet density and its relation with violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laranjeira Ronaldo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The current study set out to investigate alcohol availability in a densely populated, residential area of suburban São Paulo associated with high levels of social deprivation and violence. Gun-related deaths and a heavy concentration of alcohol outlets are notable features of the area surveyed. Given the strong evidence for a link between alcohol availability and a number of alcohol-related problems, including violent crime, measures designed to reduce accessibility have become a favored choice for alcohol prevention programs in recent years. METHODS: The interviewers were 24 residents of the area who were trained for the study. It was selected an area of nineteen streets, covering a total distance of 3.7 km. A profile of each alcohol outlet available on the area was recorded. RESULTS: One hundred and seven alcohol outlets were recorded. The number of other properties in the same area was counted at 1,202. Two measures of outlet density may thus be calculated: the number of outlets per kilometer of roadway (29 outlets/km; and the proportion of all properties that sold alcohol (1 in 12. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study is compared with others which are mainly from developed countries and shown that the area studied have the highest density of alcohol outlet density ever recorded in the medical literature. The implication of this data related to the violence of the region is discussed. By generating a profile of alcohol sales and selling points, it was hoped to gain a better understanding of alcohol access issues within the sample area. Future alcohol prevention policy would be well served by such knowledge.

  14. Use of Ultrasound Contrast Agents in Relation to Percutaneous Interventional Procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolsøe, Christian Pállson; Nolsøe, Alexander Bjørneboe; Klubien, Jeanett

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide an inventory of the use of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in relation to percutaneous interventional procedures. The article is structured into a systematic literature review followed by a clinical part relating to percutaneous CEUS-guided procedures...

  15. Interfacial Tension and Surface Pressure of High Density Lipoprotein, Low Density Lipoprotein, and Related Lipid Droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ollila, O. H. S.; Lamberg, A.; Lehtivaara, M.

    2012-01-01

    ) are essentially lipid droplets surrounded by specific proteins, their main function being to transport cholesterol. Interfacial tension and surface pressure of these particles are of great interest because they are related to the shape and the stability of the droplets and to protein adsorption at the interface....... Here we use coarse-grained molecular-dynamics simulations to consider a number of related issues by calculating the interfacial tension in protein-free lipid droplets, and in HDL and LDL particles mimicking physiological conditions. First, our results suggest that the curvature dependence......Lipid droplets play a central role in energy storage and metabolism on a cellular scale. Their core is comprised of hydrophobic lipids covered by a surface region consisting of amphiphilic lipids and proteins. For example, high and low density lipoproteins (HDL and LDL, respectively...

  16. Annihilation Radiation Gauge for Relative Density and Multiphase Fluid Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidal A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of the multi-phase flow parameters are important for the petroleum industry, specifically during the transport in pipelines and network related to exploitation’s wells. Crude oil flow is studied by Monte Carlo simulation and experimentally to determine transient liquid phase in a laboratory system. Relative density and fluid phase time variation is monitored employing a fast nuclear data acquisition setup that includes two large volume BaF2 scintillator detectors coupled to an electronic chain and data display in a LabView® environment. Fluid parameters are determined by the difference in count rate of coincidence pulses. The operational characteristics of the equipment indicate that 2 % deviation in the CCR corresponds to a variation, on average, of 20 % in the fraction of liquid of the multiphase fluid.

  17. Neural Computation of Surface Border Ownership and Relative Surface Depth from Ambiguous Contrast Inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresp-Langley, Birgitta; Grossberg, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The segregation of image parts into foreground and background is an important aspect of the neural computation of 3D scene perception. To achieve such segregation, the brain needs information about border ownership; that is, the belongingness of a contour to a specific surface represented in the image. This article presents psychophysical data derived from 3D percepts of figure and ground that were generated by presenting 2D images composed of spatially disjoint shapes that pointed inward or outward relative to the continuous boundaries that they induced along their collinear edges. The shapes in some images had the same contrast (black or white) with respect to the background gray. Other images included opposite contrasts along each induced continuous boundary. Psychophysical results demonstrate conditions under which figure-ground judgment probabilities in response to these ambiguous displays are determined by the orientation of contrasts only, not by their relative contrasts, despite the fact that many border ownership cells in cortical area V2 respond to a preferred relative contrast. Studies are also reviewed in which both polarity-specific and polarity-invariant properties obtain. The FACADE and 3D LAMINART models are used to explain these data. PMID:27516746

  18. Neural Computation of Surface Border Ownership and Relative Surface Depth from Ambiguous Contrast Inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresp-Langley, Birgitta; Grossberg, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The segregation of image parts into foreground and background is an important aspect of the neural computation of 3D scene perception. To achieve such segregation, the brain needs information about border ownership; that is, the belongingness of a contour to a specific surface represented in the image. This article presents psychophysical data derived from 3D percepts of figure and ground that were generated by presenting 2D images composed of spatially disjoint shapes that pointed inward or outward relative to the continuous boundaries that they induced along their collinear edges. The shapes in some images had the same contrast (black or white) with respect to the background gray. Other images included opposite contrasts along each induced continuous boundary. Psychophysical results demonstrate conditions under which figure-ground judgment probabilities in response to these ambiguous displays are determined by the orientation of contrasts only, not by their relative contrasts, despite the fact that many border ownership cells in cortical area V2 respond to a preferred relative contrast. Studies are also reviewed in which both polarity-specific and polarity-invariant properties obtain. The FACADE and 3D LAMINART models are used to explain these data.

  19. Neural computation of surface border ownership and relative surface depth from ambiguous contrast inputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitta Dresp-Langley

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The segregation of image parts into foreground and background is an important aspect of the neural computation of 3D scene perception. To achieve such segregation, the brain needs information about border ownership; that is, the belongingness of a contour to a specific surface represented in the image. This article presents psychophysical data derived from 3D percepts of figure and ground that were generated by presenting 2D images composed of spatially disjoint shapes that pointed inward or outward relative to the continuous boundaries that they induced along their collinear edges. The shapes in some images had the same contrast (black or white with respect to the background gray. Other images included opposite contrasts along each induced continuous boundary. Results demonstrate conditions under which figure-ground judgment probabilities in response to these ambiguous displays are determined by the orientation of contrasts only, not by their relative contrasts, despite the fact that many border ownership cells in cortical area V2 respond to a preferred relative contrast. Studies are also reviewed in which both polarity-specific and polarity-invariant properties obtain. The FACADE and 3D LAMINART models are used to explain these data.

  20. Toward the Prediction of Water Exchange Rates in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents: A Density Functional Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regueiro-Figueroa, Martín; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos

    2015-06-18

    We present a theoretical investigation of Gd-Owater bonds in different complexes relevant as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The analysis of the Ln-Owater distances, electron density (ρBCP), and electron localization function (ELF) at the bond critical points of [Ln(DOTA)(H2O)](-) and [Ln(DTPA-BMA)(H2O)] indicates that the strength of the Ln-Owater bonds follows the order DTPA-BMA > DOTA (M isomer) > DOTA (m isomer). The ELF values decrease along the 4f period as the Ln-Owater bonds get shorter, in line with the labile capping bond phenomenon. Extension of these calculations to other Gd(3+) complexes allowed us to correlate the experimentally observed water exchange rates and the calculated ρBCP and ELF values. The water exchange reaction becomes faster as the Gd-Owater bonds are weakened, which is reflected in longer bond distances and lower values of ρBCP and ELF. DKH2 calculations show that the two coordinated water molecules may also have significantly different (17)O hyperfine coupling constants (HFCCs).

  1. 54 relative density and distribution of tantalus monkey

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tersor

    RANGES OF SAMBISA GAME RESERVE. M. Modu*, A. A. ... density and he found a negative relationship with minimum density. .... analysis. A comprehensive computer software .... a large effect on the abundance and ranging ecology of ...

  2. The use of dilute calogen[reg] as a fat density oral contrast medium in upper abdominal computed tomography, compared with the use of water and positive oral contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsay, Duncan W.; Markham, Derrian H.; Morgan, Bruno; Rodgers, Peter M.; Liddicoat, Amanda J.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: Oral contrast media are commonly given prior to computed tomography (CT) examination of the upper abdomen. Although positive oral contrast media are normally used, there is increasing interest in using negative agents such as water and less commonly fat density products. The aim of this study was to compare a positive oral contrast medium, water, and a diluted emulsion of arachis oil (Calogen[reg], a fat density food supplement) for assessment of the upper abdomen. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-one patients referred for upper abdominal CT were randomized to receive either 500 ml water, 2% sodium diatrizoate or a dilute suspension of Calogen[reg]. The CT images were scored independently by three radiologists. Distension and anatomical identification was assessed for the stomach, duodenum and jejunum; with anatomical identification recorded for the pancreas, retroperitoneum, liver, gallbladder and spleen. RESULTS: Dilute Calogen[reg] produced a significant improvement (P < 0.01) in distension and anatomical visualization of the stomach and proximal duodenum. Only minimal differences were demonstrated between the three contrast media for visualization of more distal small bowel or identification of the other upper abdominal viscera. Significantly more artifacts were caused by positive contrast media than with the Calogen[reg] mixture. CONCLUSION: A dilute suspension of Calogen[reg] as an oral contrast medium is recommended when disease is suspected within the stomach or proximal duodenum. Ramsay, D.W. et al. (2001)

  3. Rôle of contrast media viscosity in altering vessel wall shear stress and relation to the risk of contrast extravasations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariou, Sophia; Li, Wenguang; Paul, Manosh C; Roditi, Giles

    2016-12-01

    Iodinated contrast media (CM) are the most commonly used injectables in radiology today. A range of different media are commercially available, combining various physical and chemical characteristics (ionic state, osmolality, viscosity) and thus exhibiting distinct in vivo behaviour and safety profiles. In this paper, numerical simulations of blood flow with contrast media were conducted to investigate the effects of contrast viscosity on generated vessel wall shear stress and vessel wall pressure to elucidate any possible relation to extravasations. Five different types of contrast for Iodine fluxes ranging at 1.5-2.2gI/s were modelled through 18G and 20G cannulae placed in an ideal vein at two different orientation angles. Results demonstrate that the least viscous contrast media generate the least maximum wall shear stress as well as the lowest total pressure for the same flow rate. This supports the empirical clinical observations and hypothesis that more viscous contrast media are responsible for a higher percentage of contrast extravasations. In addition, results support the clinical hypothesis that a catheter tip directed obliquely to the vein wall always produces the highest maximum wall shear stress and total pressure due to impingement of the contrast jet on the vessel wall. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Absolute and relative densities of fast-food versus other restaurants in relation to weight status: Does restaurant mix matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsky, Jane Y; Moineddin, Rahim; Dunn, James R; Glazier, Richard H; Booth, Gillian L

    2016-01-01

    Given the continuing epidemic of obesity, policymakers are increasingly looking for levers within the local retail food environment as a means of promoting healthy weights. To examine the independent and joint associations of absolute and relative densities of restaurants near home with weight status in a large, urban, population-based sample of adults. We studied 10,199 adults living in one of four cities in southern Ontario, Canada, who participated in the Canadian Community Health Survey (cycles 2005, 2007/08, 2009/10). Multivariate models assessed the association of weight status (obesity and body mass index) with absolute densities (numbers) of fast-food, full-service and other restaurants, and the relative density (proportion) of fast-food restaurants (FFR) relative to all restaurants within ~10-minute walk of residential areas. Higher numbers of restaurants of any type were inversely related to excess weight, even in models adjusting for a range of individual covariates and area deprivation. However, these associations were no longer significant after accounting for higher walkability of areas with high volumes of restaurants. In contrast, there was a direct relationship between the proportion of FFR relative to all restaurants and excess weight, particularly in areas with high volumes of FFR (e.g., odds ratio for obesity=2.55 in areas with 5+ FFR, 95% confidence interval: 1.55-4.17, across the interquartile range). Policies aiming to promote healthy weights that target the volume of certain retail food outlets in residential settings may be more effective if they also consider the relative share of outlets serving more and less healthful foods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Experimental studies on the development of Falibaryt HD, a new high density barium meal for double contrast examination of the stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietze, R.

    1985-01-01

    During the development of a new double contrast barium meal barium sulfate preparations with different densities, additives and particle size distributions were tested. Phantoms made of leather, rubber and dissected stomachs of cows and pigs. High density bariumsulfat suspension (200 - 250 % weight/volume) of low viscosity and suitable particle size spectrum containing additives improving the adherence (e.g. natrium citrate) displayed the best quality parameters for optimal imaging of the fine mucosal relief. (author)

  6. ICRF power limitation relation to density limit in ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryter, F.

    1992-01-01

    Launching high ICRF power into ASDEX plasmas required good antenna-plasma coupling. This could be achieved by sufficient electron density in front of the antennas i.e. small antenna-plasma distance (1-2 cm) and moderate to high line-averaged electron density compared to the density window in ASDEX. These are conditions eventually close to the density limit. ICRF heated discharges terminated by plasma disruptions caused by the RF pulse limited the maximum RF power which can be injected into the plasma. The disruptions occurring in these cases have clear phenomenological similarities with those observed in density limit discharges. We show in this paper that the ICRF-power limitation by plasma disruptions in ASDEX was due to reaching the density limit. (orig.)

  7. ICRF power limitation relation to density limit in ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryter, F.

    1992-01-01

    Launching high ICRF power into ASDEX plasmas required good antenna-plasma coupling. This could be achieved by sufficient electron density in front of the antennas i.e. small antenna-plasma distance (1-2 cm) and moderate to high line-averaged electron density compared to the density window in ASDEX. These are conditions eventually close to the density limit. ICRF heated discharges terminated by plasma disruptions caused by the RF pulse limited the maximum RF power which can be injected into the plasma. The disruptions occurring in these cases have clear phenomenological similarities with those observed in density limit discharges. We show in this paper that the ICRF-power limitation by plasma disruptions in ASDEX was due to reaching the density limit. (author) 3 refs., 3 figs

  8. [Observing the density increase curve after intravenous contrast medium administration using a bolus triggering system: a method for detection cardiovascular disorders?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stückle, C A; Kickuth, R; Kirchner, E M; Liermann, D; Kirchner, J

    2002-06-01

    Recently bolus tracking systems were developed to improve the timing of intravenous contrast media application in helical computed tomography. We investigated the benefit of this new method as a parameter of the cardiac function. Retrospective analysis of 64 patients which incidentally underwent bolus triggered contrast enhanced helical CT and invasive investigation of the heart within one week. All examinations were performed on the CT scanner Somatom Plus 4 Volume Zoom (Siemens Corp., Forchheim, Germany) using the C.A.R.E. Bolus software. This performs repetitive low-dose test scans (e.g. for the abdomen: 140 kV, 20 mA, Tl 0.5 s) and measures the Hounsfield attenuation (increase over the baseline) in a preselected region of interest. The displayed increase of vascular density over the time after peripheral contrast media injection (75 ml lopromid (300 mg/ml), 2 ml/s) was categorised to three types: (a) rapid increase, (b) deceleration before a 100 HE threshold was reached and (c) one or more peaks. The findings of the invasive investigation of the heart were correlated to the findings of the bolus-tracking measurements. The examinations were categorized as follows: 19 type A, 34 type B, 11 type C. We found a high significant correlation between the type of the Hounsfield attenuation and systolic pressure in the left ventricle. There was no correlation between the type of the Hounsfield attenuation and the diastolic pressure in the left ventricle, the pressures related to the right ventricle or the ejection fraction. The bolus-tacking system showed a sensitivity of 53, a specificity of 82, an accuracy of 70%, a positive predictive value of 70% and a negative predictive value of 70% in detection of left heart failure. The bolus tracking system C.A.R.E.-bolus often shows atypical Hounsfield attenuation in cases of cardiac failure but is not suitable as a screening method of the cardiopulmonary function.

  9. Relative density: the key to stocking assessment in regional analysis—a forest survey viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin D. MacLean

    1979-01-01

    Relative density is a measure of tree crowding compared to a reference level such as normal density. This stand attribute, when compared to management standards, indicates adequacy of stocking. The Pacific Coast Forest Survey Unit assesses the relative density of each stand sampled by summing the individual density contributions of each tree tallied, thus quantifying...

  10. Developmental morphology of cover crop species exhibit contrasting behaviour to changes in soil bulk density, revealed by X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr-Hersey, Jasmine E; Mooney, Sacha J; Bengough, A Glyn; Mairhofer, Stefan; Ritz, Karl

    2017-01-01

    Plant roots growing through soil typically encounter considerable structural heterogeneity, and local variations in soil dry bulk density. The way the in situ architecture of root systems of different species respond to such heterogeneity is poorly understood due to challenges in visualising roots growing in soil. The objective of this study was to visualise and quantify the impact of abrupt changes in soil bulk density on the roots of three cover crop species with contrasting inherent root morphologies, viz. tillage radish (Raphanus sativus), vetch (Vicia sativa) and black oat (Avena strigosa). The species were grown in soil columns containing a two-layer compaction treatment featuring a 1.2 g cm-3 (uncompacted) zone overlaying a 1.4 g cm-3 (compacted) zone. Three-dimensional visualisations of the root architecture were generated via X-ray computed tomography, and an automated root-segmentation imaging algorithm. Three classes of behaviour were manifest as a result of roots encountering the compacted interface, directly related to the species. For radish, there was switch from a single tap-root to multiple perpendicular roots which penetrated the compacted zone, whilst for vetch primary roots were diverted more horizontally with limited lateral growth at less acute angles. Black oat roots penetrated the compacted zone with no apparent deviation. Smaller root volume, surface area and lateral growth were consistently observed in the compacted zone in comparison to the uncompacted zone across all species. The rapid transition in soil bulk density had a large effect on root morphology that differed greatly between species, with major implications for how these cover crops will modify and interact with soil structure.

  11. Age-related contrast enhancement study of normal bone marrow in lumbar spinal MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young A; Ha, Doo Hoe

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the degree of contrast enhancement of normal bone marrow in L-spine relating to aging and to determine the range of contrast enhancement in normal bone marrow. We analyzed a total of 120 patients (20 per decade) who had undergone lumbar spinal MRI and who ranged in age from the 2nd decade to more than the 7th. Bone marrow revealed no abnormal pathology. Sagittal T1-weighted spin echo sequences were obtained before and after gadolinium administration. For each sequence, a region of interest was drawn within the L1 vertebral body from the midsagittal slice. Signal intensity (SI) values of each sequence were ascertained and the percentage increase in SI was calculated. After contrast enhancement, lumbar MRI revealed no statistically significant in the percentage increase in SI of normal bone marrow in relation to aging. Most patients (99%) however showed an SI increase of between 10% and 49%. In only four, none of whom were aged over 40, was this increase above 50%. Lumbar MRI, revealed no statistically significant difference in percentage increase in SI in normal bone marrow relating to aging, but when the increase is above 50% in a patient aged over 40, bone marrow pathology should be further investigated

  12. Suction/inspiration against resistance or standardized Mueller maneuver: a new breathing technique to improve contrast density within the pulmonary artery: a pilot CT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutzeit, Andreas [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Hirslanden Hospital St. Anna, Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Clinical Research Unit, Lucerne (Switzerland); Kantonsspital Winterthur, Department of Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); Froehlich, Johannes M.; Weymarn, Constantin von; Goyen, Matthias [Hirslanden Hospital St. Anna, Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Clinical Research Unit, Lucerne (Switzerland); Waelti, Stephan [Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Roos, Justus E. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States); Meissnitzer, Matthias; Hergan, Klaus [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Czell, David [Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Neurology, Winterthur (Switzerland); Reischauer, Carolin [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Hirslanden Hospital St. Anna, Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Clinical Research Unit, Lucerne (Switzerland)

    2015-11-15

    Our aim was to prospectively investigate whether the recently introduced suction/inspiration against resistance breathing method leads to higher computed tomography (CT) contrast density in the pulmonary artery compared to standard breathing. The present study was approved by the Medical Ethics committee and all subjects gave written informed consent. Fifteen patients, each without suspicious lung emboli, were randomly assigned to four different groups with different breathing maneuvers (suction against resistance, Valsalva, inspiration, expiration) during routine CT. Contrast enhancement in the central and peripheral sections of the pulmonary artery were measured and compared with one another. Peripheral enhancement during suction yielded increased mean densities of 138.14 Hounsfield units (HU) (p = 0.001), compared to Valsalva and a mean density of 67.97 HU superior to inspiration (p = 0.075). Finally, suction in comparison to expiration resulted in a mean increase of 30.51 HU (p = 0.42). Central parts of pulmonary arteries presented significantly increased enhancement values (95.74 HU) for suction versus the Valsalva technique (p = 0.020), while all other mean densities were in favour of suction (versus inspiration: p = 0.201; versus expiration: p = 0.790) without reaching significance. Suction/Inspiration against resistance is a promising technique to improve contrast density within pulmonary vessels, especially in the peripheral parts, in comparison to other breathing maneuvers. (orig.)

  13. The relative importance of topography and RGD ligand density for endothelial cell adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Le Saux

    Full Text Available The morphology and function of endothelial cells depends on the physical and chemical characteristics of the extracellular environment. Here, we designed silicon surfaces on which topographical features and surface densities of the integrin binding peptide arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD could be independently controlled. We used these surfaces to investigate the relative importance of the surface chemistry of ligand presentation versus surface topography in endothelial cell adhesion. We compared cell adhesion, spreading and migration on surfaces with nano- to micro-scaled pyramids and average densities of 6×10(2-6×10(11 RGD/mm(2. We found that fewer cells adhered onto rough than flat surfaces and that the optimal average RGD density for cell adhesion was 6×10(5 RGD/mm(2 on flat surfaces and substrata with nano-scaled roughness. Only on surfaces with micro-scaled pyramids did the topography hinder cell migration and a lower average RGD density was optimal for adhesion. In contrast, cell spreading was greatest on surfaces with 6×10(8 RGD/mm(2 irrespectively of presence of feature and their size. In summary, our data suggest that the size of pyramids predominately control the number of endothelial cells that adhere to the substratum but the average RGD density governs the degree of cell spreading and length of focal adhesion within adherent cells. The data points towards a two-step model of cell adhesion: the initial contact of cells with a substratum may be guided by the topography while the engagement of cell surface receptors is predominately controlled by the surface chemistry.

  14. The Impact of the Prior Density on a Minimum Relative Entropy Density: A Case Study with SPX Option Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassio Neri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We study the problem of finding probability densities that match given European call option prices. To allow prior information about such a density to be taken into account, we generalise the algorithm presented in Neri and Schneider (Appl. Math. Finance 2013 to find the maximum entropy density of an asset price to the relative entropy case. This is applied to study the impact of the choice of prior density in two market scenarios. In the first scenario, call option prices are prescribed at only a small number of strikes, and we see that the choice of prior, or indeed its omission, yields notably different densities. The second scenario is given by CBOE option price data for S&P500 index options at a large number of strikes. Prior information is now considered to be given by calibrated Heston, Schöbel–Zhu or Variance Gamma models. We find that the resulting digital option prices are essentially the same as those given by the (non-relative Buchen–Kelly density itself. In other words, in a sufficiently liquid market, the influence of the prior density seems to vanish almost completely. Finally, we study variance swaps and derive a simple formula relating the fair variance swap rate to entropy. Then we show, again, that the prior loses its influence on the fair variance swap rate as the number of strikes increases.

  15. Individual variation in cone photoreceptor density in house sparrows: implications for between-individual differences in visual resolution and chromatic contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensminger, Amanda L; Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

    2014-01-01

    Between-individual variation has been documented in a wide variety of taxa, especially for behavioral characteristics; however, intra-population variation in sensory systems has not received similar attention in wild animals. We measured a key trait of the visual system, the density of retinal cone photoreceptors, in a wild population of house sparrows (Passer domesticus). We tested whether individuals differed from each other in cone densities given within-individual variation across the retina and across eyes. We further tested whether the existing variation could lead to individual differences in two aspects of perception: visual resolution and chromatic contrast. We found consistent between-individual variation in the densities of all five types of avian cones, involved in chromatic and achromatic vision. Using perceptual modeling, we found that this degree of variation translated into significant between-individual differences in visual resolution and the chromatic contrast of a plumage signal that has been associated with mate choice and agonistic interactions. However, there was no evidence for a relationship between individual visual resolution and chromatic contrast. The implication is that some birds may have the sensory potential to perform "better" in certain visual tasks, but not necessarily in both resolution and contrast simultaneously. Overall, our findings (a) highlight the need to consider multiple individuals when characterizing sensory traits of a species, and (b) provide some mechanistic basis for between-individual variation in different behaviors (i.e., animal personalities) and for testing the predictions of several widely accepted hypotheses (e.g., honest signaling).

  16. An expression relating breaking stress and density of trabecular bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajapakse, C.S.; Thomsen, J.S.; Ortiz, J.S.E.

    2004-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is the principal diagnostic tool used in clinical settings to diagnose and monitor osteoporosis. Experimental studies on ex vivo bone samples from multiple skeletal locations have been used to propose that their breaking stress bears a power-law relationship to volumetric...

  17. Nest site preference depends on the relative density of conspecifics and heterospecifics in wild birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samplonius, Jelmer M; Kromhout Van Der Meer, Iris M; Both, Christiaan

    2017-01-01

    Social learning allows animals to eavesdrop on ecologically relevant knowledge of competitors in their environment. This is especially important when selecting a habitat if individuals have relatively little personal information on habitat quality. It is known that birds can use both conspecific and heterospecific information for social learning, but little is known about the relative importance of each information type. If provided with the choice between them, we expected that animals should copy the behaviour of conspecifics, as these confer the best information for that species. We tested this hypothesis in the field for Pied Flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca arriving at their breeding grounds to select a nest box for breeding. We assigned arbitrary symbols to nest boxes of breeding pied flycatchers (conspecifics) and blue and great tits, Cyanistes caeruleus and Parus major (heterospecifics), in 2014 and 2016 in two areas with different densities of tits and flycatchers. After ca 50% of flycatchers had returned and a flycatcher symbol was assigned to their nest box, we gave the later arriving flycatchers the choice between empty nest boxes with either a conspecific (flycatcher) or a heterospecific (tit) symbol. As expected, Pied Flycatchers copied the perceived nest box choice of conspecifics, but only in areas that were dominated by flycatchers. Against our initial expectation, flycatchers copied the perceived choice of heterospecifics in the area heavily dominated by tits, even though conspecific minority information was present. Our results confirm that the relative density of conspecifics and heterospecifics modulates the propensity to copy or reject novel behavioural traits. By contrasting conspecific and heterospecific ecology in the same study design we were able to draw more general conclusions about the role of fluctuating densities on social information use.

  18. The impact of high-density barium use in double contrast radiographic methods for gastric cancer screening in Niigata, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakai, Shizuko; Tanabe, Naohito; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2005-04-01

    Use of high-density barium (= or > 180 w/v%) has been widely spread in community-based mass screening for gastric cancer in Japan. However, the impact on outcomes of the screening has not been fully evaluated. Then, we investigated the advantage of high-density barium use by comparing the outcomes between a period with high-density barium and that with low-density barium (barium decreases the positive finding rate in initial mass screening x-ray examinations by 12% (odds ratio, 0.88; 95% confidence interval, 0.86 - 0.90) and increase the gastric cancer detection rate by diagnostic examination by 15% (odds ratio, 1.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.31). We conclude that introduction of high-density barium has improved the efficiency of mass screening for gastric cancer by decreasing unnecessary diagnostic examinations and reducing the total personal and public health costs. Thus, nationwide use of high-density barium is recommended for mass gastric cancer screening in Japan.

  19. Angiogenesis of cancer of the cervix. Contrast-enhanced dynamic MRT, histological quantification of capillary density and lymph system infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawighorst, H.; Knoop, M.V.; Zuna, I.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Essig, M.; Hoffmann, U.; Brix, G.; Kaick, G. van; Knapstein, P.G.; Weikel, W.; Schaeffer, U.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: It was the aim of this project to examine (i) the relationships between contrastenhanced dynamic MR imaging derived characteristics and histologic microvessel density counts - a recognized surrogate of tumor angiogenesis - from tumors in patients with primary or recurrent cancer of the uterine cervix, and (ii) to correlate these parameters with lymphatic involvement (i.e. lymphatic channels) to assess tumorbiological aggressiveness in terms of lymphatic spread. Results: Pharmacokinetic MR imaging derived parameters (A, k 21 ) showed a weak but signifikant (p 21 compared with histologic microvessel density, resulting in a significantly (p [de

  20. The effect of landscape heterogeneity on population density and habitat preferences of the European hare (Lepus europaeus) in contrasting farmlands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavliska, P. L.; Riegert, J.; Grill, S.; Šálek, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 88, January (2018), s. 8-15 ISSN 1616-5047 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Lepus europaeus * Field size * Agricultural policy * Conservation measures * Density-dependent habitat selection Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.429, year: 2016

  1. Classification of structurally related commercial contrast media by near infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Wai Lam; Soosainather, Tom Collin; Dyrstad, Knut; Sande, Sverre Arne

    2014-03-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a non-destructive measurement technique with broad application in pharmaceutical industry. Correct identification of pharmaceutical ingredients is an important task for quality control. Failure in this step can result in several adverse consequences, varied from economic loss to negative impact on patient safety. We have compared different methods in classification of a set of commercially available structurally related contrast media, Iodixanol (Visipaque(®)), Iohexol (Omnipaque(®)), Caldiamide Sodium and Gadodiamide (Omniscan(®)), by using NIR spectroscopy. The performance of classification models developed by soft independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and Main and Interactions of Individual Principal Components Regression (MIPCR) were compared. Different variable selection methods were applied to optimize the classification models. Models developed by backward variable elimination partial least squares regression (BVE-PLS) and MIPCR were found to be most effective for classification of the set of contrast media. Below 1.5% of samples from the independent test set were not recognized by the BVE-PLS and MIPCR models, compared to up to 15% when models developed by other techniques were applied. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Non-ionic iodinated contrast media related immediate reactions: A mechanism study of 27 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Liqin; Guo, Xiangjie; Zhang, Haoyue; Jin, Qianqian; Zeng, Qiang; Tang, Xiaoxian; Gao, Cairong

    2017-01-01

    The underlying mechanism of non-ionic iodinated contrast media-related immediate reactions was evaluated in this study. Patients presenting at least grade II immediate reactions after non-ionic iodinated contrast media injection were enrolled. Basophil activation was evaluated by flow cytometry. The plasma concentration of human terminal complement complex SC5b-9, as well as concentrations of serum chymase, tryptase, human mast cell carboxypeptidase A3, human prostaglandin D2, and total IgE were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The basophil activation percentage was significantly higher in the study group than in the control group (17.94±21.06% vs 3.45±1.49%). The plasma concentration of human terminal complement complex SC5b-9 and concentrations of serum chymase, human mast cell carboxypeptidase A3, prostaglandin D2, tryptase, and total IgE were also significantly increased (236.99±318.21 vs 49.70±30.41ng/mL, 0.41±0.49 vs 0.09±0.06ng/mL, 1.17±0.67 vs 0.30±0.17ng/mL, 203.52±137.27 vs 102.28±48.72pg/mL, 3.81±0.22 vs 2.70±0.16ng/mL, 102.00±51.84 vs 19.97±2.75ng/mL, respectively). Both mast cells and basophils were activated in non-ionic iodinated contrast media to mediate immediate hypersensitivity, and mast cells may be involved. Different mechanisms, including IgE-dependent, complement-dependent, and direct membrane effects, contributed to mast cell and basophil activation. Individual patients may use a single or combined mechanism involving single or combined mast cells and basophils. Immediate reactions following non-ionic iodinated contrast media injection may be a mechanically heterogenous disease. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. VALIDITY OF CONTRAST ENHANCED CT IN THE ASSESSMENT OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS AND ITS RELATED COMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannivanan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND In the earlier days, ultrasonogram was considered as one of the most important investigation for pancreatitis, later the clinicians started using cholangiography in acute pancreatitis, but today CT is considered as a gold standard test in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Though the sensitivity of CT in diagnosing acute pancreatitis was not studied much particularly in a mild case, but a good-quality contrast enhanced CT demonstrates distinct pancreatic and peri-pancreatic abnormalities. AIM To assess the importance of computed tomography in diagnosing acute pancreatitis and its related complications. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective study was conducted on 150 patients with clinically suspected pancreatitis. CT was performed on all the patients with Siemens Spiral CT scanner Sensation 16 slice. Oral contrast of was 1000 mL given one hour prior to the scan in the form of taking 250 mL every 15 mins. The CT severity index (CTSI and the necrosis point scoring was used to assess the severity of acute pancreatitis. All the complications related to acute pancreatitis were also assessed. RESULTS The CT analysis in the detection of acute pancreatitis showed the sensitivity of 100% and the positive predictive value of 97.3%. The severity index of acute pancreatitis based on the CT imaging had shown that majority of the patients are with moderate (60.6% level of acute pancreatitis. The necrosis point scoring showed that 54.6% of the patients had necrosis involving less than 30% of the pancreas. Among the various complications detected by CECT the commonest were pleural effusion and ascites. CONCLUSION CECT is the most important gold standard technique both for diagnosis as well as for predicting the prognosis in acute pancreatitis. The clinicians should routinely send the patient for the CT imaging whenever there is a suspicion of pancreatitis clinically.

  4. Birth weight, childhood body mass index, and height in relation to mammographic density and breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Baker, Jennifer Lyn; Bihrmann, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    High breast density, a strong predictor of breast cancer may be determined early in life. Childhood anthropometric factors have been related to breast cancer and breast density, but rarely simultaneously. We examined whether mammographic density (MD) mediates an association of birth weight, child...

  5. Relative Density of Backfilled Soil Material around Monopiles for Offshore Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Søren Peder Hyldal; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Frigaard, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The relative density of backfilled soil material around offshore monopiles is assessed through experimental testing in the Large Wave Channel (GWK) of the Coastal Research Centre (FZK) in Hannover. The relative density of the backfill material was found to vary between 65 and 80 %. The dependency...... of the relative density of backfill on the maximum pile bending moment is assessed through three-dimensional numerical modeling of a monopile foundation located at the offshore wind farm at Horns Reef, Denmark....

  6. The causal relation between turbulent particle flux and density gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milligen, B. Ph. van; Martín de Aguilera, A.; Hidalgo, C. [CIEMAT - Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Avda. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Carreras, B. A. [BACV Solutions, 110 Mohawk Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); García, L.; Nicolau, J. H. [Universidad Carlos III, 28911 Leganés, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-07-15

    A technique for detecting the causal relationship between fluctuating signals is used to investigate the relation between flux and gradient in fusion plasmas. Both a resistive pressure gradient driven turbulence model and experimental Langmuir probe data from the TJ-II stellarator are studied. It is found that the maximum influence occurs at a finite time lag (non-instantaneous response) and that quasi-periodicities exist. Furthermore, the model results show very long range radial influences, extending over most of the investigated regions, possibly related to coupling effects associated with plasma self-organization. These results clearly show that transport in fusion plasmas is not local and instantaneous, as is sometimes assumed.

  7. High energy density physics issues related to Future Circular Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N. A.; Burkart, F.; Schmidt, R.; Shutov, A.; Wollmann, D.; Piriz, A. R.

    2017-07-01

    A design study for a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator named, Future Circular Collider (FCC), is being carried out by the International Scientific Community. A complete design report is expected to be ready by spring 2018. The FCC will accelerate two counter rotating beams of 50 TeV protons in a tunnel having a length (circumference) of 100 km. Each beam will be comprised of 10 600 proton bunches, with each bunch having an intensity of 1011 protons. The bunch length is of 0.5 ns, and two neighboring bunches are separated by 25 ns. Although there is an option for 5 ns bunch separation as well, in the present studies, we consider the former case only. The total energy stored in each FCC beam is about 8.5 GJ, which is equivalent to the kinetic energy of Airbus 380 (560 t) flying at a speed of 850 km/h. Machine protection is a very important issue while operating with such powerful beams. It is important to have an estimate of the damage caused to the equipment and accelerator components due to the accidental release of a partial or total beam at a given point. For this purpose, we carried out numerical simulations of full impact of one FCC beam on an extended solid copper target. These simulations have been done employing an energy deposition code, FLUKA, and a two-dimensional hydrodynamic code, BIG2, iteratively. This study shows that although the static range of a single FCC proton and its shower is about 1.5 m in solid copper, the entire beam will penetrate around 350 m into the target. This substantial increase in the range is due to the hydrodynamic tunneling of the beam. Our calculations also show that a large part of the target will be converted into high energy density matter including warm dense matter and strongly coupled plasmas.

  8. Relations between the density matrix and thermodynamic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitanga, P.; Mundim, K.C.

    1988-01-01

    We propose to study the stability of a polyatomic molecular system in terms of the thermodynamic potential G. This enables us to establish a relation between the bond index and susceptibility tensor ∂ 2 G/∂μ i ∂ j . (author) [pt

  9. Bird Density and Distribution Patterns in Relation to Anthropogenic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the river, human activity and water quality had no clear effect on the avifauna. ... which trophic relations might be altered and community ... from the bridge to sea, dividing the river into four 200 m sections ... made of vegetation cover at ground level, 1,. 2 and 3 m ... analysed using the Shannon diversity index. H′ to obtain ...

  10. Guaiacol hydrodeoxygenation mechanism on Pt(111): insights from density functional theory and linear free energy relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyungtae; Gu, Geun Ho; Mullen, Charles A; Boateng, Akwasi A; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2015-01-01

    Density functional theory is used to study the adsorption of guaiacol and its initial hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) reactions on Pt(111). Previous Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) correlations for small open-chain molecules are inadequate in estimating the reaction barriers of phenolic compounds except for the side group (methoxy) carbon-dehydrogenation. New BEP relations are established using a select group of phenolic compounds. These relations are applied to construct a potential-energy surface of guaiacol-HDO to catechol. Analysis shows that catechol is mainly produced via dehydrogenation of the methoxy functional group followed by the CHx (x<3) removal of the functional group and hydrogenation of the ring carbon, in contrast to a hypothesis of a direct demethylation path. Dehydroxylation and demethoxylation are slow, implying that phenol is likely produced from catechol but not through its direct dehydroxylation followed by aromatic carbon-ring hydrogenation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. 3D CT cerebral angiography technique using a 320-detector machine with a time–density curve and low contrast medium volume: Comparison with fixed time delay technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, K.; Biswas, S.; Roughley, S.; Bhojak, M.; Niven, S.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To describe a cerebral computed tomography angiography (CTA) technique using a 320-detector CT machine and a small contrast medium volume (35 ml, 15 ml for test bolus). Also, to compare the quality of these images with that of the images acquired using a larger contrast medium volume (90 or 120 ml) and a fixed time delay (FTD) of 18 s using a 16-detector CT machine. Materials and methods: Cerebral CTA images were acquired using a 320-detector machine by synchronizing the scanning time with the time of peak enhancement as determined from the time–density curve (TDC) using a test bolus dose. The quality of CTA images acquired using this technique was compared with that obtained using a FTD of 18 s (by 16-detector CT), retrospectively. Average densities in four different intracranial arteries, overall opacification of arteries, and the degree of venous contamination were graded and compared. Results: Thirty-eight patients were scanned using the TDC technique and 40 patients using the FTD technique. The arterial densities achieved by the TDC technique were higher (significant for supraclinoid and basilar arteries, p < 0.05). The proportion of images deemed as having “good” arterial opacification was 95% for TDC and 90% for FTD. The degree of venous contamination was significantly higher in images produced by the FTD technique (p < 0.001%). Conclusion: Good diagnostic quality CTA images with significant reduction of venous contamination can be achieved with a low contrast medium dose using a 320-detector machine by coupling the time of data acquisition with the time of peak enhancement

  12. Referring Physicians' Tendency to Collaborate With Radiologists in Managing Contrast Media-Related Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İmamoğlu, Hakan; Doğan, Serap; Erdoğan, Nuri

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the tendency of referring physicians to collaborate with radiologists in managing contrast media (CM)-related risk factors. The study was conducted at a single academic hospital. Among 150 referring physicians from various specialties, 51 referring physicians (34%) responded to the invitation letter asking for an interview with a radiologist. During the interview, a modified form of the Control Preferences Scale was administered, in which there were five preferences (each displayed on a separate card) that ranged from the fully active to fully passive involvement of referring physicians in managing CM-related risk factors. A descriptive analysis was performed through categorization of the results depending on the respondents' two most preferred roles. Thirty-six referring physicians (70.5%) preferred a collaborative role, and 15 (29.4%) preferred a noncollaborative role (i.e., remained on either the fully active or fully passive side). Among the referring physicians who preferred a collaborative role, the most common response (n = 15 [29.4%]) was collaborative-active. Referring physicians at the authors' institution have basic cognitive and motivational-affective tone toward collaboration in future teamwork aimed at the management of CM-related risk factors. A modified form of the Control Preferences Scale, as in this study, can be used to investigate the tendency of referring physicians to collaborate with radiologists. The results are discussed from ethical and legal perspectives. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. An experimental study on renal damage induced by ionic contrast media in relation to iodine concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Dong Wook; Yoon, Yup; Lim, Jae Hoon; Yang, Moon Ho

    1990-01-01

    Renal injury caused by iodinated contrast media has been widely known, but there has been few papers regarding the pathological change. A series of kidneys after injection of iodinated contrast media was examined to document pathological change. A total of 80 rats was divided into two groups; those given Urografin-60% by 5ml/kg; those given Urografin-76% by 5ml/kg. The kidneys were removed out 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14 and 21 days after injection of contrast media and microscopically examined. The resulted were as follows: 1. Pathological changes induced by ionic contrast media were deposition of proteinaceous materials in the proximal convoluted tubules, congestion of interstitial vessels, and vasa rectae, and epithelial degeneration of collecting ducts. There was no detectable pathological changes in the glomerulus, loop of Henle, and distal convoluted tubules. 2. All pathological changes were severe, as the concentration of contrast media increased. 3. These pathologic changes appeared 1 day after injection of contrast media and persisted at least 3 weeks without improvement. Author concludes that the renal damage induced by ionic contrast media becomes severe with increase in concentration, and pathologic changes are not influence with time interval

  14. Feed intake as explanation for density related growth differences of common sole Solea solea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ivar; Steenfeldt, Svend Jørgen; Herrmann, Bent

    2013-01-01

    correlated to both fish size and individual SGR. Feed conversion ratio was likewise positively correlated to feed intake. The relative feed intake (g feed g fish−1) was not correlated to fish size at any density tested, but was significantly highest for the LD population. This explains a substantial part......Growth of common sole Solea solea is negatively correlated to density, which affects productivity in culture and hence commercial success. Studies of individual feed intake were performed to examine growth and population dynamics at different densities. Three initial stocking densities: 1.0, 2.......1 and 3.9 kg m−2 of individually tagged sole, referred to as low density (LD), medium density and high density HD), were examined during 145 days. Despite that tank productivity (g m−2 day−1), was highest for the HD group, the specific growth rate (SGR) decreased significantly with increase in stocking...

  15. Age-related differences in skeletal muscle microvascular response to exercise as detected by contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Wulf; Schwarzbach, Hans; Pardun, Anita; Hannemann, Lena; Bogs, Björn; König, Alexander M; Mahnken, Andreas H; Hildebrandt, Olaf; Koehler, Ulrich; Kinscherf, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Aging involves reductions in exercise total limb blood flow and exercise capacity. We hypothesized that this may involve early age-related impairments of skeletal muscle microvascular responsiveness as previously reported for insulin but not for exercise stimuli in humans. Using an isometric exercise model, we studied the effect of age on contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) parameters, i.e. microvascular blood volume (MBV), flow velocity (MFV) and blood flow (MBF) calculated from replenishment of Sonovue contrast-agent microbubbles after their destruction. CEUS was applied to the vastus lateralis (VLat) and intermedius (VInt) muscle in 15 middle-aged (MA, 43.6±1.5 years) and 11 young (YG, 24.1±0.6 years) healthy males before, during, and after 2 min of isometric knee extension at 15% of peak torque (PT). In addition, total leg blood flow as recorded by femoral artery Doppler-flow. Moreover, fiber-type-specific and overall capillarisation as well as fiber composition were additionally assessed in Vlat biopsies obtained from CEUS site. MA and YG had similar quadriceps muscle MRT-volume or PT and maximal oxygen uptake as well as a normal cardiovascular risk factors and intima-media-thickness. During isometric exercise MA compared to YG reached significantly lower levels in MFV (0.123±0.016 vs. 0.208±0.036 a.u.) and MBF (0.007±0.001 vs. 0.012±0.002 a.u.). In the VInt the (post-occlusive hyperemia) post-exercise peaks in MBV and MBF were significantly lower in MA vs. YG. Capillary density, capillary fiber contacts and femoral artery Doppler were similar between MA and YG. In the absence of significant age-related reductions in capillarisation, total leg blood flow or muscle mass, healthy middle-aged males reveal impaired skeletal muscle microcirculatory responses to isometric exercise. Whether this limits isometric muscle performance remains to be assessed.

  16. Age-related differences in skeletal muscle microvascular response to exercise as detected by contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wulf Hildebrandt

    Full Text Available Aging involves reductions in exercise total limb blood flow and exercise capacity. We hypothesized that this may involve early age-related impairments of skeletal muscle microvascular responsiveness as previously reported for insulin but not for exercise stimuli in humans.Using an isometric exercise model, we studied the effect of age on contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS parameters, i.e. microvascular blood volume (MBV, flow velocity (MFV and blood flow (MBF calculated from replenishment of Sonovue contrast-agent microbubbles after their destruction. CEUS was applied to the vastus lateralis (VLat and intermedius (VInt muscle in 15 middle-aged (MA, 43.6±1.5 years and 11 young (YG, 24.1±0.6 years healthy males before, during, and after 2 min of isometric knee extension at 15% of peak torque (PT. In addition, total leg blood flow as recorded by femoral artery Doppler-flow. Moreover, fiber-type-specific and overall capillarisation as well as fiber composition were additionally assessed in Vlat biopsies obtained from CEUS site. MA and YG had similar quadriceps muscle MRT-volume or PT and maximal oxygen uptake as well as a normal cardiovascular risk factors and intima-media-thickness.During isometric exercise MA compared to YG reached significantly lower levels in MFV (0.123±0.016 vs. 0.208±0.036 a.u. and MBF (0.007±0.001 vs. 0.012±0.002 a.u.. In the VInt the (post-occlusive hyperemia post-exercise peaks in MBV and MBF were significantly lower in MA vs. YG. Capillary density, capillary fiber contacts and femoral artery Doppler were similar between MA and YG.In the absence of significant age-related reductions in capillarisation, total leg blood flow or muscle mass, healthy middle-aged males reveal impaired skeletal muscle microcirculatory responses to isometric exercise. Whether this limits isometric muscle performance remains to be assessed.

  17. T1 weighted brain images at 7 Tesla unbiased for Proton Density, T2* contrast and RF coil receive B1 sensitivity with simultaneous vessel visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Moortele, Pierre-François; Auerbach, Edwards J; Olman, Cheryl; Yacoub, Essa; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Moeller, Steen

    2009-06-01

    At high magnetic field, MR images exhibit large, undesirable signal intensity variations commonly referred to as "intensity field bias". Such inhomogeneities mostly originate from heterogeneous RF coil B(1) profiles and, with no appropriate correction, are further pronounced when utilizing rooted sum of square reconstruction with receive coil arrays. These artifacts can significantly alter whole brain high resolution T(1)-weighted (T(1)w) images that are extensively utilized for clinical diagnosis, for gray/white matter segmentation as well as for coregistration with functional time series. In T(1) weighted 3D-MPRAGE sequences, it is possible to preserve a bulk amount of T(1) contrast through space by using adiabatic inversion RF pulses that are insensitive to transmit B(1) variations above a minimum threshold. However, large intensity variations persist in the images, which are significantly more difficult to address at very high field where RF coil B(1) profiles become more heterogeneous. Another characteristic of T(1)w MPRAGE sequences is their intrinsic sensitivity to Proton Density and T(2)(*) contrast, which cannot be removed with post-processing algorithms utilized to correct for receive coil sensitivity. In this paper, we demonstrate a simple technique capable of producing normalized, high resolution T(1)w 3D-MPRAGE images that are devoid of receive coil sensitivity, Proton Density and T(2)(*) contrast. These images, which are suitable for routinely obtaining whole brain tissue segmentation at 7 T, provide higher T(1) contrast specificity than standard MPRAGE acquisitions. Our results show that removing the Proton Density component can help in identifying small brain structures and that T(2)(*) induced artifacts can be removed from the images. The resulting unbiased T(1)w images can also be used to generate Maximum Intensity Projection angiograms, without additional data acquisition, that are inherently registered with T(1)w structural images. In addition

  18. T1 weighted Brain Images at 7 Tesla Unbiased for Proton Density, T2* contrast and RF Coil Receive B1 Sensitivity with Simultaneous Vessel Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Moortele, Pierre-François; Auerbach, Edwards J.; Olman, Cheryl; Yacoub, Essa; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Moeller, Steen

    2009-01-01

    At high magnetic field, MR images exhibit large, undesirable signal intensity variations commonly referred to as “intensity field bias”. Such inhomogeneities mostly originate from heterogeneous RF coil B1 profiles and, with no appropriate correction, are further pronounced when utilizing rooted sum of square reconstruction with receive coil arrays. These artifacts can significantly alter whole brain high resolution T1-weighted (T1w) images that are extensively utilized for clinical diagnosis, for gray/white matter segmentation as well as for coregistration with functional time series. In T1 weighted 3D-MPRAGE sequences, it is possible to preserve a bulk amount of T1 contrast through space by using adiabatic inversion RF pulses that are insensitive to transmit B1 variations above a minimum threshold. However, large intensity variations persist in the images, which are significantly more difficult to address at very high field where RF coil B1 profiles become more heterogeneous. Another characteristic of T1w MPRAGE sequences is their intrinsic sensitivity to Proton Density and T2* contrast, which cannot be removed with post-processing algorithms utilized to correct for receive coil sensitivity. In this paper, we demonstrate a simple technique capable of producing normalized, high resolution T1w 3D-MPRAGE images that are devoid of receive coil sensitivity, Proton Density and T2* contrast. These images, which are suitable for routinely obtaining whole brain tissue segmentation at 7 Tesla, provide higher T1 contrast specificity than standard MPRAGE acquisitions. Our results show that removing the Proton Density component can help identifying small brain structures and that T2* induced artifacts can be removed from the images. The resulting unbiased T1w images can also be used to generate Maximum Intensity Projection angiograms, without additional data acquisition, that are inherently registered with T1w structural images. In addition, we introduce a simple technique

  19. Banks-Casher-type relation for the BCS gap at high density

    OpenAIRE

    Kanazawa, Takuya; Wettig, Tilo; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    We derive a new Banks-Casher-type relation which relates the density of complex Dirac eigenvalues at the origin to the BCS gap of quarks at high density. Our relation is applicable to QCD and QCD-like theories without a sign problem, such as two-color QCD and adjoint QCD with baryon chemical potential, and QCD with isospin chemical potential. It provides us with a method to measure the BCS gap through the Dirac spectrum on the lattice.

  20. Measurements relating fire radiative energy density and surface fuel consumption - RxCADRE 2011 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew T. Hudak; Matthew B. Dickinson; Benjamin C. Bright; Robert L. Kremens; E. Louise Loudermilk; Joseph J. O' Brien; Benjamin S. Hornsby; Roger D. Ottmar

    2016-01-01

    Small-scale experiments have demonstrated that fire radiative energy is linearly related to fuel combusted but such a relationship has not been shown at the landscape level of prescribed fires. This paper presents field and remotely sensed measures of pre-fire fuel loads, consumption, fire radiative energy density (FRED) and fire radiative power flux density (FRFD),...

  1. Local relative density modulates failure and strength in vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Siddhartha; Mohan, Nisha; Decolvenaere, Elizabeth; Needleman, Alan; Bedewy, Mostafa; Hart, A John; Greer, Julia R

    2013-10-22

    Micromechanical experiments, image analysis, and theoretical modeling revealed that local failure events and compressive stresses of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) were uniquely linked to relative density gradients. Edge detection analysis of systematically obtained scanning electron micrographs was used to quantify a microstructural figure-of-merit related to relative local density along VACNT heights. Sequential bottom-to-top buckling and hardening in stress-strain response were observed in samples with smaller relative density at the bottom. When density gradient was insubstantial or reversed, bottom regions always buckled last, and a flat stress plateau was obtained. These findings were consistent with predictions of a 2D material model based on a viscoplastic solid with plastic non-normality and a hardening-softening-hardening plastic flow relation. The hardening slope in compression generated by the model was directly related to the stiffness gradient along the sample height, and hence to the local relative density. These results demonstrate that a microstructural figure-of-merit, the effective relative density, can be used to quantify and predict the mechanical response.

  2. Cone photopigment in older subjects: decreased optical density in early age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Ann E.; Burns, Stephen A.; Weiter, John J.

    2002-01-01

    We measured changes to cone photoreceptors in patients with early age-related macular degeneration. The data of 53 patients were compared with normative data for color matching measurements of long- and middle-wavelength-sensitive cones in the central macula. A four-parameter model quantified cone photopigment optical density and kinetics. Cone photopigment optical density was on average less for the patients than for normal subjects and was uncorrelated with visual acuity. More light was needed to reduce the photopigment density by 50% in the steady state for patients. These results imply that cone photopigment optical density is reduced by factors other than slowed kinetics.

  3. Observer variability of absolute and relative thrombus density measurements in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Emilie M.M.; Yoo, Albert J.; Beenen, Ludo F.; Majoie, Charles B.; Berkhemer, Olvert A.; Blanken, Mark D. den; Wismans, Carrie; Niessen, Wiro J.; Marquering, Henk A.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombus density may be a predictor for acute ischemic stroke treatment success. However, only limited data on observer variability for thrombus density measurements exist. This study assesses the variability and bias of four common thrombus density measurement methods by expert and non-expert observers. For 132 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke, three experts and two trained observers determined thrombus density by placing three standardized regions of interest (ROIs) in the thrombus and corresponding contralateral arterial segment. Subsequently, absolute and relative thrombus densities were determined using either one or three ROIs. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was determined, and Bland-Altman analysis was performed to evaluate interobserver and intermethod agreement. Accuracy of the trained observer was evaluated with a reference expert observer using the same statistical analysis. The highest interobserver agreement was obtained for absolute thrombus measurements using three ROIs (ICCs ranging from 0.54 to 0.91). In general, interobserver agreement was lower for relative measurements, and for using one instead of three ROIs. Interobserver agreement of trained non-experts and experts was similar. Accuracy of the trained observer measurements was comparable to the expert interobserver agreement and was better for absolute measurements and with three ROIs. The agreement between the one ROI and three ROI methods was good. Absolute thrombus density measurement has superior interobserver agreement compared to relative density measurement. Interobserver variation is smaller when multiple ROIs are used. Trained non-expert observers can accurately and reproducibly assess absolute thrombus densities using three ROIs. (orig.)

  4. Observer variability of absolute and relative thrombus density measurements in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Emilie M.M. [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Yoo, Albert J. [Texas Stroke Institute, Plano, TX (United States); Beenen, Ludo F.; Majoie, Charles B. [Department of Radiology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Berkhemer, Olvert A. [Department of Radiology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Neurology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Blanken, Mark D. den; Wismans, Carrie [AMC, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Niessen, Wiro J. [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft (Netherlands); Marquering, Henk A. [Department of Radiology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); AMC, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Collaboration: on behalf of the MR CLEAN investigators

    2016-02-15

    Thrombus density may be a predictor for acute ischemic stroke treatment success. However, only limited data on observer variability for thrombus density measurements exist. This study assesses the variability and bias of four common thrombus density measurement methods by expert and non-expert observers. For 132 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke, three experts and two trained observers determined thrombus density by placing three standardized regions of interest (ROIs) in the thrombus and corresponding contralateral arterial segment. Subsequently, absolute and relative thrombus densities were determined using either one or three ROIs. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was determined, and Bland-Altman analysis was performed to evaluate interobserver and intermethod agreement. Accuracy of the trained observer was evaluated with a reference expert observer using the same statistical analysis. The highest interobserver agreement was obtained for absolute thrombus measurements using three ROIs (ICCs ranging from 0.54 to 0.91). In general, interobserver agreement was lower for relative measurements, and for using one instead of three ROIs. Interobserver agreement of trained non-experts and experts was similar. Accuracy of the trained observer measurements was comparable to the expert interobserver agreement and was better for absolute measurements and with three ROIs. The agreement between the one ROI and three ROI methods was good. Absolute thrombus density measurement has superior interobserver agreement compared to relative density measurement. Interobserver variation is smaller when multiple ROIs are used. Trained non-expert observers can accurately and reproducibly assess absolute thrombus densities using three ROIs. (orig.)

  5. Ionization Potentials of Chemical Warfare Agents and Related Compounds Determined with Density Functional Theory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wright, J

    2000-01-01

    ...) agents at contaminated sites. Reported herein are theoretical ionization potentials for CW agents and their related compounds calculated using density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,p) level of theory...

  6. Fragmentation of massive dense cores down to ≲ 1000 AU: Relation between fragmentation and density structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palau, Aina; Girart, Josep M.; Estalella, Robert; Fuente, Asunción; Fontani, Francesco; Sánchez-Monge, Álvaro; Commerçon, Benoit; Hennebelle, Patrick; Busquet, Gemma; Bontemps, Sylvain; Zapata, Luis A.; Zhang, Qizhou; Di Francesco, James

    2014-01-01

    In order to shed light on the main physical processes controlling fragmentation of massive dense cores, we present a uniform study of the density structure of 19 massive dense cores, selected to be at similar evolutionary stages, for which their relative fragmentation level was assessed in a previous work. We inferred the density structure of the 19 cores through a simultaneous fit of the radial intensity profiles at 450 and 850 μm (or 1.2 mm in two cases) and the spectral energy distribution, assuming spherical symmetry and that the density and temperature of the cores decrease with radius following power-laws. Even though the estimated fragmentation level is strictly speaking a lower limit, its relative value is significant and several trends could be explored with our data. We find a weak (inverse) trend of fragmentation level and density power-law index, with steeper density profiles tending to show lower fragmentation, and vice versa. In addition, we find a trend of fragmentation increasing with density within a given radius, which arises from a combination of flat density profile and high central density and is consistent with Jeans fragmentation. We considered the effects of rotational-to-gravitational energy ratio, non-thermal velocity dispersion, and turbulence mode on the density structure of the cores, and found that compressive turbulence seems to yield higher central densities. Finally, a possible explanation for the origin of cores with concentrated density profiles, which are the cores showing no fragmentation, could be related with a strong magnetic field, consistent with the outcome of radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

  7. Fragmentation of massive dense cores down to ≲ 1000 AU: Relation between fragmentation and density structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, Aina; Girart, Josep M. [Institut de Ciències de l' Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB-Facultat de Ciències, Torre C5-parell 2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalunya (Spain); Estalella, Robert [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia (IEEC-UB), Institut de Ciències del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fuente, Asunción [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, P.O. Box 112, E-28803 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Fontani, Francesco; Sánchez-Monge, Álvaro [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, INAF, Lago E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Commerçon, Benoit; Hennebelle, Patrick [Laboratoire de Radioastronomie, UMR CNRS 8112, École Normale Supérieure et Observatoire de Paris, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Busquet, Gemma [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Area di Recerca di Tor Vergata, Via Fosso Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Bontemps, Sylvain [Université de Bordeaux, LAB, UMR 5804, F-33270 Floirac (France); Zapata, Luis A. [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, P.O. Box 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Zhang, Qizhou [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Di Francesco, James, E-mail: palau@ieec.uab.es [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 355, STN CSC, Victoria, BC, V8W 3P6 (Canada)

    2014-04-10

    In order to shed light on the main physical processes controlling fragmentation of massive dense cores, we present a uniform study of the density structure of 19 massive dense cores, selected to be at similar evolutionary stages, for which their relative fragmentation level was assessed in a previous work. We inferred the density structure of the 19 cores through a simultaneous fit of the radial intensity profiles at 450 and 850 μm (or 1.2 mm in two cases) and the spectral energy distribution, assuming spherical symmetry and that the density and temperature of the cores decrease with radius following power-laws. Even though the estimated fragmentation level is strictly speaking a lower limit, its relative value is significant and several trends could be explored with our data. We find a weak (inverse) trend of fragmentation level and density power-law index, with steeper density profiles tending to show lower fragmentation, and vice versa. In addition, we find a trend of fragmentation increasing with density within a given radius, which arises from a combination of flat density profile and high central density and is consistent with Jeans fragmentation. We considered the effects of rotational-to-gravitational energy ratio, non-thermal velocity dispersion, and turbulence mode on the density structure of the cores, and found that compressive turbulence seems to yield higher central densities. Finally, a possible explanation for the origin of cores with concentrated density profiles, which are the cores showing no fragmentation, could be related with a strong magnetic field, consistent with the outcome of radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

  8. Cyclil Oxidation Behaviors of MoSi2 with Different Relative Density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Jianhui; ZHANG Houan; TANG Siwen; XU Jianguang

    2008-01-01

    The influence of different relative density on the cyclic oxidation behaviors of MoSi2 at 1 273 K were studied. "Pesting" was not found in all MoSi2 materials after being oxidized for 480 h. All samples exhibited continuous mass gain during the oxidation process. The mass gains of MoSi2 with the lowest relative density (78.6%) and the highest relative density (94.8%) are increased by 8.15 mg·cm2 and 3.48 mg·cm-2, respectively. The surface of the material with lower relative density formed a loose, porous and discontinuous oxidation scale, which accelerated oxygen diffusion and aggravated the oxidation process. However, a dense scale in the material with higher relative density is formed, which acts a diffusion barrier to the oxygen atoms penetrating into the matrix. The high temperature oxidation resistance of MoSi2 can be improved by increasing its relative density.

  9. Are energy-dense foods really cheaper? Reexamining the relation between food price and energy density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsky, Leah M

    2009-11-01

    The inverse relation between energy density (kcal/g) and energy cost (price/kcal) has been interpreted to suggest that produce (fruit, vegetables) is more expensive than snacks (cookies, chips). The objective of this study was to show the methodologic weakness of comparing energy density with energy cost. The relation between energy density and energy cost was replicated in a random-number data set. Additionally, observational data were collected for produce and snacks from an online supermarket. Variables included total energy (kcal), total weight (g), total number of servings, serving size (g/serving), and energy density (kcal/g). Price measures included energy cost ($/kcal), total price ($), unit price ($/g), and serving price ($/serving). Two-tailed t tests were used to compare price measures by food category. Relations between energy density and price measures within food categories were examined with the use of Spearman rank correlation analysis. The relation between energy density and energy cost was shown to be driven by the algebraic properties of these variables. Food category was strongly correlated with both energy density and food price measures. Energy cost was higher for produce than for snacks. However, total price and unit price were lower for produce. Serving price and serving size were greater for produce than for snacks. Within food categories, energy density was uncorrelated with most measures of food price, except for a weak positive correlation with serving price within the produce category. The findings suggest the relation between energy density and food price is confounded by food category and depends on which measure of price is used.

  10. Digital evaluation of the influence of interruption of the fixation process on radiographic contrast and base-plus-fog density in three commercial brands of radiographic films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Verona Ragusa da Silva

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : With the interest in anticipating access to the result of intraoral radiography, the radiographic processing is frequently neglected, compromising image quality. OBJECTIVE : The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of interrupting the fixation process on the radiographic contrast and base-plus-fog density (BPFD in three brands of periapical films. MATERIAL AND METHOD : Ninety radiographs were taken of an aluminum stepwedge and a lead plate for each brand, and they were divided according to the time of initial immersion in the fixative in: control group (without interrupting the fixing, 5, 10, 20, 30 and 40 seconds. During processing, films had the fixing stage stopped and were exposed to a negatoscope for 1 minute, then the fixation time of 10 minutes was completed. The radiographs were digitized and exported to Image Tool 3.0.software. RESULT : Kodak(r film showed no statistically significant differences between groups, while Agfa(r film presented difference in BPFD compared with Group 5 seconds, and Dentix(r film showed statistical difference in all groups in comparison with the control group. CONCLUSION : Under the conditions studied, Kodak(r film is not influenced by disruption of fixation as regards BPFD and image contrast, enabling early access to the results of radiographs, whereas Agfa(r film requires at least 10 seconds of initial fixation, and Dentix(r film obtains better results when the process of fixation is not interrupted.

  11. Production of litter and detritus related to the density of mangrove

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budi Mulya, Miswar; Arlen, HJ

    2018-03-01

    Research about the production of leaf litter and detritus related to the density of mangrove trees has been done. The aims of this research are to know and analyze the amount of litter and detritus produced to the density of mangrove trees. The production and collection of leaf litter were carried out in five stations. Production of detritus and decomposition rate were calculated by measuring its dry weight. The density and level of mangrove trees were determined using transect quadratic method. The relationship between the leaf litter and detritus production ratio related to mangrove density were then analyzed. Results showed that mangrove trees with the density of 766.67 ind ha‑1 ccould produce the amount of litter and detritus to about 28597.33 gha‑1day‑1and 1099.35 gha‑1day‑1 while mangrove trees with the density of 1300 ind ha‑1 could produce the amount of litter and detritus to about 35093.33 g/ha/day and 1216.68 gha‑1day‑1 respectively. Data analysis showed that the increment of mangrove density is linearly related to the production increment of litter and detritus.

  12. Seasonal photosynthesis and water relations of juvenile loblolly pine relative to stand density and canopy position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhenmin Tang; Jim L. Chambers; Mary A. Sword Sayer; James P. Barnett

    2003-01-01

    To assess the effects of stand density and canopy environment on tree physiology, we measured gas exchange responses of the same needle age class of 16-year-old loblolly pines (Pinus taeda L.) in thinned (512 trees ha-1) and non-thinned treatment plots (2,863 trees ha-1) in central Louisiana....

  13. Breast density and mode of detection in relation to breast cancer specific survival: a cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Åsa; Sartor, Hanna; Borgquist, Signe; Zackrisson, Sophia; Manjer, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine breast density in relation to breast cancer specific survival and to assess if this potential association was modified by mode of detection. An additional aim was to study whether the established association between mode of detection and survival is modified by breast density. The study included 619 cases from a prospective cohort, The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. Breast density estimated qualitatively, was analyzed in relation to breast cancer death, in non-symptomatic and symptomatic women, using Cox regression calculating hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals. Adjustments were made in several steps for; diagnostic age, tumour size, axillary lymph node involvement, grade, hormone receptor status, body mass index (baseline), diagnostic period, use of hormone replacement therapy at diagnosis and mode of detection. Detection mode in relation to survival was analyzed stratified for breast density. Differences in HR following different adjustments were analyzed by Freedmans%. After adjustment for age and other prognostic factors, women with dense, as compared to fatty breasts, had an increased risk of breast cancer death, HR 2.56:1.07-6.11, with a statistically significant trend over density categories, p = 0.04. In the stratified analysis, the effect was less pronounced in non-symptomatic women, HR 2.04:0.49-8.49 as compared to symptomatic, HR 3.40:1.06-10.90. In the unadjusted model, symptomatic women had a higher risk of breast cancer death, regardless of breast density. Analyzed by Freedmans%, age, tumour size, lymph nodes, grade, diagnostic period, ER and PgR explained 55.5% of the observed differences in mortality between non-symptomatic and symptomatic cases. Additional adjustment for breast density caused only a minor change. High breast density at diagnosis may be associated with decreased breast cancer survival. This association appears to be stronger in women with symptomatic cancers but breast density could

  14. Performance of tablet disintegrants: impact of storage conditions and relative tablet density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quodbach, Julian; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Tablet disintegration can be influenced by several parameters, such as storage conditions, type and amount of disintegrant, and relative tablet density. Even though these parameters have been mentioned in the literature, the understanding of the disintegration process is limited. In this study, water uptake and force development of disintegrating tablets are analyzed, as they reveal underlying processes and interactions. Measurements were performed on dibasic calcium phosphate tablets containing seven different disintegrants stored at different relative humidities (5-97%), and on tablets containing disintegrants with different mechanisms of action (swelling and shape recovery), compressed to different relative densities. Disintegration times of tablets containing sodium starch glycolate are affected most by storage conditions, which is displayed in decreased water uptake and force development kinetics. Disintegration times of tablets with a swelling disintegrant are only marginally affected by relative tablet density, whereas the shape recovery disintegrant requires high relative densities for quick disintegration. The influence of relative tablet density on the kinetics of water uptake and force development greatly depends on the mechanism of action. Acquired data allows a detailed analysis of the influence of storage conditions and mechanisms of action on disintegration behavior.

  15. Relation between plasma plume density and gas flow velocity in atmospheric pressure plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Taka, Shogo; Ogura, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and copper foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. To study the properties of the plasma plume, the plasma plume current is estimated from the difference in currents on the circuit, and the drift velocity is measured using a photodetector. The relation of the plasma plume density n plu , which is estimated from the current and the drift velocity, and the gas flow velocity v gas is examined. It is found that the dependence of the density on the gas flow velocity has relations of n plu ∝ log(v gas ). However, the plasma plume density in the laminar flow is higher than that in the turbulent flow. Consequently, in the laminar flow, the density increases with increasing the gas flow velocity

  16. Influence of relative density on the cyclic shear strength of sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arab A.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a laboratory study of the influence of relative density on the liquefaction potential of a soil. The study is based on undrained triaxial tests that were performed on samples with relative density Id = 0.15, 0.5 and 0.65. The article is composed of three parts. First, we present the materials and characteristics of the studied sands. the second part deals with the procedure and the device used. The third part studies the influence of the relative density on the liquefaction potential of the three sands (Hostun Rf, Chlef and Rass. This study also makes it possible to explore the influence of granulometry on the liquefaction potential. The results of the tests show that concordant results have been obtained which clearly show that the increase of the relative density leads to a significant improvement in the resistance to liquefaction of the sands. This effect is very significant when the initial relative density Id = 0.50 to Id = 0.65.

  17. Differential activation of genes related to aluminium tolerance in two contrasting rice cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roselló, Maite; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Gunsé, Benet; Barceló, Juan; Llugany, Mercè

    2015-11-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is a highly Al-tolerant crop. Among other mechanisms, a higher expression of STAR1/STAR2 (sensitive to Al rhizotoxicity1/2) genes and of Nrat1 (NRAMP Aluminium Transporter 1), and ALS1 (Aluminium sensitive 1) can at least in part be responsible for the inducible Al tolerance in this species. Here we analysed the responses to Al in two contrasting rice varieties. All analysed toxicity/tolerance markers (root elongation, Evans blue, morin and haematoxylin staining) indicated higher Al-tolerance in variety Nipponbare, than in variety Modan. Nipponbare accumulated much less Al in the roots than Modan. Aluminium supply caused stronger expression of STAR1 in Nipponbare than in Modan. A distinctively higher increase of Al-induced abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation was found in the roots of Nipponbare than in Modan. Highest ABA levels were observed in Nipponbare after 48 h exposure to Al. This ABA peak was coincident in time with the highest expression level of STAR1. It is proposed that ABA may be required for cell wall remodulation facilitated by the enhanced UDP-glucose transport to the walls through STAR1/STAR2. Contrastingly, in the roots of Modan the expression of both Nrat1 coding for a plasma membrane Al-transporter and of ALS1 coding for a tonoplast-localized Al transporter was considerably enhanced. Moreover, Modan had a higher Al-induced expression of ASR1 a gene that has been proposed to code for a reactive oxygen scavenging protein. In conclusion, the Al-exclusion strategy of Nipponbare, at least in part mediated by STAR1 and probably regulated by ABA, provided better protection against Al toxicity than the accumulation and internal detoxification strategy of Modan mediated by Nrat1, ALS1 and ARS1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Fate of High-Density Lesions on the Non-contrast CT Obtained Immediately After Intra-arterial Thrombolysis in Ischemic Stroke Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Yu Mi; Lee, Deok Hee; Kim, Ho Sung; Ryu, Chang Woo; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Choi, Choong Gon; Kim, Sang Joon; Suh, Dae Chul

    2006-01-01

    Hyperdense lesions can frequently be observed on the CT obtained immediately after intra-arterial (IA) thrombolysis, and it is sometimes difficult to differentiate contrast extravasation from the hemorrhagic lesions. The purposes of this study are to classify the hyperdense lesions according to their morphologic features and to track the outcome of those lesions. Among the 94 patients who suffered with anterior circulation ischemic stroke and who were treated with IA thrombolysis, 31 patients revealed hyperdense lesions on the CT obtained immediately after the procedure. The lesions were categorized into four types according to their volume, shape, location and density: cortical high density (HD), soft HD, metallic HD and diffuse HD. The follow-up images were obtained 3 5 days later in order to visualize the morphologic changes and hemorrhagic transformation of the lesions. Among the 31 patients with HD lesions, 18 (58%) showed hemorrhagic transformation of their lesion, and six of them were significant. All the cortical HD lesions (n = 4) revealed spontaneous resolution. Seven of the soft HD lesions (n = 13) showed spontaneous resolution, while the rest of the group showed hemorrhagic transformation. Among them the hemorrhage was significant in only two patients (2/6) who did not achieve successful recanalization. All the metallic HD lesions (n = 10) resulted in hemorrhagic transformation; among them, three cases (30%) with a maximum CT value more than 150 HU (Hounsfield unit) subsequently showed significant hemorrhagic transformation on the follow-up CT. There were four diffuse HD lesions, and two of them showed hemorrhagic transformation. The parenchymal hyperdense lesions observed on the CT obtained immediately after IA thrombolysis in ischemic stroke patients exhibited varying features and they were not always hemorrhagic. Most of the soft HD lesions were benign, and although all of the metallic HD lesions were hemorrhagic, some of them were ultimately found

  19. Triton-3He relative and differential flows and the high density behavior of nuclear symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong, Gaochan; Li, Baoan; Chen, Liewen

    2010-01-01

    Using a transport model coupled with a phase-space coalescence after-burner we study the triton- 3 He relative and differential transverse flows in semi-central 132 Sn + 124 Sn reactions at a beam energy of 400 MeV/nucleon. We find that the triton- 3 He pairs carry interesting information about the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. The t- 3 He relative flow can be used as a particularly powerful probe of the high-density behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy. (author)

  20. Contrasting robbery- and non-robbery-related workplace homicide: North Carolina, 1994-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurka, Kelly K; Marshall, Stephen W; Runyan, Carol W; Loomis, Dana P; Casteel, Carri; Richardson, David B

    2009-07-01

    Most research regarding the perpetration of occupational homicide has focused on robbery-related violence; relatively little is known about the circumstances surrounding non-robbery-related occupational homicides and interventions that may prevent these events. A case series was assembled and utilized to examine occupational homicides that were and were not motivated by robbery to determine if select characteristics of the events differed according to the perpetrator's motivation for the crime and relationship to the workplace. Information on occupational homicides that occurred in North Carolina from 1994 to 2003 was abstracted from medical examiners' records and death certificates and was obtained by interviews with law-enforcement officers and from newspaper accounts (data collection occurred in 1996-2001 and 2003-2007). Each homicide was classified by motive and the perpetrator's relationship to the workplace and its employees. Characteristics of robbery-motivated and non-robbery-motivated homicides were compared. Analysis was conducted in 2006 and 2007. Most occupational homicides occurred during robbery of the workplace (64%). However, 36% of occupational homicides during the study period were not robbery-related. Strangers perpetrated 73% of robbery-related killings but only 11% of non-robbery-related homicides. Homicides unrelated to robbery occurred in several industrial sectors, including retail (28%); service (26%); and manufacturing (22%), whereas robbery-related homicides occurred overwhelmingly in retail (67%). The type of firearm used to perpetrate these killings differed by the perpetrator's relationship to the workplace. Non-robbery-related homicides constitute a meaningful proportion of occupational homicides, and the characteristics of these cases can differ from those that are robbery-related. The current system by which workplace homicides are classified could be expanded to include robbery motivation. Efforts to examine occupational

  1. Capturing age-related changes in functional contrast sensitivity with decreasing light levels in monocular and binocular vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie-Gallery, Hanna; Konstantakopoulou, Evgenia; Harlow, Jonathan A; Barbur, John L

    2013-09-09

    It is challenging to separate the effects of normal aging of the retina and visual pathways independently from optical factors, decreased retinal illuminance, and early stage disease. This study determined limits to describe the effect of light level on normal, age-related changes in monocular and binocular functional contrast sensitivity. We recruited 95 participants aged 20 to 85 years. Contrast thresholds for correct orientation discrimination of the gap in a Landolt C optotype were measured using a 4-alternative, forced-choice (4AFC) procedure at screen luminances from 34 to 0.12 cd/m(2) at the fovea and parafovea (0° and ±4°). Pupil size was measured continuously. The Health of the Retina index (HRindex) was computed to capture the loss of contrast sensitivity with decreasing light level. Participants were excluded if they exhibited performance outside the normal limits of interocular differences or HRindex values, or signs of ocular disease. Parafoveal contrast thresholds showed a steeper decline and higher correlation with age at the parafovea than the fovea. Of participants with clinical signs of ocular disease, 83% had HRindex values outside the normal limits. Binocular summation of contrast signals declined with age, independent of interocular differences. The HRindex worsens more rapidly with age at the parafovea, consistent with histologic findings of rod loss and its link to age-related degenerative disease of the retina. The HRindex and interocular differences could be used to screen for and separate the earliest stages of subclinical disease from changes caused by normal aging.

  2. Evaluation of microvascular endothelial function and capillary density in patients with infective endocarditis using laser speckle contrast imaging and video-capillaroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcelos, Amanda; Tibirica, Eduardo; Lamas, Cristiane

    2018-07-01

    To evaluate the systemic microcirculation of patients with infective endocarditis (IE). This is a comparative study of patients with definite IE by the modified Duke criteria admitted to our center for treatment. A reference group of sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers was included. Microvascular flow was evaluated in the forearm using a laser speckle contrast imaging system, for noninvasive measurement of cutaneous microvascular perfusion, in combination with skin iontophoresis of acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) to test microvascular reactivity. Microvascular density was evaluated using skin video-capillaroscopy. We studied 22 patients with IE; 15 were male and seven female. The mean age and standard deviation (SD) were 45.5 ± 17.3 years. Basal skin microvascular conductance was significantly increased in patients with IE, compared with healthy individuals (0.36 ± 0.13 versus 0.21 ± 0.08 APU/mmHg; P < 0.0001). The increase in microvascular conductance induced by ACh in patients was 0.21 ± 0.17 and in the reference group, it was 0.37 ± 0.14 APU/mmHg (P = 0.0012). The increase in microvascular conductance induced by SNP in patients was 0.18 ± 0.14 and it was 0.29 ± 0.15 APU/mmHg (P = 0.0140) in the reference group. The basal mean skin capillary density of patients (135 ± 24 capillaries/mm 2 ) was significantly higher, compared with controls (97 ± 21 capillaries/mm 2 ; P < 0.0001). The main findings in the microcirculation of patients with IE were greater basal vasodilation and a reduction of the endothelium-dependent and -independent microvascular reactivity, as well as greater functional skin capillary density compared to healthy individuals. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fish but Not Macroinvertebrates Promote Trophic Cascading Effects in High Density Submersed Plant Experimental Lake Food Webs in Two Contrasting Climate Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Iglesias

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Predators play a key role in the functioning of shallow lakes. Differences between the response of temperate and subtropical systems to fish predation have been proposed, but experimental evidence is scarce. To elucidate cascading effects produced by predators in contrasting climatic zones, we conducted a mesocosm experiment in three pairs of lakes in Uruguay and Denmark. We used two typical planktivorous-omnivorous fish species (Jenynsia multidentata + Cnesterodon decemmaculatus and Gasterosteus aculeatus + Perca fluviatilis and one littoral omnivorous-predatory macroinvertebrate (Palaemonetes argentinus and Gammarus lacustris, alone and combined, in numbers resembling natural densities. Fish predation on zooplankton increased phytoplankton biomass in both climate zones, whereas the effects of predatory macroinvertebrates on zooplankton and phytoplankton were not significant in either climate zone. Macroinvertebrates (that freely colonized the sampling devices were diminished by fish in both climate areas; however, periphyton biomass did not vary among treatments. Our experiments demonstrated that fish affected the structure of both planktonic and littoral herbivorous communities in both climate regions, with a visible positive cascading effect on phytoplankton biomass, but no effects on periphyton. Altogether, fish impacts appeared to be a strong driver of turbid water conditions in shallow lakes regardless of climatic zone by indirectly contributing to increasing phytoplankton biomass.

  4. Perfusion parameters of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in patients with rectal cancer: Correlation with microvascular density and vascular endothelial growth factor expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeo Eun; Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Myeong Jin; Kim, Ki Whang; Choi, Jun Jeong; Kim, Dae Hong; Myoung, Sung Min

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether quantitative perfusion parameters of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) correlate with immunohistochemical markers of angiogenesis in rectal cancer. Preoperative DCE-MRI was performed in 63 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma. Transendothelial volume transfer (K trans ) and fractional volume of the extravascular-extracellular space (Ve) were measured by Interactive Data Language software in rectal cancer. After surgery, microvessel density (MVD) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression scores were determined using immunohistochemical staining of rectal cancer specimens. Perfusion parameters (K trans , Ve) of DCE-MRI in rectal cancer were found to be correlated with MVD and VEGF expression scores by Spearman's rank coefficient analysis. T stage and N stage (negative or positive) were correlated with perfusion parameters and MVD. Significant correlation was not found between any DCE-MRI perfusion parameters and MVD (rs = -0.056 and p 0.662 for K trans ; rs = -0.103 and p = 0.416 for Ve), or between any DCE-MRI perfusion parameters and the VEGF expression score (rs = -0.042, p 0.741 for K trans ; r = 0.086, p = 0.497 for Ve) in rectal cancer. TN stage showed no significant correlation with perfusion parameters or MVD (p > 0.05 for all). DCE-MRI perfusion parameters, K trans and Ve, correlated poorly with MVD and VEGF expression scores in rectal cancer, suggesting that these parameters do not simply denote static histological vascular properties.

  5. Contrast and Raman spectroscopy study of single- and few-layered charge density wave material: 2H-TaSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajiyev, Parviz; Cong, Chunxiao; Qiu, Caiyu; Yu, Ting

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we report the first successful preparation of single- and few-layers of tantalum diselenide (2H-TaSe2) by mechanical exfoliation technique. Number of layers is confirmed by white light contrast spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Vibrational properties of the atomically thin layers of 2H-TaSe2 are characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy. Room temperature Raman measurements demonstrate MoS2-like spectral features, which are reliable for thickness determination. E1g mode, usually forbidden in backscattering Raman configuration is observed in the supported TaSe2 layers while disappears in the suspended layers, suggesting that this mode may be enabled because of the symmetry breaking induced by the interaction with the substrate. A systematic in-situ low temperature Raman study, for the first time, reveals the existence of incommensurate charge density wave phase transition in single and double-layered 2H-TaSe2 as reflected by a sudden softening of the second-order broad Raman mode resulted from the strong electron-phonon coupling (Kohn anomaly). PMID:24005335

  6. Macular pigment optical density is related to serum lutein in retinitis pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: To determine whether macular pigment optical density (MPOD) is related to the degree of cystoid macular edema (CME) in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. Methods: We measured MPOD with heterochromatic flicker photometry and central foveal retinal thickness with optical coherence tomography...

  7. Influence of the curve density relative electron in dosimetry clinic in treatments stereo tactics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno Saiz, C.; Benitez Villegas, E. M.; Casado Villalon, F. J.; Parra Osorio, V.; Bodineau Gil, C.; Garcia Pareja, S.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the difference between clinical dosimetry in the treatments with radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy fractional obtained from the relative Electron density curve (Schneider 1996) tabulated and provided with the scanner's radiation therapy. (Author)

  8. How Are Traits Related to Problem Behavior in Preschoolers? Similarities and Contrasts between Temperament and Personality

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pauw, Sarah S. W.; Mervielde, Ivan; Van Leeuwen, Karla G.

    2009-01-01

    The lack of empirical research relating temperament models and personality hinders conceptual integration and holds back research linking childhood traits to problem behavior or maladjustment. This study evaluates, within a sample of 443 preschoolers, the relationships between children's maladaptation and traits measured by three temperament…

  9. RELATIVE AND ABSOLUTE DENSITY ESTIMATES OF LAND PLANARIANS (PLATYHELMINTHES, TRICLADIDA IN URBAN RAINFOREST PATCHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FERNANDO CARBAYO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Land planarians (Platyhelminthes are likely important components of the soil cryptofauna, although relevant aspects of their ecology such as their density remain largely unstudied. We investigated absolute and relative densities of flatworms in three patches of secondary Brazilian Atlantic rainforest in an urban environment. Two methods of sampling were carried out, one consisting of 90 hours of active search in delimited plots covering 6,000 m² over a year, and the other consisting of leaf litter extraction from a 60 m² soil area, totaling 480-600 l leaf litter. We found 288 specimens of 16 species belonging to the genera Geobia, Geoplana, Issoca, Luteostriata, Obama, Paraba, Pasipha, Rhynchodemus, Xerapoa, and the exotic species Bipalium kewense and Dolichoplana striata. Specimens up to 10 mm long were mostly sampled only with the leaf litter extraction method. Absolute densities, calculated from data obtained with leaf litter extraction, ranged between 1.25 and 2.10 individuals m-2. These values are 30 to 161 times higher than relative densities, calculated from data obtained by active search. Since most common sampling method used in land planarian studies on species composition and faunal inventories is active search for a few hours in a locality, our results suggest that small species might be overlooked. It remains to be tested whether similar densities of this cryptofauna are also found in primary forests.

  10. Interspecific variation in tree seedlings establishment in canopy gaps in relation to tree density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reader, R.J.; Bonser, S.P.; Duralia, T.E.; Bricker, B.D. [Guelph Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Botany

    1995-10-01

    We tested whether interspecific variation in tree seedling establishment in canopy gaps was significantly related to interspecific variation in tree density, for seven deciduous forest tree species (Quercus alba, Hamamelis virginiana, Acer rubrum, Sassafras albidum, Quercus rubra, Prunus serotina, Ostrya virginiana). For each species, seedling establishment was calculated as the difference in seedling density before experimental gap creation versus three years after gap creation. In each of the six experimentally-created gap types (33% or 66% removal of tree basal area from 0.01ha, 0.05ha or 0.20ha patches), differences in seedling establishment among species were significantly related to differences in their density in the tree canopy. A regression model with log{sub e} tree density as the independent variable accounted for between 93% and 98% of interspecific variation in seedling establishment. Our results provide empirical support for models of tree dynamics in gaps that assume seedling establishment depends on canopy tree density. 17 refs, 1 fig, 3 tabs

  11. Association of water spectral indices with plant and soil water relations in contrasting wheat genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Mario; Reynolds, Matthew P; Klatt, Arthur R

    2010-07-01

    Spectral reflectance indices can be used to estimate the water status of plants in a rapid, non-destructive manner. Water spectral indices were measured on wheat under a range of water-deficit conditions in field-based yield trials to establish their relationship with water relations parameters as well as available volumetric soil water (AVSW) to indicate soil water extraction patterns. Three types of wheat germplasm were studied which showed a range of drought adaptation; near-isomorphic sister lines from an elite/elite cross, advanced breeding lines, and lines derived from interspecific hybridization with wild relatives (synthetic derivative lines). Five water spectral indices (one water index and four normalized water indices) based on near infrared wavelengths were determined under field conditions between the booting and grain-filling stages of crop development. Among all water spectral indices, one in particular, which was denominated as NWI-3, showed the most consistent associations with water relations parameters and demonstrated the strongest associations in all three germplasm sets. NWI-3 showed a strong linear relationship (r(2) >0.6-0.8) with leaf water potential (psi(leaf)) across a broad range of values (-2.0 to -4.0 MPa) that were determined by natural variation in the environment associated with intra- and inter-seasonal affects. Association observed between NWI-3 and canopy temperature (CT) was consistent with the idea that genotypes with a better hydration status have a larger water flux (increased stomatal conductance) during the day. NWI-3 was also related to soil water potential (psi(soil)) and AVSW, indicating that drought-adapted lines could extract more water from deeper soil profiles to maintain favourable water relations. NWI-3 was sufficiently sensitive to detect genotypic differences (indicated by phenotypic and genetic correlations) in water status at the canopy and soil levels indicating its potential application in precision

  12. Probing topological relations between high-density and low-density regions of 2MASS with hexagon cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yongfeng [American Physical Society, San Diego, CA (United States); Xiao, Weike, E-mail: yongfeng.wu@maine.edu [Department of Astronautics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 345, Heilongjiang Province 150001 (China)

    2014-02-01

    We introduced a new two-dimensional (2D) hexagon technique for probing the topological structure of the universe in which we mapped regions of the sky with high and low galaxy densities onto a 2D lattice of hexagonal unit cells. We defined filled cells as corresponding to high-density regions and empty cells as corresponding to low-density regions. The numbers of filled cells and empty cells were kept the same by controlling the size of the cells. By analyzing the six sides of each hexagon, we could obtain and compare the statistical topological properties of high-density and low-density regions of the universe in order to have a better understanding of the evolution of the universe. We applied this hexagonal method to Two Micron All Sky Survey data and discovered significant topological differences between the high-density and low-density regions. Both regions had significant (>5σ) topological shifts from both the binomial distribution and the random distribution.

  13. Surface-plasmon dispersion relation for the inhomogeneous charge-density medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harsh, O.K.; Agarwal, B.K.

    1989-01-01

    The surface-plasmon dispersion relation is derived for the plane-bounded electron gas when there is an inhomogeneous charge-density distribution in the plasma. The hydrodynamical model is used. Both cphi and dcphi/dx are taken to be continuous at the surface of the slab, where cphi is the scalar potential. The dispersion relation is compared with the theoretical works of Stern and Ferrell and of Harsh and Agarwal. It is also compared with the observations of Kunz. A dispersion relation for the volume-plasmon oscillations is derived which resembles the well-known relation of Bohm and Pines

  14. Allocation to reproduction and relative reproductive costs in two species of dioecious Anacardiaceae with contrasting phenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Shuhei; Sakimoto, Michinori

    2008-06-01

    The cost of reproduction in dioecious plants is often female-biased. However, several studies have reported no difference in costs of reproduction between the sexes. In this study, the relative reproductive allocation and costs at the shoot and whole-plant levels were examined in woody dioecious Rhus javanica and R. trichocarpa, in order to examine differences between types of phenophase (i.e. physiological stage of development). Male and female Rhus javanica and R. trichocarpa were sampled and the reproductive and vegetative allocation of the shoot were estimated by harvesting reproductive current-year shoots during flowering and fruiting. Measurements were made of the number of reproductive and total current-year shoots per whole plant, and of the basal area increment (BAI). The numbers of reproductive and total current-year shoots per 1-year-old shoot were counted in order to examine the costs in the following year at the shoot level. A female-biased annual reproductive allocation was found; however, the ratio of reproductive current-year shoots per tree and the BAI did not differ between sexes in Rhus javanica and R. trichocarpa. The percentage of 1-year-old shoots with at least one reproductive current-year shoot was significantly male-biased in R. trichocarpa, but not in R. javanica, indicating that there was a relative cost at the shoot level only in R. trichocarpa. The female-biased leaf mass per shoot, an indicator of compensation for costs, was only found in R. javanica. Relative reproductive costs at the shoot level were detected in Rhus trichocarpa, which has simultaneous leafing and flowering, but not in R. javanica, which has leafing followed by flowering. However, the costs for the whole-plant level were diminished in both species. The results suggest that the phenophase type may produce the different costs for R. javanica and R. trichocarpa through the development of a compensation mechanism.

  15. Surface density: a new parameter in the fundamental metallicity relation of star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Tetsuya; Goto, Tomotsugu; Momose, Rieko

    2018-04-01

    Star-forming galaxies display a close relation among stellar mass, metallicity, and star formation rate (or molecular-gas mass). This is known as the fundamental metallicity relation (FMR) (or molecular-gas FMR), and it has a profound implication on models of galaxy evolution. However, there still remains a significant residual scatter around the FMR. We show here that a fourth parameter, the surface density of stellar mass, reduces the dispersion around the molecular-gas FMR. In a principal component analysis of 29 physical parameters of 41 338 star-forming galaxies, the surface density of stellar mass is found to be the fourth most important parameter. The new 4D fundamental relation forms a tighter hypersurface that reduces the metallicity dispersion to 50 per cent of that of the molecular-gas FMR. We suggest that future analyses and models of galaxy evolution should consider the FMR in a 4D space that includes surface density. The dilution time-scale of gas inflow and the star-formation efficiency could explain the observational dependence on surface density of stellar mass.

  16. Local energy equation for two-electron atoms and relation between kinetic energy and electron densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March, N.H.

    2002-08-01

    In early work, Dawson and March [J. Chem. Phys. 81, 5850 (1984)] proposed a local energy method for treating both Hartree-Fock and correlated electron theory. Here, an exactly solvable model two-electron atom with pure harmonic interactions is treated in its ground state in the above context. A functional relation between the kinetic energy density t(r) at the origin r=0 and the electron density p(r) at the same point then emerges. The same approach is applied to the Hookean atom; in which the two electrons repel with Coulombic energy e 2 /r 12 , with r 12 the interelectronic separation, but are still harmonically confined. Again the kinetic energy density t(r) is the focal point, but now generalization away from r=0 is also effected. Finally, brief comments are added about He-like atomic ions in the limit of large atomic number. (author)

  17. Relation among serum and tissue concentrations of lutein and zeaxanthin and macular pigment density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E J; Hammond, B R; Yeum, K J; Qin, J; Wang, X D; Castaneda, C; Snodderly, D M; Russell, R M

    2000-06-01

    Lutein and zeaxanthin are the only carotenoids in the macular region of the retina (referred to as macular pigment [MP]). Foods that are rich in lutein and zeaxanthin can increase MP density. Response to dietary lutein and zeaxanthin in other tissues has not been studied. The objective of this study was to examine tissue responses to dietary lutein and zeaxanthin and relations among tissues in lutein and zeaxanthin concentrations. Seven subjects consumed spinach and corn, which contain lutein and zeaxanthin, with their daily diets for 15 wk. At 0, 4, 8, and 15 wk and 2 mo after the study, serum, buccal mucosa cells, and adipose tissue were analyzed for carotenoids, and MP density was measured. Serum and buccal cell concentrations of lutein increased significantly from baseline during dietary modification. Serum zeaxanthin concentrations were greater than at baseline only at 4 wk, whereas buccal cell and adipose tissue concentrations of zeaxanthin did not change. Adipose tissue lutein concentrations peaked at 8 wk. Changes in adipose tissue lutein concentration were inversely related to the changes in MP density, suggesting an interaction between adipose tissue and retina in lutein metabolism. To investigate the possibility of tissue interactions, we examined cross-sectional relations among serum, tissue, and dietary lutein concentrations, anthropometric measures, and MP density in healthy adults. Significant negative correlations were found between adipose tissue lutein concentrations and MP for women, but a significant positive relation was found for men. Sex differences in lutein metabolism may be an important factor in tissue interactions and in determining MP density.

  18. Relations between sinkhole density and anthropogenic contaminants in selected carbonate aquifers in the eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Bruce D.; Katz, Brian G.; Berndt, Marian P.; Ardis, Ann F.; Skach, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    The relation between sinkhole density and water quality was investigated in seven selected carbonate aquifers in the eastern United States. Sinkhole density for these aquifers was grouped into high (>25 sinkholes/100 km2), medium (1–25 sinkholes/100 km2), or low (2) categories using a geographical information system that included four independent databases covering parts of Alabama, Florida, Missouri, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee. Field measurements and concentrations of major ions, nitrate, and selected pesticides in samples from 451 wells and 70 springs were included in the water-quality database. Data were collected as a part of the US Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Areas with high and medium sinkhole density had the greatest well depths and depths to water, the lowest concentrations of total dissolved solids and bicarbonate, the highest concentrations of dissolved oxygen, and the lowest partial pressure of CO2 compared to areas with low sinkhole density. These chemical indicators are consistent conceptually with a conduit-flow-dominated system in areas with a high density of sinkholes and a diffuse-flow-dominated system in areas with a low density of sinkholes. Higher cave density and spring discharge in Pennsylvania also support the concept that the high sinkhole density areas are dominated by conduit-flow systems. Concentrations of nitrate-N were significantly higher (p sinkhole density than in low sinkhole-density areas; when accounting for the variations in land use near the sampling sites, the high sinkhole-density area still had higher concentrations of nitrate-N than the low sinkhole-density area. Detection frequencies of atrazine, simazine, metolachlor, prometon, and the atrazine degradate deethylatrazine indicated a pattern similar to nitrate; highest pesticide detections were associated with high sinkhole-density areas. These patterns generally persisted when analyzing the detection frequency by land

  19. Anisotropy of streambed sediments of contrasting geomorphological environments and its relation to groundwater discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebok, Eva; Duque, Carlos; Engesgaard, Peter; Bøgh, Eva

    2013-04-01

    As a main factor controlling surface water-groundwater exchange, spatial variability in streambed hydraulic conductivity and anisotropy is a key to understand groundwater discharge patterns to streams. Here we report on a field investigation in a soft-bedded stream, where horizontal and vertical streambed hydraulic conductivities were determined in order to, (i) detect spatial and seasonal variability in streambed hydraulic conductivity and anisotropy, (ii) relate this variability to channel morphology and different streambed sediments. The study was carried out at a field site located along Holtum stream in Western Denmark. The 5 m wide stream has a soft sandy streambed, an average discharge of 1000 l/s and an average depth of 0.7 m. Hydraulic tests were carried out in 8 transects across the stream with 5 test locations in each transect to study the spatial variability and streambed hydraulic anisotropy across the stream. Different geomorphological environments were compared by having two transects in a straight channel and six transects across a channel bend with a depositional and an erosional bank. Streambed horizontal hydraulic conductivity (Kh) 0.5 meters below the streambed was determined with slugtests in piezometers. At the same locations falling head tests were conducted in standpipes to calculate vertical hydraulic conductivity (Kv) on a 0.5 m long streambed material column some of which were later removed for grain size analysis. In order to account for any seasonal changes in the temperature-related fluid properties the falling head tests and slugtests were carried out in December 2011 and August 2012. Both the Kh and Kv values show greater variability in the summer dataset. During both seasons the shallow, depositional streambank displays the highest Kh values, while the erosional bank at the thalweg is characterised by lower Kh. Vertical streambed hydraulic conductivities do not show any spatial trend across the stream. Streambed anisotropy values of

  20. [Dietary patterns in college freshmen and its relation to bone mineral density].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sufang; Mu, Min; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Xiaoqin; Shu, Long; Li, Qingyan; Li, Yingchun

    2012-07-01

    In order to investigate the bone density of freshmen, and to analyze the association between dietary pattern and bone mineral density (BMD). A questionnaire survey on the situation of dietary pattern was conducted in 1414 freshmen. Effective dietary survey questionnaires and bone mineral density measurements were completed for 1319 participants. Bone mass was assessed by using an Ultrasound Bone Densitometer on the right calcaneus (CM-200, Furuno Electric Corporation, Japan), and the speed of sound (SOS, m/s) was used as an indicator for bone density. Factor analysis with varimax rotation was used to identify the dietary patterns. After adjusting for confounders, covariance with Bonferroni's was used to further examine the associations between dietary patterns and bone mineral density (BMD). (1) Four major dietary patterns were noticed. Western food pattern (high consumption in hamburger, fried food, nuts, biscuit, chocolate, cola, coffee, sugars). Animal protein pattern (high consumption in pork, mutton, beef, poultry meat, animal liver). Calcium pattern (high consumption in fresh fruits, eggs, fish and shrimps, kelp laver and sea fish, milk and dairy products, beans and bean products). Traditional Chinese pattern (high consumption in rice and grain, fresh fruits, fresh vegetables, pork). (2) No association was observed between the western food pattern and bone mineral density. High animal protein pattern showed lower SOS value compared with low animal protein pattern. High calcium pattern showed higher SOS value compared with low calcium pattern. High traditional Chinese pattern showed higher SOS value compared with the low traditional Chinese pattern. Dietary patterns are closely related with bone mineral density (BMD) of freshmen.

  1. Size-density relations in dark clouds: Non-LTE effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maloney, P.

    1986-01-01

    One of the major goals of molecular astronomy has been to understand the physics and dynamics of dense interstellar clouds. Because the interpretation of observations of giant molecular clouds is complicated by their very complex structure and the dynamical effects of star formation, a number of studies have concentrated on dark clouds. Leung, Kutner and Mead (1982) (hereafter LKM) and Myers (1983), in studies of CO and NH 3 emission, concluded that dark clouds exhibit significant correlations between linewidth and cloud radius of the form delta v varies as R(0.5) and between mean density and radius of the form n varies as R(-1), as originally suggested by Larson (1981). This result suggests that these objects are in virial equilibrium. However, the mean densities inferred from the CO data of LKM are based on an local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of their 13CO data. At the very low mean densities inferred by LKM for the larger clouds in their samples, the assumption of LTE becomes very questionable. As most of the range in R in the density-size correlation comes from the clouds observed in CO, it seems worthwhile to examine how non-LTE effects will influence the derived densities. Microturbulent models of inhomogeneous clouds of varying central concentration with the linewidth-size and mean density-size relations found by Myers show sub-thermal excitation of the 13CO line in the larger clouds, with the result that LTE analysis considerbly underestimates the actual column density. A more general approach which doesn't require detailed modeling of the clouds is to consider whether the observed T/sub R/*(13CO)/T/sub R/*(12CO) ratios in the clouds studied by LKM are in the range where the LTE-derived optical depths be seriously in error due to sub-thermal excitation of the 13CO molecule

  2. Energy and nutrient density of foods in relation to their carbon footprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewnowski, Adam; Rehm, Colin D; Martin, Agnes; Verger, Eric O; Voinnesson, Marc; Imbert, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    A carbon footprint is the sum of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGEs) associated with food production, processing, transporting, and retailing. We examined the relation between the energy and nutrient content of foods and associated GHGEs as expressed as g CO2 equivalents. GHGE values, which were calculated and provided by a French supermarket chain, were merged with the Composition Nutritionnelle des Aliments (French food-composition table) nutrient-composition data for 483 foods and beverages from the French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety. Foods were aggregated into 34 food categories and 5 major food groups as follows: meat and meat products, milk and dairy products, frozen and processed fruit and vegetables, grains, and sweets. Energy density was expressed as kcal/100 g. Nutrient density was determined by using 2 alternative nutrient-density scores, each based on the sum of the percentage of daily values for 6 or 15 nutrients, respectively. The energy and nutrient densities of foods were linked to log-transformed GHGE values expressed per 100 g or 100 kcal. Grains and sweets had lowest GHGEs (per 100 g and 100 kcal) but had high energy density and a low nutrient content. The more-nutrient-dense animal products, including meat and dairy, had higher GHGE values per 100 g but much lower values per 100 kcal. In general, a higher nutrient density of foods was associated with higher GHGEs per 100 kcal, although the slopes of fitted lines varied for meat and dairy compared with fats and sweets. Considerations of the environmental impact of foods need to be linked to concerns about nutrient density and health. The point at which the higher carbon footprint of some nutrient-dense foods is offset by their higher nutritional value is a priority area for additional research. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  3. Density and relative frequency effects on competitive interactions and resource use in pea–barley intercrops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauggaard-Nielsen, H.; Andersen, H.K.; Jørnsgaard, B.

    2006-01-01

    or specific grain yield composition are wanted. Keywords: Competition dynamics; Grain quality; Hordeum vulgare; Intercropping; Nitrogen use; Organic farming; Pisum sativum; Weeds; Yield Abbreviations: IC, mixed intercropping; LER, land equivalent ratio; N, nitrogen; REIc, relative efficiency index; SC, sole...... not increase its reliance on atmospheric nitrogen fixation compared to the pea sole crop. With respect to soil nitrogen uptake there were no effect of plant density but a strong effect of the relative frequency of pea in the intercrop, the greater the proportion the lower the uptake. Changes in the competitive...... and tillering ability of barley are seen as likely explanations of lower weed load in the barley dominated crop treatments. This study points at the potential of employing density and relative crop frequency as "regulators" when specific intercrop objectives such as increased competitiveness towards weeds...

  4. Dispersion relation and Landau damping of waves in high-energy density plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jun; Ji Peiyong

    2012-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation on the propagation of electromagnetic waves and electron plasma waves in high energy density plasmas using the covariant Wigner function approach. Based on the covariant Wigner function and Dirac equation, a relativistic quantum kinetic model is established to describe the physical processes in high-energy density plasmas. With the zero-temperature Fermi–Dirac distribution, the dispersion relation and Landau damping of waves containing the relativistic quantum corrected terms are derived. The relativistic quantum corrections to the dispersion relation and Landau damping are analyzed by comparing our results with those obtained in classical and non-relativistic quantum plasmas. We provide a detailed discussion on the Landau damping obtained in classical plasmas, non-relativistic Fermi plasmas and relativistic Fermi plasmas. The contributions of the Bohm potential, the Fermi statistics pressure and relativistic effects to the dispersion relation and Landau damping of waves are quantitatively calculated with real plasma parameters. (paper)

  5. Relating the baryon asymmetry to the thermal relic dark matter density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, John

    2011-01-01

    We present a generic framework, baryomorphosis, which modifies the baryon asymmetry to be naturally of the order of a typical thermal relic weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) density. We consider a simple scalar-based model to show how this is possible. This model introduces a sector in which a large initial baryon asymmetry is injected into particles ('annihilons'), φ B , φ-circumflex B , of mass ∼100 GeV-1 TeV. φ B φ-circumflex B annihilations convert the initial φ B , φ-circumflex B asymmetry to a final asymmetry with a thermal relic WIMP-like density. This subsequently decays to a conventional baryon asymmetry whose magnitude is naturally related to the density of thermal relic WIMP dark matter. In this way the two coincidences of baryons and dark matter, i.e. why their densities are similar to each other and why they are both similar to a WIMP thermal relic density (the 'WIMP miracle'), may be understood. The model may be tested by the production of annihilons at colliders.

  6. A local leaky-box model for the local stellar surface density-gas surface density-gas phase metallicity relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangtun Ben; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge K.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Yan, Renbin; Brinkmann, Jonathan

    2017-07-01

    We revisit the relation between the stellar surface density, the gas surface density and the gas-phase metallicity of typical disc galaxies in the local Universe with the SDSS-IV/MaNGA survey, using the star formation rate surface density as an indicator for the gas surface density. We show that these three local parameters form a tight relationship, confirming previous works (e.g. by the PINGS and CALIFA surveys), but with a larger sample. We present a new local leaky-box model, assuming star-formation history and chemical evolution is localized except for outflowing materials. We derive closed-form solutions for the evolution of stellar surface density, gas surface density and gas-phase metallicity, and show that these parameters form a tight relation independent of initial gas density and time. We show that, with canonical values of model parameters, this predicted relation match the observed one well. In addition, we briefly describe a pathway to improving the current semi-analytic models of galaxy formation by incorporating the local leaky-box model in the cosmological context, which can potentially explain simultaneously multiple properties of Milky Way-type disc galaxies, such as the size growth and the global stellar mass-gas metallicity relation.

  7. Life table parameters of three Mirid Bug (Adelphocoris species (Hemiptera: Miridae under contrasted relative humidity regimes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongsheng Pan

    Full Text Available The genus Adelphocoris (Hemiptera: Miridae is a group of important insect pests of Bt cotton in China. The three dominant species are A. lineolatus, A. suturalis, and A. fasciaticollis, and these species have different population dynamics. The causal factors for the differences in population dynamics have not been determined; one hypothesis is that humidity may be important for the growth of Adelphocoris populations. In the laboratory, the demographic parameters of the three Adelphocoris species were compared when the mirid bugs were subjected to various levels of relative humidity (40, 50, 60, 70 and 80% RH. Middle to high levels of RH (60, 70 and 80% were associated with higher egg and nymph survival rates and increased adult longevity and female fecundity. Lower humidity levels (40 and 50% RH had negative effects on the survival of nymphs, adult longevity and fecundity. The intrinsic rate of increase (rm, the net reproductive rate (R0 and the finite rate of increase (λ for each Adelphocoris species increased with increasing RH. Significant positive relationships were found between RH and the life table parameters, rm, R0 and λ for the three Adelphocoris species. These results will help to better understand the phenology of the three Adelphocoris species, and the information can be used in population growth models to optimize pest forecasting and management strategies for these key pests.

  8. Low-level contrast statistics of natural images can modulate the frequency of event-related potentials (ERP in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Ghodrati

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Humans are fast and accurate in categorizing complex natural images. It is, however, unclear what features of visual information are exploited by brain to perceive the images with such speed and accuracy. It has been shown that low-level contrast statistics of natural scenes can explain the variance of amplitude of event-related potentials (ERP in response to rapidly presented images. In this study, we investigated the effect of these statistics on frequency content of ERPs. We recorded ERPs from human subjects, while they viewed natural images each presented for 70 ms. Our results showed that Weibull contrast statistics, as a biologically plausible model, explained the variance of ERPs the best, compared to other image statistics that we assessed. Our time-frequency analysis revealed a significant correlation between these statistics and ERPs’ power within theta frequency band (~3-7 Hz. This is interesting, as theta band is believed to be involved in context updating and semantic encoding. This correlation became significant at ~110 ms after stimulus onset, and peaked at 138 ms. Our results show that not only the amplitude but also the frequency of neural responses can be modulated with low-level contrast statistics of natural images and highlights their potential role in scene perception.

  9. Contrasting petrogenesis of spatially related carbonatites from Samalpatti and Sevattur, Tamil Nadu, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Lukáš; Magna, Tomáš; Rapprich, Vladislav; Upadhyay, Dewashish; Krátký, Ondřej; Čejková, Bohuslava; Erban, Vojtěch; Kochergina, Yulia V.; Hrstka, Tomáš

    2017-07-01

    Two Neoproterozoic carbonatite suites of spatially related carbonatites and associated silicate alkaline rocks from Sevattur and Samalpatti, south India, have been investigated in terms of petrography, chemistry and radiogenic-stable isotopic compositions in order to provide further constraints on their genesis. The cumulative evidence indicates that the Sevattur suite is derived from an enriched mantle source without significant post-emplacement modifications through crustal contamination and hydrothermal overprint. The stable (C, O) isotopic compositions confirm mantle origin of Sevattur carbonatites with only a modest difference to Paleoproterozoic Hogenakal carbonatite, emplaced in the same tectonic setting. On the contrary, multiple processes have shaped the petrography, chemistry and isotopic systematics of the Samalpatti suite. These include pre-emplacement interaction with the ambient crustal materials with more pronounced signatures of such a process in silicocarbonatites. Calc-silicate marbles present in the Samalpatti area could represent a possible evolved end member due to the inability of common silicate rocks (pyroxenites, granites, diorites) to comply with radiogenic isotopic constraints. In addition, Samalpatti carbonatites show a range of C-O isotopic compositions, and δ13CV-PDB values between + 1.8 and + 4.1‰ found for a sub-suite of Samalpatti carbonatites belong to the highest values ever reported for magmatic carbonates. These heavy C-O isotopic signatures in Samalpatti carbonatites could be indicative of massive hydrothermal interaction with carbonated fluids. Unusual high-Cr silicocarbonatites, discovered at Samalpatti, seek their origin in the reaction of pyroxenites with enriched mantle-derived alkali-CO2-rich melts, as also evidenced by mantle-like O isotopic compositions. Field and petrographic observations as well as isotopic constraints must, however, be combined with the complex chemistry of incompatible trace elements as indicated

  10. Size-density relations in dark clouds: Non-LTE effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, P.

    1986-01-01

    One of the major goals of molecular astronomy has been to understand the physics and dynamics of dense interstellar clouds. Because the interpretation of observations of giant molecular clouds is complicated by their very complex structure and the dynamical effects of star formation, a number of studies have concentrated on dark clouds. Leung, Kutner and Mead (1982) (hereafter LKM) and Myers (1983), in studies of CO and NH3 emission, concluded that dark clouds exhibit significant correlations between linewidth and cloud radius of the form delta v varies as R(0.5) and between mean density and radius of the form n varies as R(-1), as originally suggested by Larson (1981). This result suggests that these objects are in virial equilibrium. However, the mean densities inferred from the CO data of LKM are based on an local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of their 13CO data. At the very low mean densities inferred by LKM for the larger clouds in their samples, the assumption of LTE becomes very questionable. As most of the range in R in the density-size correlation comes from the clouds observed in CO, it seems worthwhile to examine how non-LTE effects will influence the derived densities. One way to assess the validity of LTE-derived densities is to construct cloud models and then to interpret them in the same way as the observed data. Microturbulent models of inhomogeneous clouds of varying central concentration with the linewidth-size and mean density-size relations found by Myers show sub-thermal excitation of the 13CO line in the larger clouds, with the result that LTE analysis considerbly underestimates the actual column density. A more general approach which doesn't require detailed modeling of the clouds is to consider whether the observed T sub R*(13CO)/T sub R*(12CO) ratios in the clouds studied by LKM are in the range where the LTE-derived optical depths (and hence column densities) can be seriously in error due to sub-thermal excitation of the 13CO

  11. Contrast Media–Induced Anaphylaxis Causing a Stress-Related Cardiomyopathy Post Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Seecheran

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Anaphylaxis is a sudden-onset, severe hypersensitivity reaction that can be potentially fatal. It can often transition to refractory hemodynamic instability, eventually resulting in death. Stress-related cardiomyopathies (SRCs have multifactorial etiologies, including being linked to excessive catecholamine release in periods of intense stress. This novel case report recounts a SRC caused by contrast-induced anaphylaxis within 1 hour post percutaneous coronary intervention. Both acutely life-threatening conditions may occur simultaneously and are implicated with devastating complications. Further research is required to understand this cardiac-neuroaxis interplay in SRC to identify risk factors and develop management strategies.

  12. Flocculation of Clay Colloids Induced by Model Polyelectrolytes: Effects of Relative Charge Density and Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhawoth, Yasine; Michot, Laurent J; Levitz, Pierre; Malikova, Natalie

    2017-10-06

    Flocculation and its tuning are of utmost importance in the optimization of several industrial protocols in areas such as purification of waste water and civil engineering. Herein, we studied the polyelectrolyte-induced flocculation of clay colloids on a model system consisting of purified clay colloids of well-defined size fractions and ionene polyelectrolytes presenting regular and tunable chain charge density. To characterize ionene-induced clay flocculation, we turned to the combination of light absorbance (turbidity) and ζ-potential measurements, as well as adsorption isotherms. Our model system allowed us to identify the exact ratio of positive and negative charges in clay-ionene mixtures, the (c+/c-) ratio. For all samples studied, the onset of efficient flocculation occurred consistently at c+/c- ratios significantly below 1, which indicated the formation of highly ionene-deficient aggregates. At the same time, the ζ-potential measurements indicated an apparent zero charge on such aggregates. Thus, the ζ-potential values could not provide the stoichiometry inside the clay-ionene aggregates. The early onset of flocculation in clay-ionene mixtures is reminiscent of the behavior of multivalent salts and contrasts that of monovalent salts, for which a large excess amount of ions is necessary to achieve flocculation. Clear differences in the flocculation behavior are visible as a function of the ionene charge density, which governs the conformation of the ionene chains on the clay surface. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Age-related decrements in bone mineral density in women over 65

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, P.; Cummings, S. R.; Black, D. M.; Spencer, N. E.; Genant, H. K.

    1992-01-01

    Age-related changes in bone density contribute to the risk of fractures. To describe the relationship between age and bone mass in elderly women, we studied a large cohort of women over age 65 years who were recruited from population-based lists in four cities in the United States. Bone density in g/cm2 was measured by single-photon absorptiometry (SPA) and dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at the distal and proximal radius, the calcaneus, the lumbar spine, and the proximal femur. Centralized data collection was used to control data quality and consistency. We found a strong inverse relationship between bone density and age for most sites. Decrements in bone density between women aged 65-69 years and women 85 years and older exceeded 16% in all regions except the spine, where the difference between the two age groups was 6%. Ward's triangle and the calcaneus exhibited the largest decrements, with 26 and 21%, respectively. The estimates of annual changes in bone mineral density by linear regression at sites other than the spine ranged from -0.82% at the femoral neck and trochanter to -1.30% at Ward's triangle. Correlations between the different regions ranged from r = 0.51 between the proximal radius and Ward's triangle to r = 0.66 between the distal radius and calcaneus. We conclude that the inverse relationship between age and bone mass measured by absorptiometry techniques in white women continues into the ninth decade of life. The relationship is strongest for bone density of Ward's triangle and the calcaneus and weakest for the spine.

  14. Thermal Conductivity of Human Bone in Cryoprobe Freezing as Related to Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kyle E; Baldini, Todd; Lindeque, Bennie G

    2017-03-01

    Cryoprobes create localized cell destruction through freezing. Bone is resistant to temperature flow but is susceptible to freezing necrosis at warmer temperatures than tumor cells. Few studies have determined the thermal conductivity of human bone. No studies have examined conductivity as related to density. The study goal was to examine thermal conductivity in human bone while comparing differences between cancellous and cortical bone. An additional goal was to establish a relationship between bone density and thermal conductivity. Six knee joints from 5 cadavers were obtained. The epiphyseal region was sliced in half coronally prior to inserting an argon-circulating cryoprobe directed away from the joint line. Thermistor thermometers were placed perpendicularly at measured increments, and the freezing cycle was recorded until steady-state conditions were achieved. For 2 cortical samples, the probe was placed intramedullary in metaphyseal samples and measurements were performed radially from the central axis of each sample. Conductivity was calculated using Fournier's Law and then plotted against measured density of each sample. Across samples, density of cancellous bone ranged from 0.86 to 1.38 g/mL and average thermal conductivity ranged between 0.404 and 0.55 W/mK. Comparatively, cortical bone had a density of 1.70 to 1.86 g/mL and thermal conductivity of 0.0742 to 0.109 W/mK. A strong 2-degree polynomial correlation was seen (R 2 =0.8226, P<.001). Bone is highly resistant to temperature flow. This resistance varies and inversely correlates strongly with density. This information is clinically relevant to maximize tumor ablation while minimizing morbidity through unnecessary bone loss and damage to surrounding structures. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(2):90-94.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Epizootic of sarcoptic mange in raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) in relation to population density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Natsuko; Doi, Kandai; Kato, Takuya; Morita, Tatsushi; Hayama, Shin-Ichi

    2018-03-30

    To examine outbreaks of mange in raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) with respect to population density, we analyzed camera trap videos, and isolated mites from raccoon dog carcasses. In a camera trapping survey, we categorized the skin condition of raccoon dogs, and used a number of independent videos to calculate the relative abundance index (RAI). The RAI of raccoon dogs with alopecia increased following an increase in the RAI of those without alopecia. Among 27 raccoon dog carcasses, 12 showed mange-compatible skin lesions. Sarcoptes scabiei was isolated from 11 of these raccoon dogs, indicating that sarcoptic mange was endemic in our study area. Therefore, a high relative population density may be a factor underlying epizootics of sarcoptic mange in raccoon dogs.

  16. Dual-energy CT for detection of contrast enhancement or leakage within high-density haematomas in patients with intracranial haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Tsukabe, Akio; Kunitomi, Yuki; Nishizawa, Mitsuo; Arisawa, Atsuko; Tanaka, Hisashi; Tomiyama, Noriyuki [Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Yoshiya, Kazuhisa; Shimazu, Takeshi [Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Traumatology and Acute Critical Medicine, Osaka (Japan)

    2014-04-15

    Our study aimed to elucidate the diagnostic performance of dual-energy CT (DECT) in the detection of contrast enhancement in intracranial haematomas (ICrH) with early phase dual-energy computed tomography angiography (CTA) and compare the results with those obtained by delayed CT enhancement. Thirty-six patients with ICrH were retrospectively included in this study. All patients had undergone single-energy non-contrast CT and contrast-enhanced dual-source DECT. DECT images were post-processed with commercial software, followed by obtaining iodine images and virtual non-contrast images and generating combined images that created the impression of 120-kVp images. Two neuroradiologists, blinded to the patients' data, reviewed two reading sessions: session A (non-contrast CT and combined CT) and session B (non-contrast CT, combined CT, and iodine images) for detection of contrast enhancement in the haematomas. Contrast leakage or enhancement was detected in 23 (57.5 %) out of 40 haemorrhagic lesions in 36 patients on delayed CT. Three enhanced lesions were depicted only in the DECT iodine images. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of session A were 82.6, 94.1, 95.0, and 80.0 %, respectively, and those of session B were 95.7, 94.1, 95.7, and 94.1 %, respectively. DECT emphasised the iodine enhancement and facilitated the detection of contrast enhancement or leakage. (orig.)

  17. Dual-energy CT for detection of contrast enhancement or leakage within high-density haematomas in patients with intracranial haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Tsukabe, Akio; Kunitomi, Yuki; Nishizawa, Mitsuo; Arisawa, Atsuko; Tanaka, Hisashi; Yoshiya, Kazuhisa; Shimazu, Takeshi; Tomiyama, Noriyuki

    2014-04-01

    Our study aimed to elucidate the diagnostic performance of dual-energy CT (DECT) in the detection of contrast enhancement in intracranial haematomas (ICrH) with early phase dual-energy computed tomography angiography (CTA) and compare the results with those obtained by delayed CT enhancement. Thirty-six patients with ICrH were retrospectively included in this study. All patients had undergone single-energy non-contrast CT and contrast-enhanced dual-source DECT. DECT images were post-processed with commercial software, followed by obtaining iodine images and virtual non-contrast images and generating combined images that created the impression of 120-kVp images. Two neuroradiologists, blinded to the patients' data, reviewed two reading sessions: session A (non-contrast CT and combined CT) and session B (non-contrast CT, combined CT, and iodine images) for detection of contrast enhancement in the haematomas. Contrast leakage or enhancement was detected in 23 (57.5 %) out of 40 haemorrhagic lesions in 36 patients on delayed CT. Three enhanced lesions were depicted only in the DECT iodine images. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of session A were 82.6, 94.1, 95.0, and 80.0 %, respectively, and those of session B were 95.7, 94.1, 95.7, and 94.1 %, respectively. DECT emphasised the iodine enhancement and facilitated the detection of contrast enhancement or leakage.

  18. Dual-energy CT for detection of contrast enhancement or leakage within high-density haematomas in patients with intracranial haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Tsukabe, Akio; Kunitomi, Yuki; Nishizawa, Mitsuo; Arisawa, Atsuko; Tanaka, Hisashi; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Yoshiya, Kazuhisa; Shimazu, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Our study aimed to elucidate the diagnostic performance of dual-energy CT (DECT) in the detection of contrast enhancement in intracranial haematomas (ICrH) with early phase dual-energy computed tomography angiography (CTA) and compare the results with those obtained by delayed CT enhancement. Thirty-six patients with ICrH were retrospectively included in this study. All patients had undergone single-energy non-contrast CT and contrast-enhanced dual-source DECT. DECT images were post-processed with commercial software, followed by obtaining iodine images and virtual non-contrast images and generating combined images that created the impression of 120-kVp images. Two neuroradiologists, blinded to the patients' data, reviewed two reading sessions: session A (non-contrast CT and combined CT) and session B (non-contrast CT, combined CT, and iodine images) for detection of contrast enhancement in the haematomas. Contrast leakage or enhancement was detected in 23 (57.5 %) out of 40 haemorrhagic lesions in 36 patients on delayed CT. Three enhanced lesions were depicted only in the DECT iodine images. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of session A were 82.6, 94.1, 95.0, and 80.0 %, respectively, and those of session B were 95.7, 94.1, 95.7, and 94.1 %, respectively. DECT emphasised the iodine enhancement and facilitated the detection of contrast enhancement or leakage. (orig.)

  19. TRACING THE STAR-FORMATION-DENSITY RELATION TO z {approx} 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quadri, Ryan F.; Williams, Rik J. [Carnegie Observatories, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Franx, Marijn; Hildebrandt, Hendrik, E-mail: quadri@obs.carnegiescience.edu [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2012-01-10

    Recent work has shown that the star formation (SF) density relation-in which galaxies with low SF rates are preferentially found in dense environments-is still in place at z {approx} 1, but the situation becomes less clear at higher redshifts. We use mass-selected samples drawn from the UKIDSS Ultra-Deep Survey to show that galaxies with quenched SF tend to reside in dense environments out to at least z {approx} 1.8. Over most of this redshift range we are able to demonstrate that this SF-density relation holds even at fixed stellar mass. The environmental quenching of SF appears to operate with similar efficiency on all galaxies regardless of stellar mass. Nevertheless, the environment plays a greater role in the buildup of the red sequence at lower masses, whereas other quenching processes dominate at higher masses. In addition to a statistical analysis of environmental densities, we investigate a cluster at z = 1.6, and show that the central region has an elevated fraction of quiescent objects relative to the field. Although the uncertainties are large, the environmental quenching efficiency in this cluster is consistent with that of galaxy groups and clusters at z {approx} 0. In this work we rely on photometric redshifts and describe some of the pitfalls that large redshift errors can present.

  20. Silicate melts density, buoyancy relations and the dynamics of magmatic processes in the upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Valle, Carmen; Malfait, Wim J.

    2016-04-01

    with results from ab initio calculations. The density model has been applied to examine the mineral-melt buoyancy relations at depth and the implications of these results for the dynamics of magma chambers, crystal settling and the stability and mobility of magmas in the upper mantle will be discussed.

  1. Progranulin concentration in relation to bone mineral density among obese individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milajerdi, Alireza; Maghbooli, Zhila; Mohammadi, Farzad; Hosseini, Banafsheh; Mirzaei, Khadijeh

    2018-01-01

    Adipose tissue, particularly visceral adipose tissue, secretes a variety of cytokines, among which progranulin is a glycoprotein related to the immune system. Along with other secreted proteins, progranulin may be associated with bone mineral density. The aim of this study was to find out whether there are associations between the progranulin and bone mineral density among obese people. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 244 obese participants (aged 22-52). Serum progranulin, high sensitive C-reactive protein, oxidised-low dencity lipoprotein, tumor necrosis factor-α, parathormone, vitamin D, and interleukins of 1 β, 4, 6, 10, 13, and 17 concentrations were measured. Anthropometric measurements, body composition and bone mineral density were also assessed. Serum progranulin was directly associated with interleukin-6 and interleukin-1β, while it had a negative association with interleukin-17 and tumor necrosis factor-α. We also observed a statistically significant direct association between progranulin concentration and visceral fat, abdominal fat, waist, abdominal and hip circumferences, hip T-score, and Z-score and T-score for the lumbar region. A partial correlation test has also shown a significant positive correlation regarding serum progranulin and the hip Z-score. Moreover, progranulin level is inversely associated with ospteopenia (P = 0.04 and CI: 0.17,0.96). Our study revealed that central obesity may be related to increased progranulin concentration. In addition, progranulin concentration was directly related to bone formation parameters, which indicates the protective effects of progranulin on bone density. Further studies are needed to clarify the exact mechanisms underlying these associations.

  2. Change in alcohol outlet density and alcohol-related harm to population health (CHALICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fone David

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excess alcohol consumption has serious adverse effects on health and violence-related harm. In the UK around 37% of men and 29% of women drink to excess and 20% and 13% report binge drinking. The potential impact on population health from a reduction in consumption is considerable. One proposed method to reduce consumption is to reduce availability through controls on alcohol outlet density. In this study we investigate the impact of a change in the density of alcohol outlets on alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harms to health in the community. Methods/Design A natural experiment of the effect of change in outlet density between 2005–09, in Wales, UK; population 2.4 million aged 16 years and over. Data on outlets are held by the 22 local authorities in Wales under The Licensing Act 2003. The study outcomes are change in (1 alcohol consumption using data from annual Welsh Health Surveys, (2 alcohol-related hospital admissions using the Patient Episode Database for Wales, (3 Accident & Emergency department attendances between midnight–6am, and (4 alcohol-related violent crime against the person, using Police data. The data will be anonymously record-linked within the Secure Anonymised Information Linkage Databank at individual and 2001 Census Lower Super Output Area levels. New methods of network analysis will be used to estimate outlet density. Longitudinal statistical analysis will use (1 multilevel ordinal models of consumption and logistic models of admissions and Accident & Emergency attendance as a function of change in individual outlet exposure, adjusting for confounding variables, and (2 spatial models of the change in counts/rates of each outcome measure and outlet density. We will assess the impact on health inequalities and will correct for population migration. Discussion This inter-disciplinary study requires expertise in epidemiology and public health, health informatics, medical statistics

  3. Lymphatic Vessel Density as Prognostic Factor in Breast Carcinoma: Relation to Clinico pathologic Parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Gendi, S.; Abdel-Hadi, M.

    2009-01-01

    Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis are essential for breast cancer growth and progression. This study aimed at investigating lymphatic micro vessel density (LVD) and microvessel density (MVD) as prognostic markers in breast carcinoma. Forty breast carcinomas were immuno stained for D2-40, CD31 and VEGF. Median lymphatic and blood micro vessel densities, as well as VEGF expression, were related to each other and to clinico pathologic parameters including lymph node (Ln) status. The efficacy of haematoxylin and eosin (H and E) in detecting lymphatic vessel invasion (LVI) compared to D2-40 immunostaining was also investigated. D2-40 stained normal lymphatic endothelium and myoepithelial cells, but with different staining patterns. D2-40 LVD related significantly to CD31 counts (r=0.470; p=0.002), and LN metastasis (Mann-Whitney U=101.500; p=0.043); however, it did not relate to age, tumor grade, tumor size or LVI. D2-40 identified LVI in 3 more cases (7.5%) than those detected by H and E. VEGF was expressed in 85% of cases, and was significantly related to CD31 and D2-40 counts (p=0.033 and 0.007, respectively). In conclusion, D2-40 LVD showed a significant association with LN metastasis, and can be considered to segregate patients with positive from those with negative LNs. D2-40 enhances the detection of LVI relative to H and E staining reflecting a potential for lymphatic metastatic spread and possible poor prognosis

  4. Dietary intake and nutrition-related knowledge in a sample of Lebanese adolescents of contrasting socioeconomic status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabhani-Zeidan, Maya; Naja, Farah; Nasreddine, Lara

    2011-06-01

    Socioeconomic status (SES) is postulated to be a major predictor of dietary intake and nutrition-related knowledge in adults. To date, very few studies have addressed this effect among adolescents. To explore differences in nutrient intake and nutrition-related knowledge among adolescents of contrasting SES in Lebanon. In a cross-sectional survey, 209 males and females, aged 17 to 19 years, were recruited from a private university with high tuition and a free public university in Beirut. The participants completed a multicomponent, self-administered questionnaire that inquired about demographic characteristics and nutrition-related knowledge. Three nonconsecutive 24-hour dietary recalls were obtained through interviews. Energy-adjusted means of dietary intake and age-adjusted nutrition-related knowledge were compared between groups using a general linear model. Adolescents in the high-SES group consumed more vegetables, meats, and fats and oils (p Nutritional knowledge, although high among all participants, was higher in the high-SES group (p nutrition-related knowledge, SES significantly affected dietary intake in a sample of Lebanese adolescents. This warrants consideration of other factors, such as cost and environment, that may modulate eating behavior among adolescents from different socioeconomic strata.

  5. Measurement of average density and relative volumes in a dispersed two-phase fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreepada, Sastry R.; Rippel, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and a method are disclosed for measuring the average density and relative volumes in an essentially transparent, dispersed two-phase fluid. A laser beam with a diameter no greater than 1% of the diameter of the bubbles, droplets, or particles of the dispersed phase is directed onto a diffraction grating. A single-order component of the diffracted beam is directed through the two-phase fluid and its refraction is measured. Preferably, the refracted beam exiting the fluid is incident upon a optical filter with linearly varing optical density and the intensity of the filtered beam is measured. The invention can be combined with other laser-based measurement systems, e.g., laser doppler anemometry.

  6. The Temperature-Density Relation in the Intergalactic Medium at Redshift langzrang = 2.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudie, Gwen C.; Steidel, Charles C.; Pettini, Max

    2012-10-01

    We present new measurements of the temperature-density (T-ρ) relation for neutral hydrogen in the 2.0 law index of (Γ - 1) = 0.15 ± 0.02. Using analytic arguments, these measurements imply an "equation of state" for the IGM at langzrang = 2.4 of the form T=T_0 \\left(\\rho /\\bar{\\rho }\\right)^{\\gamma -1} with a temperature at mean density of T 0 = [1.94 ± 0.05] × 104 K and a power-law index (γ - 1) = 0.46 ± 0.05. Based on data obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  7. Density and success of bird nests relative to grazing on western Montana grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fondell, Thomas F.; Ball, I.J.

    2004-01-01

    Grassland birds are declining at a faster rate than any other group of North American bird species. Livestock grazing is the primary economic use of grasslands in the western United States, but the effects of this use on distribution and productivity of grassland birds are unclear. We examined nest density and success of ground-nesting birds on grazed and ungrazed grasslands in western Montana. In comparison to grazed plots, ungrazed plots had reduced forb cover, increased litter cover, increased litter depth, and increased visual obstruction readings (VOR) of vegetation. Nest density among 10 of 11 common bird species was most strongly correlated with VOR of plots, and greatest nest density for each species occurred where mean VOR of the plot was similar to mean VOR at nests. Additionally, all bird species were relatively consistent in their choice of VOR at nests despite substantial differences in VOR among plots. We suggest that birds selected plots based in part on availability of suitable nest sites and that variation in nest density relative to grazing reflected the effect of grazing on availability of nest sites. Nest success was similar between grazed plots and ungrazed plots for two species but was lower for nests on grazed plots than on ungrazed plots for two other species because of increased rates of predation, trampling, or parasitism by brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater). Other species nested almost exclusively on ungrazed plots (six species) or grazed plots (one species), precluding evaluation of the effects of grazing on nest success. We demonstrate that each species in a diverse suite of ground-nesting birds preferentially used certain habitats for nesting and that grazing altered availability of preferred nesting habitats through changes in vegetation structure and plant species composition. We also show that grazing directly or indirectly predisposed some bird species to increased nesting mortality. Management alternatives that avoid

  8. Brief report: The Brief Alcohol Social Density Assessment (BASDA): convergent, criterion-related, and incremental validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKillop, James; Acker, John D; Bollinger, Jared; Clifton, Allan; Miller, Joshua D; Campbell, W Keith; Goodie, Adam S

    2013-09-01

    Alcohol misuse is substantially influenced by social factors, but systematic assessments of social network drinking are typically lengthy. The goal of the present study was to provide further validation of a brief measure of social network alcohol use, the Brief Alcohol Social Density Assessment (BASDA), in a sample of emerging adults. Specifically, the study sought to examine the BASDA's convergent, criterion, and incremental validity in relation to well-established measures of drinking motives and problematic drinking. Participants were 354 undergraduates who were assessed using the BASDA, the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), and the Drinking Motives Questionnaire. Significant associations were observed between the BASDA index of alcohol-related social density and alcohol misuse, social motives, and conformity motives, supporting convergent validity. Criterion-related validity was supported by evidence that significantly greater alcohol involvement was present in the social networks of individuals scoring at or above an AUDIT score of 8, a validated criterion for hazardous drinking. Finally, the BASDA index was significantly associated with alcohol misuse above and beyond drinking motives in relation to AUDIT scores, supporting incremental validity. Taken together, these findings provide further support for the BASDA as an efficient measure of drinking in an individual's social network. Methodological considerations as well as recommendations for future investigations in this area are discussed.

  9. Risk Evaluation of Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography-Related Contrast Media Allergic-Like Reaction: A Single Centre Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix Trottier-Tellier

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. Few cases of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography- (ERCP- related contrast media (CM adverse reactions have been reported in the current literature. There is a lack of standardisation in practice regarding premedication prophylaxis for at-risk patients undergoing ERCP and there are few data to guide the practitioners. Our goal is to evaluate the risk of CM adverse reaction in a group of patients with a past history of allergic-like reaction to iodine product undergoing ERCP. Methods. A retrospective chart review study was performed of patients who underwent ERCP at our single centre from January 2010 to December 2015. Results. 2295 ERCPs were performed among 1766 patients. No anaphylactoid or severe adverse reaction occurred. One (0.04% ERCP-related CM benign reaction was reported in a patient known for penicillin allergy. Among 127 ERCPs performed on patients with a prior adverse reaction to iodine, 121 procedures were done without and 6 with a premedication prophylaxis. In both groups, no ERCP-related CM reaction occurred. Conclusions. To our knowledge, we report the largest cohort of iodine allergic patients undergoing ERCP ever published. These results suggest that ERCP-related CM adverse reactions are very rare even among patients at risk for CM reaction.

  10. Macular pigment density in relation to serum and adipose tissue concentrations of lutein and serum concentrations of zeaxanthin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekmans, W.M.R.; Berendschot, T.T.J.R.; Klöpping-Ketelaars, I.A.A.; Vries, A.J. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Tijburg, L.B.M.; Kardinaal, A.F.M.; Poppel, G. van

    2002-01-01

    Background: Macular pigment (MP), concentrated in the central area of the retina, contains the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin. A low MP density could be a risk factor for age-related macular degeneration. Little information is available regarding MP density in relation to serum lutein and

  11. Dispersion relations of density fluctuations observed by heavy ion beam probe in the TEXT tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, D.W.

    1990-09-01

    Wave numbers as functions of frequency for density fluctuations in the core of the TEXT tokamak are measured in Heavy Ion Beam Probe experiments by analyzing the relative phases of signals originating from nearby points in the plasma. The adjacent points are typically 2 cm apart, with their relative orientation (δr, δθ) depending on position (r,θ). for angular frequencies ω ≤ 10 6 /s the signals are quite coherent, leading to reasonably well-defined ''dispersion relations.'' These do not correspond to known modes of the drift wave type, i.e., ballooning or slab-like electron drift waves or ion temperature gradient modes. The effect of finite sample volume size does not significantly alter this conclusion. 25 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Positron probing of electron momentum density in GaAs-AlAs superlattices and related materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arutyunov, N.Y.; Sekkal, N.

    2008-08-01

    The band structure calculations based on the method proposed by Jaros et al. (Phys. Rev. B 31, 1205 (1985)) have been performed for the defect-free GaAs-AlAs superlattice and related AlAs and GaAs single crystals; the electron-positron momentum density distributions have been computed and analyzed. The results of calculations are in good agreement with the experimental data obtained ad hoc for GaAs and AlAs bulk materials by measuring the angular correlation of the annihilation radiation (ACAR). Small (but marked) features of the electron-positron momentum density of the valence band have been revealed both for constituent materials and GaAs-AlAs superlattice. The delocalization of positron in 'perfect' defect-'free' AlAs and GaAs single crystals to be observed experimentally is borne out by the results of pseudo-potential band calculations performed on the basis of method proposed by Sekkal et al. (Superlattices and Microstructures, 33, 63 (2003)). The prediction of the possibility of a certain confinement of positron in the interstitial area of GaAs- AlAs superlattice is confirmed by the agreement between the results of calculations and relevant experimental data obtained for GaAs and AlAs single crystals. No considerable effect of the enhancement of the annihilation rate (due to electron-positron interaction) upon the electron-positron momentum density distribution both in the superlattice and its constituent bulk materials has been found. The results of ACAR measurements and calculations performed suggest that a tangible improvement of the sensitivity of existing positron annihilation techniques is necessary for studying details of the electron-positron momentum density distributions in defect-'free' superlattices to be created on the basis of the diamond-like semiconductors possessing close values of the electron momentum densities. On the contrary, the positron-sensitive vacancy-type defects of various types in the superlattice may become a source of the

  13. Density Variations in Quartz As a Key for Deciphering Impact-Related Ultrasonic Sounding (Rajlich's Hypothesis)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestan, J.; Alvarez Polanco, E. I.

    2014-12-01

    Ultrasound is a form of mechanical energy with a frequency greater than ≈ 20 kHz (upper human hearing limit). It is used in many scientific as well as industrial fields. Most modern applications of ultrasound utilize sources which are either piezoelectric or magnetostrictive (Benwell et Bly 1987). A meteorite impact has been considered to be an ultrasound source during last years (Rajlich 2011). Rajlich (2014) is coming with a hypothesis that white planes made of microcavities in Bohemian quartz have their origin in an impact-related ultrasonic sounding. The Bohemian Massif has been considered to be one of the largest impact craters in whole of the world (Papagiannis et El-Baz 1988, Papagiannis 1989, Rajlich 2014). Rajlich's hypothesis implies a liquid behavior of quartz during the impact event. We state that then there have to exist planes of slightly higher density than their surroundings together with planes of microcavities. They should intersect each other without mutual influencing (as in a case of planes made of microcavities). Because physics of ultrasound during an impact event is a brand new and unknown field, we try to choose a simple way of its cognition. It is possible to take the sine wave and set 3 requirements. (1) There exist some surroundings of points of peak amplitudes. (2) These surroundings are of higher density (compression) or lower density (rarefaction) than the mean density of quartz. (3) The difference between the higher/lower and surrounding density is measurable. There was done an experimental study of Bohemian quartz using QCT bone densitometry at the Radiology Munich. Quartz with a size of ≈ 5 x 8 cm absorbed too much RTG radiation (kV 140, mAs 330), which made a picture of internal structure impossible. We propose another techniques and appeal to other scientists to face this challenge. If Bohemian quartz has a harmonically distributed density, we consider it to be a support for Rajlich's hypothesis. AcknowledgementsWe would like

  14. Pain sensitivity is inversely related to regional grey matter density in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Nichole M; Zeidan, Fadel; Lobanov, Oleg V; Hadsel, Morten S; Martucci, Katherine T; Quevedo, Alexandre S; Starr, Christopher J; Nahman-Averbuch, Hadas; Weissman-Fogel, Irit; Granovsky, Yelena; Yarnitsky, David; Coghill, Robert C

    2014-03-01

    Pain is a highly personal experience that varies substantially among individuals. In search of an anatomical correlate of pain sensitivity, we used voxel-based morphometry to investigate the relationship between grey matter density across the whole brain and interindividual differences in pain sensitivity in 116 healthy volunteers (62 women, 54 men). Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and psychophysical data from 10 previous functional MRI studies were used. Age, sex, unpleasantness ratings, scanner sequence, and sensory testing location were added to the model as covariates. Regression analysis of grey matter density across the whole brain and thermal pain intensity ratings at 49°C revealed a significant inverse relationship between pain sensitivity and grey matter density in bilateral regions of the posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus, intraparietal sulcus, and inferior parietal lobule. Unilateral regions of the left primary somatosensory cortex also exhibited this inverse relationship. No regions showed a positive relationship to pain sensitivity. These structural variations occurred in areas associated with the default mode network, attentional direction and shifting, as well as somatosensory processing. These findings underscore the potential importance of processes related to default mode thought and attention in shaping individual differences in pain sensitivity and indicate that pain sensitivity can potentially be predicted on the basis of brain structure. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of relative density and accumulated shear strain on post-liquefaction residual deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kim

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The damage caused by liquefaction, which occurs following an earthquake, is usually because of settlement and lateral spreading. Generally, the evaluation of liquefaction has been centered on settlement, that is, residual volumetric strain. However, in actual soil, residual shear and residual volumetric deformations occur simultaneously after an earthquake. Therefore, the simultaneous evaluation of the two phenomena and the clarification of their relationship are likely to evaluate post-liquefaction soil behaviors more accurately. Hence, a quantitative evaluation of post-liquefaction damage will also be possible. In this study, the effects of relative density and accumulated shear strain on post-liquefaction residual deformations were reviewed through a series of lateral constrained-control hollow cylindrical torsion tests under undrained conditions. In order to identify the relationship between residual shear and residual volumetric strains, this study proposed a new test method that integrates monotonic loading after cyclic loading, and K0-drain after cyclic loading – in other words, the combination of cyclic loading, monotonic loading, and the K0 drain. In addition, a control that maintained the lateral constrained condition across all the processes of consolidation, cyclic loading, monotonic loading, and drainage was used to reproduce the anisotropy of in situ ground. This lateral constrain control was performed by controlling the axial strain, based on the assumption that under undrained conditions, axial and lateral strains occur simultaneously, and unless axial strain occurs, lateral strain does not occur. The test results confirmed that the recovery of effective stresses, which occur during monotonic loading and drainage after cyclic loading, respectively, result from mutually different structural restoration characteristics. In addition, in the ranges of 40–60% relative density and 50–100% accumulated shear strain, relative

  16. Visual acuity and contrast sensitivity are two important factors affecting vision-related quality of life in advanced age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Miin; Selivanova, Alexandra; Shin, Hyun Joon; Miller, Joan W; Jackson, Mary Lou

    2018-01-01

    Vision loss from age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has a profound effect on vision-related quality of life (VRQoL). The pupose of this study is to identify clinical factors associated with VRQoL using the Rasch- calibrated NEI VFQ-25 scales in bilateral advanced AMD patients. We retrospectively reviewed 47 patients (mean age 83.2 years) with bilateral advanced AMD. Clinical assessment included age, gender, type of AMD, high contrast visual acuity (VA), history of medical conditions, contrast sensitivity (CS), central visual field loss, report of Charles Bonnet Syndrome, current treatment for AMD and Rasch-calibrated NEI VFQ-25 visual function and socioemotional function scales. The NEI VFQ visual function scale includes items of general vision, peripheral vision, distance vision and near vision-related activity while the socioemotional function scale includes items of vision related-social functioning, role difficulties, dependency, and mental health. Multiple regression analysis (structural regression model) was performed using fixed item parameters obtained from the one-parameter item response theory model. Multivariate analysis showed that high contrast VA and CS were two factors influencing VRQoL visual function scale (β = -0.25, 95% CI-0.37 to -0.12, p<0.001 and β = 0.35, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.46, p<0.001) and socioemontional functioning scale (β = -0.2, 95% CI -0.37 to -0.03, p = 0.023, and β = 0.3, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.43, p = 0.001). Central visual field loss was not assoicated with either VRQoL visual or socioemontional functioning scale (β = -0.08, 95% CI-0.28 to 0.12,p = 0.44 and β = -0.09, 95% CI -0.03 to 0.16, p = 0.50, respectively). In patients with vision impairment secondary to bilateral advanced AMD, high contrast VA and CS are two important factors affecting VRQoL.

  17. Visual acuity and contrast sensitivity are two important factors affecting vision-related quality of life in advanced age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selivanova, Alexandra; Shin, Hyun Joon; Miller, Joan W.; Jackson, Mary Lou

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Vision loss from age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has a profound effect on vision-related quality of life (VRQoL). The pupose of this study is to identify clinical factors associated with VRQoL using the Rasch- calibrated NEI VFQ-25 scales in bilateral advanced AMD patients. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 47 patients (mean age 83.2 years) with bilateral advanced AMD. Clinical assessment included age, gender, type of AMD, high contrast visual acuity (VA), history of medical conditions, contrast sensitivity (CS), central visual field loss, report of Charles Bonnet Syndrome, current treatment for AMD and Rasch-calibrated NEI VFQ-25 visual function and socioemotional function scales. The NEI VFQ visual function scale includes items of general vision, peripheral vision, distance vision and near vision-related activity while the socioemotional function scale includes items of vision related-social functioning, role difficulties, dependency, and mental health. Multiple regression analysis (structural regression model) was performed using fixed item parameters obtained from the one-parameter item response theory model. Results Multivariate analysis showed that high contrast VA and CS were two factors influencing VRQoL visual function scale (β = -0.25, 95% CI-0.37 to -0.12, p<0.001 and β = 0.35, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.46, p<0.001) and socioemontional functioning scale (β = -0.2, 95% CI -0.37 to -0.03, p = 0.023, and β = 0.3, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.43, p = 0.001). Central visual field loss was not assoicated with either VRQoL visual or socioemontional functioning scale (β = -0.08, 95% CI-0.28 to 0.12,p = 0.44 and β = -0.09, 95% CI -0.03 to 0.16, p = 0.50, respectively). Conclusion In patients with vision impairment secondary to bilateral advanced AMD, high contrast VA and CS are two important factors affecting VRQoL. PMID:29746512

  18. Magnetic resonance fiber density mapping of age-related white matter changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadlbauer, Andreas; Ganslandt, Oliver; Salomonowitz, Erich; Buchfelder, Michael; Hammen, Thilo; Bachmair, Johanna; Eberhardt, Knut

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To introduce fiber density mapping (FDM) for investigation of age-related white matter (WM) changes and to compare its capabilities with conventional diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) post-processing. Methods: DTI data with 1.9 mm 3 isotropic voxels were acquired from 44 healthy volunteers (18–88 years) at 3 T. FDM is a 3-step approach which includes diagonalization of the diffusion tensor, fiber reconstruction for the whole brain, and calculation of fiber density (FD) values. Maps of fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were additionally calculated. Voxel-based analyses were performed to determine volume clusters of significant correlation with age. Bivariate linear regression models and Hotelling–Williams tests were used to detect significant differences between correlations. Results: FDM detected a larger WM volume affected by age-related changes concomitant with fewer significant clusters compared to FA and MD. This indicates that WM alterations due to normal aging occur rather globally than locally. FD values showed a significant stronger correlation with age in frontal lobes (prefrontal and precentral gyrus), limbic lobes (cingulate and parahippocampal gyrus), the corpus callosum (genu) and temporal lobes. Conclusions: FDM shows higher sensitivity for detection of age-related WM changes because it includes all surrounding fiber structures into the evaluation of each DTI data voxel.

  19. The relation between bone mineral density and lifestyle in college students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Tae Hun; Lee, Mu Sik; Bae, Suk Hwan; KIm, Yong Kwon [Konyang University, Nonsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    This study was performed in order to identify the relation between bone nineral density and life styles of some of Korean colleague students. A total of 121 college students were assessed through bone mineral density test on femoral neck and lumbar spine using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry(DEXA). The survey about their lifestyles with a self-rating questionnaire, was conducted from September 2014 to November 2014. SPSS 18.0 Program was used for those research data analyses such as the frequency analysis, the cross analysis. The percentage of the osteoporisis, osteopenia and normal groups were 0.0%, 24.8% and 75.2%. BMI, Regular menstrual cycle, Walking and Regular exercise in adolescence were positively related with T-score. But Using time of electronic devices was negative related with T-score. It can be concluded that desirable life style in time of college students and adolescence is important for their bone health. The necessity of preparing guideline for preventing bone disease in old age connected with the school curriculum should be recognized to the public and educational authorities.

  20. The relation between bone mineral density and lifestyle in college students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Tae Hun; Lee, Mu Sik; Bae, Suk Hwan; KIm, Yong Kwon

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed in order to identify the relation between bone nineral density and life styles of some of Korean colleague students. A total of 121 college students were assessed through bone mineral density test on femoral neck and lumbar spine using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry(DEXA). The survey about their lifestyles with a self-rating questionnaire, was conducted from September 2014 to November 2014. SPSS 18.0 Program was used for those research data analyses such as the frequency analysis, the cross analysis. The percentage of the osteoporisis, osteopenia and normal groups were 0.0%, 24.8% and 75.2%. BMI, Regular menstrual cycle, Walking and Regular exercise in adolescence were positively related with T-score. But Using time of electronic devices was negative related with T-score. It can be concluded that desirable life style in time of college students and adolescence is important for their bone health. The necessity of preparing guideline for preventing bone disease in old age connected with the school curriculum should be recognized to the public and educational authorities

  1. Magnetic resonance fiber density mapping of age-related white matter changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadlbauer, Andreas, E-mail: andi@nmr.at [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, A-3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Ganslandt, Oliver [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Salomonowitz, Erich [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, A-3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Buchfelder, Michael [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Hammen, Thilo [Department of Neurology, Epilepsy Center, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, D-90429 Erlangen (Germany); Bachmair, Johanna [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, A-3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Eberhardt, Knut [Krankenhaus Schloss Werneck, MRT-Kompetenzzentrum, Balthasar-Neumann-Platz 1, D-97440 Werneck (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: To introduce fiber density mapping (FDM) for investigation of age-related white matter (WM) changes and to compare its capabilities with conventional diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) post-processing. Methods: DTI data with 1.9 mm{sup 3} isotropic voxels were acquired from 44 healthy volunteers (18–88 years) at 3 T. FDM is a 3-step approach which includes diagonalization of the diffusion tensor, fiber reconstruction for the whole brain, and calculation of fiber density (FD) values. Maps of fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were additionally calculated. Voxel-based analyses were performed to determine volume clusters of significant correlation with age. Bivariate linear regression models and Hotelling–Williams tests were used to detect significant differences between correlations. Results: FDM detected a larger WM volume affected by age-related changes concomitant with fewer significant clusters compared to FA and MD. This indicates that WM alterations due to normal aging occur rather globally than locally. FD values showed a significant stronger correlation with age in frontal lobes (prefrontal and precentral gyrus), limbic lobes (cingulate and parahippocampal gyrus), the corpus callosum (genu) and temporal lobes. Conclusions: FDM shows higher sensitivity for detection of age-related WM changes because it includes all surrounding fiber structures into the evaluation of each DTI data voxel.

  2. Topology of charge density of flucytosine and related molecules and characteristics of their bond charge distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgich, Juan; Franco, Héctor J; San-Blas, Gioconda

    2006-08-24

    The molecular charge distribution of flucytosine (4-amino-5-fluoro-2-pyrimidone), uracil, 5-fluorouracil, and thymine was studied by means of density functional theory calculations (DFT). The resulting distributions were analyzed by means of the atoms in molecules (AIM) theory. Bonds were characterized through vectors formed with the charge density value, its Laplacian, and the bond ellipticity calculated at the bond critical point (BCP). Within each set of C=O, C-H, and N-H bonds, these vectors showed little dispersion. C-C bonds formed three different subsets, one with a significant degree of double bonding, a second corresponding to single bonds with a finite ellipticity produced by hyperconjugation, and a third one formed by a pure single bond. In N-C bonds, a decrease in bond length (an increase in double bond character) was not reflected as an increase in their ellipticity, as in all C-C bonds studied. It was also found that substitution influenced the N-C, C-O, and C-C bond ellipticity much more than density and its Laplacian at the BCP. The Laplacian of charge density pointed to the existence of both bonding and nonbonding maxima in the valence shell charge concentration of N, O, and F, while only bonding ones were found for the C atoms. The nonbonding maxima related to the sites for electrophilic attack and H bonding in O and N, while sites of nucleophilic attack were suggested by the holes in the valence shell of the C atoms of the carbonyl groups.

  3. GAMA/H-ATLAS: THE DUST OPACITY-STELLAR MASS SURFACE DENSITY RELATION FOR SPIRAL GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grootes, M. W.; Tuffs, R. J.; Andrae, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Popescu, C. C.; Pastrav, B. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Gunawardhana, M.; Taylor, E. N. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 206 (Australia); Kelvin, L. S.; Driver, S. P. [Scottish Universities' Physics Alliance (SUPA), School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Liske, J. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Seibert, M. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Graham, Alister W. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Baes, M. [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Baldry, I. K. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Twelve Quays House, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Bourne, N. [Centre for Astronomy and Particle Theory, The School of Physics and Astronomy, Nottingham University, University Park Campus, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Brough, S. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 296, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Cooray, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Dariush, A. [Physics Department, Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); De Zotti, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Dunne, L., E-mail: meiert.grootes@mpi-hd.mpg.de [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140 (New Zealand); and others

    2013-03-20

    We report the discovery of a well-defined correlation between B-band face-on central optical depth due to dust, {tau}{sup f}{sub B}, and the stellar mass surface density, {mu}{sub *}, of nearby (z {<=} 0.13) spiral galaxies. This relation was derived from a sample of spiral galaxies taken from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, which were detected in the FIR/submillimeter (submm) in the Herschel-ATLAS science demonstration phase field. Using a quantitative analysis of the NUV attenuation-inclination relation for complete samples of GAMA spirals categorized according to stellar mass surface density, we demonstrate that this correlation can be used to statistically correct for dust attenuation purely on the basis of optical photometry and Sersic-profile morphological fits. Considered together with previously established empirical relationships of stellar mass to metallicity and gas mass, the near linearity and high constant of proportionality of the {tau}{sub B}{sup f} - {mu}{sub *} relation disfavors a stellar origin for the bulk of refractory grains in spiral galaxies, instead being consistent with the existence of a ubiquitous and very rapid mechanism for the growth of dust in the interstellar medium. We use the {tau}{sub B}{sup f} - {mu}{sub *} relation in conjunction with the radiation transfer model for spiral galaxies of Popescu and Tuffs to derive intrinsic scaling relations between specific star formation rate (SFR), stellar mass, and stellar surface density, in which attenuation of the UV light used for the measurement of SFR is corrected on an object-to-object basis. A marked reduction in scatter in these relations is achieved which we demonstrate is due to correction of both the inclination-dependent and face-on components of attenuation. Our results are consistent with a general picture of spiral galaxies in which most of the submm emission originates from grains residing in translucent structures, exposed to UV in the diffuse interstellar

  4. Low bone mineral density is related to atherosclerosis in postmenopausal Moroccan women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherkaoui Mohammed

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some studies have implicated several possible metabolic linkages between osteoporosis and vascular calcification, including estrogen deficiency, vitamin D excess, vitamin K deficiency and lipid oxidation products. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether osteoporosis and atherosclerosis are related to each other or are independent processes, both related to aging. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the correlation between arterial thickening and bone status in a sample of apparently healthy Moroccan women. Methods Seventy-two postmenopausal women were studied. All patients were without secondary causes that might affect bone density. Bone status was assessed by bone mineral density (BMD in lumbar spine and all femoral sites. Arterial wall thickening was assessed by intima-media thickness (IMT in carotid artery (CA and femoral artery (FA. Prevalent plaques were categorized into four groups ranging from low echogenicity to high echogenicity. Results The mean age was 59.2 ± 8.3 years. 84.7% had at least one plaque. By Spearman Rank correlation, CA IMT was negatively correlated to Femoral total BMD (r = -0.33, Femoral neck BMD (r = -0.23, Ward triangle BMD (r = -0.30 and Trochanter BMD (r = -0.28 while there was no association with lumbar BMD. In multiple regression analysis, CA IMT emerged as an independent factor significantly associated with all femoral sites BMD after adjusting of confounding factors. FA IMT failed to be significantly associated with both Femoral and Lumbar BMD. No significant differences between echogenic, predominantly echogenic, predominantly echolucent and echolucent plaques groups were found concerning lumbar BMD and all femoral sites BMD Conclusion Our results demonstrate a negative correlation between bone mineral density (BMD qnd carotid intima-media thickness (IMT in postmenopausal women, independently of confounding factors. We suggest that bone status should be evaluated in

  5. The significance of relative density for particle damage in loaded and sheared gravels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fityus Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For granular assemblages of strong particles, an increase in the relative density usually leads to a significant increase in shear strength, which is evident as a peak strength, accompanied by significant dilation as the peak strength is attained. This paper describes an experimental study of shearing in assemblages of weak particles, where particle breakage offsets dilation for all but the lowest of confining stresses. In such materials, prone to particle breakage, the shear strengths of loose and dense assemblages rapidly converge to similar values as confining stress increases, and any benefit of greater relative density is lost. This is attributed to the densification effect associated with the loading under a high stress prior to shearing, which is characterised by widespread particle breakage and the formation of smaller particles to occupy space between coarser ones. Interestingly, under both low and high stresses, there was a tendency for greater particle breakage in the loose samples, as a result of both shearing and compression. This result suggests that, despite the denser assemblage having its particles more rigidly constrained and less able to rearrange to avoid direct loading, the influence of greater load-spreading capacity afforded by an increased number of particle contacts in a denser sample, is more dominant in controlling breakage.

  6. Some features of excited states density matrix calculation and their pairing relations in conjugated systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giambiagi, M.S. de; Giambiagi, M.

    1982-01-01

    Direct PPP-type calculations of self-consistent (SC) density matrices for excited states are described and the corresponding 'thawn' molecular orbitals (MO) are discussed. Special attention is addressed to particular solutions arising in conjugated systems of a certain symmetry, and to their chemical implications. The U(2) and U(3) algebras are applied respectively to the 4-electron and 6-electron cases: a natural separation of excited states in different cases follows. A simple approach to the convergence problem for excited states is given. The complementarity relations, an alternative formulation of the pairing theorem valid for heteromolecules and non-alternant systems, allow some fruitful experimental applications. Together with the extended pairing relations shown here, they may help to rationalize general trends. (Author) [pt

  7. Radiographic contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golman, K.; Holtz, E.; Almen, T.

    1987-01-01

    Contrast media are used in diagnostic radiology to enhance the X-ray attenuation between a body structure of interest and the surrounding tissue. A detail becomes perceptible on a roentgenogram only when its contrast exceeds a minimum value in relation to the background. Small areas of interest must have higher contrast than the background. The contrast effect depends on concentration of the contrast media with the body. A high contrast media concentration difference thus gives rise to more morphological details in the radiographs. Contrast media can be divided into negative contrast media such as air and gas which attenuate X-rays less than the body tissues, and positive contrast materials which attenuate X-rays more than the body tissues. The positive contrast media all contain either iodine (atomic number 53) or barium (atomic number 56) and can be divided into water-insoluble and water-soluble contrast media

  8. Genetic predisposition for adult lactose intolerance and relation to diet, bone density, and bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara M; Bonelli, Christine M; Walter, Daniela E; Kuhn, Regina J; Fahrleitner-Pammer, Astrid; Berghold, Andrea; Goessler, Walter; Stepan, Vinzenz; Dobnig, Harald; Leb, Georg; Renner, Wilfried

    2004-01-01

    Evidence that genetic disposition for adult lactose intolerance significantly affects calcium intake, bone density, and fractures in postmenopausal women is presented. PCR-based genotyping of lactase gene polymorphisms may complement diagnostic procedures to identify persons at risk for both lactose malabsorption and osteoporosis. Lactase deficiency is a common autosomal recessive condition resulting in decreased intestinal lactose degradation. A -13910 T/C dimorphism (LCT) near the lactase phlorizin hydrolase gene, reported to be strongly associated with adult lactase nonpersistence, may have an impact on calcium supply, bone density, and osteoporotic fractures in the elderly. We determined LCT genotypes TT, TC, and CC in 258 postmenopausal women using a polymerase chain reaction-based assay. Genotypes were related to milk intolerance, nutritional calcium intake, intestinal calcium absorption, bone mineral density (BMD), and nonvertebral fractures. Twenty-four percent of all women were found to have CC genotypes and genetic lactase deficiency. Age-adjusted BMD at the hip in CC genotypes and at the spine in CC and TC genotypes was reduced by -7% to -11% depending on the site measured (p = 0.04). LCT(T/C-13910) polymorphisms alone accounted for 2-4% of BMD in a multiple regression model. Bone fracture incidence was significantly associated with CC genotypes (p = 0.001). Milk calcium intake was significantly lower (-55%, p = 0.004) and aversion to milk consumption was significantly higher (+166%, p = 0.01) in women with the CC genotype, but there were no differences in overall dietary calcium intake or in intestinal calcium absorption test values. The LCT(T/C-13910) polymorphism is associated with subjective milk intolerance, reduced milk calcium intake, and reduced BMD at the hip and the lumbar spine and may predispose to bone fractures. Genetic testing for lactase deficiency may complement indirect methods in the detection of individuals at risk for both lactose

  9. Left ventricular mass in dialysis patients, determinants and relation with outcome. Results from the COnvective TRansport STudy (CONTRAST.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira M Mostovaya

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Left ventricular mass (LVM is known to be related to overall and cardiovascular mortality in end stage kidney disease (ESKD patients. The aims of the present study are 1 to determine whether LVM is associated with mortality and various cardiovascular events and 2 to identify determinants of LVM including biomarkers of inflammation and fibrosis. DESIGN SETTING PARTICIPANTS & MEASUREMENTS: Analysis was performed with data of 327 ESKD patients, a subset from the CONvective TRAnsport STudy (CONTRAST. Echocardiography was performed at baseline. Cox regression analysis was used to assess the relation of LVM tertiles with clinical events. Multivariable linear regression models were used to identify factors associated with LVM. RESULTS: Median age was 65 (IQR: 54-73 years, 203 (61% were male and median LVM was 227 (IQR: 183-279 grams. The risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio (HR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.11-2.99, cardiovascular death (HR = 3.66, 95% CI: 1.35-10.05 and sudden death (HR = 13.06; 95% CI: 6.60-107 was increased in the highest tertile (>260 grams of LVM. In the multivariable analysis positive relations with LVM were found for male gender (B = 38.8±10.3, residual renal function (B = 17.9±8.0, phosphate binder therapy (B = 16.9±8.5, and an inverse relation for a previous kidney transplantation (B = -41.1±7.6 and albumin (B = -2.9±1.1. Interleukin-6 (Il-6, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP, hepcidin-25 and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF were not related to LVM. CONCLUSION: We confirm the relation between a high LVM and outcome and expand the evidence for increased risk of sudden death. No relationship was found between LVM and markers of inflammation and fibrosis. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN38365125.

  10. Substorm-related thermospheric density and wind disturbances derived from CHAMP observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ritter

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The input of energy and momentum from the magnetosphere is most efficiently coupled into the high latitude ionosphere-thermosphere. The phenomenon we are focusing on here is the magnetospheric substorm. This paper presents substorm related observations of the thermosphere derived from the CHAMP satellite. With its sensitive accelerometer the satellite can measure the air density and zonal winds. Based on a large number of substorm events the average high and low latitude thermospheric response to substorm onsets was deduced. During magnetic substorms the thermospheric density is enhanced first at high latitudes. Then the disturbance travels at an average speed of 650 m/s to lower latitudes, and 3–4 h later the bulge reaches the equator on the night side. Under the influence of the Coriolis force the travelling atmospheric disturbance (TAD is deflected westward. In accordance with present-day atmospheric models the disturbance zonal wind velocities during substorms are close to zero near the equator before midnight and attain moderate westward velocities after midnight. In general, the wind system is only weakly perturbed (Δvy<20 m/s by substorms.

  11. Method using a density field for locating related items for data mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Brian N.

    2002-01-01

    A method for locating related items in a geometric space transforms relationships among items to geometric locations. The method locates items in the geometric space so that the distance between items corresponds to the degree of relatedness. The method facilitates communication of the structure of the relationships among the items. The method makes use of numeric values as a measure of similarity between each pairing of items. The items are given initial coordinates in the space. An energy is then determined for each item from the item's distance and similarity to other items, and from the density of items assigned coordinates near the item. The distance and similarity component can act to draw items with high similarities close together, while the density component can act to force all items apart. If a terminal condition is not yet reached, then new coordinates can be determined for one or more items, and the energy determination repeated. The iteration can terminate, for example, when the total energy reaches a threshold, when each item's energy is below a threshold, after a certain amount of time or iterations.

  12. The role of cone-beam breast-CT for breast cancer detection relative to breast density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wienbeck, Susanne; Uhlig, Johannes; Fintel, Eva von; Stahnke, Vera; Lotz, Joachim [University Medical Center Goettingen, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Goettingen (Germany); Luftner-Nagel, Susanne; Fischer, Uwe [Diagnostic Breast Center Goettingen, Goettingen (Germany); Zapf, Antonia [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Medical Statistics, Goettingen (Germany); Surov, Alexey [University of Leipzig, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Leipzig (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    To evaluate the impact of breast density on the diagnostic accuracy of non-contrast cone-beam breast computed tomography (CBBCT) in comparison to mammography for the detection of breast masses. A retrospective study was conducted from August 2015 to July 2016. Fifty-nine patients (65 breasts, 112 lesions) with BI-RADS, 5th edition 4 or 5 assessment in mammography and/or ultrasound of the breast received an additional non-contrast CBBCT. Independent double blind reading by two radiologists was performed for mammography and CBBCT imaging. Sensitivity, specificity and AUC were compared between the modalities. Breast lesions were histologically examined in 85 of 112 lesions (76%). The overall sensitivity for CBBCT (reader 1: 91%, reader 2: 88%) was higher than in mammography (both: 68%, p<0.001), and also for the high-density group (p<0.05). The specificity and AUC was higher for mammography in comparison to CBBCT (p<0.05 and p<0.001). The interobserver agreement (ICC) between the readers was 90% (95% CI: 86-93%) for mammography and 87% (95% CI: 82-91%) for CBBCT. Compared with two-view mammography, non-contrast CBBCT has higher sensitivity, lower specificity, and lower AUC for breast mass detection in both high and low density breasts. (orig.)

  13. The use of salinity contrast for density difference compensation to improve the thermal recovery efficiency in high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lopik, J.H.; Hartog, N.; Zaadnoordijk, Willem Jan

    The efficiency of heat recovery in high-temperature (>60 °C) aquifer thermal energy storage (HT-ATES) systems is limited due to the buoyancy of the injected hot water. This study investigates the potential to improve the efficiency through compensation of the density difference by increased salinity

  14. Contrasting Patterns of Phytoplankton Assemblages in Two Coastal Ecosystems in Relation to Environmental Factors (Corsica, NW Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Garrido

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Corsica Island is a sub-basin of the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea, with hydrological features typical of both oligotrophic systems and eutrophic coastal zones. Phytoplankton assemblages in two coastal ecosystems of Corsica (the deep Bay of Calvi and the shallow littoral of Bastia show contrasting patterns over a one-year cycle. In order to determine what drives these variations, seasonal changes in littoral phytoplankton are considered together with environmental parameters. Our methodology combined a survey of the physico-chemical structure of the subsurface water with a characterization of the phytoplankton community structure. Sampling provided a detailed record of the seasonal changes and successions that occur in these two areas. Results showed that the two sampled stations presented different phytoplankton abundance and distribution patterns, notably during the winter–spring bloom period. Successions in pico-, nano-, and microphytoplankton communities appeared mainly driven by differences in the ability to acquire nutrients, and in community-specific growth rates. Phytoplankton structure and dynamics are discussed in relation to available data on the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea. These results confirm that integrated monitoring of coastal areas is a requisite for gaining a proper understanding of marine ecosystems.

  15. The use of salinity contrast for density difference compensation to improve the thermal recovery efficiency in high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lopik, Jan H.; Hartog, Niels; Zaadnoordijk, Willem Jan

    2016-08-01

    The efficiency of heat recovery in high-temperature (>60 °C) aquifer thermal energy storage (HT-ATES) systems is limited due to the buoyancy of the injected hot water. This study investigates the potential to improve the efficiency through compensation of the density difference by increased salinity of the injected hot water for a single injection-recovery well scheme. The proposed method was tested through numerical modeling with SEAWATv4, considering seasonal HT-ATES with four consecutive injection-storage-recovery cycles. Recovery efficiencies for the consecutive cycles were investigated for six cases with three simulated scenarios: (a) regular HT-ATES, (b) HT-ATES with density difference compensation using saline water, and (c) theoretical regular HT-ATES without free thermal convection. For the reference case, in which 80 °C water was injected into a high-permeability aquifer, regular HT-ATES had an efficiency of 0.40 after four consecutive recovery cycles. The density difference compensation method resulted in an efficiency of 0.69, approximating the theoretical case (0.76). Sensitivity analysis showed that the net efficiency increase by using the density difference compensation method instead of regular HT-ATES is greater for higher aquifer hydraulic conductivity, larger temperature difference between injection water and ambient groundwater, smaller injection volume, and larger aquifer thickness. This means that density difference compensation allows the application of HT-ATES in thicker, more permeable aquifers and with larger temperatures than would be considered for regular HT-ATES systems.

  16. Two-colour QCD at finite fundamental quark-number density and related theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hands, S.J.; Kogut, J.B.; Morrison, S.E.; Sinclair, D.K.

    2001-01-01

    We are simulating SU(2) Yang-Mills theory with four flavours of dynamical quarks in the fundamental representation of SU(2) 'colour' at finite chemical potential, μ for quark number, as a model for QCD at finite baryon number density. In particular we observe that for μ large enough this theory undergoes a phase transition to a state with a diquark condensate which breaks quark-number symmetry. In this phase we examine the spectrum of light scalar and pseudoscalar bosons and see evidence for the Goldstone boson associated with this spontaneous symmetry breaking. This theory is closely related to QCD at finite chemical potential for isospin, a theory which we are now studying for SU(3) colour

  17. Two-colour QCD at finite fundamental quark-number density and related theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hands, S. J.; Kogut, J. B.; Morrison, S. E.; Sinclair, D. K.

    2000-01-01

    We are simulating SU(2) Yang-Mills theory with four flavours of dynamical quarks in the fundamental representation of SU(2) colour at finite chemical potential, p for quark number, as a model for QCD at finite baryon number density. In particular we observe that for p large enough this theory undergoes a phase transition to a state with a diquark condensate which breaks quark-number symmetry. In this phase we examine the spectrum of light scalar and pseudoscalar bosons and see evidence for the Goldstone boson associated with this spontaneous symmetry breaking. This theory is closely related to QCD at finite chemical potential for isospin, a theory which we are now studying for SU(3) colour

  18. Observer variability of absolute and relative thrombus density measurements in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, Emilie M. M.; Yoo, Albert J.; Beenen, Ludo F.; Berkhemer, Olvert A.; den Blanken, Mark D.; Wismans, Carrie; Niessen, Wiro J.; Majoie, Charles B.; Marquering, Henk A.; Fransen, Puck S. S.; Beumer, Debbie; van den Berg, Lucie A.; Lingsma, Hester F.; Schonewille, Wouter J.; Vos, Jan Albert; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Wermer, Marieke J. H.; van Walderveen, Marianne A. A.; Staals, Julie; Hofmeijer, Jeannette; van Oostayen, Jacques A.; Lycklama à Nijeholt, Geert J.; Boiten, Jelis; Brouwer, Patrick A.; Emmer, Bart J.; de Bruijn, Sebastiaan F.; van Dijk, Lukas C.; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Lo, Rob H.; van Dijk, Ewoud J.; de Vries, Joost; de Kort, Paul L. M.; van den Berg, Jan S. P.; A A M van Hasselt, Boudewijn; Aerden, Leo A. M.; Dallinga, René J.; Visser, Marieke C.; Bot, Joseph C. J.; Vroomen, Patrick C.; Eshghi, Omid; Schreuder, Tobien H. C. M. L.; Heijboer, Roel J. J.; Keizer, Koos; Tielbeek, Alexander V.; Hertog, Heleen M. Den; Gerrits, Dick G.; van den Berg-Vos, Renske M.; Karas, Giorgos B.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Flach, H. Zwenneke; Sprengers, Marieke E. S.; Jenniskens, Sjoerd F. M.; van den Berg, René; Koudstaal, Peter J.; van Zwam, Wim H.; Roos, Yvo B. W. E. M.; van der Lugt, Aad; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J.; Dippel, Diederik W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombus density may be a predictor for acute ischemic stroke treatment success. However, only limited data on observer variability for thrombus density measurements exist. This study assesses the variability and bias of four common thrombus density measurement methods by expert and non-expert

  19. Observer variability of absolute and relative thrombus density measurements in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M.M. Santos (Emilie M.); A.J. Yoo (Albert J.); L.F.M. Beenen (Ludo); O.A. Berkhemer (Olvert); M.D. Den Blanken (Mark D.); C. Wismans (Carrie); W.J. Niessen (Wiro); C.B. Majoie (Charles); H. Marquering (Henk)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Thrombus density may be a predictor for acute ischemic stroke treatment success. However, only limited data on observer variability for thrombus density measurements exist. This study assesses the variability and bias of four common thrombus density measurement methods by

  20. Observer variability of absolute and relative thrombus density measurements in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, E.M.; Yoo, A.J.; Beenen, L.F.; Berkhemer, O.A.; Blanken, M.D. den; Wismans, C.; Niessen, W.J.; Majoie, C.B.; Marquering, H.A.; Dijk, E.J. van; et al.,

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Thrombus density may be a predictor for acute ischemic stroke treatment success. However, only limited data on observer variability for thrombus density measurements exist. This study assesses the variability and bias of four common thrombus density measurement methods by expert and

  1. [Diagnostic value of quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters and relative quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters in breast lesions with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, T T; Liu, W H; Zhang, Y Q; Li, L H; Wang, R; Ye, Y Y

    2017-08-01

    Objective: To explore the differential between the value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters and relative pharmacokinetic quantitative parameters in breast lesions. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 255 patients(262 breast lesions) who was obtained by clinical palpation , ultrasound or full-field digital mammography , and then all lessions were pathologically confirmed in Zhongda Hospital, Southeast University from May 2012 to May 2016. A 3.0 T MRI scanner was used to obtain the quantitative MR pharmacokinetic parameters: volume transfer constant (K(trans)), exchange rate constant (k(ep))and extravascular extracellular volume fraction (V(e)). And measured the quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters of normal glands tissues which on the same side of the same level of the lesions; and then calculated the value of relative pharmacokinetic parameters: rK(rans)、rk(ep) and rV(e).To explore the diagnostic value of two pharmacokinetic parameters in differential diagnosis of benign and malignant breast lesions using receiver operating curves and model of logistic regression. Results: (1)There were significant differences between benign lesions and malignant lesions in K(trans) and k(ep) ( t =15.489, 15.022, respectively, P 0.05). The areas under the ROC curve(AUC)of K(trans), k(ep) and V(e) between malignant and benign lesions were 0.933, 0.948 and 0.387, the sensitivity of K(trans), k(ep) and V(e) were 77.1%, 85.0%, 51.0% , and the specificity of K(trans), k(ep) and V(e) were 96.3%, 93.6%, 60.8% for the differential diagnosis of breast lesions if taken the maximum Youden's index as cut-off. (2)There were significant differences between benign lesions and malignant lesions in rK(trans), rk(ep) and rV(e) ( t =14.177, 11.726, 2.477, respectively, P quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters and the prediction probability of relative quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters( Z =0.867, P =0.195). Conclusion: There was no significant

  2. Relative Influence of Prior Life Stages and Habitat Variables on Dragonfly (Odonata: Gomphidae Densities among Lake Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alysa Remsburg

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Many aquatic species have discrete life stages, making it important to understand relative influences of the different habitats occupied within those populations. Although population demographics in one stage can carry over to spatially separated life stages, most studies of habitat associations have been restricted to a single life stage. Among Gomphidae dragonflies (Odonata: Anisoptera, recruitment via adult oviposition establishes initial population sizes of the aquatic larvae. However, spatial variability in larval survivorship could obscure the relationship between adult and larval densities. This study uses surveys conducted during 2005 and 2006 of Gomphidae larval, emergence, and adult stages from 22 lake sites in northern Wisconsin, USA, to investigate (1 whether the Gomphidae density of each life stage correlated spatially with that of the preceding life stage and (2 what habitat factors help explain variation in densities at each life stage. Results indicated that adult densities from the previous season helped predict densities of early-instar larvae. This finding suggests that oviposition site selection controlled the local larval distribution more than larval survivorship or movement. Late-instar larval densities helped predict densities of emerging Gomphidae later the same season, suggesting that variation in survivorship of final-instar larvae among sites is small relative to the variation in larval recruitment. This study demonstrates that locations with higher densities of odonates in the water also have higher densities of odonates on land. In addition to the densities of Gomphidae in previous life stages, water clarity helped predict larval densities, and riparian wetland vegetation helped predict emergent dragonfly densities.

  3. Contrast Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is mixed with water before administration liquid paste tablet When iodine-based and barium-sulfate contrast materials ... for patients with kidney failure or allergies to MRI and/or computed tomography (CT) contrast material. Microbubble ...

  4. Knowledge of breast density and awareness of related breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Mark A; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter; Bey-Knight, Lisa; Penner, Louis; Albrecht, Terrance L

    2013-06-01

    Little is known about women's knowledge of breast density or between-race differences in this knowledge. In the current study, we examined knowledge of breast density and awareness of its role as a breast cancer risk factor among women who had previously taken part in a breast imaging study. Seventy-seven women (54.5 % Black) returned a survey assessing perceptions and accuracy of breast density knowledge, knowledge of one's own breast density, and breast cancer risk awareness. White women had greater perceived knowledge of breast density compared to Black women; however, differences in the accuracy of definitions of breast density were due to education. Black women were less likely to know how dense their own breasts were. Black and White women both lacked awareness that having dense breast increased breast cancer risk. The results highlight the need to disseminate information regarding breast density to women, while ensuring that the information is equally accessible to both Black and White women.

  5. Seasonal patterns of leaf gas exchange and water relations in dry rain forest trees of contrasting leaf phenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choat, Brendan; Ball, Marilyn C; Luly, Jon G; Donnelly, Christine F; Holtum, Joseph A M

    2006-05-01

    Diurnal and seasonal patterns of leaf gas exchange and water relations were examined in tree species of contrasting leaf phenology growing in a seasonally dry tropical rain forest in north-eastern Australia. Two drought-deciduous species, Brachychiton australis (Schott and Endl.) A. Terracc. and Cochlospermum gillivraei Benth., and two evergreen species, Alphitonia excelsa (Fenzal) Benth. and Austromyrtus bidwillii (Benth.) Burret. were studied. The deciduous species had higher specific leaf areas and maximum photosynthetic rates per leaf dry mass in the wet season than the evergreens. During the transition from wet season to dry season, total canopy area was reduced by 70-90% in the deciduous species and stomatal conductance (g(s)) and assimilation rate (A) were markedly lower in the remaining leaves. Deciduous species maintained daytime leaf water potentials (Psi(L)) at close to or above wet season values by a combination of stomatal regulation and reduction in leaf area. Thus, the timing of leaf drop in deciduous species was not associated with large negative values of daytime Psi(L) (greater than -1.6 MPa) or predawn Psi(L) (greater than -1.0 MPa). The deciduous species appeared sensitive to small perturbations in soil and leaf water status that signalled the onset of drought. The evergreen species were less sensitive to the onset of drought and g(s) values were not significantly lower during the transitional period. In the dry season, the evergreen species maintained their canopies despite increasing water-stress; however, unlike Eucalyptus species from northern Australian savannas, A and g(s) were significantly lower than wet season values.

  6. The tumour border on contrast-enhanced spectral mammography and its relation to histological characteristics of invasive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambicka, Aleksandra; Luczynska, Elzbieta; Adamczyk, Agnieszka; Harazin-Lechowska, Agnieszka; Sas-Korczynska, Beata; Niemiec, Joanna

    Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) is one of the new diagnostic modalities implemented in clinical practice. In the case of these techniques, there are two major issues to be addressed: (1) their diagnostic usefulness, and (2) the relation between parameters assessed using these techniques and well-known diagnostic/prognostic/predictive markers (histological, clinical, and molecular). Therefore, we studied the relationship between the tumour margin assessed on CESM and (1) tumour borders defined on the basis of macroscopic and microscopic examination, (2) pT, (3) pN, and (4) tumour grade in a group of 82 breast cancer patients. Based on CESM, the tumour border was defined as sharp, indistinct or spiculated, whereas in the case of lesions showing weak or medium enhancement on CESM the borders were classified as unspecified. We found a statistically significant relationship between tumour margin on CESM and (1) macroscopic border (a spiculated margin on CESM was found only in carcinomas with an invasive border on histological examination; p = 0.004), (2) pT (p = 0.016), and (3) pN (nodal involvement was observed most frequently in carcinomas with a spiculated or indistinct margin on CESM; p = 0.045). Moreover, in cases with an undefined margin on CESM (cases showing weak or medium enhancement on CESM), both invasive and pushing borders were found on histological examination. The results of our preliminary study suggest that it is possible to assess macroscopic borders of examined lesions on the basis of CESM imaging. This might be useful in planning the extent of surgical excision. On the other hand, the assessment of the tumour margin on CESM might not be precise in cases showing weak enhancement.

  7. The tumour border on contrast-enhanced spectral mammography and its relation to histological characteristics of invasive breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Ambicka

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM is one of the new diagnostic modalities implemented in clinical practice. In the case of these techniques, there are two major issues to be addressed: (1 their diagnostic usefulness, and (2 the relation between parameters assessed using these techniques and well-known diagnostic/prognostic/predictive markers (histological, clinical, and molecular. Therefore, we studied the relationship between the tumour margin assessed on CESM and (1 tumour borders defined on the basis of macroscopic and microscopic examination, (2 pT, (3 pN, and (4 tumour grade in a group of 82 breast cancer patients. Based on CESM, the tumour border was defined as sharp, indistinct or spiculated, whereas in the case of lesions showing weak or medium enhancement on CESM the borders were classified as unspecified. We found a statistically significant relationship between tumour margin on CESM and (1 macroscopic border (a spiculated margin on CESM was found only in carcinomas with an invasive border on histological examination; p = 0.004, (2 pT (p = 0.016, and (3 pN (nodal involvement was observed most frequently in carcinomas with a spiculated or indistinct margin on CESM; p = 0.045. Moreover, in cases with an undefined margin on CESM (cases showing weak or medium enhancement on CESM, both invasive and pushing borders were found on histological examination. The results of our preliminary study suggest that it is possible to assess macroscopic borders of examined lesions on the basis of CESM imaging. This might be useful in planning the extent of surgical excision. On the other hand, the assessment of the tumour margin on CESM might not be precise in cases showing weak enhancement.

  8. Subalpine bumble bee foraging distances and densities in relation to flower availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Susan E

    2009-06-01

    Bees feed almost exclusively on nectar and pollen from flowers. However, little is known about how food availability limits bee populations, especially in high elevation areas. Foraging distances and relationships between forager densities and resource availability can provide insights into the potential for food limitation in mobile consumer populations. For example, if floral resources are limited, bee consumers should fly farther to forage, and they should be more abundant in areas with more flowers. I estimated subalpine bumble bee foraging distances by calculating forager recapture probabilities at increasing distances from eight marking locations. I measured forager and flower densities over the flowering season in six half-hectare plots. Because subalpine bumble bees have little time to build their colonies, they may forage over short distances and forager density may not be constrained by flower density. However, late in the season, when floral resources dwindle, foraging distances may increase, and there may be stronger relationships between forager and flower densities. Throughout the flowering season, marked bees were primarily found within 100 m (and never >1,000 m) from their original marking location, suggesting that they typically did not fly far to forage. Although the density of early season foraging queens increased with early-season flower density, the density of mid- and late-season workers and males did not vary with flower density. Short foraging distances and no relationships between mid- and late-season forager and flower densities suggest that high elevation bumble bees may have ample floral resources for colony growth reproduction.

  9. Automatic temporal expectancy: a high-density event-related potential study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Mento

    Full Text Available How we compute time is not fully understood. Questions include whether an automatic brain mechanism is engaged in temporally regular environmental structure in order to anticipate events, and whether this can be dissociated from task-related processes, including response preparation, selection and execution. To investigate these issues, a passive temporal oddball task requiring neither time-based motor response nor explicit decision was specifically designed and delivered to participants during high-density, event-related potentials recording. Participants were presented with pairs of audiovisual stimuli (S1 and S2 interspersed with an Inter-Stimulus Interval (ISI that was manipulated according to an oddball probabilistic distribution. In the standard condition (70% of trials, the ISI lasted 1,500 ms, while in the two alternative, deviant conditions (15% each, it lasted 2,500 and 3,000 ms. The passive over-exposition to the standard ISI drove participants to automatically and progressively create an implicit temporal expectation of S2 onset, reflected by the time course of the Contingent Negative Variation response, which always peaked in correspondence to the point of S2 maximum expectation and afterwards inverted in polarity towards the baseline. Brain source analysis of S1- and ISI-related ERP activity revealed activation of sensorial cortical areas and the supplementary motor area (SMA, respectively. In particular, since the SMA time course synchronised with standard ISI, we suggest that this area is the major cortical generator of the temporal CNV reflecting an automatic, action-independent mechanism underlying temporal expectancy.

  10. The role of cone-beam breast-CT for breast cancer detection relative to breast density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienbeck, Susanne; Uhlig, Johannes; Luftner-Nagel, Susanne; Zapf, Antonia; Surov, Alexey; von Fintel, Eva; Stahnke, Vera; Lotz, Joachim; Fischer, Uwe

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the impact of breast density on the diagnostic accuracy of non-contrast cone-beam breast computed tomography (CBBCT) in comparison to mammography for the detection of breast masses. A retrospective study was conducted from August 2015 to July 2016. Fifty-nine patients (65 breasts, 112 lesions) with BI-RADS, 5th edition 4 or 5 assessment in mammography and/or ultrasound of the breast received an additional non-contrast CBBCT. Independent double blind reading by two radiologists was performed for mammography and CBBCT imaging. Sensitivity, specificity and AUC were compared between the modalities. Breast lesions were histologically examined in 85 of 112 lesions (76%). The overall sensitivity for CBBCT (reader 1: 91%, reader 2: 88%) was higher than in mammography (both: 68%, pdensity group (pdensity breasts. • Overall sensitivity for non-contrast CBBCT ranged between 88%-91%. • Sensitivity was higher for CBBCT than mammography in both density types (pdensity types (pdensity types (p<0.001).

  11. The relation between the column density structures and the magnetic field orientation in the Vela C molecular complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, J. D.; Ade, P. A. R.; Angilè, F. E.; Ashton, P.; Benton, S. J.; Devlin, M. J.; Dober, B.; Fissel, L. M.; Fukui, Y.; Galitzki, N.; Gandilo, N. N.; Hennebelle, P.; Klein, J.; Li, Z.-Y.; Korotkov, A. L.; Martin, P. G.; Matthews, T. G.; Moncelsi, L.; Netterfield, C. B.; Novak, G.; Pascale, E.; Poidevin, F.; Santos, F. P.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Shariff, J. A.; Thomas, N. E.; Tucker, C. E.; Tucker, G. S.; Ward-Thompson, D.

    2017-07-01

    We statistically evaluated the relative orientation between gas column density structures, inferred from Herschel submillimetre observations, and the magnetic field projected on the plane of sky, inferred from polarized thermal emission of Galactic dust observed by the Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Submillimetre Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) at 250, 350, and 500 μm, towards the Vela C molecular complex. First, we find very good agreement between the polarization orientations in the three wavelength-bands, suggesting that, at the considered common angular resolution of 3.´0 that corresponds to a physical scale of approximately 0.61 pc, the inferred magnetic field orientation is not significantly affected by temperature or dust grain alignment effects. Second, we find that the relative orientation between gas column density structures and the magnetic field changes progressively with increasing gas column density, from mostly parallel or having no preferred orientation at low column densities to mostly perpendicular at the highest column densities. This observation is in agreement with previous studies by the Planck collaboration towards more nearby molecular clouds. Finally, we find a correspondencebetween (a) the trends in relative orientation between the column density structures and the projected magnetic field; and (b) the shape of the column density probability distribution functions (PDFs). In the sub-regions of Vela C dominated by one clear filamentary structure, or "ridges", where the high-column density tails of the PDFs are flatter, we find a sharp transition from preferentially parallel or having no preferred relative orientation at low column densities to preferentially perpendicular at highest column densities. In the sub-regions of Vela C dominated by several filamentary structures with multiple orientations, or "nests", where the maximum values of the column density are smaller than in the ridge-like sub-regions and the high-column density

  12. Modeling and control of the current density profile in Tokamaks and its relation to electron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucca, C.

    2009-04-01

    The current density in tokamak plasmas strongly affects transport phenomena, therefore its understanding and control represent a crucial challenge for controlled thermonuclear fusion. Within the vast framework of tokamak studies, three topics have been tackled in the course of the present thesis: first, the modelling of the current density evolution in electron Internal Transport Barrier (eITB) discharges in the Tokamak à Configuration Variable (TCV); second, the study of current diffusion and inversion of electron transport properties observed during Swing Electron Cyclotron Current Drive (Swing ECCD) discharges in TCV; third, the analysis of the current density tailoring obtained by local ECCD driven by the improved EC system for sawtooth control and reverse shear scenarios in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The work dedicated to the study of eITBs in TCV has been undertaken to identify which of the main parameters, directly related to the current density, played a relevant role in the confinement improvement created during these advanced scenarios. In this context, the current density has to be modeled, there being no measurement currently available on TCV. Since the Rebut-Lallia-Watkins (RLW) model has been validated on TCV ohmic heated plasmas, the corresponding scaling factor has often been used as a measure of improved confinement on TCV. The many interpretative simulations carried on different TCV discharges have shown that the thermal confinement improvement factor, H RLW , linearly increases with the absolute value of the minimum shear outside ρ > 0.3, ρ indicating a normalized radial coordinate. These investigations, performed with the transport code ASTRA, therefore confirmed a general observation, formulated through previous studies, that the formation of the transport barrier is correlated with the magnetic shear reversal. This was, indeed, found to be true in all cases studied, regardless of the different heating and

  13. Uncertainty relations and reduced density matrices: Mapping many-body quantum mechanics onto four particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazziotti, David A.; Erdahl, Robert M.

    2001-04-01

    For the description of ground-state correlation phenomena an accurate mapping of many-body quantum mechanics onto four particles is developed. The energy for a quantum system with no more than two-particle interactions may be expressed in terms of a two-particle reduced density matrix (2-RDM), but variational optimization of the 2-RDM requires that it corresponds to an N-particle wave function. We derive N-representability conditions on the 2-RDM that guarantee the validity of the uncertainty relations for all operators with two-particle interactions. One of these conditions is shown to be necessary and sufficient to make the RDM solutions of the dispersion condition equivalent to those from the contracted Schrödinger equation (CSE) [Mazziotti, Phys. Rev. A 57, 4219 (1998)]. In general, the CSE is a stronger N-representability condition than the dispersion condition because the CSE implies the dispersion condition as well as additional N-representability constraints from the Hellmann-Feynman theorem. Energy minimization subject to the representability constraints is performed for a boson model with 10, 30, and 75 particles. Even when traditional wave-function methods fail at large perturbations, the present method yields correlation energies within 2%.

  14. Measurement of carbon nanotube microstructure relative density by optical attenuation and observation of size-dependent variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sei Jin; Schmidt, Aaron J; Bedewy, Mostafa; Hart, A John

    2013-07-21

    Engineering the density of carbon nanotube (CNT) forest microstructures is vital to applications such as electrical interconnects, micro-contact probes, and thermal interface materials. For CNT forests on centimeter-scale substrates, weight and volume can be used to calculate density. However, this is not suitable for smaller samples, including individual microstructures, and moreover does not enable mapping of spatial density variations within the forest. We demonstrate that the relative mass density of individual CNT microstructures can be measured by optical attenuation, with spatial resolution equaling the size of the focused spot. For this, a custom optical setup was built to measure the transmission of a focused laser beam through CNT microstructures. The transmittance was correlated with the thickness of the CNT microstructures by Beer-Lambert-Bouguer law to calculate the attenuation coefficient. We reveal that the density of CNT microstructures grown by CVD can depend on their size, and that the overall density of arrays of microstructures is affected significantly by run-to-run process variations. Further, we use the technique to quantify the change in CNT microstructure density due to capillary densification. This is a useful and accessible metrology technique for CNTs in future microfabrication processes, and will enable direct correlation of density to important properties such as stiffness and electrical conductivity.

  15. Increased power spectral density in resting-state pain-related brain networks in fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, Seong-Ho; Seo, Jeehye; Kim, Sang-Hyon; Han, Seung Woo; Nam, Eon Jeong; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Lee, Hui Joong; Lee, Seung-Jae; Kim, Yang-Tae; Chang, Yongmin

    2013-09-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM), characterized by chronic widespread pain, is known to be associated with heightened responses to painful stimuli and atypical resting-state functional connectivity among pain-related regions of the brain. Previous studies of FM using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) have focused on intrinsic functional connectivity, which maps the spatial distribution of temporal correlations among spontaneous low-frequency fluctuation in functional MRI (fMRI) resting-state data. In the current study, using rs-fMRI data in the frequency domain, we investigated the possible alteration of power spectral density (PSD) of low-frequency fluctuation in brain regions associated with central pain processing in patients with FM. rsfMRI data were obtained from 19 patients with FM and 20 age-matched healthy female control subjects. For each subject, the PSDs for each brain region identified from functional connectivity maps were computed for the frequency band of 0.01 to 0.25 Hz. For each group, the average PSD was determined for each brain region and a 2-sample t test was performed to determine the difference in power between the 2 groups. According to the results, patients with FM exhibited significantly increased frequency power in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1), supplementary motor area (SMA), dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and amygdala. In patients with FM, the increase in PSD did not show an association with depression or anxiety. Therefore, our findings of atypical increased frequency power during the resting state in pain-related brain regions may implicate the enhanced resting-state baseline neural activity in several brain regions associated with pain processing in FM. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. B-vitamin status in relation to bone mineral density in treated celiac disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Michelle; Ward, Mary; Dickey, William; Hoey, Leane; Molloy, Anne M; Waldron, Lisa; Varghese, Abraham; McCann, Adrian; Blayney, Jaine K; McNulty, Helene

    2015-08-01

    Patients with celiac disease (CD) are at increased risk of osteoporosis and compromised B-vitamin status. Emerging evidence supports a beneficial role of folate and the metabolically related B-vitamins in bone health in generally healthy adults, but no previous study has investigated this in CD patients. The aim of the current study was to examine the relationship of folate, vitamins B12, B6 and B2 (riboflavin), and the related metabolite homocysteine, with bone mineral density (BMD) in CD patients. Of the 400 treated adult CD patients invited to participate, 110 responded and met the eligibility criteria for study participation. BMD was measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning at the lumbar spine (L1-L4), femoral neck, and total hip sites. Biomarker status of the relevant B-vitamins and homocysteine, and dietary B-vitamin intakes, were measured. The significant predictors of low BMD were increasing age (B = 0.080, p B = 0.072, p = 0.004), whereas no significant relationship with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (B = 0.093, p = 0.928) was observed. Following adjustment for these predictors, serum vitamin B12 (but no other B-vitamin biomarker) was found to be a significant determinant of BMD at the femoral neck (β = 0.416, p = 0.011) and total hip (β = 0.327, p = 0.049) in men only. No significant relationships were found between any of the B-vitamin biomarkers investigated and BMD (at any measured site) in women. These findings add to current evidence suggesting a potential role of vitamin B12 in BMD, particularly in men, and show such a relationship for the first time in CD patients.

  17. Lactoperoxidase catalyzed radioiodination of cell surface immunoglobulin: incorporated radioactivity may not reflect relative cell surface Ig density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, R.L.; Yuen, C.C.; Mage, R.G.

    1979-01-01

    Rabbit and mouse splenic lymphocytes were radioiodinated by the lactoperoxidase technique, extracted with non-ionic detergent, immunoprecipitated with high titered rabbit anti-kappa antisera, and compared by SDS-PAGE. Mouse sIg peaks were reproducibly larger in size than rabbit sIg peaks (often greater than 10 times). Neither differences in incorporation of label into the rabbit cell surface, nor differences in average sIg density explain this result. Total TCA-precipitable radioactivity was similar in each species. Estimation of the relative amounts of sIg in the mouse and rabbit showed similar average sIg densities. Differences in detergent solubility, proteolytic lability, or antisera used also do not adequately account for this difference. Thus, these data indicate that radioactivity incorporated after lactoperoxidase catalyzed cell surface radioiodination may not reflect cell surface Ig density. Conclusions about cell surface density based upon relative incorporation of radioactivity should be confirmed by other approaches

  18. A 970 Hounsfield units (HU) threshold of kidney stone density on non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT) improves patients' selection for extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL): evidence from a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzaid, Idir; Al-qahtani, Said; Dominique, Sébastien; Hupertan, Vincent; Fernandez, Pédro; Hermieu, Jean-François; Delmas, Vincent; Ravery, Vincent

    2012-12-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Stone density on non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT) is reported to be a prognosis factor for extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL). In this prospective study, we determined that a 970 HU threshold of stone density is a very specific and sensitive threshold beyond which the likelihood to be rendered stone free is poor. Thus, NCCT evaluation of stone density before ESWL may useful to identify which patients should be offered alternative treatment to optimise their outcome. • To evaluate the usefulness of measuring urinary calculi attenuation values by non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT) for predicting the outcome of treatment by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL). • We prospectively evaluated 50 patients with urinary calculi of 5-22 mm undergoing ESWL. • All patients had NCCT at 120 kV and 100 mA on a spiral CT scanner. Patient age, sex, body mass index, stone laterality, stone size, stone attenuation values (Hounsfield units [HU]), stone location, and presence of JJ stent were studied as potential predictors. • The outcome was evaluated 4 weeks after the ESWL session by NCCT. • ESWL success was defined as patients being stone-free (SF) or with remaining stone fragments of ESWL treatment. • Stones of patients who became SF or had CIRF had a lower density compared with stones in patients with residual fragments [mean (sd) 715 (260) vs 1196 (171) HU, P ESWL was identified. • The use of NCCT to determine the attenuation values of urinary calculi before ESWL helps to predict treatment outcome, and, consequently, could be helpful in planning alternative treatment for patients with a likelihood of a poor outcome from ESWL. © 2012 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2012 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  19. Anatomical traits related to stress in high density populations of Typha angustifolia L. (Typhaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. F. Corrêa

    Full Text Available Abstract Some macrophytes species show a high growth potential, colonizing large areas on aquatic environments. Cattail (Typha angustifolia L. uncontrolled growth causes several problems to human activities and local biodiversity, but this also may lead to competition and further problems for this species itself. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate anatomical modifications on T. angustifolia plants from different population densities, once it can help to understand its biology. Roots and leaves were collected from natural populations growing under high and low densities. These plant materials were fixed and submitted to usual plant microtechnique procedures. Slides were observed and photographed under light microscopy and images were analyzed in the UTHSCSA-Imagetool software. The experimental design was completely randomized with two treatments and ten replicates, data were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Scott-Knott test at p<0.05. Leaves from low density populations showed higher stomatal density and index. These modifications on stomatal characteristics were more evident on the leaf abaxial surface. Plants from low density populations showed thicker mesophyll and higher proportion of aerenchymal area. Roots from low density populations showed a higher proportion of the vascular cylinder. Whereas, plants from higher density populations showed greater thickness of the endodermis, exodermis, phloem and root cortex. Higher density populations showed a higher proportion of aerenchymal gaps in the root cortex. Therefore, cattail plants from populations growing under high density population show anatomical traits typical of plants under stress, which promotes the development of less functional anatomical modifications to aquatic environments.

  20. Variability in body mass and sexual dimorphism in Danish red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) in relation to population density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagh, Sussie; Hansen, Mette Sif; Jensen, Birger

    2018-01-01

    For the first time, temporal variability in body size and sexual dimorphism is revealed in foxes Vulpes vulpes from the same geographical area at over time. The weights and lengths of 552 Danish foxes were documented during three different periods: 1965–1977, 2012–2014 and the winter of 2015...... of 2012–2014, no difference in body fat measured by rump fat thickness (RFT) was found between age groups and genders in contrast to 2015/2016, when RFT was significantly (p ...–1977 and compared to 2015/2016, compared to 2012–2014, when population density was high (the mean weight: 6.8 kg). However, no significant differences were found in the weight of females. Hence, sexual dimorphism ranged from 7.6 to 3.6 in adult foxes in low and high-density periods, respectively. During the winters...

  1. Bond index: relation to second-order density matrix and charge fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giambiagi, M.S. de; Giambiagi, M.; Jorge, F.E.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that, in the same way as the atomic charge is an invariant built from the first-order density matrix, the closed-shell generalized bond index is an invariant associated with the second-order reduced density matrix. The active charge of an atom (sum of bond indices) is shown to be the sum of all density correlation functions between it and the other atoms in the molecule; similarly, the self-charge is the fluctuation of its total charge. (Author) [pt

  2. Genetic analysis of male reproductive success in relation to density in the zebrafish, Danio rerio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan William C

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We used behavioural and genetic data to investigate the effects of density on male reproductive success in the zebrafish, Danio rerio. Based on previous measurements of aggression and courtship behaviour by territorial males, we predicted that they would sire more offspring than non-territorial males. Results Microsatellite analysis of paternity showed that at low densities territorial males had higher reproductive success than non-territorial males. However, at high density territorial males were no more successful than non-territorials and the sex difference in the opportunity for sexual selection, based on the parameter Imates, was low. Conclusion Male zebrafish exhibit two distinct mating tactics; territoriality and active pursuit of females. Male reproductive success is density dependent and the opportunity for sexual selection appears to be weak in this species.

  3. Copepod swimming behavior, respiration, and expression of stress-related genes in response to high stocking densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Birgitte; Jakobsen, Hans Henrik; Stief, Peter

    2017-01-01

    is problematic for calanoid copepod species like Acartia tonsa. In the present study, we evaluated the response of copepods experiencing stress under high-density conditions by assessing the acute stress level of A. tonsa. Control density was at 100 ind. L−1 while the treatments were increased stepwise up to 10......,000 ind. L−1. Three biological/physiological end-points were studied: swimming behavior, respiration rate and expression level of stress-related genes. None of the elevated densities caused any significant change in swimming behavior, respiration rate or gene expression level. This study suggests...... that adults of A. tonsa do not exhibit any measurable acute stress response when exposed to high culture densities for 12 h....

  4. Predação de larvas de pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus, Holmberg por copépodes ciclopóides (Mesocyclops longisetus, Thiébaud em diferentes densidades e ambientes e com diferentes contrastes visuais Predation of pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus, Holmberg larvae by cyclopoid copepods (Mesocyclops longisetus, Thiébaud at different densities in environments with different visual contrast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmino Hayashi

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente trabalho foi avaliar a influência da densidade de copépodes ciclopóides (Mesocyclops longisetus na predação de larvas de pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus em ambientes com diferentes contrastes visuais. Foram utilizadas 360 larvas de pacu (Lt = 5,77±0,23 mm e Wt = 6,57 mg, distribuídas em 24 aquários (1-L de vidro transparente, em um delineamento em blocos casualizados com oito tratamentos e três repetições, que constaram de 0, 10, 20 e 30 copépodes/L, em aquários com paredes sem revestimento ou com paredes revestidas de plástico escuro. Realizou-se a contagem, a cada uma hora, das larvas mortas e em seguida elas eram retiradas com uma pipeta. Observou-se um aumento linear nas taxas de predação (p Influence of density of cyclopoid copepods (Mesocyclops longisetus on pacu larvae (Piaractus mesopotamicus predation in environments with different visual contrast is provided. Three hundred and sixty larvae (Lt: 5.77±0.23 mm and Wt: 6.57 mg were distributed in 24 one-liter light-color-lined aquaria, in a entirely randomized design, with eight treatments and three replications, with densities 0, 10, 20 and 30 copepods/L. Similar densities were used and distributed in aquaria with dark plastic lined interior. Dead larvae were counted hourly and removed with a pipette. After three hours from the start of experiment a linear increase in predation rate (p th to the 9th observation, with smaller survival values of pacu larvae in light-colored aquaria. It may be concluded that increase in copepod density and absence of lining on walls of aquaria favor higher predation rates of copepods on pacu larvae

  5. Gender-related differences in the apparent timing of skeletal density bands in the reef-building coral Siderastrea siderea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carricart-Ganivet, J. P.; Vásquez-Bedoya, L. F.; Cabanillas-Terán, N.; Blanchon, P.

    2013-09-01

    Density banding in skeletons of reef-building corals is a valuable source of proxy environmental data. However, skeletal growth strategy has a significant impact on the apparent timing of density-band formation. Some corals employ a strategy where the tissue occupies previously formed skeleton during as the new band forms, which leads to differences between the actual and apparent band timing. To investigate this effect, we collected cores from female and male colonies of Siderastrea siderea and report tissue thicknesses and density-related growth parameters over a 17-yr interval. Correlating these results with monthly sea surface temperature (SST) shows that maximum skeletal density in the female coincides with low winter SSTs, whereas in the male, it coincides with high summer SSTs. Furthermore, maximum skeletal densities in the female coincide with peak Sr/Ca values, whereas in the male, they coincide with low Sr/Ca values. Both results indicate a 6-month difference in the apparent timing of density-band formation between genders. Examination of skeletal extension rates also show that the male has thicker tissue and extends faster, whereas the female has thinner tissue and a denser skeleton—but both calcify at the same rate. The correlation between extension and calcification, combined with the fact that density banding arises from thickening of the skeleton throughout the depth reached by the tissue layer, implies that S. siderea has the same growth strategy as massive Porites, investing its calcification resources into linear extension. In addition, differences in tissue thicknesses suggest that females offset the greater energy requirements of gamete production by generating less tissue, resulting in differences in the apparent timing of density-band formation. Such gender-related offsets may be common in other corals and require that environmental reconstructions be made from sexed colonies and that, in fossil corals where sex cannot be determined

  6. Numerical investigations on contactless methods for measuring critical current density in HTS: application of modified constitutive-relation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamitani, A.; Takayama, T.; Itoh, T.; Ikuno, S.

    2011-01-01

    A fast method is proposed for calculating the shielding current density in an HTS. The J-E constitutive relation is modified so as not to change the solution. A numerical code is developed on the basis of the proposed method. The permanent magnet method is successfully simulated by means of the code. A fast method has been proposed for calculating the shielding current density in a high-temperature superconducting thin film. An initial-boundary-value problem of the shielding current density cannot be always solved by means of the Runge-Kutta method even when an adaptive step-size control algorithm is incorporated to the method. In order to suppress an overflow in the algorithm, the J-E constitutive relation is modified so that its solution may satisfy the original constitutive relation. A numerical code for analyzing the shielding current density has been developed on the basis of this method and, as an application of the code, the permanent magnet method for measuring the critical current density has been investigated numerically.

  7. High-density 3D graphene-based monolith and related materials, methods, and devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Biener, Juergen; Charnvanichborikarn, Supakit; Kucheyev, Sergei; Montalvo, Elizabeth; Shin, Swanee; Tylski, Elijah

    2017-03-21

    A composition comprising at least one high-density graphene-based monolith, said monolith comprising a three-dimensional structure of graphene sheets crosslinked by covalent carbon bonds and having a density of at least 0.1 g/cm.sup.3. Also provided is a method comprising: preparing a reaction mixture comprising a suspension and at least one catalyst, said suspension selected from a graphene oxide (GO) suspension and a carbon nanotube suspension; curing the reaction mixture to produce a wet gel; drying the wet gel to produce a dry gel, said drying step is substantially free of supercritical drying and freeze drying; and pyrolyzing the dry gel to produce a high-density graphene-based monolith. Exceptional combinations of properties are achieved including high conductive and mechanical properties.

  8. Relation of bone mineral density with homocysteine and cathepsin K levels in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhukar Mittal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Homocysteine (HCY interferes with collagen cross-linking in bones and stimulates osteoclast activity. The activated osteoclasts secrete cathepsin K (CathK, a cysteine protease, in eminent quantity during bone resorption. Hyperhomocysteinemia may effect bone mineral density (BMD through CathK. We, therefore, examined the relation between HCY and BMD along with CathK, 25-hydroxyvit-D (25[OH]D, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH, and Vitamin B12. Materials and Methods: We recruited a total of 93 postmenopausal women between the age group of 45–60 years, attending the Endocrinology outpatient department at King George's Medical University, Lucknow. BMD was done by DXA scan using Hologic QDR1000 system. Based on the WHO criteria, patients were segregated into three groups as follows; normal bone mass, osteopenia, and osteoporosis. All women underwent routine biochemical laboratory parameters, HCY, Vitamin B12, and CathK levels. Results: Among 93 postmenopausal women, 56% (52 had osteoporosis. Nineteen percent (18 had normal BMD (mean age, 53.22 ± 8.5 years and 23 (25% had osteopenia (mean age 52.86 ± 6.67 years. The mean age in the osteoporetic group was 56.2 ± 6.9 years. The median (interquartile range levels of HCY in the three groups were 14.5 μmol/L (12.2–24.7, 15.05 μmol/L (12.1–19.9 and 13.2 μmol/L (10.3–17.0, respectively. CathK levels were similar in three groups 7.6 ng/ml (7.0–80.5, 8.3 ng/ml (7.3–8.5, and 8.6 ng/ml (7.2–8.9. Both HCY and CathK were found positively associated with serum phosphorus (r = 0.584, P < 2.01 and r = 0.249, P < 0.05, respectively. Levels of HCY positively correlate with PTH (r = 0.303, P < 0.01 and inversely with Vitamin B12 (r = −0.248, P < 0.05. No significant association was seen between CathK level and 25(OH D, iPTH, serum calcium. Conclusion: Low bone mass by DXA is a significant problem in postmenopausal females. HCY and CathK do not reliably correlate with bone loss in

  9. High-Density Lipoprotein Function in Exudative Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Pertl

    Full Text Available High-density lipoproteins (HDL have long been implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. However, conflicting results have been reported with regard to the associations of AMD with HDL-cholesterol levels. The present study is the first to assess HDL composition and metrics of HDL function in patients with exudative AMD and control patients.Blood samples were collected from 29 patients with exudative AMD and 26 age-matched control patients. Major HDL associated apolipoproteins were determined in apoB-depleted serum by immunoturbidimetry or ELISA, HDL-associated lipids were quantified enzymatically. To get an integrated measure of HDL quantity and quality, we assessed several metrics of HDL function, including cholesterol efflux capacity, anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities using apoB-depleted serum from study participants.In our study, we observed that the HDL associated acute phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA was significantly increased in AMD patients (p<0.01, whereas all other assessed apolipoproteins including ApoA-I, apoA-II, apoC-II, apoC-III and apoE as well as major HDL associated lipids were not altered. HDL efflux capacity, anti-oxidative capacity and arylesterase activity were not different in AMD patients when compared with the control group. The ability of apoB-depleted serum to inhibit monocyte NF-κB expression was significantly improved in AMD patients (mean difference (MD -5.6, p<0.01. Moreover, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 activity, a marker of vascular inflammation, was decreased in AMD subjects (MD -24.1, p<0.01.The investigated metrics of HDL composition and HDL function were not associated with exudative AMD in this study, despite an increased content of HDL associated SAA in AMD patients. Unexpectedly, anti-inflammatory activity of apoB-depleted serum was even increased in our study. Our data suggest that the investigated parameters of serum HDL function showed no

  10. Calculation of the phonon density of states and related thermodynamic properties for trigonal selenium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Alldredge, G. P.; McMurry, H. L.

    1983-01-01

    The phonon density of states for trigonal selenium has been calculated on the basis of a short range force model giving good overall agreement with experimental room temperature phonon dispersion data. A qualitative comparison with an experimental determination of the phonon density of states shows...... similarities in the gross features, but the experimental data lacks many of the finer details shown by the theoretical results due to resolution effects. The lattice dynamical contribution to the heat capacity CV is calculated and is found to be in good agreement with experimental determinations of Cp after...

  11. Online learning from input versus offline memory evolution in adult word learning: effects of neighborhood density and phonologically related practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storkel, Holly L; Bontempo, Daniel E; Pak, Natalie S

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the authors investigated adult word learning to determine how neighborhood density and practice across phonologically related training sets influence online learning from input during training versus offline memory evolution during no-training gaps. Sixty-one adults were randomly assigned to learn low- or high-density nonwords. Within each density condition, participants were trained on one set of words and then were trained on a second set of words, consisting of phonological neighbors of the first set. Learning was measured in a picture-naming test. Data were analyzed using multilevel modeling and spline regression. Steep learning during input was observed, with new words from dense neighborhoods and new words that were neighbors of recently learned words (i.e., second-set words) being learned better than other words. In terms of memory evolution, large and significant forgetting was observed during 1-week gaps in training. Effects of density and practice during memory evolution were opposite of those during input. Specifically, forgetting was greater for high-density and second-set words than for low-density and first-set words. High phonological similarity, regardless of source (i.e., known words or recent training), appears to facilitate online learning from input but seems to impede offline memory evolution.

  12. Brent goose colonies near snowy owls: Internest distances in relation to breeding arctic fox densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kharitonov, S.P.; Ebbinge, B.S.; De Fouw, J.

    2013-01-01

    It was shown that in the years when the numbers of the Arctic foxes are high, even though the lemming numbers are high as well, Brent geese nest considerably closer to owls' nests than in the years with low Arctic fox numbers. At values of the Arctic fox densities greater than one breeding pair per

  13. Relative electron density determination using a physics based parameterization of photon interactions in medical DECT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Abbema, Joanne K.; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; Greuter, Marcel J. W.; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Brandenburg, Sytze; van der Graaf, Emiel R.

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy and particle therapy treatment planning require accurate knowledge of the electron density and elemental composition of the tissues in the beam path to predict the local dose deposition. We describe a method for the analysis of dual energy computed tomography (DECT) images that provides

  14. Feeding and growth of larval herring,Clupea harengus, in relation to density of copepod nauplii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Munk, Peter

    1986-01-01

    Feeding and growth rates of 1–3 wk old herring larvae from four different stocks were compared in laboratory experiments (8°C). For most of the larval groups, feeding rate was saturated at nauplii (Acartia tonsa, nauplii stages 3–5) densities over 301−1 (5 μg d.w. 1−1). Specific growth rate incre...

  15. Bone mineral density in children and adolescents: relation to puberty, calcium intake, and physical activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Boot (Annemieke); H.A.P. Pols (Huib); E.P. Krenning (Eric); S.M.P.F. de Muinck Keizer-Schrama (Sabine); M.A.J. de Ridder (Maria)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe association of height, weight, pubertal stage, calcium intake, and physical activity with bone mineral density (BMD) was evaluated in 500 children and adolescents (205 boys and 295 girls), aged 4-20 yr. The BMD (grams per cm2) of lumbar spine and total

  16. Mapping brucellosis increases relative to elk density using hierarchical Bayesian models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Paul C.; Heisey, Dennis M.; Scurlock, Brandon M.; Edwards, William H.; Brennan, Angela; Ebinger, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between host density and parasite transmission is central to the effectiveness of many disease management strategies. Few studies, however, have empirically estimated this relationship particularly in large mammals. We applied hierarchical Bayesian methods to a 19-year dataset of over 6400 brucellosis tests of adult female elk (Cervus elaphus) in northwestern Wyoming. Management captures that occurred from January to March were over two times more likely to be seropositive than hunted elk that were killed in September to December, while accounting for site and year effects. Areas with supplemental feeding grounds for elk had higher seroprevalence in 1991 than other regions, but by 2009 many areas distant from the feeding grounds were of comparable seroprevalence. The increases in brucellosis seroprevalence were correlated with elk densities at the elk management unit, or hunt area, scale (mean 2070 km2; range = [95–10237]). The data, however, could not differentiate among linear and non-linear effects of host density. Therefore, control efforts that focus on reducing elk densities at a broad spatial scale were only weakly supported. Additional research on how a few, large groups within a region may be driving disease dynamics is needed for more targeted and effective management interventions. Brucellosis appears to be expanding its range into new regions and elk populations, which is likely to further complicate the United States brucellosis eradication program. This study is an example of how the dynamics of host populations can affect their ability to serve as disease reservoirs.

  17. Mapping brucellosis increases relative to elk density using hierarchical Bayesian models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C Cross

    Full Text Available The relationship between host density and parasite transmission is central to the effectiveness of many disease management strategies. Few studies, however, have empirically estimated this relationship particularly in large mammals. We applied hierarchical Bayesian methods to a 19-year dataset of over 6400 brucellosis tests of adult female elk (Cervus elaphus in northwestern Wyoming. Management captures that occurred from January to March were over two times more likely to be seropositive than hunted elk that were killed in September to December, while accounting for site and year effects. Areas with supplemental feeding grounds for elk had higher seroprevalence in 1991 than other regions, but by 2009 many areas distant from the feeding grounds were of comparable seroprevalence. The increases in brucellosis seroprevalence were correlated with elk densities at the elk management unit, or hunt area, scale (mean 2070 km(2; range = [95-10237]. The data, however, could not differentiate among linear and non-linear effects of host density. Therefore, control efforts that focus on reducing elk densities at a broad spatial scale were only weakly supported. Additional research on how a few, large groups within a region may be driving disease dynamics is needed for more targeted and effective management interventions. Brucellosis appears to be expanding its range into new regions and elk populations, which is likely to further complicate the United States brucellosis eradication program. This study is an example of how the dynamics of host populations can affect their ability to serve as disease reservoirs.

  18. Effects of stocking density on lipid deposition and expression of lipid-related genes in Amur sturgeon (Acipenser schrenckii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yuanyuan; Wen, Haishen; Li, Yun; Li, Jifang; He, Feng; Ni, Meng

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the correlation between lipid deposition variation and stocking density in Amur sturgeon (Acipenser schrenckii) and the possible physiological mechanism, fish were conducted in different stocking densities (LSD 5.5 kg/m 3 , MSD 8.0 kg/m 3 , and HSD 11.0 kg/m 3 ) for 70 days and then the growth index, lipid content, lipase activities, and the mRNA expressions of lipid-related genes were examined. Results showed that fish subjected to higher stocking density presented lower final body weights (FBW), specific growth ratio (SGR), and gonad adipose tissue index (GAI) (P density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) decreased significantly with increasing stocking density, while no significant change was observed for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Furthermore, the cDNAs encoding lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic lipase (HL) were isolated in Amur sturgeon, respectively. The full-length LPL cDNA was composed of 1757 bp with an open reading frame of 501 amino acids, while the complete nucleotide sequences of HL covered 1747 bp encoding 499 amino acids. In the liver, the activities and mRNA levels of LPL were markedly lower in HSD group, which were consistent with the variation tendency of HL. Fish reared in HSD group also presented lower levels of activities and mRNA expression of LPL in the muscle and gonad. Moreover, the expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) in both the liver and skeletal muscle were significantly upregulated in HSD group. Overall, the results indicated that high stocking density negatively affects growth performance and lipid deposition of Amur sturgeon to a certain extent. The downregulation of LPL and HL and the upregulation of PPARα may be responsible for the lower lipid distribution of Amur sturgeon in higher stocking density.

  19. Copepod swimming behavior, respiration, and expression of stress-related genes in response to high stocking densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Birgitte; Jakobsen, Hans H.; Stief, Peter

    2017-01-01

    ,000 ind. L−1. Three biological/physiological end-points were studied: swimming behavior, respiration rate and expression level of stress-related genes. None of the elevated densities caused any significant change in swimming behavior, respiration rate or gene expression level. This study suggests...

  20. THE PHYSICAL ORIGINS OF THE MORPHOLOGY-DENSITY RELATION: EVIDENCE FOR GAS STRIPPING FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Wel, Arjen; Bell, Eric F.; Skibba, Ramin A.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Holden, Bradford P.

    2010-01-01

    We provide a physical interpretation and explanation of the morphology-density relation for galaxies, drawing on stellar masses, star formation rates, axis ratios, and group halo masses from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We first re-cast the classical morphology-density relation in more quantitative terms, using low star formation rate (quiescence) as a proxy for early-type morphology and dark matter halo mass from a group catalog as a proxy for environmental density: for galaxies of a given stellar mass the quiescent fraction is found to increase with increasing dark matter halo mass. Our novel result is that-at a given stellar mass-quiescent galaxies are significantly flatter in dense environments, implying a higher fraction of disk galaxies. Supposing that the denser environments differ simply by a higher incidence of quiescent disk galaxies that are structurally similar to star-forming disk galaxies of similar mass, explains simultaneously and quantitatively these quiescence-environment and shape-environment relations. Our findings add considerable weight to the slow removal of gas as the main physical driver of the morphology-density relation, at the expense of other explanations.

  1. Triton-3He relative and differential flows as probes of the nuclear symmetry energy at supra-saturation densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong Gaochan; Li Baoan; Chen Liewen; Zhang Xunchao

    2009-01-01

    Using a transport model coupled with a phase-space coalescence afterburner, we study the triton- 3 He (t- 3 He) ratio with both relative and differential transverse flows in semicentral 132 Sn+ 124 Sn reactions at a beam energy of 400 MeV/nucleon. The neutron-proton ratios with relative and differential flows are also discussed as a reference. We find that similar to the neutron-proton pairs, the t- 3 He pairs also carry interesting information regarding the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. Moreover, the nuclear symmetry energy affects more strongly the t- 3 He relative and differential flows than the π - /π + ratio in the same reaction. The t- 3 He relative flow can be used as a particularly powerful probe of the high-density behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy.

  2. Radiation exposure and contrast agent use related to radial versus femoral arterial access during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)-Results of the FERARI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, Tobias; Behnes, Michael; Ünsal, Melike; Baumann, Stefan; El-Battrawy, Ibrahim; Fastner, Christian; Kuschyk, Jürgen; Papavassiliu, Theano; Hoffmann, Ursula; Mashayekhi, Kambis; Borggrefe, Martin; Akin, Ibrahim

    2016-12-01

    Data regarding radiation exposure related to radial versus femoral arterial access in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) remain controversial. This study aims to evaluate patients enrolled in the FERARI study regarding radiation exposure, fluoroscopy time and contrast agent use. The Femoral Closure versus Radial Compression Devices Related to Percutaneous Coronary Interventions (FERARI) study evaluated prospectively 400 patients between February 2014 and May 2015 undergoing PCI either using the radial or femoral access. In these 400 patients, baseline characteristics, procedural data such as procedural duration, fluoroscopy time, dose-area product (DAP) as well as the amount of contrast agent used were documented and analyzed. Median fluoroscopy time was not significantly different in patients undergoing radial versus femoral access (12.2 vs. 9.8min, p=0.507). Furthermore, median DAP (54.5 vs. 52.0 Gycm2, p=0.826), procedural duration (46.0 vs. 45.0min, p=0.363) and contrast agent use (185.5 vs. 199.5ml, p=0.742) were also similar in radial and femoral PCI. There was no difference regarding median fluoroscopy time, procedural duration, radiation dose or contrast agent use between radial versus femoral arterial access in PCI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Exact correlated kinetic energy related to the electron density for two-electron model atoms with harmonic confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March, Norman H.; Akbari, Ali; Rubio, Angel

    2007-01-01

    For arbitrary interparticle interaction u(r 12 ), the model two-electron atom in the title is shown to be such that the ground-state electron density ρ(r) is determined uniquely by the correlated kinetic energy density t R (r) of the relative motion. Explicit results for t R (r) are presented for the Hookean atom with force constant k=1/4, and also for u(r 12 )=(λ)/(r 12 2 ) . Possible relevance of the Hookean atom treatment to the ground state of the helium atom itself is briefly discussed

  4. Effects of the instability enhanced friction on relative ion densities in a two-ion species low-temperature plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukovic, Mirko

    2011-10-01

    The instability enhanced friction theory of Baalrud & Hegna (Phys. Plasmas 18, 023505 (2011)) predicts that for comparable ion densities the ions nearly reach a common velocity near the sheath edge in a low temperature plasma. The theory was experimentally confirmed by Yip, Hershkowitz, & Severn (Phys. Rev. Letters 104, 225003 (2010)). We will explore the effects of the theory on relative ion densities in a numerical simulation of an Ar/Xe plasma. Results for a 0D plasma model (Lieberman, Lichtenberg, Principles of Plasma Discharges and Materials Processing, 2005) will be presented.

  5. On the relation between the statistical γ-decay and the level density in 162Dy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henden, L.; Bergholt, L.; Guttormsen, M.; Rekstad, J.; Tveter, T.S.

    1994-12-01

    The level density of low-spin states (0-10ℎ) in 162 Dy has been determined from the ground state up to approximately 6 MeV of excitation energy. Levels in the excitation region up to 8 MeV were populated by means of the 163 Dy( 3 He, α) reaction, and the first-generation γ-rays in the decay of these states has been isolated. The energy distribution of the first-generation γ-rays provides a new source of information about the nuclear level density over a wide energy region. A broad peak is observed in the first-generation spectra, and the authors suggest an interpretation in terms of enhanced M1 transitions between different high-j Nilsson orbitals. 30 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Problems related to the determination of mass densities of evaporated reference deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagziria, H.; Pauwels, J.; Verdonk, J.; Van Gestel, J.; Eykens, R.; Gilliam, D. M.; Scott, R. D.; Byrne, J.; Dawber, P.

    1991-05-01

    The accurate characterization of the surface density (nuclei/cm 2) of thin isotopic deposits is of highest importance in certain experiments. If accuracies better than ± 0.5% are to be quoted, careful consideration of seemingly minor effects is necessary, as these effects may generate serious errors. The radial surface density distribution in the central region of the target disks, the thickness profile at the edges, and the evaluation of effective deposit diameters are discussed for the case of measurements and observations made during the preparation and characterization of 6LiF and 10B reference deposits, which were employed in a recent determination of the free neutron lifetime. Theoretical calculations are in excellent agreement with the experimental results.

  7. Problems related to the determination of mass densities of evaporated reference deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagziria, H.; Pauwels, J.; Verdonk, J.; Gestel, J. van; Eykens, R.; Gilliam, D.M.; Scott, R.D.; Byrne, J.; Dawber, P.

    1991-01-01

    The accurate characterization of the surface density (nuclei/cm 2 ) of thin isotopic deposits is of highest importance in certain experiments. If accuracies better than ±0.5% are to be quoted, careful consideration of seemingly minor effects is necessary, as these effects may generate serious errors. The radial surface density distribution in the central region of the target disks, the thickness profile at the edges, and the evaluation of effective deposit diameters are discussed for the case of measurements and observations made during the preparation and characterization of 6 LiF and 10 B reference deposits, which were employed in a recent determination of the free neutron lifetime. Theoretical calculations are in excellent agreement with the experimental results. (orig.)

  8. Problems related to the determination of mass densities of evaporated reference deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagziria, H.; Pauwels, J.; Verdonk, J.; Gestel, J. van; Eykens, R. (Commission of the European Communities, Joint Research Centre, Central Bureau for Nuclear Measurements, Geel (Belgium)); Gilliam, D.M. (National Inst. of Standards and Tech., Gaithersburg, MD (USA)); Scott, R.D. (Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre, Glasgow (UK)); Byrne, J.; Dawber, P. (School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Univ. of Sussex, Brighton (UK))

    1991-05-15

    The accurate characterization of the surface density (nuclei/cm{sup 2}) of thin isotopic deposits is of highest importance in certain experiments. If accuracies better than {+-}0.5% are to be quoted, careful consideration of seemingly minor effects is necessary, as these effects may generate serious errors. The radial surface density distribution in the central region of the target disks, the thickness profile at the edges, and the evaluation of effective deposit diameters are discussed for the case of measurements and observations made during the preparation and characterization of {sup 6}LiF and {sup 10}B reference deposits, which were employed in a recent determination of the free neutron lifetime. Theoretical calculations are in excellent agreement with the experimental results. (orig.).

  9. Contrast-enhanced 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in immunoglobulin G4-related retroperitoneal fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Punit; Chatterjee, Piyali

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related disease encompasses a wide variety of immune disorders previously thought be distinct. IgG4-related retroperitoneal fibrosis is one such entity. Metabolic imaging with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) can be useful in the management of IgG4-related retroperitoneal fibrosis. We here discuss the case of 63-year-old male with IgG4-related retroperitoneal fibrosis and the role, 18 F-FDG PET/CT played in his management

  10. Effect of areal power density and relative humidity on corrosion resistant container performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gansemer, J.D.

    1994-10-01

    The impact of the rewetting process on the performance of waste containers at the Yucca Mountain repository is analyzed. This paper explores the impact of the temperature-humidity relationships on pitting corrosion failure of stainless steel containers for different areal power densities (APDs)in the repository. It compares the likely performance of containers in a repository with a low APD, 55 Kw/acre, and a high APD, 110 kW/acre

  11. Predation on simulated duck nests in relation to nest density and landscape structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Padyšáková, E.; Šálek, Martin; Poledník, L.; Sedláček, František; Albrecht, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 7 (2010), s. 597-603 ISSN 1035-3712 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520; CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : density-dependent predation * littoral patch * landscape type * nest predators * nest success * simulated nests Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.205, year: 2010

  12. Assessment of lesser prairie-chicken lek density relative to landscape characteristics in Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmer, Jennifer; Butler, Matthew; Ballard, Warren; Boal, Clint; Whitlaw, Heather

    2012-08-31

    My 2.5-yr Master's project accomplished the objectives of estimating lesser prairie-chicken (LPC) lek density and abundance in the Texas occupied range and modeling anthropogenic and landscape features associated with lek density by flying helicopter lek surveys for 2 field seasons and employing a line-transect distance sampling method. This project was important for several reasons. Firstly, wildlife managers and biologists have traditionally monitored LPC populations with road-based surveys that may result in biased estimates and do not provide access to privately-owned or remote property. From my aerial surveys and distance sampling, I was able to provide accurate density and abundance estimates, as well as new leks and I detected LPCs outside the occupied range. Secondly, recent research has indicated that energy development has the potential to impact LPCs through avoidance of tall structures, increased mortality from raptors perching on transmission lines, disturbance to nesting hens, and habitat loss/fragmentation. Given the potential wind energy development in the Texas Panhandle, spatial models of current anthropogenic and vegetative features (such as transmission lines, roads, and percent native grassland) influencing lek density were needed. This information provided wildlife managers and wind energy developers in Texas with guidelines for how change in landscape features could impact LPCs. Lastly, LPC populations have faced range-wide declines over the last century and they are currently listed as a candidate species under the Endangered Species Act. I was able to provide timely information on LPC populations in Texas that will be used during the listing process.

  13. Modelling Age- and Density-Related Gas Exchange of Picea abies Canopies in the Fichtelgebirge, Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Falge, Eva; Tennhunen, John D.; Ryel, Ronald J.; Alsheimer, Martina; Köstner, Barbara

    2000-01-01

    International audience; Differences in canopy exchange of water and carbon dioxide that occur due to changes in tree structure and density in montane Norway spruce stands of Central Germany were analyzed with a three dimensional microclimate and gas exchange model STANDFLUX. The model was used to calculate forest radiation absorption, the net photosynthesis and transpiration of single trees, and gas exchange of tree canopies. Model parameterizations were derived for six stands of Picea abies ...

  14. The role of forest stand density in controlling soil erosion: implications to sediment-related disasters in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razafindrabe, Bam H N; He, Bin; Inoue, Shoji; Ezaki, Tsugio; Shaw, Rajib

    2010-01-01

    The role of forest stand density in controlling soil erosion was investigated in Ehime Prefecture, Japan. The main objective was to compare soil erosion under different forest conditions including forest type, species composition, and stand density as influenced by thinning operations. Relative yield index (Ry) was used as an indicator of stand density to reflect the degree of management operations in the watershed. Eleven treatments were established based on the above forest conditions. Soil loss was collected in each of the 11 treatments after each rainfall event for a period of 1 year. The paper presents summary data on soil loss as affected by forest conditions and rainfall patterns. Findings showed that an appropriate forest management operation, which can be insured by stand density control, is needed to reduce soil loss. The present study plays an important role in clarifying technical processes related to soil erosion, while it helps linking these elements to current Japanese forestry issues and bringing new inputs to reducing sediment-related disasters in Japan.

  15. Sampling Error in Relation to Cyst Nematode Population Density Estimation in Small Field Plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Župunski, Vesna; Jevtić, Radivoje; Jokić, Vesna Spasić; Župunski, Ljubica; Lalošević, Mirjana; Ćirić, Mihajlo; Ćurčić, Živko

    2017-06-01

    Cyst nematodes are serious plant-parasitic pests which could cause severe yield losses and extensive damage. Since there is still very little information about error of population density estimation in small field plots, this study contributes to the broad issue of population density assessment. It was shown that there was no significant difference between cyst counts of five or seven bulk samples taken per each 1-m 2 plot, if average cyst count per examined plot exceeds 75 cysts per 100 g of soil. Goodness of fit of data to probability distribution tested with χ 2 test confirmed a negative binomial distribution of cyst counts for 21 out of 23 plots. The recommended measure of sampling precision of 17% expressed through coefficient of variation ( cv ) was achieved if the plots of 1 m 2 contaminated with more than 90 cysts per 100 g of soil were sampled with 10-core bulk samples taken in five repetitions. If plots were contaminated with less than 75 cysts per 100 g of soil, 10-core bulk samples taken in seven repetitions gave cv higher than 23%. This study indicates that more attention should be paid on estimation of sampling error in experimental field plots to ensure more reliable estimation of population density of cyst nematodes.

  16. Impact factor of relationships between CT value and relative electron density for treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Guosheng; Liang Yuan; Wu Danling; Hao Yanrong; Lu Heming; Chen Jiaxin; Liao Chaolong; Mo Ying; Huang Yihang

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the CT values of certain phantoms scanned by various CT scanners with dissimilar parameters. Methods: The CT values of tissue equivalent inserts was measured in the TM164 and CIRS-062 phantom scanned by TOSHIBA AQUILION TM , SIEMENS SOMATOM TM SENSATION TM 64 and SIEMENS SOMATOM TM SENSATION TM OPEN with different voltages,currents and slice thicknesses and then the corresponding CT-to-density curves was compared. Results: There are no significant differences of CT values with various currents and slice thicknesses and also for low atom number materials scanned by different scanners with various tube voltages. The CT values of high atom number materials have obvious differences scanned with tube voltage,the maximum is about 400 HU. There are also significant differences between CT-density curves of two phantoms in the range from soft tissues to dense bone, the maximum is up to 500 HU. Conclusions: CT-density curves were highly affected by materials of phantoms, scanners and tube voltages. It is necessary to measure the curve with a comfortable phantom and certain scanner to assure the accuracy for dose calculation for treatment planning system. (authors)

  17. Contrast settling in cerebral aneurysm angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhijie; Hoffmann, Kenneth R; Guterman, Lee R; Wang Zhou; Rudin, Stephen; Meng Hui

    2005-01-01

    During angiography, blood flow is visualized with a radiopaque contrast agent, which is denser than blood. In complex vasculature, such as cerebral saccular aneurysms, the density difference may produce an appreciable gravity effect, where the contrast material separates from blood and settles along the gravity direction. Although contrast settling has been occasionally reported before, the fluid mechanics behind it have not been explored. Furthermore, the severity of contrast settling in cerebral aneurysms varies significantly from case to case. Therefore, a better understanding of the physical principles behind this phenomenon is needed to evaluate contrast settling in clinical angiography. In this study, flow in two identical groups of sidewall aneurysm models with varying parent-vessel curvature was examined by angiography. Intravascular stents were deployed into one group of the models. To detect contrast settling, we used lateral view angiography. Time-intensity curves were analysed from the angiographic data, and a computational fluid dynamic analysis was conducted. Results showed that contrast settling was strongly related to the local flow dynamics. We used the Froude number, a ratio of flow inertia to gravity force, to characterize the significance of gravity force. An aneurysm with a larger vessel curvature experienced higher flow, which resulted in a larger Froude number and, thus, less gravitational settling. Addition of a stent reduced the aneurysmal flow, thereby increasing the contrast settling. We found that contrast settling resulted in an elevated washout tail in the time-intensity curve. However, this signature is not unique to contrast settling. To determine whether contrast settling is present, a lateral view should be obtained in addition to the anteroposterior (AP) view routinely used clinically so as to rule out contrast settling and hence to enable a valid time-intensity curve analysis of blood flow in the aneurysm

  18. Contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decazes, Ph.

    2004-01-01

    The Guerbet firm, which holds 69% of the capital on the contrast media for medical imagery, could sale about 20% of this capital in order to accelerate its development in the United States, one of its next market with the Japan. (O.M.)

  19. Radiation exposure and contrast agent use related to radial versus femoral arterial access during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)—Results of the FERARI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becher, Tobias, E-mail: Tobias.Becher@umm.de [First Department of Medicine, University Medical Centre Mannheim, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, 68167 Mannheim (Germany); DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), partner site Heidelberg/Mannheim, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, 68167 Mannheim (Germany); Behnes, Michael; Ünsal, Melike; Baumann, Stefan; El-Battrawy, Ibrahim; Fastner, Christian; Kuschyk, Jürgen; Papavassiliu, Theano; Hoffmann, Ursula [First Department of Medicine, University Medical Centre Mannheim, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, 68167 Mannheim (Germany); DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), partner site Heidelberg/Mannheim, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, 68167 Mannheim (Germany); Mashayekhi, Kambis [Division of Cardiology and Angiology II, University Heart Center Freiburg Bad Krozingen, Bad Krozingen (Germany); Borggrefe, Martin; Akin, Ibrahim [First Department of Medicine, University Medical Centre Mannheim, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, 68167 Mannheim (Germany); DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), partner site Heidelberg/Mannheim, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, 68167 Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Summary: Background: Data regarding radiation exposure related to radial versus femoral arterial access in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) remain controversial. This study aims to evaluate patients enrolled in the FERARI study regarding radiation exposure, fluoroscopy time and contrast agent use. Methods: The Femoral Closure versus Radial Compression Devices Related to Percutaneous Coronary Interventions (FERARI) study evaluated prospectively 400 patients between February 2014 and May 2015 undergoing PCI either using the radial or femoral access. In these 400 patients, baseline characteristics, procedural data such as procedural duration, fluoroscopy time, dose–area product (DAP) as well as the amount of contrast agent used were documented and analyzed. Results: Median fluoroscopy time was not significantly different in patients undergoing radial versus femoral access (12.2 vs. 9.8 min, p = 0.507). Furthermore, median DAP (54.5 vs. 52.0 Gycm2, p = 0.826), procedural duration (46.0 vs. 45.0 min, p = 0.363) and contrast agent use (185.5 vs. 199.5 ml, p = 0.742) were also similar in radial and femoral PCI. Conclusion: There was no difference regarding median fluoroscopy time, procedural duration, radiation dose or contrast agent use between radial versus femoral arterial access in PCI. - Highlights: • Data comparing radiation exposure in radial versus femoral PCI remain controversial. • 400 enrolled in the FERARI study were prospectively evaluated. • There was no difference regarding radiation exposure in radial versus femoral access. • Furthermore, there was no significant difference regarding contrast agent use.

  20. Radiation exposure and contrast agent use related to radial versus femoral arterial access during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)—Results of the FERARI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becher, Tobias; Behnes, Michael; Ünsal, Melike; Baumann, Stefan; El-Battrawy, Ibrahim; Fastner, Christian; Kuschyk, Jürgen; Papavassiliu, Theano; Hoffmann, Ursula; Mashayekhi, Kambis; Borggrefe, Martin; Akin, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Background: Data regarding radiation exposure related to radial versus femoral arterial access in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) remain controversial. This study aims to evaluate patients enrolled in the FERARI study regarding radiation exposure, fluoroscopy time and contrast agent use. Methods: The Femoral Closure versus Radial Compression Devices Related to Percutaneous Coronary Interventions (FERARI) study evaluated prospectively 400 patients between February 2014 and May 2015 undergoing PCI either using the radial or femoral access. In these 400 patients, baseline characteristics, procedural data such as procedural duration, fluoroscopy time, dose–area product (DAP) as well as the amount of contrast agent used were documented and analyzed. Results: Median fluoroscopy time was not significantly different in patients undergoing radial versus femoral access (12.2 vs. 9.8 min, p = 0.507). Furthermore, median DAP (54.5 vs. 52.0 Gycm2, p = 0.826), procedural duration (46.0 vs. 45.0 min, p = 0.363) and contrast agent use (185.5 vs. 199.5 ml, p = 0.742) were also similar in radial and femoral PCI. Conclusion: There was no difference regarding median fluoroscopy time, procedural duration, radiation dose or contrast agent use between radial versus femoral arterial access in PCI. - Highlights: • Data comparing radiation exposure in radial versus femoral PCI remain controversial. • 400 enrolled in the FERARI study were prospectively evaluated. • There was no difference regarding radiation exposure in radial versus femoral access. • Furthermore, there was no significant difference regarding contrast agent use

  1. Augmented potential, energy densities, and virial relations in the weak- and strong-interaction limits of DFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuckovic, Stefan; Levy, Mel; Gori-Giorgi, Paola

    2017-12-01

    The augmented potential introduced by Levy and Zahariev [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 113002 (2014)] is shifted with respect to the standard exchange-correlation potential of the Kohn-Sham density functional theory by a density-dependent constant that makes the total energy become equal to the sum of the occupied orbital energies. In this work, we analyze several features of this approach, focusing on the limit of infinite coupling strength and studying the shift and the corresponding energy density at different correlation regimes. We present and discuss coordinate scaling properties of the augmented potential, study its connection to the response potential, and use the shift to analyze the classical jellium and uniform gas models. We also study other definitions of the energy densities in relation to the functional construction by local interpolations along the adiabatic connection. Our findings indicate that the energy density that is defined in terms of the electrostatic potential of the exchange-correlation hole is particularly well suited for this purpose.

  2. Contrast analysis : A tutorial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haans, A.

    2018-01-01

    Contrast analysis is a relatively simple but effective statistical method for testing theoretical predictions about differences between group means against the empirical data. Despite its advantages, contrast analysis is hardly used to date, perhaps because it is not implemented in a convenient

  3. Seasonal Variation in Group Size Is Related to Seasonal Variation in Neuropeptide Receptor Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Leah C; Goodson, James L; Kingsbury, Marcy A

    2016-01-01

    In many species, seasonal variation in grouping behavior is widespread, with shifts towards territoriality in the breeding season and grouping in the winter. Compared to the hormonal and neural mechanisms of seasonal territorial aggression, the mechanisms that promote seasonal grouping have received little attention. We collected brains in spring and winter from wild-caught males of two species of emberizid sparrows that seasonally flock (the field sparrow, Spizella pusilla, and the dark-eyed junco, Junco hyemalis) and two species that do not seasonally flock (the song sparrow, Melospiza melodia, and the eastern towhee, Pipilo erythrophthalmus). We used receptor autoradiography to quantify seasonal plasticity in available binding sites for three neuropeptides known to influence social behavior. We examined binding sites for 125I-vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), 125I-sauvagine (SG, a ligand for corticotropin-releasing hormone receptors) and 125I-ornithine vasotocin analog (OVTA, a ligand for the VT3 nonapeptide). For all species and ligands, brain areas that exhibited a seasonal pattern in binding density were characterized by a winter increase. Compared to nonflocking species, seasonally flocking species showed different binding patterns in multiple brain areas. Furthermore, we found that winter flocking was associated with elevated winter 125I-VIP binding density in the medial amygdala, as well as 125I-VIP and 125I-OVTA binding density in the rostral arcopallium. While the functional significance of the avian rostral arcopallium is unclear, it may incorporate parts of the pallial amygdala. Our results point to this previously undescribed area as a likely hot spot of social modulation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. A surface structural model for ferrihydrite I: Sites related to primary charge, molar mass, and mass density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemstra, Tjisse; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H.

    2009-08-01

    A multisite surface complexation (MUSIC) model for ferrihydrite (Fh) has been developed. The surface structure and composition of Fh nanoparticles are described in relation to ion binding and surface charge development. The site densities of the various reactive surface groups, the molar mass, the mass density, the specific surface area, and the particle size are quantified. As derived theoretically, molecular mass and mass density of nanoparticles will depend on the types of surface groups and the corresponding site densities and will vary with particle size and surface area because of a relatively large contribution of the surface groups in comparison to the mineral core of nanoparticles. The nano-sized (˜2.6 nm) particles of freshly prepared 2-line Fh as a whole have an increased molar mass of M ˜ 101 ± 2 g/mol Fe, a reduced mass density of ˜3.5 ± 0.1 g/cm 3, both relatively to the mineral core. The specific surface area is ˜650 m 2/g. Six-line Fh (5-6 nm) has a molar mass of M ˜ 94 ± 2 g/mol, a mass density of ˜3.9 ± 0.1 g/cm 3, and a surface area of ˜280 ± 30 m 2/g. Data analysis shows that the mineral core of Fh has an average chemical composition very close to FeOOH with M ˜ 89 g/mol. The mineral core has a mass density around ˜4.15 ± 0.1 g/cm 3, which is between that of feroxyhyte, goethite, and lepidocrocite. These results can be used to constrain structural models for Fh. Singly-coordinated surface groups dominate the surface of ferrihydrite (˜6.0 ± 0.5 nm -2). These groups can be present in two structural configurations. In pairs, the groups either form the edge of a single Fe-octahedron (˜2.5 nm -2) or are present at a single corner (˜3.5 nm -2) of two adjacent Fe octahedra. These configurations can form bidentate surface complexes by edge- and double-corner sharing, respectively, and may therefore respond differently to the binding of ions such as uranyl, carbonate, arsenite, phosphate, and others. The relatively low PZC of

  5. Bulk density, cone index and water content relations for some Ghanian soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agodzo, S.K.; Adama, I.

    2004-01-01

    Correlations were established between water content θ, bulk density ρ and cone index Δ for 4 Ghanaian soils, namely, Kumasi, Akroso, Nta and Offin series. The relationship between Δ and θ is in the form Δ = a θ 2 + b θ + c, where the correlation coefficients r 2 for the various soils were found to be very high. Similarly, Δ - ρ relationships were linear but the correlations got weaker with increasing sand content of the soil, as expected. Soil sample sizes and compaction procedures did not conform to standard procedures, yet the results did not deviate from what pertains when standard procedures are used. (author)

  6. [Analysis of elderly outpatients in relation to nutritional status, sarcopenia, renal function, and bone density].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmaso, Franciany Viana; Vigário, Patrícia dos Santos; Mendonça, Laura Maria Carvalho de; Madeira, Miguel; Vieira Netto, Leonardo; Guimarães, Marcela Rodrigues Moreira; Farias, Maria Lucia Fleiuss de

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate relationships between nutritional status, sarcopenia and osteoporosis in older women. We studied 44 women, 67-94 years, by mini-nutritional assessment (MAN), glomerular filtration corr. 1.73 m(2), body mass index (BMI), arm circumference and calf (CP and CB), bone mineral density and body composition, DXA (fat mass MG; lean MM). We gauge sarcopenia: IMM MM = MSS + MIS/height(2). We used the Pearson correlation coefficient, p nutritional status and body composition; and major influences on BMD were nutritional status and fat mass.

  7. Dialysis and contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morcos, Sameh K.; Thomsen, Henrik S.; Webb, Judith A.W.

    2002-01-01

    In a previous survey we revealed uncertainty among responders about (a) whether or not to perform hemodialysis in patients with severely reduced renal function who had received contrast medium; and (b) when to perform hemodialysis in patients on regular treatment with hemodialysis or continuous ambulatory dialysis who received contrast medium. Therefore, the Contrast Media Safety Committee of The European Society of Urogenital Radiology decided to review the literature and to issue guidelines. The committee performed a Medline search. Based on this, a report and guidelines were prepared. The report was discussed at the Ninth European Symposium on Urogenital Radiology in Genoa, Italy. Hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis safely remove both iodinated and gadolinium-based contrast media. The effectiveness of hemodialysis depends on many factors including blood and dialysate flow rate, permeability of dialysis membrane, duration of hemodialysis and molecular size, protein binding, hydrophilicity, and electrical charge of the contrast medium. Generally, several hemodialysis sessions are needed to removal all contrast medium, whereas it takes 3 weeks for continuous ambulatory dialysis to remove the agent completely. There is no need to schedule the dialysis in relation to the injection of iodinated or MR contrast media or the injection of contrast agent in relation to the dialysis program. Hemodialysis does not protect poorly functioning kidneys against contrast-medium-induced nephrotoxicity. Simple guidelines are given. (orig.)

  8. Graphene on metals: A van der Waals density functional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanin, Marco; Mortensen, Jens Jørgen; Kelkkanen, Kari André

    2010-01-01

    We use density functional theory (DFT) with a recently developed van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) to study the adsorption of graphene on Co, Ni, Pd, Ag, Au, Cu, Pt, and Al(111) surfaces. In contrast to the local-density approximation (LDA) which predicts relatively strong binding for Ni...

  9. Do galaxy global relationships emerge from local ones? The SDSS IV MaNGA surface mass density-metallicity relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge K.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Zhu, Guangtun B.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Law, David; Wake, David; Green, Jenny E.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Oravetz, Daniel; Simmons, Audrey; Malanushenko, Elena; Pan, Kaike; Roman Lopes, Alexandre; Lane, Richard R.

    2016-12-01

    We present the stellar surface mass density versus gas metallicity (Σ*-Z) relation for more than 500 000 spatially resolved star-forming resolution elements (spaxels) from a sample of 653 disc galaxies included in the SDSS IV MaNGA survey. We find a tight relation between these local properties, with higher metallicities as the surface density increases. This relation extends over three orders of magnitude in the surface mass density and a factor of 4 in metallicity. We show that this local relationship can simultaneously reproduce two well-known properties of disc galaxies: their global mass-metallicity relationship and their radial metallicity gradients. We also find that the Σ*-Z relation is largely independent of the galaxy's total stellar mass and specific star formation rate (sSFR), except at low stellar mass and high sSFR. These results suggest that in the present-day universe local properties play a key role in determining the gas-phase metallicity in typical disc galaxies.

  10. Topographic and sex-related differences in sleep spindles in major depressive disorder: a high-density EEG investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, D T; Goldstein, M R; Landsness, E C; Peterson, M J; Riedner, B A; Ferrarelli, F; Wanger, T; Guokas, J J; Tononi, G; Benca, R M

    2013-03-20

    Sleep spindles are believed to mediate several sleep-related functions including maintaining disconnection from the external environment during sleep, cortical development, and sleep-dependent memory consolidation. Prior studies that have examined sleep spindles in major depressive disorder (MDD) have not demonstrated consistent differences relative to control subjects, which may be due to sex-related variation and limited spatial resolution of spindle detection. Thus, this study sought to characterize sleep spindles in MDD using high-density electroencephalography (hdEEG) to examine the topography of sleep spindles across the cortex in MDD, as well as sex-related variation in spindle topography in the disorder. All-night hdEEG recordings were collected in 30 unipolar MDD participants (19 women) and 30 age and sex-matched controls. Topography of sleep spindle density, amplitude, duration, and integrated spindle activity (ISA) were assessed to determine group differences. Spindle parameters were compared between MDD and controls, including analysis stratified by sex. As a group, MDD subjects demonstrated significant increases in frontal and parietal spindle density and ISA compared to controls. When stratified by sex, MDD women demonstrated increases in frontal and parietal spindle density, amplitude, duration, and ISA; whereas MDD men demonstrated either no differences or decreases in spindle parameters. Given the number of male subjects, this study may be underpowered to detect differences in spindle parameters in male MDD participants. This study demonstrates topographic and sex-related differences in sleep spindles in MDD. Further research is warranted to investigate the role of sleep spindles and sex in the pathophysiology of MDD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Abundance of plankton population densities in relation to bottom soil textural types in aquaculture ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Siddika

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Plankton is an important food item of fishes and indicator for the productivity of a water body. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of bottom soil textural conditions on abundance of plankton in aquaculture pond. The experiment was carried out using three treatments, i.e., ponds bottom with sandy loam (T1, with loam (T2 and with clay loam (T3. The ranges of water quality parameters analyzed were suitable for the growth of plankton during the experimental period. Similarly, chemical properties of soil were also within suitable ranges and every parameter showed higher ranges in T2. A total 20 genera of phytoplankton were recorded belonged to Chlorophyceae (7, Cyanophyceae (5, Bacillariophyceae (5, Euglenophyceae (2 and Dinophyceae (1. On the other hand, total 13 genera of zooplankton were recorded belonged to Crustacea (7 and Rotifera (6. The highest ranges of phytoplankton and zooplankton densities were found in T2 where low to medium-type bloom was observed during the study period. Consequently, the mean abundance of plankton (phytoplankton and zooplankton density was significantly highest in T2. The highest abundance of plankton in the T2 indicated that pond bottom with loamy soil is suitable for the growth and production of plankton in aquaculture ponds.

  12. Plasticity and density-moisture-resistance relations of soils amended with fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mapfuno, E.; Chanasyk, D.S. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Renewable Resources

    1998-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of fly ash amendments on the plasticity, water retention and penetration resistance-density-moisture relationships of three soils of sandy loam, loam and clay loam textures in order to determine the potential compaction of these soil/fly ash mixtures if they were worked at different moisture ranges. For all three soils the addition of fly ash decreased the plasticity index, but slightly increased the Proctor maximum density. This implies that fly ash amendments reduce the range of moisture within which soils are most susceptible to compaction. However, for the sandy loam and loam textured soils amended with fly ash, cultivation must be avoided at moisture contents close to field capacity since maximum densification occurs at these moisture contents. In all three soils the addition of fly ash increased water retention, especially in the sandy loam. Fly ash amendments increased penetration resistance of the clay loam, but increased penetration resistance of the sandy loam.

  13. [Development of a software standardizing optical density with operation settings related to several limitations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Xiao-Ming; Zhang, Zuo-Heng; Wan, Cheng; Zheng, Yu; Xu, Jin-Mei; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Luo, Jian-Ping; Wu, Hai-Wei

    2012-12-01

    To develop a software that can be used to standardize optical density to normalize the procedures and results of standardization in order to effectively solve several problems generated during standardization of in-direct ELISA results. The software was designed based on the I-STOD method with operation settings to solve the problems that one might encounter during the standardization. Matlab GUI was used as a tool for the development. The software was tested with the results of the detection of sera of persons from schistosomiasis japonica endemic areas. I-STOD V1.0 (WINDOWS XP/WIN 7, 0.5 GB) was successfully developed to standardize optical density. A serial of serum samples from schistosomiasis japonica endemic areas were used to examine the operational effects of I-STOD V1.0 software. The results indicated that the software successfully overcame several problems including reliability of standard curve, applicable scope of samples and determination of dilution for samples outside the scope, so that I-STOD was performed more conveniently and the results of standardization were more consistent. I-STOD V1.0 is a professional software based on I-STOD. It can be easily operated and can effectively standardize the testing results of in-direct ELISA.

  14. Volumetric breast density measurement: sensitivity analysis of a relative physics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susie; Ng, Kwan Hoong; Abdul Aziz, Yang Faridah

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the sensitivity and robustness of a volumetric breast density (VBD) measurement system to errors in the imaging physics parameters including compressed breast thickness (CBT), tube voltage (kVp), filter thickness, tube current-exposure time product (mAs), detector gain, detector offset and image noise. 3317 raw digital mammograms were processed with Volpara(®) (Matakina Technology Ltd, Wellington, New Zealand) to obtain fibroglandular tissue volume (FGV), breast volume (BV) and VBD. Errors in parameters including CBT, kVp, filter thickness and mAs were simulated by varying them in the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) tags of the images up to ±10% of the original values. Errors in detector gain and offset were simulated by varying them in the Volpara configuration file up to ±10% from their default values. For image noise, Gaussian noise was generated and introduced into the original images. Errors in filter thickness, mAs, detector gain and offset had limited effects on FGV, BV and VBD. Significant effects in VBD were observed when CBT, kVp, detector offset and image noise were varied (p applications such as tracking density change over time, it remains to be seen how accurate the measures need to be.

  15. Interactions between leaf nitrogen status and longevity in relation to N cycling in three contrasting European forest canopies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, L.; Ibrom, Andreas; Korhonen, J. F. J.

    2013-01-01

    and Finland, respectively. The objectives were to investigate the distribution of N pools within the canopies of the different forests and to relate this distribution to factors and plant strategies controlling leaf development throughout the seasonal course of a vegetation period. Leaf N pools generally...

  16. Genetic Dissection of Root Morphological Traits Related to Nitrogen Use Efficiency in Brassica napus L. under Two Contrasting Nitrogen Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available As the major determinant for nutrient uptake, root system architecture (RSA has a massive impact on nitrogen use efficiency (NUE. However, little is known the molecular control of RSA as related to NUE in rapeseed. Here, a rapeseed recombinant inbred line population (BnaZNRIL was used to investigate root morphology (RM, an important component for RSA and NUE-related traits under high-nitrogen (HN and low-nitrogen (LN conditions by hydroponics. Data analysis suggested that RM-related traits, particularly root size had significantly phenotypic correlations with plant dry biomass and N uptake irrespective of N levels, but no or little correlation with N utilization efficiency (NUtE, providing the potential to identify QTLs with pleiotropy or specificity for RM- and NUE-related traits. A total of 129 QTLs (including 23 stable QTLs, which were repeatedly detected at least two environments or different N levels were identified and 83 of them were integrated into 22 pleiotropic QTL clusters. Five RM-NUE, ten RM-specific and three NUE-specific QTL clusters with same directions of additive-effect implied two NUE-improving approaches (RM-based and N utilization-based directly and provided valuable genomic regions for NUE improvement in rapeseed. Importantly, all of four major QTLs and most of stable QTLs (20 out of 23 detected here were related to RM traits under HN and/or LN levels, suggested that regulating RM to improve NUE would be more feasible than regulating N efficiency directly. These results provided the promising genomic regions for marker-assisted selection on RM-based NUE improvement in rapeseed.

  17. A grey relational analytical approach to orange peel filler particulates for tapped density experiments of green composite reinforcements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwaseyi Ayodele Ajibade

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring density changes during transportation of composite fillers is the principal reason for composite industries implementing the tapped density concept. Till date, very sparse literature information exists on tapped density optimisation for orange peel particles (OPPs. A unique application of grey relational analysis (GRA in the optimisation of tapped process parameters for OPPs is contributed in this paper. Experimental results on the principal process parameters indicate G1H1I2J3 as the best experimental run, which translates to 257.956 g and 78.076 cm3 as well as 254.939 g and 72.94 cm3 for masses and volumes of the 0.425 and 0.600 mm OPPs, respectively. In addition, Taguchi method was applied to arrive at an optimal parametric setting of G2H2I1J1 for comparative purposes which translate to 257.723 g and 75.031 cm3 for mass and volume of the 0.425 OPPs, as well as 254.952 g and 77.982 cm3 for the mass and volume of 0.600 mm OPPs. By comparison, the GRA values produced positive percentage improvement over other optimal values. The unique contribution of this paper are principally the (i application of GRA in a novel manner, incorporating harmonic mean in factor-level determination and computation of S/N responses; (ii development of new indices of tapped density; and (iii introduction of economic factors in tapped density computations, incorporating inflation and interest factors. The practical utility of the demonstrated approach lies in reducing the uncertainties about density measurements in the transportation of green fillers for use as composite reinforcements.

  18. Stress hormones in relation to breeding status and territory location in colonial king penguin: a role for social density?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viblanc, Vincent A; Gineste, Benoit; Stier, Antoine; Robin, Jean-Patrice; Groscolas, René

    2014-07-01

    Because glucocorticoid (stress) hormones fundamentally affect various aspects of the behaviour, life history and fitness of free-living vertebrates, there is a need to understand the environmental factors shaping their variation in natural populations. Here, we examined whether spatial heterogeneity in breeding territory quality affected the stress of colonial king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus). We assessed the effects of local climate (wind, sun and ambient temperature) and social conditions (number of neighbours, distance to neighbours) on the baseline levels of plasma total corticosterone (CORT) in 77 incubating and 42 chick-brooding birds, breeding on territories of central or peripheral colony location. We also assessed the oxidative stress status of a sub-sample of central vs. peripheral chick-brooders to determine whether chronic stress arose from breeding on specific territories. On average, we found that brooders had 55% higher CORT levels than incubators. Regardless of breeding status, central birds experienced greater social density (higher number of neighbours, shorter distance between territories) and had higher CORT levels than peripheral birds. Increasing social density positively explained 40% of the variation in CORT levels of both incubators and brooders, but the effect was more pronounced in brooders. In contrast, climate was similar among breeding territories and did not significantly affect the CORT levels of breeding birds. In brooders, oxidative stress status was not affected by local density or weather conditions. These results highlight that local heterogeneity in breeding (including social) conditions may strongly affect the stress levels of breeding seabirds. The fitness consequences of such variation remain to be investigated.

  19. Transcriptional profiles of hybrid Eucalyptus genotypes with contrasting lignin content reveal that monolignol biosynthesis-related genes regulate wood composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomotaka eShinya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus species constitutes the most widely planted hardwood trees in temperate and subtropical regions. In this study, we compared the transcript levels of genes involved in lignocellulose formation such as cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin biosynthesis in two selected three-year old hybrid Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus urophylla x E. grandis genotypes (AM063 and AM380 that have different lignin content. AM063 and AM380 had 20.2 and 35.5% of Klason lignin content and 59.0% and 48.2%, -cellulose contents, respectively. We investigated the correlation between wood properties and transcript levels of wood formation-related genes using RNA-seq with total RNAs extracted from developing xylem tissues at a breast height. Transcript levels of cell wall construction genes such as cellulose synthase (CesA and sucrose synthase (SUSY were almost the same in both genotypes. However, AM063 exhibited higher transcript levels of UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGP and xyloglucan endotransglucoxylase (XTH than those in AM380. Most monolignol biosynthesis- related isozyme genes showed higher transcript levels in AM380. These results indicate monolignol biosynthesis-related genes may regulate wood composition in Eucalyptus. Flavonoids contents were also observed at much higher levels in AM380 as a result of the elevated transcript levels of common phenylpropanoid pathway genes, phenylalanine ammonium lyase (PAL, cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H and 4-coumarate-CoA ligase (4CL. Secondary plant cell wall formation is regulated by many transcription factors. We analyzed genes encoding NAC, WRKY, AP2/ERF and KNOX transcription factors and found higher transcript levels of these genes in AM380. We also observed increased transcription of some MYB and LIM domain transcription factors in AM380 compared to AM063. All these results show that genes related to monolignol biosynthesis may regulate the wood composition and help maintain the ratio of cellulose and lignin contents

  20. Relation of parity and homocysteine to bone mineral density of postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Necat; Kepkep, Necip; Ciçek, Hülya Kanbur; Celik, Ahmet; Meram, Iclal

    2006-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a major problem in contemporary society. However, there is not enough data on multiparity and osteoporosis from developing and/or undeveloped countries on a large scale. Selection of participants in this study was aimed at the detection of bone status in healthy (normal bone mineral density) postmenopausal (n = 46, 55.3 +/- 6.7 years) and osteoporotic postmenopausal women (n: 33) of similar age. Bone mineral density (BMD) was evaluated using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. At the DEXA evaluation, 33 women had osteoporotic (T score below -2.5) and 46 had normal BMD values. The number of pregnancies was found to range from 3 to 12 (with an overall mean of 6.7 +/- 2.5), while 2.6 +/- 1.9 (range, 1-7) were miscarriages in all of the 33 postmenopausal osteoporotic women. Serum homocysteine (t-Hcy) and urinary deoxypyridinoline (DPD) levels were significantly higher in osteoporotic postmenopausal women (11.96 +/- 3.84 micromol/L, 15.4 +/- 7.0 nM/mM cr) than in non-osteoporotic postmenopausal women (10.93 +/- 3.6 micromol/L, 10.6 +/- 9.1 nM/mM cr), p pregnancies is unclear, and the relationship may only be by chance. In conclusion, the present study firstly suggests that the number of pregnancies has an effect on the t-Hcy levels. In addition, our study indicates that there is a significant negative correlation between the number of pregnancies and the lumbar spine BMD.

  1. The Riemann problem for the relativistic full Euler system with generalized Chaplygin proper energy density-pressure relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zhiqiang

    2018-04-01

    The relativistic full Euler system with generalized Chaplygin proper energy density-pressure relation is studied. The Riemann problem is solved constructively. The delta shock wave arises in the Riemann solutions, provided that the initial data satisfy some certain conditions, although the system is strictly hyperbolic and the first and third characteristic fields are genuinely nonlinear, while the second one is linearly degenerate. There are five kinds of Riemann solutions, in which four only consist of a shock wave and a centered rarefaction wave or two shock waves or two centered rarefaction waves, and a contact discontinuity between the constant states (precisely speaking, the solutions consist in general of three waves), and the other involves delta shocks on which both the rest mass density and the proper energy density simultaneously contain the Dirac delta function. It is quite different from the previous ones on which only one state variable contains the Dirac delta function. The formation mechanism, generalized Rankine-Hugoniot relation and entropy condition are clarified for this type of delta shock wave. Under the generalized Rankine-Hugoniot relation and entropy condition, we establish the existence and uniqueness of solutions involving delta shocks for the Riemann problem.

  2. Interactions between leaf nitrogen status and longevity in relation to N cycling in three contrasting European forest canopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal and spatial variations in foliar nitrogen (N parameters were investigated in three European forests with different tree species, viz. beech (Fagus sylvatica L., Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb. Franco and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. growing in Denmark, the Netherlands and Finland, respectively. The objectives were to investigate the distribution of N pools within the canopies of the different forests and to relate this distribution to factors and plant strategies controlling leaf development throughout the seasonal course of a vegetation period. Leaf N pools generally showed much higher seasonal and vertical variability in beech than in the coniferous canopies. However, also the two coniferous tree species behaved very differently with respect to peak summer canopy N content and N re-translocation efficiency, showing that generalisations on tree internal vs. ecosystem internal N cycling cannot be made on the basis of the leaf duration alone. During phases of intensive N turnover in spring and autumn, the NH4+ concentration in beech leaves rose considerably, while fully developed green beech leaves had relatively low tissue NH4+, similar to the steadily low levels in Douglas fir and, particularly, in Scots pine. The ratio between bulk foliar concentrations of NH4+ and H+, which is an indicator of the NH3 emission potential, reflected differences in foliage N concentration, with beech having the highest values followed by Douglas fir and Scots pine. Irrespectively of the leaf habit, i.e. deciduous versus evergreen, the majority of the canopy foliage N was retained within the trees. This was accomplished through an effective N re-translocation (beech, higher foliage longevity (fir or both (boreal pine forest. In combination with data from a literature review, a general relationship of decreasing N re

  3. Histamine H3 receptor density is negatively correlated with neural activity related to working memory in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takehito; Kimura, Yasuyuki; Seki, Chie; Ichise, Masanori; Yokokawa, Keita; Kawamura, Kazunori; Takahashi, Hidehiko; Higuchi, Makoto; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Suhara, Tetsuya; Yamada, Makiko

    2018-06-14

    The histamine H 3 receptor is regarded as a drug target for cognitive impairments in psychiatric disorders. H 3 receptors are expressed in neocortical areas, including the prefrontal cortex, the key region of cognitive functions such as working memory. However, the role of prefrontal H 3 receptors in working memory has not yet been clarified. Therefore, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) techniques, we aimed to investigate the association between the neural activity of working memory and the density of H 3 receptors in the prefrontal cortex. Ten healthy volunteers underwent both fMRI and PET scans. The N-back task was used to assess the neural activities related to working memory. H 3 receptor density was measured with the selective PET radioligand [ 11 C] TASP457. The neural activity of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during the performance of the N-back task was negatively correlated with the density of H 3 receptors in this region. Higher neural activity of working memory was associated with lower H 3 receptor density in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. This finding elucidates the role of H 3 receptors in working memory and indicates the potential of H 3 receptors as a therapeutic target for the cognitive impairments associated with neuropsychiatric disorders.

  4. Paternal epigenetic effects of population density on locust phase-related characteristics associated with heat-shock protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing; Li, Shaoqin; Ren, Qiang; Tong, Xiwen; Zhang, Xia; Kang, Le

    2015-02-01

    Many species exhibit transgenerational plasticity by which environmental cues experienced by either parent can be transmitted to their offspring, resulting in phenotypic variants in offspring to match ancestral environments. However, the manner by which paternal experiences affect offspring plasticity through epigenetic inheritance in animals generally remains unclear. In this study, we examined the transgenerational effects of population density on phase-related traits in the migratory locust Locusta migratoria. Using an experimental design that explicitly controls genetic background, we found that the effects of crowd or isolation rearing on phase plasticity could be inherited to the offspring. The isolation of gregarious locusts resulted in reduced weight in offspring eggs and altered morphometric traits in hatchlings, whereas crowding of solitarious locusts exhibited opposite effects. The consequences of density changes were transmitted by both maternal and paternal inheritance, although the expression of paternal effects was not as pronounced as that of maternal effects. Prominent expression of heat-shock proteins (Hsps), such as Hsp90, Hsp70 and Hsp20.6, could be triggered by density changes. Hsps were significantly upregulated upon crowding but downregulated upon isolation. The variation in parental Hsp expression was also transmitted to the offspring, in which the pattern of inheritance was consistent with that of phase characteristics. These results revealed a paternal effect on phase polyphenism and Hsp expression induced by population density, and defined a model system that could be used to study the paternal epigenetic inheritance of environmental changes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Soil aggregation and slope stability related to soil density, root length, and mycorrhiza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Frank; Frei, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Eco-engineering measures combine the use of living plants and inert mechanical constructions to protect slopes against erosion and shallow mass movement. Whereas in geotechnical engineering several performance standards and guidelines for structural safety and serviceability of construction exist, there is a lack of comparable tools in the field of ecological restoration. Various indicators have been proposed, including the fractal dimension of soil particle size distribution, microbiological parameters, and soil aggregate stability. We present results of an soil aggregate stability investigation and compare them with literature data of the angle of internal friction ?' which is conventionally used in slope stability analysis and soil failure calculation. Aggregate stability tests were performed with samples of differently treated moraine, including soil at low (~15.5 kN/m³) and high (~19.0 kN/m³) dry unit weight, soil planted with Alnus incana (White Alder) as well as the combination of soil planted with alder and inoculated with the mycorrhizal fungus Melanogaster variegatus s.l. After a 20 weeks growth period in a greenhouse, a total of 100 samples was tested and evaluated. Positive correlations were found between the soil aggregate stability and the three variables dry unit weight, root length per soil volume, and degree of mycorrhization. Based on robust statistics it turned out that dry unit weight and mycorrhization degree were strongest correlated with soil aggregate stability. Compared to the non-inoculated control plants, mycorrhized White Alder produced significantly more roots and higher soil aggregate stability. Furthermore, the combined biological effect of plant roots and mycorrhizal mycelia on aggregate stability on soil with low density (~15.5 kN/m³) was comparable to the compaction effect of the pure soil from 15.5 to ~19.0 kN/m³. Literature data on the effect of vegetation on the angle of internal friction ?' of the same moraine showed

  6. Association of polymorphisms in low-density lipoprotein receptor- related protein 5 gene with bone mineral density in postmenopausal Chinese women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-lin ZHANG; Yue-juan QIN; Jin-wei HE; Qi-ren HUANG; Miao LI; Yun-qiu HU; Yu-juan LIU

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the possible association of Q89R, N740N and A1330V polymorphisms in low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene with bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal Chinese women. Methods: Q89R,N740N and A1330V genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reactionrestriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) in 647 unrelated healthy postmenopausal Han Chinese women aged 43-76 years in Shanghai. BMD at lumbar spine 1-4 and the left proximal femur including the femoral neck, trochanter and Ward's triangle were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptionmetry in all subjects. Results: The distribution of the Q89R, N740N and A1330V genotypes in this population was as follows: QQ 80.5%, QR 18.7%, and RR 0.8%; TT 66.9%,TC 31.1%, and CC 2.0%; AA 68.0%, AV 29.7%, and VV 2.3%. The frequencies of the Q89R, N740N and A1330V genotypes and alleles did not deviate from the HardyWeinberg equilibrium. We found that the Q89R and A1330V polymorphisms were in linkage disequilibrium in our population (x2= 13.50, P<0.01). Both before and after adjusting for age, years since menopause, height, and weight, the Q89R or N740N genotypes were significantly associated with BMD at the femoral neck (P<0.05).Subjects with the Q89R QQ genotype or the N740N TT genotype had a significantly higher BMD at the femoral neck, compared with those with the QR/RR or TC/CC genotypes, respectively. No significant association was found between A1330V polymorphism and BMD at any site. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the LRP5 gene is a candidate for the genetic determination of BMD in postmenopausal Chinese women.

  7. On the de Vaucouleurs density-radius relation and the cellular intermediate large-scale structure of the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruffini, R.

    1989-01-01

    In the present interpretation of the de Vaucouleurs mass density relation within the framework of universal fractal and cellular structure, attention is given to the relationship of such structure to the conventionally assumed cosmological conditions of three-dimensional homogeneity and isotropy. It is noted to be possible that the degree of regularity of the fractal structure will allow the definition, for distances smaller than the upper cutoff, of a Hubble ratio; this would be a function of the distance, however, and is clearly not directly related to a cosmological interpretation. 44 refs

  8. VEGF expression and microvascular density in relation to high-risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HPV)- related cancer mandates the search for new treatment modalities. Therapeutic targeting of tumor vasculature is a promising strategy. The aim was to study angiogenesis in cervical carcinoma in terms of VEGF expression and assessment ...

  9. Power relations and contrasting conceptions of evidence in patient-involvement processes used to inform health funding decisions in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Edilene; Carter, Drew; Street, Jackie

    2015-06-01

    We collected and analysed views of key stakeholders on the processes used to involve patient organisations in health care funding decision making in Australia. We conducted 12 semi-structured interviews with patient organisation representatives and members of Advisory Committees that provide advice to the Australian Department of Health and employ Health Technology Assessment (HTA) as an evaluation framework. Using two theoretical frameworks, we analysed structural and contextual elements pertaining to the involvement processes. The findings reported in this article relate to interviewees' perspectives on contextual elements, analysed using a Foucauldian lens. These elements include: the perspectives of marginalised voices; the diversity of views on what ought to be considered valid evidence in a HTA setting; and the relationships between stakeholders, along with how these relationships impact on involvement processes and the outcomes of those processes. The findings demonstrate that the involvement processes currently used are deemed inadequate by both patient organisation representatives and Advisory Committee members, but for different reasons connected to how different stakeholders conceptualise evidence. Advisory Committee members viewed evidence as encompassing clinical outcomes and patient preferences, whereas patient organisation representatives tended to view evidence as encompassing aspects not directly related to a disease entity, such as the social and emotional aspects of patients' experiences in living with illness. Patient organisation representatives reported interacting with other stakeholders (especially industry) to increase the influence of their conception of evidence on decision making. The use of this strategy by interviewees illustrates how power struggles occur in government decision-making processes which involve both medical expertise and patients' accounts. Such struggles, and the power differentials they reflect, need to be considered

  10. Changes in plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL)- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in hypo- and hyperthyroid patients are related to changes in free thyroxine, not to polymorphisms in LDL receptor or cholesterol ester transfer protein genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diekman, M. J.; Anghelescu, N.; Endert, E.; Bakker, O.; Wiersinga, W. M.

    2000-01-01

    Thyroid function disorders lead to changes in lipoprotein metabolism. Both plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) increase in hypothyroidism and decrease in hyperthyroidism. Changes in LDL-C relate to altered clearance of LDL particles

  11. A regression-based method for mapping traffic-related air pollution. Application and testing in four contrasting urban environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, D.J.; De Hoogh, C.; Elliot, P.; Gulliver, J.; Wills, J.; Kingham, S.; Smallbone, K.

    2000-01-01

    Accurate, high-resolution maps of traffic-related air pollution are needed both as a basis for assessing exposures as part of epidemiological studies, and to inform urban air-quality policy and traffic management. This paper assesses the use of a GIS-based, regression mapping technique to model spatial patterns of traffic-related air pollution. The model - developed using data from 80 passive sampler sites in Huddersfield, as part of the SAVIAH (Small Area Variations in Air Quality and Health) project - uses data on traffic flows and land cover in the 300-m buffer zone around each site, and altitude of the site, as predictors of NO 2 concentrations. It was tested here by application in four urban areas in the UK: Huddersfield (for the year following that used for initial model development), Sheffield, Northampton, and part of London. In each case, a GIS was built in ArcInfo, integrating relevant data on road traffic, urban land use and topography. Monitoring of NO 2 was undertaken using replicate passive samplers (in London, data were obtained from surveys carried out as part of the London network). In Huddersfield, Sheffield and Northampton, the model was first calibrated by comparing modelled results with monitored NO 2 concentrations at 10 randomly selected sites; the calibrated model was then validated against data from a further 10-28 sites. In London, where data for only 11 sites were available, validation was not undertaken. Results showed that the model performed well in all cases. After local calibration, the model gave estimates of mean annual NO 2 concentrations within a factor of 1.5 of the actual mean (approx. 70-90%) of the time and within a factor of 2 between 70 and 100% of the time. r 2 values between modelled and observed concentrations are in the range of 0.58-0.76. These results are comparable to those achieved by more sophisticated dispersion models. The model also has several advantages over dispersion modelling. It is able, for example, to

  12. Relative Contribution of Matrix Structure, Patch Resources and Management to the Local Densities of Two Large Blue Butterfly Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajzer-Bonk, Joanna; Skórka, Piotr; Nowicki, Piotr; Bonk, Maciej; Król, Wiesław; Szpiłyk, Damian; Woyciechowski, Michal

    2016-01-01

    The type of matrix, the landscape surrounding habitat patches, may determine the distribution and function of local populations. However, the matrix is often heterogeneous, and its various components may differentially contribute to metapopulation processes at different spatial scales, a phenomenon that has rarely been investigated. The aim of this study was to estimate the relative importance of matrix composition and spatial scale, habitat quality, and management intensity on the occurrence and density of local populations of two endangered large blue butterflies: Phengaris teleius and P. nausithous. Presence and abundance data were assessed over two years, 2011-12, in 100 local patches within two heterogeneous regions (near Kraków and Tarnów, southern Poland). The matrix composition was analyzed at eight spatial scales. We observed high occupancy rates in both species, regions and years. With the exception of area and isolation, almost all of the matrix components contributed to Phengaris sp. densities. The different matrix components acted at different spatial scales (grassland cover within 4 and 3 km, field cover within 0.4 and 0.3 km and water cover within 4 km radii for P. teleius and P. nausithous, respectively) and provided the highest independent contribution to the butterfly densities. Additionally, the effects of a 0.4 km radius of forest cover and a food plant cover on P. teleius, and a 1 km radius of settlement cover and management intensity on P. nausithous densities were observed. Contrary to former studies we conclude that the matrix heterogeneity and spatial scale rather than general matrix type are of relevance for densities of butterflies. Conservation strategies for these umbrella species should concentrate on maintaining habitat quality and managing matrix composition at the most appropriate spatial scales.

  13. Relative Contribution of Matrix Structure, Patch Resources and Management to the Local Densities of Two Large Blue Butterfly Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skórka, Piotr; Nowicki, Piotr; Bonk, Maciej; Król, Wiesław; Szpiłyk, Damian; Woyciechowski, Michal

    2016-01-01

    The type of matrix, the landscape surrounding habitat patches, may determine the distribution and function of local populations. However, the matrix is often heterogeneous, and its various components may differentially contribute to metapopulation processes at different spatial scales, a phenomenon that has rarely been investigated. The aim of this study was to estimate the relative importance of matrix composition and spatial scale, habitat quality, and management intensity on the occurrence and density of local populations of two endangered large blue butterflies: Phengaris teleius and P. nausithous. Presence and abundance data were assessed over two years, 2011–12, in 100 local patches within two heterogeneous regions (near Kraków and Tarnów, southern Poland). The matrix composition was analyzed at eight spatial scales. We observed high occupancy rates in both species, regions and years. With the exception of area and isolation, almost all of the matrix components contributed to Phengaris sp. densities. The different matrix components acted at different spatial scales (grassland cover within 4 and 3 km, field cover within 0.4 and 0.3 km and water cover within 4 km radii for P. teleius and P. nausithous, respectively) and provided the highest independent contribution to the butterfly densities. Additionally, the effects of a 0.4 km radius of forest cover and a food plant cover on P. teleius, and a 1 km radius of settlement cover and management intensity on P. nausithous densities were observed. Contrary to former studies we conclude that the matrix heterogeneity and spatial scale rather than general matrix type are of relevance for densities of butterflies. Conservation strategies for these umbrella species should concentrate on maintaining habitat quality and managing matrix composition at the most appropriate spatial scales. PMID:28005942

  14. Obtaining source current density related to irregularly structured electromagnetic target field inside human body using hybrid inverse/FDTD method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jijun; Yang, Deqiang; Sun, Houjun; Xin, Sherman Xuegang

    2017-01-01

    Inverse method is inherently suitable for calculating the distribution of source current density related with an irregularly structured electromagnetic target field. However, the present form of inverse method cannot calculate complex field-tissue interactions. A novel hybrid inverse/finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method that can calculate the complex field-tissue interactions for the inverse design of source current density related with an irregularly structured electromagnetic target field is proposed. A Huygens' equivalent surface is established as a bridge to combine the inverse and FDTD method. Distribution of the radiofrequency (RF) magnetic field on the Huygens' equivalent surface is obtained using the FDTD method by considering the complex field-tissue interactions within the human body model. The obtained magnetic field distributed on the Huygens' equivalent surface is regarded as the next target. The current density on the designated source surface is derived using the inverse method. The homogeneity of target magnetic field and specific energy absorption rate are calculated to verify the proposed method.

  15. Interspecies Interactions in Relation to Root Distribution Across the Rooting Profile in Wheat-Maize Intercropping Under Different Plant Densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifan Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In wheat-maize intercropping systems, the maize is often disadvantageous over the wheat during the co-growth period. It is unknown whether the impaired growth of maize can be recovered through the enhancement of the belowground interspecies interactions. In this study, we (i determined the mechanism of the belowground interaction in relation to root growth and distribution under different maize plant densities, and (ii quantified the “recovery effect” of maize after wheat harvest. The three-year (2014–2016 field experiment was conducted at the Oasis Agriculture Research Station of Gansu Agricultural University, Wuwei, Northwest China. Root weight density (RWD, root length density (RLD, and root surface area density (RSAD, were measured in single-cropped maize (M, single-cropped wheat (W, and three intercropping systems (i wheat-maize intercropping with no root barrier (i.e., complete belowground interaction, IC, (ii nylon mesh root barrier (partial belowground interaction, IC-PRI, and (iii plastic sheet root barrier (no belowground interaction, IC-NRI. The intercropped maize was planted at low (45,000 plants ha−1 and high (52,000 plants ha−1 densities. During the wheat/maize co-growth period, the IC treatment increased the RWD, RLD, and RSAD of the intercropped wheat in the 20–100 cm soil depth compared to the IC-PRI and IC-NRI systems; intercropped maize had 53% lower RWD, 81% lower RLD, and 70% lower RSAD than single-cropped maize. After wheat harvest, the intercropped maize recovered the growth with the increase of RWD by 40%, RLD by 44% and RSAD by 11%, compared to the single-cropped maize. Comparisons among the three intercropping systems revealed that the “recovery effect” of the intercropped maize was attributable to complete belowground interspecies interaction by 143%, the compensational effect due to root overlap by 35%, and the compensational effect due to water and nutrient exchange (CWN by 80%. The higher maize plant

  16. High density renal medulla on unenhanced CT : significance and relation with hydration status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Hyun Suk; Oh, Kyung Seung; Kim, Jong Min; Kim, Sung Min; Jung, Gyoo Sik; Huh, Jin Do; Joh, Young Duk

    1999-01-01

    To assess the effect of hydration status on renal medullary attenuation and to evaluate the incidence of dense renal medulla, as seen on unenhanced CT. We prospectively studied unenhanced CT scans of 12 healthy volunteers. Obtained done after 10 hours and 15 hours of dehydration and after oral intake of 2L of water. BUN/Cr, urine specific gravity, urine osmole and hematocrit were evaluated after 10 hours of dehydration. CT images were reviewed for the presence of dense renal medulla and differential attenuation of dense renal and isodense medulla and cortex at the same level. The density changes of renal medulla after hydration were evaluated. and CT findings were compared with the results of biochemical studies. In addition, we retrospectively reviewed the CT scans of 200 consecutive patients for evaluation of the incidence of dense renal medulla. In 8 of 12 volunteers, dense renal medulla was seen on CT scan after dehydration. Mean attenuation was 71.3±10.42HU after 10 hours of dehydration, 68.6±13.54HU after 15 hours, and 34.5±11.47HU after hydration. No significant attenuation differences were detected between 10 hours and 15 hours of dehydration, but significantly lower attenuation values were noted after hydration. For isodense medulla, the mean attenuation value was 35.7±7.9HU after 10 hours of dehydration, 39.58±9.66HU after 15 hours, and 36.58±7.77HU after hydration. The mean attenuation values of cortex were 35.9±5.95HU after 10 hours of dehydration. 37.58±5.95HU after 15 hours, and 37.08±9.75HU after hydration. With regard not only to duration of dehydration, but also ti hydration, no differences in attenuation values were noted for renal cortex or isodense renal medulla. However, higher density was noted in dense renal medulla than in isodense medulla or cortex for the same duration of dehydration. After hydration, complete resolution was seen at five of eight sites and incomplete resolution at three of eight sites. There was no correlation

  17. Are serotonin metabolite levels related to bone mineral density in patients with neuroendocrine tumours?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen Gupta, Piya; Grozinsky-Glasberg, Simona; Drake, William M; Akker, Scott A; Perry, Les; Grossman, Ashley B; Druce, Maralyn R

    2014-02-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is influenced by multiple factors. Recent studies have highlighted a possible relationship between serotonin and BMD. Patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) frequently have elevated urinary 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels, a serotonin metabolite. Evaluation of the relationship between 5-HIAA and BMD in patients with NETs may provide insights into the relationship between serotonin and BMD. One-year audit of consecutive patients with NETs within two institutions. Relationships between urinary 5-HIAA and dual X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA)-scan-measured BMD were investigated by group comparisons, correlation and regression. Of 65 patients with NETs, 19 did not participate or were excluded. Of 46 subjects evaluated (48·9% males, 63·8 ± 10·5 years, BMI 26·6 ± 4·4 kg/m(2) ) with 32 gastrointestinal, 9 pancreatic, 3 pulmonary and 2 ovarian NETs, 72·3% had the carcinoid syndrome. Median interval from diagnosis was 4·0 years (IQR 2·0-6·0); 41·3% had osteoporosis and 32·6% osteopaenia (WHO definition). The group with a higher urinary 5-HIAA had a lower hip BMD (total T-score and Z-score), confirmed on individual analysis (Spearman's rank correlation -0·41, P = 0·004; -0·44, P = 0·002, respectively); urinary 5-HIAA was not found to be an independent predictor for BMD on multiple linear regression analysis. These data of patients with NETs with higher serotonin metabolites having a lower BMD at the hip in group and individual comparisons, warrants further evaluation. Urinary 5-HIAA measurement alone cannot be used to predict future BMD. A larger cohort with prospective design including fractures as a clinical outcome will aid these data in determining whether patients with NETs should be subject to targeted osteoporosis prevention. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. [Low bone mineral density in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Prevalence and related factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo Zavala, Rocío; Núñez Cuadros, Esmeralda; Martín Pedraz, Laura; Díaz-Cordovés Rego, Gisela; Sierra Salinas, Carlos; Urda Cardona, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    Height adjustment is currently recommended for Z-score bone mineral density (BMD) assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. At present there are no studies that evaluate the prevalence of low BMD in paediatric patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) in Spain following current recommendations. To evaluate low BMD in JIA in paediatric patients with JIA in Spain following the latest recommendations, as well as to assess associated factors. Observational cross-sectional study of Spanish JIA patients from 5 to 16 years-old, followed-up in a Paediatric Rheumatology Unit between July 2014 and July 2015. Anthropometric, clinical and treatment data were recorded. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, and bone metabolism parameters were collected, and a completed diet and exercise questionnaire was obtained. A total of 92 children participated. The population prevalence estimation of low BMD was less than 5% (95% CI). A significant positive correlation was found in the multiple linear regression analysis between the body mass index percentile (B: 0.021; P<.001) and lean mass index (B: 0.0002; P=.012), and BMD Z-score adjusted for height (Z-SAH). A significant negative correlation was found between fat mass index (B: -0.0001; P=.018) and serum type I collagen N-propeptide (B: -0,0006; P=.036) and Z-SAH. Low BMD prevalence in JIA patients in our population is low. An adequate nutritional status and the prevalence of lean over fat mass seem to promote the acquisition of bone mass. Those JIA patients with lower BMD could be subjected to an increase of bone turnover. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Lifetime physical activity and calcium intake related to bone density in young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Lorraine Silver; Ballard, Joyce E

    2002-05-01

    Osteoporosis is a significant public health problem associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Our aim in this cross-sectional study was to investigate the relationship between lifetime physical activity and calcium intake and bone mineral density (BMD) and BMC (bone mineral content) in 42 regularly menstruating Caucasian women (age 21.26+/-1.91 years, BMI 23.83+/-5.85). BMD and BMC at the lumbar spine (L2-L4), hip (femoral neck, trochanter, total), and total body were assessed by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Lifetime history of physical activity and calcium intake was obtained by a structured interview using valid and reliable instruments. Measures of both lifetime physical activity and calcium intake were highly correlated. In stepwise multiple regression analyses, lean mass was the most important and consistent factor for predicting BMD and BMC at all skeletal sites (attributable r2 = 28.8%-78.7%). Lifetime physical activity contributed to 3.0% of the variation in total body BMD, and life-time weight-bearing physical activity explained 15.1% of variance in lumbar spine BMC. Current calcium intake predicted 6% of the variance in BMD at the femoral neck and trochanter. We found lean mass to be a powerful predictor of BMD and BMC in young women. Because lean mass can be modified to some extent by physical activity, public health efforts must be directed at increasing physical activity throughout the lifespan. Furthermore, our results suggest that adequate calcium intake may help to enhance bone mass, thus decreasing the risk of osteoporotic fracture later in life.

  20. ALK1 expression in oral lichen planus: a possible relation to microvessel density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazzaa, Hala H A; El-Wakeel, Naglaa M; Attia, Enas A S; Abo Hager, Eman A

    2016-05-01

    To assess the expression of activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1) and investigate its possible relationship with microvessel density (MVD) in different forms of oral lichen planus (OLP) compared to controls' biopsies. Biopsies from 20 reticular/papular OLP (R/PLP), 20 atrophic/erosive OLP (A/ELP) patients, and 20 healthy subjects were immunohistochemically analyzed and statistically compared and correlated for ALK1 expression and MVD as assessed by CD34 expression. All OLP specimens revealed the presence of positive cytoplasmic CD34 immunostaining in endothelial cells, with statistically high significant MVD in each of R/PLP (Median; M = 4.40) and A/ELP (M = 7.69) compared to controls (M = 1.16) (P < 0.001). Statistically significant MVD was found in A/ELP compared to R/PLP (P < 0.001). All control specimens revealed negative ALK1 immunostaining of the few inflammatory cells found, while 85% of A/ELP cases and 70% of R/PLP cases showed positively immunostained sections for ALK-1, with statistically significant higher ALK1 expression In A/ELP (M = 1.95) compared to R/PLP (M = 0.86) (P = 0.005). No significant correlation between CD34 and ALK1 was detected in R/PLP (r = 0.081), while a barely moderate positive correlation was found in A/ELP (r = 0.396). ALK1 expression and MVD are increased in OLP, particularly in A/ELP type. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Public support for river restoration funding in relation to local river ecomorphology, population density, and mean income

    Science.gov (United States)

    SchläPfer, Felix; Witzig, Pieter-Jan

    2006-12-01

    In 1997, about 140,000 citizens in 388 voting districts in the Swiss canton of Bern passed a ballot initiative to allocate about 3 million Swiss Francs annually to a canton-wide river restoration program. Using the municipal voting returns and a detailed georeferenced data set on the ecomorphological status of the rivers, we estimate models of voter support in relation to local river ecomorphology, population density, mean income, cultural background, and recent flood damage. Support of the initiative increased with increasing population density and tended to increase with increasing mean income, in spite of progressive taxation. Furthermore, we found evidence that public support increased with decreasing "naturalness" of local rivers. The model estimates may be cautiously used to predict the public acceptance of similar restoration programs in comparable regions. Moreover, the voting-based insights into the distribution of river restoration benefits provide a useful starting point for debates about appropriate financing schemes.

  2. Nest site preference depends on the relative density of conspecifics and heterospecifics in wild birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samplonius, Jelmer M.; Kromhout Van Der Meer, Iris M; Both, Christiaan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Social learning allows animals to eavesdrop on ecologically relevant knowledge of competitors in their environment. This is especially important when selecting a habitat if individuals have relatively little personal information on habitat quality. It is known that birds can use both

  3. Density and distribution of cutaneous sensilla on tails of leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) in relation to caudal autotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Anthony P; Lai, Erica K; Lawrence Powell, G; Higham, Timothy E

    2014-09-01

    The lizard tail is well known for its ability to autotomize and regenerate. Physical contact of the tail by a predator may induce autotomy at the location at which the tail is grasped, and upon detachment the tail may undergo violent, rapid, and unpredictable movements that appear to be, to some degree, regulated by contact with the physical environment. Neither the mechanism by which tail breakage at a particular location is determined, nor that by which environmental feedback to the tail is received, are known. It has been suggested that mechanoreceptors (sensilla) are the means of mediation of such activities, and reports indicate that the density of sensilla on the tail is high. To determine the feasibility that mechanoreceptors are involved in such phenomena, we mapped scale form and the size, density, distribution, and spacing of sensilla on the head, body, limbs, and tail of the leopard gecko. This species has a full complement of autotomy planes along the length of the tail, and the postautotomic behavior of its tail has been documented. We found that the density of sensilla is highest on the tail relative to all other body regions examined; a dorsoventral gradient of caudal sensilla density is evident on the tail; sensilla are more closely spaced on the dorsal and lateral regions of the tail than elsewhere and are carried on relatively small scales; and that the whorls of scales on the tail bear a one to one relationship with the autotomy planes. Our results are consistent with the hypotheses of sensilla being involved in determining the site at which autotomy will occur, and with them being involved in the mediation of tail behavior following autotomy. These findings open the way for experimental neurological investigations of how autotomy is induced and how the detached tail responds to external environmental input. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Manganese concentrations in the air of the Montreal (Canada) subway in relation to surface automobile traffic density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudia, Nacera; Gareau, Lise; Zayed, Joseph [GRIS Interdisciplinary Health Research Group, University of Montreal (Canada); Halley, Renee [Transport Montreal Society (Canada); Kennedy, Greg [Department of Engineering Physics, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal (Canada); Lambert, Jean [Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal (Canada)

    2006-07-31

    Methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) is an organic derivative of manganese (Mn), used since 1976 in Canadian gasoline as an octane enhancer. Its combustion leads to the emission of Mn particles. Several studies carried out by our research group have established a correlation between atmospheric Mn concentrations and automobile traffic density, suggesting that MMT in gasoline could play a significant role. This study aims to measure Mn concentrations in the air of the underground subway in Montreal (Canada) and to examine the relation with nearby surface automobile traffic density and, by extension, with the use of MMT in gasoline. Three subway stations were chosen for their location in different microenvironments with different traffic densities. Respirable (MnR<5 {mu}m) and total Mn (MnT) were sampled over two weeks, 5 days/week, 12 h/day. For the station located in the lower traffic density area, relatively low levels of MnR and MnT were found, with averages of 0.018 and 0.032 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, respectively. These concentrations are within the range of the background levels in Montreal. For the other two stations, the average concentrations of MnR were twice as high and exceeded the US EPA reference concentration of 0.05 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. Although there may be several sources of Mn from different components of the subway structure and vehicles, no correlation was found between subway traffic and atmospheric Mn in the subway. Since the air in the underground subway is pumped directly from outside without filtration, our findings strongly suggest that the combustion of MMT in automobiles is an important factor. (author)

  5. Interactions between leaf nitrogen status and longevity in relation to N cycling in three contrasting European forest canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Ibrom, A.; Korhonen, J. F. J.; Arnoud Frumau, K. F.; Wu, J.; Pihlatie, M.; Schjoerring, J. K.

    2012-07-01

    Seasonal and spatial variations in foliar nitrogen (N) parameters were investigated in three European forests with different tree species, viz. beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii, Mirb., Franco) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in Denmark, The Netherlands and Finland, respectively. This was done in order to obtain information about functional acclimation, tree internal N conservation and its relevance for both ecosystem internal N cycling and foliar N exchange with the atmosphere. Leaf N pools generally showed much higher seasonal variability in beech trees than in the coniferous canopies. The concentrations of N and chlorophyll in the beech leaves were synchronized with the seasonal course of solar radiation implying close physiological acclimation, which was not observed in the coniferous needles. During phases of intensive N metabolism in the beech leaves, the NH4+ concentration rose considerably. This was compensated for by a strong pH decrease resulting in relatively low Γ values (ratio between tissue NH4+ and H+). The Γ values in the coniferous were even smaller than in beech, indicating low probability of NH3 emissions from the foliage to the atmosphere as an N conserving mechanism. The reduction in foliage N content during senescence was interpreted as N re-translocation from the senescing leaves into the rest of the trees. The N re-translocation efficiency (ηr) ranged from 37 to 70% and decreased with the time necessary for full renewal of the canopy foliage. Comparison with literature data from in total 23 tree species showed a general tendency for ηr to on average be reduced by 8% per year the canopy stays longer, i.e. with each additional year it takes for canopy renewal. The boreal pine site returned the lowest amount of N via foliage litter to the soil, while the temperate Douglas fir stand which had the largest peak canopy N content and the lowestηr returned the highest amount of N to the soil. These results

  6. MODEL-ASSISTED ESTIMATION OF THE GENETIC VARIABILITY IN PHYSIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS RELATED TO TOMATO FRUIT GROWTH UNDER CONTRASTED WATER CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Constantinescu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Drought stress is a major abiotic stres threatening plant and crop productivity. In case of fleshy fruits, understanding Drought stress is a major abiotic stress threatening plant and crop productivity. In case of fleshy fruits, understanding mechanisms governing water and carbon accumulations and identifying genes, QTLs and phenotypes, that will enable trade-offs between fruit growth and quality under Water Deficit (WD condition is a crucial challenge for breeders and growers. In the present work, 117 recombinant inbred lines of a population of Solanum lycopersicum were phenotyped under control and WD conditions. Plant water status, fruit growth and composition were measured and data were used to calibrate a process-based model describing water and carbon fluxes in a growing fruit as a function of plant and environment. Eight genotype-dependent model parameters were estimated using a multiobjective evolutionary algorithm in order to minimize the prediction errors of fruit dry and fresh mass throughout fruit development. WD increased the fruit dry matter content (up to 85 % and decreased its fresh weight (up to 60 %, big fruit size genotypes being the most sensitive. The mean normalized root mean squared errors of the predictions ranged between 16-18 % in the population. Variability in model genotypic parameters allowed us to explore diverse genetic strategies in response to WD. An interesting group of genotypes could be discriminated in which i the low loss of fresh mass under WD was associated with high active uptake of sugars and low value of the maximum cell wall extensibility, and ii the high dry matter content in control treatment (C was associated with a slow decrease of mass flow. Using 501 SNP markers genotyped across the genome, a QTL analysis of model parameters allowed to detect three main QTLs related to xylem and phloem conductivities, on chromosomes 2, 4 and 8. The model was then applied to design ideotypes with high dry matter

  7. Are color or high rearing density related to migratory polyphenism in the band-winged grasshopper, Oedaleus asiaticus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cease, Arianne J; Hao, Shuguang; Kang, Le; Elser, James J; Harrison, Jon F

    2010-08-01

    Locusts represent an impressive example of migratory polyphenism, with high densities triggering a switch from a solitarious, shorter dispersal range, and sometimes greenish phenotype to a gregarious and sometimes darker form exhibiting behavioral, morphological and physiological traits associated with long-distance migratory swarms. While such polyphenism has been well documented in Locusta migratoria and Schistocerca gregaria, the extent to which other grasshoppers exhibit this type of migratory polyphenism is unclear. Anecdotally, the Chinese grasshopper, Oedaleus asiaticus, forms migratory swarms comprised mostly of a darker, brown-colored morph, but also exhibits a non-migratory green-colored morph that predominates at low densities. In a population in Inner Mongolia not currently exhibiting migratory swarms, we found that while green and brown O. asiaticus are found concurrently across our sampled range, only brown grasshoppers were found in high densities. Differences between field-collected brown and green forms matched some but not key predictions associated with the hypothesis that the brown form is morphologically and physiologically specialized for gregarious migration. Controlling for body mass, brown forms had more massive thoraxes, abdomens and legs, and higher metabolic rates, but not more flight muscle or lipid stores. Further, the brown and green grasshoppers did not differ in gregarious behavior, and neither would fly in multiple lab and field trials. Lab or field-rearing at high densities for one-to-multiple juvenile instars caused grasshoppers to exhibit some morphological traits predicted to benefit migration (larger wings and a shift in relative mass from abdomen to thorax), but did not change color or induce flight behavior. One hypothesis to explain these data is that a migratory form of O. asiaticus is partially triggered by high field densities, but that existing ecological conditions blocked full expression of such traits (and outbreak

  8. Coarse-grained models using local-density potentials optimized with the relative entropy: Application to implicit solvation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanyal, Tanmoy; Shell, M. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Bottom-up multiscale techniques are frequently used to develop coarse-grained (CG) models for simulations at extended length and time scales but are often limited by a compromise between computational efficiency and accuracy. The conventional approach to CG nonbonded interactions uses pair potentials which, while computationally efficient, can neglect the inherently multibody contributions of the local environment of a site to its energy, due to degrees of freedom that were coarse-grained out. This effect often causes the CG potential to depend strongly on the overall system density, composition, or other properties, which limits its transferability to states other than the one at which it was parameterized. Here, we propose to incorporate multibody effects into CG potentials through additional nonbonded terms, beyond pair interactions, that depend in a mean-field manner on local densities of different atomic species. This approach is analogous to embedded atom and bond-order models that seek to capture multibody electronic effects in metallic systems. We show that the relative entropy coarse-graining framework offers a systematic route to parameterizing such local density potentials. We then characterize this approach in the development of implicit solvation strategies for interactions between model hydrophobes in an aqueous environment.

  9. Fall-related self-efficacy, not balance and mobility performance, is related to accidental falls in chronic stroke survivors with low bone mineral density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, M Y C; Eng, J J

    2008-07-01

    Chronic stroke survivors with low hip bone density are particularly prone to fractures. This study shows that fear of falling is independently associated with falls in this population. Thus, fear of falling should not be overlooked in the prevention of fragility fractures in these patients. Chronic stroke survivors with low bone mineral density (BMD) are particularly prone to fragility fractures. The purpose of this study was to identify the determinants of balance, mobility and falls in this sub-group of stroke patients. Thirty-nine chronic stroke survivors with low hip BMD (T-score fall-related self-efficacy. Any falls in the past 12 months were also recorded. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify the determinants of balance and mobility performance, whereas logistic regression was used to identify the determinants of falls. Multiple regression analysis revealed that after adjusting for basic demographics, fall-related self-efficacy remained independently associated with balance/mobility performance (R2 = 0.494, P fall-related self-efficacy, but not balance and mobility performance, was a significant determinant of falls (odds ratio: 0.18, P = 0.04). Fall-related self-efficacy, but not mobility and balance performance, was the most important determinant of accidental falls. This psychological factor should not be overlooked in the prevention of fragility fractures among chronic stroke survivors with low hip BMD.

  10. Neuronal low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 binds and endocytoses prion fibrils via receptor cluster 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jen, Angela; Parkyn, Celia J; Mootoosamy, Roy C

    2010-01-01

    For infectious prion protein (designated PrP(Sc)) to act as a template to convert normal cellular protein (PrP(C)) to its distinctive pathogenic conformation, the two forms of prion protein (PrP) must interact closely. The neuronal receptor that rapidly endocytoses PrP(C) is the low......-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1). We show here that on sensory neurons LRP1 is also the receptor that binds and rapidly endocytoses smaller oligomeric forms of infectious prion fibrils, and recombinant PrP fibrils. Although LRP1 binds two molecules of most ligands independently to its receptor...... both prion and LRP1 biology....

  11. Age- and gender-related distribution of bone mineral density and mechanical properties of the proximal humerus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lill, H.; Hepp, P.; Korner, J.; Josten, C.; Gowin, W.; Oestmann, J.W.; Haas, N.P.; Duda, G.N.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate age- and gender-related mechanical properties and bone mineral density (BMD) of the proximal humerus at different levels and regions. Materials and methods: Mechanical indentation testing, DXA, QCT, pQCT and the radiogrammetry (Cortical Index, CI) were carried out in 70 freshly harvested humeri from 46 human cadavers (23 females, 23-males; median age 70.5 years). Results: In the female group, a high correlation between age and BMD was found (ρ=0.62 to -0.70, p [de

  12. Striated muscle fiber size, composition and capillary density in diabetes in relation to neuropathy and muscle strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Christer Swan; Jensen, Jacob Malte; Jakobsen, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    study was to evaluate histologic properties and capillarization of diabetic skeletal muscle in relation to DPN and muscle strength. METHODS: Twenty type 1 and 20 type 2 diabetic (T1D and T2D, respectively) patients underwent biopsy of the gastrocnemic muscle, isokinetic dynamometry at the ankle...... between muscle fiber diameter, muscle fiber type distribution, or capillary density and degree of neuropathy or muscle strength for either patient group. Muscle fiber diameter and the proportion of Type II fibers were greater for T1D patients than both T2D patients and controls. The T2D patients had fewer...

  13. Association between mammographic density and pregnancies relative to age and BMI: a breast cancer case-only analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Carolin C; Emons, Julius; Jud, Sebastian M; Heusinger, Katharina; Adler, Werner; Gass, Paul; Haeberle, Lothar; Heindl, Felix; Hein, Alexander; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Uder, Michael; Hartmann, Arndt; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fasching, Peter A; Pöhls, Uwe G

    2017-12-01

    Percentage mammographic density (PMD) is a major risk factor for breast cancer (BC). It is strongly associated with body mass index (BMI) and age, which are themselves risk factors for breast cancer. This analysis investigated the association between the number of full-term pregnancies and PMD in different subgroups relative to age and BMI. Patients were identified in the breast cancer database of the University Breast Center for Franconia. A total of 2410 patients were identified, for whom information on parity, age, and BMI, and a mammogram from the time of first diagnosis were available for assessing PMD. Linear regression analyses were conducted to investigate the influence on PMD of the number of full-term pregnancies (FTPs), age, BMI, and interaction terms between them. As in previous studies, age, number of FTPs, and BMI were found to be associated with PMD in the expected direction. However, including the respective interaction terms improved the prediction of PMD even further. Specifically, the association between PMD and the number of FTPs differed in young patients under the age of 45 (mean decrease of 0.37 PMD units per pregnancy) from the association in older age groups (mean decrease between 2.29 and 2.39 PMD units). BMI did not alter the association between PMD and the number of FTPs. The effect of pregnancies on mammographic density does not appear to become apparent before the age of menopause. The mechanism that drives the effect of pregnancies on mammographic density appears to be counter-regulated by other influences on mammographic density in younger patients.

  14. Use of spiral CT and the contrast medium iohexol to determine in one session aortorenal morphology and the relative glomerular filtration rate of each kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frennby, B.; Almen, T.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relative glomerular filtration rate (GFR), i.e. the GFR of each kidney in percent of total GFR, by spiral CT. In 41 patients, who were part of a follow-up program after endoluminal stent grafting of aortic aneurysm, spiral CT with the contrast medium iohexol was used to evaluate the morphology of the aorta and kidneys. The opportunity was taken to utilize the already injected iohexol to determine the relative GFR with an extra CT sequence. In each patient two determinations were made, 6 or 12 months apart. The amount of a GFR marker accumulating in Bowman's space, tubuli, and renal pelvis within 2-3 min after i.v. injection, before any marker had left the kidney via the ureter, was defined as proportional to the GFR of that kidney. The renal accumulation of iohexol was obtained by spiral CT using 10-mm collimation and a table speed of 10 mm/s (pitch ratio 1:1) from the upper to the lower poles. The correlation coefficient between the relative GFR of each kidney determined at the first and second examination was excellent (r=0.99) with a median (range) difference of 1% (0-6%) of total GFR. The radiation dose calculated as the mean absorbed dose to the kidneys was 50 mGy and the effective dose 5 mSv. The morphology of aorta and kidneys and the relative GFR of each kidney can be determined in one session with spiral CT using iohexol as both angiographic contrast medium and as a GFR marker. It is also possible to take some plasma samples in the same session to determine iohexol concentration to calculate the body clearance of iohexol (or take plasma and urine samples to calculate the renal clearance of iohexol). (orig.)

  15. Influence of amplitude-related perfusion parameters in the parotid glands by non-fat-saturated dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, Su-Chin; Cheng, Cheng-Chieh; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Chiu, Hui-Chu; Liu, Yi-Jui; Hsu, Hsian-He; Juan, Chun-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To verify whether quantification of parotid perfusion is affected by fat signals on non-fat-saturated (NFS) dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and whether the influence of fat is reduced with fat saturation (FS). Methods: This study consisted of three parts. First, a retrospective study analyzed DCE-MRI data previously acquired on different patients using NFS (n = 18) or FS (n = 18) scans. Second, a phantom study simulated the signal enhancements in the presence of gadolinium contrast agent at six concentrations and three fat contents. Finally, a prospective study recruited nine healthy volunteers to investigate the influence of fat suppression on perfusion quantification on the same subjects. Parotid perfusion parameters were derived from NFS and FS DCE-MRI data using both pharmacokinetic model analysis and semiquantitative parametric analysis. T tests and linear regression analysis were used for statistical analysis with correction for multiple comparisons. Results: NFS scans showed lower amplitude-related parameters, including parameter A, peak enhancement (PE), and slope than FS scans in the patients (all with P < 0.0167). The relative signal enhancement in the phantoms was proportional to the dose of contrast agent and was lower in NFS scans than in FS scans. The volunteer study showed lower parameter A (6.75 ± 2.38 a.u.), PE (42.12% ± 14.87%), and slope (1.43% ± 0.54% s"−"1) in NFS scans as compared to 17.63 ± 8.56 a.u., 104.22% ± 25.15%, and 9.68% ± 1.67% s"−"1, respectively, in FS scans (all with P < 0.005). These amplitude-related parameters were negatively associated with the fat content in NFS scans only (all with P < 0.05). Conclusions: On NFS DCE-MRI, quantification of parotid perfusion is adversely affected by the presence of fat signals for all amplitude-related parameters. The influence could be reduced on FS scans.

  16. Influence of amplitude-related perfusion parameters in the parotid glands by non-fat-saturated dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Su-Chin [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan, Republic of China and Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Cheng-Chieh [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Chang, Hing-Chiu [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Chung, Hsiao-Wen [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Hui-Chu [Ph.D. Program of Technology Management, Chung Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yi-Jui [Department of Automatic Control Engineering, Feng-Chia University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Hsian-He; Juan, Chun-Jung, E-mail: peterjuancj@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei 114, Taiwan and Department of Radiology, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: To verify whether quantification of parotid perfusion is affected by fat signals on non-fat-saturated (NFS) dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and whether the influence of fat is reduced with fat saturation (FS). Methods: This study consisted of three parts. First, a retrospective study analyzed DCE-MRI data previously acquired on different patients using NFS (n = 18) or FS (n = 18) scans. Second, a phantom study simulated the signal enhancements in the presence of gadolinium contrast agent at six concentrations and three fat contents. Finally, a prospective study recruited nine healthy volunteers to investigate the influence of fat suppression on perfusion quantification on the same subjects. Parotid perfusion parameters were derived from NFS and FS DCE-MRI data using both pharmacokinetic model analysis and semiquantitative parametric analysis. T tests and linear regression analysis were used for statistical analysis with correction for multiple comparisons. Results: NFS scans showed lower amplitude-related parameters, including parameter A, peak enhancement (PE), and slope than FS scans in the patients (all with P < 0.0167). The relative signal enhancement in the phantoms was proportional to the dose of contrast agent and was lower in NFS scans than in FS scans. The volunteer study showed lower parameter A (6.75 ± 2.38 a.u.), PE (42.12% ± 14.87%), and slope (1.43% ± 0.54% s{sup −1}) in NFS scans as compared to 17.63 ± 8.56 a.u., 104.22% ± 25.15%, and 9.68% ± 1.67% s{sup −1}, respectively, in FS scans (all with P < 0.005). These amplitude-related parameters were negatively associated with the fat content in NFS scans only (all with P < 0.05). Conclusions: On NFS DCE-MRI, quantification of parotid perfusion is adversely affected by the presence of fat signals for all amplitude-related parameters. The influence could be reduced on FS scans.

  17. Constitutive mass balance relations between chemical composition, volume, density, porosity, and strain in metasomatic hydrochemical systems: Results on weathering and pedogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimhall, George H.; Dietrich, William E.

    1987-03-01

    Relations characterizing the chemical, physical, and mechanical changes resulting from metasomatic hydrochemical processes are developed using mass balance models which formally link chemical composition to bulk density, mineral density, volumetric properties, porosity, and amount of deformation (strain). Rigorous analysis of aqueous solute transport effects is then made possible in a variety of porous media flow environments including chemical weathering, pedogenesis (soil formation), diagenesis, ore deposition and enrichment, and metamorphism. Application of these linear constitutive relations to chemical weathering profiles shows that immobile and locally mobile chemical elements, with masses conserved on the scale of soil profiles, can be accurately identified from analysis of appropriate data arrays and then used as natural geochemical tracers to infer the nature and extent of hydrochemical weathering processes and volume changes during pedogenesis. Assumptions commonly made in the past about the supposed immobility of certain elements, e.g., Ti and Zr, become unnecessary. Quantitative differentiation between the effects of residual and supergene fractionation is then easily made. These methods are applied to Ni-rich laterites developed by weathering of ultramafic rocks, showing that during ordinary residual enrichment, Ni is concentrated by as much as 4× protolith peridotite concentrations. This occurs simply by silicate mineral dissolution and removal of chemical elements other than Ni ( e.g., Mg) with a corresponding reduction in saprolite density and increase in bulk porosity without significant deformation. In contrast, laterites with mineable concentrations of Ni which are similarly undeformed (such as the Nickel Mountain Mine in Riddle, Oregon) have experienced, in addition to residual enrichment, strong supergene enrichment by fractionation of ore elements between a leached zone from which Ni is extracted and a complementary enriched zone positioned

  18. The multiligand α2-macroglobulin receptor/low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gliemann, Jørgen; Nykjær, Anders; Petersen, Claus Munck

    1994-01-01

    The fusion of separate lines of research has greatly helped in elucidating the function of the giant members of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) supergene family. The cDNA encoding a large protein structurally closely related to LDLR, and hence named LDLR-related protein (LRP......), was cloned by Herz et al. in 1988.'Evidence was provided demonstrating that LRP can function as a receptor for chylomicron remnants@-migrating very low density lipoproteins (P-VLDL) rich in apolipoprotein E (apoE)?' The a2-macroglobulin (a2M) receptor (a2MR) was purified from rat livep and human p l a~e n t...... from the observation that affinity-purified a2MR/LRP contains a 40-kDa5.8 or 39-kDa6.' protein, designated a2MRAP, in addition to the a2MFULRP a- and P-chains. cDNA cloning" disclosed the 323-residue protein as both the human homologue of mouse heparin binding protein 44 (see reference 11) and...

  19. When strong unions meet precarious migrants: Building trustful relations to unionise labour migrants in a high union-density setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refslund, Bjarke

    2018-01-01

    Based on case studies in a fish processing plant and a demolition company, this article shows how strong and institutionally embedded unions interact with migrant workers in a precarious labour market position in order to safeguard their working conditions and organise them. It shows how strong...... in the IR-model. The dynamic relation between migrant workers and national unions in this high-density setting is discussed emphasising the need for building a trustful relation between the migrant workers and the unions in order to empower the migrants to better navigate in the national labour market...... unions are in a good position to include migrant workers and thereby resist labour market segmentation. The strong Danish unions, faced with the serious challenges of intra-European labour migration, have increased their attention and resources devoted to organising migrant workers and including them...

  20. Power spectral density analysis of wind-shear turbulence for related flight simulations. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laituri, Tony R.

    1988-01-01

    Meteorological phenomena known as microbursts can produce abrupt changes in wind direction and/or speed over a very short distance in the atmosphere. These changes in flow characteristics have been labelled wind shear. Because of its adverse effects on aerodynamic lift, wind shear poses its most immediate threat to flight operations at low altitudes. The number of recent commercial aircraft accidents attributed to wind shear has necessitated a better understanding of how energy is transferred to an aircraft from wind-shear turbulence. Isotropic turbulence here serves as the basis of comparison for the anisotropic turbulence which exists in the low-altitude wind shear. The related question of how isotropic turbulence scales in a wind shear is addressed from the perspective of power spectral density (psd). The role of the psd in related Monte Carlo simulations is also considered.

  1. Evaluation of contrast in duplicated radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thunthy, K.H.; Weinberg, R.

    1982-01-01

    This investigation evaluated changes in the contrast of duplicated radiographs made at different ultraviolet light exposures. Increasing ultraviolet light exposure had different effects on the duplicates of originals of different background densities. When correctly exposed, a duplicate radiograph enhanced contrast. When originals had the same contrast but different background densities, their duplicates did not have the same contrast. It was not possible to duplicate accurately all the different contrasts measured on an original. It was possible, however, to produce duplicates with all contrasts greater than those of the original

  2. Phase-contrast cine MR imaging of normal aqueductal CSF flow. Effect of aging and relation to CSF void on modulus MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkhof, F.; Kouwenhoven, M.; Scheltens, P.; Sprenger, M.; Algra, P.; Valk, J.

    1994-01-01

    Cine phase-contrast MR imaging was used to study pulsatile CSF flow in the aqueduct in 11 young controls (mean age 30 years) and 9 old controls (mean age 69 years). A high-resolution gradient echo technique and an oblique imaging plane, perpendicular to the aqueduct, was used to avoid volume averaging. Phantom studies confirmed that the technique was accurate. Aqueductal velocity and flux in old controls was higher than in young controls, but the differences were not significant. For all controls together, the averaged peak velocity was 4.2 ± 1.5 cm/s in rostral and -7.8 ± 4.9 cm/s in caudal direction; for the flux it was 0.16 ± 0.10 cm 3 /s in rostral and -0.29 ± 0.19 cm 3 /s in caudal direction. Phase-contrast measurements were significantly related to flow-void on modulus MR images, but not with ventricular size or cortical atrophy. The present technique avoids underestimation of aqueductal flow, and therefore reveals higher aqueductal velocity and flux values than previous studies. Factors other than age or atrophy seem to determine aqueductal CSF flow. (orig.)

  3. Aging memory for pictures: using high-density event-related potentials to understand the effect of aging on the picture superiority effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ally, Brandon A; Waring, Jill D; Beth, Ellen H; McKeever, Joshua D; Milberg, William P; Budson, Andrew E

    2008-01-31

    High-density event-related potentials (ERPs) were used to understand the effect of aging on the neural correlates of the picture superiority effect. Pictures and words were systematically varied at study and test while ERPs were recorded at retrieval. Here, the results of the word-word and picture-picture study-test conditions are presented. Behavioral results showed that older adults demonstrated the picture superiority effect to a greater extent than younger adults. The ERP data helped to explain these findings. The early frontal effect, parietal effect, and late frontal effect were all indistinguishable between older and younger adults for pictures. In contrast, for words, the early frontal and parietal effects were significantly diminished for the older adults compared to the younger adults. These two old/new effects have been linked to familiarity and recollection, respectively, and the authors speculate that these processes are impaired for word-based memory in the course of healthy aging. The findings of this study suggest that pictures allow older adults to compensate for their impaired memorial processes, and may allow these memorial components to function more effectively in older adults.

  4. Ecosystem respiration, vegetation development and soil nitrogen in relation to breeding density of seagulls on a pristine volcanic island, Surtsey, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdsson, B. D.; Magnusson, B.

    2009-08-01

    Since its birth in 1963 by volcanic eruption in the North Atlantic Ocean off Iceland, Surtsey has been a unique natural laboratory on how organisms colonize volcanic islands and form ecosystems with contrasting structure and function. In July, 2004, ecosystem respiration rate, soil properties and surface cover of vascular plants were measured on 21 plots distributed among the main plant communities found 40 years after the primary succession started. The plots could be divided into two groups, inside and outside seagull (Larus sp.) colonies found on the island. Vegetation cover of the plots was strongly related to the density of seagull nests within and around them. The occurrence of seagull nests and increased vegetation also coincided with significant increase in ecosystem respiration, soil carbon and nitrogen, and with significantly lower soil pH and soil temperatures. The ecosystem respiration was high inside the gull colonies, similar to the highest fluxes measured in drained wetlands or agricultural fields in Iceland. The most important factor for vegetation succession and ecosystem function on Surtsey seems to be the amount of nitrogen, which was mainly brought in by the seagulls.

  5. THE PHRASEOLOGY OF “HEAD” IN RELATION WITH BALKAN MENTALITY (CONTRASTIVE ANALYSIS OF THE PHRASEOLOGY OF ALBANIAN, BULGARIAN AND GREEK LANGUAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva ÇËRAVA (KANE

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The common points in the phraseology of Balkan languages are often attributed to some “Balkan cultural heritage”, a term which is usually not defined any further. So, this term can allow us to see how this her itage is represented in phraseology. First of all, the use of a systematic empirical research to describe these phraseological units serves to determine which idioms actually share a relatively identical lexical and semantic structure across the three lang uages and could therefore be called “widespread”. This article presents a contrastive study of the structures and semantics of phraseology units containing the word “head” in Albanian, Bulgarian and Greek languages. This approach can describe similarities and differences of mentality as reflected in phraseology.

  6. Refractive index contrast in porous silicon multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nava, R.; Mora, M.B. de la; Tagueena-Martinez, J. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Rio, J.A. del [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Centro Morelense de Innovacion y Transferencia Tecnologica, Consejo de Ciencia y Tecnologia del Estado de Morelos (Mexico)

    2009-07-15

    Two of the most important properties of a porous silicon multilayer for photonic applications are flat interfaces and a relative large refractive index contrast between layers in the optical wavelength range. In this work, we studied the effect of the current density and HF electrolyte concentration on the refractive index of porous silicon. With the purpose of increasing the refractive index contrast in a multilayer, the refractive index of porous silicon produced at low current was studied in detail. The current density applied to produce the low porosity layers was limited in order to keep the electrolyte flow through the multilayer structure and to avoid deformation of layer interfaces. We found that an electrolyte composed of hydrofluoric acid, ethanol and glycerin in a ratio of 3:7:1 gives a refractive index contrast around 1.3/2.8 at 600 nm. Several multilayer structures with this refractive index contrast were fabricated, such as dielectric Bragg mirrors and microcavities. Reflectance spectra of the structures show the photonic quality of porous silicon multilayers produced under these electrochemical conditions. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Family Density and SES Related to Diabetes Management and Glycemic Control in Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccavale, Laura J; Weaver, Patrick; Chen, Rusan; Streisand, Randi; Holmes, Clarissa S

    2015-06-01

    Youth with Type 1 diabetes (T1D) from single-parent families have poorer glycemic control; a finding confounded with socioeconomic status (SES). Family density (FD), or youth:adult ratio, may better characterize family risk status. Structural equation modeling assessed the relation of single-parent status, SES, and FD to parenting stress, diabetes-related conflict, parental monitoring, adherence, and glycemic control using cross-sectional parent and youth data (n = 257). Single-parent status exhibited similar relations as SES and was removed. Lower FD was associated with better glycemic control (β = -.29, p = .014) via less conflict (β = .17, p = .038) and greater adherence (β = -.54, p single-parent status were indistinguishable from those of SES. FD provides distinct information related to adolescent glycemic control. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Forest biomass density across large climate gradients in northern South America is related to water availability but not with temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Dávila, Esteban; Cayuela, Luis; González-Caro, Sebastián; Aldana, Ana M; Stevenson, Pablo R; Phillips, Oliver; Cogollo, Álvaro; Peñuela, Maria C; von Hildebrand, Patricio; Jiménez, Eliana; Melo, Omar; Londoño-Vega, Ana Catalina; Mendoza, Irina; Velásquez, Oswaldo; Fernández, Fernando; Serna, Marcela; Velázquez-Rua, Cesar; Benítez, Doris; Rey-Benayas, José M

    2017-01-01

    Understanding and predicting the likely response of ecosystems to climate change are crucial challenges for ecology and for conservation biology. Nowhere is this challenge greater than in the tropics as these forests store more than half the total atmospheric carbon stock in their biomass. Biomass is determined by the balance between biomass inputs (i.e., growth) and outputs (mortality). We can expect therefore that conditions that favor high growth rates, such as abundant water supply, warmth, and nutrient-rich soils will tend to correlate with high biomass stocks. Our main objective is to describe the patterns of above ground biomass (AGB) stocks across major tropical forests across climatic gradients in Northwestern South America. We gathered data from 200 plots across the region, at elevations ranging between 0 to 3400 m. We estimated AGB based on allometric equations and values for stem density, basal area, and wood density weighted by basal area at the plot-level. We used two groups of climatic variables, namely mean annual temperature and actual evapotranspiration as surrogates of environmental energy, and annual precipitation, precipitation seasonality, and water availability as surrogates of water availability. We found that AGB is more closely related to water availability variables than to energy variables. In northwest South America, water availability influences carbon stocks principally by determining stand structure, i.e. basal area. When water deficits increase in tropical forests we can expect negative impact on biomass and hence carbon storage.

  9. Damage of Rhopalosiphum padi (L.) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) on wheat plants related to duration time and density of infestation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roza-Gomes, Margarida F.; Salvadori, Jose R.; Schons, Jurema

    2008-01-01

    Aphids are considered relevant pests on wheat either by direct damage through sap sucking or by indirect damage vectoring BYDV (Barley yellow dwarf virus). Rhopalosiphum padi L. has been observed infesting wheat fields with an increasing frequency. The knowledge and the available technology, besides being more related to other aphids species already recognized as pests, they are insufficient to control the specific c problem of R. padi. Thus, this work evaluated the effects of feeding duration and infestation densities of R. padi on seedlings of wheat cv. EMBRAPA 16. rain yield, yield components and the extent of symptoms were recorded. The experiment was carried out in the fi eld under a completely randomized split-plot experimental design with four replications. The main plot was feeding duration (two and seven days) and the sub-plots were infestation densities (zero, two and 10 aphids per plant). Independent on feeding duration, 10 aphids per plant resulted in significant yield losses, reduction of number of heads and tillers per plant. Canopy dry matter was also reduced. Infestations of two and 10 aphids per plant resulted in continuous yellowing of wheat plants from tillering to the end of flowering stage. When aphids fed for seven days on wheat, more yellowing symptoms were observed at the flower stage in comparison with two days feeding. (author)

  10. Transfer standard for the spectral density of relative intensity noise of optical fiber sources near 1550 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obarski, Gregory E.; Splett, Jolene D.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a transfer standard for the spectral density of relative intensity noise (RIN) of optical fiber sources near 1550 nm. Amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) from an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA), when it is optically filtered over a narrow band (<5 nm), yields a stable RIN spectrum that is practically constant to several tens of gigahertz. The RIN is calculated from the power spectral density as measured with a calibrated optical spectrum analyzer. For a typical device it is -110 dB/Hz, with uncertainty ≤0.12 dB/Hz. The invariance of the RIN under attenuation yields a considerable dynamic range with respect to rf noise levels. Results are compared with those from a second method that uses a distributed-feedback laser (DFB) that has a Poisson-limited RIN. Application of each method to the same RIN measurement system yields frequency-dependent calibration functions that, when they are averaged, differ by ≤0.2 dB. [copyright] 2001 Optical Society of America

  11. Transfer standard for the spectral density of relative intensity noise of optical fiber sources near 1550 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obarski, Gregory E.; Splett, Jolene D.

    2001-06-01

    We have developed a transfer standard for the spectral density of relative intensity noise (RIN) of optical fiber sources near 1550 nm. Amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) from an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA), when it is optically filtered over a narrow band ({lt}5 nm), yields a stable RIN spectrum that is practically constant to several tens of gigahertz. The RIN is calculated from the power spectral density as measured with a calibrated optical spectrum analyzer. For a typical device it is {minus}110 dB/Hz, with uncertainty {le}0.12 dB/Hz. The invariance of the RIN under attenuation yields a considerable dynamic range with respect to rf noise levels. Results are compared with those from a second method that uses a distributed-feedback laser (DFB) that has a Poisson-limited RIN. Application of each method to the same RIN measurement system yields frequency-dependent calibration functions that, when they are averaged, differ by {le}0.2 dB. {copyright} 2001 Optical Society of America

  12. Gray matter density of auditory association cortex relates to knowledge of sound concepts in primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Michael F; Grossman, Murray

    2012-06-06

    Long-term memory integrates the multimodal information acquired through perception into unified concepts, supporting object recognition, thought, and language. While some theories of human cognition have considered concepts to be abstract symbols, recent functional neuroimaging evidence has supported an alternative theory: that concepts are multimodal representations associated with the sensory and motor systems through which they are acquired. However, few studies have examined the effects of cortical lesions on the sensory and motor associations of concepts. We tested the hypothesis that individuals with disease in auditory association cortex would have difficulty processing concepts with strong sound associations (e.g., thunder). Human participants with the logopenic variant of primary progressive aphasia (lvPPA) performed a recognition task on words with strong associations in three modalities: Sound, Sight, and Manipulation. LvPPA participants had selective difficulty on Sound words relative to other modalities. Structural MRI analysis in lvPPA revealed gray matter atrophy in auditory association cortex, as defined functionally in a separate BOLD fMRI study of healthy adults. Moreover, lvPPA showed reduced gray matter density in the region of auditory association cortex that healthy participants activated when processing the same Sound words in a separate BOLD fMRI experiment. Finally, reduced gray matter density in this region in lvPPA directly correlated with impaired performance on Sound words. These findings support the hypothesis that conceptual memories are represented in the sensory and motor association cortices through which they are acquired.

  13. On-treatment non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, triglycerides, and lipid ratios in relation to residual vascular risk after treatment with potent statin therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mora, Samia; Glynn, Robert J; Boekholdt, S Matthijs

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether residual risk after high-dose statin therapy for primary prevention individuals with reduced levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is related to on-treatment apolipoprotein B, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C), tri...

  14. Mobility-electron density relation probed via controlled oxygen vacancy doping in epitaxial BaSnO3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koustav Ganguly

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The recently discovered high room temperature mobility in wide band gap semiconducting BaSnO3 is of exceptional interest for perovskite oxide heterostructures. Critical open issues with epitaxial films include determination of the optimal dopant and understanding the mobility-electron density (μ-n relation. These are addressed here through a transport study of BaSnO3(001 films with oxygen vacancy doping controlled via variable temperature vacuum annealing. Room temperature n can be tuned from 5 × 1019 cm−3 to as low as 2 × 1017 cm−3, which is shown to drive a weak- to strong-localization transition, a 104-fold increase in resistivity, and a factor of 28 change in μ. The data reveal μ ∝ n0.65 scaling over the entire n range probed, important information for understanding mobility-limiting scattering mechanisms.

  15. An investigation of student understanding of classical ideas related to quantum mechanics: Potential energy diagrams and spatial probability density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanik, Brian Michael

    This dissertation describes the results of two related investigations into introductory student understanding of ideas from classical physics that are key elements of quantum mechanics. One investigation probes the extent to which students are able to interpret and apply potential energy diagrams (i.e., graphs of potential energy versus position). The other probes the extent to which students are able to reason classically about probability and spatial probability density. The results of these investigations revealed significant conceptual and reasoning difficulties that students encounter with these topics. The findings guided the design of instructional materials to address the major problems. Results from post-instructional assessments are presented that illustrate the impact of the curricula on student learning.

  16. Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor–Related Protein-1 Is a Therapeutic Target in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Toldo, PhD

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein-1 (LRP1 is a ubiquitous membrane receptor functioning as a scavenger and regulatory receptor, inducing anti-inflammatory and prosurvival signals. Based on the known structure–activity of the LRP1 receptor binding site, the authors synthesized a small peptide (SP16. SP16 induced a >50% reduction in infarct size (p < 0.001 and preservation of left ventricular systolic function (p < 0.001, and treatment with an LRP1 blocking antibody eliminated the protective effects of SP16. In conclusion, LRP1 activation with SP16 given within 30 min of reperfusion during experimental acute myocardial infarction leads to a cardioprotective signal reducing infarct size and preservation of cardiac systolic function.

  17. Sex-related differences in sleep slow wave activity in major depressive disorder: a high-density EEG investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, David T; Landsness, Eric C; Peterson, Michael J; Goldstein, Michael R; Riedner, Brady A; Wanger, Timothy; Guokas, Jeffrey J; Tononi, Giulio; Benca, Ruth M

    2012-09-18

    Sleep disturbance plays an important role in major depressive disorder (MDD). Prior investigations have demonstrated that slow wave activity (SWA) during sleep is altered in MDD; however, results have not been consistent across studies, which may be due in part to sex-related differences in SWA and/or limited spatial resolution of spectral analyses. This study sought to characterize SWA in MDD utilizing high-density electroencephalography (hdEEG) to examine the topography of SWA across the cortex in MDD, as well as sex-related variation in SWA topography in the disorder. All-night recordings with 256 channel hdEEG were collected in 30 unipolar MDD subjects (19 women) and 30 age and sex-matched control subjects. Spectral analyses of SWA were performed to determine group differences. SWA was compared between MDD and controls, including analyses stratified by sex, using statistical non-parametric mapping to correct for multiple comparisons of topographic data. As a group, MDD subjects demonstrated significant increases in all-night SWA primarily in bilateral prefrontal channels. When stratified by sex, MDD women demonstrated global increases in SWA relative to age-matched controls that were most consistent in bilateral prefrontal regions; however, MDD men showed no significant differences relative to age-matched controls. Further analyses demonstrated increased SWA in MDD women was most prominent in the first portion of the night. Women, but not men with MDD demonstrate significant increases in SWA in multiple cortical areas relative to control subjects. Further research is warranted to investigate the role of SWA in MDD, and to clarify how increased SWA in women with MDD is related to the pathophysiology of the disorder.

  18. Absolute and estimated values of macular pigment optical density in young and aged Asian participants with or without age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Yoko; Shigeno, Yuta; Nagai, Norihiro; Suzuki, Misa; Kurihara, Toshihide; Minami, Sakiko; Hirano, Eri; Shinoda, Hajime; Kobayashi, Saori; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2017-08-29

    Lutein and zeaxanthin are suggested micronutrient supplements to prevent the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness worldwide. To monitor the levels of lutein/zeaxanthin in the macula, macular pigment optical density (MPOD) is measured. A commercially available device (MPSII®, Elektron Technology, Switzerland), using technology based on heterochromatic flicker photometry, can measure both absolute and estimated values of MPOD. However, whether the estimated value is applicable to Asian individuals and/or AMD patients remains to be determined. The absolute and estimated values of MPOD were measured using the MPSII® device in 77 participants with a best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) > 0.099 (logMAR score). The studied eyes included 17 young (20-29 years) healthy, 26 aged (>50 years) healthy, 18 aged and AMD-fellow, and 16 aged AMD eyes. The mean BCVA among the groups were not significantly different. Both absolute and estimated values were measurable in all eyes of young healthy group. However, absolute values were measurable in only 57.7%, 66.7%, and 43.8%, of the aged healthy, AMD-fellow, and AMD groups, respectively, and 56.7% of the eyes included in the 3 aged groups. In contrast, the estimated value was measurable in 84.6%, 88.9% and 93.8% of the groups, respectively, and 88.3% of eyes in the pooled aged group. The estimated value was correlated with absolute value in individuals from all groups by Spearman's correlation coefficient analyses (young healthy: R 2  = 0.885, P = 0.0001; aged healthy: R 2  = 0.765, P = 0.001; AMD-fellow: R 2  = 0.851, P = 0.0001; and AMD: R 2  = 0.860, P = 0.013). Using the estimated value, significantly lower MPOD values were found in aged AMD-related eyes, which included both AMD-fellow and AMD eyes, compared with aged healthy eyes by Student's t-test (P = 0.02). Absolute, in contrast to estimated, value was measurable in a limited number of aged participants

  19. Using the internet for suicide-related purposes: Contrasting findings from young people in the community and self-harm patients admitted to hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, Lucy; Derges, Jane; Goldsmith, Carlie; Donovan, Jenny L; Gunnell, David

    2018-01-01

    Despite accelerating interest in the impact of the internet on suicidal behaviour, empirical work has not captured detailed narratives from those who engaged in suicide-related internet use. This study explored the suicide-related online behaviour of two contrasting samples of distressed users, focusing on their purpose, methods and the main content viewed. In-depth interviews were conducted in the UK between 2014-2016 with i) young people in the community; and ii) self-harm patients presenting to hospital emergency departments. Data were analysed using methods of constant comparison. Suicide-related internet use varied according to the severity of suicidal feelings. In the young people sample, where severity was lower, use was characterised by disorganised browsing without clear purpose. A range of content was 'stumbled upon' including information about suicide methods. They also pursued opportunities to interact with others and explore online help. Self-harm patients were a higher severity group with a history of suicidal behaviour. Their use was purposeful and strategic, focused around 'researching' suicide methods to maximise effectiveness. They made specific choices about content viewed; many consulting factual content in preference to user generated accounts, while help content and communication was avoided. Findings indicate further action is necessary to improve online safety. Also, novel online help approaches are needed to engage individuals experiencing suicidal crisis. Awareness of the nature of suicide-related internet use and how this may reflect the status of an individual's suicidal thinking could be beneficial to clinicians to promote safety and indicate risk.

  20. Fruit and vegetable purchasing and the relative density of healthy and unhealthy food stores: evidence from an Australian multilevel study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Kate E; Bentley, Rebecca J; Kavanagh, Anne M

    2013-03-01

    Evidence of a relationship between residential retail food environments and diet-related outcomes is inconsistent. One reason for this may be that food environments are typically defined in terms of the absolute number of particular store types in an area, whereas a measure of the relative number of healthy and unhealthy stores may be more appropriate. Using cross-sectional data from the VicLANES study conducted in Melbourne, Australia, multilevel logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the independent associations between absolute measures (numbers of healthy and unhealthy stores) and a relative measure (relative density of healthy stores) of the food environment, and self-reported variety of fruit and vegetable purchasing in local households. Purchasing behaviour was measured as the odds of purchasing above the median level of fruit and vegetables. Compared to households in areas where healthy food stores made up no more than 10% of all healthy and unhealthy stores, households in areas with 10.1-15.0% healthy food stores and >15% healthy stores had increased odds of healthier purchasing (OR=1.48 (95% CI 1.12 to 1.96) and OR=1.45 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.91), respectively). There was less evidence of an association between absolute numbers of healthy or unhealthy stores and fruit and vegetable purchasing. We found strong evidence of healthier fruit and vegetable purchasing in households located in areas where the proportion of food stores that were healthy was greater. Policies aimed at improving the balance between healthy and unhealthy stores within areas may therefore be effective in promoting greater consumption of fruit and vegetables.

  1. High-Density Genetic Map Construction and Stem Total Polysaccharide Content-Related QTL Exploration for Chinese Endemic Dendrobium (Orchidaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiangjie; Liu, Yuyang; Xu, Jing; Mei, Ziwei; Shi, Yujun; Liu, Pengli; He, Jianbo; Wang, Xiaotong; Meng, Yijun; Feng, Shangguo; Shen, Chenjia; Wang, Huizhong

    2018-01-01

    Plants of the Dendrobium genus are orchids with not only ornamental value but also high medicinal value. To understand the genetic basis of variations in active ingredients of the stem total polysaccharide contents (STPCs) among different Dendrobium species, it is of paramount importance to understand the mechanism of STPC formation and identify genes affecting its process at the whole genome level. Here, we report the first high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) integrated genetic map with a good genome coverage of Dendrobium. The specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) technology led to identification of 7,013,400 SNPs from 1,503,626 high-quality SLAF markers from two parents (Dendrobium moniliforme ♀ × Dendrobium officinale ♂) and their interspecific F1 hybrid population. The final genetic map contained 8, 573 SLAF markers, covering 19 linkage groups (LGs). This genetic map spanned a length of 2,737.49 cM, where the average distance between markers is 0.32 cM. In total, 5 quantitative trait loci (QTL) related to STPC were identified, 3 of which have candidate genes within the confidence intervals of these stable QTLs based on the D. officinale genome sequence. This study will build a foundation up for the mapping of other medicinal-related traits and provide an important reference for the molecular breeding of these Chinese herb. PMID:29636767

  2. Female autonomy as a contributing factor to women's HIV-related knowledge and behaviour in three culturally contrasting States in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Shelah S; Griffiths, Paula L

    2007-07-01

    Factors contributing to India's vulnerability to the AIDS epidemic include pervasive poverty, low levels of education and high gender stratification. This study uses data collected in the 1998-99 National Family Health Survey-2 (NFHS-2) to investigate the relationship between aspects of women's autonomy and four measures of HIV-related knowledge and behaviour--awareness and knowledge of HIV/AIDS, condom awareness and condom use--in three culturally contrasting states in India: Kerala (n=2884), Karnataka (n=4357) and Uttar Pradesh (n=8981). The NFHS-2 is a nationally representative survey of India, with a sampling scheme that was designed such that each state sample can be generalized back to represent ever-married women aged 15-49 living in the state. Kerala scores highest in the four health outcome measures, followed by Karnataka and then Uttar Pradesh, but condom use is lowest in Karnataka. Kerala also leads in the four dimensions of autonomy examined and in socio-demographic status, followed again by Karnataka and Uttar Pradesh. Despite these observed differences, in all three states, women with greater autonomy as measured by this study were more likely to be knowledgeable about AIDS and condoms and to use condoms, after controlling for socio-demographic factors. These results concur with other studies focusing on women's autonomy and health outcomes around the world, and point to the importance of incorporating a gender-based approach to AIDS prevention programmes in India.

  3. Relative Ease in Creating Detailed Orthographic Representations Contrasted with Severe Difficulties to Maintain Them in Long-term Memory Among Dyslexic Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binamé, Florence; Danzio, Sophie; Poncelet, Martine

    2015-11-01

    Most research into orthographic learning abilities has been conducted in English with typically developing children using reading-based tasks. In the present study, we examined the abilities of French-speaking children with dyslexia to create novel orthographic representations for subsequent use in spelling and to maintain them in long-term memory. Their performance was compared with that of chronological age (CA)-matched and reading age (RA)-matched control children. We used an experimental task designed to provide optimal learning conditions (i.e. 10 spelling practice trials) ensuring the short-term acquisition of the spelling of the target orthographic word forms. After a 1-week delay, the long-term retention of the targets was assessed by a spelling post-test. Analysis of the results revealed that, in the short term, children with dyslexia learned the novel orthographic word forms well, only differing from both CA and RA controls on the initial decoding of the targets and from CA controls on the first two practice trials. In contrast, a dramatic drop was observed in their long-term retention relative to CA and RA controls. These results support the suggestion of the self-teaching hypothesis (Share, 1995) that initial errors in the decoding and spelling of unfamiliar words may hinder the establishment of fully specified novel orthographic representations. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Density, size structure, shell orientation and epibiontic colonization of the fan mussel Pinna nobilis L. 1758 (Mollusca: Bivalvia in three contrasting habitats in an estuarine area of Sardinia (W Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Addis

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the spatial distribution, size structure, shell orientation and valve colonization by epibionts of the endangered Mediterranean bivalve Pinna nobilis in three continuous but different habitats in the Gulf of Oristano (Sardinia, western Mediterranean. The sampling stations chosen were: an estuarine area (E of coastal salt-marshes characterized by unvegetated sea-bottoms; and two areas in a seagrass meadow characterized by an extensive Posidonia oceanica meadow (Mw and patched mixed meadows of P. oceanica and Cymodocea nodosa (Me. We found significant differences in mean densities among stations and the highest value was found in the estuarine area. Shell orientation showed that there was uniform circular distribution of specimens in the Mw station and a unimodal distribution in the Me and E stations, where specimens were set at 0°N and 10°NNE, which is a pattern related to sea drift. Shell epibiosis displayed differences between habitats. The highest valve colonization was in the estuary, with filamentous dark algae and Ostrea edulis reaching almost 90 percent of shell coverage. This study provides new information on habitat preferences and data for assessing local populations of P. nobilis that is useful for its conservation and improving the knowledge of its ecology.

  5. SU-F-T-136: Breath Hold Lung Phantom Study in Using CT Density Versus Relative Stopping Power Ratio for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syh, J; Wu, H; Rosen, L [Willis-Knighton Medical Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate mass density effects of CT conversion table and its variation in current treatment planning system of spot scanning proton beam using an IROC proton lung phantom for this study. Methods: A proton lung phantom study was acquired to Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston (IROC) Quality Assurance Center. Inside the lung phantom, GAF Chromic films and couples of thermal luminescent dosimeter (TLD) capsules embedded in specified PTV and adjacent structures to monitor delivered dosage and 3D dose distribution profiles. Various material such as cork (Lung), blue water (heart), Techron HPV (ribs) and organic material of balsa wood and cork as dosimetry inserts within phantom of solid water (soft tissue). Relative stopping power (RLSP) values were provided. Our treatment planning system (TPS) doesn’t require SP instead relative density was converted relative to water. However lung phantom was irradiated by planning with density override and the results were compared with IROC measurements. The second attempt was conducted without density override and compared with IROC’s. Results: The higher passing rate of imaging and measurement results of the lung phantom irradiation met the criteria by IROC without density override. The film at coronal plane was found to be shift due to inclined cylinder insertion. The converted CT density worked as expected to correlate relative stopping power. Conclusion: The proton lung phantom provided by IROC is a useful tool to qualify our commissioned proton pencil beam delivery with TPS within reliable confidence. The relative mass stopping power ratios of materials were converted from the relative physical density relative to water and the results were satisfied.

  6. Laboratory Density Functionals

    OpenAIRE

    Giraud, B. G.

    2007-01-01

    We compare several definitions of the density of a self-bound system, such as a nucleus, in relation with its center-of-mass zero-point motion. A trivial deconvolution relates the internal density to the density defined in the laboratory frame. This result is useful for the practical definition of density functionals.

  7. Spatial and temporal variation in proportional stock density and relative weight of smallmouth bass in a reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa, Matthew G.; Duke, S.D.; Ward, David L.

    1990-01-01

    Population data for smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieui in 20,235 ha John Day Reservoir on the Columbia River were used to (1) determine whether Proportional Stock Density (PSD) and Relative Weight (Wr) varied spatially and temporally in two areas of the reservoir with established smallmouth bass fisheries; (2) explore possible causes of any observed variation; and (3) discuss some management implications and recommendations. Both PSD and Wr varied spatially and monthly in all years examined. On an annual basis, PSD varied at one area but not at the other, whereas Wr showed little variation. Possible explanations for the variation in PSD and Wr are differences in growth, mortality, recruitment, and exploitation. Our data suggested that regulations established or changed on a reservoir-wide basis may have different effects on the fishery, depending on location in the reservoir. Also, pooling data from various areas within a reservoir to yield point estimates of structural indices may not represent the variation present in the population as a whole. The significant temporal variability reflects the importance of determining the proper time to sample fish to yield representative estimates of the variable of interest. In areas with valuable fisheries or markedly different population structures, we suggest that an area-specific approach be made to reservoir fishery management, and that efforts be made toward effecting consistent harvest regulations in interstate waters.

  8. Work- and travel-related physical activity and alcohol consumption: relationship with bone mineral density and calcaneal quantitative ultrasonometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sritara, Chanika; Thakkinstian, Ammarin; Ongphiphadhanakul, Boonsong; Pornsuriyasak, Prapaporn; Warodomwichit, Daruneewan; Akrawichien, Tawatchai; Vathesatogkit, Prin; Sritara, Piyamitr

    2015-01-01

    A number of healthy workers rarely exercise because of a lack of time or resources. Physical activity related to work and everyday travel may be more feasible, but evidence of its beneficial effect on bone health is scarce. We assessed if this form of physical activity was associated with higher bone mineral density (BMD) and stiffness index (SI) when adjusted for recreational physical activity, age, body mass index, smoking, alcohol consumption, education, and serum level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Healthy workers, aged 25-54 yr, of the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand were surveyed. The outcomes were BMD (lumbar spine, femoral neck, and total hip) and calcaneal SI. Physical activity was estimated using the global physical activity questionnaire and considered active when >600 metabolic equivalent tasks (min). Of 2268 subjects, 74% were men. Active male subjects had significantly higher BMD at the femoral neck and total hip (pwomen (p>0.05). In men, work and travel physical activity seems beneficial to male bone health; hence, it should be encouraged. Furthermore, smoking appeared harmful while moderate alcohol consumption was beneficial. Copyright © 2015 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Seasonal dynamics in the relative density of aquatic flora along some coastal areas of the Red Sea, Tabuk, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abid Ali Ansari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Plants are the producers of all autotrophic ecosystems’ and are the base of the food chain taking energy from the sun and converting it into food for all other organisms through photosynthesis. Plants grow in certain places and seasons when the environmental factors are suitable for their germination, growth and developments that influence their diversity. Environmental factors can include abiotic factors such as temperature, light, moisture, soil nutrients; or biotic factors like competition from other plants or grazing by animals. Anthropogenic perturbations can also influence distribution patterns. Monitoring of ecological habitats and diversity of some aquatic flora along some coastal areas of Red Sea has been done to understand the dynamics of aquatic plants influenced by prevailing environmental and anthropogenic perturbations The results of this research showed that the summer season is the most suitable period for the study of aquatic plant diversity along the coastal sites of Red Sea. The aquatic flora had high relative density and diversity in April, May, June and July and these four months of the summer season are best for collection of aquatic plants from the selected coastal areas of Red Sea for medicinal purposes and ecological studies.

  10. Non-iterative determination of the stress-density relation from ramp wave data through a window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Evan; Fratanduono, Dayne; Swift, Damian

    2017-06-01

    In the canonical ramp compression experiment, a smoothly-increasing load is applied the surface of the sample, and the particle velocity history is measured at interfaces two or more different distances into the sample. The velocity histories are used to deduce a stress-density relation by correcting for perturbations caused by reflected release waves, usually via the iterative Lagrangian analysis technique of Rothman and Maw. We previously described a non-iterative (recursive) method of analysis, which was more stable and orders of magnitude faster than iteration, but was subject to the limitation that the free surface velocity had to be sampled at uniform intervals. We have now developed more general recursive algorithms suitable for analyzing ramp data through a finite-impedance window. Free surfaces can be treated seamlessly, and the need for uniform velocity sampling has been removed. These calculations require interpolation of partially-released states using the partially-constructed isentrope, making them slower than the previous free-surface scheme, but they are still much faster than iterative analysis. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Vertical Distribution of Soil Organic Carbon Density in Relation to Land Use/Cover, Altitude and Slope Aspect in the Eastern Himalayas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tshering Dorji

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In-depth understanding about the vertical distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC density is crucial for carbon (C accounting, C budgeting and designing appropriate C sequestration strategies. We examined the vertical distribution of SOC density under different land use/land cover (LULC types, altitudinal zones and aspect directions in a montane ecosystem of Bhutan. Sampling sites were located using conditioned Latin hypercube sampling (cLHS scheme. Soils were sampled based on genetic horizons. An equal-area spline function was fitted to interpolate the target values to predetermined depths. Linear mixed model was fitted followed by mean separation tests. The results show some significant effects of LULC, altitudinal zone and slope aspect on the vertical distribution of SOC density in the profiles. Based on the proportion of mean SOC density in the first 20 cm relative to the cumulative mean SOC density in the top meter, the SOC density under agricultural lands (34% was more homogeneously distributed down the profiles than forests (39%, grasslands (59% and shrublands (43%. Similarly, the SOC density under 3500–4000 m zone (35% was more uniformly distributed compared to 3000–3500 m zone (43% and 1769–2500 m and 2500–3000 m zones (41% each. Under different aspect directions, the north and east-facing slopes (38% each had more uniform distribution of SOC density than south (40% and west-facing slopes (49%.

  12. Individualized volume CT dose index determined by cross-sectional area and mean density of the body to achieve uniform image noise of contrast-enhanced pediatric chest CT obtained at variable kV levels and with combined tube current modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo, Hyun Woo

    2011-01-01

    A practical body-size adaptive protocol providing uniform image noise at various kV levels is not available for pediatric CT. To develop a practical contrast-enhanced pediatric chest CT protocol providing uniform image noise by using an individualized volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) determined by the cross-sectional area and density of the body at variable kV levels and with combined tube current modulation. A total of 137 patients (mean age, 7.6 years) underwent contrast-enhanced pediatric chest CT based on body weight. From the CTDIvol, image noise, and area and mean density of the cross-section at the lung base in the weight-based group, the best fit equation was estimated with a very high correlation coefficient (γ 2 = 0.86, P 2 vs. 326.3 ± 124.8 cm 2 ), mean density (-212.9 ± 53.1 HU vs. -221.1 ± 56.3 HU), and image noise (13.8 ± 2.3 vs. 13.6 ± 1.7 HU) between the weight-based and the CTDIvol groups (P > 0.05). Contrast-enhanced pediatric chest CT with the CTDIvol determined individually by the cross-sectional area and density of the body provides more uniform noise and better dose adaptation to body habitus than does weight-based CT at variable kV levels and with combined tube current modulation. (orig.)

  13. Added value of contrast-enhanced CISS imaging in relation to conventional MR images for the evaluation of intracavernous cranial nerve lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, Akiko; Takahashi, Ayako; Morita, Hideo; Amanuma, Makoto; Endo, Keigo [Gunma University School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Gunma (Japan); Sato, Noriko [National Center Hospital of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Radiology, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Takeuchi, K. [Takasaki University of Health and Welfare, Department of Health and Welfare, Gunma (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    The normal cranial nerves (CNs) of the cavernous sinus can be clearly demonstrated using contrast-enhanced constructive interference in steady-state (CISS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study used the method to evaluate pathological CNs III, IV, V{sub 1}, V{sub 2}, and VI in cavernous sinuses affected by inflammatory and neoplastic diseases. MR images from 17 patients with diseases involving the cavernous sinuses and/or causing neuropathy in CNs III-VI were retrospectively evaluated. The patients were divided into inflammatory (n = 11) and neoplastic (n = 6) groups. We defined CNs as abnormal when they exhibited enlargement or enhancement. CNs were evaluated using both contrast-enhanced CISS and T1-weighted MRI. In the inflammatory group, abnormal CNs were identified by contrast-enhanced CISS MRI in 13 of 25 symptomatic CNs (52%) in eight patients, but in only two CNs (8%) in two patients by contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI. In the neoplastic group, both sequences of contrast-enhanced CISS and T1-weighted MRI detected abnormalities in the same three of eight symptomatic CNs (37.5%), i.e., the three CNs were all in the same patient with adenoid cystic carcinoma. Contrast-enhanced CISS MRI is useful for detecting CN abnormalities in inflammatory pathological conditions of the cavernous sinuses. (orig.)

  14. Prevalence of lactose intolerance and its relation with bone mineral density among Malay students of Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, Noor Fairuzi Suhana; Daud, Norlida Mat; Makbul, Ika Aida Aprilini; Aziz, Qurratul Aini Salma Abdul

    2016-11-01

    Lactose intolerance (LI), a risk factor for low bone mineral density (BMD), is the most common type of carbohydrate intolerance, which predominantly affects Southeast Asian populations. However, data on the prevalence of LI and its association with BMD among Malaysian adults are still lacking as not much research has been done on this matter. Thus, the aims of this study are to determine the prevalence of LI and to evaluate its association with BMD among students of Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. A total of 100 Malay students (50 males and 50 females) with mean age of 23.9 ± 4.7 years old and body mass index of 24.5 ± 5.8 kg/m2 were selected to involve in this preliminary study. After an overnight fast, subjects were asked to perform hydrogen breath test (HBT) and lactose tolerance test (LTT) after an intake of 300 ml lactose drink (50g lactose). HBT measurements were recorded at every 30 minutes intervals while LTT results were recorded at fasting and 30 minutes after lactose consumption. Visual analogue scales were used to measure gastrointestinal symptoms. BMD was measured at calcaneus bone using quantitative ultrasound and expressed as T-score. A consistent rise by >20 ppm for HBT and failure of blood sugar to rise by >1.10 mmol/L above basal level were considered as abnormal HBT and LTT. Lactose malabsorption (LM) is defined by abnormal HBT and LTT whilst LI is characterized by having abnormal HBT, LTT and gastrointestinal symptoms. The result showed that 86% male and 90% female subjects exhaled breath hydrogen >20 ppm but there was no significant difference (p>0.05) between them. LTT results showed that 86% male subjects failed to rise their blood sugar level >1.10 mmol/L compared to 60% in female subjects. Both male and female subjects had high percentage occurrence of gastrointestinal symptom (82 % and 80% respectively) although no significant difference (p>0.05) was demonstrated. The prevalence of LI and LM among all subjects was 77% and 18

  15. Diagnostic study of low-pressure Ar-O2 remote plasma generated in HCD-L 300 system: Relative density of O atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saloum, S.; Naddaf, M.

    2007-01-01

    The relative density of O atom of Ar-O 2 remote plasma excited in a low pressure 13.56 HMz hollow cathode discharge system has been investigated. The measurements were carried out at a total pressure of 0.05 mbar, radiofrequency (RF) power of 200 W and at three different axial distances in the plasma chamber below the outlet of the discharge source. Using optical emission spectroscopy (OES), the relative density of O ground state was determined from intensity ratio of O(844.6 nm) and Ar(750.4 nm) lines. The electron temperature and O 2 + densities have been measured using double langmuir probe measurements. The kinetic study of Ar-O 2 plasma, combined with both spectroscopy and langmuir probe measurements, revealed that the main production mechanism of the excited O(3p 3 P) is direct excitation by electron impact. A maximum of O ground state relative density and correspondingly a minimum of O 2 + density are obtained for the ratio O 2 /Ar: 60/40. The maximum O density in the remote zone is found to be 4.5 times higher than at the outlet of source. (author)

  16. Neuromelanin-related contrast in the substantia nigra semiquantitatively evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging at 3T. Comparison between normal aging and Parkinson disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Makoto; Aihara, Yuko; Ikeda, Sachie; Aihara, Yoshiaki

    2011-01-01

    Fast spin-echo (FSE) T 1 -weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3T, which was optimized to detect neuromelanin-related contrast (NRC), was applied to quantitative estimation of signal alterations in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) of 72 normal volunteers and 59 patients with Parkinson disease (PD). We examined relationship between NRC in SNc and clinical parameters. The NRC showed significant positive correlation with normal aging and was slightly but significantly higher in women than in men. Significant reduction in the NRC was found in PD as compared with 59 age- and sex-matched normal volunteers. The NRC in PD was negatively and significantly correlated with duration of illness and disease severity assessed by unified Parkinoson's disease rating scale (UPDRS) and Hoehn and Yahr stage. Significant reduction of the NRC was demonstrated in patients with visual hallucinations as compare with patients without the symptoms. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder also contributed reduction of NRC although it did more mildly than visual hallucination. Anosmia or hyposmia had no statistical relationship with the amount of NRC in PD. The overall visual inspection indicated that the reduction of the NRC in PD should start at the ventrolateral portion of SNc and advance medially. Additionally, we studied dementia with Lewy body disease (DLB). The NRC was reduced more significantly in DLB patients with PD symptoms than in those without them who also showed a significant reduction compared with normal controls. Quantification and distribution of the NRC obtained by 3T MRI was well correlated with pathological findings reported previously and clinical parameters in this study. Visualization and quantification of the NRC provide some parts of clinical and diagnostic information about pathologic condition of SNc. (author)

  17. Localization of oxidized low-density lipoprotein and its relation to plaque morphology in human coronary artery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasumi Uchida

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL plays a key role in the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. However, its localization in human coronary arterial wall is not well understood. The present study was performed to visualize deposition sites and patterns of native oxLDL and their relation to plaque morphology in human coronary artery. METHODS: Evans blue dye (EB elicits a violet fluorescence by excitation at 345-nm and emission at 420-nm, and a reddish-brown fluorescence by excitation at 470-nm and emission at 515-nm characteristic of oxLDL only. Therefore, native oxLDL in excised human coronary artery were investigated by color fluorescent microscopy (CFM using EB as a biomarker. RESULTS: (1 By luminal surface scan with CFM, the % incidence of oxLDL in 38 normal segments, 41 white plaques and 32 yellow plaques that were classified by conventional angioscopy, was respectively 26, 44 and 94, indicating significantly (p<0.05 higher incidence in the latter than the former two groups. Distribution pattern was classified as patchy, diffuse and web-like. Web-like pattern was observed only in yellow plaques with necrotic core. (2 By transected surface scan, oxLDL deposited within superficial layer in normal segments and diffusely within both superficial and deep layers in white and yellow plaques. In yellow plaques with necrotic core, oxLDL deposited not only in the marginal zone of the necrotic core but also in the fibrous cap. CONCLUSION: Taken into consideration of the well-known process of coronary plaque growth, the results suggest that oxLDL begins to deposit in human coronary artery wall before plaque formation and increasingly deposits with plaque growth, exhibiting different deposition sites and patterns depending on morphological changes.

  18. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 and amyloid-β clearance in Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahisa eKanekiyo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation and aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ peptides in the brain trigger the development of progressive neurodegeneration and dementia associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Perturbation in Aβ clearance, rather than Aβ production, is likely the cause of sporadic, late-onset AD, which accounts for the majority of AD cases. Since cellular uptake and subsequent degradation constitute a major Aβ clearance pathway, the receptor-mediated endocytosis of Aβ has been intensely investigated. Among Aβ receptors, the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1 is one of the most studied receptors. LRP1 is a large endocytic receptor for more than 40 ligands, including apolipoprotein E (apoE, α2-macroglobulin and Aβ. Emerging in vitro and in vivo evidence demonstrates that LRP1 is critically involved in brain Aβ clearance. LRP1 is highly expressed in a variety of cell types in the brain including neurons, vascular cells and glial cells, where LRP1 functions to maintain brain homeostasis and control Aβ metabolism. LRP1-mediated endocytosis regulates cellular Aβ uptake by binding to Aβ either directly or indirectly through its co-receptors or ligands. Furthermore, LRP1 regulates several signaling pathways, which also likely influences Aβ endocytic pathways. In this review, we discuss how LRP1 regulates the brain Aβ clearance and how this unique endocytic receptor participates in AD pathogenesis. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying LRP1-mediated Aβ clearance should enable the rational design of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for AD.

  19. [Correlative factors related to the density of Meriones unguiculatus in the Meriones unguiculatus plague foci of Hebei province, 2001-2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Y F; Kang, X P; Yan, D; Zhang, Y H; Liu, G; Kang, D M; Liu, H Z; Shi, X M; Li, Y G

    2016-08-10

    To explore the yearly, monthly and habitat-related distribution and their relations with Meriones unguiculatus density in the Hebei Meriones unguiculatus plague foci, from 2001 to 2013. Data related to Meriones unguiculatus was gathered through the monitoring programs set up at the national and provincial Meriones unguiculatus plague foci in Hebei province, from 2001 to 2013. According to the yearly density of Meriones unguiculatus, criteria set for the three groups under study, were as follows:'high-risk group'-when the rodent density was≥1.00 under rodents/hm(2),'warning group'-when the rodents/hm(2)>rodent density> 0.20,'standard group'-when rodents/hm(2) rodent density≤0.20 rodents/hm(2). Differences of habitats and monthly distribution among the three groups were compared, under the Kruskal-Wallis H rank sum test while their relations were under the multiple correspondence analysis. The Meriones unguiculatus densities were higher than 1.00 rodents/hm(2), far above the set national standards, in the monitoring area, between 2001 and 2005. From 2005, though the rodent densities began to decrease, however, figures from 2008 to 2013 were still among 0.20 to 1.00 rodents/hm(2). The distribution of habitats in the three groups showed that the Meriones unguiculatus densities were all different in habitats and the difference was statistically significant (Pplague increased in Hebei Meriones unguiculatus plague foci. Based on the distribution of Meriones unguiculatus, programs should be set to monitor the rodent in arable land and wasteland, in April and June, to reduce the prevalence of animals plague.

  20. Current iodinated contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacul, F.

    2001-01-01

    The number of scientific papers on iodinated contrast media is declining. Indeed, comparative trials between high-osmolality and low-osmolality agents largely showed the higher safety and tolerability of the latter, and this is no longer a matter of discussion. Only financial constraints could prevent a total conversion to low-osmolality agents. Research comparing low-osmolality (nonionic monomers, ionic dimer) and iso-osmolality contrast media (nonionic dimers) are still ongoing. Both classes of nonionic compounds proved safer than the ionic dimer. The relative merits of nonionic monomers and nonionic dimers are a matter for debate, and criteria for a selective use of different agents for different procedures could be discussed. (orig.)

  1. Development of contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, W.

    1993-01-01

    Description of all contrast media (ionic and nonionic monomers, ionic and nonionic dimers) was presented. Chemotoxicity, osmolality and viscosity of some contrast agents were analyzed. The main adverse reactions to ionic and nonionic contrast media were described

  2. Age-related changes in bone biochemical markers and their relationship with bone mineral density in normal Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Yin-Zhen; Wu, Xian-Ping; Liu, Shi-Ping; Luo, Xiang-Hang; Cao, Xing-Zhi; Xie, Hui; Liao, Er-Yuan

    2006-01-01

    Measurements of bone biochemical markers are increasingly being used to evaluate the state of bone turnover in the management of bone metabolic diseases, especially osteoporosis. However, changes in the bone turnover rate vary with age. The aim of this study was to establish the laboratory reference range of serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (sBAP), serum type I collagen cross-linked C-terminal telopeptide (sCTx), and urine CTx (uCTx), based on values from 665 healthy Chinese women aged 20-80 years. We measured the levels of sBAP, sCTx, serum alkaline phosphatase (sALP), and uCTx and evaluated the age-related changes and their relationship with bone mineral density (BMD) in the anteroposterior (AP) lumbar spine, hip, and left forearm. We found significant correlations between biochemical markers and age, with coefficients of determination (R (2)) of 0.358 for sBAP, 0.126 for sCTx, 0.125 for uCTx, and 0.336 for sALP. The net changes in different biochemical markers were inversely correlated with the rates of BMD loss in the AP lumbar spine. After correction for age, body weight, and height, the levels of the markers had significant negative correlations with the BMD of the AP lumbar spine, femoral neck, and ultradistal forearm. All four biochemical markers had the highest negative correlation with BMD of the AP lumbar spine (partial correlation coefficients of -0.366, -0.296, -0.290, and -0.258 for sBAP, sCTx, uCTx, and sALP, respectively). The mean and SD values of these markers in premenopausal and postmenopausal women with normal BMD values were used as the normal reference ranges. The reference ranges of sBAP, sCTx, and uCTx for pre- vs postmenopausal women were 17.3 +/- 6.23 vs 18.9 +/- 7.52 U/l, 3.18 +/- 1.49 vs 3.23 +/- 1.57 nmol/l, and 15.5 +/- 11.4 vs 16.2 +/- 12.4 nM bone collagen equivalents/mM urinary creatinine, respectively. Levels of the bone formation marker (sBAP) and bone resorption markers (sCTx, uCTx) increased rapidly in women with

  3. SU-F-I-24: Feasibility of Magnetic Susceptibility to Relative Electron Density Conversion Method for Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, K; Kadoya, N; Chiba, M; Matsushita, H; Jingu, K [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Sato, K; Nagasaka, T; Yamanaka, K [Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Dobashi, S; Takeda, K [Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop radiation treatment planning using magnetic susceptibility obtained from quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) via MR imaging. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a method for generating a substitute for a CT image from an MRI. Methods: The head of a healthy volunteer was scanned using a CT scanner and a 3.0 T MRI scanner. The CT imaging was performed with a slice thickness of 2.5 mm at 80 and 120 kV (dual-energy scan). These CT images were converted to relative electron density (rED) using the CT-rED conversion table generated by a previous dual-energy CT scan. The CT-rED conversion table was generated using the conversion of the energy-subtracted CT number to rED via a single linear relationship. One T2 star-weighted 3D gradient echo-based sequence with four different echo times images was acquired using the MRI scanner. These T2 star-weighted images were used to estimate the phase data. To estimate the local field map, a Laplacian unwrapping of the phase and background field removal algorithm were implemented to process phase data. To generate a magnetic susceptibility map from the local field map, we used morphology enabled dipole inversion method. The rED map was resampled to the same resolution as magnetic susceptibility, and the magnetic susceptibility-rED conversion table was obtained via voxel-by-voxel mapping between the magnetic susceptibility and rED maps. Results: A correlation between magnetic susceptibility and rED is not observed through our method. Conclusion: Our results show that the correlation between magnetic susceptibility and rED is not observed. As the next step, we assume that the voxel of the magnetic susceptibility map comprises two materials, such as water (0 ppm) and bone (-2.2 ppm) or water and marrow (0.81ppm). The elements of each voxel were estimated from the ratio of the two materials.

  4. Statistical theory of electron densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, L.R.; Hoffman, G.G.; Harris, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    An optimized Thomas--Fermi theory is proposed which retains the simplicity of the original theory and is a suitable reference theory for Monte Carlo density functional treatments of condensed materials. The key ingredient of the optimized theory is a neighborhood sampled potential which contains effects of the inhomogeneities in the one-electron potential. In contrast to the traditional Thomas--Fermi approach, the optimized theory predicts a finite electron density in the vicinity of a nucleus. Consideration of the example of an ideal electron gas subject to a central Coulomb field indicates that implementation of the approach is straightforward. The optimized theory is found to fail completely when a classically forbidden region is approached. However, these circumstances are not of primary interest for calculations of interatomic forces. It is shown how the energy functional of the density may be constructed by integration of a generalized Hellmann--Feynman relation. This generalized Hellmann--Feynman relation proves to be equivalent to the variational principle of density functional quantum mechanics, and, therefore, the present density theory can be viewed as a variational consequence of the constructed energy functional

  5. Individualized volume CT dose index determined by cross-sectional area and mean density of the body to achieve uniform image noise of contrast-enhanced pediatric chest CT obtained at variable kV levels and with combined tube current modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    A practical body-size adaptive protocol providing uniform image noise at various kV levels is not available for pediatric CT. To develop a practical contrast-enhanced pediatric chest CT protocol providing uniform image noise by using an individualized volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) determined by the cross-sectional area and density of the body at variable kV levels and with combined tube current modulation. A total of 137 patients (mean age, 7.6 years) underwent contrast-enhanced pediatric chest CT based on body weight. From the CTDIvol, image noise, and area and mean density of the cross-section at the lung base in the weight-based group, the best fit equation was estimated with a very high correlation coefficient ({gamma}{sup 2} = 0.86, P < 0.001). For the next study, 177 patients (mean age, 7.9 years; the CTDIvol group) underwent contrast-enhanced pediatric chest CT with the CTDIvol determined individually by the best fit equation. CTDIvol values on the dose report after CT scanning, noise differences from the target noise, areas, and mean densities were compared between these two groups. The CTDIvol values (mean{+-}standard deviation, 1.6 {+-} 0.7 mGy) and the noise differences from the target noise (1.1 {+-} 0.9 HU) of the CTDIvol group were significantly lower than those of the weight-based group (2.0 {+-} 1.0 mGy, 1.8 {+-} 1.4 HU) (P < 0.001). In contrast, no statistically significant difference was found in area (317.0 {+-} 136.8 cm{sup 2} vs. 326.3 {+-} 124.8 cm{sup 2}), mean density (-212.9 {+-} 53.1 HU vs. -221.1 {+-} 56.3 HU), and image noise (13.8 {+-} 2.3 vs. 13.6 {+-} 1.7 HU) between the weight-based and the CTDIvol groups (P > 0.05). Contrast-enhanced pediatric chest CT with the CTDIvol determined individually by the cross-sectional area and density of the body provides more uniform noise and better dose adaptation to body habitus than does weight-based CT at variable kV levels and with combined tube current modulation. (orig.)

  6. The Relations Between Soil Water Retention Characteristics, Particle Size Distributions, Bulk Densities and Calcium Carbonate Contents for Danish Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels H.; Balstrøm, Thomas; Breuning-Madsen, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    functions developed in HYPRES (Hydraulic Properties of European Soils). Introducing bulk density as a predictor improved the equation for pressure head –1 kPa but not for lower ones. The grouping of data sets in surface and subsurface horizons or in textural classes did not improve the equations. Based...

  7. Nest densities of cavity-nesting birds in relation to postfire salvage logging and time since wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victoria A. Saab; Robin E. Russell; Jonathan G. Dudley

    2007-01-01

    We monitored the nest densities and nest survival of seven cavity-nesting bird species, including four open-space foragers (American Kestrel [Falco sparverius], Lewis's Woodpecker [Melanerpes lewis], Western Bluebird [Sialia mexicana], and Mountain Bluebird [S. currucoides]) and three wood...

  8. Dietary Energy Density in Relation to Subsequent Changes of Weight and Waist Circumference in European Men and Women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Du, H.; Ginder, V.; Jebb, S.A.; Forouchi, N.G.; Wareham, N.; Halkjaer, J.; Tjonneland, A.; Overvad, K.; Jakobsen, M.U.; Buijsse, B.; Steffen, A.; Palli, D.; Masala, G.; Saris, W.H.; Sorensen, T.; Feskens, E.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background - Experimental studies show that a reduction in dietary energy density (ED) is associated with reduced energy intake and body weight. However, few observational studies have investigated the role of ED on long-term weight and waist circumference change. Methods and Principal Findings -

  9. The relation between 25-hydroxyvitamin D with peak bone mineral density and body composition in healthy young adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, Annemieke M.; Krenning, Eric P.; Keizer-Schrama, Sabine M. P. F. de Muinck

    Objective: The associations between peak bone mineral density (BMD) and body composition with 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels in healthy young adults were evaluated. Methods: The number of participants was 464; 347 women and 117 men. The mean age was 24.3 years (range 17-31 years). BMD of the

  10. A comparison of the relative locations of the mid-latitude electron density trough and the scintillation boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulunay, Y.K.; Demir, O.; Tauriainen, A.

    1976-01-01

    The mid-latitude electron density trough position and the scintillation boundary have been compared for magnetically quiet periods by using the data returned by Ariel 3 and Explorer 22 satellites. The scintillation boundary is found southward of the trough during daytime, but at night the positions are reversed. (author)

  11. Bone Mineral Density Is Positively Related to Carotid Intima-Media Thickness: Findings From a Population-Based Study in Adolescents and Premenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frysz, Monika; Deere, Kevin; Lawlor, Debbie A; Benfield, Li; Tobias, Jon H; Gregson, Celia L

    2016-12-01

    Osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are both common causes of morbidity and mortality. Previous studies, mainly of people older than 60 years, suggest a relationship between these conditions. Our aim was to determine the association between bone characteristics and CVD markers in younger and middle-aged individuals. Women (n = 3366) and their adolescent offspring (n = 4368) from the UK population-based cohort study, Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), were investigated. We measured total body (TB) and hip bone mineral density (BMD), TB bone area (BA) and bone mineral content (BMC) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) by high-resolution ultrasound. Arterial distensibility was calculated as the difference between systolic and diastolic arterial diameters. Linear regression determined associations between bone exposures and cIMT (in adolescents) and both cIMT and arterial distensibility (in women), generating partial correlation coefficients. Mean (SD) age of women was 48 (4.2) years, body mass index (BMI) was 26.2 (5.0) kg/m 2 , and 71% were premenopausal. In confounder-adjusted analyses (age, height, lean mass, fat mass, menopause, smoking, estrogen replacement, calcium/vitamin D supplementation, and education) TB and hip BMD were both positively associated with cIMT (0.071 [0.030, 0.112], p = 0.001; 0.063 [0.025, 0.101], p = 0.001, respectively). Femoral neck BMD and TB BMD, BMC, and BA were positively associated with arterial distensibility. Mean (SD) age of adolescents was 17 (0.4) years, BMI was 23 (4.1) kg/m 2 , and 44.5% were male. Total hip and TB measurements were positively associated with cIMT, with similar magnitudes of association to those found in their mothers. In contrast to most published findings, we identified weak positive associations between BMD and cIMT in predominantly premenopausal women and their adolescent offspring. We found greater femoral neck

  12. The relation between fine root density and proximity of stems in closed Douglas-fir plantations on homogen[e]ous sandy soils: implications for sampling design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olsthoorn, A.F.M.; Klap, J.M.; Oude Voshaar, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    Studies have been carried out in two fully stocked, fast growing Douglas-fir plantations of the Dutch ACIFORN project in three consecutive years, to obtain information on fine root densities (Olsthoorn 1991). For the present paper, data collected in early summer 1987 were used to study the relation

  13. Comparison of the image quality of intravenous urograms using low-osmolar contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, B.; Howard, J.; Foord, K.D.; Cumberland, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    Almost equivalent, intravenous iodine doses of the three new low-osmolar contrast media, ioxaglate (Hexabrix), iopamidol (Niopam) and iohexol (Omnipaque) have been compared for image quality on the intravenous urogram. Generally good radiographic images were obtained. Iohexol gave better results for the nephrogram and pelvicalyceal distension compared with the other contrast media, but only the nephrogram results were statistically significant. Pyelographic density and ureteric distension and density were similar with all three contrast media. In patients where low-osmolality contrast media need to be used for intravenous urography, we suggest that iohexol gives the best radiographic images. Other factors, such as cost and the relative incidence of side-effects of the low-osmolar contrast media also need to be taken into consideration. (author)

  14. Adverse effects and complications related to the use of barium sulphate contrast media for radiological examinations of the gastrointestinal tract - a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Periard, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Barium sulphate is considered a safe and efficacious contrast medium that is routinely used for radiologic examinations of the gastrointestinal tract. Although the examinations rarely result in complications, the technique is moderately invasive and not entirely innocuous. Complications resulting from the procedures, and adverse reactions from the barium itself, have ranged from mild to severe and in rare instances have led to patient death. This paper reviews the clinical application, biological requirements and clinical properties of barium sulphate contrast media used in diagnostic x-ray imaging. It also outlines the risk factors and associated adverse reactions and complications involved with the use of barium sulphate, and presents documented cases where iatrogenic injuries have resulted. (author)

  15. Increased stocking density causes changes in expression of selected stress- and immune-related genes, humoral innate immune parameters and stress responses of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarahmadi, Peyman; Miandare, Hamed Kolangi; Fayaz, Sahel; Caipang, Christopher Marlowe A

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of various stocking densities on the health status (stress and immune responses) of rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss). Juvenile rainbow trout were acclimated, placed in circular tanks under stocking densities of 10, 40 and 80 kg m(-3) and reared for 30 days. The relative expression of genes involved in stress and immunity such as HSP70, LyzII, TNF-1α, IL-1β, IL-8 and IFN-γ1 in the head kidney was determined. Serum cortisol, ACTH, total antioxidant capacity, osmolality and lactate were measured after 30 days of culture at different stocking densities (D1:10 kg m(-3), D2: 40 kg m(-3) and D3: 80 kg m(-3)) as indices of stress responses. In addition, the effects of stocking densities on serum complement, bactericidal activity, agglutinating antibody titers, serum IgM, anti-protease activity, serum total protein and alkaline phosphatase of the fish were measured. HSP70 gene expression was significantly density-dependent upregulated in D2 and D3 densities compared to D1 (P < 0.05). Also, there was significant downregulation in expression of LyzII, TNF-1α, IL-1β, IL-8 and IFN-γ1 in fish reared at density of either D2 or D3 (P < 0.05). In terms of stress responses, serum ACTH, cortisol and lactate level showed significant density-dependent increase (P < 0.05) while serum osmolality and total antioxidant capacity showed significant decline (P < 0.05) in fish reared at higher densities (D2 and D3) compared to fish reared at lower density (D1) (P < 0.05). Concordant with the expression of the immune-related genes, the serum complement and bactericidal activity as well as specific antibody titer against Aeromonas hydrophila, IgM and anti-protease activity decreased along with elevation of stocking density from D1 to D3 (P < 0.05). However, different stocking densities had no significant effect on serum total protein level and alkaline phosphatase activity. These results suggested that elevation of stocking

  16. Contrast opacification for CT from iodine, gadolinium and ytterbium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwicker, C.; Langer, M.; Ullrich, V.; Felix, R.

    1993-01-01

    The absorption of the elements iodine, gadolinium und ytterbium in various dilutions was studied in relation to CT. Regression analysis and specific CT density measurements showed that absorption decreases from gadolinium to ytterbium and iodine. These results were confirmed by experiments using ten dogs. Boli of 0.5 molar gadolinium used for angio-CT without table movement showed the largest increase in density in the aorta and liver with an average of 190 HU and 21 HU respectively compared with iodine which gave 157 HU and 12 HU respectively. The animal experimental studies suggest that gadolinium and ytterbium are suitable contrast media for dynamic CT investigations. (orig.) [de

  17. Factors in secondary prevention subsequent to distal radius fracture : Focus on physical function, co-morbidity, bone mineral density and health-related quality of life

    OpenAIRE

    Nordvall, Helena

    2009-01-01

    In Sweden approximately 25000 distal radius fractures occur annually, which is 37 % of all fractures related to osteoporosis. In this thesis, risk factors for osteoporosis, bone mineral density (BMD) and health-related quality of life (the SF-36) were compared in patients who suffered a distal radius fracture after low energy trauma with a control group matched on the basis of age, gender, and municipality of residence. The aim was also to analyse, among these patients, whether a risk factor ...

  18. Determination of the relative power density distribution in a heterogeneous reactor from the results of measurements of the reactivity effects and the neutron importance function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobrov, A. A.; Glushkov, E. S.; Zimin, A. A.; Kapitonova, A. V.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Nosov, V. I.; Petrushenko, R. P.; Smirnov, O. N.

    2012-01-01

    A method for experimental determination of the relative power density distribution in a heterogeneous reactor based on measurements of fuel reactivity effects and importance of neutrons from a californium source is proposed. The method was perfected on two critical assembly configurations at the NARCISS facility of the Kurchatov Institute, which simulated a small-size heterogeneous nuclear reactor. The neutron importance measurements were performed on subcritical and critical assemblies. It is shown that, along with traditionally used activation methods, the developed method can be applied to experimental studies of special features of the power density distribution in critical assemblies and reactors.

  19. SDSS-IV MaNGA: Probing the Kinematic Morphology–Density Relation of Early-type Galaxies with MaNGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, J. E.; Leauthaud, A.; Emsellem, E.; Goddard, D.; Ge, J.; Andrews, B. H.; Brinkman, J.; Brownstein, J. R.; Greco, J.; Law, D.; Lin, Y.-T.; Masters, K. L.; Merrifield, M.; More, S.; Okabe, N.; Schneider, D. P.; Thomas, D.; Wake, D. A.; Yan, R.; Drory, N.

    2017-12-01

    The “kinematic” morphology–density relation for early-type galaxies posits that those galaxies with low angular momentum are preferentially found in the highest-density regions of the universe. We use a large sample of galaxy groups with halo masses {10}12.5MaNGA) survey to examine whether there is a correlation between local environment and rotational support that is independent of stellar mass. We find no compelling evidence for a relationship between the angular momentum content of early-type galaxies and either local overdensity or radial position within the group at fixed stellar mass.

  20. Capillary ultrastructure and mitochondrial volume density in skeletal muscle in relation to reduced exercise capacity of patients with intermittent claudication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baum, Oliver; Torchetti, Eleonora; Malik, Corinna

    2016-01-01

    power output (PPO) was determined for all participants using an incremental single-leg knee-extension protocol. Capillary density was lower (411±90 mm(-2)versus 506±95 mm(-2); P≤0.05) in the biopsies of the IC patients than in those of the controls. The basement membrane (BM) around capillaries...... was thicker (543±82 nm versus 423±97 nm; P≤0.01) and the volume density of mitochondria was lower (3.51±0.56% versus 4.60±0.74; P≤0.01) in the IC-patients than the controls. In the IC-patients, a higher proportion of capillaries appeared with collapsed slit-like lumen and/or swollen endothelium. PPO was lower...

  1. The relation between 25-hydroxyvitamin D with peak bone mineral density and body composition in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, Annemieke M; Krenning, Eric P; de Muinck Keizer-Schrama, Sabine M P F

    2011-01-01

    The associations between peak bone mineral density (BMD) and body composition with 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels in healthy young adults were evaluated. The number of participants was 464; 347 women and 117 men. The mean age was 24.3 years (range 17-31 years). BMD of the lumbar spine, total body and femoral neck (FN) and body composition were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Volumetric BMD, bone mineral apparent density (BMAD), of the lumbar spine and FN was calculated. In females, 25OHD level was positively associated with FN BMD and BMAD (both ppercentage body fat (pbody BMD and lean body mass (p=0.03 and p=0.01). 25OHD level is a determinant of peak BMD in both sexes. Vitamin D status was associated with body fat in females and with lean body mass in males.

  2. Dietary energy density in relation to subsequent changes of weight and waist circumference in European men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Huaidong; van der A, Daphne L; Ginder, Vanessa

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Experimental studies show that a reduction in dietary energy density (ED) is associated with reduced energy intake and body weight. However, few observational studies have investigated the role of ED on long-term weight and waist circumference change. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: T...... not prevent weight gain but have a weak yet potentially beneficial effect on the prevention of abdominal obesity as measured by waist circumference....

  3. Tumor characteristics and family history in relation to mammographic density and breast cancer: The French E3N cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskarinec, Gertraud; Dartois, Laureen; Delaloge, Suzette; Hopper, John; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Baglietto, Laura

    2017-08-01

    Mammographic density is a known heritable risk factor for breast cancer, but reports how tumor characteristics and family history may modify this association are inconsistent. Dense and total breast areas were assessed using Cumulus™ from pre-diagnostic mammograms for 820 invasive breast cancer cases and 820 matched controls nested within the French E3N cohort study. To allow comparisons across models, percent mammographic density (PMD) was standardized to the distribution of the controls. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of breast cancer risk for mammographic density were estimated by conditional logistic regression while adjusting for age and body mass index. Heterogeneity according to tumor characteristic and family history was assessed using stratified analyses. Overall, the OR per 1 SD for PMD was 1.50 (95% CI, 1.33-1.69). No evidence for significant heterogeneity by tumor size, lymph node status, grade, and hormone receptor status (estrogen, progesterone, and HER2) was detected. However, the association of PMD was stronger for women reporting a family history of breast cancer (OR 1SD =2.25; 95% CI, 1.67-3.04) than in women reporting none (OR 1SD =1.41; 95% CI, 1.24-1.60; p heterogeneity =0.002). Similarly, effect modification by FHBC was observed using categories of PMD (p heterogeneity =0.02) with respective ORs of 15.16 (95% CI, 4.23-54.28) vs. 3.14 (95% CI, 1.89-5.22) for ≥50% vs. breast cancer risk with a family history supports the hypothesis of shared genetic factors responsible for familial aggregation of breast cancer and the heritable component of mammographic density. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Densities of Barrow's goldeneyes during winter in Prince William Sound, Alaska in relation to habitat, food, and history of oil contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esler, Daniel N.; Bowman, Timothy D.; O'Clair, Charles E.; Dean, Thomas A.; McDonald, Lyman L.

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated variation in densities of Barrow's Goldeneyes (Bucephala islandica) during winter at 214 sites within oiled and unoiled study areas in Prince William Sound, Alaska in relation to physical habitat attributes, prey biomass, and history of habitat contamination by the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill. Using general linear model analyses, we found that goldeneye densities were positively associated with occurrence of a stream within 200 m, lack of exposure to wind and waves, and mixed (versus rocky) substrate. We speculate that these associations relate to habitat profitability via selection of beneficial attributes and avoidance of detrimental features. We also determined that biomass of blue mussels (Mytilus trossulus), the primary prey, was not related to Barrow's Goldeneye densities; we suggest that mussel standing stock exceeds predation demands in our study areas and, thus, does not dictate goldeneye distribution. After accounting for habitat effects, we detected no effect of history of oil contamination on Barrow's Goldeneye densities, suggesting that populations have recovered from the oil spill. Although other studies documented hydrocarbon exposure in Barrow's Goldeneyes through at least 1997, either the level of exposure did not affect populations via reductions in survival, or effects of oil exposure were offset by immigration.

  5. Genotypes and haplotypes in the insulin-like growth factors, their receptors and binding proteins in relation to plasma metabolic levels and mammographic density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanock Stephen J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased mammographic density is one of the strongest independent risk factors for breast cancer. It is believed that one third of breast cancers are derived from breasts with more than 50% density. Mammographic density is affected by age, BMI, parity, and genetic predisposition. It is also greatly influenced by hormonal and growth factor changes in a woman's life cycle, spanning from puberty through adult to menopause. Genetic variations in genes coding for hormones and growth factors involved in development of the breast are therefore of great interest. The associations between genetic polymorphisms in genes from the IGF pathway on mammographic density and circulating levels of IGF1, its binding protein IGFBP3, and their ratio in postmenopausal women are reported here. Methods Samples from 964 postmenopausal Norwegian women aged 55-71 years were collected as a part of the Tromsø Mammography and Breast Cancer Study. All samples were genotyped for 25 SNPs in IGF1, IGF2, IGF1R, IGF2R, IGFALS and IGFBP3 using Taqman (ABI. The main statistical analyses were conducted with the PROC HAPLOTYPE procedure within SAS/GENETICS™ (SAS 9.1.3. Results The haplotype analysis revealed six haploblocks within the studied genes. Of those, four had significant associations with circulating levels of IGF1 or IGFBP3 and/or mammographic density. One haplotype variant in the IGF1 gene was found to be associated with mammographic density. Within the IGF2 gene one haplotype variant was associated with levels of both IGF1 and IGFBP3. Two haplotype variants in the IGF2R were associated with the level of IGF1. Both variants of the IGFBP3 haplotype were associated with the IGFBP3 level and indicate regulation in cis. Conclusion Polymorphisms within the IGF1 gene and related genes were associated with plasma levels of IGF1, IGFBP3 and mammographic density in this study of postmenopausal women.

  6. Low bone mineral density is not related to failure in femoral neck fracture patients treated with internal fixation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viberg, Bjarke; Ryg, Jesper; Overgaard, Søren

    2014-01-01

    the importance of low bone mineral density (BMD). Patients and methods - 140 consecutive patients (105 females, median age 80) treated with IF had a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan of the hip performed median 80 days after treatment. The patients' radiographs were evaluated for fracture displacement......, implant positioning, and quality of reduction. From a questionnaire completed during admission, 2 variables for comorbidity and walking disability were chosen. Primary outcome was low hip BMD (amount of mineral matter per square centimeter of hip bone) compared to hip failure (resection, arthroplasty...

  7. Relative power density distribution calculations of the Kori unit 1 pressurized water reactor with full-scope explicit modeling of monte carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. O.; Kim, J. K.

    1997-01-01

    Relative power density distributions of the Kori unit 1 pressurized water reactor calculated by Monte Carlo modeling with the MCNP code. The Kori unit 1 core is modeled on a three-dimensional representation of the one-eighth of the reactor in-vessel component with reflective boundaries at 0 and 45 degrees. The axial core model is based on half core symmetry and is divided into four axial segments. Fission reaction density in each rod is calculated by following 100 cycles with 5,000 test neutrons in each cycle after starting with a localized neutron source and ten noncontributing settle cycles. Relative assembly power distributions are calculated from fission reaction densities of rods in assembly. After 100 cycle calculations, the system coverages to a κ value of 1.00039 ≥ 0.00084. Relative assembly power distribution is nearly the same with that of the Kori unit 1 FSAR. Applicability of the full-scope Monte Carlo simulation in the power distribution calculation is examined by the relative root mean square error of 2.159%. (author)

  8. Blood pressure of urban school children in relation to road-traffic noise, traffic density and presence of public transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paunovic, Katarina; Belojevic, Goran; Jakovljevic, Branko

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between noise levels, traffic density and the presence of public transport and children's blood pressure. Another aim was to assess the applicability of public transport as a proxy indicator of noise exposure. A cross-sectional study involved 1113 children aged 7-11 years from a central municipality in Belgrade. Equivalent noise levels were measured in front of all schools and in the middle of all streets. Traffic density was defined as number of light and heavy vehicles per hour. The number of public transport vehicles was calculated from official timetables. Children's addresses were matched with noise levels and transport maps. A physician measured blood pressure with the sphygmomanometer. Children attending schools with public transport running nearby had by 1.3 mmHg higher systolic pressure than did children from schools without public transport. This relationship was independent from children's age, gender, and body mass index, family history of hypertension, some dwelling characteristics, and lifestyle habits. The association between diastolic pressure and public transport was statistically insignificant. The study indicated a possible positive association between the presence of public transport in the vicinity of schools with systolic blood pressure in 7-11 year-old schoolchildren. The presence of public transport may serve as an auxiliary indicator of noise exposure in undeveloped countries with limited capacities for noise measurement or modeling.

  9. A high-density linkage map and QTL mapping of fruit-related traits in pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata Duch.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yu-Juan; Zhou, Yang-Yang; Li, Jun-Xing; Yu, Ting; Wu, Ting-Quan; Luo, Jian-Ning; Luo, Shao-Bo; Huang, He-Xun

    2017-10-06

    Pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata) is an economically worldwide crop. Few quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were reported previously due to the lack of genomic and genetic resources. In this study, a high-density linkage map of C. moschata was structured by double-digest restriction site-associated DNA sequencing, using 200 F2 individuals of CMO-1 × CMO-97. By filtering 74,899 SNPs, a total of 3,470 high quality SNP markers were assigned to the map spanning a total genetic distance of 3087.03 cM on 20 linkage groups (LGs) with an average genetic distance of 0.89 cM. Based on this map, both pericarp color and strip were fined mapped to a novel single locus on LG8 in the same region of 0.31 cM with phenotypic variance explained (PVE) of 93.6% and 90.2%, respectively. QTL analysis was also performed on carotenoids, sugars, tuberculate fruit, fruit diameter, thickness and chamber width with a total of 12 traits. 29 QTLs distributed in 9 LGs were detected with PVE from 9.6% to 28.6%. It was the first high-density linkage SNP map for C. moschata which was proved to be a valuable tool for gene or QTL mapping. This information will serve as significant basis for map-based gene cloning, draft genome assembling and molecular breeding.

  10. Significance of oxidized low-density lipoprotein in body fluids as a marker related to diseased conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itabe, Hiroyuki; Kato, Rina; Sasabe, Naoko; Obama, Takashi; Yamamoto, Matsuo

    2018-03-06

    Oxidatively modified low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is known to be involved in various diseases, including cardiovascular diseases. The presence of oxLDL in the human circulatory system and in atherosclerotic lesions has been demonstrated using monoclonal antibodies. Studies have shown the significance of circulating oxLDL in various systemic diseases, including acute myocardial infarction and diabetic mellitus. Several different enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) procedures to measure oxLDL were utilized. Evidence has been accumulating that reveals changes in oxLDL levels under certain pathological conditions. Since oxLDL concentration tends to correlate with low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, the ratio of oxLDL and LDL rather than oxLDL concentration alone has been focused attention. In addition to circulating plasma, LDL and oxLDL are found in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), where the ratio of oxLDL to LDL in GCF is much higher than in plasma. LDL and oxLDL levels in GCF show an increase in diabetic patients and periodontal patients, suggesting that GCF might be useful in examining systemic conditions. GCF oxLDL increased when the teeth were affected by periodontitis. It is likely that oxLDL levels in plasma and GCF could reflect oxidative stress and transfer efficacy in circulatory system. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Effect of contrast on treatment planning system dose calculations in the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lees, J.; Holloway, L.; Fuller, M.; Forstner, D.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Contrast-enhanced x-ray computed tomography is utilised in the planning of radiotherapy lung treatments to allow greater accuracy in defining tumour volume and nodal areas. The use of contrast results in increased density in the region of the tumour and may result in an overall increased density in the lung volume. It is possible that this change in density may affect the accuracy of any dose calculations based on this CT data. As yet, the effect of the contrast agent on the calculations performed by the treatment planning computer is unclear. Ideally, a study would be undertaken using pre- and post- contrast patient data, however this may be considered unethical as an extra CT scan would be required. For this reason, the following study was undertaken to assess the possible impact in a simulated environment. The object of this study was to explore the effect of the contrast agent upon the isodose curves and the monitor units calculated by the treatment planning system. Two investigations were made. Initially, pre- and post-contrast images were acquired using an anthropomorphic phantom. Contrast-enhancement was simulated by replacing cylindrical sections of the lung with lengths of drinking straw containing contrast agent. The effect of increased density in the tumour volume was considered in this comparison. Secondly, block density corrections were used in an existing patient dataset to simulate an increase in lung density and compared with the original dataset. In the two investigations, a treatment was generated using both datasets. Fields were placed on the non contrast-enhanced scan, and then transferred onto the contrast-enhanced scan. The numbers of monitor units calculated in each of the plans were compared, as were the resulting isodose curves. In the first investigation, the relative electron density in the contrast-enhanced scan varied between 0.523 and 1.705 within the tumour volume. This resulted from the presence of undiluted contrast agent

  12. Phase contrast STEM for thin samples: Integrated differential phase contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazić, Ivan; Bosch, Eric G.T.; Lazar, Sorin

    2016-01-01

    It has been known since the 1970s that the movement of the center of mass (COM) of a convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) pattern is linearly related to the (projected) electrical field in the sample. We re-derive a contrast transfer function (CTF) for a scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging technique based on this movement from the point of view of image formation and continue by performing a two-dimensional integration on the two images based on the two components of the COM movement. The resulting integrated COM (iCOM) STEM technique yields a scalar image that is linear in the phase shift caused by the sample and therefore also in the local (projected) electrostatic potential field of a thin sample. We confirm that the differential phase contrast (DPC) STEM technique using a segmented detector with 4 quadrants (4Q) yields a good approximation for the COM movement. Performing a two-dimensional integration, just as for the COM, we obtain an integrated DPC (iDPC) image which is approximately linear in the phase of the sample. Beside deriving the CTFs of iCOM and iDPC, we clearly point out the objects of the two corresponding imaging techniques, and highlight the differences to objects corresponding to COM-, DPC-, and (HA) ADF-STEM. The theory is validated with simulations and we present first experimental results of the iDPC-STEM technique showing its capability for imaging both light and heavy elements with atomic resolution and a good signal to noise ratio (SNR). - Highlights: • First DPC-based atomic resolution images of potential and charge density are obtained. • This is enabled by integration and differentiation of 2D DPC signals, respectively. • Integrated DPC (iDPC) based on 4 quadrant imaging is compared to iCOM imaging. • Noise analysis and comparison with standard STEM imaging modes is provided. • iDPC allows direct imaging of light (C, N, O …) and heavy (Ga, Au …) atoms together.

  13. Phase contrast STEM for thin samples: Integrated differential phase contrast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazić, Ivan, E-mail: ivan.lazic@fei.com; Bosch, Eric G.T.; Lazar, Sorin

    2016-01-15

    It has been known since the 1970s that the movement of the center of mass (COM) of a convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) pattern is linearly related to the (projected) electrical field in the sample. We re-derive a contrast transfer function (CTF) for a scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging technique based on this movement from the point of view of image formation and continue by performing a two-dimensional integration on the two images based on the two components of the COM movement. The resulting integrated COM (iCOM) STEM technique yields a scalar image that is linear in the phase shift caused by the sample and therefore also in the local (projected) electrostatic potential field of a thin sample. We confirm that the differential phase contrast (DPC) STEM technique using a segmented detector with 4 quadrants (4Q) yields a good approximation for the COM movement. Performing a two-dimensional integration, just as for the COM, we obtain an integrated DPC (iDPC) image which is approximately linear in the phase of the sample. Beside deriving the CTFs of iCOM and iDPC, we clearly point out the objects of the two corresponding imaging techniques, and highlight the differences to objects corresponding to COM-, DPC-, and (HA) ADF-STEM. The theory is validated with simulations and we present first experimental results of the iDPC-STEM technique showing its capability for imaging both light and heavy elements with atomic resolution and a good signal to noise ratio (SNR). - Highlights: • First DPC-based atomic resolution images of potential and charge density are obtained. • This is enabled by integration and differentiation of 2D DPC signals, respectively. • Integrated DPC (iDPC) based on 4 quadrant imaging is compared to iCOM imaging. • Noise analysis and comparison with standard STEM imaging modes is provided. • iDPC allows direct imaging of light (C, N, O …) and heavy (Ga, Au …) atoms together.

  14. On the relation between orbital-localization and self-interaction errors in the density functional theory treatment of organic semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körzdörfer, T

    2011-03-07

    It is commonly argued that the self-interaction error (SIE) inherent in semilocal density functionals is related to the degree of the electronic localization. Yet at the same time there exists a latent ambiguity in the definitions of the terms "localization" and "self-interaction," which ultimately prevents a clear and readily accessible quantification of this relationship. This problem is particularly pressing for organic semiconductor molecules, in which delocalized molecular orbitals typically alternate with localized ones, thus leading to major distortions in the eigenvalue spectra. This paper discusses the relation between localization and SIEs in organic semiconductors in detail. Its findings provide further insights into the SIE in the orbital energies and yield a new perspective on the failure of self-interaction corrections that identify delocalized orbital densities with electrons. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  15. "allometry" Deterministic Approaches in Cell Size, Cell Number and Crude Fiber Content Related to the Physical Quality of Kangkong (Ipomoea reptans) Grown Under Different Plant Density Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selamat, A.; Atiman, S. A.; Puteh, A.; Abdullah, N. A. P.; Mohamed, M. T. M.; Zulkeefli, A. A.; Othman, S.

    Kangkong, especially the upland type (Ipomoea reptans) is popularly consumed as a vegetable dish in the South East Asian countries for its quality related to Vitamins (A and C) and crude fiber contents. Higher fiber contents would prevent from the occurrence of colon cancer and diverticular disease. With young stem edible portion, its cell number and size contribute to the stem crude fiber content. The mathematical approach of allometry of cell size, number, and fiber content of stem could be used in determining the 'best' plant density pressure in producing the quality young stem to be consumed. Basically, allometry is the ratio of relative increment (growth or change) rates of two parameters, or the change rate associated to the log of measured variables relationship. Kangkog grown equal or lower than 55 plants m-2 produced bigger individual plant and good quality (physical) kangkong leafy vegetable, but with lower total yield per unit area as compared to those grown at higher densities.

  16. Texture-contrast profile development across the prairie-forest ecotone in northern Minnesota, USA, and its relation to soil aggregation and clay dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasmerchak, C. S.; Mason, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    Along the prairie-forest ecotone, Alfisols with distinct clay-enriched B horizons are found under forest, established only within the past 4 ka, including outlying patches of prairie groves surrounded by prairie. Grassland soils only 5-10 km away from the vegetation boundary show much weaker texture-contrast. In order for clay to be dispersed it must first be released from aggregates upper horizons, which occurs when exposed top soil undergoes wetting and mechanical stress. The relationship between physiochemical soil characteristics and soil aggregation/clay dispersion is of particular interest in explaining texture-contrast development under forest. Soil samples were collected along a transect in northern Minnesota on gentle slopes in similar glacial sediment. Aggregate stability experiments show Mollisol A and B horizons have the most stable aggregates, while Alfisol E horizons have the weakest aggregates and disintegrate rapidly. This demonstrates the strong influence of OM and exchange chemistry on aggregation. Analysis of other physiochemical soil characteristics such as base saturation and pH follow a gradual decreasing eastward trend across the study sites, and do not abruptly change at the prairie-forest boundary like soil morphology does. Linear models show the strongest relationship between rapid aggregate disintegration and ECEC, although they only explain 47-50% of the variance. Higher surface charge enhances aggregation by allowing for greater potential of cation bridging between OM and clay particles. ECEC also represents multiple soil characteristics such as OC, clay, mineralogy, and carbonate presence, suggesting the relationship between aggregation stability and soil characteristics is not simple. Given the parent material consists of calcareous glacial sediment, abundant Ca2+ and Mg2+ from carbonates weathering also contributes to enhanced aggregation in upper horizons. Differences in the rates of bioturbation, most likely also contribute

  17. Aging memory for pictures: Using high-density event-related potentials to understand the effect of aging on the picture superiority effect

    OpenAIRE

    Ally, Brandon A.; Waring, Jill D.; Beth, Ellen H.; McKeever, Joshua D.; Milberg, William P.; Budson, Andrew E.

    2007-01-01

    High-density event-related potentials (ERPs) were used to understand the effect of aging on the neural correlates of the picture superiority effect. Pictures and words were systematically varied at study and test while ERPs were recorded at retrieval. Here, the results of the word-word and picture-picture study-test conditions are presented. Behavioral results showed that older adults demonstrated the picture superiority effect to a greater extent than younger adults. The ERP data helped to e...

  18. An exploratory study of the relation of population density and agricultural activity to hematologic malignancies in North Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Patricia L; Watkins, John M

    2013-02-01

    Established risk factors for hematologic cancers include exposure to ionizing radiation, organic solvents, and genetic mutation; however, the potential roles of environmental and sociological factors are not well explored. As North Dakota engages in significant agricultural activity, the present investigation seeks to determine whether an association exists between the incidence of hematologic cancers and either population density or agricultural occupation for residents of south central North Dakota. The present study is a retrospective analysis. Cases of hematologic malignancies and associated pre-malignant conditions were collected from the regional Central North Dakota Cancer Registry, and analysis of study-specific demographic factors was performed. Significantly higher incidence of hematologic cancers and pre-malignant disorders was associated with residence in an "urban" county and rural city/town. Within the latter designation, there was a higher rate of self-reported agricultural occupation (40% vs 10%, P Dakota supports the need for more detailed prospective research centered on agricultural exposures.

  19. Quantifying relative fishing impact on fish populations based on spatio-temporal overlap of fishing effort and stock density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Morten; Eero, Margit

    2013-01-01

    Evaluations of the effects of management measures on fish populations are usually based on the analyses of population dynamics and estimates of fishing mortality from stock assessments. However, this approach may not be applicable in all cases, in particular for data-limited stocks, which may...... GAM analyses to predict local cod densities and combine this with spatio-temporal data of fishing effort based on VMS (Vessel Monitoring System). To quantify local fishing impact on the stock, retention probability of the gears is taken into account. The results indicate a substantial decline...... in the impact of the Danish demersal trawl fleet on cod in the Kattegat in recent years, due to a combination of closed areas, introduction of selective gears and changes in overall effort....

  20. Lymph node density as a prognostic predictor in patients with betel nut-related oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei-Chin; Lin, Chun-Shu; Yang, Cheng-Yu; Lin, Chih-Kung; Chen, Yuan-Wu

    2018-04-01

    Lymph node metastasis in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a poor prognostic factor. The histopathologic stage (e.g., pN) is used to evaluate the severity of lymph node metastasis; however, the current staging system insufficiently predicts survival and recurrence. We investigated clinical outcomes and lymph node density (LND) in betel nut-chewing individuals. We retrospectively analyzed 389 betel nut-exposed patients with primary OSCC who underwent surgical resection in 2002-2015. The prognostic significance of LND was evaluated by overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) using the Kaplan-Meier method. Kaplan-Meier analyses showed that the 5-year OS and DFS rates in all patients were 60.9 and 48.9%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that variables independently prognostic for OS were aged population (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.6, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.1-2.5; P = .025), and cell differentiation classification (HR = 2.4, 95% CI = 1.4-4.2; P = .002). In pathologic N-positive patients, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for OS was used and indicated the best cutoff of 0.05, and the multivariate analysis showed that LND was an independent predictor of OS (HR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.3-3.7; P = .004). Lymph node density, at a cutoff of 0.05, was an independent predictor of OS and DFS. OS and DFS underwent multiple analyses, and LND remained significant. The pathologic N stage had no influence in the OS analysis. LND is a more reliable predictor of survival in betel nut-chewing patients for further post operation adjuvant treatment, such as reoperation or adjuvant radiotherapy.

  1. Neighborhood Characteristics, Alcohol Outlet Density, and Alcohol-Related Calls-for-Service: A Spatiotemporal Analysis in a Wet Drinking Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Marco

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol outlets have been associated with different social problems, such as crime, violence, intimate partner violence, and child maltreatment. The spatial analysis of neighborhood availability of alcohol outlets is key for better understanding of these influences. Most studies on the spatial distribution of alcohol outlets in the community have been conducted in U.S. cities, but few studies have assessed this spatial distribution in other countries where the drinking culture may differ. The aim of this study was to analyze the spatiotemporal distribution of alcohol outlets in the city of Valencia, Spain, and its relationship with neighborhood-level characteristics, as well as to examine the influence of alcohol outlet density on alcohol-related police calls-for-service. Spain is characterized by having a “wet” drinking culture and greater social acceptance of drinking compared to the U.S. Data on alcohol outlets between 2010–2015 in three categories (off-premise, restaurants and cafes, and bars were used for the analysis. We used the 552 census block groups allocated within the city as neighborhood unit. Data were analyzed using Bayesian spatiotemporal regression models. Results showed different associations between alcohol outlets categories and neighborhood variables: off-premise density was higher in areas with lower economic status, higher immigrant concentration, and lower residential instability; restaurant and cafe density was higher in areas with higher spatially-lagged economic status, and bar density was higher in areas with higher economic status and higher spatially-lagged economic status. Furthermore, restaurant and cafe density was negatively associated with alcohol-related police calls-for-service, while bar density was positively associated with alcohol-related calls-for-service. These results can be used to inform preventive strategies for alcohol-related problems at the neighborhood-level in Spain or other countries

  2. Contrast induced nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stacul, Fulvio; van der Molen, Aart J; Reimer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The Contrast Media Safety Committee (CMSC) of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) has updated its 1999 guidelines on contrast medium-induced nephropathy (CIN). AREAS COVERED: Topics reviewed include the definition of CIN, the choice of contrast medium, the prophylactic me...

  3. Generalized phase contrast:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin

    Generalized Phase Contrast elevates the phase contrast technique not only to improve phase imaging but also to cross over and interface with diverse and seemingly disparate fields of contemporary optics and photonics. This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the Generalized Phase Contrast...

  4. Effects of relative humidity, temperature, and population density on production of cuticular hydrocarbons in housefly Musca domestica L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorman, N; Den Otter, CJ

    The production of cuticular hydrocarbons by both males and females of Musca domestica L. under very wet conditions (90% relative humidity) compared to the production at 50 and 20% relative humidity is delayed up to at least 3 days after emergence from the pupae. Eight days after emergence, however,

  5. THE STAR-FORMATION-RATE-DENSITY RELATION AT 0.6 < z < 0.9 AND THE ROLE OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Shannon G.; Holden, Bradford P.; Illingworth, Garth D.; Kelson, Daniel D.; Franx, Marijn

    2011-01-01

    We study the star formation rates (SFRs) of galaxies as a function of local galaxy density at 0.6 z /(1 + z) ∼ 1% for galaxies with z AB 1.8 x 10 10 M sun (log M/M sun >10.25) to conduct our main analysis. With three different SFR indicators, (1) Spitzer MIPS 24 μm imaging, (2) spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting, and (3) [O II]λ3727 emission, we find the median specific SFR (SSFR) and SFR to decline from the low-density field to the cores of groups and a rich cluster. For the SED- and [O II]-based SFRs, the decline in SSFR is roughly an order of magnitude while for the MIPS-based SFRs, the decline is a factor of ∼4. We find approximately the same magnitude of decline in SSFR even after removing the sample of galaxies near the cluster. Galaxies in groups and a cluster at these redshifts therefore have lower star formation (SF) activity than galaxies in the field, as is the case at z ∼ 0. We investigated whether the decline in SFR with increasing density is caused by a change in the proportion of quiescent and star-forming galaxies (SFGs) or by a decline in the SFRs of SFGs. Using the rest-frame U - V and V - J colors to distinguish quiescent galaxies from SFGs (including both unattenuated blue galaxies and reddened ones), we find that the fraction of quiescent galaxies increases from ∼32% to 79% from low to high density. In addition, we find the SSFRs of SFGs, selected based on U - V and V - J colors, to decline with increasing density by factors of ∼5-6 for the SED- and [O II]-based SFRs. The MIPS-based SSFRs for SFGs decline with a shallower slope. The declining SFRs of SFGs with density are paralleled by a decline in the median A V , providing indirect evidence that the cold gas content that fuels future SF is diminished in higher density environments. The order of magnitude decline in the SSFR-density relation at 0.6 < z < 0.9 is therefore driven by both a combination of declining SFRs of SFGs as well as a changing mix of SFGs and quiescent

  6. Adriamycin nephrosis and contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomsen, H.S.; Golman, K.; Hemmingsen, L.; Larsen, S.; Skaarup, P.; Koebenhavns Amts Sygehus, Herlev; Koebenhavns Amts Sygehus, Herlev; Centralsygehuset, Nykoebing Falster; Malmoe Allmaenna Sjukhus

    1990-01-01

    Urine profiles (albumin, glucose, NAG, LDH, GGT and sodium) were followed for 9 days after intravenous injection of either diatrizoate, iohexol, or saline in 27 Wistar rats with nephrosis induced by Adriamycin 42 days before. Another 9 rats exposed to neither Adriamycin nor contrast media served as controls. None of the contrast media caused further increased albuminuria of significance, whereas both induced significantly increased excretion of all 5 tubular components. The excretion of NAG and sodium was significantly higher following diatrizoate than following iohexol. From 24 h post injection there was no significantly greater excretion of any of the components after either diatrizoate or iohexol than after saline among the rats given Adriamycin. At the end of day 9 after contrast medium injection neither serum sodium, potassium, glucose, urea, creatinine, nor albumin revealed any contrast media related changes. Kidney histology showed quantitatively larger lesions in kidneys exposed to Adriamycin and contrast media than in kidneys exposed to Adriamycin and saline. There were no differences between the two contrast media groups. It is thus concluded, that both high osmolar ionic and low osmolar non-ionic contrast media cause temporary tubular dysfunction but no further glomerular dysfunction in rats with nephrosis induced by Adriamycin. The histologic findings indicate that both media may worsen non-reversible renal lesions. (orig.)

  7. Phase Contrast Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1996-01-01

    The invention relates to a method and a system for synthesizing a prescribed intensity pattern based on phase contrast imaging that is not based on the assumption of prior art methods that the pahase shift phi is less than 1 radian. An improved method based on a simple imaging operation...... phasors attain predetermined values for predetermined spatial frequencies, and the phasor value of the specific resolution element of the spatial phase mask corresponds to a distinct intensity level of the image of the resolution element in the intensity pattern, and a spatial phase filter for phase...... shifting of a part of the electromagntic radiation, in combination with an imaging system for generation of the intensity pattern by interference in the image plane of the imaging system between the part of the electromagnetic raidation that has been phase shifted by the phase filter and the remaining part...

  8. Perforations during contrast enema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.; Steinkamp, U.; Grabbe, E.; Allgemeines Krankenhaus Ochsenzoll, Hamburg

    1983-01-01

    During contrast enema, perforation into the retroperitoneal space can be differentiated from perforation into the peritoneum and perforation into the intestinal wall associated with formation of barium granulomas or submucosal spreading of the contrast medium. Other special forms are perforation with contrast medium embolism of diverticula; of the processus vermiformis; penetration of contrast medium into fistulous systems and from the operated areas. Risk factors are: balloon catheter, intestinal tubes with a hard tip, preternatural anus, excessive enema pressure, contrast medium additions, preceding manipulations, intestinal diseases, advanced age and delegation of manipulations to assistants and unskilled staff. Children are particularly at risk. (orig.) [de

  9. Contrast induced nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stacul, Fulvio; van der Molen, Aart J; Reimer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The Contrast Media Safety Committee (CMSC) of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) has updated its 1999 guidelines on contrast medium-induced nephropathy (CIN). AREAS COVERED: Topics reviewed include the definition of CIN, the choice of contrast medium, the prophylactic me....../min/1.73 m (2) is CIN risk threshold for intravenous contrast medium. • Hydration with either saline or sodium bicarbonate reduces CIN incidence. • Patients with eGFR = 60 ml/min/1.73 m (2) receiving contrast medium can continue metformin normally....

  10. Abundance, biomass and caloric content of Chukchi Sea bivalves and association with Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) relative density and distribution in the northeastern Chukchi Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jordann K.; Black, Bryan A.; Clarke, Janet T.; Schonberg, Susan V.; Dunton, Kenneth H.

    2017-10-01

    The northeastern Chukchi Sea is a shallow subarctic shelf ecosystem that supports a substantial benthic infaunal community of which bivalves are a major component. We assessed the patterns in population abundance, biomass, and caloric content of ten dominant bivalve taxa in relation to the distribution of the upper trophic level consumer Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens). Bivalves were collected over four cruises in the northeastern Chukchi Sea (2009, 2010, 2012, 2013). Our samples were largely dominated by calorie-dense, deposit-feeding species, including Macoma spp., Ennucula tenuis, Nuculana spp. and Yoldia spp. Weight-frequency distributions were strongly right-skewed for most taxa, though some showed evidence of a bimodal distribution. Caloric densities as measured through bomb calorimetry significantly differed among taxa (ANOVA F = 32.57, df = 9, p-valueanimal wet weight was found to be a reliable predictor of whole animal caloric content. Bivalve populations and peak caloric densities were centered on and to the southeast of Hanna Shoal, which coincided with peak Pacific walrus relative density (walruses per km surveyed) from July through October. Significant differences in mean caloric values were found between areas with and without walruses present (student's t-test, t=-2.9088, df = 252.24, p-value = 0.003952), as well as between areas with low and high walrus relative densities in the pooled annual dataset and in each individual month except October (ANOVA, p-value<0.05). The high-calorie deposit feeders that dominate these bivalve communities preferentially consume food sources, such as sea ice algae, that are likely to be affected by shifting sea ice dynamics. As such, continued warming has the potential to alter bivalve communities in the northeastern Chukchi Sea, which may have profound implications for upper trophic levels.

  11. Diffusion-weighted imaging in relation to morphology on dynamic contrast enhancement MRI. The diagnostic value of characterizing non-puerperal mastitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lina; Chu, Jianguo; Zhang, Weisheng; Liu, Ailian; Song, Qingwei [First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Department of Radiology, Dalian, Liaoning (China); Hu, Jiani; Guys, Nicholas [Wayne State University, Department of Radiology, Detroit, MI (United States); Meng, Jinli [Chengban Branch of West China Hospital, Department of Radiology, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Wang, Shaowu [Second Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Department of Radiology, Dalian, Liaoning (China)

    2018-03-15

    To demonstrate the value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the characterisation of mastitis lesions. Sixty-one non-puerperal patients with pathologically confirmed single benign mastitis lesions underwent preoperative examinations with conventional MRI and axial DWI. Patients were categorised into three groups: (1) periductal mastitis (PDM), (2) granulomatous lobular mastitis (GLM), and (3) infectious abscess (IAB). Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of each lesion were recorded. A one-way ANOVA with logistic analysis was performed to compare ADC values and other parameters. Discriminative abilities of DWI modalities were compared using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. ADC values differed significantly among the three groups (P = 0.003) as well as between PDM and IAB and between PDM and GLM. The distribution of non-mass enhancement on dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI differed significantly among the three groups (P = 0.03) but not between any two groups specifically. There were no differences in lesion location, patient age, T{sub 2}WI or DWI signal intensity, enhancement type, non-mass internal enhancement, or mass enhancement characteristics among the three groups. ADC values and the distribution of non-mass enhancement are valuable in classifying mastitis subtypes. (orig.)

  12. Fusarium head blight incidence and mycotoxin accumulation in three durum wheat cultivars in relation to sowing date and density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczyca, Anna; Oleksy, Andrzej; Gala-Czekaj, Dorota; Urbaniak, Monika; Laskowska, Magdalena; Waśkiewicz, Agnieszka; Stępień, Łukasz

    2018-02-01

    Durum wheat ( Triticum turgidum var. durum) is an important crop in Europe, particularly in the Mediterranean countries. Fusarium head blight (FHB) is considered as one of the most damaging diseases, resulting in yield and quality reduction as well as contamination of grain with mycotoxins. Three winter durum wheat cultivars originating from Austria, Slovakia, and Poland were analyzed during 2012-2014 seasons for FHB incidence and Fusarium mycotoxin accumulation in harvested grain. Moreover, the effects of sowing density and delayed sowing date were evaluated in the climatic conditions of Southern Poland. Low disease severity was observed in 2011/2012 in all durum wheat cultivars analyzed, and high FHB occurrence was recorded in 2012/2013 and 2013/2014 seasons. Fusarium graminearum was the most abundant pathogen, followed by Fusarium avenaceum. Through all three seasons, cultivar Komnata was the most susceptible to FHB and to mycotoxin accumulation, while cultivars Auradur and IS Pentadur showed less symptoms. High susceptibility of cv. Komnata was reflected by the number of Fusarium isolates and elevated mycotoxin (deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, and moniliformin) content in the grain of this cultivar across all three seasons. Nivalenol was identified in the samples of cv. Komnata only. Genotype-dependent differences in FHB susceptibility were observed for the plants sown at optimal date but not at delayed sowing date. It can be hypothesized that cultivars bred in Austria and Slovakia show less susceptibility towards FHB than the cultivar from Poland because of the environmental conditions allowing for more efficient selection of breeding materials.

  13. Changes of bone mineral density and related parameters in patients of hyperthyroidism before and after 131I therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Jibing; Cai Shanwu; Huang Haiquan; Lv Xuefeng; Chen Jizhong; Li Xuguang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of bone metabolism in patients with hyperthyroidism before and after 131 I therapy. Methods: The serum levels of TT 3 , TT 4 , sensitive thyroid-stimulating hormone (sTSH), bone gla protein (BGP), parathyroid hormone (PTH) and calcitonin (CT) of 58 patients with hyperthyroidism were measured and also the serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) levels. The bone mineral density (BMD) of the forearm, lumbar (L 2 -L 4 ) and femur was obtained by dual photon X-ray before and after 131 I therapy. Results: 1) Both BMD between the patients treated after 6 months, and before treatment, also the BMD between various 131 I treated group and no response group had significant differences (P 3 level before therapy was positively correlative to the serum BGP (r=0.4113, t=2.9896, P 3 and CT/PTH radio (r=0.3613, t=2.6836, P 131 I therapy (authors)

  14. Magnetic Exchange Couplings from Semilocal Functionals Evaluated Nonself-Consistently on Hybrid Densities: Insights on Relative Importance of Exchange, Correlation, and Delocalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jordan J; Peralta, Juan E

    2012-09-11

    Semilocal functionals generally yield poor magnetic exchange couplings for transition-metal complexes, typically overpredicting in magnitude the experimental values. Here we show that semilocal functionals evaluated nonself-consistently on densities from hybrid functionals can yield magnetic exchange couplings that are greatly improved with respect to their self-consistent semilocal values. Furthermore, when semilocal functionals are evaluated nonself-consistently on densities from a "half-and-half" hybrid, their errors with respect to experimental values can actually be lower than those from self-consistent calculations with standard hybrid functionals such as PBEh or TPSSh. This illustrates that despite their notoriously poor performance for exchange couplings, for many systems semilocal functionals are capable of delivering accurate relative energies for magnetic states provided that their electron delocalization error is corrected. However, while self-consistent calculations with hybrids uniformly improve results for all complexes, evaluating nonself-consistently with semilocal functionals does not give a balanced improvement for both ferro- and antiferromagnetically coupled complexes, indicating that there is more at play with the overestimation problem than simply the delocalization error. Additionally, we show that for some systems the conventional wisdom of choice of exchange functional mattering more than correlation does not hold. This combined with results from the nonself-consistent calculations provide insight on clarifying the relative roles of exchange, correlation, and delocalization in calculating magnetic exchange coupling parameters in Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory.

  15. X-ray elastography: Modification of x-ray phase contrast images using ultrasonic radiation pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Theron J.; Bailat, Claude; Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Diebold, Gerald J.; Gehring, Stephan; Laperle, Christopher M.; Wands, Jack

    2009-01-01

    The high resolution characteristic of in-line x-ray phase contrast imaging can be used in conjunction with directed ultrasound to detect small displacements in soft tissue generated by differential acoustic radiation pressure. The imaging method is based on subtraction of two x-ray images, the first image taken with, and the second taken without the presence of ultrasound. The subtraction enhances phase contrast features and, to a large extent, removes absorption contrast so that differential movement of tissues with different acoustic impedances or relative ultrasonic absorption is highlighted in the image. Interfacial features of objects with differing densities are delineated in the image as a result of both the displacement introduced by the ultrasound and the inherent sensitivity of x-ray phase contrast imaging to density variations. Experiments with ex vivo murine tumors and human tumor phantoms point out a diagnostic capability of the method for identifying tumors.

  16. Studies of thermodynamic properties and relative stability of a series of polyfluorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins by density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xi; Liu Hui; Hou Haifeng; Flamm, Alison; Zhang Xuesheng; Wang Zunyao

    2010-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of 75 polyfluorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PFDDs) in the ideal gas state at 298.15 K and 1.013 x 10 5 Pa have been calculated at the B3LYP/6-311G* level using Gaussian 03 program. The isodesmic reactions were designed to calculate standard enthalpy of formation (ΔH f o ) and standard free energy of formation (ΔG f o ) of PFDDs congeners. The relations of these thermodynamic parameters with the number and position of fluorine atom substitution (N PFS ) were discussed, and it was found that there exist high correlations between thermodynamic parameters (entropy (S o ), ΔH f o and ΔG f o ) and N PFS . According to the relative magnitude of their ΔG f o , the relative stability order of PFDD congeners was theoretically proposed.

  17. Chapter 7: High-Density H-Mode Operation in ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stober, Joerg Karl; Lang, Peter Thomas; Mertens, Vitus

    2003-01-01

    Recent results are reported on the maximum achievable H-mode density and the behavior of pedestal density and central density peaking as this limit is approached. The maximum achievable H-mode density roughly scales as the Greenwald density, though a dependence on B t is clearly observed. In contrast to the stiff temperature profiles, the density profiles seem to allow more shape variation and especially with high-field-side pellet-injection, strongly peaked profiles with good confinement have been achieved. Also, spontaneous density peaking at high densities is observed in ASDEX Upgrade, which is related to the generally observed large time constants for the density profile equilibration. The equilibrated density profile shapes depend strongly on the heat-flux profile in the sense that central heating leads to significantly flatter profiles

  18. Transcriptome Analysis of Two Rice Varieties Contrasting for Nitrogen Use Efficiency under Chronic N Starvation Reveals Differences in Chloroplast and Starch Metabolism-Related Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subodh Kumar Sinha

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The nitrogen use efficiency (NUE of crop plants is limited and enhancing it in rice, a major cereal crop, would be beneficial for farmers and the environment alike. Here we report the genome-wide transcriptome analysis of two rice genotypes, IR 64 (IR64 and Nagina 22 (N22 under optimal (+N and chronic starvation (-N of nitrogen (N from 15-day-old root and shoot tissues. The two genotypes were found to be contrasting in their response to -N; IR64 root architecture and root dry weight remained almost equivalent to that under +N conditions, while N22 showed high foraging ability but a substantial reduction in biomass under -N. Similarly, the photosynthetic pigments showed a drastic reduction in N22 under low N, while IR64 was more resilient. Nitrate reductase showed significantly low specific activity under -N in both genotypes. Glutamate synthase (GOGAT and citrate synthase CS activity were highly reduced in N22 but not in IR64. Transcriptome analysis of these genotypes revealed nearly double the number of genes to be differentially expressed (DEGs in roots (1016 compared to shoots (571. The response of the two genotypes to N starvation was distinctly different reflecting their morphological/biochemical response with just two and eight common DEGs in the root and shoot tissues. There were a total of 385 nitrogen-responsive DEGs (106 in shoots and 279 in roots between the two genotypes. Fifty-two of the 89 DEGs identified as specific to N22 root tissues were also found to be differentially expressed between the two genotypes under -N. Most of these DEGs belonged to starch and chloroplast metabolism, followed by membrane and signaling proteins. Physical mapping of DEGs revealed 95 DEGs in roots and 76 in shoots to be present in quantitative trait loci (QTL known for NUE.

  19. Dietary energy density in relation to subsequent changes of weight and waist circumference in European men and women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaidong Du

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Experimental studies show that a reduction in dietary energy density (ED is associated with reduced energy intake and body weight. However, few observational studies have investigated the role of ED on long-term weight and waist circumference change. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This population-based prospective cohort study included 89,432 participants from five European countries with mean age 53 years (range: 20-78 years at baseline and were followed for an average of 6.5 years (range: 1.9-12.5 years. Participants were free of cancer, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes at baseline. ED was calculated as the energy intake (kcal from foods divided by the weight (g of foods. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to investigate the associations of ED with annual weight and waist circumference change. Mean ED was 1.7 kcal/g and differed across study centers. After adjusting for baseline anthropometrics, demographic and lifestyle factors, follow-up duration and energy from beverages, ED was not associated with weight change, but significantly associated with waist circumference change overall. For 1 kcal/g ED, the annual weight change was -42 g/year [95% confidence interval (CI: -112, 28] and annual waist circumference change was 0.09 cm/year [95% CI: 0.01, 0.18]. In participants with baseline BMI<25 kg/m(2, 1 kcal/g ED was associated with a waist circumference change of 0.17 cm/year [95% CI: 0.09, 0.25]. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that lower ED diets do not prevent weight gain but have a weak yet potentially beneficial effect on the prevention of abdominal obesity as measured by waist circumference.

  20. Measurement of the relative power density distribution of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor, using a fuel rod gamma scanning technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carneiro, Alvaro Luiz Guimaraes

    1996-01-01

    This work presents a measurement methodology for determination of radial and axial relative power density distribution of the IPEN/MB-01 Reactor core by means of the fuel rod gamma scanning. The methodology is based on the proportionality between gamma activity emitted by the radioactive decay of the fission products and power density. The scanning technique consists of counting gamma radiation above 0,6 MeV along the active area of the fuel rod, getting a distribution profile. The experimental results will be used as a benchmark for qualification and to establish possible deviations for the calculational methodology currently used at IPEN. The comparison of the calculated and measured results showed good agreement. (author)

  1. Determination of protein and solvent volumes in protein crystals from contrast variation data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badger, J. [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    By varying the relative values of protein and solvent scattering densities in a crystal, it is possible to obtain information on the shape and dimensions of protein molecular envelopes. Neutron diffraction methods are ideally suited to these contrast variation experiments because H/D exchange leads to large differential changes in the protein and solvent scattering densities and is structurally non-perturbing. Low resolution structure factors have been measured from cubic insulin crystals with differing H/D contents. Structure factors calculated from a simple binary density model, in which uniform scattering densities represent the protein and solvent volumes in the crystals, were compared with these data. The contrast variation differences in the sets of measured structure factors were found to be accurately fitted by this simple model. Trial applications to two problems in crystal structure determination illustrate how this fact may be exploited. (1) A translation function that employs contrast variation data gave a sharp minimum within 1-9{Angstrom} of the correctly positioned insulin molecule and is relatively insensitive to errors in the atomic model. (2) An ab initio phasing method for the contrast variation data, based on analyzing histograms of the density distributions in trial maps, was found to recover the correct molecular envelope.

  2. What are we learning from the relative orientation between density structures and the magnetic field in molecular clouds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, J. D.; Hennebelle, P.

    2017-10-01

    >⟨Bˆ⊥⟩-> being mostly parallel at low NH to mostly perpendicular at the highest NH, is related to the magnetic field strength and constitutes a crucial piece of information for determining the role of the magnetic field in the dynamics of MCs.

  3. Effect of the relative shift between the electron density and temperature pedestal position on the pedestal stability in JET-ILW and comparison with JET-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanikova, E.; Frassinetti, L.; Saarelma, S.; Loarte, A.; Nunes, I.; Garzotti, L.; Lomas, P.; Rimini, F.; Drewelow, P.; Kruezi, U.; Lomanowski, B.; de la Luna, E.; Meneses, L.; Peterka, M.; Viola, B.; Giroud, C.; Maggi, C.; contributors, JET

    2018-05-01

    The electron temperature and density pedestals tend to vary in their relative radial positions, as observed in DIII-D (Beurskens et al 2011 Phys. Plasmas 18 056120) and ASDEX Upgrade (Dunne et al 2017 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 59 14017). This so-called relative shift has an impact on the pedestal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability and hence on the pedestal height (Osborne et al 2015 Nucl. Fusion 55 063018). The present work studies the effect of the relative shift on pedestal stability of JET ITER-like wall (JET-ILW) baseline low triangularity (δ) unseeded plasmas, and similar JET-C discharges. As shown in this paper, the increase of the pedestal relative shift is correlated with the reduction of the normalized pressure gradient, therefore playing a strong role in pedestal stability. Furthermore, JET-ILW tends to have a larger relative shift compared to JET carbon wall (JET-C), suggesting a possible role of the plasma facing materials in affecting the density profile location. Experimental results are then compared with stability analysis performed in terms of the peeling-ballooning model and with pedestal predictive model EUROPED (Saarelma et al 2017 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion). Stability analysis is consistent with the experimental findings, showing an improvement of the pedestal stability, when the relative shift is reduced. This has been ascribed mainly to the increase of the edge bootstrap current, and to minor effects related to the increase of the pedestal pressure gradient and narrowing of the pedestal pressure width. Pedestal predictive model EUROPED shows a qualitative agreement with experiment, especially for low values of the relative shift.

  4. Patterns in hydraulic architecture from roots to branches in six tropical tree species from cacao agroforestry and their relation to wood density and stem growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyna Malgorzata Kotowska

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available For decades it has been assumed that the largest vessels are generally found in roots and that vessel size and corresponding sapwood area-specific hydraulic conductivity are acropetally decreasing towards the distal twigs. However, recent studies from the perhumid tropics revealed a hump-shaped vessel size distribution. Worldwide tropical perhumid forests are extensively replaced by agroforestry systems often using introduced species of various biogeographical and climatic origins. Nonetheless, it is unknown so far what kind of hydraulic architectural patterns are developed in those agroforestry tree species and which impact this exerts regarding important tree functional traits, such as stem growth, hydraulic efficiency and wood density. We investigated wood anatomical and hydraulic properties of the root, stem and branch wood in Theobroma cacao and five common shade tree species in agroforestry systems on Sulawesi (Indonesia; three of these were strictly perhumid tree species, and the other three tree species are tolerating seasonal drought. The overall goal of our study was to relate these properties to stem growth and other tree functional traits such as foliar nitrogen content and sapwood to leaf area ratio. Our results confirmed a hump-shaped vessel size distribution in nearly all species. Drought-adapted species showed divergent patterns of hydraulic conductivity, vessel density and relative vessel lumen area between root, stem and branch wood compared to wet forest species. Confirming findings from natural old-growth forests in the same region, wood density showed no relationship to specific conductivity. Overall, aboveground growth performance was better predicted by specific hydraulic conductivity than by foliar traits and wood density. Our study results suggest that future research on conceptual trade-offs of tree hydraulic architecture should consider biogeographical patterns underlining the importance of anatomical adaptation

  5. A solid-state hybrid density functional theory study of Prussian blue analogues and related chlorides at pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middlemiss, Derek S; Lawton, Lorreta M; Wilson, Chick C [Department of Chemistry and WestCHEM Research School, University Avenue, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: c.c.wilson@chem.gla.ac.uk

    2008-08-20

    The variations with pressure in the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of a series of Prussian blue analogues (PBAs) K{sup I}M{sup II}[Cr{sup III}(CN){sub 6}] (M = V{sup II}, Mn{sup II} and Ni{sup II}) and associated isomorphous chlorides K{sup I}M{sup II}Cr{sup III}Cl{sub 6} are investigated within a series of solid-state hybrid density functional calculations. The sensitivity of the computed properties to the choice of Hamiltonian is tested by application of functionals containing 35%, 65% and 100% admixtures of Fock exchange. Magnetic coupling constants (J) are obtained at a range of cell volumes (V), with fits of the Bloch relationship (J {proportional_to} V{sup -{epsilon}}, {epsilon} typically 3-4) yielding exponents {epsilon} in the ranges 5.16-6.34, 8.48-12.07 and 4.00-4.51 for the antiferromagnetic (AF) V{sup II}Cr{sup III}-, ferrimagnetic (FI) Mn{sup II}Cr{sup III}- and ferromagnetic (FO) Ni{sup II}Cr{sup III} PBAs, respectively; and 3.33-4.99, 1.86-3.09 and 1.65-3.28 for the AF V{sup II}Cr{sup III}-, FO Mn{sup II}Cr{sup III}- and FO Ni{sup II}Cr{sup III} chlorides, respectively. The Mn{sup II}Cr{sup III} PBA range encloses the high values {epsilon}{approx}9-10 obtained in a recent joint experimental and theoretical study, and it is suggested that this strong magnetostructural effect arises due to the presence of competing AF and FO interactions in this material. Estimates of the spin ordering temperatures derived from the combination of the 35%-functional couplings with a mean field approach are in good agreement with experiment in the V{sup II}Cr{sup III} and Ni{sup II}Cr{sup III} PBAs, but are too low in the Mn{sup II}Cr{sup III} system. The variations with pressure in the structural parameters, charges and spin moments are also detailed, the PBA and chloride energy-volume data yielding bulk moduli in the ranges 39-53 and 36-50 GPa, respectively. Finally, the energies governing CN{sup -} ligand isomerization are estimated and successfully

  6. Prosody-Syntax Integration in a Second Language: Contrasting Event-Related Potentials from German and Chinese Learners of English Using Linear Mixed Effect Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Stefanie; Steinhauer, Karsten

    2018-01-01

    The role of prosodic information in sentence processing is not usually addressed in second language (L2) instruction, and neurocognitive studies on prosody-syntax interactions are rare. Here we compare event-related potentials (ERP) of Chinese and German learners of English L2 to those of native English speakers and show how first language (L1)…

  7. Quantitative contrast-enhanced mammography for contrast medium kinetics studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitis, C. D.; Speller, R.

    2009-10-01

    Quantitative contrast-enhanced mammography, based on a dual-energy approach, aims to extract quantitative and temporal information of the tumour enhancement after administration of iodinated vascular contrast media. Simulations using analytical expressions and optimization of critical parameters essential for the development of quantitative contrast-enhanced mammography are presented. The procedure has been experimentally evaluated using a tissue-equivalent phantom and an amorphous silicon active matrix flat panel imager. The x-ray beams were produced by a tungsten target tube and spectrally shaped using readily available materials. Measurement of iodine projected thickness in mg cm-2 has been performed. The effect of beam hardening does not introduce nonlinearities in the measurement of iodine projected thickness for values of thicknesses found in clinical investigations. However, scattered radiation introduces significant deviations from slope equal to unity when compared with the actual iodine projected thickness. Scatter correction before the analysis of the dual-energy images provides accurate iodine projected thickness measurements. At 10% of the exposure used in clinical mammography, signal-to-noise ratios in excess of 5 were achieved for iodine projected thicknesses less than 3 mg cm-2 within a 4 cm thick phantom. For the extraction of temporal information, a limited number of low-dose images were used with the phantom incorporating a flow of iodinated contrast medium. The results suggest that spatial and temporal information of iodinated contrast media can be used to indirectly measure the tumour microvessel density and determine its uptake and washout from breast tumours. The proposed method can significantly improve tumour detection in dense breasts. Its application to perform in situ x-ray biopsy and assessment of the oncolytic effect of anticancer agents is foreseeable.

  8. Phase contrast image synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, J.

    1996-01-01

    A new method is presented for synthesizing arbitrary intensity patterns based on phase contrast imaging. The concept is grounded on an extension of the Zernike phase contrast method into the domain of full range [0; 2 pi] phase modulation. By controlling the average value of the input phase funct...... function and by choosing appropriate phase retardation at the phase contrast filter, a pure phase to intensity imaging is accomplished. The method presented is also directly applicable in dark field image synthesis....

  9. Road density

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Road density is generally highly correlated with amount of developed land cover. High road densities usually indicate high levels of ecological disturbance. More...

  10. LAST II: Differential temporal responses of macular pigment optical density in patients with atrophic age-related macular degeneration to dietary supplementation with xanthophylls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richer, Stuart; Devenport, Jenny; Lang, John C

    2007-05-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in aging Western societies. The objective of the Lutein Antioxidant Supplementation Trial (LAST) was to determine whether specific dietary interventions increased macular pigment optical density (MPOD) and visual function in patients with atrophic ARMD. The current objective of LAST II is to discern those specific characteristics that increase MPOD, i.e., that might differentiate a responder from a nonresponder. The LAST study was a prospective, 12-month, randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled trial conducted at an urban midwestern Veterans Administation Hospital from August 1999 to May 2001. Ninety patients with atrophic ARMD entered the study and were assigned randomly to 1 of 3 groups. Patients in group 1 received 10 mg lutein; in group 2, 10 mg lutein in combination with vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants; and in group 3, maltodextrin placebo. Changes in macular MPOD over time were evaluated. Characteristics potentially influencing MPOD included age, weight (body mass index), initial baseline values of macular pigment, and combining xanthophylls with other nutrients. MPOD increased with supplementation and declined slightly without supplementation (regression slopes not equal to zero in supplemented groups, P < 0.02). The highest increases in MPOD over time occurred in patients with lower baseline values of MPOD. Statistically significant increases in MPOD density were observed in the lutein group for patients with baseline MPOD density units and up to 0.2 optical density units in the lutein plus antioxidant group. Further analysis found that none of the subjects' eyes in the lowest quartile of baseline MPOD were in the lowest quartile for change in MPOD. Noteworthy is the observation that those individuals with lowest MPOD, and in greatest need of supplementation, were also most likely to benefit from either the lutein or the lutein plus antioxidant

  11. Population Density and AIDS-Related Stigma in Large-Urban, Small-Urban, and Rural Communities of the Southeastern USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalichman, Seth; Katner, Harold; Banas, Ellen; Kalichman, Moira

    2017-07-01

    AIDS stigmas delay HIV diagnosis, interfere with health care, and contribute to mental health problems among people living with HIV. While there are few studies of the geographical distribution of AIDS stigma, research suggests that AIDS stigmas are differentially experienced in rural and urban areas. We conducted computerized interviews with 696 men and women living with HIV in 113 different zip code areas that were classified as large-urban, small-urban, and rural areas in a southeast US state with high-HIV prevalence. Analyses conducted at the individual level (N = 696) accounting for clustering at the zip code level showed that internalized AIDS-related stigma (e.g., the sense of being inferior to others because of HIV) was experienced with greater magnitude in less densely populated communities. Multilevel models indicated that after adjusting for potential confounding factors, rural communities reported greater internalized AIDS-related stigma compared to large-urban areas and that small-urban areas indicated greater experiences of enacted stigma (e.g., discrimination) than large-urban areas. The associations between anticipated AIDS-related stigma (e.g., expecting discrimination) and population density at the community-level were not significant. Results suggest that people living in rural and small-urban settings experience greater AIDS-related internalized and enacted stigma than their counterparts living in large-urban centers. Research is needed to determine whether low-density population areas contribute to or are sought out by people who experienced greater AIDS-related stigma. Regardless of causal directions, interventions are needed to address AIDS-related stigma, especially among people in sparsely populated areas with limited resources.

  12. Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein-1 (LRP1) Mediates Autophagy and Apoptosis Caused by Helicobacter pylori VacA*

    OpenAIRE

    Yahiro, Kinnosuke; Satoh, Mamoru; Nakano, Masayuki; Hisatsune, Junzo; Isomoto, Hajime; Sap, Jan; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Nomura, Fumio; Noda, Masatoshi; Moss, Joel; Hirayama, Toshiya

    2012-01-01

    In Helicobacter pylori infection, vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA)-induced mitochondrial damage leading to apoptosis is believed to be a major cause of cell death. It has also been proposed that VacA-induced autophagy serves as a host mechanism to limit toxin-induced cellular damage. Apoptosis and autophagy are two dynamic and opposing processes that must be balanced to regulate cell death and survival. Here we identify the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1) as the VacA rec...

  13. Evaluation of Traffic Density Parameters as an Indicator of Vehicle Emission-Related Near-Road Air Pollution: A Case Study with NEXUS Measurement Data on Black Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shi V; Chen, Fu-Lin; Xue, Jianping

    2017-12-15

    An important factor in evaluating health risk of near-road air pollution is to accurately estimate the traffic-related vehicle emission of air pollutants. Inclusion of traffic parameters such as road length/area, distance to roads, and traffic volume/intensity into models such as land use regression (LUR) models has improved exposure estimation. To better understand the relationship between vehicle emissions and near-road air pollution, we evaluated three traffic density-based indices: Major-Road Density (MRD), All-Traffic Density (ATD) and Heavy-Traffic Density (HTD) which represent the proportions of major roads, major road with annual average daily traffic (AADT), and major road with commercial annual average daily traffic (CAADT) in a buffered area, respectively. We evaluated the potential of these indices as vehicle emission-specific near-road air pollutant indicators by analyzing their correlation with black carbon (BC), a marker for mobile source air pollutants, using measurement data obtained from the Near-road Exposures and Effects of Urban Air Pollutants Study (NEXUS). The average BC concentrations during a day showed variations consistent with changes in traffic volume which were classified into high, medium, and low for the morning rush hours, the evening rush hours, and the rest of the day, respectively. The average correlation coefficients between BC concentrations and MRD, ATD, and HTD, were 0.26, 0.18, and 0.48, respectively, as compared with -0.31 and 0.25 for two commonly used traffic indicators: nearest distance to a major road and total length of the major road. HTD, which includes only heavy-duty diesel vehicles in its traffic count, gives statistically significant correlation coefficients for all near-road distances (50, 100, 150, 200, 250, and 300 m) that were analyzed. Generalized linear model (GLM) analyses show that season, traffic volume, HTD, and distance from major roads are highly related to BC measurements. Our analyses indicate that

  14. Evaluation of Traffic Density Parameters as an Indicator of Vehicle Emission-Related Near-Road Air Pollution: A Case Study with NEXUS Measurement Data on Black Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi V. Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An important factor in evaluating health risk of near-road air pollution is to accurately estimate the traffic-related vehicle emission of air pollutants. Inclusion of traffic parameters such as road length/area, distance to roads, and traffic volume/intensity into models such as land use regression (LUR models has improved exposure estimation. To better understand the relationship between vehicle emissions and near-road air pollution, we evaluated three traffic density-based indices: Major-Road Density (MRD, All-Traffic Density (ATD and Heavy-Traffic Density (HTD which represent the proportions of major roads, major road with annual average daily traffic (AADT, and major road with commercial annual average daily traffic (CAADT in a buffered area, respectively. We evaluated the potential of these indices as vehicle emission-specific near-road air pollutant indicators by analyzing their correlation with black carbon (BC, a marker for mobile source air pollutants, using measurement data obtained from the Near-road Exposures and Effects of Urban Air Pollutants Study (NEXUS. The average BC concentrations during a day showed variations consistent with changes in traffic volume which were classified into high, medium, and low for the morning rush hours, the evening rush hours, and the rest of the day, respectively. The average correlation coefficients between BC concentrations and MRD, ATD, and HTD, were 0.26, 0.18, and 0.48, respectively, as compared with −0.31 and 0.25 for two commonly used traffic indicators: nearest distance to a major road and total length of the major road. HTD, which includes only heavy-duty diesel vehicles in its traffic count, gives statistically significant correlation coefficients for all near-road distances (50, 100, 150, 200, 250, and 300 m that were analyzed. Generalized linear model (GLM analyses show that season, traffic volume, HTD, and distance from major roads are highly related to BC measurements. Our analyses

  15. Age-related changes in prefrontal norepinephrine transporter density: The basis for improved cognitive flexibility after low doses of atomoxetine in adolescent rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Sarah E.; Agster, Kara L.; Waterhouse, Barry D.; McGaughy, Jill A.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence is a period of major behavioral and brain reorganization. As diagnoses and treatment of disorders like attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often occur during adolescence, it is important to understand how the prefrontal cortices change and how these changes may influence the response to drugs during development. The current study uses an adolescent rat model to study the effect of standard ADHD treatments, atomoxetine and methylphenidate on attentional set shifting and reversal learning. While both of these drugs act as norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, higher doses of atomoxetine and all doses of methylphenidate also block dopamine transporters (DAT). Low doses of atomoxetine, were effective at remediating cognitive rigidity found in adolescents. In contrast, methylphenidate improved performance in rats unable to form an attentional set due to distractibility but was without effect in normal subjects. We also assessed the effects of GBR 12909, a selective DAT inhibitor, but found no effect of any dose on behavior. A second study in adolescent rats investigated changes in norepinephrine transporter (NET) and dopamine beta hydroxylase (DBH) density in five functionally distinct subregions of the prefrontal cortex: infralimbic, prelimbic, anterior cingulate, medial and lateral orbitofrontal cortices. These regions are implicated in impulsivity and distractibility. We found that NET, but not DBH, changed across adolescence in a regionally selective manner. The prelimbic cortex, which is critical to cognitive rigidity, and the lateral orbitofrontal cortex, critical to reversal learning and some forms of response inhibition, showed higher levels of NET at early than mid- to late adolescence. PMID:26774596

  16. Relative importance of social factors, conspecific density, and forest structure on space use by the endangered Red-cockaded Woodpecker: A new consideration for habitat restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garabedian, James E. [Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology Program, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA; Moorman, Christopher E. [Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology Program, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA; Peterson, M. Nils [Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology Program, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA; Kilgo, John C. [Southern Research Station, USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, New Ellenton, South Carolina, USA

    2018-03-14

    Understanding how the interplay between social behaviors and habitat structure influences space use is important for conservation of birds in restored habitat. We integrated fine-grained LiDAR-derived habitat data, spatial distribution of cavity trees, and spatially explicit behavioral observations in a multi-scale model to determine the relative importance of conspecific density, intraspecific interactions, and the distribution of cavities on space use by Red-cockaded Woodpeckers (Picoides borealis) on 2 sites in South Carolina, USA. We evaluated candidate models using information theoretic methods. Top scale-specific models included effects of conspecific density and number of cavity tree starts within 200 m of Red-cockaded Woodpecker foraging locations, and effects of the number of intraspecific interactions within 400 m of Red-cockaded Woodpecker foraging locations. The top multi-scale model for 22 of 34 Red-cockaded Woodpecker groups included covariates for the number of groups within 200 m of foraging locations and LiDARderived habitat with moderate densities of large pines (Pinus spp.) and minimal hardwood overstory. These results indicate distribution of neighboring groups was the most important predictor of space use once a minimal set of structural habitat thresholds was reached, and that placing recruitment clusters as little as 400 m from foraging partitions of neighboring groups may promote establishment of new breeding groups in unoccupied habitat. The presence of neighboring groups likely provides cues to foraging Red-cockaded Woodpeckers that facilitate prospecting prior to juvenile dispersal and, to a lesser extent, indicates high-quality forage resources. Careful consideration of local distribution of neighboring groups in potential habitat may improve managers’ ability to increase Red-cockaded Woodpecker density on restored landscapes and mitigate isolation of Red-cockaded Woodpecker groups, a problem that negatively affects fitness across the

  17. Discovery and Fine-Mapping of Glycaemic and Obesity-Related Trait Loci Using High-Density Imputation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momoko Horikoshi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Reference panels from the 1000 Genomes (1000G Project Consortium provide near complete coverage of common and low-frequency genetic variation with minor allele frequency ≥0.5% across European ancestry populations. Within the European Network for Genetic and Genomic Epidemiology (ENGAGE Consortium, we have undertaken the first large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS, supplemented by 1000G imputation, for four quantitative glycaemic and obesity-related traits, in up to 87,048 individuals of European ancestry. We identified two loci for body mass index (BMI at genome-wide significance, and two for fasting glucose (FG, none of which has been previously reported in larger meta-analysis efforts to combine GWAS of European ancestry. Through conditional analysis, we also detected multiple distinct signals of association mapping to established loci for waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (RSPO3 and FG (GCK and G6PC2. The index variant for one association signal at the G6PC2 locus is a low-frequency coding allele, H177Y, which has recently been demonstrated to have a functional role in glucose regulation. Fine-mapping analyses revealed that the non-coding variants most likely to drive association signals at established and novel loci were enriched for overlap with enhancer elements, which for FG mapped to promoter and transcription factor binding sites in pancreatic islets, in particular. Our study demonstrates that 1000G imputation and genetic fine-mapping of common and low-frequency variant association signals at GWAS loci, integrated with genomic annotation in relevant tissues, can provide insight into the functional and regulatory mechanisms through which their effects on glycaemic and obesity-related traits are mediated.

  18. Discovery and Fine-Mapping of Glycaemic and Obesity-Related Trait Loci Using High-Density Imputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikoshi, Momoko; Mӓgi, Reedik; van de Bunt, Martijn; Surakka, Ida; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Mahajan, Anubha; Marullo, Letizia; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hӓgg, Sara; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ladenvall, Claes; Ried, Janina S; Winkler, Thomas W; Willems, Sara M; Pervjakova, Natalia; Esko, Tõnu; Beekman, Marian; Nelson, Christopher P; Willenborg, Christina; Wiltshire, Steven; Ferreira, Teresa; Fernandez, Juan; Gaulton, Kyle J; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Hamsten, Anders; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Willemsen, Gonneke; Milaneschi, Yuri; Robertson, Neil R; Groves, Christopher J; Bennett, Amanda J; Lehtimӓki, Terho; Viikari, Jorma S; Rung, Johan; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Perola, Markus; Heid, Iris M; Herder, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Roden, Michael; Hypponen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Karssen, Lennart C; Mihailov, Evelin; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; de Craen, Anton J M; Deelen, Joris; Havulinna, Aki S; Blades, Matthew; Hengstenberg, Christian; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert; Kaprio, Jaakko; Tobin, Martin D; Samani, Nilesh J; Lind, Lars; Salomaa, Veikko; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Slagboom, P Eline; Metspalu, Andres; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Eriksson, Johan G; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Jula, Antti; Groop, Leif; Raitakari, Olli T; Power, Chris; Penninx, Brenda W J H; de Geus, Eco; Smit, Johannes H; Boomsma, Dorret I; Pedersen, Nancy L; Ingelsson, Erik; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; Ripatti, Samuli; Prokopenko, Inga; McCarthy, Mark I; Morris, Andrew P

    2015-07-01

    Reference panels from the 1000 Genomes (1000G) Project Consortium provide near complete coverage of common and low-frequency genetic variation with minor allele frequency ≥0.5% across European ancestry populations. Within the European Network for Genetic and Genomic Epidemiology (ENGAGE) Consortium, we have undertaken the first large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), supplemented by 1000G imputation, for four quantitative glycaemic and obesity-related traits, in up to 87,048 individuals of European ancestry. We identified two loci for body mass index (BMI) at genome-wide significance, and two for fasting glucose (FG), none of which has been previously reported in larger meta-analysis efforts to combine GWAS of European ancestry. Through conditional analysis, we also detected multiple distinct signals of association mapping to established loci for waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (RSPO3) and FG (GCK and G6PC2). The index variant for one association signal at the G6PC2 locus is a low-frequency coding allele, H177Y, which has recently been demonstrated to have a functional role in glucose regulation. Fine-mapping analyses revealed that the non-coding variants most likely to drive association signals at established and novel loci were enriched for overlap with enhancer elements, which for FG mapped to promoter and transcription factor binding sites in pancreatic islets, in particular. Our study demonstrates that 1000G imputation and genetic fine-mapping of common and low-frequency variant association signals at GWAS loci, integrated with genomic annotation in relevant tissues, can provide insight into the functional and regulatory mechanisms through which their effects on glycaemic and obesity-related traits are mediated.

  19. Close and distant: Contrasting the metabolism of two closely related subspecies of Scots pine under the effects of folivory and summer drought

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivas-Ubach, Albert; Sardans, J.; Hodar, Jose A.; Garcia-Porta, Joan; Guenther, Alex B.; Pasa Tolic, Ljiljana; Oravec, Michal; Urban, Otmar; Penuelas, Josep

    2017-09-25

    The metabolome, the chemical phenotype of an organism, should be shaped by evolution. Metabolomes depend on genetic composition and expression, which can be sources of evolutionary inertia, so most aspects of metabolomes should be similar in closely related sympatric species. We examined the metabolomes of two sympatric subspecies of Pinus sylvestris in Sierra Nevada (southern Iberian Peninsula), one introduced (ssp. iberica) and one autochthonous (ssp. nevadensis), in summer and winter and exposed to folivory by the pine processionary moth. The overall metabolomes differed between the subspecies but both tended to respond more similarly to folivory. The metabolomes of the subspecies were more dissimilar in summer than in winter, and iberica trees had higher concentrations of metabolites directly related to drought stress. Our results suggest that certain plant metabolic responses associated with folivory have been conserved throughout evolutionary history. The larger divergence between subspecies metabolomes in summer is likely due to the warmer and drier conditions that the northern iberica subspecies experience in Sierra Nevada. Our results provide crucial insights into how iberica populations would respond to the predicted conditions of climate change under an increased defoliation, two recent severe issues in the Mediterranean Basin.

  20. Contrasting effects of fresh and fermented kimchi consumption on gut microbiota composition and gene expression related to metabolic syndrome in obese Korean women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyungsun; Bose, Shambhunath; Wang, Jing-hua; Kim, Bong-Soo; Kim, Mi Jeong; Kim, Eun-Jung; Kim, Hojun

    2015-05-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests relationship of compositional changes of gut microbiota with onset of metabolic disorders and obesity. Kimchi, a traditional Korean side dish, is known for its beneficial impact on metabolic parameters and anti-obesity effects. The current study was designed to evaluate the association between gut microbiota and human genome after kimchi intervention in an effort to understand the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the antiobesity impact of kimchi. Twenty-four obese women were randomly assigned to either fresh or fermented kimchi group for eight weeks of kimchi intervention. Pyrosequencing of fecal microbiota and microarray analyses of blood samples revealed that fresh and fermented kimchi interventions exerted differential effects on the obesity-related clinical parameters. Correlations of these effects with changes in blood gene expression and gut microbial population were more evident in the fermented kimchi group than the fresh kimchi group. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Xenon contrast CT-CBF scanning of the brain differentiates normal age-related changes from multi-infarct dementia and senile dementia of Alzheimer type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, H.; Meyer, J.S.; Okayasu, H.; Shaw, T.G.; Kandula, P.; Rogers, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    Local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) and partition coefficients (L lambda) were measured during inhalation of stable xenon gas with serial CT scanning among normal volunteers (N . 15), individuals with multi-infarct dementia (MID, N . 10), and persons with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT, N . 8). Mean gray matter flow values were reduced in both MID and SDAT. Age-related declines in LCBF values in normals were marked in frontal cortex and basal ganglia. LCBF values were decreased beyond normals in frontal and temporal cortices and thalamus in MID and SDAT, in basal ganglia only in MID. Unlike SDAT and age-matched normals, L lambda values were reduced in fronto-temporal cortex and thalamus in MID. Multifocal nature of lesions in MID was apparent. Coefficients of variation for LCBFs were greater in MID compared with SDAT and/or age-matched normals

  2. Partitioning Uncertainty In Aboveground Carbon Density Estimates: Relative Contributions From Lidar and Forest Inventory In The Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, P.; Keller, M. M.; Morton, D. C.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon accounting for REDD+ requires knowledge of deforestation, degradation, and associated changes in forest carbon stocks. Degradation is more