WorldWideScience

Sample records for relative corrosion rates

  1. Development of Copper Corrosion Products and Relation between Surface Appearance and Corrosion Rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, Tran Thi Ngoc; Binh, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Tru, Nguyen Nhi; Yoshino, Tsujino; Yasuki, Maeda

    2008-01-01

    Copper was exposed unsheltered and sheltered in four humid tropical sites, representing urban, urban-industrial, urban-marine and rural environments. The corrosion rates and the sequence of corrosion product formation are presented and discussed in relation with climatic and atmospheric pollution parameters. Chemical compositions of corrosion products were found to depend on environments and duration of exposure. In all environments, cuprite was the predominating corrosion product that formed first and continuously increased during the exposure. Among the sulphur-containing corrosion products, posnjakite and brochantite were more frequently found and the first formed earlier. Nantokite was the most common chlorine-containing products for most cases, except the high-chloride environment, where atacamite was detected instead. The corrosion rate of copper was well indicated by the colour of patina. The red-purple colour corresponded to the high corrosion rate and the greenish grey colour corresponded to the low corrosion rate. Corrosion rate of sheltered copper in urban-marine environment increased with the exposure time

  2. Corrosion product identification and relative rates of corrosion of candidate metals in an irradiated air-steam environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, D.T.; Swayambunathan, V.; Tani, B.S.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Previously reported work by others indicates that dicopper trihydroxide nitrate, Cu 2 NO 3 (OH) 3 , forms on copper and copper alloys subjected to irradiated moist air near room temperature. We have performed experiments over a range of temperature and humidity, and have found that this species is formed at temperatures up to at least 150 degree C if low to intermediate relative humidities are present. At 150 degree C and 100% relative humidity, only Cu 2 O and CuO were observed. The relative general corrosion rates of the copper materials tested in 1-month experiments at dose rates of 0.7 and 2.0 kGy/h were Cu > 70/30 Cu--Ni > Al-bronze. High-nickel alloy 825 showed no observable corrosion. 29 refs., 4 tabs

  3. Standard practice for calculation of corrosion rates and related information from electrochemical measurements

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1989-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the providing of guidance in converting the results of electrochemical measurements to rates of uniform corrosion. Calculation methods for converting corrosion current density values to either mass loss rates or average penetration rates are given for most engineering alloys. In addition, some guidelines for converting polarization resistance values to corrosion rates are provided. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard.

  4. Corrosion rates of fasteners in treated wood exposed to 100% relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2009-01-01

    In the past, gravimetric corrosion data for fasteners exposed to treated wood has been reported as a percent weight loss. Although percent weight loss is a valid measure of corrosion for comparing identical fasteners, it can distort the corrosion performance of fasteners with different geometries and densities. This report reevaluates a key report on the corrosiveness...

  5. Monitoring corrosion rates and localised corrosion in low conductivity water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2006-01-01

    Monitoring of low corrosion rates and localised corrosion in a media with low conductivity is a challenge. In municipal district heating, quality control may be improved by implementing on-line corrosion monitoring if a suitable technique can be identified to measure both uniform and localised...... corrosion. Electrochemical techniques (LPR, EIS, crevice corrosion current) as well as direct measurement techniques (high-sensitive electrical resistance, weight loss) have been applied in operating plants. Changes in the corrosion processes are best monitored in non-aggressive, low conductivity media...

  6. Strain rate effects in stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkins, R.N. (Newcastle upon Tyne Univ. (UK). Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)

    1990-03-01

    Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, ad hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why strain rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic strain provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow strain tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that strain or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.

  7. Effectiveness of Ti-micro alloying in relation to cooling rate on corrosion of AZ91 Mg alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candan, S.; Celik, M.; Candan, E.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, micro Ti-alloyed AZ91 Mg alloys (AZ91 + 0.5wt.%Ti) have been investigated in order to clarify effectiveness of micro alloying and/or cooling rate on their corrosion properties. Molten alloys were solidified under various cooling rates by using four stage step mold. The microstructural investigations were carried out by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Corrosion behaviors of the alloys were evaluated by means of immersion and electrochemical polarization tests in 3.5% NaCl solution. Results showed that the Mg 17 Al 12 (β) intermetallic phase in the microstructure of AZ91 Mg alloy formed as a net-like structure. The Ti addition has reduced the distribution and continuity of β intermetallic phase and its morphology has emerged as fully divorced eutectic. Compared to AZ91 alloy, the effect of the cooling rate in Ti-added alloy on the grain size was less pronounced. When AZ91 and its Ti-added alloys were compared under the same cooling conditions, the Ti addition showed notably high corrosion resistance. Electrochemical test results showed that while I corr values of AZ91 decrease with the increase in the cooling rate, the effect of the cooling rate on I corr values was much lower in the Ti-added alloy. The corrosion resistance of AZ91 Mg alloy was sensitive towards the cooling rates while Ti-added alloy was not affected much from the cooling conditions. - Highlights: • Effect the cooling rate on grain size was less pronounced in the Ti-added alloy. • The morphology of the β phase transformed into fully divorced eutectics. • Ti addition exhibited significantly higher corrosion resistance. • Ti micro alloying is more effective than faster cooling of the alloy on corrosion.

  8. Corrosion Rate Monitoring in District Heating Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo; Andersen, A.

    2005-01-01

    be applicable, and if on-line monitoring could improve the quality control. Water quality monitoring was applied as well as corrosion rate monitoring with linear polarization resistance (LPR), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), electrical resistance (ER) technique, mass loss and a crevice corrosion......Quality control in district heating systems to keep uniform corrosion rates low and localized corrosion minimal is based on water quality control. Side-stream units equipped with carbon steel probes for online monitoring were mounted in district heating plants to investigate which techniques would...... cell for localized corrosion risk estimation. Important variations in corrosion rate due to changes in make-up water quality were detected with the continuous monitoring provided by ER and crevice cell, while LPR gave unreliable corrosion rates. The acquisition time of two-three days for EIS...

  9. Exposure testing of fasteners in preservative treated wood: Gravimetric corrosion rates and corrosion product analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelinka, Samuel L., E-mail: szelinka@fs.fed.u [USDA Forest Products Laboratory, One Gifford Pinchot Drive, Madison, WI 53726 (United States); Sichel, Rebecca J. [College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Stone, Donald S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The composition of the corrosion products was similar for the nail head and shank. {yields} Reduced copper was not detected on any of the fasteners. {yields} Measured corrosion rates were between 1 and 35 {mu}m year{sup -1}. - Abstract: Research was conducted to determine the corrosion rates of metals in preservative treated wood and also understand the mechanism of metal corrosion in treated wood. Steel and hot-dip galvanized steel fasteners were embedded in wood treated with one of six preservative treatments and exposed to 27 {sup o}C at 100% relative humidity for 1 year. The corrosion rate was determined gravimetrically and the corrosion products were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Although the accepted mechanism of corrosion in treated wood involves the reduction of cupric ions from the wood preservative, no reduced copper was found on the corrosion surfaces. The galvanized corrosion products contained sulfates, whereas the steel corrosion products consisted of iron oxides and hydroxides. The possible implications and limitations of this research on fasteners used in building applications are discussed.

  10. Exposure testing of fasteners in preservative treated wood : gravimetric corrosion rates and corrosion product analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Rebecca J. Sichel; Donald S. Stone

    2010-01-01

    Research was conducted to determine the corrosion rates of metals in preservative treated wood and also understand the mechanism of metal corrosion in treated wood. Steel and hot-dip galvanized steel fasteners were embedded in wood treated with one of six preservative treatments and exposed to 27oC at 100% relative humidity for 1 year. The...

  11. Corrosion failure analysis as related to prevention of corrosion failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suss, H.

    1977-10-01

    The factors and conditions which have contributed to many of the corrosion related service failures are discussed based on a review of actual case histories. The anti-corrosion devices which developed as a result of these failure analyses are reviewed, and the method which must be adopted and used to take advantage of the available corrosion prevention techniques is discussed

  12. Aqueous Corrosion Rates for Waste Package Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Arthur

    2004-10-08

    The purpose of this analysis, as directed by ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]), is to compile applicable corrosion data from the literature (journal articles, engineering documents, materials handbooks, or standards, and national laboratory reports), evaluate the quality of these data, and use these to perform statistical analyses and distributions for aqueous corrosion rates of waste package materials. The purpose of this report is not to describe the performance of engineered barriers for the TSPA-LA. Instead, the analysis provides simple statistics on aqueous corrosion rates of steels and alloys. These rates are limited by various aqueous parameters such as temperature (up to 100 C), water type (i.e., fresh versus saline), and pH. Corrosion data of materials at pH extremes (below 4 and above 9) are not included in this analysis, as materials commonly display different corrosion behaviors under these conditions. The exception is highly corrosion-resistant materials (Inconel Alloys) for which rate data from corrosion tests at a pH of approximately 3 were included. The waste package materials investigated are those from the long and short 5-DHLW waste packages, 2-MCO/2-DHLW waste package, and the 21-PWR commercial waste package. This analysis also contains rate data for some of the materials present inside the fuel canisters for the following fuel types: U-Mo (Fermi U-10%Mo), MOX (FFTF), Thorium Carbide and Th/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain [FSVR]), Th/U Oxide (Shippingport LWBR), U-metal (N Reactor), Intact U-Oxide (Shippingport PWR, Commercial), aluminum-based, and U-Zr-H (TRIGA). Analysis of corrosion rates for Alloy 22, spent nuclear fuel, defense high level waste (DHLW) glass, and Titanium Grade 7 can be found in other analysis or model reports.

  13. Aqueous Corrosion Rates for Waste Package Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, S.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis, as directed by ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]), is to compile applicable corrosion data from the literature (journal articles, engineering documents, materials handbooks, or standards, and national laboratory reports), evaluate the quality of these data, and use these to perform statistical analyses and distributions for aqueous corrosion rates of waste package materials. The purpose of this report is not to describe the performance of engineered barriers for the TSPA-LA. Instead, the analysis provides simple statistics on aqueous corrosion rates of steels and alloys. These rates are limited by various aqueous parameters such as temperature (up to 100 C), water type (i.e., fresh versus saline), and pH. Corrosion data of materials at pH extremes (below 4 and above 9) are not included in this analysis, as materials commonly display different corrosion behaviors under these conditions. The exception is highly corrosion-resistant materials (Inconel Alloys) for which rate data from corrosion tests at a pH of approximately 3 were included. The waste package materials investigated are those from the long and short 5-DHLW waste packages, 2-MCO/2-DHLW waste package, and the 21-PWR commercial waste package. This analysis also contains rate data for some of the materials present inside the fuel canisters for the following fuel types: U-Mo (Fermi U-10%Mo), MOX (FFTF), Thorium Carbide and Th/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain [FSVR]), Th/U Oxide (Shippingport LWBR), U-metal (N Reactor), Intact U-Oxide (Shippingport PWR, Commercial), aluminum-based, and U-Zr-H (TRIGA). Analysis of corrosion rates for Alloy 22, spent nuclear fuel, defense high level waste (DHLW) glass, and Titanium Grade 7 can be found in other analysis or model reports

  14. A review on pipeline corrosion, in-line inspection (ILI), and corrosion growth rate models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanaei, H.R.; Eslami, A.; Egbewande, A.

    2017-01-01

    Pipelines are the very important energy transmission systems. Over time, pipelines can corrode. While corrosion could be detected by in-line inspection (ILI) tools, corrosion growth rate prediction in pipelines is usually done through corrosion rate models. For pipeline integrity management and planning selecting the proper corrosion ILI tool and also corrosion growth rate model is important and can lead to significant savings and safer pipe operation. In this paper common forms of pipeline corrosion, state of the art ILI tools, and also corrosion growth rate models are reviewed. The common forms of pipeline corrosion introduced in this paper are Uniform/General Corrosion, Pitting Corrosion, Cavitation and Erosion Corrosion, Stray Current Corrosion, Micro-Bacterial Influenced Corrosion (MIC). The ILI corrosion detection tools assessed in this study are Magnetic Flux Leakage (MFL), Circumferential MFL, Tri-axial MFL, and Ultrasonic Wall Measurement (UT). The corrosion growth rate models considered in this study are single-value corrosion rate model, linear corrosion growth rate model, non-linear corrosion growth rate model, Monte-Carlo method, Markov model, TD-GEVD, TI-GEVD model, Gamma Process, and BMWD model. Strengths and limitations of ILI detection tools, and also corrosion predictive models with some practical examples are discussed. This paper could be useful for those whom are supporting pipeline integrity management and planning. - Highlights: • Different forms of pipeline corrosion are explained. • Common In-Line Inspection (ILI) tools and corrosion growth rate models are introduced. • Strength and limitations of corrosion growth rate models/ILI tools are discussed. • For pipeline integrity management programs using more than one corrosion growth rate model/ILI tool is suggested.

  15. Corrosion rate of steel in concrete - Evaluation of confinement techniques for on-site corrosion rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Peter Vagn; Geiker, Mette Rica; Elsener, Bernhard

    2009-01-01

    Earlier on-site investigations and laboratory studies have shown that varying corrosion rates are obtained when different commercially available instruments are used. The different confinement techniques, rather than the different electrochemical techniques used in the instruments, are considered...... to be the main reason for the discrepancies. This paper presents a method for the quantitative assessment of confinement techniques based on monitoring the operation of the corrosion rate instrument and the current distribution between the electrode assembly on the concrete surface and a segmented reinforcement...... bar embedded in the concrete. The applicability of the method was demonstrated on two commercially available corrosion rate instruments based on different confinement techniques. The method provided an explanation of the differences in performance of the two instruments. Correlated measurements...

  16. The Effects of Corrosive Chemicals on Corrosion Rate of Steel Reinforcement Bars: II. Swamp Sludges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henki Ashadi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A polluted environment will influence the building age. The objective of this research was to find out the influence of corrosive chemicals within the sludge swamp area with the corrosion rate of steel concrete. Corrosion in steel concrete usually occur in acid area which contain of SO42-, Cl- and NO3-. The research treatment used by emerging ST 37 andST 60 within 60 days in 'polluted' sludge swamp area. Three variation of 'polluted' swamp sludge were made by increasing the concentration a corrosive unsure up to 1X, 5X and 10X. The corrosion rate measured by using an Immersion Method. The result of Immersion test showed that sulphate had a greatest influence to corrosion rate of ST 37 and ST 60 and followed by chloride and nitrate. Corrosion rate value for ST 37 was 17.58 mpy and for ST 60 was 12.47 mpy.

  17. Corrosion rate of nuclear glass in saturated media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillet, S.; Vernaz, E.; Nogues, J.L.; Jacquet-Francillon, N.

    1986-01-01

    Leaching experiments under a static mode have shown that, after a given time, the concentration of the solubilized elements reaches an apparent steady state which can be detected by a plateau in the curve of cumulated leach rates vs time. Since the real slope of this plateau is a key datum to modernize the source term, works related to the evaluation of this slope and based on a statistical approach have been necessary. Twelve static leaching experiments carried out for one year at 90 0 C were scrutinized. Various glasses, both active and nonactive, akin to the LWR French reference glass were involved. Previously, an abnormally high corrosion rate had been found after 12 months of testing. This feature could have been interpreted as a further leaching step occuring after the plateau period. The corrosion rates at 90 0 C with deionized water are compared to those gained from integral tests at 90 0 C

  18. CORROSION RATE OF STEELS DX51D AND S220GD IN DIFFERENT CORROSION ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Crina CIUBOTARIU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion in the marine environment is an important issue because the costs causes by marine corrosion increased year upon year. It is necessary a correctly approach to materials selection, protection and corrosion control to reduce this burden of wasted materials, wasted energy and wasted money. Many different types of corrosion attack can be observed to structures, ships and other equipment used in sea water service. Shipping containers are exposed to various corrosive mediums like as airborne salt, industrial pollutants, rain and saltwater. Transport damage during loading onto and unloading off trucks, train beds and ships breaches the paint coating which further contributes to corrosion. The result is shortened container life and high costs for container repair or replacement. The paper intends to evaluate, by gravimetric method, the corrosion rate and corrosion penetration rate of two types of carbon steel DX51D and S220GD. Carbon steel DX51D and hot-dip galvanized steel S220GD are used in marine and industrial applications for buildings cargo vessels, container ships and oil tankers. For testing it was used different corrosive environments: 5% NaOH solution; 5% HCL solution and 0.5M NaCl solution. The samples were immersed in 400mL of testing solution for exposure period of 28 days. Periodically at 3 days, 7 days, 14 days, 21 days and 28 days was measured de mass loss and evaluate the corrosion rate and corrosion stability coefficient. The steel DX51D was stable in 5% NaOH solution for 28 days, the values of corrosion stability coefficient was 7 after 3 days and 6 after 28 days of immersion in corrosive medium. In 5% HCL solution steels DX51D and S220GD was completely corroded in 21 days with a corrosion stability coefficient equal with 9 for 7 days and 8 for 21 days of immersion in corrosive solution. It was observed a good resistance for 3 days in 0.5M NaCl solution with a corrosion stability coefficient equal with 5, but after that

  19. Effect of Flow Velocity on Corrosion Rate and Corrosion Protection Current of Marine Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seong Jong [Kunsan National University, Kunsan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Min Su; Jang, Seok Ki; Kim, Seong Jong [Mokpo National Maritime University, Mokpo (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In spite of highly advanced paint coating techniques, corrosion damage of marine metal and alloys increase more and more due to inherent micro-cracks and porosities in coatings formed during the coating process. Furthermore, flowing seawater conditions promote the breakdown of the protective oxide of the materials introducing more oxygen into marine environments, leading to the acceleration of corrosion. Various corrosion protection methods are available to prevent steel from marine corrosion. Cathodic protection is one of the useful corrosion protection methods by which the potential of the corroded metal is intentionally lowered to an immune state having the advantage of providing additional protection barriers to steel exposed to aqueous corrosion or soil corrosion, in addition to the coating. In the present investigation, the effect of flow velocity was examined for the determination of the optimum corrosion protection current density in cathodic protection as well as the corrosion rate of the steel. It is demonstrated from the result that the material corrosion under dynamic flowing conditions seems more prone to corrosion than under static conditions.

  20. The Corrosion Inhibition Characteristics of Sodium Nitrite Using an On-line Corrosion Rate Measurement System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Mal-Yong; Kang, Dae-Jin; Moon, Jeon-Soo

    2015-01-01

    An on-line corrosion rate measurement system was developed using a personal computer, a data acquisition board and program, and a 2-electrode corrosion probe. Reliability of the developed system was confirmed with through comparison test. With this system, the effect of sodium nitrite (NaNO 2 ) as a corrosion inhibitor were studied on iron and aluminum brass that were immersed in sodium chloride (NaCl) solution. Corrosion rate was measured based on the linear polarization resistance method. The corrosion rates of aluminum brass and iron in 1% NaCl solutions were measured to be 0.290 mm per year (mmpy) and 0.2134 mmpy, respectively. With the addition of 200 ppm of NO 2 - , the corrosion rates decreased to 0.0470 mmpy and 0.0254 mmpy. The addition of NO 2 - caused a decrease in corrosion rates of both aluminum brass and iron, yet the NO 2 - acted as a more effective corrosion inhibitor for iron. than aluminum brass

  1. Prediction of corrosion rates of water distribution pipelines according to aggressive corrosive water in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, W S; Yu, M J; Lee, H D

    2004-01-01

    The drinking water network serving Korea has been used for almost 100 years. Therefore, pipelines have suffered various degrees of deterioration due to aggressive environments. The pipe breaks were caused by in-external corrosion, water hammer, surface loading, etc. In this paper, we focused on describing corrosion status in water distribution pipes in Korea and reviewing some methods to predict corrosion rates. Results indicate that corrosive water of lakes was more aggressive than river water and the winter was more aggressive compared to other seasons. The roughness growth rates of Dongbok lake showed 0.23 mm/year. The high variation of corrosion rates is controlled by the aging pipes and smaller diameter. Also the phenolphthalein test on a cementitious core of cement mortar lined ductile cast iron pipe indicated the pipes over 15 years old had lost 50-100% of their lime active cross sectional area.

  2. Development and evaluation of an instantaneous atmospheric corrosion rate monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfeld, F.; Jeanjaquet, S. L.; Kendig, M. W.; Roe, D. K.

    1985-06-01

    A research program was carried out in which a new instantaneous atmospheric corrosion rate monitor (ACRM) was developed and evaluated, and equipment was constructed which will allow the use of many sensors in an economical way in outdoor exposures. In the first task, the ACRM was developed and tested in flow chambers in which relative humidity and gaseous and particulate pollutant levels can be controlled. Diurnal cycles and periods of rain were simulated. The effects of aerosols were studied. A computerized system was used for collection, storage, and analysis of the electrochemical data. In the second task, a relatively inexpensive electronics system for control of the ACRM and measurement of atmospheric corrosion rates was designed and built. In the third task, calibration of deterioration rates of various metallic and nonmetallic materials with the response of the ACRMs attached to these materials was carried out under controlled environmental conditions using the system developed in the second task. A Quality Assurance project plan was prepared with inputs from the Rockwell International Environmental Monitoring and Service Center and Quality Assurance System audits were performed.

  3. The Effects of Corrosive Chemicals on Corrosion Rate of Steel Reinforcement Bars: I. Swamp Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulistyoweni Widanarko

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Most of infrastructures using steel concrete to reinforce the strength of concrete. Steel concrete is so vulnerable to chemical compounds that can cause corrosion. It can happen due to the presence of chemical compounds in acid environment in low pH level. These chemical compounds are SO42-, Cl-, NO3-. There are many swamp area in Indonesia. The acid contents and the concentration of ion sulphate, chlorides, and nitrate are higher in the swamp water than in the ground water .The objective of this research was to find out the influence of corrosive chemicals in the swamp water to the steel concrete corrosion rate. There were two treatment used: (1 emerging ST 37 and ST 60 within 60 days in the 'polluted' swamp water, (2 moving the ST 37 up and down periodically in the ' polluted' swamp water. Three variation of 'polluted' swamp water were made by increasing the concentration of corrosive chemical up to 1X, 5X and 10X respectively. The corrosion rate was measured by using an Immersion Method. The result of Immersion test showed that chloride had the greatest influence to corrosion rate of ST 37 and ST 60 and followed by sulphate and Nitrate. Corrosion rate value for ST 37 is 24.29 mpy and for ST 60 is 22.76 mpy. By moving the sample up and down, the corrosion rate of ST 37 increase up to 37.59 mpy, and chloride still having the greatest influence, followed by sulphate and nitrate.

  4. Influence of grain structure on quench sensitivity relative to localized corrosion of high strength aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, ShengDan, E-mail: csuliusd@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Key Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials Science and Engineering, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410083 (China); Li, ChengBo [Light Alloy Research Institute, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Deng, YunLai; Zhang, XinMing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Key Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials Science and Engineering, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2015-11-01

    The influence of grain structure on quench sensitivity relative to localized corrosion of high strength aluminum alloy 7055 was investigated by electrochemical test, accelerated exfoliation corrosion test, optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The decrease of quench rate led to lower corrosion resistance of both the homogenized and solution heat treated (HS) alloy with equiaxed grains and the hot-rolled and solution heat treated (HRS) alloy with elongated grains, but there was a higher increment in corrosion depth and corrosion current density and a higher decrement in corrosion potential for the latter alloy, which therefore exhibited higher quench sensitivity. It is because in this alloy the larger amount of (sub) grain boundaries led to a higher increment in the amount of quench-induced η phase and precipitates free zone at (sub) grain boundaries with the decrease of quench rate, and there was a larger increment in the content of Zn, Mg and Cu in the η phase at grain boundaries due to slow quenching. The presence of subgrain boundaries in the HRS alloy tended to increase corrosion resistance at high quench rates higher than about 630 °C/min but decrease it at lower quench rates. - Highlights: • (Sub)Grain boundaries increase quench sensitivity relative to localized corrosion. • Subgrain boundaries decrease corrosion resistance below quench rate of 630 °C/min. • More (sub) grain boundaries leads to more GBPs and PFZ with decreasing quench rate.

  5. Influence of LMFBR fuel pin temperature profiles on corrosion rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiels, S.A.; Bagnall, C.; Schrock, S.L.; Orbon, S.J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes the sodium corrosion behavior of 20 percent cold worked Type 316 stainless steel fuel pin cladding under a simulated reactor thermal environment. A temperature gradient, typical of a fuel pin, was generated in a 0.9 m long heater section by direct resistance heating. Specimens were located in an isothermal test section immediately downstream of the heater. A comparison of the measured corrosion rates with available data showed an enhancement factor of between 1.5 and 2 which was attributed to the severe axial temperature gradient through the heater. Differences in structure and surface chemistry were also noted

  6. Chromium steel corrosion rates and mechanisms in aqueous nickel chloride at 300C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, J.E.; Broomfield, J.P.; Mitra, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    Rapid corrosion of PWR steam generator carbon steel support structures and consequential denting of steam generator tubes led to investigation of alternative support designs and materials. In recent designs of steam generators the carbon steel drilled hole tube support plate has been replaced by one of quatrefoil or trefoil shape to minimize the contact area. These plates are now made of more corrosion resistant chromium steel (approx. 12%Cr) to ensure that they are less vulnerable to attack in the event of adverse boiler water chemistry. This study was initiated to examine the corrosion behavior of a range of chromium steels in the acid chloride environments characteristic of tube/support plate crevices under adverse boiler water conditions. Objectives of the study were to: 1) determine the relative susceptibility of candidate tube support plate steels to acid chloride corrosion; 2) investigate the corrosion product morphology and its relationship to the corrosion mechanism; 3) determine the effect of environment aggressiveness on 12%Cr (A405) steel corrosion rates and mechanisms; and 4) investigate the effect of restraint stress/environment on denting potential of A405. Experimental method and results are discussed

  7. An experimental comparison of three wire beam electrode based methods for determining corrosion rates and patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Y.-J.

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have been carried out to examine the advantages and limitations of three wire beam electrode (WBE) based techniques, including the noise resistance R n -WBE method, the overpotential-galvanic current method, and the galvanic current method, in determining corrosion rates and patterns. These techniques have been applied simultaneously to several selected corrosion systems of different characteristics. It has been found that the R n -WBE method has advantages over other WBE based methods when applying to WBE surfaces under uniform corrosion. However, the R n -WBE method has been found to be unsuitable for low noise level corrosion systems. It has also been found that both R n -WBE and overpotential-galvanic current methods are similarly applicable to WBE surfaces under nonuniform corrosion. However, the galvanic current method has been found to be suitable only for WBE surfaces under highly localised corrosion. Some related issues regarding R n calculation such as trend removal and its effects on corrosion mapping have also been discussed

  8. Prediction of pipeline corrosion rate based on grey Markov models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yonghong; Zhang Dafa; Peng Guichu; Wang Yuemin

    2009-01-01

    Based on the model that combined by grey model and Markov model, the prediction of corrosion rate of nuclear power pipeline was studied. Works were done to improve the grey model, and the optimization unbiased grey model was obtained. This new model was used to predict the tendency of corrosion rate, and the Markov model was used to predict the residual errors. In order to improve the prediction precision, rolling operation method was used in these prediction processes. The results indicate that the improvement to the grey model is effective and the prediction precision of the new model combined by the optimization unbiased grey model and Markov model is better, and the use of rolling operation method may improve the prediction precision further. (authors)

  9. Influence of temperature on corrosion rate and porosity of corrosion products of carbon steel in anoxic bentonite environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoulil, J.; Kaňok, J.; Kouřil, M.; Parschová, H.; Novák, P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The corrosion rate is not significantly dependent on temperature. •Corrosion products at higher temperatures have different color. •Corrosion products at higher temperatures are more compact. •The change in corrosion products nature is reversible. -- Abstract: The study focuses on the porosity of layers of corrosion products and its impact on corrosion rate of carbon steel in moist bentonite. Measurements were performed in an aggressive Czech type of bentonite – Rokle B75 at temperatures of 90 and 40 °C. Aggressiveness of B75 bentonite consists in low content of chlorides. Presence of chlorides in pore solution allows formation of more protective magnetite. The evaluation was made by electrochemical techniques (red/ox potential, open circuit potential, linear polarization resistance, impedance spectroscopy) and resistometric sensor measurements. The result imply that the higher the temperature the more compact is the layer of corrosion products that slightly decelerates corrosion rate compared to the state at 40 °C. The state of corrosion products at both temperatures is reversible

  10. Influence of temperature on corrosion rate and porosity of corrosion products of carbon steel in anoxic bentonite environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoulil, J., E-mail: jan.stoulil@vscht.cz [Department of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Kaňok, J.; Kouřil, M. [Department of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Parschová, H. [Department of Power Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Novák, P. [Department of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •The corrosion rate is not significantly dependent on temperature. •Corrosion products at higher temperatures have different color. •Corrosion products at higher temperatures are more compact. •The change in corrosion products nature is reversible. -- Abstract: The study focuses on the porosity of layers of corrosion products and its impact on corrosion rate of carbon steel in moist bentonite. Measurements were performed in an aggressive Czech type of bentonite – Rokle B75 at temperatures of 90 and 40 °C. Aggressiveness of B75 bentonite consists in low content of chlorides. Presence of chlorides in pore solution allows formation of more protective magnetite. The evaluation was made by electrochemical techniques (red/ox potential, open circuit potential, linear polarization resistance, impedance spectroscopy) and resistometric sensor measurements. The result imply that the higher the temperature the more compact is the layer of corrosion products that slightly decelerates corrosion rate compared to the state at 40 °C. The state of corrosion products at both temperatures is reversible.

  11. Elevated corrosion rates and hydrogen sulfide in homes with ‘Chinese Drywall’

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Joseph G.; MacIntosh, David L.; Saltzman, Lori E.; Baker, Brian J.; Matheson, Joanna M.; Recht, Joel R.; Minegishi, Taeko; Fragala, Matt A.; Myatt, Theodore A.; Spengler, John D.; Stewart, James H.; McCarthy, John F.

    2012-01-01

    In December 2008, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) began receiving reports about odors, corrosion, and health concerns related to drywall originating from China. In response, a detailed environmental health and engineering evaluation was conducted of 41 complaint and 10 non-complaint homes in the Southeast U.S. Each home investigation included characterization of: 1) drywall composition; 2) indoor and outdoor air quality; 3) temperature, moisture, and building ventilation; and 4) copper and silver corrosion rates. Complaint homes had significantly higher hydrogen sulfide concentrations (mean 0.82 vs. 3 , p 2 S: 476 vs. 2 S: 1472 vs. 389 Å/30 d, p < 0.01). The abundance of carbonate and strontium in drywall was also elevated in complaint homes, and appears to be useful objective marker of problematic drywall in homes that meet other screening criteria (e.g., constructed or renovated in 2006–2007, reports of malodor and accelerated corrosion). This research provides empirical evidence of the direct association between homes constructed with ‘Chinese Drywall’ in 2006–2007 and elevated corrosion rates and hydrogen sulfide concentrations in indoor air. - Highlights: ► Environmental measurements in homes with and without “Chinese Drywall” ► Homes with “Chinese Drywall” had higher hydrogen sulfide concentrations ► Homes with “Chinese Drywall” had elevated corrosion rates ► Study provides empirical evidence of reported associations

  12. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  13. Estimation of flow rates through intergranular stress corrosion cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, R.P.; Norris, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental studies of critical two-phase water flow, through simulated and actual intergranular stress corrosion cracks, were performed to obtain data to evaluate a leak flow rate model and investigate acoustic transducer effectiveness in detecting and sizing leaks. The experimental program included a parametric study of the effects of crack geometry, fluid stagnation pressure and temperature, and crack surface roughness on leak flow rate. In addition, leak detection, location, and leak size estimation capabilities of several different acoustic transducers were evaluated as functions of leak rate and transducer position. This paper presents flow rate data for several different cracks and fluid conditions. It also presents the minimum flow rate detected with the acoustic sensors and a relationship between acoustic signal strength and leak flow rate

  14. Elevated corrosion rates and hydrogen sulfide in homes with 'Chinese Drywall'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Joseph G.; MacIntosh, David L. [Environmental Health and Engineering, Inc., 117 Fourth Avenue, Needham, MA (United States); Harvard School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA (United States); Saltzman, Lori E. [U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, Bethesda, MD (United States); Baker, Brian J. [Environmental Health and Engineering, Inc., 117 Fourth Avenue, Needham, MA (United States); Matheson, Joanna M.; Recht, Joel R. [U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, Bethesda, MD (United States); Minegishi, Taeko; Fragala, Matt A.; Myatt, Theodore A. [Environmental Health and Engineering, Inc., 117 Fourth Avenue, Needham, MA (United States); Spengler, John D.; Stewart, James H. [Environmental Health and Engineering, Inc., 117 Fourth Avenue, Needham, MA (United States); Harvard School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA (United States); McCarthy, John F., E-mail: jmcccarthy@eheinc.com [Environmental Health and Engineering, Inc., 117 Fourth Avenue, Needham, MA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    In December 2008, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) began receiving reports about odors, corrosion, and health concerns related to drywall originating from China. In response, a detailed environmental health and engineering evaluation was conducted of 41 complaint and 10 non-complaint homes in the Southeast U.S. Each home investigation included characterization of: 1) drywall composition; 2) indoor and outdoor air quality; 3) temperature, moisture, and building ventilation; and 4) copper and silver corrosion rates. Complaint homes had significantly higher hydrogen sulfide concentrations (mean 0.82 vs. < LOD {mu}g/m{sup 3}, p < 0.05), and significantly greater rates of copper sulfide and silver sulfide corrosion compared to non-complaint homes (Cu{sub 2}S: 476 vs. < 32 A/30 d, p < 0.01; Ag{sub 2}S: 1472 vs. 389 A/30 d, p < 0.01). The abundance of carbonate and strontium in drywall was also elevated in complaint homes, and appears to be useful objective marker of problematic drywall in homes that meet other screening criteria (e.g., constructed or renovated in 2006-2007, reports of malodor and accelerated corrosion). This research provides empirical evidence of the direct association between homes constructed with 'Chinese Drywall' in 2006-2007 and elevated corrosion rates and hydrogen sulfide concentrations in indoor air. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental measurements in homes with and without 'Chinese Drywall' Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homes with 'Chinese Drywall' had higher hydrogen sulfide concentrations Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homes with 'Chinese Drywall' had elevated corrosion rates Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study provides empirical evidence of reported associations.

  15. Corrosion rate transients observed by linear polarization techniques at Zr-1%Nb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beran, J.; Cerny, K.

    1997-01-01

    Momentary corrosion rate of Zr-1%Nb alloy during nonisothermal autoclave experiments at temperature up to 328 deg. C in various solutions was determined by T/R p values (T - absolute temperature, R p - polarization resistance), multiplied by temperature independent conversion factor. This factor was found by comparison of conventional corrosion loss evaluation with electrochemical measurements. Corrosion rate transients in boric acid solutions and in lithium hydroxide differed significantly. Great differences were also found in stabilized corrosion rates at the end of experiments. Temperature irregularities caused considerable changes in corrosion rate. (author). 5 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab

  16. Corrosion rate transients observed by linear polarization techniques at Zr-1%Nb alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beran, J; Cerny, K [ZJS SKODA plc., Pelzen (Czech Republic)

    1997-02-01

    Momentary corrosion rate of Zr-1%Nb alloy during nonisothermal autoclave experiments at temperature up to 328 deg. C in various solutions was determined by T/R{sub p} values (T - absolute temperature, R{sub p}- polarization resistance), multiplied by temperature independent conversion factor. This factor was found by comparison of conventional corrosion loss evaluation with electrochemical measurements. Corrosion rate transients in boric acid solutions and in lithium hydroxide differed significantly. Great differences were also found in stabilized corrosion rates at the end of experiments. Temperature irregularities caused considerable changes in corrosion rate. (author). 5 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab.

  17. An Electrochemical Method to Predict Corrosion Rates in Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dafter, M. R. [Hunter Water Australia Pty Ltd, Newcastle (Australia)

    2016-10-15

    Linear polarization resistance (LPR) testing of soils has been used extensively by a number of water utilities across Australia for many years now to determine the condition of buried ferrous water mains. The LPR test itself is a relatively simple, inexpensive test that serves as a substitute for actual exhumation and physical inspection of buried water mains to determine corrosion losses. LPR testing results (and the corresponding pit depth estimates) in combination with proprietary pipe failure algorithms can provide a useful predictive tool in determining the current and future conditions of an asset{sup 1)}. A number of LPR tests have been developed on soil by various researchers over the years{sup 1)}, but few have gained widespread commercial use, partly due to the difficulty in replicating the results. This author developed an electrochemical cell that was suitable for LPR soil testing and utilized this cell to test a series of soil samples obtained through an extensive program of field exhumations. The objective of this testing was to examine the relationship between short-term electrochemical testing and long-term in-situ corrosion of buried water mains, utilizing an LPR test that could be robustly replicated. Forty-one soil samples and related corrosion data were obtained from ad hoc condition assessments of buried water mains located throughout the Hunter region of New South Wales, Australia. Each sample was subjected to the electrochemical test developed by the author, and the resulting polarization data were compared with long-term pitting data obtained from each water main. The results of this testing program enabled the author to undertake a comprehensive review of the LPR technique as it is applied to soils and to examine whether correlations can be made between LPR testing results and long-term field corrosion.

  18. A finite element modeling method for predicting long term corrosion rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, J.W.; Chan, S.

    1984-01-01

    For the analyses of galvanic corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, which have been identified as possible corrosion processes for nuclear waste isolation, a finite element method has been developed for the prediction of corrosion rates. The method uses a finite element mesh to model the corrosive environment and the polarization curves of metals are assigned as the boundary conditions to calculate the corrosion cell current distribution. A subroutine is used to calculate the chemical change with time in the crevice or the pit environments. In this paper, the finite element method is described along with experimental confirmation

  19. Risk Analysis using Corrosion Rate Parameter on Gas Transmission Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikirono, B.; Kim, S. J.; Haryadi, G. D.; Huda, A.

    2017-05-01

    In the oil and gas industry, the pipeline is a major component in the transmission and distribution process of oil and gas. Oil and gas distribution process sometimes performed past the pipeline across the various types of environmental conditions. Therefore, in the transmission and distribution process of oil and gas, a pipeline should operate safely so that it does not harm the surrounding environment. Corrosion is still a major cause of failure in some components of the equipment in a production facility. In pipeline systems, corrosion can cause failures in the wall and damage to the pipeline. Therefore it takes care and periodic inspections or checks on the pipeline system. Every production facility in an industry has a level of risk for damage which is a result of the opportunities and consequences of damage caused. The purpose of this research is to analyze the level of risk of 20-inch Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline using Risk-based inspection semi-quantitative based on API 581 associated with the likelihood of failure and the consequences of the failure of a component of the equipment. Then the result is used to determine the next inspection plans. Nine pipeline components were observed, such as a straight pipes inlet, connection tee, and straight pipes outlet. The risk assessment level of the nine pipeline’s components is presented in a risk matrix. The risk level of components is examined at medium risk levels. The failure mechanism that is used in this research is the mechanism of thinning. Based on the results of corrosion rate calculation, remaining pipeline components age can be obtained, so the remaining lifetime of pipeline components are known. The calculation of remaining lifetime obtained and the results vary for each component. Next step is planning the inspection of pipeline components by NDT external methods.

  20. Stress corrosion crack growth rate in dissimilar metal welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, M. P.; Lapena, J.; Lancha, A. M.; Perosanz, F. J.; Navas, M.

    2000-01-01

    Dissimilar welds, used to join different sections in light water reactors, are potentially susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in aqueous mediums characteristic of nuclear plants. However, the study of these The ma has been limited to evaluating the weld material susceptibility in these mediums. Little scarce data are available on crack growth rates due, fundamentally, to inadequate testing techniques. In order to address this lack of information the crack growth rate at the interface of ferritic SA 533 B-1 alloy and alloy I-82, in a dissimilar weld (SA533B-1/I-82/316L), was studied. Experiments were conducted in water at 288 degree centigrade, 8 ppm of O 2 and 1 μS/cm conductivity. (Author) 33 refs

  1. Standard guide for corrosion-related failure analysis

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers key issues to be considered when examining metallic failures when corrosion is suspected as either a major or minor causative factor. 1.2 Corrosion-related failures could include one or more of the following: change in surface appearance (for example, tarnish, rust, color change), pin hole leak, catastrophic structural failure (for example, collapse, explosive rupture, implosive rupture, cracking), weld failure, loss of electrical continuity, and loss of functionality (for example, seizure, galling, spalling, swelling). 1.3 Issues covered include overall failure site conditions, operating conditions at the time of failure, history of equipment and its operation, corrosion product sampling, environmental sampling, metallurgical and electrochemical factors, morphology (mode) or failure, and by considering the preceding, deducing the cause(s) of corrosion failure. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibili...

  2. New Findings in Hydrogen Sulfide Related Corrosion of Concrete Sewers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes major findings of a long-term study of hydrogen sulfide gas (H2S) adsorption and oxidation on concrete and plastic sewer pipe surfaces. The processes have been studied using a pilot-scale setup designed to replicate conditions in a gravity sewer located downstream of a force...... main. H2S related concrete corrosion and odor is often observed at such locations. The experiments showed that the rate of H2S oxidation was significantly faster on concrete pipe surfaces than on plastic pipe surfaces. Steady state calculations based on the kinetic data demonstrated that the gas phase...... H2S concentration in concrete sewers would typically amount to a few percent of the equilibrium concentration calculated from Henrys law. In plastic pipe sewers, significantly higher concentrations were predicted because of the slower adsorption and oxidation kinetics on these surfaces. Finally...

  3. Simulation of corrosion product activity in pressurized water reactors under flow rate transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, Anwar M.; Mirza, Nasir M.; Mir, Imran

    1998-01-01

    Simulation of coolant activation due to corrosion products and impurities in a typical pressurized water reactor has been done under flow rate transients. Employing time dependent production and losses of corrosion products in the primary coolant path an approach has been developed to calculate the coolant specific activity. Results for 24 Na, 56 Mn, 59 Fe, 60 Co and 99Mo show that the specific activity in primary loop approaches equilibrium value under normal operating conditions fairly rapidly. Predominant corrosion product activity is due to Mn-56. Parametric studies at full power for various ramp decreases in flow rate show initial decline in the activity and then a gradual rise to relatively higher saturation values. The minimum value and the time taken to reach the minima are strong functions of the slope of linear decrease in flow rate. In the second part flow rate coastdown was allowed to occur at different flow half-times. The reactor scram was initiated at 90% of the normal flow rate. The results show that the specific activity decreases and the rate of decrease depends on pump half time and the reactor scram conditions

  4. The Secant Rate of Corrosion: Correlating Observations of the USS Arizona Submerged in Pearl Harbor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Donald L.; DeAngelis, Robert J.; Medlin, Dana J.; Johnson, Jon E.; Carr, James D.; Conlin, David L.

    2018-03-01

    Contrary to previous linear projections of steel corrosion in seawater, analysis of an inert marker embedded in USS Arizona concretion since the 7 December 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor reveals evidence that the effective corrosion rate decreases with time. The secant rate of corrosion, or SRC correlation, derived from this discovery could have a significant impact on failure analysis investigations for concreted shipwrecks or underwater structures. The correlation yields a lower rate of metal thinning than predicted. Development of the correlation is described.

  5. Is cell viability always directly related to corrosion resistance of stainless steels?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salahinejad, E.; Ghaffari, M.; Vashaee, D.; Tayebi, L.

    2016-01-01

    It has been frequently reported that cell viability on stainless steels is improved by increasing their corrosion resistance. The question that arises is whether human cell viability is always directly related to corrosion resistance in these biostable alloys. In this work, the microstructure and in vitro corrosion behavior of a new class of medical-grade stainless steels were correlated with adult human mesenchymal stem cell viability. The samples were produced by a powder metallurgy route, consisting of mechanical alloying and liquid-phase sintering with a sintering aid of a eutectic Mn–Si alloy at 1050 °C for 30 and 60 min, leading to nanostructures. In accordance with transmission electron microscopic studies, the additive particles for the sintering time of 30 min were not completely melted. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic experiments suggested the higher corrosion resistance for the sample sintered for 60 min; however, a better cell viability on the surface of the less corrosion-resistant sample was unexpectedly found. This behavior is explained by considering the higher ion release rate of the Mn–Si additive material, as preferred sites to corrosion attack based on scanning electron microscopic observations, which is advantageous to the cells in vitro. In conclusion, cell viability is not always directly related to corrosion resistance in stainless steels. Typically, the introduction of biodegradable and biocompatible phases to biostable alloys, which are conventionally anticipated to be corrosion-resistant, can be advantageous to human cell responses similar to biodegradable metals. - Highlights: • Cell viability vs. corrosion resistance for medical-grade stainless steels • The stainless steel samples were prepared by powder metallurgy. • Unpenetrated additive played a critical role in the correlation.

  6. Is cell viability always directly related to corrosion resistance of stainless steels?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salahinejad, E., E-mail: salahinejad@kntu.ac.ir [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghaffari, M. [Bruker AXS Inc., 5465 East Cheryl Parkway, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Vashaee, D. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States); Tayebi, L. [Department of Developmental Sciences, Marquette University School of Dentistry, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-01

    It has been frequently reported that cell viability on stainless steels is improved by increasing their corrosion resistance. The question that arises is whether human cell viability is always directly related to corrosion resistance in these biostable alloys. In this work, the microstructure and in vitro corrosion behavior of a new class of medical-grade stainless steels were correlated with adult human mesenchymal stem cell viability. The samples were produced by a powder metallurgy route, consisting of mechanical alloying and liquid-phase sintering with a sintering aid of a eutectic Mn–Si alloy at 1050 °C for 30 and 60 min, leading to nanostructures. In accordance with transmission electron microscopic studies, the additive particles for the sintering time of 30 min were not completely melted. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic experiments suggested the higher corrosion resistance for the sample sintered for 60 min; however, a better cell viability on the surface of the less corrosion-resistant sample was unexpectedly found. This behavior is explained by considering the higher ion release rate of the Mn–Si additive material, as preferred sites to corrosion attack based on scanning electron microscopic observations, which is advantageous to the cells in vitro. In conclusion, cell viability is not always directly related to corrosion resistance in stainless steels. Typically, the introduction of biodegradable and biocompatible phases to biostable alloys, which are conventionally anticipated to be corrosion-resistant, can be advantageous to human cell responses similar to biodegradable metals. - Highlights: • Cell viability vs. corrosion resistance for medical-grade stainless steels • The stainless steel samples were prepared by powder metallurgy. • Unpenetrated additive played a critical role in the correlation.

  7. Electrochemical Corrosion Studies for Modeling Metallic Waste Form Release Rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poineau, Frederic; Tamalis, Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    The isotope 99 Tc is an important fission product generated from nuclear power production. Because of its long half-life (t 1/2 = 2.13 ∙ 105 years) and beta-radiotoxicity (β - = 292 keV), it is a major concern in the long-term management of spent nuclear fuel. In the spent nuclear fuel, Tc is present as an alloy with Mo, Ru, Rh, and Pd called the epsilon-phase, the relative amount of which increases with fuel burn-up. In some separation schemes for spent nuclear fuel, Tc would be separated from the spent fuel and disposed of in a durable waste form. Technetium waste forms under consideration include metallic alloys, oxide ceramics and borosilicate glass. In the development of a metallic waste form, after separation from the spent fuel, Tc would be converted to the metal, incorporated into an alloy and the resulting waste form stored in a repository. Metallic alloys under consideration include Tc–Zr alloys, Tc–stainless steel alloys and Tc–Inconel alloys (Inconel is an alloy of Ni, Cr and iron which is resistant to corrosion). To predict the long-term behavior of the metallic Tc waste form, understanding the corrosion properties of Tc metal and Tc alloys in various chemical environments is needed, but efforts to model the behavior of Tc metallic alloys are limited. One parameter that should also be considered in predicting the long-term behavior of the Tc waste form is the ingrowth of stable Ru that occurs from the radioactive decay of 99 Tc ( 99 Tc → 99 Ru + β - ). After a geological period of time, significant amounts of Ru will be present in the Tc and may affect its corrosion properties. Studying the effect of Ru on the corrosion behavior of Tc is also of importance. In this context, we studied the electrochemical behavior of Tc metal, Tc-Ni alloys (to model Tc-Inconel alloy) and Tc-Ru alloys in acidic media. The study of Tc-U alloys has also been performed in order to better understand the nature of Tc in metallic spent fuel. Computational modeling

  8. Electrochemical Corrosion Studies for Modeling Metallic Waste Form Release Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poineau, Frederic [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Tamalis, Dimitri [Florida Memorial Univ., Miami Gardens, FL (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The isotope 99Tc is an important fission product generated from nuclear power production. Because of its long half-life (t1/2 = 2.13 ∙ 105 years) and beta-radiotoxicity (β⁻ = 292 keV), it is a major concern in the long-term management of spent nuclear fuel. In the spent nuclear fuel, Tc is present as an alloy with Mo, Ru, Rh, and Pd called the epsilon-phase, the relative amount of which increases with fuel burn-up. In some separation schemes for spent nuclear fuel, Tc would be separated from the spent fuel and disposed of in a durable waste form. Technetium waste forms under consideration include metallic alloys, oxide ceramics and borosilicate glass. In the development of a metallic waste form, after separation from the spent fuel, Tc would be converted to the metal, incorporated into an alloy and the resulting waste form stored in a repository. Metallic alloys under consideration include Tc–Zr alloys, Tc–stainless steel alloys and Tc–Inconel alloys (Inconel is an alloy of Ni, Cr and iron which is resistant to corrosion). To predict the long-term behavior of the metallic Tc waste form, understanding the corrosion properties of Tc metal and Tc alloys in various chemical environments is needed, but efforts to model the behavior of Tc metallic alloys are limited. One parameter that should also be considered in predicting the long-term behavior of the Tc waste form is the ingrowth of stable Ru that occurs from the radioactive decay of 99Tc (99Tc → 99Ru + β⁻). After a geological period of time, significant amounts of Ru will be present in the Tc and may affect its corrosion properties. Studying the effect of Ru on the corrosion behavior of Tc is also of importance. In this context, we studied the electrochemical behavior of Tc metal, Tc-Ni alloys (to model Tc-Inconel alloy) and Tc-Ru alloys in acidic media. The study of Tc-U alloys has also been performed in order to better understand the

  9. Sensitivity Analysis of Corrosion Rate Prediction Models Utilized for Reinforced Concrete Affected by Chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siamphukdee, Kanjana; Collins, Frank; Zou, Roger

    2013-06-01

    Chloride-induced reinforcement corrosion is one of the major causes of premature deterioration in reinforced concrete (RC) structures. Given the high maintenance and replacement costs, accurate modeling of RC deterioration is indispensable for ensuring the optimal allocation of limited economic resources. Since corrosion rate is one of the major factors influencing the rate of deterioration, many predictive models exist. However, because the existing models use very different sets of input parameters, the choice of model for RC deterioration is made difficult. Although the factors affecting corrosion rate are frequently reported in the literature, there is no published quantitative study on the sensitivity of predicted corrosion rate to the various input parameters. This paper presents the results of the sensitivity analysis of the input parameters for nine selected corrosion rate prediction models. Three different methods of analysis are used to determine and compare the sensitivity of corrosion rate to various input parameters: (i) univariate regression analysis, (ii) multivariate regression analysis, and (iii) sensitivity index. The results from the analysis have quantitatively verified that the corrosion rate of steel reinforcement bars in RC structures is highly sensitive to corrosion duration time, concrete resistivity, and concrete chloride content. These important findings establish that future empirical models for predicting corrosion rate of RC should carefully consider and incorporate these input parameters.

  10. Effect of heating rate on caustic stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indig, M.E.; Hoffman, N.J.

    1977-01-01

    To evaluate effects of a large water leak into the sodium side of a steam generator in a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor the Liquid Metal Engineering Center (LMEC) at Canoga Park, California, is performing a series of tests in a Large Leak Test Rig (LLTR). This test series involves heating a large steam generator that possibly contains localized pockets of aqueous caustic retained from a previous sodium-water reaction. Such pockets of caustic solution could be in contact with welds and other components that contain residual stresses up to the yield point. The LMEC and General Electric (GE) ran a series of tests to evaluate the effect of heating rate on caustic stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for alloys either used or considered for the LLTR. A summary of the temperatures and caustic concentration ranges that can result in caustic SCC for carbon steel and Type-304 stainless steel is given

  11. Chloride-induced corrosion mechanism and rate of enamel- and epoxy-coated deformed steel bars embedded in mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Fujian; Chen, Genda; Brow, Richard K.

    2016-01-01

    The chloride-induced corrosion mechanisms of uncoated, pure enamel (PE)-coated, mixed enamel (ME)-coated, double enamel (DE)-coated, and fusion bonded epoxy (FBE)-coated deformed steel bars embedded in mortar cylinders are investigated in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution and compared through electrochemical tests and visual inspection. Corrosion initiated after 29 or 61 days of tests in all uncoated and enamel-coated steel bars, and after 244 days of tests in some FBE-coated steel bars. In active stage, DE- and FBE-coated steel bars are subjected to the highest and lowest corrosion rates, respectively. The uncoated and ME-coated steel bars revealed relatively uniform corrosion while the PE-, DE-, and FBE-coated steel bars experienced pitting corrosion around damaged coating areas. Due to the combined effect of ion diffusion and capillary suction, wet–dry cyclic immersion caused more severe corrosion than continuous immersion. Both exposure conditions affected the corrosion rate more significantly than the water–cement ratio in mortar design.

  12. Slow strain rate corrosion and fracture characteristics of X-52 and X-70 pipeline steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras, A.; Albiter, A.; Salazar, M.; Perez, R.

    2005-01-01

    The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in a NACE solution saturated with H 2 S, of the X-52 and X-70 steels was studied using slow strain rate tests (SSRT) and electrochemical evaluations. SCC tests were performed in samples which include the longitudinal weld bead of the pipeline steels and were carried out in the NACE solution at both room temperature and 50 deg. C. After failure, the fracture surfaces were observed in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the chemical analysis were obtained using X-rays energy dispersive (EDXs) techniques. The specimens tested in air, exhibited a ductile type of failure, and whereas, those tested in the corrosive solution showed a brittle fracture. Specimens tested in the NACE solution saturated with H 2 S presented high susceptibility to SCC. Corrosion was found to be an important factor in the initiation of some cracks. In addition, the effect of the temperature on the corrosion attack was explored. The susceptibility to SCC was manifested as a decrease in the mechanical properties. Potentiodynamic polarization curves and hydrogen permeation measurements were made. The diffusion of atomic hydrogen was related to this fracture forms. The hydrogen permeation flux increased with the increasing of temperature

  13. A study of microbial population dynamics associated with corrosion rates influenced by corrosion control materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Yu Jie; Hung, Chun Hsiung; Lee, Jyh Wei; Chang, Yi Tang; Lin, Fen Yu; Chuang, Chun Jie

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to analyze the variations of microbial community structure under anaerobic corrosive conditions, using molecular fingerprinting method. The effect of adding various materials to the environment on the corrosion mechanism has been discussed. In the initial experiment,

  14. Is cell viability always directly related to corrosion resistance of stainless steels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahinejad, E; Ghaffari, M; Vashaee, D; Tayebi, L

    2016-05-01

    It has been frequently reported that cell viability on stainless steels is improved by increasing their corrosion resistance. The question that arises is whether human cell viability is always directly related to corrosion resistance in these biostable alloys. In this work, the microstructure and in vitro corrosion behavior of a new class of medical-grade stainless steels were correlated with adult human mesenchymal stem cell viability. The samples were produced by a powder metallurgy route, consisting of mechanical alloying and liquid-phase sintering with a sintering aid of a eutectic Mn-Si alloy at 1050 °C for 30 and 60 min, leading to nanostructures. In accordance with transmission electron microscopic studies, the additive particles for the sintering time of 30 min were not completely melted. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic experiments suggested the higher corrosion resistance for the sample sintered for 60 min; however, a better cell viability on the surface of the less corrosion-resistant sample was unexpectedly found. This behavior is explained by considering the higher ion release rate of the Mn-Si additive material, as preferred sites to corrosion attack based on scanning electron microscopic observations, which is advantageous to the cells in vitro. In conclusion, cell viability is not always directly related to corrosion resistance in stainless steels. Typically, the introduction of biodegradable and biocompatible phases to biostable alloys, which are conventionally anticipated to be corrosion-resistant, can be advantageous to human cell responses similar to biodegradable metals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of irradiation and radiolysis on the corrosion rates and mechanisms of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verlet, Romain

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear fuel of pressurized water reactors (PWR) in the form of uranium oxide UO 2 pellets (or MOX) is confined in a zirconium alloy cladding. This cladding is very important because it represents the first containment barrier against the release of fission products generated by the nuclear reaction to the external environment. Corrosion by the primary medium of zirconium alloys, particularly the Zircaloy-4, is one of the factors limiting the reactor residence time of the fuel rods (UO 2 pellets + cladding). To optimize core management and to extend the lifetime of the fuel rods in reactor, new alloys based on zirconium-niobium (M5) have been developed. However, the corrosion mechanisms of these are not completely understood because of the complexity of these materials, corrosion environment and the presence of radiation from the nuclear fuel. Therefore, this thesis specifically addresses the effects of radiolysis and defects induced by irradiation with ions in the matrix metal and the oxide layer on the corrosion rate of Zircaloy-4 and M5. The goal is to separate the influence of radiation damage to the metal, that relating to defects created in the oxide and that linked to radiolysis of the primary medium on the oxidation rate of zirconium alloys in reactor. 1) Regarding effect of irradiation of the metal on the oxidation rate: type dislocation loops appear and increase the oxidation rate of the two alloys. For M5, in addition to the first effect, a precipitation of fines needles of niobium reduced the solid solution of niobium concentration in the metal and ultimately in the oxide, which strongly reduces the oxidation rate of the alloy. 2) Regarding the effect of irradiation of the oxide layer on the oxidation rate: defects generated by the nuclear cascades in the oxide increase the oxidation rate of the two materials. For M5, germination of niobium enriched zones in irradiated oxide also causes a decrease of the niobium concentration in solid solution

  16. Corrosion potential detection method, potential characteristic simulation method for reaction rate and plant monitoring system using the same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Masanori; Onaka, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Tatsuya; Yamanaka, Hiroshi.

    1995-01-01

    In a calculation controlling device for a plant monitoring system, concentrations of materials concerning reaction materials in a certain state of a reaction process, and an actually measured value for the potential of a material in this state are substituted into a reaction rate equation obtained in accordance with a reaction process model. With such procedures, a relation between the reaction rate (current value) and the potential of the material can be obtained. A potential at which the reaction rates of an anode reaction and a cathode reaction contained in a corrosion reaction are made equal is determined by a numerical value calculation, based on an electrochemical hybrid potential logic by using the reaction rate equation, the reaction rate information relative to the corrosion reaction of the material and the concentration of the material concerning the corrosion reaction is obtained by a numerical value calculation. Then, simulation for the corrosion potential is enabled based on the handling corresponding to the actual reaction. Further, even for a portion which can not be measured actually, the corrosion potential can be recognized by simulation. (N.H.)

  17. Correlation of flow accelerated corrosion rate with iron solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, K.; Domae, M.; Yoneda, K.; Inada, F.; Ohira, T.; Hisamune, K.; Takiguchi, H.

    2009-01-01

    Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel is one of the most important subjects in coolant systems of power plants. FAC is influenced by material, flow condition, temperature, and water chemistry. It is considered that solubility is the most important factor to determine the effect of water chemistry on FAC. In the present study, effect of specific oxide on FAC rate was studied from the thermodynamic solubility of iron. The effects of temperature and pH on the iron solubility were evaluated by taking into consideration hydrolysis reactions of ferrous iron, dissolution equilibria of Fe 3 O 4 , FeO, and Fe(OH) 2 , and charge balance. The correlation between the iron solubility and FAC behavior was evaluated by using the normalized mass transfer coefficient. It is clarified that the product of iron solubility equilibrated with Fe 3 O 4 and normalized mass transfer coefficient can explain the temperature and pH dependence of FAC. These results indicate presence of magnetite on the surface of carbon steel. Diffusion of iron from the saturated layer determines the FAC rate from water chemistry aspect. (author)

  18. Corrosion-related failures in power plant condensers. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beavers, J.A.; Agrawal, A.K.; Berry, W.E.

    1980-08-01

    A survey of the literature has been conducted for the Electric Power Research Institute on corrosion failures in surface condensers. The survey was directed toward condenser failures in pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plants but includes pertinent literature related to fossil and to other nuclear power plants. It includes literature on reported service failures and on experimental studies that impact on these failures

  19. High temperature corrosion in straw-fired power plants: Influence of steam/metal temperature on corrosion rates for TP347H

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Biede, O; Larsen, OH

    2002-01-01

    The corrosion in straw-fired boilers has been investigated at various straw-fired power plants in Denmark. Water/air-cooled probes, a test superheater and test sections removed from the actual superheater have been utilised to characterise corrosion and corrosion rates. This paper describes...... the corrosion rates measured for the TP347H type steel. The corrosion morphology at high temperature consists of grain boundary attack and selective attack of chromium. The corrosion rate increases with calculated metal temperature (based on steam temperature), however there is great variation within....... The difference in the results could be traced back to a lower flue gas temperature on one side of the boiler. Although metal temperature is the most important parameter with respect to corrosion rate, flue gas temperature also plays an important role. Efforts to quantify the effect of flue gas temperature...

  20. EFFECT OF RATIO OF SURFACE AREA ON THE CORROSION RATE

    OpenAIRE

    Dody Prayitno; M. Irsyad

    2018-01-01

    Aluminum and steel are used to be a construction for a building outdoor panel. Aluminum and steel are connected by bolt and nut. An atmosphere due to a corrosion of the aluminum. The corrosion possibly to cause the hole diameter of bolt and nut to become larger. Thus the bolt and nut can not enough strong to hold the panel. The panel may collapse. The aim of the research is first to answer a question where does the corrosion starts. The second is to know the effect of ratio surface area of st...

  1. Evaluation of intergranular corrosion rate and microstructure of forged 316L round bar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, H. K.; Kim, Y. S.

    2009-01-01

    When austenitic stainless steels are heat treated in the range of 500∼850 .deg. C, the alloys are sensitized due to the formation of chromium carbide at grain boundaries and then intergranular corrosion occurs. This paper aims to evaluate the intergranular corrosion rate and microstructural change of forged 316L stainless steel. To analyze the microstructure by forging conditions, ferrite phase, sigma phase, intergranular precipitation were observed. In order to evaluate the intergranular corrosion rate. Huey test was performed by ASTM A262. On the base of microstructural observation, ferrite and sigma phases were not detected, and also intergranular precipitation was not revealed in optical microscopic observation. By ASTM A262 Practice A, step structure was shown in all forging conditions. Intergranular corrosion rate gradually increased by Huey test periods but average corrosion rate was under 0.03 mm/month

  2. Evaluation of intergranular corrosion rate and microstructure of forged 316L round bar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, H. K.; Kim, Y. S. [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    When austenitic stainless steels are heat treated in the range of 500{approx}850 .deg. C, the alloys are sensitized due to the formation of chromium carbide at grain boundaries and then intergranular corrosion occurs. This paper aims to evaluate the intergranular corrosion rate and microstructural change of forged 316L stainless steel. To analyze the microstructure by forging conditions, ferrite phase, sigma phase, intergranular precipitation were observed. In order to evaluate the intergranular corrosion rate. Huey test was performed by ASTM A262. On the base of microstructural observation, ferrite and sigma phases were not detected, and also intergranular precipitation was not revealed in optical microscopic observation. By ASTM A262 Practice A, step structure was shown in all forging conditions. Intergranular corrosion rate gradually increased by Huey test periods but average corrosion rate was under 0.03 mm/month.

  3. Correlation of flow accelerated corrosion rate with iron solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, K.; Domae, M.; Yoneda, K.; Inada, F.; Ohira, T.; Hisamune, K.

    2011-01-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) of the carbon steel is one of the most important subjects in the coolant systems of the power plants. FAC is influenced by the composition of the material, the flow condition, temperature, and the water chemistry conditions. It is considered that the solubility of iron (Fe) is the most important factor in the water chemistry parameters affecting FAC. In the present study, the effects of temperature and pH on the Fe solubility were evaluated in consideration of the hydrolysis reactions of the ferrous iron, the dissolution equilibria of Fe 3 O 4 , FeO, and Fe(OH) 2 , and the charge balance. The correlation between the Fe solubility and the FAC behavior was discussed. It has been suggested that the product of the Fe solubility equilibrated with Fe 3 O 4 and the mass transfer coefficient can explain the temperature and pH dependence of FAC. These results indicate the presence of the magnetite on the surface of the carbon steel. Diffusion of the Fe from the saturated layer to the bulk solution determines the FAC rate from the water chemistry aspect.

  4. Scanning reference electrode techniques in localized corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacs, H.S.; Vyas, B.

    1979-04-01

    The principles, advantages, and implementations of scanning reference electrode techniques are reviewed. Data related to pitting, intergranular corrosion, welds and stress corrosion cracking are presented. The technique locates the position of localized corrosion and can be used to monitor the development of corrosion and changes in the corrosion rate under a wide range of conditions

  5. A combined neural network and mechanistic approach for the prediction of corrosion rate and yield strength of magnesium-rare earth alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birbilis, N., E-mail: nick.birbilis@monash.ed [ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Monash University (Australia); CAST Co-operative Research Centre, Monash University (Australia); Cavanaugh, M.K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University (United States); Sudholz, A.D. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Monash University (Australia); Zhu, S.M.; Easton, M.A. [CAST Co-operative Research Centre, Monash University (Australia); Gibson, M.A. [CSIRO Division of Process Science and Engineering (Australia)

    2011-01-15

    Research highlights: This study presents a body of corrosion data for a set of custom alloys and displays this in multivariable space. These alloys represent the next generation of Mg alloys for auto applications. The data is processed using an ANN model, which makes it possible to yield a single expression for prediction of corrosion rate (and strength) as a function of any input composition (of Ce, La or Nd between 0 and 6 wt.%). The relative influence of the various RE elements on corrosion is assessed, with the outcome that Nd additions can offer comparable strength with minimal rise in corrosion rate. The morphology and solute present in the eutectic region itself (as opposed to just the intermetallic presence) was shown - for the first time - to also be a key contributor to corrosion. The above approach sets the foundation for rational alloy design of alloys with corrosion performance in mind. - Abstract: Additions of Ce, La and Nd to Mg were made in binary, ternary and quaternary combinations up to {approx}6 wt.%. This provided a dataset that was used in developing a neural network model for predicting corrosion rate and yield strength. Whilst yield strength increased with RE additions, corrosion rates also systematically increased, however, this depended on the type of RE element added and the combination of elements added (along with differences in intermetallic morphology). This work is permits an understanding of Mg-RE alloy performance, and can be exploited in Mg alloy design for predictable combinations of strength and corrosion resistance.

  6. Evaluation of the flow-accelerated corrosion downstream of an orifice. 2. Measurement of corrosion rate and evaluation on the effects of the flow field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaya, Yukinori; Utanohara, Yoichi; Nakamura, Akira; Murase, Michio

    2008-01-01

    In this study, in order to evaluate the effects of flow field on corrosion rate due to flow accelerated corrosion (FAC), a corrosion rate downstream of an orifice was measured using the electric resistance method. The diameter of the pipe is 50 mm and that of the orifice is 24.3 mm, and flow velocity of the experimental loop was set at 5m/s, and the temperature of water was controlled within ±1 at 150deg-C. There were no significant circumferential difference in measured corrosion rate, and the maximum corrosion rate was observed at 1D or 2D downstream from the orifice. The ratios of the measured corrosion rate and the calculated wall shear stress at the 1D downstream from the orifice to the value at upstream under well developed flow agreed well. (author)

  7. The corrosion rate of copper in a bentonite test package measured with electric resistance sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosborg, Bo [Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Kosec, Tadeja; Kranjc, Andrej; Kuhar, Viljem; Legat, Andraz [Slovenian National Building and Civil Engineering Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-12-15

    LOT1 test parcel A2 was exposed for six years in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, which offers a realistic environment for the conditions that will prevail in a deep repository for high-level radioactive waste disposal in Sweden. The test parcel contained copper electrodes for real-time corrosion monitoring in bentonite ring 36, where the temperature was 24 deg C, and copper coupons in bentonite rings 22 and 30, where the temperature was higher. After retrieval of the test parcel in January 2006, a bentonite test package consisting of bentonite rings 35 - 37 was placed in a container and sealed with a thick layer of paraffin. Later the same year new copper electrodes were installed in the test package. In January 2007 electric resistance (ER) sensors of pure copper with a thickness of 35 {mu}m were also installed in the test package mainly to facilitate the interpretation of the results from the real-time corrosion monitoring with electrochemical techniques. The ER measurements have shown that the corrosion rate of pure copper exposed in an oxic bentonite/ saline groundwater environment at room temperate decreases slowly with time to low but measurable values. The corrosion rates estimated from the regularly performed EIS measurements replicate the ER data. Thus, for this oxic environment in which copper acquires corrosion potentials of the order of 200 mV (SHE) or higher, electrochemical measurements provide believable data. Comparing the recorded ER data with an estimate of the average corrosion rate based on comparing cross-sections from exposed and protected sensor elements, it is obvious that the former overestimates the actual corrosion rate, which is understandable. It seems as if electrochemical measurements can provide a better estimate of the corrosion rate; however, this is quite dependent on the use of proper measuring frequencies and evaluation methods. In this respect ER measurements are more reliable. It has been shown that real-time corrosion

  8. The corrosion rate of copper in a bentonite test package measured with electric resistance sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosborg, Bo; Kosec, Tadeja; Kranjc, Andrej; Kuhar, Viljem; Legat, Andraz

    2012-12-01

    LOT1 test parcel A2 was exposed for six years in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, which offers a realistic environment for the conditions that will prevail in a deep repository for high-level radioactive waste disposal in Sweden. The test parcel contained copper electrodes for real-time corrosion monitoring in bentonite ring 36, where the temperature was 24 deg C, and copper coupons in bentonite rings 22 and 30, where the temperature was higher. After retrieval of the test parcel in January 2006, a bentonite test package consisting of bentonite rings 35 - 37 was placed in a container and sealed with a thick layer of paraffin. Later the same year new copper electrodes were installed in the test package. In January 2007 electric resistance (ER) sensors of pure copper with a thickness of 35 μm were also installed in the test package mainly to facilitate the interpretation of the results from the real-time corrosion monitoring with electrochemical techniques. The ER measurements have shown that the corrosion rate of pure copper exposed in an oxic bentonite/ saline groundwater environment at room temperate decreases slowly with time to low but measurable values. The corrosion rates estimated from the regularly performed EIS measurements replicate the ER data. Thus, for this oxic environment in which copper acquires corrosion potentials of the order of 200 mV (SHE) or higher, electrochemical measurements provide believable data. Comparing the recorded ER data with an estimate of the average corrosion rate based on comparing cross-sections from exposed and protected sensor elements, it is obvious that the former overestimates the actual corrosion rate, which is understandable. It seems as if electrochemical measurements can provide a better estimate of the corrosion rate; however, this is quite dependent on the use of proper measuring frequencies and evaluation methods. In this respect ER measurements are more reliable. It has been shown that real-time corrosion

  9. When can Electrochemical Techniques give Reliable Corrosion Rates on Carbon Steel in Sulfide Media?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Hemmingsen, Tor; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo

    2005-01-01

    in combination with ferrous sulfide corrosion products cover the steel surface. Corrosion rates can be overestimated by a factor of 10 to 100 with electrochemical techniques - both by linear polarization resistance (LPR) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Oxygen entering the system accelerates......Effects of film formation on carbon steel in hydrogen sulfide media may corrupt corrosion rate monitoring by electrochemical techniques. Electrochemical data from hydrogen sulfide solutions, biological sulfide media and natural sulfide containing geothermal water have been collected and the process...... of film formation in sulfide solutions was followed by video. It can be shown that capacitative and diffusional effects due to porous reactive deposits tend to dominate the data resulting in unreliable corrosion rates measured by electrochemical techniques. The effect is strongly increased if biofilm...

  10. Reliability of Electrochemical Techniques for Determining Corrosion Rates on Carbon Steel in Sulfide Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Hemmingsen, T.; Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo

    2007-01-01

    if the biofilm in combination with ferrous sulfide corrosion products cover the steel surface. Corrosion rates can be overestimated by a factor of 10 to 100 with electrochemical techniques - both by linear polarization resistance (LPR) and electrochemicel impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Oxygen entering the system......Effects of film formation on carbon steel in hydrogen sulfide (H2S) media may corrupt corrosion rate monitoring by electrochemical techniques. Electrochemical data from H2S solutions, biological sulfide media, and natural sulfide containing geothermal water have been collected, and the process...... of film formation in sulfide solutins was followed by video. It can be shown that capacitative and diffusional effects due to porous reactive deposits tend to dominate the data, resulting in unreliable corrosion rates measured using electrochemical techniques. The effect is strongly increased...

  11. The effect of texture, heat treatment and elongation rate on stress corrosion cracking in irradiated zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, K.; Stany, W.; Hellstrand, E.

    1979-03-01

    Irradiated zircaloy samples with different textures and heat treatments have been tested concerning stress corrosion. Irradiated samples of Zr-1Nb, pure Zr and beta quenched zircaloy have also been investigated. Stress-relieve annealled zircaloy is even after irradiation more sensitive to stress corrosion than recrystallized zircaloy. Zr-1Nb and beta quenched zircaloy are much more sinsitive to stress corrosion than the samples with different textures. As a rule irradiated zircaloy is sensitive to stress corrosion at stresses far below the yield point. The breaking stress decreases with the elongation rate. The extension of cracks is much faster in irradiated zircaloy than in unirradiated zircaloy. There is no simple failure criterium for irradiated zircaloy. However for a certain stress and a certain elongation rate the probability for a failure before this stress is reached with a constant elongation rate can be given. (E.R.)

  12. Recorded corrosion rates on copper electrodes in the Prototype Repository at the Aespoe HRL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosborg, Bo [Rosborg Consulting, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2013-04-15

    Real-time corrosion monitoring by means of electrochemical methods has been applied in an effort to measure corrosion rates of pure copper in the Prototype Repository at the Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory. Copper electrodes were installed in bentonite blocks on top of the electrically heated copper canisters in two deposition holes (dh). Three nominally identical cylindrical copper electrodes were installed in dh 1 and another three in dh 5 a few days before the heat was turned on to the canisters in September 2001 and in May 2003 respectively. The temperature of the copper electrodes has been around 30 deg C in dh 1 and somewhat below 35 deg C in dh 5. Real-time corrosion monitoring for both electrode setups was first applied in January 2004, and then periodically in 2005, 2006, 2008, and most recently in the end of 2010 just before work to open the outer section of the Prototype Repository was started. The recorded corrosion rates fall below 1.3 {mu}m/year (using a default value of n=2 in the software to convert the corrosion current density to a penetration rate by means of Faraday's law, and with no correction applied for the used measuring frequency of 0.01 Hz; also disregarding highly scattered data obtained for the copper electrodes in dh 1 during 2010). While the recorded rates on the electrodes in dh 5 first increased from about 0.2 {mu}m/year in 2004 up to a maximum of 1.3 {mu}m/year a year later (the drainage of the inner and outer sections was temporary closed in the end of 2004), and then gradually decreased to 0.7 {mu}m/year in the end of 2010, the recorded rates on the electrodes in dh 1 show a quite different picture. The recorded rates fall in the range 0.4-0.7 {mu}m/year and do not reflect any obvious decrease. However, it is anticipated that a similar time dependence as observed for the electrodes in dh 5 could have been present early on in the exposure; the electrodes were installed in 2001 but the first measurements were performed in 2004. Also

  13. Recorded corrosion rates on copper electrodes in the Prototype Repository at the Aespoe HRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosborg, Bo

    2013-04-01

    Real-time corrosion monitoring by means of electrochemical methods has been applied in an effort to measure corrosion rates of pure copper in the Prototype Repository at the Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory. Copper electrodes were installed in bentonite blocks on top of the electrically heated copper canisters in two deposition holes (dh). Three nominally identical cylindrical copper electrodes were installed in dh 1 and another three in dh 5 a few days before the heat was turned on to the canisters in September 2001 and in May 2003 respectively. The temperature of the copper electrodes has been around 30 deg C in dh 1 and somewhat below 35 deg C in dh 5. Real-time corrosion monitoring for both electrode setups was first applied in January 2004, and then periodically in 2005, 2006, 2008, and most recently in the end of 2010 just before work to open the outer section of the Prototype Repository was started. The recorded corrosion rates fall below 1.3 μm/year (using a default value of n=2 in the software to convert the corrosion current density to a penetration rate by means of Faraday's law, and with no correction applied for the used measuring frequency of 0.01 Hz; also disregarding highly scattered data obtained for the copper electrodes in dh 1 during 2010). While the recorded rates on the electrodes in dh 5 first increased from about 0.2 μm/year in 2004 up to a maximum of 1.3 μm/year a year later (the drainage of the inner and outer sections was temporary closed in the end of 2004), and then gradually decreased to 0.7 μm/year in the end of 2010, the recorded rates on the electrodes in dh 1 show a quite different picture. The recorded rates fall in the range 0.4-0.7 μm/year and do not reflect any obvious decrease. However, it is anticipated that a similar time dependence as observed for the electrodes in dh 5 could have been present early on in the exposure; the electrodes were installed in 2001 but the first measurements were performed in 2004. Also, saturation of

  14. Simulation of corrosion product activity in ion- exchanger of PWR under acceleration of corrosion and flow rate perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, N.M.; Mirza, S.M.; Rafique, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper computer code developed earlier by the authors (CPAIR-P) has been employed to compute corrosion product activity in PWRs for flow rate perturbations. The values of radioactivity in ion exchanger of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) under normal and flow rate perturbation conditions have been calculated. For linearly accelerating corrosion rates, activity saturates for removal rate of 600 cm/sup 3// s in primary coolant of PWR. A higher removal rate of 750 cm/sup 3// s was selected for which the saturation value is sufficiently low (0. 28 micro Ci/cm/sup 3/). Simulation results shows that the Fe/sup 59/ Na/sup 24/, Mo/sup 99/, Mn/sup 56/ reaches saturation values with in about 700 hours of reactor operation. However, Co/sup 58/ and Co/sup 60/ keep on accumulating and do not saturate with in 2000 hours of these simulation time. When flow rate is decreased by 10% of rated flow rate after 500 hours of reactor operation, a dip in activity is seen, which reaches to the value of 0.00138 micro Ci cm/sup -3/ then again it begins to rise and reaches saturation value of 0.00147 cm/sup 3//s. (author)

  15. Importance of temperature, pH, and boric acid concentration on rates of hydrogen production from galvanized steel corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loyola, V.M.

    1982-01-01

    One of the known sources of hydrogen gas within a nuclear plant containment building during a LOCA is the high temperature corrosion of galvanized steel yielding hydrogen gas. The importance of this source of hydrogen will vary depending on the severity of the accident. In an accident which resulted in core degradation, for example, the major source of hydrogen would probably be the metal-water reaction of the zircaloy cladding, and the corrosion of galvanized steel would then become a relatively minor source of hydrogen. However, in an accident in which core degradation is avoided or limited to minor damage, the corrosion of galvanized steel, and presumably of other materials as well, would then become a major contributor to the buildup of hydrogen within containment. The purpose of this paper is to present the overall effects of temperature, pH, and boric acid concentration on the rate of hydrogen generation over a broad range of each parameter

  16. NDT method in determining the rate of corrosion applicable to risk based inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed Hairul Hasmoni; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail; Ab Razak Hamzah

    2004-01-01

    Corrosion is a major problem in oil and gas industries, refineries and chemical process plants as the equipment is often exposed to corrosive environments or elevated temperature. Important equipment need to operate safely and reliably to avoid injuries to personnel and the public, and to prevent loss time and cost incurred due to loss of production and shutdown. The paper assess the approach in evaluating the technique of non-destructive testing (NDT) using Ultrasonic Testing (UT) in determining the rate of corrosion and remaining life of equipment applicable to Risk Based Inspection (RBI). Methods in determining the corrosion rate are presented using analytical method. Examples and data from MINT chiller water pipeline are presented to illustrate the application of these methods. (Author)

  17. The importance of the strain rate and creep on the stress corrosion cracking mechanisms and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, Omar F.; Mattar Neto, Miguel; Schvartzman, Monica M.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is a nuclear, power, petrochemical, and other industries equipment and components (like pressure vessels, nozzles, tubes, accessories) life degradation mode, involving fragile fracture. The stress corrosion cracking failures can produce serious accidents, and incidents which can put on risk the safety, reliability, and efficiency of many plants. These failures are of very complex prediction. The stress corrosion cracking mechanisms are based on three kinds of factors: microstructural, mechanical and environmental. Concerning the mechanical factors, various authors prefer to consider the crack tip strain rate rather than stress, as a decisive factor which contributes to the process: this parameter is directly influenced by the creep strain rate of the material. Based on two KAPL-Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory experimental studies in SSRT (slow strain rate test) and CL (constant load) test, for prediction of primary water stress corrosion cracking in nickel based alloys, it has done a data compilation of the film rupture mechanism parameters, for modeling PWSCC of Alloy 600 and discussed the importance of the strain rate and the creep on the stress corrosion cracking mechanisms and models. As derived from this study, a simple theoretical model is proposed, and it is showed that the crack growth rate estimated with Brazilian tests results with Alloy 600 in SSRT, are according with the KAPL ones and other published literature. (author)

  18. Corrosion rate of construction materials in hot phosphoric acid with the contribution of anodic polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouril, M. [Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Christensen, E. [Technical University of Denmark, Kemitorvet, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Eriksen, S.; Gillesberg, B. [Tantaline A/S, Nordborgvej 81, 6430 Nordborg (Denmark)

    2012-04-15

    The paper is focused on selection of a proper material for construction elements of water electrolysers, which make use of a 85% phosphoric acid as an electrolyte at temperature of 150 C and which might be loaded with anodic polarization up to 2.5 V versus a saturated Ag/AgCl electrode (SSCE). Several grades of stainless steels were tested as well as tantalum, niobium, titanium, nickel alloys and silicon carbide. The corrosion rate was evaluated by means of mass loss at free corrosion potential as well as under various levels of polarization. The only corrosion resistant material in 85% phosphoric acid at 150 C and at polarization of 2.5 V/SSCE is tantalum. In that case, even a gentle cathodic polarization is harmful in such an acidic environment. Hydrogen reduction leads to tantalum hydride formation, to loss of mechanical properties and to complete disintegration of the metal. Contrary to tantalum, titanium is free of any corrosion resistance in hot phosphoric acid. Its corrosion rate ranges from tens of millimetres to metres per year depending on temperature of the acid. Alloy bonded tantalum coating was recognized as an effective corrosion protection for both titanium and stainless steel. Its serviceability might be limited by slow dissolution of tantalum that is in order of units of mm/year. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Conditions for testing the corrosion rates of ceramics in coal gasification systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, J.P.; Nowok, J.W. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Coal gasifier operating conditions and gas and ash compositions affect the corrosion rates of ceramics used for construction in three ways: (1) through direct corrosion of the materials, (2) by affecting the concentration and chemical form of the primary corrodents, and (3) by affecting the mass transport rate of the primary corrodents. To perform an accurate corrosion test on a system material, the researcher must include all relevant corrodents and simulate conditions in the gasifier as closely as possible. In this paper, the authors present suggestions for conditions to be used in such corrosion tests. Two main types of corrosion conditions are discussed: those existing in hot-gas cleanup systems where vapor and dry ash may contribute to corrosion and those experienced by high-temperature heat exchangers and refractories where the main corrodent will be coal ash slag. Only the fluidized-bed gasification systems such as the Sierra Pacific Power Company Pinon Pine Power Project system are proposing the use of ceramic filters for particulate cleanup. The gasifier is an air-blown 102-MWe unit employing a Westinghouse{trademark} ceramic particle filter system operating at as high as 1100{degrees}F at 300 psia. Expected gas compositions in the filter will be approximately 25% CO, 15% H{sub 2}, 5% CO{sub 2}, 5% H{sub 2}O, and 50% N{sub 2}. Vapor-phase sodium chloride concentrations are expected to be 10 to 100 times the levels in combustion systems at similar temperatures, but in general the concentrations of the minor primary and secondary corrodents are not well understood. Slag corrosiveness will depend on its composition as well as viscosity. For a laboratory test, the slag must be in a thermodynamically stable form before the beginning of the corrosion test to assure that no inappropriate reactions are allowed to occur. Ideally, the slag would be flowing, and the appropriate atmosphere must be used to assure realistic slag viscosity.

  20. Preliminary Simulation of the Corrosion Rate of Archaeological Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steefel, Carl

    2014-01-06

    In this study, we make use of a micro-continuum modeling approach (the Kinetic-Microscopic-Continuum Model or K{micro}C model) to capture the spatial distribution and identity of reaction products developing over time as a result of the archaeological glass corrosion, while also matching the time scales of alteration where possible. Since the glass blocks sat on the Mediterranean seafloor for 1800 years, the physical and chemical boundary conditions are largely constant. We focus on a fracture within the glass block identified by Verney-Carron et al. (2008) and simulate it as a 1D system, with a fixed concentration (Dirichlet) boundary corresponding to the interior of the fracture.

  1. High temperature electrochemistry related to light water reactor corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, Gabor; Kerner, Zsolt; Balog, Janos; Schiller, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The present work deals with corrosion problems related to conditions which prevail in a WWER primary circuit. We had a two-fold aim: (A) electrochemical methods were applied to characterise the hydrothermally produced oxides of the cladding material (Zr-1%Nb) of nuclear fuel elements used in Russian made power reactors of WWER type, and (B) a number of possible reference electrodes were investigated with a view to high temperature applications. (A) Test specimens made of the cladding material, Zr-1%Nb, were immersed into an autoclave, filled with an aqueous solution typical to a WWER primary circuit, and were treated for different periods of time up to 28 weeks. The electrode potentials were measured and electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) were taken regularly both as a function of oxidation time and temperature. This rendered information on the overall kinetics of oxide growth. By combining in situ and ex situ impedance measurements, with a particular view of the temperature dependence of EIS, we concluded that the high frequency region of impedance spectra is relevant to the presence of oxide layer on the alloy. This part of the spectra was treated in terms of a parallel CPE||R ox equivalent circuit (CPE denoting constant phase element, R ox ohmic resistor). The CPE element was understood as a dispersive resistance in terms of the continuous time random walk theory by Scher and Lax. This enabled us to tell apart electrical conductance and oxide growth with a model of charge transfer and recombination within the oxide layer as rate determining steps. (B) Three types of reference electrodes were tested within the framework of the LIRES EU5 project: (i) external Ag/AgCl, (ii) Pt/Ir alloy and (iii) Pd(Pt) double polarised active electrode. The most stable of the electrodes was found to be the Pt/Ir one. The Ag/AgCl electrode showed good stability after an initial period of some days, while substantial drifts were found for the Pd(Pt) electrode. EIS spectra of the

  2. Detrimental role of hydrogen on the corrosion rate of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blat, M.; Noel, D.

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that hydride precipitation at the metal/oxide interface could play a detrimental role on the waterside corrosion rate. Nevertheless, the mechanism of that detrimental role is not completely understood, and two hypotheses were investigated to understand the mechanism that controls the role of the hydrides. The first hypothesis is based on a mechanical effect: the hydrides precipitate at the metal/oxide interface and destroy the physical integrity of the barrier oxide layer. The second hypothesis is a modification of the transport properties of the oxide grown on the hydrided metal. The detrimental role of hydrides on the corrosion rate was studied by charging unirradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding material with hydrogen to a level higher than the limit of solubility at 400 C. Both gaseous and cathodic charging techniques were used. Static corrosion tests were carried out in autoclave with steam at 400 C on an as-received and hydrided sample. The detrimental role of hydrides is confirmed from the post-transition corrosion rate, and that effect is more significant for high cathodic charging. The results of the metallurgical examinations are discussed to provide an understanding of the mechanism. No relationship between hydrides, physical defects in the oxide, and local corrosion rate enhancement was found. Therefore, the results do not support the hypothesis of a mechanical effect at the scale of the performed examinations, but more detailed work is required to confirm this

  3. A combined neural network and mechanistic approach for the prediction of corrosion rate and yield strength of magnesium-rare earth alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birbilis, N.; Cavanaugh, M.K.; Sudholz, A.D.; Zhu, S.M.; Easton, M.A.; Gibson, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → This study presents a body of corrosion data for a set of custom alloys and displays this in multivariable space. These alloys represent the next generation of Mg alloys for auto applications. → The data is processed using an ANN model, which makes it possible to yield a single expression for prediction of corrosion rate (and strength) as a function of any input composition (of Ce, La or Nd between 0 and 6 wt.%). → The relative influence of the various RE elements on corrosion is assessed, with the outcome that Nd additions can offer comparable strength with minimal rise in corrosion rate. → The morphology and solute present in the eutectic region itself (as opposed to just the intermetallic presence) was shown - for the first time - to also be a key contributor to corrosion. → The above approach sets the foundation for rational alloy design of alloys with corrosion performance in mind. - Abstract: Additions of Ce, La and Nd to Mg were made in binary, ternary and quaternary combinations up to ∼6 wt.%. This provided a dataset that was used in developing a neural network model for predicting corrosion rate and yield strength. Whilst yield strength increased with RE additions, corrosion rates also systematically increased, however, this depended on the type of RE element added and the combination of elements added (along with differences in intermetallic morphology). This work is permits an understanding of Mg-RE alloy performance, and can be exploited in Mg alloy design for predictable combinations of strength and corrosion resistance.

  4. Prediction on corrosion rate of pipe in nuclear power system based on optimized grey theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yonghong; Zhang Dafa; Chen Dengke; Jiang Wei

    2007-01-01

    For the prediction of corrosion rate of pipe in nuclear power system, the pre- diction error from the grey theory is greater, so a new method, optimized grey theory was presented in the paper. A comparison among predicted results from present and other methods was carried out, and it is seem that optimized grey theory is correct and effective for the prediction of corrosion rate of pipe in nuclear power system, and it provides a fundamental basis for the maintenance of pipe in nuclear power system. (authors)

  5. Study on transition behavior of corrosion related environment near disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, K.; Nakanishi, T.; Kato, O.; Wada, R.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Disposal vessels are desired to stand for a certain period of time to stabilize radioactive wastes containing heat-generating substances. Besides, in case of wastes containing irradiated metal, which is a source of long-lived 14 C, long-term capability to enclose such long-life species is desired to the vessels. Since endurance of vessels is very affected by surrounding environment, evaluation of long-term environmental transition is important. In this study, we focused on the behavior of red-ox conditions and pH by reactive transport modeling in order to obtain fundamental knowledge about long-term transition of corrosion-related environment around metal vessels or metal-containing radioactive wastes. A two-dimensional reactive transport simulation was applied to a modeled repository site with engineering barrier system including cement and bentonite, etc., in consideration of following chemical models: - The metal corrosion rate was modeled to consider its effect on red-ox conditions. - The corrosion rate of carbon steel was modeled as kinetic reaction rate of production of ferrous ion and electrons as a function of pH and oxygen concentration, based on the experimental results observed under highly-controlled reducing conditions (1). - Formation of corrosion products was modeled by solubility products of iron oxides, such as magnetite, according to analytical results by in-situ XPS (2). - Cement composition and its reaction with groundwater were modeled by chemical equilibrium of primary and secondary minerals, for example, calcium silicates with several C/S ratios to consider the long-term transition of pH with cement degradations. According to the simulation results, the variation of red-ox conditions and pH around the disposal vessels has been estimated. Main component of cement composition slowly changes to calcium silicate having lower C/S ratios, resulting in decrease of pH. Although it depends on the bentonite efficiency

  6. Influence of cooling rate on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of Al–Fe alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorin, T.; Stanford, N.; Birbilis, N.; Gupta, R.K.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Increasing the cooling rate from 0.1 to 500 °C/s, mass loss rate decreased by 6 times. • Increase in corrosion resistance was attributed to the refined Fe-intermetallics. • Increased cooling rate resulted in increased Fe content in solid solution. • Direct strip casting can produce alloys with higher acceptable content of impurities. • Direct Strip Casting is a potential candidate to improve recyclability of Al alloys - Abstract: The effect of Fe in Al is technologically important for commercial Al-alloys, and in recycled Al. This work explores the use of the novel rapid solidification technology, known as direct strip casting, to improve the recyclability of Al-alloys. We provide a comparison between the corrosion and microstructure of Al–Fe alloys prepared with wide-ranging cooling rates (0.1 °C/s to 500 °C/s). Rapid cooling was achieved via direct strip casting, while slow cooling was achieved using sand casting. Corrosion was studied via polarisation and immersion tests, followed by surface analysis using scanning electron microscopy and optical profilometry. It was shown that the corrosion resistance of Al–Fe alloys is improved with increased cooling rates, attributed to the reduced size and number of Fe-containing intermetallics.

  7. Corrosion Aggressivenes of Soil Related to the Activity of

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    naoc

    resulting from attack on the metal by sulphate-reducing bacteria in the soils. KEY WORDS: ... analysis of corrosion products formed on the surfaces of X60 steel coupons buried in ..... publication on the control of biofilm growth in drinking water distribution ... passive film formed on austentic stainless steel AISI. 304, Corrosion ...

  8. Slow strain rate stress corrosion cracking under multiaxial deformation conditions: technique and application to admiralty brass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, W.K.; Heldt, L.A.; Koss, D.

    1984-01-01

    A set of straightforward experimental techniques are described for the examination of slow strain rate stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of sheet deforming under nearly all multiaxial deformation conditions which result in sheet thinning. Based on local fracture strain as a failure criterion, the results contrast stress corrosion susceptibility in uniaxial tension with those in both plane strain and balanced biaxial tension. These results indicate that the loss of ductility of the brass increases as the stress state changes from uniaxial toward balanced biaxial tension

  9. Mg and Mg alloys: how comparable are in vitro and in vivo corrosion rates? A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Sanchez, Adela Helvia; Luthringer, Bérengère J C; Feyerabend, Frank; Willumeit, Regine

    2015-02-01

    Due to their biodegradability, magnesium and magnesium-based alloys could represent the third generation of biomaterials. However, their mechanical properties and time of degradation have to match the needs of applications. Several approaches, such as choice of alloying elements or tailored microstructure, are employed to tailor corrosion behaviour. Due to the high electrochemical activity of Mg, numerous environmental factors (e.g. temperature and surrounding ion composition) influence its corrosion behaviour, making it unpredictable. Nevertheless, the need of reliable in vitro model(s) to predict in vivo implant degradation is increasing. In an attempt to find a correlation between in vitro and vivo corrosion rates, this review presents a systematic literature survey, as well as an attempt to correlate the different results. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. An expert system for corrosion rate monitoring and diagnosis in the heating circuits of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balducelli, C.; Conte, E.; Federico, A.G.; Tripi, A.; Ronchetti, C.

    1988-01-01

    The radiation field of out of core components of a water reactor primary plant depends on corrosion product equilibria. The computer programs that try to simulate the behaviour of the corrosion products and the radiation build up didn't provide good results, especially in describing several different plants with the same program. In order to obtain better results the authors decided to use a different approach, building an expert system, which performs on-line corrosion rate monitoring by means of a number of probes connected to an automatic corrosimeter, evaluates expected corrosion rate values and behaviours, and, if there are discrepancies, performs a diagnosis, providing suggestions to overcome the difficulty. (author)

  11. Stochastic theory of fatigue corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haiyun

    1999-10-01

    A stochastic theory of corrosion has been constructed. The stochastic equations are described giving the transportation corrosion rate and fluctuation corrosion coefficient. In addition the pit diameter distribution function, the average pit diameter and the most probable pit diameter including other related empirical formula have been derived. In order to clarify the effect of stress range on the initiation and growth behaviour of pitting corrosion, round smooth specimen were tested under cyclic loading in 3.5% NaCl solution.

  12. Volatile amines treatment: Corrosion rates and Atucha I nuclear power plant experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, Alberto M.; Jimenez Rebagliati, Raul; Raffo Calderon, Maria C.; Manzi, Ricardo

    2000-01-01

    Steam generators water treatment with volatile amines in place of ammonia is usual today. This option seems an acceptable alternative to the generalize use of ammonia-sodium phosphate and has advantages when copper alloys are present. There are several amines that can work as corrosion inhibitor but the most useful for plant applications are: morpholine, ethanolamine and cyclohexylamine. In this work, are present the obtained results of corrosion rates measurements by electrochemical methods. The hydrothermal conditions of our experiences were similar to that of the Atucha I nuclear power plant (CNA I). pH, conductivity and dissolved oxygen measures were correlated with corrosion rates of the CNA I materials as carbon steel and admiralty brass. The faradaic impedance spectroscopy techniques allows a more detailed interpretation of corrosion rates process. Morpholine and ammonia behavior can be evaluated under power plant operations conditions with the accumulated experience of CNA I. Results are present throughout material release and his effects over heat transfer parameters. (author)

  13. The corrosion rate measurement of Inconel 690 on high temperature and pressure by using CMS100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriyono; Satmoko, Ari; Febrianto; Hidayati, N R; Arifal; Sumarno, Ady; Handoyo, Ismu; Prasetjo, Joko

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion rate measurement of Inconel 690 on high temperature and pressure had been done. By using an Autoclave, and temperature can be simulated. For reducing the pressure on Autoclave so its can be measure by Corrosion Measurement System 100(CMS100), the electrodes placement had designed and fabrication on the cover of Autoclave. The electrodes of CMS100 are reference electrode, working electrodes and counter electrodes. The electrodes placement are made and and designed on two packages, these are Salt bridge and Counter-specimen placement. From the result of testing these both of placement are able to 90 bar (pressure) and 280 C (temperature) operation rate measurement was done on temperature variation from 150 0C, 190 0C, 200 0C, 210 0C, 220 0C and 230 0C, and the solution is 0.1 ppm chloride. The pressure experiment is the pressure, which occurred in Autoclave. From the Tafel analysis, even through very little The corrosion current increased from 150 C to 230 C it is 2,54x10-10 a/cm2 to 1,62x10-9 A/cm2, but the the corrosion rate is still zero

  14. Effect of diamond-like carbon coating on corrosion rate of machinery steel HQ 805

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slat, Winda Sanni; Malau, Viktor; Iswanto, Priyo Tri; Sujitno, Tjipto; Suprapto

    2018-04-01

    HQ 805 is known as a super strength alloys steel and widely applied in military equipment and, aircraft components, drilling device and so on. It is due to its excellent behavior in wear, fatigue, high temperature and high speed operating conditions. The weakness of this material is the vulnerablality to corrosion when employed in sour environments where hydrogen sulfide and chlorides are present. To overcome the problems, an effort should be made to improve or enhance the surface properties for a longer service life. There are varieties of coatings developed and used to improve surface material properties. There are several kinds of coating methods; chemical vapour deposition (CVD), physical vapour deposition (PVD), thermochemical treatment, oxidation, or plasma spraying. This paper presents the research result of the influence of Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) coating deposited using DC plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (DC-PECVD) on corrosion rate (by potentiodynamic polarization method) of HQ 805 machinery steel. As a carbon sources, a mixture of argon (Ar) and methane (CH4) with ratio 76% : 24% was used in this experiment. The conditions of experiment were 400 °C of temperature, 1.2 mbar, 1.4 mbar, 1.6 mbar and 1.8 mbar of pressure of process. Investigated surface properties were hardness (microhardness tester), roughness (roughness test), chemical composition (Spectrometer), microstructure (SEM) and corrosion rate (potentiodynamic polarization). It has been found that the optimum condition with the lowest corrosion rate is at a pressure of 1.4 mbar with a deposition duration of 4 hours at a constant temperature of 400 °C. In this condition, the corrosion rate decreases from 12.326 mpy to 4.487 mpy.

  15. On researching erosion-corrosion wear in pipelines: the rate and residual lifetime estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranenko, V.I.; Yanchenko, Yu.A.; Gulina, O.M.; Dokukin, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    To base the normative document on calculation of pipelines erosive-corrosive wear (ECW) rate and residual lifetime this research of ECW regularities for pearlitic steel NPP pipelines was performed. The estimates of control data treatment statistical procedures efficiency were presented. The influence of the scheme of piping control on the ECW rate and residual lifetime estimation results was demonstrated. The simplified scheme is valid only in case of complete information. It's usage under data uncertainties leads to essential residual lifetime overstating [ru

  16. Controlling corrosion rate of Magnesium alloy using powder mixed electrical discharge machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, M. A.; Rani, A. M. A.; Saad, N. M.; Littlefair, G.; Aliyu, A. A.

    2018-04-01

    Biomedical implant can be divided into permanent and temporary employment. The duration of a temporary implant applied to children and adult is different due to different bone healing rate among the children and adult. Magnesium and its alloys are compatible for the biodegradable implanting application. Nevertheless, it is difficult to control the degradation rate of magnesium alloy to suit the application on both the children and adult. Powder mixed electrical discharge machining (PM-EDM) method, a modified EDM process, has high capability to improve the EDM process efficiency and machined surface quality. The objective of this paper is to establish a formula to control the degradation rate of magnesium alloy using the PM-EDM method. The different corrosion rate of machined surface is hypothesized to be obtained by having different combinations of PM-EDM operation inputs. PM-EDM experiments are conducted using an opened-loop PM-EDM system and the in-vitro corrosion tests are carried out on the machined surface of each specimen. There are four operation inputs investigated in this study which are zinc powder concentration, peak current, pulse on-time and pulse off-time. The results indicate that zinc powder concentration is significantly affecting the response with 2 g/l of zinc powder concentration obtaining the lowest corrosion rate. The high localized temperature at the cutting zone in spark erosion process causes some of the zinc particles get deposited on the machined surface, hence improving the surface characteristics. The suspended zinc particles in the dielectric fluid have also improve the sparking efficiency and the uniformity of sparks distribution. From the statistical analysis, a formula was developed to control the corrosion rate of magnesium alloy within the range from 0.000183 mm/year to 0.001528 mm/year.

  17. Corrosion and runoff rates of Cu and three Cu-alloys in marine environments with increasing chloride deposition rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Zhang, Xian; Goidanich, Sara; Le Bozec, Nathalie; Herting, Gunilla; Leygraf, Christofer

    2014-02-15

    Bare copper sheet and three commercial Cu-based alloys, Cu15Zn, Cu4Sn and Cu5Al5Zn, have been exposed to four test sites in Brest, France, with strongly varying chloride deposition rates. The corrosion rates of all four materials decrease continuously with distance from the coast, i.e. with decreasing chloride load, and in the following order: Cu4Sn>Cu sheet>Cu15Zn>Cu5Al5Zn. The patina on all materials was composed of two main layers, Cu2O as the inner layer and Cu2(OH)3Cl as the outer layer, and with a discontinuous presence of CuCl in between. Additional minor patina constituents are SnO2 (Cu4Sn), Zn5(OH)6(CO3)2 (Cu15Zn and Cu5Al5Zn) and Zn6Al2(OH)16CO3·4H2O/Zn2Al(OH)6Cl·2H2O/Zn5Cl2(OH)8·H2O and Al2O3 (Cu5Al5Zn). The observed Zn- and Zn/Al-containing corrosion products might be important factors for the lower sensitivity of Cu15Zn and Cu5Al5Zn against chloride-induced atmospheric corrosion compared with Cu sheet and Cu4Sn. Decreasing corrosion rates with exposure time were observed for all materials and chloride loads and attributed to an improved adherence with time of the outer patina to the underlying inner oxide. Flaking of the outer patina layer was mainly observed on Cu4Sn and Cu sheet and associated with the gradual transformation of CuCl to Cu2(OH)3Cl of larger volume. After three years only Cu5Al5Zn remains lustrous because of a patina compared with the other materials that appeared brownish-reddish. Significantly lower release rates of metals compared with corresponding corrosion rates were observed for all materials. Very similar release rates of copper from all four materials were observed during the fifth year of marine exposure due to an outer surface patina that with time revealed similar constituents and solubility properties. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of pipe material and surfaces on sulfide related odor and corrosion in sewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Vollertsen, Jes; Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Wium-Andersen, Tove; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild

    2008-09-01

    Hydrogen sulfide oxidation on sewer pipe surfaces was investigated in a pilot scale experimental setup. The experiments were aimed at replicating conditions in a gravity sewer located immediately downstream of a force main where sulfide related concrete corrosion and odor is often observed. During the experiments, hydrogen sulfide gas was injected intermittently into the headspace of partially filled concrete and plastic (PVC and HDPE) sewer pipes in concentrations of approximately 1,000 ppm(v). Between each injection, the hydrogen sulfide concentration was monitored while it decreased because of adsorption and subsequent oxidation on the pipe surfaces. The experiments showed that the rate of hydrogen sulfide oxidation was approximately two orders of magnitude faster on the concrete pipe surfaces than on the plastic pipe surfaces. Removal of the layer of reaction (corrosion) products from the concrete pipes was found to reduce the rate of hydrogen sulfide oxidation significantly. However, the rate of sulfide oxidation was restored to its background level within 10-20 days. A similar treatment had no observable effect on hydrogen sulfide removal in the plastic pipe reactors. The experimental results were used to model hydrogen sulfide oxidation under field conditions. This showed that the gas-phase hydrogen sulfide concentration in concrete sewers would typically amount to a few percent of the equilibrium concentration calculated from Henry's law. In the plastic pipe sewers, significantly higher concentrations were predicted because of the slower adsorption and oxidation kinetics on such surfaces.

  19. Probability distribution of pitting corrosion depth and rate in underground pipelines: A Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caleyo, F.; Velazquez, J.C.; Valor, A.; Hallen, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The probability distributions of external-corrosion pit depth and pit growth rate were investigated in underground pipelines using Monte Carlo simulations. The study combines a predictive pit growth model developed by the authors with the observed distributions of the model variables in a range of soils. Depending on the pipeline age, any of the three maximal extreme value distributions, i.e. Weibull, Frechet or Gumbel, can arise as the best fit to the pitting depth and rate data. The Frechet distribution best fits the corrosion data for long exposure periods. This can be explained by considering the long-term stabilization of the diffusion-controlled pit growth. The findings of the study provide reliability analysts with accurate information regarding the stochastic characteristics of the pitting damage in underground pipelines.

  20. Probability distribution of pitting corrosion depth and rate in underground pipelines: A Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caleyo, F. [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, ESIQIE, IPN, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: fcaleyo@gmail.com; Velazquez, J.C. [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, ESIQIE, IPN, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Valor, A. [Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de La Habana, San Lazaro y L, Vedado, 10400, La Habana (Cuba); Hallen, J.M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, ESIQIE, IPN, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-09-15

    The probability distributions of external-corrosion pit depth and pit growth rate were investigated in underground pipelines using Monte Carlo simulations. The study combines a predictive pit growth model developed by the authors with the observed distributions of the model variables in a range of soils. Depending on the pipeline age, any of the three maximal extreme value distributions, i.e. Weibull, Frechet or Gumbel, can arise as the best fit to the pitting depth and rate data. The Frechet distribution best fits the corrosion data for long exposure periods. This can be explained by considering the long-term stabilization of the diffusion-controlled pit growth. The findings of the study provide reliability analysts with accurate information regarding the stochastic characteristics of the pitting damage in underground pipelines.

  1. Effect of steam corrosion on core post strength loss: I. Low, chronic steam ingress rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wichner, R.P.

    1976-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the effect of chronic, low levels of steam ingress into the primary system of the HTGR on the corrosion, and consequent strength loss of the core support posts. The assessment proceeded through the following three steps: (1) The impurity composition in the primary system was estimated as a function of a range of steady ingress rates of from 0.001 to 1.0 g/sec, both by means of an analysis of the Dragon steam ingress experiment and a computer code, TIMOX, which treats the primary system as a well-mixed pot. (2) The core post burnoffs which result from 40-year exposures to these determined impurity atmospheres were then estimated using a corrosion rate expression derived from published ATJ-graphite corrosion rate data. Burnoffs were determined for both the core posts at the nominal and the maximum sustained temperature, estimated to be 90 0 C above nominal. (3) The final step involved assessment of the degree of strength loss resulting from the estimated burnoffs. An empirical equation was developed for this purpose which compares reasonably well with strength loss data for a number of different graphites and specimen geometries

  2. A study on the corrosion rate for metal nuclear fuel by the soxhlet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, S. J.; Lee, Y. R.; Lee, D. B.; Park, J. M.; Kim, K. H.; Lee, Y. S.; Park, H. D.; Kim, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    In order to compare in-pile performance of nuclear fuel candidates for HANARO, corrosion test with the Soxhlet apparatus for rare-earth-oxide added U-Mo alloy fuels has been carried out by measuring a leaching rate. It appeared from the result that the leaching rate of the U-Mo fuel specimen became decreased as a rare-earth-oxide added, and there was a little difference in the leaching rate depending on the kind of the rare-earth-oxide

  3. The effect of quench rate on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion behavior of U-6 Wt Pct Nb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckelmeyer, K.H.; Romiy, A.D.; Weirick, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of cooling rate on microstructure, mechanical behavior, corrosion resistance, and subsequent age hardenability is discussed. Cooling rates in excess of 20 Ks -1 cause the parent γ-phase to transform martensitically to a niobium supersaturated variant of the α-phase. This phase exhibits low hardness and strength, high ductility, good corrosion resistance, and age hardenability. As cooling rate decreases from 10 Ks -1 to 0.2 Ks -1 , microstructural changes (consistent with spinodal decomposition) occur to an increasing extent. These changes produce increases in hardness and strength and decreases in ductility, corrosion resistance, and age hardenability. At cooling rates less than 0.2 Ks -1 the parent phase undergoes cellular decomposition to a coarse two-phase lamellar microstructure which exhibits intermediate strength and ductility, reduced corrosion resistance, and no age hardenability. An analysis of the cooling rates indicates that fully martensitic microstructures can be obtained in plates as thick as 50 mm

  4. Mechanical and corrosion properties of Ni-Cr-Fe Alloy 600 related to primary side SCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begley, J.A.; Jacko, R.J.; Gold, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    The two-fold objective of the program is to provide the mechanical property data required for the development of a strain rate damage model for environmentally assisted cracking of Inconel 600 and to evaluate critical damage model parameters in primary water environments by conducting a series of stress corrosion tests. The test program includes mechanical property tests at 20 0 C, 316 0 C and strain rate tests to determine critical strain rate SCC parameters in primary water environments. Data are presented from slow strain rate tensile tests, stress relaxation tests and creep tests. A short discussion of the Gerber-Garud Strain Rate Damage Model is included to provide the background rationale for the test program. Utilitarian aspects of the Strain Rate Damage Model and the test program data are presented. Analysis of accelerated stress corrosion testing at high temperatures, and the contribution of thermally activated inelastic deformation to apparent activation energies for stress corrosion cracking is emphasized

  5. Electrochemical techniques implementation for corrosion rate measurement in function of humidity level in grounding systems (copper and stainless steel) in soil samples from Tunja (Colombia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Y.; Guerrero, L.; Blanco, J.; Jimenez, C.; Vera-Monroy, S. P.; Mejía-Camacho, A.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, DC electrochemical techniques were used to determine the corrosion rate of copper and stainless-steel electrodes used in grounding, varying the level of humidity, in sandy loam and clay loam soils. The maximum corrosion potentials were: for copper -211 and -236mV and for stainless steel of -252 and -281mV, in sandy loam and clay loam respectively, showing that in sandy loam the values are higher, about 30mV. The mechanism by which steel controls corrosion is by diffusion, whereas in copper it is carried out by transfer of mass and charge, which affects the rate of corrosion, which in copper reached a maximum value of 5mm/yr and in Steel 0.8mm/yr, determined by Tafel approximations. The behaviour of the corrosion rate was mathematically adjusted to an asymptotic model that faithfully explains the C.R. as a function of humidity, however, it is necessary to define the relation between the factor □ established in the model and the precise characteristics of the soil, such as the permeability or quantity of ions present.

  6. Evaluation of flow accelerated corrosion by coupled analysis of corrosion and flow dynamics. Relationship of oxide film thickness, hematite/magnetite ratio, ECP and wall thinning rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Naitoh, Masanori; Okada, Hidetoshi; Uehara, Yasushi; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2011-01-01

    Systematic approaches to evaluate flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) are desired before discussing application of countermeasures for FAC. First, future FAC occurrence should be evaluated to identify locations where a higher possibility of FAC occurrence exists, and then, wall thinning rate at the identified FAC occurrence zone is evaluated to obtain the preparation time for applying countermeasures. Wall thinning rates were calculated with two coupled models: 1.static electrochemical analysis and 2.dynamic oxide layer growth analysis. The anodic current density and the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) were calculated with the static electrochemistry model based on an Evans diagram. The ferrous ion release rate, determined by the anodic current density, was applied as input for the dynamic double oxide layer model. Some of the dissolved ferrous ion was removed to the bulk water and others precipitated on the surface as magnetite particles. The thickness of oxide layer was calculated with the dynamic oxide layer growth model and then its value was used as input in the electrochemistry model. It was confirmed that the calculated results (corrosion rate and ECP) based on the coupled models were in good agreement with the measured ones. Higher ECP was essential for preventing FAC rate. Moderated conditions due to lower mass transfer coefficients resulted in thicker oxide layer thickness and then higher ECP, while moderated corrosion conditions due to higher oxidant concentrations resulted in larger hematite/magnetite rate and then higher ECP.

  7. Correlation of the corrosion rates of steels in a straw fired boiler with the thermodynamically predicted trend of KOH(g) in the flue gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomberg, Tom

    2012-01-01

    The thermodynamic stability of KOH(g) in flue gases without sulfur and chlorine compounds was studied. Relatively good correlation of the thermodynamically predicted trend of KOH(g) in the flue gases and the literature data of the corrosion rates of different steels in a straw fired boiler was found. A discussion on a possible, physically reasonable mechanism is also presented. However, the causality of the found correlation requires further studies. Highlights: ► Corrosion rates in a straw boiler correlate with the predicted trend of KOH(g). ► KOH(g) impinging the surface may be an important factor in corrosion in straw fired boilers. ► The proposed mechanism may be relevant also to other biomass fuels that release potassium hydroxide during combustion.

  8. Surface treatments for controlling corrosion rate of biodegradable Mg and Mg-based alloy implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uddin, M S; Hall, Colin; Murphy, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Due to their excellent biodegradability characteristics, Mg and Mg-based alloys have become an emerging material in biomedical implants, notably for repair of bone as well as coronary arterial stents. However, the main problem with Mg-based alloys is their rapid corrosion in aggressive environments such as human bodily fluids. Previously, many approaches such as control of alloying materials, composition and surface treatments, have been attempted to regulate the corrosion rate. This article presents a comprehensive review of recent research focusing on surface treatment techniques utilised to control the corrosion rate and surface integrity of Mg-based alloys in both in vitro and in vivo environments. Surface treatments generally involve the controlled deposition of thin film coatings using various coating processes, and mechanical surfacing such as machining, deep rolling or low plasticity burnishing. The aim is to either make a protective thin layer of a material or to change the micro-structure and mechanical properties at the surface and sub-surface levels, which will prevent rapid corrosion and thus delay the degradation of the alloys. We have organised the review of past works on coatings by categorising the coatings into two classes—conversion and deposition coatings—while works on mechanical treatments are reviewed based on the tool-based processes which affect the sub-surface microstructure and mechanical properties of the material. Various types of coatings and their processing techniques under two classes of coating and mechanical treatment approaches have been analysed and discussed to investigate their impact on the corrosion performance, biomechanical integrity, biocompatibility and cell viability. Potential challenges and future directions in designing and developing the improved biodegradable Mg/Mg-based alloy implants were addressed and discussed. The literature reveals that no solutions are yet complete and hence new and innovative approaches

  9. Surface treatments for controlling corrosion rate of biodegradable Mg and Mg-based alloy implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, M S; Hall, Colin; Murphy, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Due to their excellent biodegradability characteristics, Mg and Mg-based alloys have become an emerging material in biomedical implants, notably for repair of bone as well as coronary arterial stents. However, the main problem with Mg-based alloys is their rapid corrosion in aggressive environments such as human bodily fluids. Previously, many approaches such as control of alloying materials, composition and surface treatments, have been attempted to regulate the corrosion rate. This article presents a comprehensive review of recent research focusing on surface treatment techniques utilised to control the corrosion rate and surface integrity of Mg-based alloys in both in vitro and in vivo environments. Surface treatments generally involve the controlled deposition of thin film coatings using various coating processes, and mechanical surfacing such as machining, deep rolling or low plasticity burnishing. The aim is to either make a protective thin layer of a material or to change the micro-structure and mechanical properties at the surface and sub-surface levels, which will prevent rapid corrosion and thus delay the degradation of the alloys. We have organised the review of past works on coatings by categorising the coatings into two classes—conversion and deposition coatings—while works on mechanical treatments are reviewed based on the tool-based processes which affect the sub-surface microstructure and mechanical properties of the material. Various types of coatings and their processing techniques under two classes of coating and mechanical treatment approaches have been analysed and discussed to investigate their impact on the corrosion performance, biomechanical integrity, biocompatibility and cell viability. Potential challenges and future directions in designing and developing the improved biodegradable Mg/Mg-based alloy implants were addressed and discussed. The literature reveals that no solutions are yet complete and hence new and innovative approaches

  10. Ultrasonic Measurement of Erosion/corrosion Rates in Industrial Piping Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, A. N.; Safavi, V.; Honarvar, F.

    2011-06-01

    Industrial piping systems that carry aggressive corrosion or erosion agents may suffer from a gradual wall thickness reduction that eventually threatens pipe integrity. Thinning rates could be estimated from the very small change in wall thickness values measured by conventional ultrasound over a time span of at least a few months. However, measurements performed over shorter time spans would yield no useful information—minor signal distortions originating from grain noise and ultrasonic equipment imperfections prevent a meaningful estimate of the minuscule reduction in echo travel time. Using a Model-Based Estimation (MBE) technique, a signal processing scheme has been developed that enables the echo signals from the pipe wall to be separated from the noise. This was implemented in a laboratory experimental program, featuring accelerated erosion/corrosion on the inner wall of a test pipe. The result was a reduction in the uncertainty in the wall thinning rate by a factor of four. This improvement enables a more rapid response by system operators to a change in plant conditions that could pose a pipe integrity problem. It also enables a rapid evaluation of the effectiveness of new corrosion inhibiting agents under plant operating conditions.

  11. Monitoring of corrosion rates of Fe-Cu alloys under wet/dry condition in weakly alkaline environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Je Kyoung; Nishikata, Atsushi; Tsuru, Tooru

    2002-01-01

    When the steel, containing scrap elements like copper, is used as reinforcing steel bars for concrete, the steel is exposed to alkaline environments. in this study, AC impedance technique has been applied to the monitoring of corrosion rates of iron and several Fe-Cu (0.4, 10wt%) alloys in a wet-dry cycle condition. The wet-dry cycle was conducted by exposure to alternate conditions of 1 hour-immersion in a simulated pH10 concrete solution (Ca(OH) 2 ) containing 0.01M NaCl and 3 hour-drying at 298K and 50%RH. The corrosion rate of the iron is greatly accelerated by the wet-dry cycles. Because the active FeOOH species, which are produced by the oxidation of Fe(II, III)oxide in air during drying, act as very strong oxidants to the corrosion in the wet condition. As the drying progresses, iron shows a large increase in the corrosion rate and a small shift of the corrosion potential to the positive values. This can be explained by acceleration of oxygen transport through the thin electrolyte layer In contrast to iron, the Fe-Cu alloys show low corrosion rates and the high corrosion potentials in whole cycles

  12. Effect of temperature, of oxygen content and the downstream effect on corrosion rate of structural materials in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilincev, G.

    1988-01-01

    The effects were experimentally tested of temperature and of oxygen content on the corrosion rate of structural materials in liquid sodium and on reducing the corrosion rate down the sodium stream. The results of the experiments are shown in graphs and tables and are discussed in detail. The duration of all tests was standard 1,000 hours. The test parameters were set such as to determine the effect of temperature on corrosion of a quantity of various materials in sodium with a low oxygen content (1.2 to 2 ppm) at temperatures of 500 to 800 degC and in sodium with a high oxygen content (345 ppm) at temperatures of 500 to 700 degC. More experiments served the determination of the effect of a different oxygen content varying between 1.2 and 2 ppm at a constant temperature of 600 degC. The materials being tested included main structural materials used for fast reactor construction and materials allowing to establish the effect of main alloying elements on their corrosion in liquid sodium of different temperatures and purity grades. The relationships showing the effects of temperature and oxygen content in sodium on the rate of corrosion of various structural materials in hot parts of the installation and on the reduction in the rate of corrosion downstream due to sodium saturation with corrosion products were constructed using the experimental results. (Z.M.). 15 figs., 2 tabs., 7 refs

  13. Effect of water chemistry on flow accelerated corrosion rate of carbon steel measured by on-line corrosion-monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, K.; Domae, M.; Yoneda, K.; Inada, F.

    2010-01-01

    Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel is one of the most important subjects in coolant systems of power plants. FAC is influenced by material, flow condition, temperature, and water chemistry. Iron and chromium solubility should be the most effective factor to determine the effect of water chemistry on the FAC. It is very important to evaluate the correlation between the solubility and the FAC rate of the carbon steel. In the present study, the effects of pH and Cr concentration of material on the FAC rate of carbon steel were evaluated by using high temperature loop equipment with on-line corrosion-monitoring system. Effect of dissolved oxygen concentration at pH 7 was also evaluated. The experimental FAC rates were compared with the calculation result, which was obtained from a FAC model developed previously by the authors' group. The tube specimens made of STPT 480 carbon steel were used for the FAC tests. The Cr concentration of STPT 480 was specially adjusted to 0.001 and 0.08 %. The inner diameters of the tubes were 1.6, 2.4, and 3.2 mm. The solutions were fed to the specimens with the flow rate of 1.5 l/min. The temperature of the solution at the specimen was controlled at 140 o C. Test solutions were demineralized water or NH 3 solutions of pH 8.0, 9.2, and 10.0. The increase in pH more than 9 decreased the FAC rates of both 0.001 and 0.08 % Cr specimens at 140 o C. Increase of the Cr concentration of the material decreased the FAC rate in the solution of pH 7.0, 8.0, 9.2, and 10.0. The FAC model reproduced well dependence of the experimental FAC behavior on water chemistry. It was confirmed that effect of pH and Cr concentration of material on the FAC rate were closely related to the solubility and diffusion of iron and chromium. (author)

  14. The Corrosion Rate Measurement of Inconel 690 on High Temperature andPressure by Using CMS100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriyono; Febrianto

    2000-01-01

    The corrosion rate measurement of Inconel 690 on high temperature andpressure had been done. By using an Autoclave, pressure and temperature canbe simulated. The environment of this experiment is 0.1 ppm of chloridesolution, which permit to dissolved in secondary cooling of steam generator.The corrosion rate measurement was done on temperature between 150 o C and230 o C with step 10 o C. Pressure experiment is the pressure, which occurredin Autoclave. Corrosion rate is measured by CMS100. From the Tafel analysis,corrosion rate of Inconel 690 linearity increased from 6.548 x 10 -5 mpy to4.331 x 10 -4 mpy. It concludes that Inconel 690 is resist on corrosionenvironment, so it's most using on the fabrication of steam generator tubeson the advanced power plant. (author)

  15. Effects of grain size on the corrosion resistance of pure magnesium by cooling rate-controlled solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yichi; Liu, Debao; You, Chen; Chen, Minfang

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of grain size on the corrosion resistance of pure magnesium developed for biomedical applications. High-purity magnesium samples with different grain size were prepared by the cooling rate-controlled solidification. Electrochemical and immersion tests were employed to measure the corrosion resistance of pure magnesium with different grain size. The electrochemical polarization curves indicated that the corrosion susceptibility increased as the grain size decrease. However, the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and immersion tests indicated that the corrosion resistance of pure magnesium is improved as the grain size decreases. The improvement in the corrosion resistance is attributed to refine grain can produce more uniform and density film on the surface of sample.

  16. The effects of time, temperature and rotation of water on the corrosion rate of different types of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhamad Daud; Jamaliah Shariff.

    1984-01-01

    By using hot plate/magnetic stirrer and immersion technique, the steel corroded uniformly and their corrosion rates vary due to type of steel, time of immersion, temperature and rotation of water. Therefore the rate of general corrosion, or sealing, of steel alloys is influenced by a number of factors, those best established being the composition of the metal, time, temperature, velocity, cleanliness or roughness of the metal surface and direct contact with solutions of the other materials. (author)

  17. A method for measuring the corrosion rate of materials in spallation neutron source target/blanket cooling loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes the ongoing evaluation of the susceptibility of materials in accelerator target/blanket cooling loops to corrosion. To simulate the exposure environment in a target/blanket cooling loop, samples were irradiated by an 800 MeV proton beam at the A6 Target Station of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). To accomplish this, a cooling water loop capable of exposing corrosion samples to an 800 MeV proton beam at currents upwards of 1 mA was constructed. This loop allowed control and evaluation hydrogen water chemistry, water conductivity, and solution pH. Specially designed ceramic sealed samples were used to measure the real-time corrosion rates of materials placed directly in the proton beam using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). EIS was also used to measure real-time corrosion rates of samples that were out of the proton beam and downstream from the in-beam samples. These out-of-beam probes primarily examined the effects of long lived water radiolysis products from proton irradiation on corrosion rates. An overview of the LANSCE corrosion loop, the corrosion probes, and data from an in-beam alloy 718 probe are presented

  18. Establishing empirical relationships to predict porosity level and corrosion rate of atmospheric plasma-sprayed alumina coatings on AZ31B magnesium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Thirumalaikumarasamy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma sprayed ceramic coatings are successfully used in many industrial applications, where high wear and corrosion resistance with thermal insulation are required. In this work, empirical relationships were developed to predict the porosity and corrosion rate of alumina coatings by incorporating independently controllable atmospheric plasma spray operational parameters (input power, stand-off distance and powder feed rate using response surface methodology (RSM. A central composite rotatable design with three factors and five levels was chosen to minimize the number of experimental conditions. Within the scope of the design space, the input power and the stand-off distance appeared to be the most significant two parameters affecting the responses among the three investigated process parameters. A linear regression relationship was also established between porosity and corrosion rate of the alumina coatings. Further, sensitivity analysis was carried out and compared with the relative impact of three process parameters on porosity level and corrosion rate to verify the measurement errors on the values of the uncertainty in estimated parameters.

  19. Determination of the corrosion rate of zinc by measuring the polarization resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeschenbleck, B.; Koenig, W.

    1982-01-01

    Zinc is an important common metal. It should be noticeably attacked just by water as a result of its basic character. However, this is not the case, firstly because it tends to form protective layers and furthermore pure zinc has a high hydrogen overpressure. Zinc is often used as cathodic protection of iron. In order to assess the protective effect, the corrosion rate depending on the pH-value is important. A report is given here on the problems involved in determining these values. (orig./RW) [de

  20. Contribution of archaeological analogs to the estimation of average corrosion rates and long term corrosion mechanisms of low carbon steel in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neff, D.

    2003-11-01

    . This corrosion form, constituted among others by a siderite layer is due to a particular environment: waterlogged soil containing wood. In the whole, analyses conducted in the TM show that it is composed of goethite badly crystallized in comparison with those of the DPL. Moreover, in this zone, the average elemental iron amount decreases progressively from the metal to the soil in which it stabilizes. In order to know the behaviour of the identified phases in soil water, some thermodynamic data have been involved to calculate their solubility in function of pH, potential and various water composition. The first conclusion concerns the influence of the composition and the structure of the material which is not important for the corrosion behaviour. From the results, some hypothesis have been formulated on the long term corrosion mechanisms of hypo-eutectoids steels in the considered environment. The role of the cracks formed in the DPL during the burial was evidenced. Moreover, these corrosion products undertake a dissolution in the soil water and a reprecipitation, explaining the progressive decrease of the iron amount in the TM. Lastly, some average corrosion rates have been measured with the help of the analytical and thermodynamic results: they do not exceed 4 μm/year. (author)

  1. Determination of corrosion rate of reinforcement with a modulated guard ring electrode; analysis of errors due to lateral current distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojtas, H.

    2004-01-01

    The main source of errors in measuring the corrosion rate of rebars on site is a non-uniform current distribution between the small counter electrode (CE) on the concrete surface and the large rebar network. Guard ring electrodes (GEs) are used in an attempt to confine the excitation current within a defined area. In order to better understand the functioning of modulated guard ring electrode and to assess its effectiveness in eliminating errors due to lateral spread of current signal from the small CE, measurements of the polarisation resistance performed on a concrete beam have been numerically simulated. Effect of parameters such as rebar corrosion activity, concrete resistivity, concrete cover depth and size of the corroding area on errors in the estimation of polarisation resistance of a single rebar has been examined. The results indicate that modulated GE arrangement fails to confine the lateral spread of the CE current within a constant area. Using the constant diameter of confinement for the calculation of corrosion rate may lead to serious errors when test conditions change. When high corrosion activity of rebar and/or local corrosion occur, the use of the modulated GE confinement may lead to significant underestimation of the corrosion rate

  2. Corrosion rate of API 5L Gr. X60 multipurpose steel pipeline under combined effect of water and crude oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Jian; Wang, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Multipurpose pipeline is often seriously corroded during its service life, and the phenomenon is more prominent once the transportation medium is changed. Electrochemical polarization curves and impedance spectroscopy of the API 5L Gr. X60 steel pipeline's corrosion process in sedimentary water with different ion types and their concentrations have been studied in this work. The results showed that the corrosion rates were found to be 0.00418 and 0.00232 mm/a for pure water and crude oil, respectively. However, for the mixtures of water and crude oil (with water content increased from 0.2 vol% to 10 vol%), the corrosion rate increased consistently and reached a maximum value of 0.15557 mm/a for 10 vol% water in crude oil. The effect of the concentration of various ions, namely, chloride, bicarbonate and sulfate in (oil/water) mixtures on the corrosion rate was characterized by weight-loss method. The results showed that with increasing the ions' concentrations, the corresponding exchange current density increased significantly. The results were further supported by the observations of corrosion morphology using scanning electron microscopy and are helpful in devising guidelines which would help in reducing corrosion in multipurpose transport pipelines involving a change of transported medium during their service life.

  3. Evaluation of flow accelerated corrosion by coupled analysis of corrosion and flow dynamics (3), relationship of oxide film thickness, hematite/magnetite ratio, ECP and wall thinning rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke; Naitoh, Masanori; Okada, Hidetoshi; Uehara, Yasushi; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2009-01-01

    Systematic approaches for evaluating flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) are desired before discussing application of countermeasures for FAC. Firstly, future FAC occurrence should be evaluated to identify locations where a higher possibility of FAC occurrence exists, and then, wall thinning rate at the identified FAC occurrence zone is evaluated to obtain the preparation time for applying countermeasures. Wall thinning rates were calculated with the coupled models of static electrochemical analysis and dynamic double oxide layer analysis. Anodic current density and electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) were calculated with the static electrochemistry model based on an Evans diagram and ferrous ion release rate determined by the anodic current density was applied as input for the dynamic double oxide layer model. Some of the dissolved ferrous ion was removed to the bulk water and others precipitated on the surface as magnetite particles. The thickness of oxide layer was calculated with the dynamic double oxide layer model and then was applied as input for the electrochemistry model. It was confirmed that the calculated results based on the coupled models resulted good agreement with the measured ones. Higher ECP was essential for preventing FAC rate. Moderated conditions due to lower mass transfer coefficients resulted in thicker oxide layer thickness and then higher ECP, while moderated corrosion conditions due to higher oxidant concentrations resulted in larger hematite/magnetite rate and then higher ECP. (author)

  4. Corrosion of fuel assembly materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noe, M.; Frejaville, G.; Beslu, P.

    1985-08-01

    Corrosion of zircaloy-4 is reviewed in relation with previsions of improvement in PWRs performance: higher fuel burnup; increase coolant temperature, implying nucleate boiling on the hot clad surfaces; increase duration of the cycle due to load-follow operation. Actual knowledge on corrosion rates, based partly on laboratory tests, is insufficient to insure that external clad corrosion will not constitute a limitation to these improvements. Therefore, additional testing within representative conditions is felt necessary [fr

  5. CO{sub 2} corrosion resistance of carbon steel in relation with microstructure changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochoa, Nathalie, E-mail: nochoa@usb.ve [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Universidad Simón Bolívar, Aptdo., 89000, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Vega, Carlos [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Universidad Simón Bolívar, Aptdo., 89000, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Pébère, Nadine; Lacaze, Jacques [Université de Toulouse, CIRIMAT, UPS/INPT/CNRS, ENSIACET, 4 Allée Emile Monso, CS 44362, 31030 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Brito, Joaquín L. [Laboratorio de Físico-química de Superficies, Centro de Química, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas (IVIC), Carretera Panamericana, Km 11, Altos de Pipe, Estado Miranda (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    The microstructural effects on the corrosion resistance of an API 5L X42 carbon steel in 0.5 M NaCl solution saturated with CO{sub 2} was investigated. Four microstructures were considered: banded (B), normalized (N), quenched and tempered (Q&T), and annealed (A). Electrochemical measurements (polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) were coupled with surface analyses (scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)) to characterize the formation of the corrosion product layers. Electrochemical results revealed that corrosion resistance increased in the following order: B < N < Q&T < A. From the polarization curves it was shown that specifically, cathodic current densities were affected by microstructural changes. SEM images indicated that ferrite dissolved earlier than cementite and a thin layer of corrosion products was deposited on the steel surface. XPS analyses revealed that this layer was composed of a mixture of iron carbonate and non-dissolved cementite. It was also found that the quantity of FeCO{sub 3} content on the steel surface was greater for Q&T and A microstructures. These results, in agreement with the electrochemical data, indicate that the deposition mechanism of iron carbonate is closely related to the morphology of the non-dissolved cementite, determining the protective properties of the corrosion product layers. - Highlights: • The effect of change in microstructure on CO{sub 2} corrosion resistance was evaluated. • An API 5LX 42 carbon steel was immersed in a 0.5 M NaCl solution saturated with CO{sub 2}. • Banded, normalized, quenched-tempered and annealed microstructures were considered. • Electrochemical measurements were coupled with surface analysis. • Morphology and distribution of undissolved Fe{sub 3}C control corrosion kinetics.

  6. Markov chain model helps predict pitting corrosion depth and rate in underground pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caleyo, F.; Velazquez, J.C.; Hallen, J. M. [ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Esquivel-Amezcua, A. [PEMEX PEP Region Sur, Villahermosa, Tabasco (Mexico); Valor, A. [Universidad de la Habana, Vedado, La Habana (Cuba)

    2010-07-01

    Recent reports place pipeline corrosion costs in North America at seven billion dollars per year. Pitting corrosion causes the higher percentage of failures among other corrosion mechanisms. This has motivated multiple modelling studies to be focused on corrosion pitting of underground pipelines. In this study, a continuous-time, non-homogenous pure birth Markov chain serves to model external pitting corrosion in buried pipelines. The analytical solution of Kolmogorov's forward equations for this type of Markov process gives the transition probability function in a discrete space of pit depths. The transition probability function can be completely identified by making a correlation between the stochastic pit depth mean and the deterministic mean obtained experimentally. The model proposed in this study can be applied to pitting corrosion data from repeated in-line pipeline inspections. Case studies presented in this work show how pipeline inspection and maintenance planning can be improved by using the proposed Markovian model for pitting corrosion.

  7. Measuring the corrosion rate of steel in concrete – effect of measurement technique, polarisation time and current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Peter Vagn; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2012-01-01

    , are in some studies considered the main reasons for the variations. This paper presents an experimental study on the quantitative effect of polarisation time and current on the measured polarisation resistance – and thus the corrosion current density – of passively and actively corroding steel. Two...... electrochemical techniques often used in instruments for on-site corrosion rate measurements are investigated. On passively corroding reinforcement the measured polarisation resistance was for both techniques found to be highly affected by the polarisation time and current and no plateaus at either short or long...... rate for actively corroding steel. For both techniques guidelines for polarisation times and currents are given for (on-site) non-destructive corrosion rate measurements on reinforcement steel in concrete....

  8. Savannah River Site Tank Cleaning: Corrosion Rate For One Versus Eight Percent Oxalic Acid Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2011-01-01

    Until recently, the use of oxalic acid for chemically cleaning the Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste tanks focused on using concentrated 4 and 8-wt% solutions. Recent testing and research on applicable dissolution mechanisms have concluded that under appropriate conditions, dilute solutions of oxalic acid (i.e., 1-wt%) may be more effective. Based on the need to maximize cleaning effectiveness, coupled with the need to minimize downstream impacts, SRS is now developing plans for using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution. A technology gap associated with using a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution was a dearth of suitable corrosion data. Assuming oxalic acid's passivation of carbon steel was proportional to the free oxalate concentration, the general corrosion rate (CR) from a 1-wt% solution may not be bound by those from 8-wt%. Therefore, after developing the test strategy and plan, the corrosion testing was performed. Starting with the envisioned process specific baseline solvent, a 1-wt% oxalic acid solution, with sludge (limited to Purex type sludge-simulant for this initial effort) at 75 C and agitated, the corrosion rate (CR) was determined from the measured weight loss of the exposed coupon. Environmental variations tested were: (a) Inclusion of sludge in the test vessel or assuming a pure oxalic acid solution; (b) acid solution temperature maintained at 75 or 45 C; and (c) agitation of the acid solution or stagnant. Application of select electrochemical testing (EC) explored the impact of each variation on the passivation mechanisms and confirmed the CR. The 1-wt% results were then compared to those from the 8-wt%. The immersion coupons showed that the maximum time averaged CR for a 1-wt% solution with sludge was less than 25-mils/yr for all conditions. For an agitated 8-wt% solution with sludge, the maximum time averaged CR was about 30-mils/yr at 50 C, and 86-mils/yr at 75 C. Both the 1-wt% and the 8-wt% testing demonstrated that if the sludge was removed from

  9. Experimental study on stress corrosion crack propagation rate of FV520B in carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ming; Li, Jianfeng; Chen, Songying; Qu, Yanpeng

    FV520B steel is a kind of precipitation hardening Martensitic stainless steel, it has high-strength, good plasticity and good corrosion resistance. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is one of the main corrosion failure mode for FV520B in industrial transportation of natural gas operation. For a better understanding the effect on SCC of FV520B, the improved wedge opening loading (WOL) specimens and constant displacement loading methods were employed in experimental research in carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide solution. The test results showed that the crack propagation rate is 1.941 × 10-7-5.748 × 10-7 mm/s, the stress intensity factor KISCC is not more than 36.83 MPa √{ m } . The rate increases with the increasing of the crack opening displacement. Under the condition of different initial loading, KISCC generally shows a decreasing tendency with the increase in H2S concentration, and the crack propagation rate showed an increasing trend substantially. For the enrichment of sulfur ion in the crack tip induced the generation of pitting corrosion, promoting the surrounding metal formed the corrosion micro batteries, the pit defects gradually extended and connected with the adjacent pit to form a small crack, leading to further propagation till cracking happened. Fracture microscopic morphology displayed typical brittle fracture phenomena, accompanying with trans-granular cracking, river shape and sector, many second cracks on the fracture surface.

  10. Theory and practice of corrosion related to ashes and deposits in a WtE boiler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbinnen, Bram; De Greef, Johan; Van Caneghem, Jo

    2018-03-01

    Corrosion of heat-exchanging components is one of the main operational problems in Waste-to-Energy plants, limiting the electrical efficiency that can be reached. Corrosion is mainly related to the devolatilization and/or formation of chlorides, sulphates and mixtures thereof on the heat-exchanging surfaces. Theoretical considerations on this corrosion were already put forward in literature, but this paper now for the first time combines theory with a large scale sampling campaign of several Waste-to-Energy plants. Based on the outcome of elemental and mineralogical analysis, the distribution of Cl and S in ashes sampled throughout the plant during normal operation is explained. Cl concentrations are high (15-20%) in the first empty pass, decrease in the second and third empty pass, but increase again in the convective part, whereas the S concentrations show an inverse behavior, with the highest concentrations (30%) observed in the second and third empty pass. Sampling of deposits on specific places where corrosion possibly occurred, gives a better insight in the mechanisms related to corrosion phenomena in real-scale WtE plants and provides practical evidence for some phenomena that were only assumed on the basis of theory or lab scale experiments before. More specific, it confirms the role of oxygen content, temperatures in the different stages of the boiler, the presence of polysulphates, Pb and Zb, and the concentrations of HCl and SO 2 in the flue gas for different types of boiler corrosion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Experimental studies of the effect of irradiation on the anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel in relation to the Belgian supercontainer concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy B.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes recent results from an investigation of the effects of γ-radiation on the anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel in cement, in relation to the Belgian Supercontainer Concept for radioactive waste disposal. Anaerobic corrosion rates were measured by monitoring hydrogen evolution and the corresponding electrochemical behaviour was investigated by measuring open circuit potential and linear polarisation resistance. The test medium was alkaline simulated porewater, at γ-irradiation dose rates of 0 and 25 Gy hr−1, temperatures of 25 °C and 80 °C and chloride concentrations of 0 and 100 mg/l. The effects of radiation on the corrosion behaviour were found to be small.

  12. Experimental studies of the effect of irradiation on the anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel in relation to the Belgian supercontainer concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, N. R.; Fennell, P. A. H.; Rance, A. P.; Winsley, R. J.; Reddy, B.; Kursten, B.

    2011-04-01

    This paper describes recent results from an investigation of the effects of γ-radiation on the anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel in cement, in relation to the Belgian Supercontainer Concept for radioactive waste disposal. Anaerobic corrosion rates were measured by monitoring hydrogen evolution and the corresponding electrochemical behaviour was investigated by measuring open circuit potential and linear polarisation resistance. The test medium was alkaline simulated porewater, at γ-irradiation dose rates of 0 and 25 Gy hr-1, temperatures of 25 °C and 80 °C and chloride concentrations of 0 and 100 mg/l. The effects of radiation on the corrosion behaviour were found to be small.

  13. Corrosion studies on PREPP waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, J.M.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.

    1984-05-01

    Deformation or Failure Test and Accelerated Corrosion Test procedures were conducted to investigate the effect of formulation variables on the corrosion of oversize waste in Process Experimental Pilot Plant (PREPP) concrete waste forms. The Deformation or Failure Test did not indicate substantial waste form swelling from corrosion. The presence or absence of corrosion inhibitor was the most significant factor relative to measured half-cell potentials identified in the Accelerated Corrosion Test. However, corrosion inhibitor was determined to be only marginally beneficial. While this study produced no evidence that corrosion is of sufficient magnitude to produce serious degradation of PREPP waste forms, the need for corrosion rate testing is suggested. 11 references, 4 figures, 8 tables

  14. Comparison between the corrosion forecast based on the potential measurement and the determination of the corrosion rate of the reinforcement bar by means of electrochemical techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castaneda, A.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The ASTA4 876-91 standard establishes a corrosion forecast of concrete reinforced bar by measuring the electrochemical potential. This forecast is based on thermodynamic considerations without taking into account the kinetic of the corrosion process. A comparison was made between the results obtained based on this standard and others using electrochemical techniques (Tafel, Rp, EIS, Electrochemical Noise. These techniques allows to obtain the corrosion rate in samples having 0.4, 0.5 and 0.66 water/cement ratios submitted to salt spray outdoors and by immersion in 3% saline solution during a test time of 20 months. Differences were detected between the results obtained using the ASTM standard and the electrochemical techniques used. The main difference is that samples submitted to immersion shows a higher probability of corrosion than samples submitted to salt spray; however, the electrochemical techniques showed the contrary concerning the corrosion kinetic process .A comparison respecting corrosion rate was also made between the results obtained by the different electrochemical techniques. It is very well known that all electrochemical techniques supposed always general corrosion except electrochemical noise. Using the technique the pitting index can be calculated. It shows that localized corrosion is the most predominant

    La norma ASTM 876-91 establece un pronóstico de corrosión de la barra de refuerzo del hormigón armado mediante la determinación de potenciales electroquímicos. Este pronóstico se basa en consideraciones termodinámicas, sin tener en cuenta la cinética del proceso de corrosión. Se comparan los resultados obtenidos aplicando esta norma con técnicas electroquímicas (Tafel, Rp, EIS, Ruido Electroquímico que permiten calcular la velocidad de corrosión en probetas con relaciones agua/cemento 0,4, 0,5 y 0,66 sometidas a niebla salina en condiciones naturales y en inmersión en solución salina al 3% durante un

  15. Corrosion/95 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The papers in this conference represent the latest technological advances in corrosion control and prevention. The following subject areas are covered: cathodic protection in natural waters; materials for fossil fuel combustion and conversion systems; modern problems in atmospheric corrosion; innovative ideas for controlling the decaying infrastructure; deposits and their effects on corrosion in industry; volatile high temperature and non aqueous corrosion inhibitors; corrosion of light-weight and precoated metals for automotive application; refining industry corrosion; corrosion in pulp and paper industry; arctic/cold weather corrosion; materials selection for waste incinerators and associated equipment; corrosion measurement technology; environmental cracking of materials; advancing technology in the coating industry; corrosion in gas treating; green inhibition; recent advances in corrosion control of rail equipment; velocity effects and erosion corrosion in oil and gas production; marine corrosion; corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; underground corrosion control; corrosion in potable and industrial water systems in buildings and its impact on environmental compliance; deposit related boiler tube failures; boiler systems monitoring and control; recent developments and experiences in reactive metals; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion and corrosion control for steel reinforced concrete; international symposium on the use of 12 and 13 Cr stainless steels in oil and gas production environments; subsea corrosion /erosion monitoring in production facilities; fiberglass reinforced pipe and tubulars in oilfield service; corrosion control technology in power transmission and distribution; mechanisms and methods of scale and deposit control; closing the loop -- results oriented cooling system monitoring and control; and minimization of aqueous discharge

  16. Experimental study on stress corrosion crack propagation rate of FV520B in carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Qin

    Full Text Available FV520B steel is a kind of precipitation hardening Martensitic stainless steel, it has high-strength, good plasticity and good corrosion resistance. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC is one of the main corrosion failure mode for FV520B in industrial transportation of natural gas operation. For a better understanding the effect on SCC of FV520B, the improved wedge opening loading (WOL specimens and constant displacement loading methods were employed in experimental research in carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide solution. The test results showed that the crack propagation rate is 1.941 × 10−7–5.748 × 10−7 mm/s, the stress intensity factor KISCC is not more than 36.83 MPa m. The rate increases with the increasing of the crack opening displacement. Under the condition of different initial loading, KISCC generally shows a decreasing tendency with the increase in H2S concentration, and the crack propagation rate showed an increasing trend substantially. For the enrichment of sulfur ion in the crack tip induced the generation of pitting corrosion, promoting the surrounding metal formed the corrosion micro batteries, the pit defects gradually extended and connected with the adjacent pit to form a small crack, leading to further propagation till cracking happened. Fracture microscopic morphology displayed typical brittle fracture phenomena, accompanying with trans-granular cracking, river shape and sector, many second cracks on the fracture surface. Keywords: FV520B, Wedge opening loading specimen, Stress corrosion cracking, Hydrogen sulfide

  17. Corrosion rate of steel embedded in blended Portland and fluid catalytic cracking catalyst residue (FC3R cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payá, J.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a study of the corrosion levels in steel bars embedded in mortars made with a blend of Portland cement and (0-20% spent fluid catalytic cracking catalyst residue (FC3R, with a variable (0.3-0.7 water/binder (w/b ratio. The specimens were stored in the following conditions: relative humidity of 40, 80 or 100% and CO2 concentrations of 5 and 100%. The steel corrosion rate was measured with polarization resistance techniques. In the absence of aggressive agents, the steel was found to remain duly passivated in mortars with an FC3R content of up to 15% under all the conditions of relative humidity tested. The reinforcement corrosion level in mortars with a w/b ratio of 0.3 and 15% FC3R subjected to accelerated carbonation was similar to the level observed in the unblended Portland cement control mortar.En este trabajo se ha estudiado el nivel de corrosión de barras de acero embebidas en morteros de cemento Portland con relación agua/material cementante (a/mc variable (0,3-0,7, en los que parte del cemento (0-20% se sustituyó por catalizador de craqueo usado (FC3R. Las condiciones de conservación de las probetas elaboradas fueron las siguientes: distintas humedades relativas (40, 80 y 100% y dos concentraciones de CO2 (5 y 100%. La velocidad de corrosión de los aceros se midió mediante la técnica de resistencia de polarización. Se ha podido determinar que, bajo las distintas condiciones de humedad relativa y ausencia de agresivo, los aceros se mantuvieron correctamente pasivados en los morteros con contenidos de FC3R de hasta el 15%. El nivel de corrosión que presenta el refuerzo embebidos en morteros con sustitución de un 15% de cemento por FC3R y relación a/mc 0,3, al ser sometidos a un proceso de carbonatación acelerada, era muy similar al mostrado por el mortero patrón, sin FC3R.

  18. Galvanic corrosion of copper-cast iron couples in relation to the Swedish radioactive waste canister concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, N.R.; Fennell, P.A.H.; Rance, A.P.; Werme, L.O.

    2004-01-01

    conditions the galvanic corrosion rates of iron coupled to copper are close to the values observed for anaerobic corrosion rates of uncoupled iron. The results from the work presented in the paper will be discussed in relation to understanding the evolution of the environment within the annulus of the SKB canister if premature failure of the outer copper canister were to occur. (authors)

  19. Effect of caffeine inhibitor in corrosion rate and microstructure of KS01 carbon steel and AISI 1045 at media sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulistioso Giat S; Setyo Purwanto; Deswita; Ari Handayani; Berta Vidyananda

    2013-01-01

    Many synthetic materials are good inhibitors for the prevention of corrosion . Many inhibitors are toxic, because of the influence of these toxic properties, recently use organic materials as corrosion inhibitors, that are not hazardous and environmentally friendly. In this study caffeine compounds used as corrosion inhibitors. This compound could be used as corrosion inhibitor because of the existence of their chemical groups that containing free electron pair, that is nitrogen. Corrosion rate testing conducted in sea water medium taken from the Northern region of Indramayu with variations of the concentration of caffeine 0, 50, 100, 150, and 200 ppm to determine the optimum concentration of caffeine in corrosion rate of carbon steel AISI 1045 and KS01 that a widely used on the cooling system in the industry. Corrosion rate of KS-01 steel before used in inhibitor media is 25,07 mpy that less than corrosion rate of carbon steel AISI 1045, is 45,82 mpy . The results of this study indicate that caffeine is able to inhibit the corrosion rate of both of samples with optimum efficiency KS01 for 64.38%, and AISI 1045 of 66.63%. The optimum concentration of caffeine to inhibited AISI 1045 is 150 ppm and for KS01 is 100 ppm,. Beside that analysis of microstructure for both samples have done, for media before and after inhibitor addition. (author)

  20. Evaluation of flow accelerated corrosion by coupled analysis of corrosion and flow dynamics (1), major features of coupled analysis and application for evaluation of wall thinning rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naitoh, Masanori; Uchida, Shunsuke; Okada, Hidetoshi; Uehara, Yasushi; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2009-01-01

    Six calculation steps have been prepared for predicting flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) occurrence and evaluating wall thinning rate. (1) Flow pattern and temperature in each elemental volume along the flow path are obtained with a 1D plant system code, (2) Corrosive conditions, e.g., oxygen concentration and electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) along the flow path are calculated with a hydrazine-oxygen reaction code, (3) Precise flow patterns and mass transfer coefficients at the structure surface are calculated with a 3D CFD code, (4) Danger zones are evaluated by combining major FAC parameters, (5) Wall thinning rates are calculated with the coupled models of static electrochemical analysis and dynamic double oxide layer analysis at the identified danger zone, and then, (6) Residual life and effects of countermeasures can be evaluated. Anodic and cathodic current densities and ECPs were calculated with the static electrochemistry model, and ferrous ion release rate determined by the anodic current density was used as input for the dynamic double oxide layer model. Thickness of the oxide film and its characteristics determined by the dynamic double oxide layer model were used for the electrochemistry model to determine the resistances of cathodic current from the bulk to the surface and anodic current from the surface to the bulk. The calculated results of the coupled models had been compared with the data measured at operating Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plants and it was demonstrated that the calculated results had good agreements with the measured ones. 6 step-evaluation procedures for liquid droplet impingement (LDI) were also proposed. (author)

  1. The corrosion rate and the hydrogen absorption behavior of titanium under reducing condition-III. Research document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, H.; Taniguchi, N.; Kawakami, S.

    2005-03-01

    Titanium is one of the candidate materials for overpacks as a high corrosion resistance metal. At the initial stage of repository, oxidizing condition will be given around the overpack because oxygen will be brought from the ground. The oxygen will be consumed by the reaction with impurities in buffer material or corrosion of overpack, and reducing condition will be achieved around the overpack. With the changing of redox condition, the water reduction becomes to dominate the cathodic reaction accompanying hydrogen generation. Crevice corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement are main causes of the damage of long term integrity of titanium overpack. However, it is not known about the corrosion resistance and hydrogen absorption behavior of titanium under reduction condition. In this study, the completely sealed ampoule test and the immersion test of titanium in aqueous solution and bentonite was carried out. In order to obtain reliable data about the hydrogen generation rate and the ratio of hydrogen absorption in titanium. From the result of 3 years immersion tests, corrosion rate of titanium were estimated to be in the order of 10 -2 ∼10 -1 μm/y in the aqueous solution, and 10 -3 ∼10 -2 μm/y in bentonite. This value is almost the same as the last report. Almost all the hydrogen generated by corrosion was absorbed in titanium in the immersion tests in completely sealed ampoule. In the examination that changed each parameter, it was suggested that the amount of the hydrogen absorption become 2∼3 times in 1M HCO 3- and pH13. (author)

  2. Application of electromagnetic fields to improve the removal rate of radioactive corrosion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Tae Young; Lee, Kun Jai; Song, Min Chul

    2004-01-01

    To comply with increasingly strict regulations for protection against radiation exposure, many nuclear power plants have been working ceaselessly to reduce and control both the radiation sources within power plants and the radiation exposure experienced by operational and maintenance personnel. Many research studies have shown that deposits of irradiated corrosion products on the surfaces of coolant systems are the main cause of occupational radiation exposure in nuclear power plants. These corrosion product deposits on the fuel-clad surface are also known to be main factors in the onset of Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA). Hence, there is a great deal of ongoing research on water chemistry and corrosion processes. In this study, a magnetic filter with permanent magnets was devised to remove the corrosion products in the coolant stream by taking advantage of the magnetic properties of the corrosion particles. Experiments using permanent magnets to filter the corrosion products demonstrated a removal efficiency of over 90% for particles above 5 μm. This finding led to the construction of an electromagnetic device that causes the metallic particulates to flocculate into larger aggregates of about 5 μm in diameter by using a novel application of electromagnetic flocculation on radioactive corrosion products

  3. Hydrogen-related stress corrosion cracking in line pipe steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo

    1997-01-01

    A correlation between hydrogen concentration (C0) and the critical stress intensity factor for propagation of hydrogen-related cracks has been established by fracture mechanical testing of CT-specimens for the heat affected zone of an X-70 pipeline steel. This has been compared with field...

  4. Corrosion Fatigue in District Heating Water Tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maahn, Ernst Emanuel

    1996-01-01

    Three candidate materials for construction of buffer tanks for district heating water have been tested for corrosion fatigue properties in a district heating water environment. The investigation included Slow Strain Rate Testing of plain tensile specimens, crack initiation testing by corrosion...... fatigue of plain tensile specimens and crack growth rate determination for Compact Tensile Specimens under corrosion fatigue conditions. The three materials are equal with respect to stress corrosion sensibility and crack initiation. Crack growth rate is increased with a factor of 4-6 relative to an inert...

  5. Prediction of pure water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in nickel base alloys using crack growth rate models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.D.; Krasodomski, H.T.; Lewis, N.; Makar, G.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Ford/Andresen slip dissolution SCC model, originally developed for stainless steel components in BWR environments, has been applied to Alloy 600 and Alloy X-750 tested in deaerated pure water chemistry. A method is described whereby the crack growth rates measured in compact tension specimens can be used to estimate crack growth in a component. Good agreement was found between model prediction and measured SCC in X-750 threaded fasteners over a wide range of temperatures, stresses, and material condition. Most data support the basic assumption of this model that cracks initiate early in life. The evidence supporting a particular SCC mechanism is mixed. Electrochemical repassivation data and estimates of oxide fracture strain indicate that the slip dissolution model can account for the observed crack growth rates, provided primary rather than secondary creep rates are used. However, approximately 100 cross-sectional TEM foils of SCC cracks including crack tips reveal no evidence of enhanced plasticity or unique dislocation patterns at the crack tip or along the crack to support a classic slip dissolution mechanism. No voids, hydrides, or microcracks are found in the vicinity of the crack tips creating doubt about classic hydrogen related mechanisms. The bulk oxide films exhibit a surface oxide which is often different than the oxides found within a crack. Although bulk chromium concentration affects the rate of SCC, analytical data indicates the mechanism does not result from chromium depletion at the grain boundaries. The overall findings support a corrosion/dissolution mechanism but not one necessarily related to slip at the crack tip

  6. An X-ray diffraction study of corrosion products from low carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, A. L.

    2003-01-01

    It was found in earlier work a decrease in the corrosion rate from low carbon steel when it was subjected to the action of a combined pollutant concentration (SO 4 ''2-=10''-4 M+Cl=1.5x 10''-3 M). It was also found that large magnetic content of the rust was related to higher corrosion rates. In the present study corrosion products are further analyzed by means of X-ray diffraction to account for composition changes during the corrosion process. it is found that lepidocrocite and goethite are the dominant components for the short-term corrosion in all batches considered while for log-term corrosion lepidocrite and goethite dominates if the corrosion rates is low and magnetite dominates if the corrosion rate is high. The mechanism for decreasing the corrosion rate is related to the inhibition of magnetite production at this particular concentration. (Author) 15 refs

  7. Corrosion Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Charles V.

    A description is provided for a Corrosion and Corrosion Control course offered in the Continuing Engineering Education Program at the General Motors Institute (GMI). GMI is a small cooperative engineering school of approximately 2,000 students who alternate between six-week periods of academic study and six weeks of related work experience in…

  8. Corrosion of graphite composites in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christner, L. G.; Dhar, H. P.; Farooque, M.; Kush, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Polymers, polymer-graphite composites and different carbon materials are being considered for many of the fuel cell stack components. Exposure to concentrated phosphoric acid in the fuel cell environment and to high anodic potential results in corrosion. Relative corrosion rates of these materials, failure modes, plausible mechanisms of corrosion and methods for improvement of these materials are investigated.

  9. Analysis of Gamma Dose Rate Caused by Corrosion Products inside the Containment Building of Yonngwang Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3 During Shutdown Period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Wi Ho; Kim, Jae Cheon; Kim, Soon Young; Kim, Jong Kyung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Occupational radiation exposure(ORE) of nuclear power plant(NPP) workers mainly occurs during the shutdown period. Major radioactive sources are the corrosion products released from the reactor coolant system(RCS). The corrosion products consist of circulating crud and deposited crud. Major radioactive corrosion products, {sup 58}Co and {sup 60}Co, are known to contribute approximately more than 70% of the total ORE. In this study, the corrosion products regarding cobalt were evaluated during the shutdown period, and gamma dose rates caused by them were calculated at the main working area inside the containment building of the Yonggwang NPP Unit 3.

  10. Electrokinetic and electrochemical corrosion studies related to crud formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scenini, Fabio; Palumbo, Gaetano; Stevens, Nicholas; Cook, Tony; Banks, Andrew

    2012-09-01

    A potentially important mechanism for the flow-induced deposition of CRUD from pressurised high temperature primary water is the effect of 'streaming potentials' that develop across the electrochemical double layer of a metallic surface as a result of fluid flow across a pressure gradient or orifice. Thus, under such conditions, streaming currents develop normal to a surface and may result in preferential oxidation, for example of dissolved ferrous to ferric ions with their subsequent deposition as an oxide. The approach presented in this paper was to consider the electrokinetic problem is to firstly consider the magnitude of currents that can be developed under a given set of flow/mass transport conditions and, secondly, to consider the way in which these relatively small currents might give rise to oxide deposition. Electrochemical measurements on 304L samples were carried out over a range of temperatures in hydrogenated, alkaline water. The test conditions were chosen in order to simulate PWR primary water conditions. Furthermore, in order to facilitate the electrochemical studies, the ferrous ion concentration in the solution was also enhanced by the presence of a mild steel plate left in the autoclave to corrode. By employing the cyclic voltammetry technique interpreted using the Randles-Sevcik equation it was possible to calculate the concentration of ferrous ions and their diffusion coefficient. A miniature flow cell was designed for the purpose of creating regions of accelerated flow with consequent formation of anodic and cathodic regions so as to be able to measure the streaming currents. A study was carried out in order to better understand the potential which is associated with the streaming potential as function of the velocity and temperature at fixed pH. (authors)

  11. Corrosion/94 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The approximately 500 papers from this conference are divided into the following sections: Rail transit systems--stray current corrosion problems and control; Total quality in the coatings industry; Deterioration mechanisms of alloys at high temperatures--prevention and remediation; Research needs and new developments in oxygen scavengers; Computers in corrosion control--knowledge based system; Corrosion and corrosivity sensors; Corrosion and corrosion control of steel reinforced concrete structures; Microbiologically influenced corrosion; Practical applications in mitigating CO 2 corrosion; Mineral scale deposit control in oilfield-related operations; Corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; Testing nonmetallics for life prediction; Refinery industry corrosion; Underground corrosion control; Mechanisms and applications of deposit and scale control additives; Corrosion in power transmission and distribution systems; Corrosion inhibitor testing and field application in oil and gas systems; Decontamination technology; Ozone in cooling water applications, testing, and mechanisms; Corrosion of water and sewage treatment, collection, and distribution systems; Environmental cracking of materials; Metallurgy of oil and gas field equipment; Corrosion measurement technology; Duplex stainless steels in the chemical process industries; Corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; Advances in cooling water treatment; Marine corrosion; Performance of materials in environments applicable to fossil energy systems; Environmental degradation of and methods of protection for military and aerospace materials; Rail equipment corrosion; Cathodic protection in natural waters; Characterization of air pollution control system environments; and Deposit-related problems in industrial boilers. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  12. Reinforcement corrosion in alkaline chloride media with reduced oxygen concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, C.; Fullea, J.; Toro, L.; Martinez, I.; Rebolledo, N.

    2013-01-01

    It is commonly considered that the corrosion of steel in concrete is controlled by the oxygen content of the pore solution and there are service life models that relate the corrosion rate to the amount of oxygen. It is also commonly believed that in water saturated conditions the oxygen content in the pores is negligible and that underwater there is no risk of depassivation and the corrosion rate is very low. However, the available data on corrosion rates in immersed conditions do not indicate such performance; on the contrary corrosion develops when sufficient chloride reaches the reinforcement. In the present paper, results are presented for tests performed in alkaline chloride solutions that were purged with nitrogen to reduce the oxygen content. The results indicate that at very low oxygen concentrations, corrosion may develop in the presence of chlorides. The presence or absence of corrosion is influenced by the amount of chloride, the corrosion potential and the steel surface condition. (authors)

  13. The Effect of superficial cracks of the concrete on the behavior and corrosion rate of steel rebars in Persian Golf (Booshehr)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afshar, A.; Rajabi, A.

    2001-01-01

    The presence of superficial cracks in concrete increases the diffusion of destructive agents into concrete and the corrosion of rebars will take place. In the present work, the effects of cracks width on the behavior and corrosion rate of steel rebars in the concrete containing cements type I and II at Persian Gulf water have been studied. The results show that the corrosion rate of steel rebars in the concrete with cracks width less than 0.4 mm is negligible, but with increasing the cracks width to 0.7 mm, the corrosion rate increase rapidly. Also, the corrosion gate of gebars in the concrete containing cement type I is more than that of cement type II. The visual inspection of the surface area of gebars shows that the corroded area is 6-7 times of the crack width and length

  14. Vehicle accelerated corrosion test procedures for automotive in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuar Liza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An accelerated corrosion test, known as proving ground accelerated test, is commonly performed by automotive manufacturers to evaluate the corrosion performance of a vehicle. The test combines corrosion and durability inputs to detect potential failures that may occur during in-service conditions. Currently, the test is conducted at an external test center overseas. Such test is aimed to simulate the effects of one year accelerated corrosion in severe corrosive environment of the north-east and south east of America. However, the test results obtained do not correlate with the actual corrosion conditions observed in the Malaysian market, which is likely attributed to the different test environment of the tropical climate of vehicles in service. Therefore, a vehicle accelerated corrosion test procedure that suits the Malaysian market is proposed and benchmarked with other global car manufacturers that have their own dedicated corrosion test procedure. In the present work, a test track is used as the corrosion test ground and consists of various types of roads for structural durability exposures. Corrosion related facilities like salt trough, mud trough and gravel road are constructed as addition to the existing facilities. The establishment of accelerated corrosion test facilities has contributed to the development of initial accelerated corrosion test procedure for the national car manufacturer. The corrosion exposure is monitored by fitting test coupons at the underbody of test vehicle using mass loss technique so that the desired corrosion rate capable of simulating the real time corrosion effects for its target market.

  15. The effect of prior deformation on stress corrosion cracking growth rates of Alloy 600 materials in a simulated pressurized water reactor primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Seiya; Lu Zhanpeng; Ito, Yuzuru; Takeda, Yoichi; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2008-01-01

    The effect of prior deformation on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) growth rates of Alloy 600 materials in a simulated pressurized water reactor primary water environment is studied. The prior deformation was introduced by welding procedure or by cold working. Values of Vickers hardness in the Alloy 600 weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) and in the cold worked (CW) Alloy 600 materials are higher than that in the base metal. The significantly hardened area in the HAZ is within a distance of about 2-3 mm away from the fusion line. Electron backscatter diffraction (EPSD) results show significant amounts of plastic strain in the Alloy 600 HAZ and in the cold worked Alloy 600 materials. Stress corrosion cracking growth rate tests were performed in a simulated pressurized water reactor primary water environment. Extensive intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) was found in the Alloy 600 HAZ, 8% and 20% CW Alloy 600 specimens. The crack growth rate in the Alloy 600 HAZ is close to that in the 8% CW base metal, which is significantly lower than that in the 20% CW base metal, but much higher than that in the as-received base metal. Mixed intergranular and transgranular SCC was found in the 40% CW Alloy 600 specimen. The crack growth rate in the 40% CW Alloy 600 was lower than that in the 20% CW Alloy 600. The effect of hardening on crack growth rate can be related to the crack tip mechanics, the sub-microstructure (or subdivision of grain) after cross-rolling, and their interactions with the oxidation kinetics

  16. Connecting Related Rates and Differential Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Keith

    2012-01-01

    This article points out a simple connection between related rates and differential equations. The connection can be used for in-class examples or homework exercises, and it is accessible to students who are familiar with separation of variables.

  17. Experimental Investigation of Sulfuric Acid Condensation and Corrosion Rate in Motored Bukh DV24 Diesel Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjemtrup, Lars; Cordtz, Rasmus Faurskov; Meyer, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The work conducted in this paper presents a novel experimental setup to study sulfuric acid cold corrosion of cylinder liners in large two-stroke marine diesel engines. The process is simulated in a motored light duty BUKH DV24 diesel engine where the charge air contain known amounts of H2SO4 and H......2O vapor. Liner corrosion is measured as iron accumulation in the lubeoil. Similarly sulfuric acid condensation is assessed by measuring the accumulation of sulfur in the lube oil. To clarify the corrosive effect of sulfuric acid the lube oil utilized for experiments is a sulfur free neutral oil...... without alkaline additives (Chevron Neutral Oil 600R). Iron and sulfur accumulation in the lube oil is analyzed withan Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (ED-XRF) apparatus. Three test cases with different H2SO4 concentrations are run. Results reveal good agreement between sulfuric acid injection flow...

  18. Corrosion problems related to the containment of high-level nuclear waste for disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothwell, G.P.

    1981-01-01

    The subject is examined under the headings: introduction (nature of problem; system of barriers which will initially contain the wasteform and subsequently limit the rate of transport of products from the wasteform to the external environment); environmental data (disposal in land-based repositories; disposal on or in the deep seabed); design philosophies and materials data (design; criteria for materials selection (kinetics of corrosion)); specific materials considerations (environmental parameters -temperature, pressure, heat transfer and radiation effects; single metals and alloys - steels, nickel based alloys, copper, lead, titanium, aluminium oxide); alternative approaches; an overview - information needs; summary. (U.K.)

  19. Corrosion problems related to the containment of high-level nuclear waste for disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothwell, G P

    1981-10-01

    The subject is examined under the headings: introduction (nature of problem; system of barriers which will initially contain the wasteform and subsequently limit the rate of transport of products from the wasteform to the external environment); environmental data (disposal in land-based repositories; disposal on or in the deep seabed); design philosophies and materials data (design; criteria for materials selection (kinetics of corrosion)); specific materials considerations (environmental parameters -temperature, pressure, heat transfer and radiation effects; single metals and alloys - steels, nickel based alloys, copper, lead, titanium, aluminium oxide); alternative approaches; an overview - information needs; summary.

  20. INES rating of radiation protection related events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hort, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation, based on the draft Manual, a short review of the use of the INES rating of events concerning radiation protection is given, based on a new INES User's Manual edition. The presentation comprises a brief history of the scale development, general description of the scale and the main principles of the INES rating. Several examples of the use of the scale for radiation protection related events are mentioned. In the presentation, the term 'radiation protection related events' is used for radiation source and transport related events outside the nuclear installations. (authors)

  1. Spent nuclear fuel project recommended reaction rate constants for corrosion of N-Reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, T.D.; Pajunen, A.L.

    1998-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) established the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNF Project) to address safety and environmental concerns associated with deteriorating spent nuclear fuel presently stored in the Hanford Site's K Basins. The SNF Project has been tasked by the DOE with moving the spent N-Reactor fuel from wet storage to contained dry storage in order to reduce operating costs and environmental hazards. The chemical reactivity of the fuel must be understood at each process step and during long-term dry storage. Normally, the first step would be to measure the N-fuel reactivity before attempting thermal-hydraulic transfer calculations; however, because of the accelerated project schedule, the initial modeling was performed using literature values for uranium reactivity. These literature values were typically found for unirradiated, uncorroded metal. It was fully recognized from the beginning that irradiation and corrosion effects could cause N-fuel to exhibit quite different reactivities than those commonly found in the literature. Even for unirradiated, uncorroded uranium metal, many independent variables affect uranium metal reactivity resulting in a wide scatter of data. Despite this wide reactivity range, it is necessary to choose a defensible model and estimate the reactivity range of the N-fuel until actual reactivity can be established by characterization activities. McGillivray, Ritchie, and Condon developed data and/or models that apply for certain samples over limited temperature ranges and/or reaction conditions (McGillivray 1994, Ritchie 1981 and 1986, and Condon 1983). These models are based upon small data sets and have relatively large correlation coefficients

  2. In-situ corrosion measurements of WWII shipwrecks in Chuuk Lagoon, quantification of decay mechanisms and rates of deterioration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Donald Macleod

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on a series of measurements taken on WWII historic shipwrecks that resulted from the effects of Operation Hailstone in February 1944 on the Japanese merchant fleet which was assembled in Chuuk lagoon, Federated States of Micronesia. More than 65 shipwrecks and 250 aircraft were sunk during two main bombing raids. The vessels lost covered a wide range of underwater orientation and water depths and so provided a perfect suite of corrosion experiments. Since the fuel on board the aircraft was either readily burnt at the time or was lost through volatilisation, the wrecked planes present no pollution problems today. However the bunker fuel kept inside on-board storage tanks does present a real conservation management crisis. In-situ measurements on many vessels have determined how water depth, the localised wreck topography, dissolved oxygen levels, temperature and salinity affects the corrosion rate of cast iron and mild steel. Thus corrosion rates can be calculated with confidence.

  3. Measurement of Localized Corrosion Rates at Inclusion Particles in AA7075 by In Situ Three Dimensional (3D) X-ray Synchrotron Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sudhanshu S.; Williams, Jason J.; Stannard, Tyler J.; Xiao, Xianghui; De Carlo, Francesco; Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2016-03-01

    In situ X-ray synchrotron tomography was used to measure the localized corrosion rate of Mg2Si particles present in 7075 aluminum alloys in deionized ultra-filtered (DIUF) water. The evolution of hydrogen bubbles was captured as a function of time and the measured volume was used to calculate the local corrosion rate of Mg2Si particles. It was shown that in the absence of chloride ions, stress was needed to create fresh particle surfaces, either by fracture or debonding, to initiate corrosion at the particles.

  4. What are the advantages and disadvantages of imaging modalities to diagnose wear-related corrosion problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Denis; Barrack, Robert L; Potter, Hollis G

    2014-12-01

    Adverse tissue reactions are known to occur after total hip arthroplasty using both conventional and metal-on-metal (MoM) bearings and after MoM hip resurfacing arthroplasty (SRA). A variety of imaging tools, including ultrasound (US), CT, and MRI, have been used to diagnose problems associated with wear after MoM hip arthroplasty and corrosion at the head-trunnion junction; however, the relative advantages and disadvantages of each remain a source of controversy. The purposes of this review were to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of (1) US; (2) CT; and (3) MRI as diagnostic tools in the assessment of wear-related corrosion problems after hip arthroplasty. A systematic literature review was performed through Medline, EMBASE, Scopus CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library without time restriction using search terms related to THA, SRA, US, CT, MRI, adverse tissue reactions, and corrosion. Inclusion criteria were Level I through IV studies in the English language, whereas expert opinions and case reports were excluded. The quality of included studies was judged by their level of evidence, method of intervention allocation, outcome assessments, and followup of patients. Four hundred ninety unique results were returned and 40 articles were reviewed. The prevalence of adverse local tissue reactions in both asymptomatic and symptomatic patients varies based on the method of evaluation (US, CT, MRI) and imaging protocols. US is accessible and relatively inexpensive, yet has not been used to report synovial thicknesses in the setting of wear-related corrosion. CT scans are highly sensitive and provide information regarding component positioning but are limited in providing enhanced soft tissue contrast and require ionizing radiation. MRI has shown promise in predicting both the presence and severity of adverse local tissue reactions but is more expensive. All three imaging modalities have a role in the assessment of adverse local tissue reactions and tribocorrosion

  5. Prediction equations for corrosion rates of a A-537 and A-516 steels in Double Shell Slurry, Future PUREX, and Hanford Facilities Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divine, J.R.; Bowen, W.M.; Mackey, D.B.; Bates, D.J.; Pool, K.H.

    1985-06-01

    Even though the interest in the corrosion of radwaste tanks goes back to the mid-1940's when waste storage was begun, and a fair amount of corrosion work has been done since then, the changes in processes and waste types have outpaced the development of new data pertinent to the new double shell tanks. As a consequence, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) began a development of corrosion data on a broad base of waste compositions in 1980. The objective of the program was to provide operations personnel with corrosion rate data as a function of waste temperature and composition. The work performed in this program examined A-537 tank steel in Double Shell Slurry and Future PUREX Wastes, at temperatures between 40 and 180 0 C as well as in Hanford Facilities Waste at 25 and 50 0 C. In general, the corrosion rates were less than 1 mpy (0.001 in./y) and usually less than 0.5 mpy. Excessive corrosion rates (>1 mpy) were only found in dilute waste compositions or in concentrated caustic compositions at temperatures above 140 0 C. Stress corrosion cracking was only observed under similar conditions. The results are presented as polynomial prediction equations with examples of the output of existing computer codes. The codes are not provided in the text but are available from the authors. 12 refs., 5 figs., 19 tabs

  6. Corrosion and protection of magnesium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghali, E. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Mining and Metallurgy

    2000-07-01

    The oxide film on magnesium offers considerable surface protection in rural and some industrial environments and the corrosion rate lies between that of aluminum and low carbon steels. Galvanic coupling of magnesium alloys, high impurity content such as Ni, Fe, Cu and surface contamination are detrimental for corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys. Alloying elements can form secondary particles which are noble to the Mg matrix, thereby facilitating corrosion, or enrich the corrosion product thereby possibly inhibiting the corrosion rate. Bimetallic corrosion resistance can be increased by fluxless melt protection, choice of compatible alloys, insulating materials, and new high-purity alloys. Magnesium is relatively insensible to oxygen concentration. Pitting, corrosion in the crevices, filiform corrosion are observed. Granular corrosion of magnesium alloys is possible due to the cathodic grain-boundary constituent. More homogeneous microstructures tend to improve corrosion resistance. Under fatigue loading conditions, microcrack initiation in Mg alloys is related to slip in preferentially oriented grains. Coating that exclude the corrosive environments can provide the primary defense against corrosion fatigue. Magnesium alloys that contain neither aluminum nor zinc are the most SCC resistant. Compressive surface residual stresses as that created by short peening increase SCC resistance. Cathodic polarization or cladding with a SCC resistant sheet alloy are good alternatives. Effective corrosion prevention for magnesium alloy components and assemblies should start at the design stage. Selective surface preparation, chemical treatment and coatings are recommended. Oil application, wax coating, anodizing, electroplating, and painting are possible alternatives. Recently, it is found that a magnesium hydride layer, created on the magnesium surface by cathodic charging in aqueous solution is a good base for painting. (orig.)

  7. Update of the water chemistry effect on the flow-accelerated corrosion rate of carbon steel: influence of hydrazine, boric acid, ammonia, morpholine and ethanolamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavageau, E.-M.; De Bouvier, O.; Trevin, S.; Bretelle, J.-L.; Dejoux, L.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of the water chemistry on Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) affecting carbon steel components has been studied for many years and is relatively well known and taken into account by the models. Nonetheless, experimental studies were conducted in the last few years at EDF on the CIROCO loop in order to check the influence of the water chemistry parameters (hydrazine, boric acid, ammonia, morpholine and ethanolamine) on the FAC rate of carbon steel in one phase flow conditions. The hydrazine impact on the FAC rate was shown to be minor in EDF's chemistry recommendation range, compared to other parameters' effects such as the pH effect. The presence of boric acid in the nominal secondary circuit conditions was negligible. Finally, as expected, the nature of the chemical conditioning (ammonia, morpholine or ethanolamine) did not modify the FAC rate, the influencing chemical variable being the at-temperature pH in one-phase flow conditions. (author)

  8. Related Rates and the Speed of Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althoen, S. C.; Weidner, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    Standard calculus textbooks often include a related rates problem involving light cast onto a straight line by a revolving light source. Mathematical aspects to these problems (both in the solution and in the method by which that solution is obtained) are examined. (JN)

  9. New corrosion issues in gas sweetening plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, R.G. (CLI International and Asperger Technologies, Houston, TX (United States))

    Gas treating plants are experiencing corrosion problems which impact on efficiency and safety. While general corrosion is not particularly hazardous in the gas processing industry, local corrosion is very dangerous since it has several different mechanisms, all of which have dangerously high rates, and it occurs at locations which are hard to find and hard to predict. A newly discovered, velocity-dependent type of corrosion is reported. It is related to yet-undefined species which cause excessively high corrosion in areas of turbulence. This accelerated corrosion is not due to erosion or cavitation, but to a diffusion-limited reaction accelerated by turbulence. A full-flow test loop was built to evaluate the corrosiveness of gas plant solutions at their normal temperature and flow rates. Test runs were conducted with Co[sub 2]-loaded amine solutions for periods of 12 days. Carbon steel specimens mounted in the test loop were examined and corrosion rates calculated. Chromium alloys were shown to be attacked by corrodents in the low-velocity part of the loop and very aggressively attacked in the high-velocity part. The tests demonstrate the need for rigorous monitoring of corrosion in areas of higher velocity such as piping elbows and other points of turbulence. 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Approach to mitigate intergranular stress corrosion cracking and dose rate reduction rate by water chemistry control in Tokai-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisamune, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) had been working on material replacement and measures to mitigate stress in order to maintain the integrity of the structural material of Tokai-Daini nuclear power plant (Tokai-2, BWR, 1,100 MWe; commercial operation started on November 28, 1978). In addition, as Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) environmental mitigation measures, we have been reducing the sulfate ion concentration in the reactor water by improving the regeneration method of the ion exchange resin at condensate purification system. Furthermore, in conducting the SCC environmental mitigation measures by applying hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) and HWC during start-up (HDS), we have been reducing the oxidizing agent concentration in the reactor water. On the other hand, as a plant that has not installed condensate filters, we have been working on feed water iron concentration reduction measures in Tokai-2 as part of the dose reduction measures. Therefore, we have improved condensate demineralizer's ion exchange resin and the ion exchange resin cleaning method using the ARCS (Advanced Resin Cleaning System) in order to improve the iron removal performance of condensate demineralizer. This document reports the improvement effect of the SCC environmental mitigation measures and the dose reduction measures by water chemistry management at Tokai-2. In addition, the dose reduction effect of the recently applied zinc injection, and the Electrochemical Corrosion Potential (ECP) monitoring plan under the On-Line Noble Chemical Addition (OLNC™) to be implemented later shall be introduced. (author)

  11. Influence of tannin content in Terminalia catappa leaves extracts resulted from maceration extraction on decreasing corrosion rate for mild steel in 1M H2SO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramudita, M.; Sukirno; Nasikin, M.

    2018-04-01

    The ability of natural compounds as corrosion inhibitors is necessary to obtain safe corrosion inhibitors for the environment. The tannin compounds derived from plant extract has the ability to decrease the corrosion rate. The purpose of this research is to find the ability of tannin compounds in Terminalia catappa leaves extracts to decrease corrosion rate on mild steel. Terminalia catappa leaves that have been mashed in ethanol solvent extraction using maceration with the variable time 2.4 and 6 days. Mild steel that has been on the sandpaper and cleaned then soak into the 1 M H2SO4. Terminalia catappa leaves extract concentration used is 0, 250, 500, 500, 750, 1000 ppm, the immersion time is 3.6 and 9 hours. Calculating of corrosion rate is used the weight loss method, the analysis of the tannin concentration using GC-MS. The results indicate that highest tannin content equal to 7.23% in 6 days maceration time. The result showed that the corrosion rate was reduced in the presence of tannin content in Terminalia catappa leaves extract.

  12. Evaluation of susceptibility of high strength steels to delayed fracture by using cyclic corrosion test and slow strain rate test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Songjie; Zhang Zuogui; Akiyama, Eiji; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki; Zhang Boping

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate susceptibilities of high strength steels to delayed fracture, slow strain rate tests (SSRT) of notched bar specimens of AISI 4135 with tensile strengths of 1300 and 1500 MPa and boron-bearing steel with 1300 MPa have been performed after cyclic corrosion test (CCT). During SSRT the humidity around the specimen was kept high to keep absorbed diffusible hydrogen. The fracture stresses of AISI 4135 steels decreased with increment of diffusible hydrogen content which increased with CCT cycles. Their delayed fracture susceptibilities could be successfully evaluated in consideration of both influence of hydrogen content on mechanical property and hydrogen entry.

  13. Evaluation of susceptibility of high strength steels to delayed fracture by using cyclic corrosion test and slow strain rate test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Songjie [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Hidian Zone, Beijing 100083 (China); Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Zhang Zuogui [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Akiyama, Eiji [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)], E-mail: AKIYAMA.Eiji@nims.go.jp; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Zhang Boping [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Hidian Zone, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate susceptibilities of high strength steels to delayed fracture, slow strain rate tests (SSRT) of notched bar specimens of AISI 4135 with tensile strengths of 1300 and 1500 MPa and boron-bearing steel with 1300 MPa have been performed after cyclic corrosion test (CCT). During SSRT the humidity around the specimen was kept high to keep absorbed diffusible hydrogen. The fracture stresses of AISI 4135 steels decreased with increment of diffusible hydrogen content which increased with CCT cycles. Their delayed fracture susceptibilities could be successfully evaluated in consideration of both influence of hydrogen content on mechanical property and hydrogen entry.

  14. Methodology to evaluate the crack growth rate by stress corrosion cracking in dissimilar metals weld in simulated environment of PWR nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paula, Raphael G.; Figueiredo, Celia A.; Rabelo, Emerson G.

    2013-01-01

    Inconel alloys weld metal is widely used to join dissimilar metals in nuclear reactors applications. It was recently observed failures of weld components in plants, which have triggered an international effort to determine reliable data on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of this material in reactor environment. The objective of this work is to develop a methodology to determine the crack growth rate caused by stress corrosion in Inconel alloy 182, using the specimen (Compact Tensile) in simulated PWR environment. (author)

  15. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO 2 corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  16. Laboratory investigations on the corrosion rate of A42 carbon steel in various secondary circuit chemistries representative of hydraulic tests conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brussieux, C.; Clinard, M.H.; Guillodo, M.; Alos-Ramos, O.

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia and hydrazine are currently used in the chemical conditioning of steam generators hydraulic test medium to minimize the corrosion rate of carbon steels. However, hydrazine is classified carcinogenic by the European Commission. Significant effort is therefore ongoing to limit its use or even replace it. The results presented in this paper were obtained in the frame of an EDF and AREVA research program on the subject. The corrosion rate of carbon steel in alkaline media with hydrazine was thoroughly studied. However, most studies concern polished coupons and very few data are available for carbon steel covered with oxides layer(s) representative of the layer(s) which can be found in a SG after operation. In this context, the corrosion rate at 25°C of carbon steel pre-oxidized by an autoclave treatment was studied. The tests coupons were submitted to a secondary circuit chemical conditioning treatment in an autoclave at 280°C during 30 days prior to the corrosion rate measurement. The corrosion rates were measured during two months by an electrochemical method (polarization resistance) in test media composed with deionized water, ammonia and hydrazine under an air blanket at 25°C. Similitudes with steam generators' volume/surface ratios were respected during these tests. The coupons submitted to an autoclave treatment were covered by a duplex magnetite layer. After exposure to hydrazine and ageing, the structure of the magnetite layer contains bigger crystallites than after ageing without exposure to hydrazine. The corrosion rate of passive A42 steel exposed to hydrazine was stable and low even after the complete consumption of hydrazine during at least 50 days. The corrosion rate of passive A42 steel not exposed to hydrazine grew steadily to reach the same corrosion rates as polished carbon steels within 50 days. The hydrazine consumption rate observed in the presence of magnetite covered A42 carbon steel was found higher than 1mg/kg/hour. To explain

  17. Corrosion of steel in concrete in cooling water walls. Report part 2 - Effects of the relative humidity on chlorine-initiated corrosion of the reinforcing steel; Korrosion paa staal i betong i kylvattenvaegar. Delrapport 2 - Relativa fuktighetens inverkan paa kloridinitierad armeringskorrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandberg, Bertil; Ahlstroem, Johan; Sederholm, Bror; Nilsson, Lars-Olof; Lindmark, Sture

    2010-04-15

    Steel in concrete is protected against corrosion by the high pH value of the concrete. The passivity can however be broken if chloride ions penetrate into the concrete. It is presumed that a certain amount of chloride is needed to activate the steel. This value is called the threshold level. Even though many attempts have been performed no reliable value has been found. One of the reasons for this is probably that the threshold value is influenced by the humidity of the concrete. At very high humidity the transport of oxygen to the steel surface is slow and at low humidity the electrical resistance increases. The aim of this investigation has been to determine at what humidity the corrosion rate reaches its highest value. With this as a background new tests can be performed to predict the chloride threshold value. The results indicate that it most probably do exist a threshold value for each concrete quality. At chloride contents above the threshold value the steel looses its passivity. If severe corrosion takes place or not is however strongly dependent on the humidity of the concrete. In a close interval around 95 % relative humidity the steel is attacked by pitting corrosion when the threshold value is exceeded. At lower and higher humidity the passivity is incomplete and the corrosion rate in most cases marginal. Future investigations concerning chloride threshold values is recommended to be performed at a relative humidity of 95 % and by using reference samples according to proposed procedure.

  18. Erosion and erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isomoto, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    It is very difficult to interpret the technical term of erosion-corrosion' which is sometimes encountered in piping systems of power plants, because of complicated mechanisms and several confusing definitions of erosion-corrosion phenomena. 'FAC (flow accelerated corrosion)' is recently introduced as wall thinning of materials in power plant systems, as a representative of 'erosion-corrosion'. FAC is, however, not necessarily well understood and compared with erosion-corrosion. This paper describes firstly the origin, definition and fundamental understandings of erosion and erosion-corrosion, in order to reconsider and reconfirm the phenomena of erosion, erosion-corrosion and FAC. Next, typical mapping of erosion, corrosion, erosion-corrosion and FAC are introduced in flow velocity and environmental corrosiveness axes. The concept of damage rate in erosion-corrosion is finally discussed, connecting dissolution rate, mass transfer of metal ions in a metal oxide film and film growth. (author)

  19. Methods and apparatus for managing corrosion in buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chey, S Jay; Hamann, Hendrik F; Klein, Levente Ioan; Schappert, Michael Alan; Stepanchuk, Andriy

    2015-02-03

    Principles of the invention provide methods and apparatus for providing corrosion management in buildings. In one aspect, an exemplary method includes the step of receiving first data relating corrosion rate to a plurality of environmental conditions. This first data is subsequently utilized to determine a quantitative relationship between corrosion rate and the plurality of environmental conditions. In another step, second data indicative of one or more environmental conditions within a building is received. A corrosion rate in the building is then determined at least in part by applying the determined quantitative relationship to this second data.

  20. Experimental investigation of the relation between damage at the concrete-steel interface and initiation of reinforcement corrosion in plain and fibre reinforced concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Solgaard, Anders Ole Stubbe; Pease, Bradley Justin

    2013-01-01

    Cracks in covering concrete are known to hasten initiation of steel corrosion in reinforced concrete structures. To minimise the impact of cracks on the deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, current approaches in (inter)national design codes often limit the concrete surface crack width....... Recent investigations however, indicate that the concrete-reinforcement interfacial condition is a more fundamental criterion related to reinforcement corrosion. This work investigates the relation between macroscopic damage at the concrete-steel interface and corrosion initiation of reinforcement...... embedded in plain and fibre reinforced concrete. Comparisons of experimental and numerical results indicate a strong correlation between corrosion initiation and interfacial condition....

  1. Investigation of surface oxide morphology in SG feedwater pipes and study of its influence on flow accelerated corrosion rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, G.; Alos-Ramos, O.; Monchecourt, D.; Mansour, C.; Delaunay, S.; Trevin, S.

    2015-01-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) affects carbon steel components in the secondary circuits of PWR plants. The mandatory use of the prediction tool BRT-CICERO in all its PWR plants enables EDF to perform efficient inspections programs and minimize the number of leaks in the secondary circuits. Due to the operating conditions, SG feedwater flow regulation (ARE) circuits can be affected by FAC phenomenon. Thickness loss has been reported by several plants during the last 10 years, although significant damage by FAC remains very rare. This paper describes the surface features observed on an ARE straight tube that has orange peel pattern with thickness loss on the one half of its inner surface and a thick fouling layer without much thickness loss on the other. An analysis of the oxide porosity and structure by SEM investigation has been carried out. The origin of fouling layer and its behavior in the ARE circuits environment (oxide solubility, flow stability/turbulence) have been discussed. Finally by comparing with the classic FAC models, an attempt of correlation between the presence of the fouling layer and the lower corrosion rate is proposed. (authors)

  2. Guidelines for destructive examination of potential MIC [microbiologically influenced corrosion]-related failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borenstein, S.S.

    1989-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is recognized as a major cause of pitting corrosion failures in natural waters. In order to alleviate the problem, it is important to establish the exact cause of corrosion. If there is a possibility that the failure is due to MIC, a particularly careful failure analysis must be conducted. MIC can be misdiagnosed as attack due to conventional chloride crevice/pitting corrosion unless specialized techniques are used. Certain techniques generally must be employed, including a careful visual examination, is situ bacterial sampling of residual water, bacterial analysis for corrosion products, radiographic examinations, and metallographic examinations. Other techniques may be necessary, or may be very helpful in the analysis, including culture growth, scanning electron microscopy, and ultrasonic examinations. Metallographic examinations can reveal MIC characteristics such as selective pitting of one phase in duplex stainless steel weldments. The methods of failure analysis and their importance are addressed, including each of the steps in the nondestructive examinations and destructive analyses

  3. Corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, A.S.; Totlani, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion has always been associated with structures, plants, installations and equipment exposed to aggressive environments. It effects economy, safety and product reliability. Monitoring of component corrosion has thus become an essential requirement for the plant health and safety. Protection methods such as appropriate coatings, cathodic protection and use of inhibitors have become essential design parameters. High temperature corrosion, especially hot corrosion, is still a difficult concept to accommodate in corrosion allowance; there is a lack of harmonized system of performance testing of materials at high temperatures. In order to discuss and deliberate on these aspects, National Association for Corrosion Engineers International organised a National Conference on Corrosion and its Control in Bombay during November 28-30, 1995. This volume contains papers presented at the symposium. Paper relevant to INIS is indexed separately. refs., figs., tabs

  4. Dictionary corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This dictionary has 13000 entries in both languages. Keywords and extensive accompanying information simplify the choice of word for the user. The following topics are covered: Theoretical principles of corrosion; Corrosion of the metals and alloys most frequently used in engineering. Types of corrosion - (chemical-, electro-chemical, biological corrosion); forms of corrosion (superficial, pitting, selective, intercrystalline and stress corrosion; vibrational corrosion cracking); erosion and cavitation. Methods of corrosion control (material selection, temporary corrosion protection media, paint and plastics coatings, electro-chemical coatings, corrosion prevention by treatment of the corrosive media); Corrosion testing methods. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Downhole corrosion mechanisms and mitigation strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDougall, D. [Baker Hughes Canada, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Pipeline corrosion refers to its deterioration because of a reaction with its environment. Although the physical condition of the metal at the anode initiates the corrosion process, it is the chemistry and composition of the electrolyte that controls the rate of the corrosion reaction and the severity of the corrosion. This presentation described the role of corrosion rate accelerators, with particular reference to dissolved gases such as oxygen, hydrogen sulfides and carbon dioxide, as well as pH levels, salinity, flow rate, temperature and presence of solids such as iron sulfides and sulfur. The effects of these accelerators were shown to be additive. Mitigation strategies include using materials such as resistant metal alloys or fiberglass, and applying coatings and chemical inhibitors. The importance of corrosion monitoring was also emphasized, with particular reference to the value of examining the number of corrosion related failures that have occurred over a fixed period of time. It was concluded that the ability to analyze samples of failed materials results in a better understanding of the cause of the failure, and is an integral part of designing any successful corrosion control program. tabs., figs.

  6. Influence of heating rate on corrosion behavior of Ni-base heat resistant alloys in simulated VHTR helium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Yuji; Kondo, Tatsuo

    1985-04-01

    The influence of heating rate on corrosion and carbon transfer was studied for Ni-base heat resistant alloys exposed to simulated VHTR(very high temperature reactor) coolant environment. Special attention was focused to relationship between oxidation and carburization at early stage of exposure. Tests were conducted on two heats of Hastelloy XR with different boron(B) content and the developmental alloys, 113MA and KSN. Two kinds of heating rates, i.e. 80 0 C/min and 2 0 C/min, were employed. Corrosion tests were carried out at 900 0 C up to 500 h in JAERI Type B helium, one of the simulated VHTR primary coolant specifications. Under higher heating rate, oxidation resistance of both heats of Hastelloy XR(2.8 ppmB and 40 ppmB) were equivalent and among the best, then KSN and 113MA followed in the order. Under lower heating rate only alloy, i.e. Hastelloy XR with 2.8 ppmB, showed some deteriorated oxidation resistance while all others being unaffected by the heating rate. On the other hand the carbon transfer behavior showed strong dependence on the heating rate. In case of higher heating rate, significant carburization occured at early stage of exposure and thereafter the progress of carburization was slow in all the alloys. On the other hand only slow carburization was the case throughout the exposure in case of lower heating rate. The carburization in VHTR helium environment was interpreted as to be affected by oxide film formation in the early stage of exposure. The carbon pick-up was largest in Hastelloy XR with 40 ppmB and it was followed by Hastelloy XR with 2.8 ppmB. 113MA and KSN were carburized only slightly. The observed difference of carbon pick-up among the alloys tested was interpreted to be attributed mainly to the difference of the carbon activity, the carbide precipitation characteristics among the alloys tested. (author)

  7. The optimization of CNT-PVA nanocomposite for mild steel coating: Effect of CNTs concentration on the corrosion rate of mild steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryam, M.; Ibrahim, N. M. A. A.; Eswar, K. A.; Guliling, M.; Suhaimi, M. H. F.; Khusaimi, Z.; Abdullah, S.; Rusop, M.

    2018-05-01

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are molecular-scale tubes of graphitic carbon which have outstanding mechanical and magnetic properties with extraordinary strength. It can be said that CNTs can be used in coating application to prevent corrosion and lower the rate of corrosion on steel. However, CNT alone cannot be used for coating purposes. Therefore, by combining it with polymer to produce a nanocomposite thin film, it can be used for nanocoating on mild steel substrate. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) was chosen due to its high strength and high modulus polymer fibers and has the possibilities of improving the physicochemical properties of carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes and polyvinyl alcohol (CNT-PVA) nanocomposite were prepared by using sol-gel method and coated as thin film on mild steel substrate by using spin coating. Sol-gel is a convenient technique used for the production of nanocomposite aqueous solution. Five samples were prepared at the different concentration of CNTs-PVA to verify the corrosion rate application. The samples were then characterized by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) obtaining the structural properties, surface morphology and topography of samples. Raman spectroscopy was used to determine the microraman spectra of CNTs which showed the quality and purity of samples. Finally, corrosion test was done to measure the corrosion rate of samples at the different concentration of CNTs/PVA nanocomposite.

  8. Operation related on-line measurements of low temperature fire side corrosion during co-combustion of biomass and oil; Driftrelaterad direktmaetning av laagtemperaturkorrosion i en braensleeldad kraftvaermeanlaeggning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Thomas [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2000-05-01

    A number of combustion plants have experienced corrosion attack on air preheaters and economisers when fired with biomass fuels. In certain plants the problems are great and reconstruction has been performed so that exposed components can be exchanged during operation. The electrochemical techniques offer on-line measurements of the changes in corrosion rate in the low temperature region in a waste incinerator. The purpose with this study was to evaluate the technique in a biomass fired boiler where the corrosion rate is considerable lower compared to a waste incinerator. Experiments were performed at the Haesselby plant, boiler 3, which was fired with pure biomass as well as a mixture of biomass and oil during the test period. It was found that the electrochemical technique is a useful tool for on-line measurements of the changes in corrosion rate in biomass fired utilities. Since the corrosion rate in the low temperature region is dependent on the boiler construction, electrochemical measurements give valuable information on the corrosion rate during optimisation of the fuel mixture, SNCR and temperature or the low temperature components. This is of special importance when introducing new fuels or fuel mixtures. Soot blowing is of prime importance for the total corrosion. During a few minutes an individual soot blower can initiate such a high corrosion rate that it represents the total corrosion. The material temperature is another important parameter. Above a certain temperature the corrosion rate is negligible. During co-combustion this temperature was found to be in the region 65-85 deg C. The influence of the SNCR with ammonia, with respect to corrosion, is dependent on the fuel mixture used. In utilities where acidic combustion products are formed, ammonia has a neutralising effect e.g. in Hoegdalen. At the Haesselby plant this neutralising effect was not found. During cocombustion with oil the ammonia forms ammoniahydrosulphate which increases the corrosion

  9. The effect of borate and phosphate inhibitors on corrosion rate material SS321 and incoloy 800 in chloride containing solution by using potentiodynamic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Febriyanto; Sriyono; Satmoko, Ari

    1998-01-01

    Determination of corrosion rate of steam generator materials (SS 321 and incoloy 800) in chloride containing solution using potentiodynamic method from CMS 100. NaCl 1%, 3% and 5% solution using is used as tested solution. A tested material is grounded by grinding paper on grade 400 600, 800 and 1000, then polished by METADI 1/4 microns paste to get homogeneity. Furthermore, the tested materials is mounted by epoxide resin, so only the surface which contacts to tested solution is open. From the result obtained that borate and phosphate inhibitor can reduce corrosion rate and aggressiveness of chloride ion

  10. Interaction between corrosion crack width and steel loss in RC beams corroded under load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malumbela, Goitseone; Alexander, Mark; Moyo, Pilate

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents results and discussions on an experimental study conducted to relate the rate of widening of corrosion cracks with the pattern of corrosion cracks as well as the level of steel corrosion for RC beams (153 x 254 x 3000 mm) that were corroded whilst subjected to varying levels of sustained loads. Steel corrosion was limited to the tensile reinforcement and to a length of 700 mm at the centre of the beams. The rate of widening of corrosion cracks as well as strains on uncracked faces of RC beams was constantly monitored during the corrosion process, along the corrosion region and along other potential cracking faces of beams using a demec gauge. The distribution of the gravimetric mass loss of steel along the corrosion region was measured at the end of the corrosion process. The results obtained showed that: the rate of widening of each corrosion crack is dependent on the overall pattern of the cracks whilst the rate of corrosion is independent of the pattern of corrosion cracks. A mass loss of steel of 1% was found to induce a corrosion crack width of about 0.04 mm.

  11. Electrochemical Corrosion Investigations on Anaerobic Treated Distillery Effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Chhotu; Sharma, Chhaya; Singh, A. K.

    2014-09-01

    Present study is focused on the corrosivity of anaerobic treated distillery effluent and corrosion performance of mild steel and stainless steels. Accordingly, electrochemical polarization tests were performed in both treated distillery and synthetic effluents. Polarization tests were also performed in synthetic solutions and it was observed that Cl- and K+ increase whereas SO4 -, PO4 -, NO3 -, and NO2 - decrease the corrosivity of effluent at alkaline pH. Further, comparison in corrosivity of distillery and synthetic effluents shows the former to be less corrosive and this is assigned due to the presence of amino acids and melanoidins. Mild steel experienced to have the highest corrosion rate followed by stainless steels—304L and 316L and lowest in case of SAF 2205. Relative corrosion resistance of stainless steels is observed to depend upon Cr, Mo, and N content.

  12. Factors and mechanisms affecting corrosion of steel in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehqanian, Ch.

    1986-01-01

    Atomic power plants possess reinforced concrete structures which are exposed to sea water or sea atmosphere. Sea water or its surrounding environment contain very corrosive species which cause corrosion of metal in concrete. It should be mentioned that corrosion of steel in concrete is a complex problem that is not completely understood. Some of the factors which influence the corrosion mechanism and can be related to the pore solution composition is discussed. Chloride ion caused problems are the main source of the corrosion damage seen on the reinforced concrete structures. Corrosion rate in concrete varies and depends on the way chloride ion diffuses into concrete. In addition, the associated cations can influence diffusion of chloride into concrete. The type of portland cement and also the concrete mix design all affect the corrosion behaviour of steel in concrete

  13. Study of optimal operation management by a monitoring system for corrosion and heat-transfer rate of condensate pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasui, Katsmi; Kominami, Hirohiko; Atsumi, Tetsuro; Nagata, Koji (Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan); Sumitomo Light Metal Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1988-09-26

    In order to optimize the anticorrosion and antifouling management of aluminum brass condensate pipes, the monitoring system was developed, which could control a corrosion resistance and heat transfer rate during operation. Since a polarization resistance could be used as an index for anticorrosion control, while a heat transmission coefficient or cleanliness factor for heat transfer control, a polarization resistance meter and fouling meter were made as prototype detectors. Fundamental test of a model condenser (simulated by-pass pipe) was performed using a processing system combined with the meters, and monitored data and analytical data of the test were arranged. System performance was ascertained to be preferable by the verification test on a real condenser, however, more compact system was required for practical use because of restriction in by-pass pipe installation. In addition to the monitoring function, a control function for sponge ball cleaning and iron ion injection was also added to keep the specified index value. 13 figs,. 1 tab.

  14. Humid-air and aqueous corrosion models for corrosion-allowance barrier material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; Atkins, J.E.; Andrews, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    Humid-air and aqueous general and pitting corrosion models (including their uncertainties) for the carbon steel outer containment barrier were developed using the corrosion data from literature for a suite of cast irons and carbon steels which have similar corrosion behaviors to the outer barrier material. The corrosion data include the potential effects of various chemical species present in the testing environments. The atmospheric corrosion data also embed any effects of cyclic wetting and drying and salts that may form on the corroding specimen surface. The humid-air and aqueous general corrosion models are consistent in that the predicted humid-air general corrosion rates at relative humidities between 85 and 100% RH are close to the predicted aqueous general corrosion rates. Using the expected values of the model parameters, the model predicts that aqueous pitting corrosion is the most likely failure mode for the carbon steel outer barrier, and an earliest failure (or initial pit penetration) of the 100-mm thick barrier may occur as early as about 500 years if it is exposed continuously to an aqueous condition at between 60 and 70 degrees C

  15. Improvements in zirconium alloy corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilp, G.R.; Thornburg, D.R.; Comstock, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    The corrosion rates of a series of Zircaloy 4 and Zr-Nb alloys were evaluated in long-term (exceeding 500 days in some cases) autoclave tests. The testing was done at various conditions including 633 K (680 F) water, 633 K (650 F) water, 633 k (680 F) lithiated water (70 PPM/0.01 molal lithium), and 673 K (750 F) steam. Materials evaluated are from the following three groups: (1) standard Zircaloy 4; (2) Zircaloy 4 with tightened controls on chemistry limits and heat-treatment history; and (3) Zr-Nb alloys. To optimize the corrosion resistance of the Zircaloy 4 material, the effects of specific chemistry controls (tighter limits on nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, carbon and tin) were evaluated. Also the effects of the thermal history, as measured by integrated annealing of ''A'' time were determined. The ''A'' times ranged from 0.1x10 -18 (h) to 46x10 -18 (h). A material referred to as ''Improved Zircaloy 4'', having optimized chemistry and ''A'' time levels for reduced corrosion, has been developed and tested. This material has a reduced and more uniform corrosion rate compared to the prior Zircaloy 4 material. Alternative alloys were also evaluated for potential improvement in cladding corrosion resistance. ZIRLO TM material was chosen for development and has been included in the long-term corrosion testing. Demonstration fuel assemblies using ZIRLO cladding are now operating in a commercial reactor. The results for the various test conditions and compositions are reported and the relative corrosion characteristics summarized. Based on the BR-3 data, there is a ranking correspondence between in-reactor corrosion and autoclave testing in lithiated water. In particular, the ZIRLO material has significantly improved relative corrosion resistance in the lithiated water tests. Reduced Zircaloy-4 corrosion rates are also obtained from the tighter controls on the chemistry (specifically lower tin, nitrogen, and carbon; higher silicon; and reduced oxygen variability) and ''A

  16. Quantitative analysis of hydrogen gas formed by aqueous corrosion of metallic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonnesbeck, J.

    2000-01-01

    Three unirradiated EBR-II blanket fuel samples containing depleted uranium metal were corrosion tested in simulated J-13 well water at 90 C. The corrosion rate of the blanket uranium metal was then determined relative to H 2 formation. Corrosion of one of the samples was interrupted prior to complete oxidation of the uranium metal and the solid corrosion product was analyzed for UO 2 and UH 3

  17. Quantitative analysis of hydrogen gas formed by aqueous corrosion of metallic uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonnesbeck, J.

    2000-03-20

    Three unirradiated EBR-II blanket fuel samples containing depleted uranium metal were corrosion tested in simulated J-13 well water at 90 C. The corrosion rate of the blanket uranium metal was then determined relative to H{sub 2} formation. Corrosion of one of the samples was interrupted prior to complete oxidation of the uranium metal and the solid corrosion product was analyzed for UO{sub 2} and UH{sub 3}.

  18. Electrochemical potential measurements in boiling water reactors; relation to water chemistry and stress corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indig, M.E.; Cowan, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Electrochemical potential measurements were performed in operating boiling water reactors to determine the range of corrosion potentials that exist from cold standby to full power operation and the relationship of these measurements to reactor water chemistry. Once the corrosion potentials were known, experiments were performed in the laboratory under electrochemical control to determine potentials and equivalent dissolved oxygen concentrations where intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) would and would not occur on welded Type-304 stainless steel. At 274 0 C, cracking occurred at potentials that were equivalent to dissolved oxygen concentration > 40 to 50 ppb. With decreasing temperature, IGSCC became more difficult and only severely sensitized stainless steel would crack. Recent in-reactor experiments combined with the previous laboratory data, have shown that injection of small concentrations of hydrogen during reactor operation can cause a significant decrease in corrosion potential which should cause immunity to IGSCC. (author)

  19. Influence of Portland Cement Class on the Corrosion Rate of Steel Reinforcement in Cement Mortar Caused by Penetrating Chloride and Sulfate from the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bikić, F.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of portland cement class on the corrosion rate of steel reinforcement in cement mortar caused by penetrating chloride or sulfate from the environment in already hardened cement mortar is investigated in this paper. Three classes of portland cement have been used for the tests, PC 35, PC 45 and PC 55. Cylindrical samples of cement mortar with steel reinfor- cement in the middle were treated 6 months at room temperature in the following solutions: w(SO42- = 2.1 % and w(Cl- = 5 %. Two techniques have been used for testing corrosion rate of steel reinforcement in cement mortar: Tafel extrapolation technique and potentiodynamic polarization technique. Investigations were conducted by potentiostat/galvanostat Princeton Applied Research 263A-2 with the software PowerCORR®. The results of both techniques indi-cate the most active corrosion of steel reinforcement in the samples prepared from cement PC 35 in both treated solutions, while the lowest corrosion of the steel reinforcement was observed in cement samples prepared from cement PC 55. This conclusion was drawn by analyzing the results shown in Figs. 1–4. Comparing corrosion current density of samples, working electrodes, Figs. 1 and 2, Table 2, the results show the most stable corrosion of steel reinforcement in samples prepared from cement PC 55, and the most active corrosion in samples prepared from ce- ment PC 35. The most active corrosion in samples prepared from cement PC 35 is evident from the positions of the open circuit potentials whose values are less for samples prepared from cement PC 35 in both the treated solution, Figs. 1 and 2, Table 2. Comparison of the anodic polarization curves of the working electrodes in both the treated solutions, Figs. 3 and 4, also shows that the intensity of corrosion is the largest for the working electrodes prepared from cement PC 35 and the smallest for the working electrodes prepared from cement PC 55. Investigation results should be

  20. Integrating Mobile Phones into Science Teaching to Help Students Develop a Procedure to Evaluate the Corrosion Rate of Iron in Simulated Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Edgar P.; Confessor, Mario R.; Gasparotto, Luiz H. S.

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes an indirect method to evaluate the corrosion rate of iron nail in simulated seawater. The official procedure is based on the direct measurement of the specimen's weight loss over time; however, a highly precise scale is required and such equipment may not be easily available. On the other hand, mobile phones equipped with…

  1. A Moessbauer spectroscopic study of corrosion related reactions in the iron-hydrogen fluoride-water-oxygen system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouse, P.L.

    1989-03-01

    The results of a study of a number of corrosion related reactions in the Fe-HF-H 2 O-O2 system are presented. The primary techniques used were transmission and conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy. Conversion electron Moessbauer spectra were recorded at very low γ-photon glancing angles and at normal incidence. Depth profiles of surface layers were obtained by recording spectra at different glancing angles. The initial product which forms when an iron surface is exposed to the vapour of azeotropic hydrofluoric acid was identified as FeF 25 ·47H 2 O. With increasing film thickness, a product, identified as non-stoichiometric Fe 2 F 5 ·7H 2 O, was shown to occur. A thermodynamic analysis of the system is presented which shows FeF 3 ·3H 2 O to be the most stable compound under the experimental conditions used, and suggests a stepwise reaction sequence in which FeF 2 ·4H 2 O forms first, followed by Fe 2 F 5 ·7H 2 O and finally FeF 3 ·3H 2 O. Results obtained in a gravimetric study reveal the rate of reaction of metallic iron with the azeotropic vapour to be controlled by the rate of diffusion of the gaseous species through the product layer. In the case of the reactions with the vapour of higher dilutions of aqueous HF, the chemical reaction between the iron substrate and the gaseous species is rate controlling. 86 refs., 61 figs., 14 tabs

  2. Review of test methods used to determine the corrosion rate of metals in contact with treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to give an overview of test methods previously used to evaluate the corrosion of metals in contact with wood. This article reviews the test methods used to evaluate the corrosion of metals in contact with wood by breaking the experiments into three groups: exposure tests, accelerated exposure tests, and electrochemical tests....

  3. Development and Testing of a Linear Polarization Resistance Corrosion Rate Probe for Ductile Iron Pipe (Web Report 4361)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The North American water and wastewater community has hundreds of millions of feet of ductile iron pipe in service. Only a portion of the inventory has any form of external corrosion control. Ductile iron pipe, in certain environments, is subject to external corrosion.Linear Pola...

  4. Efficiency and corrosion rate analysis of organic inhibitor utilization from bawang dayak leaves (EleutherineamericanaMerr.) on API 5L steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Shaimah Rinda; Sari, Eli Novita; Rizky, Yoel; Sulistijono, Triana, Yunita

    2018-05-01

    This research studied the inhibition of corrosion by bawang dayak leaves extract (EleutherineamericanaMerr.) on API 5L steel in brine water environment (3.5% NaCl). The inhibitor was extracted using maceration process from bawang dayak leaves that was cultivated in Paser District, East Kalimantan. The test of antioxidant activity showed that bawang dayak leaves extract is a very powerful antioxidant with IC50 value of 27.30204. The results from FTIR test show the presence of electronegative atoms and double bonds of the alkenes groups that provide the potential of the extract as a corrosion inhibitor. Efficiency of inhibition reached up to 93.158% for the addition of inhibitor with 300 ppm concentration and 20 days of immersion time. This inhibitory behavior is also supported by polarization measurements where the lowest corrosion rate of 0.00128 mm/year is obtained at the same concentration and immersion time.

  5. Corrosion of metallic materials. Dry corrosion, aqueous corrosion and corrosion by liquid metal, methods of protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helie, Max

    2015-01-01

    This book is based on a course on materials given in an engineering school. The author first gives an overview of metallurgy issues: metallic materials (pure metals, metallic alloys), defects of crystal lattices (point defects, linear defects or dislocations), equilibrium diagrams, steels and cast, thermal processing of steels, stainless steels, aluminium and its alloys, copper and its alloys. The second part addresses the properties and characterization of surfaces and interfaces: singularity of a metal surface, surface energy of a metal, energy of grain boundaries, adsorption at a material surface, metal-electrolyte interface, surface oxide-electrolyte interface, techniques of surface analysis. The third chapter addresses the electrochemical aspects of corrosion: description of the corrosion phenomenon, free enthalpy of a compound and free enthalpy of a reaction, case of dry corrosion (thermodynamic aspect, Ellingham diagram, oxidation mechanisms, experimental study, macroscopic modelling), case of aqueous corrosion (electrochemical thermodynamics and kinetics, experimental determination of corrosion rate). The fourth part addresses the different forms of aqueous corrosion: generalized corrosion (atmospheric corrosion, mechanisms and tests), localized corrosion (galvanic, pitting, cracking, intergranular, erosion and cavitation), particular cases of stress cracking (stress corrosion, fatigue-corrosion, embrittlement by hydrogen), and bi-corrosion (of non alloyed steels, of stainless steels, and of aluminium and copper alloys). The sixth chapter addresses the struggle and the protection against aqueous corrosion: methods of prevention, scope of use of main alloys, geometry-based protection of pieces, use of corrosion inhibitors, use of organic or metallic coatings, electrochemical protection. The last chapter proposes an overview of corrosion types in industrial practices: in the automotive industry, in the oil industry, in the aircraft industry, and in the

  6. Measurement of very low release rates of corrosion products in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansson, H.-P.; Falk, I.

    1984-01-01

    A radiotracer technique has been developed for the measurement of release rates from nuclear reactor materials and it has been tested in a number of experiments. THis article, which forms the first part in a series, describes the experimental loop, the experimental technique and the preliminary results. Experiments were carried out on 18Cr8Ni stainless steel and on Inconel X750 in BWR primary system and feed water environments. The result show that a steady state in the release rate is achieved after operation for approximately 600 h. The release rate depends on the elemental concentration in the material and on the chemical and physical environments. Typical release rates for an 18Cr8Ni stainless steel and Inconel X750 in a BWR primary system environment were found to be 5 mdm and 8 mdm respectively. (Authors)

  7. Relative Humidity and the Susceptibility of Austenitic Stainless Steel to Stress Corrosion Cracking in an impure Plutonium Oxide Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapp, P.; Duffey, J.; Lam, P.; Dunn, K.

    2010-05-05

    Laboratory tests to investigate the corrosivity of moist plutonium oxide/chloride salt mixtures on 304L and 316L stainless steel coupons showed that corrosion occurred in selected samples. The tests exposed flat coupons for pitting evaluation and 'teardrop' stressed coupons for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) evaluation at room temperature to various mixtures of PuO{sub 2} and chloride-bearing salts for periods up to 500 days. The exposures were conducted in sealed containers in which the oxide-salt mixtures were loaded with about 0.6 wt % water from a humidified helium atmosphere. Observations of corrosion ranged from superficial staining to pitting and SCC. The extent of corrosion depended on the total salt concentration, the composition of the salt and the moisture present in the test environment. The most significant corrosion was found in coupons that were exposed to 98 wt % PuO{sub 2}, 2 wt % chloride salt mixtures that contained calcium chloride and 0.6 wt% water. SCC was observed in two 304L stainless steel teardrop coupons exposed in solid contact to a mixture of 98 wt % PuO{sub 2}, 0.9 wt % NaCl, 0.9 wt % KCl, and 0.2 wt % CaCl{sub 2}. The cracking was associated with the heat-affected zone of an autogenous weld that ran across the center of the coupon. Cracking was not observed in coupons exposed to the headspace gas above the solid mixture, or in coupons exposed to other mixtures with either no CaCl{sub 2} or 0.92 wt% CaCl{sub 2}. SCC was present where the 0.6 wt % water content exceeded the value needed to fully hydrate the available CaCl{sub 2}, but was absent where the water content was insufficient. These results reveal the significance of the relative humidity in the austenitic stainless steels environment to their susceptibility to corrosion. The relative humidity in the test environment was controlled by the water loading and the concentration of the hydrating salts such as CaCl{sub 2}. For each salt or salt mixture there is a threshold

  8. Corrosion inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ashry, El Sayed H.; El Nemr, Ahmed; Esawy, Sami A.; Ragab, Safaa

    2006-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition efficiencies of some triazole, oxadiazole and thiadiazole derivatives for steel in presence of acidic medium have been studied by using AM1, PM3, MINDO/3 and MNDO semi-empirical SCF molecular orbital methods. Geometric structures, total negative charge on the molecule (TNC), highest occupied molecular energy level (E HOMO ), lowest unoccupied molecular energy level (E LUMO ), core-core repulsion (CCR), dipole moment (μ) and linear solvation energy terms, molecular volume (V i ) and dipolar-polarization (π *), were correlated to corrosion inhibition efficiency. Four equations were proposed to calculate corrosion inhibition efficiency. The agreement with the experimental data was found to be satisfactory; the standard deviations between the calculated and experimental results ranged between ±0.03 and ±4.18. The inhibition efficiency was closely related to orbital energies (E HOMO and E LUMO ) and μ. The correlation between quantum parameters and experimental inhibition efficiency has been validated by single point calculations for the semi-empirical AM1 structures using B3LYP/6-31G** as a higher level of theory. The proposed equations were applied to predict the corrosion inhibition efficiency of some related structures to select molecules of possible activity from a presumable library of compounds

  9. Evaluation of Nitrate and Nitrite Reduction Kinetics Related to Liquid-Air-Interface Corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaoji; Gui, F.; Cong, Hongbo; Brossia, C.S.; Frankel, G.S.

    2014-01-01

    Liquid-air interface (LAI) corrosion has been a concern for causing leaks in the carbon steel tanks used for holding high-level radioactive liquid waste. To assist in understanding the mechanism of LAI corrosion, the kinetics of nitrate and nitrite reduction reactions were investigated electrochemically. Cyclic voltammetry and cathodic polarization measurements indicated that the nitrite reduction reaction exhibited faster kinetics than the nitrate reduction reaction at higher cathodic overpotential. However, the primary reduction reaction at the open circuit potential under aerated conditions was the oxygen reduction reaction. The reduction of residual oxygen was also the dominant cathodic reaction at open circuit potential in deaerated conditions. Moreover, the kinetics of oxygen reduction on steel electrodes were significantly influenced by the sample immersion conditions (partial vs. full) for aerated liquid nuclear waste simulants, but not for deaerated conditions. Lastly, the gaseous products formed during LAI corrosion were analyzed using the gas detector tube method and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and found to contain NH 3 , NO 2 and NO. However, the results suggested that these products were caused by the local acidification generated by the hydrolysis of cations after LAI corrosion underwent extensive propagation, instead of being directly reduced in alkaline conditions. Thus, the results in this work showed that the kinetics of nitrate and nitrite reduction could not generate a salt concentration cell in the meniscus region to cause LAI corrosion

  10. The relative stress-corrosion-cracking susceptibility of candidate aluminum-lithium alloys for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, P. P.

    1982-01-01

    Stress corrosion tests of Al-Li-Cu powder metallurgy alloys are described. Alloys investigated were Al-2.6% Li-1.4% and Al-2.6% Li-1.4% Cu-1.6% Mg. The base properties of the alloys were characterized. Process, heat treatment, and size/orientational effects on the tensile and fracture behavior were investigated. Metallurgical and electrochemical conditions are identified which provide reproducible and controlled parameters for stress corrosion evaluation. Preliminary stress corrosion test results are reported. Both Al-Li-Cu alloys appear more susceptible to stress corrosion crack initiation than 7075-T6 aluminum, with the magnesium bearing alloy being the most susceptible. Tests to determine the threshold stress intensity for the base and magnesium bearing alloys are underway. Twelve each, bolt loaded DCB type specimens are under test (120 days) and limited crack growth in these precracked specimens has been observed. General corrosion in the aqueous sodium chloride environment is thought to be obscuring results through crack tip blunting.

  11. Contribution of cellular automata to the understanding of corrosion phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zenkri

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a stochastic CA modelling approach of corrosion based on spatially separated electrochemical half-reactions, diffusion, acido-basic neutralization in solution and passive properties of the oxide layers. Starting from different initial conditions, a single framework allows one to describe generalised corrosion, localised corrosion, reactive and passive surfaces, including occluded corrosion phenomena as well. Spontaneous spatial separation of anodic and cathodic zones is associated with bare metal and passivated metal on the surface. This separation is also related to local acidification of the solution. This spontaneous change is associated with a much faster corrosion rate. Material morphology is closely related to corrosion kinetics, which can be used for technological applications.

  12. Corrosion of aluminum alloys in simulated dry storage environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peacock, H.B. Jr.; Sindelar, R.L.; Lam, P.S.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of temperature and relative humidity on the high temperature (up to 150 degrees C) corrosion of aluminum alloys was investigated for dry storage of spent nuclear fuels in a closed or sealed system. A dependency on alloy type, temperature and initial humidity was determined for 1100, 5052 and 6061 aluminum alloys. Results after 4500 hours of environmental testing show that for a closed system, corrosion tends to follow a power law with the rate decreasing with increasing exposure. As corrosion takes place, two phenomena occur: (1) a hydrated layer builds up to resist corrosion, and (2) moisture is depleted from the system and the humidity slowly decreases with time. At a critical level of relative humidity, corrosion reactions stop, and no additional corrosion occurs if the system remains closed. The results form the basis for the development of an acceptance criteria for the dry storage of aluminum clad spent nuclear fuels

  13. Galvanic corrosion between carbon steel 1018 and Alloy 600 in crevice with boric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Hong Pyo; Kim, Joung Soo; Machonald, Digby D.

    2005-01-01

    This work dealt with the evaluation of galvanic corrosion rate in a corrosion cell having annular gap of 0.5 mm between carbon steel 1018 and alloy 600 as a function of temperature and boron concentration. Temperature and boron concentration were ranged from 110 to 300 .deg. C and 2000∼10000 ppm, respectively. After the operating temperature of the corrosion cell where the electrolyte was injected was attained at setting temperature, galvanic coupling was made and at the same time galvanic current was measured. The galvanic corrosion rate decreased with time, which was described by corrosion product such as protective film as well as boric acid deposit formed on the carbon steel with time. From the galvanic current obtained as a function of temperature and boron concentration, it was found that the galvanic corrosion rate decreased with temperature while the corrosion rate increased with boron concentration. The experimental results obtained from galvanic corrosion measurement were explained by adhesive property of corrosion product such as protective film, boric acid deposit formed on the carbon steel wall and dehydration of boric acid to be slightly soluble boric acid phase. Moreover the galvanic corrosion rate calculated using initial galvanic coupling current instead of steady state coupling current was remarked, which could give us relatively closer galvanic corrosion rate to real pressurized water reactor

  14. Monitoring Microbially Influenced Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    and diffusional effects and unreliable corrosion rates, when biofilm and ferrous sulphide corrosion products cover the steel surface. Corrosion rates can be overestimated by a factor of 10 to 100 by electrochemical techniques. Weight loss coupons and ER are recommended as necessary basic monitoring techniques......Abstract Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) of carbon steel may occur in media with microbiological activity of especially sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The applicability and reliability of a number of corrosion monitoring techniques for monitoring MIC has been evaluated in experiments....... EIS might be used for detection of MIC as the appearance of very large capacitances can be attributed to the combined ferrous sulphide and biofilm formation. Capacitance correlates directly with sulphide concentration in sterile sulphide media. Keywords: Corrosion monitoring, carbon steel, MIC, SRB...

  15. Relative growth rate of rich fen bryophytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Dagmar Kappel; Ejrnæs, Rasmus; Riis, Tenna

    Rigkær er blandt den nordlige halvkugles mest artsrige naturtyper, og en lang række sjældne og truede plantearter er knyttet til netop disse områder. I dette forsøg undersøges den relative vækstrate hos to almindelige og to sjældne rigkærsmosser i relation til forskellige niveauer af næringsstoff...

  16. Synthesis of published and unpublished corrosion data from long term tests of fasteners embedded in wood : calculation of corrosion rates and the effect of corrosion on lateral joint strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2011-01-01

    In the past 5 years, several accelerated test methods have been developed to measure the corrosion of metals in contact with wood. It is desirable to contrast these accelerated results against those of long term exposure tests. While there have been several published long-term exposure tests performed on metals in treated wood, the data from these studies could not be...

  17. Temperature influence on corrosion rate of armco iron in acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perboni, G.; Rocchini, G.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study of the behaviour of Armco iron and several steels in acid solutions (HCl, H 2 SO 4 , H 3 PO 4 ) has been undertaken to determine the temperature effect on dissolution rate. The test temperatures were 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90 deg C. The activation heat was determined by application of the Arrhenius law from colorimetric and electrochemical data. Investigation results obtained by both methods were represented diagrammatically and showed a good agreement, though the discrepancy in the data increased with test temperature

  18. Investigation of surface layer on rolled recycled AA5050 in relation to Filiform Corrosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2007-01-01

    The presence of a heavily deformed surface layer (a few microns thick) on rolled aluminium alloy is understood to be one of the main reasons contributing to the Filiform Corrosion (FFC) susceptibility of the alloy. The surface layer is formed during the thermo-mechanical processing of the sheet

  19. Corrosion of structural materials and electrochemistry in high temperature water of nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shunsuke

    2014-01-01

    The latest experiences with corrosion in the cooling systems of nuclear power plants are reviewed. High temperature cooling water causes corrosion of structural materials, which often leads to adverse effects in the plants, e.g., generating defects in materials of major components and fuel claddings, increasing shutdown radiation and increasing the volume of radwaste sources. Corrosion behaviors are much affected by water qualities and differ according to the values of water qualities and the materials themselves. In order to establish reliable operation, each plant requires its own unique optimal water chemistry control based on careful consideration of its system, materials and operational history. Electrochemistry is one of key issues that determine corrosion related problems but it is not the only issue. Most phenomena for corrosion related problems, e.g., flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC), intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) and thinning of fuel cladding materials, can be understood based on an electrochemical index, e.g., electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), conductivities and pH. The most important electrochemical index, ECP, can be measured at elevated temperature and applied to in situ sensors of corrosion conditions to detect anomalous conditions of structural materials at their very early stages. In the paper, theoretical models based on electrochemistry to estimate wall thinning rate of carbon steel piping due to flow-accelerated corrosion and corrosive conditions determining IGSCC crack initiation and growth rate are introduced. (author)

  20. The jet impingement cell: A valuable device for investigating CO{sub 2} corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinsella, Brian; John, Douglas; Bailey, Stuart; De Marco, Roland [Western Australian Corrosion Research Group, School of Applied Chemistry, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth WA, 6845 (Australia)

    2004-07-01

    The jet impingement cell (JIC) is a valuable technique for the investigation of carbon dioxide corrosion of steel and its inhibition under high flow conditions or high wall shear stress. Despite the use of the JIC in corrosion testing laboratories not a great deal has been published on the design and calibration of these cells. In the evaluation of corrosion inhibitors, the type of corrosion and relative performance of the inhibitors depends on the metallurgy of the steel used to manufacture electrodes and measure the corrosion rate. This paper covers aspects of cell design and the determination of mass transfer and wall shear stress at electrodes used in the cell. The performance of different generic type corrosion inhibitors and their affect on the type of corrosion (i.e, uniform, pitting and crevice corrosion) is shown and discussed. (authors)

  1. Marine atmospheric corrosion of carbon steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morcillo, M.; Alcantara, J.; Diaz, I.; Chico, B.; Simancas, J.; Fuente, D. de la

    2015-07-01

    Basic research on marine atmospheric corrosion of carbon steels is a relatively young scientific field and there continue to be great gaps in this area of knowledge. The presence of akaganeite in the corrosion products that form on steel when it is exposed to marine atmospheres leads to a notable increase in the corrosion rate. This work addresses the following issues: (a) environmental conditions necessary for akaganeite formation; (b) characterisation of akaganeite in the corrosion products formed; (c) corrosion mechanisms of carbon steel in marine atmospheres; (d) exfoliation of rust layers formed in highly aggressive marine atmospheres; (e) long-term corrosion rate prediction; and (f) behaviour of weathering steels. Field research has been carried out at Cabo Vilano wind farm (Camarinas, Galicia) in a wide range of atmospheric salinities and laboratory work involving the use of conventional atmospheric corrosion techniques and near-surface and bulk sensitive analytical techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Mossbauer spectroscopy and SEM/μRaman spectroscopy. (Author)

  2. Correlation between electrochemical impedance measurements and corrosion rate of magnesium investigated by real-time hydrogen measurement and optical imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Curioni, M.; Scenini, F.; Monetta, T.; Bellucci, F.

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of magnesium in chloride-containing aqueous environment was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) performed simultaneously with real-time hydrogen evolution measurements and optical imaging of the corroding surface. The potentiodynamic investigation revealed substantial deviations from linearity in close proximity of the corrosion potential. In particular, differences in the slope of the current/potential curves w...

  3. Effect of water flow rate and water chemistry on corrosion environment in reactor pressure vessel bottom of BWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, Nagayoshi; Hemmi, Yukio; Takagi, Junichi; Urata, Hidehiro [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    To evaluate the corrosion environment at the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel in a BWR and the effect of hydrogen water chemistry on the corrosion of materials in the region, measurements of the corrosion potential of Type-304 stainless steel and nickel base alloy were made in a laboratory test loop. The effect of water chemistry on the corrosion potential of nickel base alloy is found to be similar to the effect on Type-304 stainless steel. Flow analysis and precise evaluations of the corrosion potential of materials in the bottom region were implemented. Corrosion potentials throughout the region were evaluated from the flow analysis results. At the jet pump outlet and shroud support leg, a rather large amount of hydrogen had to be added to reduce the potential. Conversely, a small amount of hydrogen was enough in the case of the stub tube of the control rod drive guide tubing and the ICM housings located in the center of the bottom region. (author)

  4. Effect of water flow rate and water chemistry on corrosion environment in reactor pressure vessel bottom of BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Nagayoshi; Hemmi, Yukio; Takagi, Junichi; Urata, Hidehiro

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the corrosion environment at the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel in a BWR and the effect of hydrogen water chemistry on the corrosion of materials in the region, measurements of the corrosion potential of Type-304 stainless steel and nickel base alloy were made in a laboratory test loop. The effect of water chemistry on the corrosion potential of nickel base alloy is found to be similar to the effect on Type-304 stainless steel. Flow analysis and precise evaluations of the corrosion potential of materials in the bottom region were implemented. Corrosion potentials throughout the region were evaluated from the flow analysis results. At the jet pump outlet and shroud support leg, a rather large amount of hydrogen had to be added to reduce the potential. Conversely, a small amount of hydrogen was enough in the case of the stub tube of the control rod drive guide tubing and the ICM housings located in the center of the bottom region. (author)

  5. Review of corrosion causes and corrosion control in a technical facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charng, T.; Lansing, F.

    1982-06-01

    Causes of corrosion of metals and their alloys are reviewed. The corrosion mechanism is explained by electrochemical reaction theory. The causes and methods of controlling of both physiochemical corrosion and biological corrosion are presented. Factors which influence the rate of corrosion are also discussed

  6. Corrosion and wear resistant metallic layers produced by electrochemical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Lasse; Maahn, Ernst Emanuel

    1999-01-01

    Corrosion and wear-corrosion properties of novel nickel alloy coatings with promising production characteristics have been compared with conventional bulk materials and hard platings. Corrosion properties in neutral and acidic environments have been investigated with electrochemical methods....... Determination of polarisation resistance during 100 hours followed by stepwise anodic polarisation seems to be a promising technique to obtain steady state data on slowly corroding coatings with transient kinetics. A slurry test enables determination of simultaneous corrosion and abrasive wear. Comparison...... of AISI 316, hard chromium and hardened Ni-P shows that there is no universal correlation between surface hardness and wear-corrosion loss. The possible relation between questionable passivity of Ni-P coatings and their high wear-corrosion loss rate compared to hard chromium is discussed....

  7. Water quality analysis and its relation to the scaling and corrosion tendency in an open water cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaini Hamzah; Halimah Abdul Ghani; Masitah Alias

    2008-01-01

    The problem of scaling and corrosion are common phenomena in a water cooling system especially the open cooling system. This study was carried out in Temenggor dam with an objective to check the water quality at the intake and tailrace of the hydro power plant. In-situ measurement and laboratory analysis on the water samples were carried out. Seven parameters were measured in-situ for example temperature, pH, specific conductivity, dissolved oxygen (DO), total dissolved solid (TDS), turbidity, and chlorine concentration. The water samples were collected using water sampler at three locations near the intake area at surface, and at the interval of one meter up to three meter depth. Two locations at the tailrace also were collected in the same pattern. These samples were brought back to the laboratory in UiTM, Shah Alam for further analysis. Laboratory analysis includes alkalinity, Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ and Fe 2+ concentrations, and total suspended solid (TSS). From the results, the LSI, RSI and PSI were calculated to predict the scaling and corrosion tendency. The index shows strong tendency for corrosion to take place in the cooling system as the related factors supported it. (author)

  8. Determination of Erosion/Corrosion Rates in Hanford Tank Farms Radioactive Waste Transfer System Pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washenfelder, D. J.; Girardot, C. L.; Wilson, E. R.; Page, J. A.; Engeman, J. K.; Gunter, J. R.; Johnson, J. M.; Baide, D. G.; Cooke, G. A.; Larson, J. D.; Castleberry, J. L.; Boomer, K. D.

    2015-01-01

    The twenty-eight double-shell underground radioactive waste storage tanks at the U. S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site near Richland, WA are interconnected by the Waste Transfer System network of buried steel encased pipelines and pipe jumpers in below-grade pits. The pipeline material is stainless steel or carbon steel in 51 mm to 152 mm (2 in. to 6 in.) sizes. The pipelines carry slurries ranging up to 20 volume percent solids and supernatants with less than one volume percent solids at velocities necessary to prevent settling. The pipelines, installed between 1976 and 2011, were originally intended to last until the 2028 completion of the double-shell tank storage mission. The mission has been subsequently extended. In 2010 the Tank Operating Contractor began a systematic evaluation of the Waste Transfer System pipeline conditions applying guidelines from API 579-1/ASME FFS-1 (2007), Fitness-For-Service. Between 2010 and 2014 Fitness-for-Service examinations of the Waste Transfer System pipeline materials, sizes, and components were completed. In parallel, waste throughput histories were prepared allowing side-by-side pipeline wall thinning rate comparisons between carbon and stainless steel, slurries and supernatants and throughput volumes. The work showed that for transfer volumes up to 6.1E+05 m"3 (161 million gallons), the highest throughput of any pipeline segment examined, there has been no detectable wall thinning in either stainless or carbon steel pipeline material regardless of waste fluid characteristics or throughput. The paper describes the field and laboratory evaluation methods used for the Fitness-for-Service examinations, the results of the examinations, and the data reduction methodologies used to support Hanford Waste Transfer System pipeline wall thinning conclusions.

  9. Determination of Erosion/Corrosion Rates in Hanford Tank Farms Radioactive Waste Transfer System Pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washenfelder, D. J.; Girardot, C. L.; Wilson, E. R.; Page, J. A.; Engeman, J. K.; Gunter, J. R.; Johnson, J. M.; Baide, D. G.; Cooke, G. A.; Larson, J. D.; Castleberry, J. L.; Boomer, K. D.

    2015-11-05

    The twenty-eight double-shell underground radioactive waste storage tanks at the U. S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site near Richland, WA are interconnected by the Waste Transfer System network of buried steel encased pipelines and pipe jumpers in below-grade pits. The pipeline material is stainless steel or carbon steel in 51 mm to 152 mm (2 in. to 6 in.) sizes. The pipelines carry slurries ranging up to 20 volume percent solids and supernatants with less than one volume percent solids at velocities necessary to prevent settling. The pipelines, installed between 1976 and 2011, were originally intended to last until the 2028 completion of the double-shell tank storage mission. The mission has been subsequently extended. In 2010 the Tank Operating Contractor began a systematic evaluation of the Waste Transfer System pipeline conditions applying guidelines from API 579-1/ASME FFS-1 (2007), Fitness-For-Service. Between 2010 and 2014 Fitness-for-Service examinations of the Waste Transfer System pipeline materials, sizes, and components were completed. In parallel, waste throughput histories were prepared allowing side-by-side pipeline wall thinning rate comparisons between carbon and stainless steel, slurries and supernatants and throughput volumes. The work showed that for transfer volumes up to 6.1E+05 m3 (161 million gallons), the highest throughput of any pipeline segment examined, there has been no detectable wall thinning in either stainless or carbon steel pipeline material regardless of waste fluid characteristics or throughput. The paper describes the field and laboratory evaluation methods used for the Fitness-for-Service examinations, the results of the examinations, and the data reduction methodologies used to support Hanford Waste Transfer System pipeline wall thinning conclusions.

  10. Corrosion behaviour of laser surface melted magnesium alloy AZ91D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taltavull, C.; Torres, B.; Lopez, A.J.; Rodrigo, P.; Otero, E.; Atrens, A.; Rams, J.

    2014-01-01

    A high power diode laser (HPDL) was used to produce laser surface melting (LSM) treatments on the surface of the Mg alloy AZ91D. Different treatments with different microstructures were produced by varying the laser-beam power and laser-scanning speed. Corrosion evaluation, using hydrogen evolution and electrochemical measurements, led to a relationship between microstructure and corrosion. Most corrosion rates for LSM treated specimens were within the scatter of the as-received AZ91D, whereas some treatments gave higher corrosion rates and some of the samples had corrosion rates lower than the average of the corrosion rate for AZ91D. There were differences in corroded surface morphology. Nevertheless laser treatments introduced surface discontinuities, which masked the effect of the microstructure. Removing these surface defects decreased the corrosion rate for the laser-treated samples. - Highlights: • Corrosion behavior of AZ91D Mg alloys is intimately related with its microstructure. • Laser surface melting treatments allows surface modification of the microstructure. • Different laser parameters can achieve different microstructures. • Controlling laser parameters can produce different corrosion rates and morphologies. • Increase of surface roughness due to laser treatment is relevant to the corrosion rate

  11. A new corrosion sensor to determine the start and development of embedded rebar corrosion process at coastal concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Li, Zhiyuan; Jin, Weiliang

    2013-09-30

    The corrosion of reinforcements induced by chloride has resulted to be one of the most frequent causes of their premature damage. Most corrosion sensors were designed to monitor corrosion state in concrete, such as Anode-Ladder-System and Corrowatch System, which are widely used to monitor chloride ingress in marine concrete. However, the monitoring principle of these corrosion sensors is based on the macro-cell test method, so erroneous information may be obtained, especially from concrete under drying or saturated conditions due to concrete resistance taking control in macro-cell corrosion. In this paper, a fast weak polarization method to test corrosion state of reinforcements based on electrochemical polarization dynamics was proposed. Furthermore, a new corrosion sensor for monitoring the corrosion state of concrete cover was developed based on the proposed test method. The sensor was tested in cement mortar, with dry-wet cycle tests to accelerate the chloride ingress rate. The results show that the corrosion sensor can effectively monitor chloride penetration into concrete with little influence of the relative humidity in the concrete. With a reasonable corrosion sensor electrode arrangement, it seems the Ohm-drop effect measured by EIS can be ignored, which makes the tested electrochemical parameters more accurate.

  12. A New Corrosion Sensor to Determine the Start and Development of Embedded Rebar Corrosion Process at Coastal Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiliang Jin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion of reinforcements induced by chloride has resulted to be one of the most frequent causes of their premature damage. Most corrosion sensors were designed to monitor corrosion state in concrete, such as Anode-Ladder-System and Corrowatch System, which are widely used to monitor chloride ingress in marine concrete. However, the monitoring principle of these corrosion sensors is based on the macro-cell test method, so erroneous information may be obtained, especially from concrete under drying or saturated conditions due to concrete resistance taking control in macro-cell corrosion. In this paper, a fast weak polarization method to test corrosion state of reinforcements based on electrochemical polarization dynamics was proposed. Furthermore, a new corrosion sensor for monitoring the corrosion state of concrete cover was developed based on the proposed test method. The sensor was tested in cement mortar, with dry-wet cycle tests to accelerate the chloride ingress rate. The results show that the corrosion sensor can effectively monitor chloride penetration into concrete with little influence of the relative humidity in the concrete. With a reasonable corrosion sensor electrode arrangement, it seems the Ohm-drop effect measured by EIS can be ignored, which makes the tested electrochemical parameters more accurate.

  13. Superheater fireside corrosion mechanisms in MSWI plants: Lab-scale study and on-site results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brossard, J.M.; Chaucherie, X.; Nicol, F. [Veolia Environnement R and D, Zone Portuaire de Limay, 291 Avenue Dreyfous Ducas, Limay 78520 (France); Diop, I. [Veolia Environnement R and D, Zone Portuaire de Limay, 291 Avenue Dreyfous Ducas, Limay 78520 (France); Institut Jean Lamour, departement Chimie et physique des solides et des surfaces, UMR 7198 CNRS - Universite Henri Poincare Nancy 1, Vandoeuvre-Les-Nancy (France); Rapin, C.; Vilasi, M. [Institut Jean Lamour, departement Chimie et physique des solides et des surfaces, UMR 7198 CNRS - Universite Henri Poincare Nancy 1, Vandoeuvre-Les-Nancy (France)

    2011-06-15

    Combustion of municipal waste generates highly corrosive gases (HCl, SO{sub 2}, NaCl, KCl, and heavy metals chlorides) and ashes containing alkaline chlorides and sulfates. Currently, corrosion phenomena are particularly observed on superheater's tubes. Corrosion rates depend mainly on installation design, operating conditions i.e., gas and steam temperature and velocity of the flue gas containing ashes. This paper presents the results obtained using an innovative laboratory-scale corrosion unit, which simulates MSWI (Municipal Solid Waste Incineration) boilers conditions characterized by a temperature gradient at the metal tube in the presence of corrosive gases and ashes. The presented corrosion tests were realized on carbon steel at fixed metal temperature (400 C). The influence of the flue gas temperature, synthetic ashes composition, and flue gas flow pattern were investigated. After corrosion test, cross sections of tube samples were characterized to evaluate thickness loss and estimate corrosion rate while the elements present in corrosion layers were analyzed. Corrosion tests were carried out twice in order to validate the accuracy and reproducibility of results. First results highlight the key role of molten phase related to the ash composition and flue gas temperature as well as the deposit morphology, related to the flue gas flow pattern, on the mechanisms and corrosion rates. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Structural Effects of Reinforced Concrete Beam Due to Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Hamidun Mohd; Idris, Nur'ain; Noor, Nurazuwa Md; Sarpin, Norliana; Zainal, Rozlin; Kasim, Narimah

    2018-03-01

    Corrosion of steel in reinforced concrete is one of the main issues among construction stakeholders. The main consequences of steel corrosion include loss of cross section of steel area, generation of expansive pressure which caused cracking of concrete, spalling and delaminating of the concrete cover. Thus, it reduces the bond strength between the steel reinforcing bar and concrete, and deteriorating the strength of the structure. The objective of this study is to investigate the structural effects of corrosion damage on the performance of reinforced concrete beam. A series of corroded reinforced concrete beam with a corrosion rate of 0%, 20% and 40% of rebar corrosion is used in parametric study to assess the influence of different level of corrosion rate to the structural performance. As a result, the used of interface element in the finite element modelling predicted the worst case of corrosion analysis since cracks is induced and generate at this surface. On the other hand, a positive linear relationship was sketched between the increase of expansive pressure and the corrosion rate. Meanwhile, the gradient of the graph is decreased with the increase of steel bar diameter. Furthermore, the analysis shows that there is a significant effect on the load bearing capacity of the structure where the higher corrosion rate generates a higher stress concentration at the mid span of the beam. This study could predict the residual strength of reinforced concrete beam under the corrosion using the finite element analysis. The experimental validation is needed on the next stage to investigate the quantitative relation between the corrosion rate and its influence on the mechanical properties.

  15. Effect of areal power density and relative humidity on corrosion resistant container performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gansemer, J.D.

    1994-10-01

    The impact of the rewetting process on the performance of waste containers at the Yucca Mountain repository is analyzed. This paper explores the impact of the temperature-humidity relationships on pitting corrosion failure of stainless steel containers for different areal power densities (APDs)in the repository. It compares the likely performance of containers in a repository with a low APD, 55 Kw/acre, and a high APD, 110 kW/acre

  16. Apparent Fracture Toughness of Low-carbon Steel CSN 411353 as Related to Stress Corrosion Cracks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gajdoš, Lubomír; Šperl, Martin; Siegl, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 32, 8/9 (2011), s. 4348-4353 ISSN 0261-3069 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/10/2052; GA ČR(CZ) GPP105/10/P555 Grant - others:GAMPO(CZ) FT-TA5/076 Program:FT Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : corrosion * fracture * fractography Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.200, year: 2011

  17. Electrochemical noise of the erosion-corrosion of copper in relation with its hydrodynamic parameters; Ruido electroquimico de la erosion-corrosion en cobre: su relacion con los parametros hidrodinamicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaneda, I.; Romero, M.; Malo, J.M.; Uruchurtu, J.

    2010-07-01

    This work presents the electrochemical noise results obtained of the surface degradation on copper, due to erosion corrosion phenomena, which were a function of the hydrodynamic parameters of the system (fluid movement). A modified rotating cylinder (RC) comprising three ring electrodes under two rotating speeds (880 and 1750 rpm with a Reynolds numbers 1486 Re and 2972 Re, respectively) were used. Characteristic electrochemical noise spectra as a function of the hydrodynamic parameters were found, as well as surface attack intensities the noise signal. An increase and a more uniform attack due to particle impact was related to larger particle size and lesser erosion corrosion intensity, in the form of more localized attack over the surface, was obtained for smaller ones. Erosion corrosion attack presents characteristic electrochemical current and potential noise signals, according to the laminar or transitional turbulent regime and particle size added. (Author).

  18. Rhenium corrosion in chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, A.D.; Shkol'nikov, S.N.; Vetyukov, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    The results investigating rhenium corrosion in chloride melts containing sodium, potassium and chromium ions by a gravimetry potentials in argon atmosphere in a sealing quarth cell are described. Rhenium corrosion is shown to be rather considerable in melts containing CrCl 2 . The value of corrosion rate depending on temperature is determined

  19. Magnesium microelectrode corrosion product transport modelling in relation to chloride induced pitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrows, R.; Cook, A.; Stevens, N.P.C.

    2012-09-01

    The high magnesium alloy Magnox is used as a fuel clad for the UK gas cooled, graphite moderated reactors of the same name. The fuel is metallic uranium (typically natural enrichment), so a low neutron absorption cross-section clad is required. Following discharge from reactor, spent fuel is stored in water, which acts as an effective heat transfer medium and biological shield. The chemistry of these ponds is carefully controlled to ensure that the Magnox clad remains in a passive state. This is primarily through the maintenance of a high pH and very low anion concentration. Of particular concern is the presence of chloride ions as even very low levels may allow localised corrosion to initiate. Although extensive work has been undertaken historically considering the behaviour of Magnox clad and the acceptable storage envelopes, the challenges of ageing plant and aspirations for accelerated decommissioning give value to further understanding of the corrosion mechanisms of this material. Recently, electrochemical techniques have been employed to characterise performance in a variety of chemistries and microelectrodes have been produced which have shown characteristics of salt film corrosion at moderate chloride concentrations under polarisation. A characteristic of the electrochemical response observed during the mass transport limited (potential independent) salt film regime has been periodic transients which correspond to emission of microscopic hydrogen bubbles from the microelectrode cavity. A simple finite element multi-physics model has been employed to assist in understanding the dominant processes of corrosion product transport away from a magnesium electrode surface which is dissolving under a salt film and this shows that characteristic transients observed in electrochemical tests may be simulated with reasonable agreement by consideration of convection from laminar flow around hydrogen micro-bubbles in the pit cavity combined with aqueous diffusion in the

  20. Oxidation kinetics of reaction products formed in uranium metal corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totemeier, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of uranium metal ZPPR fuel corrosion products in environments of Ar-4%O 2 and Ar-20%O 2 were studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). These tests were performed to extend earlier work in this area specifically, to assess plate-to-plate variations in corrosion product properties and the effect of oxygen concentration on oxidation behavior. The corrosion products from two relatively severely corroded plates were similar, while the products from a relatively intact plate were not reactive. Oxygen concentration strongly affected the burning rate of reactive products, but had little effect on low-temperature oxidation rates

  1. Oxidation kinetics of reaction products formed in uranium metal corrosion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totemeier, T. C.

    1998-04-22

    The oxidation behavior of uranium metal ZPPR fuel corrosion products in environments of Ar-4%O{sub 2} and Ar-20%O{sub 2} were studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). These tests were performed to extend earlier work in this area specifically, to assess plate-to-plate variations in corrosion product properties and the effect of oxygen concentration on oxidation behavior. The corrosion products from two relatively severely corroded plates were similar, while the products from a relatively intact plate were not reactive. Oxygen concentration strongly affected the burning rate of reactive products, but had little effect on low-temperature oxidation rates.

  2. A corrosion detection system for buried pipeline (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yoon Seok; Shin, Dong Ho; Kim, Sang Hyun; Kim, Jung Gu

    2005-01-01

    In order to develop a new corrosion sensor for detecting and monitoring the corrosion of buried pipeline, the electrochemical property of sensors and the correlation of its output to corrosion rate of steel pipe, were evaluated by electrochemical methods in synthetic groundwater, two soils of varying resistivity (5,000 ohm-cm, 10,000 ohm-cm), and synthetic tap water. In this paper, two types of electrochemical probes were used: galvanic cells containing of pipeline steel-copper and pipeline steel-stainless steel (Type 304). The results of EIS measurement indicated that the sensor current was inversely related to sensor resistance, which was governed by the corrosion behavior of cathode. In galvanic corrosion tests, the galvanic current of Cu-CS probe was higher than that of SS-CS probe. The comparison of the sensor output and corrosion rates revealed that a linear relationship was found between the probe current and the corrosion rates. A good linear quantitative relationship was found between the Cu-CS probe current and the corrosion rate of pipeline steel coupons in the soil resistivity of 5,000 ohm-cm, and synthetic tap water. In the case of the soil resistivity of 10,000 ohm-cm, although the SS-CS probe showed a better linear correlation than that of Cu-CS probe, the Cu-CS probe is more suitable than SS-CS probe, due to the high current output

  3. Corrosion at the head-neck interface of current designs of modular femoral components: essential questions and answers relating to corrosion in modular head-neck junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, K; Panagiotidou, A P; Khan, M; Blunn, G; Haddad, F S

    2016-05-01

    There is increasing global awareness of adverse reactions to metal debris and elevated serum metal ion concentrations following the use of second generation metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasties. The high incidence of these complications can be largely attributed to corrosion at the head-neck interface. Severe corrosion of the taper is identified most commonly in association with larger diameter femoral heads. However, there is emerging evidence of varying levels of corrosion observed in retrieved components with smaller diameter femoral heads. This same mechanism of galvanic and mechanically-assisted crevice corrosion has been observed in metal-on-polyethylene and ceramic components, suggesting an inherent biomechanical problem with current designs of the head-neck interface. We provide a review of the fundamental questions and answers clinicians and researchers must understand regarding corrosion of the taper, and its relevance to current orthopaedic practice. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:579-84. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  4. Corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goel, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on alloy corrosion cracking. Topics considered at the conference included the effect of niobium addition on intergranular stress corrosion cracking, corrosion-fatigue cracking in fossil-fueled-boilers, fracture toughness, fracture modes, hydrogen-induced thresholds, electrochemical and hydrogen permeation studies, the effect of seawater on fatigue crack propagation of wells for offshore structures, the corrosion fatigue of carbon steels in seawater, and stress corrosion cracking and the mechanical strength of alloy 600

  5. Effects of prior cold work on corrosion and corrosive wear of copper in HNO3 and NaCl solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Songbo; Li, D.Y.

    2005-01-01

    Effects of prior cold work on corrosion and corrosive wear behavior of copper in 0.1 M HNO 3 and 3.5% NaCl solutions, respectively, were investigated using electrochemical tests, electron work function measurements, and sliding corrosive wear tests with and without cathodic protection. Optical microscope and SEM were employed to examine the microstructure and worn surfaces. It was shown that, in general, the prior cold work raised the corrosion rate, but the effect differed in different corrosive media. In both the solutions, pure mechanical wear decreased with an increase in cold work. The prior cold work had a significant influence on the corrosive wear of copper, depending on the corrosive solution and the applied load. In the 0.1 M HNO 3 solution, the ratio of the wear loss caused by corrosion-wear synergism to the total wear loss increased with the cold work and became saturated when the cold work reached a certain level. In the 3.5% NaCl solution, however, this ratio decreased initially and then became relatively stable with respect to the cold work. It was observed that wear of copper in the 3.5% NaCl solution was larger than that in 0.1 M HNO 3 solution, although copper showed lower corrosion rate in the former solution. The experimental observations and the possible mechanisms involved are discussed

  6. Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, Toshifumi [Wading River, NY

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

  7. Corrosion and electrochemical properties of lanthanum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomashov, N.D.; Matveeva, T.V.

    The kinetics of the corrosion rate of lanthanum at 25 0 in air of different relative humidities, distilled water, sulfuric acid, hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, phosphoric acid, hydrofluoric acid, potassium hydroxide of different concentrations and at 100 0 C in distilled water and potassium hydroxide have been studied. In air at 22--100% relative humidity, the corrosion rate of lanthanum increases with time and with increasing humidity. In distilled water and in potassium hydroxide solutions, the corrosion rate of lanthanum increases with time and decreasees when the concentration of alkali exceeds 20%. With increasing concentration of the acids, the corrosion rate of lanthanum increases in hydrochloric acid and nitric acid and passes through a maximum in sulfuric acid (20%) and phosphoric acid (60%). The values of the corrosion rates of lanthanum in 40% nitric acid, 35% hydrochloric acid, 20% sulfuric acid, 60% phosphoric acid, and 40% hydrofluoric acid are 8 x 10 5 ; 4.4 x 10 4 ; 1.3 x 10 3 ; 9 g/m 2 h respectively

  8. Metallic copper corrosion rates, moisture content, and growth medium influence survival of copper ion-resistant bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elguindi, J; Moffitt, S; Hasman, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    of both copper ion-resistant E. coli and E. faecium strains when samples in rich medium were spread in a thin, moist layer on copper alloys with 85% or greater copper content. E. coli strains were rapidly killed under dry conditions, while E. faecium strains were less affected. Electroplated copper...... on electroplated copper surfaces with benzotriazole coating and thermal oxide coating compared to surfaces without anti-corrosion treatment. Control of surface corrosion affected the level of copper ion influx into bacterial cells, which contributed directly to bacterial killing....

  9. Corrosion behaviour of the UO2 pellet in corrosive solutions using electrochemical Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taftanzani, A.; Sucipto; Lahagu, F.; Irianto, B.

    1996-01-01

    The UO 2 electrodes has been made from the local product of UO 2 pellets. The corrosion behaviour of the UO 2 pellets is affected by solution, by pH value and by concentration of salt solution. Investigation into corrosion behaviour of UO 2 electrodes have been carried out in saturated salt solutions using electrochemical technique. The saturated solutions have been made from salts NaCl, Na 2 CO 3 , Na 2 SO 4 and Na 3 PO 4 . The pH value have been done over range 1 pH 10 and the salt concentration (C) over range 0,001 mol/l C 1,0 mol/l, Na 2 CO 3 solution produced the lowest corrosion rates of UO 2 pellets. Those rates were relative constant in the range of pH = 4 - 8. The results indicate an influence of the Na 2 CO 3 concentrations on the corrosions on the corrosion rate, and the lowest rates occur in 0,10 mol/l Na 2 CO 3 . The lowest corrosion rate was 0.3388 mil/year in 0.10 mol/l Na 2 CO 3 by pH = 4. (author)

  10. Contribution of archaeological analogs to the estimation of average corrosion rates and long term corrosion mechanisms of low carbon steel in soil; Apport des analogues archeologiques a l'estimation des vitesses moyennes et a l'etude des mecanismes de corrosion a tres long terme des aciers non allies dans les sols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neff, D

    2003-11-15

    identified. This corrosion form, constituted among others by a siderite layer is due to a particular environment: waterlogged soil containing wood. In the whole, analyses conducted in the TM show that it is composed of goethite badly crystallized in comparison with those of the DPL. Moreover, in this zone, the average elemental iron amount decreases progressively from the metal to the soil in which it stabilizes. In order to know the behaviour of the identified phases in soil water, some thermodynamic data have been involved to calculate their solubility in function of pH, potential and various water composition. The first conclusion concerns the influence of the composition and the structure of the material which is not important for the corrosion behaviour. From the results, some hypothesis have been formulated on the long term corrosion mechanisms of hypo-eutectoids steels in the considered environment. The role of the cracks formed in the DPL during the burial was evidenced. Moreover, these corrosion products undertake a dissolution in the soil water and a reprecipitation, explaining the progressive decrease of the iron amount in the TM. Lastly, some average corrosion rates have been measured with the help of the analytical and thermodynamic results: they do not exceed 4 {mu}m/year. (author)

  11. Alloying effects on dissolution rate of crevice corrosion for austenitic stainless steels in 3% NaCl solution at 80 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, P.; Shinohara, Tadashi; Tsujikawa, Shigeo

    1996-01-01

    Chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been a problem for austenitic stainless steel in aqueous environments containing chlorides. Studies have found that SCC initiates only from a dissolving surface and under the condition that the crack growth rate is higher than the dissolution rate of the dissolving surface. Research conducted to improve the resistance to SCC for Type 304 steels (UNS S30400) have revealed that while molybdenum and phosphorus are unfavored, the combined alloying of 3% aluminum with 2% copper can almost nullify their detrimental effect. Based on the mentioned criteria, this study was dedicated to clarify the mechanism behind these alloying effects by examining the relationship between the measured enhancements on SCC resistance and the dissolution rate observed via the moire technique. It was found that the addition of both molybdenum and phosphorus reduces the dissolution rate and therefore impaired SCC resistance; the addition of copper increases the dissolution rate of steady growth stage where crevice corrosion proceeds at a constant rate. Moreover this dissolution rate could further be increased when combined with the alloying of aluminum. These observed results correspond well to that of the measured behavior of the SCC critical temperature, T c , suggesting that the SCC susceptibility is influenced by anodic dissolution

  12. Experimental investigation of the relation between damage at the concrete-steel interface and initiation of reinforcement corrosion in plain and fibre reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, A.; Solgaard, A.O.S.; Pease, B.J.; Geiker, M.R.; Stang, H.; Olesen, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Cracked plain and steel fibre reinforced concrete flexural beams were investigated. •“Instrumented rebars” provided location- and time-dependent corrosion measurements. •Interfacial condition can be used as a reliable indicator to quantify the risk of corrosion. •Simulated interfacial conditions are in very good agreement with all experimental observations. -- Abstract: Cracks in covering concrete are known to hasten initiation of steel corrosion in reinforced concrete structures. To minimise the impact of cracks on the deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, current approaches in (inter)national design codes often limit the concrete surface crack width. Recent investigations however, indicate that the concrete-reinforcement interfacial condition is a more fundamental criterion related to reinforcement corrosion. This work investigates the relation between macroscopic damage at the concrete-steel interface and corrosion initiation of reinforcement embedded in plain and fibre reinforced concrete. Comparisons of experimental and numerical results indicate a strong correlation between corrosion initiation and interfacial condition

  13. Plastic strains during stent deployment have a critical influence on the rate of corrosion in absorbable magnesium stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Emmet; Cummins, Christy; Yoshihara, Shoichiro; Mac Donald, Bryan J; Lally, Caitríona

    2017-08-01

    Magnesium stents are a promising candidate in the emerging field of absorbable metallic stents (AMSs). In this study, the mechanical and corrosion performance of dog-bone specimens and a specific stent design of a magnesium alloy, WE43, are assessed experimentally in terms of their corrosion behaviour and mechanical integrity. It is shown that plastic strains that are induced in the struts of the stent during stent deployment have a critical influence in directing subsequent corrosion behaviour within the material. In addition, the deployment and scaffolding characteristics of the magnesium stent are elucidated and contrasted with those of a commercial stainless steel stent. The magnesium stent is found to support higher levels of cyclic strain amplitude than the stainless steel stent, even prior to degradation, and this may play a role in reducing in-stent restenosis. This study provides new insights into the experimental performance of a current AMS design and material whilst demonstrating the critical influence of plastic strain on the corrosion performance and scaffolding ability of an AMS.

  14. The use of slow strain rate technique for studying stress corrosion cracking of an advanced silver-bearing aluminum-lithium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frefer, Abdulbaset Ali; Raddad, Bashir S.; Abosdell, Alajale M.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of naturally aged advanced silver-bearing Al-Li alloy in NaCl solution was investigated using slow strain rate test (SSRT) method. The SSRT’s were conducted at different strain rates and applied potentials at room temperature. The results were discussed based on percent reductions in tensile elongation in a SCC-causing environment over those in air tended to express the SCC susceptbility of the alloy under study at T3. The SCC behavior of the alloy was also discussed based on the microstructural and fractographic examinations

  15. Corrosion engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontana, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book emphasizes the engineering approach to handling corrosion. It presents corrosion data by corrosives or environments rather than by materials. It discusses the corrosion engineering of noble metals, ''exotic'' metals, non-metallics, coatings, mechanical properties, and corrosion testing, as well as modern concepts. New sections have been added on fracture mechanics, laser alloying, nuclear waste isolation, solar energy, geothermal energy, and the Statue of Liberty. Special isocorrosion charts, developed by the author, are introduced as a quick way to look at candidates for a particular corrosive.

  16. Corrosion of valve metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draley, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    A general survey related to the corrosion of valve metals or film-forming metals. The way these metals corrode with some general examples is described. Valve metals form relatively perfect oxide films with little breakdown or leakage when anodized

  17. Effect Mo Addition on Corrosion Property and Sulfide Stress Cracking Susceptibility of High Strength Low Alloy Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Woo Yong; Koh, Seong Ung; Kim, Kyoo Young

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to understand the effect of Mo addition on SSC susceptibility of high strength low alloy steels in terms of microstructure and corrosion property. Materials used in this study are high strength low alloy (HSLA) steels with carbon content of 0.04wt% and Mo content varying from 0.1 to 0.3wt%. The corrosion property of steels was evaluated by immersion test in NACE-TM01-77 solution A and by analyzing the growth behavior of surface corrosion products. SSC resistance of steels was evaluated using constant load test. Electrochemical test was performed to investigate initial corrosion rate. Addition of Mo increased corrosion rate of steels by enhancing the porosity of surface corrosion products. however, corrosion rate was not directly related to SSC susceptibility of steels

  18. Electrochemical corrosion of Zircaloy-2 under PWR water chemistry but at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waheed, Abdel-Aziz Fahmy; Kandil, Abdel-Hakim Taha; Hamed, Hani M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • There is no simple relation between the corrosion rate and LiOH concentration. • At low concentration, 100 ppm Li, an increase of the rate is due to the pH impact. • LiOH in concentrated solution led to accelerated corrosion by pH effect and porosity. • Boron abates the lithium effect by pH neutralizing and participation in the corrosion. - Abstract: Electrochemical corrosion of Zircaloy-2 was tested at room temperature in lithium hydroxide (LiOH) concentrations that ranged from 2.2 to 7000 ppm and boric acid (H 3 BO 3 ) concentrations that ranged from 50 to 4000 ppm. Following the corrosion experiments, the oxide films of specimens were examined by SEM to examine the oxide existence. LiOH concentrations as high as 1 M (7000-ppm lithium) can lead to significantly increased electrochemical corrosion rate. It is suggested that the accelerated corrosion in concentrated solution is caused by the synergetic effect of LiOH, pH and porosity generation. In solutions containing 100 ppm of lithium, the presence of boron had an ameliorating effect on the corrosion rates of Zircaloy-2. Similar to acceleration of corrosion by lithium, the inhibition by boron is due to a combined effect of pH neutralizing and its participation in the corrosion process.

  19. Stress corrosion crack initiation of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes in an iodine vapor environment during creep, relaxation, and constant strain rate tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezequel, T.; Auzoux, Q.; Le Boulch, D.; Bono, M.; Andrieu, E.; Blanc, C.; Chabretou, V.; Mozzani, N.; Rautenberg, M.

    2018-02-01

    During accidental power transient conditions with Pellet Cladding Interaction (PCI), the synergistic effect of the stress and strain imposed on the cladding by thermal expansion of the fuel, and corrosion by iodine released as a fission product, may lead to cladding failure by Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC). In this study, internal pressure tests were conducted on unirradiated cold-worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes in an iodine vapor environment. The goal was to investigate the influence of loading type (constant pressure tests, constant circumferential strain rate tests, or constant circumferential strain tests) and test temperature (320, 350, or 380 °C) on iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (I-SCC). The experimental results obtained with different loading types were consistent with each other. The apparent threshold hoop stress for I-SCC was found to be independent of the test temperature. SEM micrographs of the tested samples showed many pits distributed over the inner surface, which tended to coalesce into large pits in which a microcrack could initiate. A model for the time-to-failure of a cladding tube was developed using finite element simulations of the viscoplastic mechanical behavior of the material and a modified Kachanov's damage growth model. The times-to-failure predicted by this model are consistent with the experimental data.

  20. Strain rate and temperature effects on the stress corrosion cracking of Inconel 600 steam generator tubing in the primary water conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, U.C.; van Rooyen, D.

    1985-01-01

    A single heat of Inconel Alloy 600 was examined in this work, using slow strain rate tests (SSRT) in simulated primary water at temperatures of 325 0 -345 0 -365 0 C. The best measure of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was percent SCC present on the fracture surface. Strain rate did not seem to affect crack growth rate significantly, but there is some question about the accuracy of calculating these values in the absence of a direct indication of when a crack initiates. Demarcation was determined between domains of temperature/strain rate where SCC either did, or did not, occur. Slower extension rates were needed to produce SCC as the temperature was lowered. 10 figs

  1. Probes for corrosion-related variables in LWR coolant: Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madou, M.; McKubre, M.C.H.

    1987-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify, develop, and qualify a range of sensors for the measurement and control of corrosion in high temperature, flowing water, nuclear reactor heat transport systems. Sensors were developed for the quantitative determination of pH, redox potential, and dissolved hydrogen concentration. A necessary first step in the development of voltage sensors is the availability of a stable thermodynamic reference electrode suitable for use in the high temperature aqueous environments of interest, and an external, pressure balanced, reference electrode was developed for this purpose. Experiments were performed to verify sensor function under conditions simulating those in nuclear reactor aqueous heat transport systems. The results indicate that dissolved hydrogen levels can be reliably sensed in PWR primary coolant. The probes for pH and redox potential await the development of a longer-lived reference electrode which is being actively pursued

  2. Corrosion of breached UF6 storage cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, E.J.; Taylor, M.S.; DeVan, J.H.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the corrosion processes that occurred following the mechanical failure of two steel 14-ton storage cylinders containing depleted UF 6 . The failures both were traced to small mechanical tears that occurred during stacking of the cylinders. Although subsequent corrosion processes greatly extended the openings in the wall. the reaction products formed were quite protective and prevented any significant environmental insult or loss of uranium. The relative sizes of the two holes correlated with the relative exposure times that had elapsed from the time of stacking. From the sizes and geometries of the two holes, together with analyses of the reaction products, it was possible to determine the chemical reactions that controlled the corrosion process and to develop a scenario for predicting the rate of hydrolysis of UF 6 , the loss rate of HF, and chemical attack of a breached UF 6 storage cylinder

  3. Corrosion of Metal-Matrix Composites with Aluminium Alloy Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bobic

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of MMCs with aluminium alloy matrix was presented. The corrosion characteristics of boron-, graphite-, silicon carbide-, alumina- and mica- reinforced aluminium MMCs were reviewed. The reinforcing phase influence on MMCs corrosion rate as well as on various corrosion forms (galvanic, pitting, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatique, tribocorrosion was discussed. Some corrosion protection methods of aluminium based MMCs were described

  4. Metallic corrosion in the polluted urban atmosphere of Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Wang, Da-Wei; Guo, Hai; Ling, Zhen-Hao; Cheung, Kalam

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the relationship between air pollutants, particularly acidic particles, and metallic material corrosion. An atmospheric corrosion test was carried out in spring-summer 2012 at a polluted urban site, i.e., Tung Chung in western Hong Kong. Nine types of metallic materials, namely iron, Q235 steel, 20# steel, 16Mn steel, copper, bronze, brass, aluminum, and aluminum alloy, were selected as specimens for corrosion tests. Ten sets of the nine materials were all exposed to ambient air, and then each set was collected individually after exposure to ambient air for consecutive 6, 13, 20, 27, 35, 42, 49, 56, 63, and 70 days, respectively. After the removal of the corrosion products on the surface of the exposed specimens, the corrosion rate of each material was determined. The surface structure of materials was observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after the corrosion tests. Environmental factors including temperature, relative humidity, concentrations of gaseous pollutants, i.e., sulfur dioxide (SO₂), nitrogen dioxide (NO₂), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O₃), and particulate-phase pollutants, i.e., PM₂.₅ (FSP) and PM₁₀ (RSP), were monitored. Correlation analysis between environmental factors and corrosion rate of materials indicated that iron and carbon steel were damaged by both gaseous pollutants (SO₂ and NO₂) and particles. Copper and copper alloys were mainly corroded by gaseous pollutants (SO₂ and O₃), while corrosion of aluminum and aluminum alloy was mainly attributed to NO₂ and particles.

  5. Review on stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue failure of centrifugal compressor impeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiao; Chen, Songying; Qu, Yanpeng; Li, Jianfeng

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion failure, especially stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue, is the main cause of centrifugal compressor impeller failure. And it is concealed and destructive. This paper summarizes the main theories of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue and its latest developments, and it also points out that existing stress corrosion cracking theories can be reduced to the anodic dissolution (AD), the hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC), and the combined AD and HIC mechanisms. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of corrosion fatigue in the crack propagation stage are similar to stress corrosion cracking. The effects of stress ratio, loading frequency, and corrosive medium on the corrosion fatigue crack propagation rate are analyzed and summarized. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in corrosive environments, which contain sulfide, chlorides, and carbonate, are analyzed. The working environments of the centrifugal compressor impeller show the behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in different corrosive environments. The current research methods for centrifugal compressor impeller corrosion failure are analyzed. Physical analysis, numerical simulation, and the fluid-structure interaction method play an increasingly important role in the research on impeller deformation and stress distribution caused by the joint action of aerodynamic load and centrifugal load.

  6. The Vietnamese lending rate, policy-related rate, and monetary policy post-1997 Asian financial crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu V. Nguyen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Asymmetries in the Vietnamese lending central bank’s policy-related rate spread were documented. Empirical results revealed that the spread adjusts to the threshold faster when the central bank’s policy-related rates decrease relative to the lending rates than when the central bank’s policy-related rates move in the opposite direction. Additionally, the empirical findings indicate that Vietnamese commercial banks exhibit competitive rate setting behavior which may be attributable to graft maximization by bank’s management. The results also show bidirectional Granger causality between the Vietnamese lending rate and the central bank’s policy-related rate, indicating that the lending rate and the central bank’s policy-related rate affect each other’s movements. These results suggest that monetary authority can use its countercyclical monetary policy instruments to achieve its macroeconomics objectives. However, the estimation results of the GARCH (2, 3-in-Mean model suggest that they should intervene more frequently and by small policy measures to minimize the conditional variance of the spread to minimize the magnitude of the cycle of the lending rate.

  7. Corrosion detection of nanowires by magnetic sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jü rgen; Amara, Selma; Ivanov, Iurii; Blanco, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Disclosed are various embodiments related to a corrosion detection device for detecting corrosive environments. A corrosion detection device comprises a magnetic sensor and at least one magnetic nanowire disposed on the magnetic sensor. The magnetic sensor is configured to detect corrosion of the one or more magnetic nanowires based at least in part on a magnetic field of the one or more magnetic nanowires.

  8. Corrosion detection of nanowires by magnetic sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jürgen

    2017-10-05

    Disclosed are various embodiments related to a corrosion detection device for detecting corrosive environments. A corrosion detection device comprises a magnetic sensor and at least one magnetic nanowire disposed on the magnetic sensor. The magnetic sensor is configured to detect corrosion of the one or more magnetic nanowires based at least in part on a magnetic field of the one or more magnetic nanowires.

  9. Corrosion fatigue crack growth in clad low-alloy steels. Part 2: Water flow rate effects in high-sulfur plate steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.; Lee, H.B.; Wire, G.L.; Novak, S.R.; Cullen, W.H.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion fatigue crack propagation tests were conducted on a high-sulfur ASTM A302-B plate steel overlaid with weld-deposited Alloy EN82H cladding. The specimens featured semi-elliptical surface cracks penetrating approximately 6.3 mm of cladding into the underlying steel. The initial crack sizes were relatively large with surface lengths of 22.8--27.3 mm, and depths of 10.5--14.1 mm. The experiments were initiated in a quasi-stagnant low-oxygen (O 2 < 10 ppb) aqueous environment at 243 C, under loading conditions (ΔK, R, cyclic frequency) conducive to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) under quasi-stagnant conditions. Following fatigue testing under quasi-stagnant conditions where EAC was observed, the specimens were then fatigue tested under conditions where active water flow of either 1.7 m/s or 4.7 m/s was applied parallel to the crack. Earlier experiments on unclad surface-cracked specimens of the same steel exhibited EAC under quasi-stagnant conditions, but water flow rates at 1.7 m/s and 5.0 m/s parallel to the crack mitigated EAC. In the present experiments on clad specimens, water flow at approximately the same as the lower of these velocities did not mitigate EAC, and a free stream velocity approximately the same as the higher of these velocities resulted in sluggish mitigation of EAC. The lack of robust EAC mitigation was attributed to the greater crack surface roughness in the cladding interfering with flow induced within the crack cavity. An analysis employing the computational fluid dynamics code, FIDAP, confirmed that frictional forces associated with the cladding crack surface roughness reduced the interaction between the free stream and the crack cavity

  10. Corrosion Prevention of Aluminum Nanoparticles by a Polyurethane Coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Toshiyasu; Raman, Vedarajan

    2014-06-19

    In order to prevent corrosion, aluminum nanoparticles were coated with a polyurethane polymer. The coverage of the polyurethane polymer was controlled from 0 to 100%, which changed the corrosion rate of the nanoparticles quantitatively. The surface of the polymer coating was investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), and the corrosion resistance of the nanoparticles was estimated by a wet/dry corrosion test on a Pt plate with a NaCl solution. From a TEM with EDAX analysis, the 10 mass% polymer coated Al particles in the synthesis were almost 100% covered on the surface by a polymer film of 10 nm thick. On the other hand, the 3 mass% polymer coated Al was almost 40% covered by a film. In the AFM, the potential around the Al particles had a relatively low value with the polymer coating, which indicated that the conductivity of the Al was isolated from the Pt plate by the polymer. Both the corrosion and H₂ evolution reaction rates were quantitatively reduced by the mass% of polymer coating. In the case of the 10 mass% coated sample, there was no corrosion of Al nanoparticles. This fact suggested that the electrochemical reaction was suppressed by the polymer coating. Moreover, the reaction rate of Al nanoparticles was suppressed in proportion to the coverage percentage of the coating. Thus, to conclude, it was found that the corrosion rate of Al nanoparticles could be quantitatively suppressed by the coverage percentage of the polymer coating.

  11. Standard practice for preparing, cleaning, and evaluating corrosion test specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers suggested procedures for preparing bare, solid metal specimens for tests, for removing corrosion products after the test has been completed, and for evaluating the corrosion damage that has occurred. Emphasis is placed on procedures related to the evaluation of corrosion by mass loss and pitting measurements. (Warning—In many cases the corrosion product on the reactive metals titanium and zirconium is a hard and tightly bonded oxide that defies removal by chemical or ordinary mechanical means. In many such cases, corrosion rates are established by mass gain rather than mass loss.) 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific precautionary statements, see 1 and 7.2.

  12. Study of stress corrosion cracking initiation of high alloy materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blahetova, Marie; Cihal, Vladimir; Lasek, Stanislav [Department of Materials Engineering, VSB - Technical University of Ostrava, tr. 17. listopadu 15, 708 33 Ostrava - Poruba (Czech Republic)

    2004-07-01

    The stainless steels and related alloys with sufficient resistance to a general corrosion can be susceptible to a localized corrosion (pitting, cracking, intergranular corrosion) in certain environment under specific conditions. The Drop Evaporation Test (DET) was developed for study of stainless materials resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) at elevated temperatures 100 - 300 deg. C under constant external load using a chloride containing water solution. In the contribution the initiation and propagation of short cracks as well as pits were observed during the test. The crack initiation and/or propagation can be influenced by the cyclic thermal stresses, when the diluted water solution drops cool down the hot sample. The coordinates measurement of microscopic pits and sharp corrosion crack tips by the travelling microscope method allowed to derive the crack growth lengths and rates of short cracks. (authors)

  13. Study of stress corrosion cracking initiation of high alloy materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blahetova, Marie; Cihal, Vladimir; Lasek, Stanislav

    2004-01-01

    The stainless steels and related alloys with sufficient resistance to a general corrosion can be susceptible to a localized corrosion (pitting, cracking, intergranular corrosion) in certain environment under specific conditions. The Drop Evaporation Test (DET) was developed for study of stainless materials resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) at elevated temperatures 100 - 300 deg. C under constant external load using a chloride containing water solution. In the contribution the initiation and propagation of short cracks as well as pits were observed during the test. The crack initiation and/or propagation can be influenced by the cyclic thermal stresses, when the diluted water solution drops cool down the hot sample. The coordinates measurement of microscopic pits and sharp corrosion crack tips by the travelling microscope method allowed to derive the crack growth lengths and rates of short cracks. (authors)

  14. Achievments of corrosion science and corrosion protection technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontana, M.; Stehjl, R.

    1985-01-01

    Problems of corrosion-mechanical strength of metals, effect of corrosive media on creep characteristics are presented. New concepts of the mechanism of corrosion cracking and its relation to hydrogen embrittlement are described. Kinetics and mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement effect on the process of corrosion cracking of different steels and alloys are considered. The dependence of such types of failure on various structural factors is shown. Data on corrosion cracking of high-strength aluminium and titanium alloys, mechanism of the processes and protective methods are given

  15. Mobile evaporator corrosion test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80 degrees C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either open-quotes satisfactoryclose quotes (2-20 mpy) or open-quotes excellentclose quotes (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment

  16. Corrosion Fatigue Crack Propagation Rate Characteristics for Weldable Ship and Offshore Steels with Regard to the Influence of Loading Frequency and Saltwater Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubowski Marek

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available After Vosikovsky (1975, the corrosion fatigue crack growth rate (CFCGR characteristics have been divided into three regions. The region-III rates are very close to mechanical fatigue crack growth rates. CFCGR formulae, including the long-crack length effect (in region I only, the loading frequency effect (in region II only, and the saltwater temperature effect, have been proposed. It has been assumed that CFCGR is proportional to f-k, where f is the loading frequency and k is a constant. The averaged k-value for all steels of yield stress (YS below 500 MPa, usually with ferrite-pearlite microstructures, is higher than that for YS > 500 MPa, usually with quenched and tempered microstructures. The temperature effect does not appear in region I below room temperature. In the remaining cases, that is, in region I for elevated temperatures and in region II for both low and elevated temperatures, the CFCGR increases with increasing temperature. Under a potential of -0.8 V, a long-crack-length effect, qualitatively similar to analogous effect for free corrosion conditions, appears.

  17. Slow strain rate stress corrosion tests on A508-III and A533B steel in de-ionized and PWR water at 563K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, P.; Appleton, D.A.; Banks, P.; Raffel, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental programme is being undertaken to assess the extent to which PWR pressure vessel steels, including weldments, may be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking under relevant water chemistry and flow rate conditions. Initial results from slow strain rate tests on parent A533B and A508-III steels together with a weldment are described. No susceptibility to stress corrosion was observed for either steel, when tested in the rolling (L) direction, at a potential characteristic of normal quality PWR water. For cracking to occur on such specimens the potential must be displaced by 400 to 500 mV in the positive direction, requiring (in the case of high flow de-ionized water) the presence of ca 200 ppb oxygen. Some cracking was observed on transverse (S) direction specimens in water containing 2 , indicating that there may be micro-structural features which can cause cracking even in low oxygen water. This orientation is not directly relevant to pressure vessels and the cracking may only arise as a consequence of the deformation encountered in the slow strain rate test. (author)

  18. Corrosion of steel structures in sea-bed sediment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    corrosion mechanism, measurement of metal corrosion rate, corrosion ... cables, steel rigs, pipelines and other marine facilities, is ..... make high strength steel material to crack with stress ... of SBS has yet been very limited, and selection of.

  19. Timescale Correlation between Marine Atmospheric Exposure and Accelerated Corrosion Testing - Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Eliza L.; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Jerome C.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of metals to predict service life of metal-based structures in corrosive environments has long relied on atmospheric exposure test sites. Traditional accelerated corrosion testing relies on mimicking the exposure conditions, often incorporating salt spray and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and exposing the metal to continuous or cyclic conditions similar to those of the corrosive environment. Their reliability to correlate to atmospheric exposure test results is often a concern when determining the timescale to which the accelerated tests can be related. Accelerated corrosion testing has yet to be universally accepted as a useful tool in predicting the long-term service life of a metal, despite its ability to rapidly induce corrosion. Although visual and mass loss methods of evaluating corrosion are the standard, and their use is crucial, a method that correlates timescales from accelerated testing to atmospheric exposure would be very valuable. This paper presents work that began with the characterization of the atmospheric environment at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Beachside Corrosion Test Site. The chemical changes that occur on low carbon steel, during atmospheric and accelerated corrosion conditions, were investigated using surface chemistry analytical methods. The corrosion rates and behaviors of panels subjected to long-term and accelerated corrosion conditions, involving neutral salt fog and alternating seawater spray, were compared to identify possible timescale correlations between accelerated and long-term corrosion performance. The results, as well as preliminary findings on the correlation investigation, are presented.

  20. The Russian Landing Rate, Central Bank’s Policy Related Rate and Intermediation Premium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu V. Nguyen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper illustrates asymmetries in the Russian intermediation premium as measured by the spread between the commercial lending rate and the Central Bank’s policy related rate. Empirical results have shown that the Russian intermediation premium adjusts to the threshold faster when the Central Bank’s policy related rates increase relative to lending rates as opposed to when the Central Bank’s policy related rates move in the opposite direction. The findings of this paper suggest that during the period when the Russian Federation faced formidable challenges from a sharp decline in oil prices and reduced access to international capital markets due to Western sanctions, the Central Bank of Russia was not effective in utilizing countercyclical monetary policy to achieve macroeconomic objectives and commercial banks exhibited predatory pricing behavior.

  1. Experiments relating to hydrogen generated by corrosion processes associated with repositories for intermediate-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenk, R.

    1983-12-01

    Organic components in an intermediate level waste repository decompose under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions to produce carbon dioxide, which may lead to acid corrosion of metallic containers and hence to hydrogen production. The possibility of hydrogen production within the repository must be considered in determining the long term safety. Thermodynamic calculations show that only pure water is required to produce hydrogen with iron in a repository. The hydrogen evolution rate is thus the important parameter. However, the available kinetic data is insufficient and needs to be supplemented experimentally. Carbon steel specimens were immersed in water over which several gas mixtures containing nitrogen, oxygen and carbon dioxide were passed; the amount of hydrogen picked up by the gas stream was measured. 1.4 - 28 ml hydrogen per square meter per hour was evolved when the gas mixture contained 1 and 20 volume per cent carbon dioxide respectively. Hydrogen was also detected in natural CO 2 -free water when oxygen concentration cells are present. No hydrogen could be detected at pH 8.5 and above. The experiments were all carried out at 25 degrees C and atmospheric pressure and restricted to the carbonate system. Natural waters contain a mixture of salts; this may increase or reduce the hydrogen evolution rate. Higher temperatures and pressures, in particular a higher partial pressure of carbon dioxide, will probably lead to an increase in the hydrogen evolution rate. (author)

  2. The corrosion of steels in molten sodium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, R.N.; Smith, C.A.; Smith, R.J.

    1976-09-01

    The role of sodium hydroxide corrosion is discussed in relation to the wastage of materials observed in fast reactor boilers under fault conditions in the vicinity of a water leak into sodium. An experimental technique to study the corrosion under varying conditions is described. The results presented are for 2 1/4Cr 1Mo obtained in static sodium hydroxide in a closed volume over the temperature range 1033K to 1273K. It is found that the corrosion rate can be followed by monitoring the hydrogen produced by the reaction, which can be written as: Fe + 2NaOH = NaFeO 2 + NaH + 1/2H 2 . After an initial acceleration period the rate law is parabolic. The effect on the corrosion rate of melt and cover gas composition has been in part investigated, and the relevance of mass flow of reactants is discussed. (author)

  3. The effect of sulfide on the aerobic corrosion of carbon steel in near-neutral pH saline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherar, B.W.A.; Keech, P.G.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The corrosion rate is low when steel is exposed to anaerobic conditions (pH = 8.9). ► An anaerobic to aerobic corrosion with sulfide switch increases the corrosion rate. ► Aerobic exposure induces the formation of goethite-covered tubercles. ► Continual sulfide exposure leads to the slow conversion of goethite to mackinawite. - Abstract: Severe corrosion damage may occur when gas transmission pipelines are exposed, at disbonded coating locations, to trapped waters containing sulfide followed by secondary exposure to air. Aerobic corrosion with sulfide was investigated in a long-term corrosion experiment in which corrosion was monitored by measurement of the corrosion potential and polarization resistance obtained from linear polarization resistance measurements. The properties and composition of the corrosion product deposits formed were determined using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. A switch from aerobic to aerobic-with-sulfide corrosion doubles the relative corrosion rate.

  4. Relationship between corrosion and the biological sulfur cycle: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, B.J.; Ray, R.I.; Pope, R.K.

    2000-04-01

    Sulfur and sulfur compounds can produce pitting, crevice corrosion, dealloying, stress corrosion cracking, and stress-oriented hydrogen-induced cracking of susceptible metals and alloys. Even though the metabolic by-products of the biological sulfur cycle are extremely corrosive, there are no correlations between numbers and types of sulfur-related organisms and the probability or rate of corrosion, Determination of specific mechanisms for corrosion caused by microbiologically mediated oxidation and reduction of sulfur and sulfur compounds is complicated by the variety of potential metabolic-energy sources and by-products; the coexistence of reduced and oxidized sulfur species; competing reactions with inorganic and organic compounds; and the versatility and adaptability of microorganisms in biofilms. The microbial ecology of sulfur-rich environments is poorly understood because of the association of aerobes and anaerobes and the mutualism or succession of heterotrophs to autotrophs. The physical scale over which the sulfur cycle influences corrosion varies with the environment. The complete sulfur cycle of oxidation and reduction reactions can take place in macroenvironments, including sewers and polluted harbors, or within the microenvironment of biofilms. In this review, reactions of sulfur and sulfur compounds resulting in corrosion were discussed in the context of environmental processes important to corrosion.

  5. Engineering Related Technology: A Laboratory and Curriculum Design for the Newly Emerging Technology of Pollution-Corrosion Measurement and Control. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, F. K.; And Others

    In order to meet the educational needs for a separate curriculum at the secondary level for technological training related to pollution and corrosion measurement and control, a 3-year, 1080-hour vocational program was developed for use in an area vocational high school. As one of four programs in the technology careers area, this curriculum design…

  6. Corrosion of reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1963-01-15

    Much operational experience and many experimental results have accumulated in recent years regarding corrosion of reactor materials, particularly since the 1958 Geneva Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy, where these problems were also discussed. It was, felt that a survey and critical appraisal of the results obtained during this period had become necessary and, in response to this need, IAEA organized a Conference on the Corrosion of Reactor Materials at Salzburg, Austria (4-9 June 1962). It covered many of the theoretical, experimental and engineering problems relating to the corrosion phenomena which occur in nuclear reactors as well as in the adjacent circuits

  7. Biotribocorrosion-an appraisal of the time dependence of wear and corrosion interactions: I. The role of corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Y; Neville, A; Dowson, D

    2006-01-01

    With the increasing interest in metal-on-metal (MoM) joint implants, studies have been focused on their wear and corrosion behaviour. Integrated electrochemical tests have been conducted and are reported in this paper. The corrosion, wear and wear-corrosion behaviour for three materials (high carbon CoCrMo, low carbon CoCrMo and UNS S31603) have been discussed. Corrosion effects on the overall performance for the three materials are analysed. Two distinct regimes have been found for the three materials: (a) the running-in regime and (b) the steady state regime, in line with other research. Even in the steady state regime, 20%-30% of the material degradation can be attributed to corrosion-related damage. High carbon CoCrMo showed excellent corrosion, wear and corrosion-wear resistance and therefore it delivered the best overall performance in terms of a lower wear rate, a lower friction coefficient and a higher resistance to corrosion

  8. Synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion in crude oil distillation unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, B.S., E-mail: yinwenfeng2010@163.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Sichuan, Chengdu, 610500 (China); Yin, W.F. [College of Mechatronic Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Sichuan, Chengdu, 610500 (China); Sang, D.H. [Sheng Li Construction Group International Engineering Department, Shandong, Dongying, 257000 (China); Jiang, Z.Y. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Sichuan, Chengdu, 610500 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The corrosion of a carbon-manganese steel and a stainless steel in sulfur and/or naphthenic acid media was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The corrosion rate of the carbon-manganese steel increased with the increase of the acid value and sulfur content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The critical values of the concentration of sulfur and acid for corrosion rate of the stainless steel were ascertained respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The stainless steel is superior to the carbon-manganese steel in corrosion resistance because of the presence of stable Cr{sub 5}S{sub 8} phases. - Abstract: The synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion at high temperature in crude oil distillation unit was studied using Q235 carbon-manganese steel and 316 stainless steel. The corrosion of Q235 and 316 in corrosion media containing sulfur and/or naphthenic acid at 280 Degree-Sign C was investigated by weight loss, scanning electron microscope (SEM), EDS and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis. The results showed that in corrosion media containing only sulfur, the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316 first increased and then decreased with the increase of sulfur content. In corrosion media containing naphthenic acid and sulfur, with the variations of acid value or sulfur content, the synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion has a great influence on the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316. It was indicated that the sulfur accelerated naphthenic acid corrosion below a certain sulfur content but prevented naphthenic acid corrosion above that. The corrosion products on two steels after exposure to corrosion media were investigated. The stable Cr{sub 5}S{sub 8} phases detected in the corrosion products film of 316 were considered as the reason why 316 has greater corrosion resistance to that of Q235.

  9. Synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion in crude oil distillation unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, B. S.; Yin, W. F.; Sang, D. H.; Jiang, Z. Y.

    2012-10-01

    The synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion at high temperature in crude oil distillation unit was studied using Q235 carbon-manganese steel and 316 stainless steel. The corrosion of Q235 and 316 in corrosion media containing sulfur and/or naphthenic acid at 280 °C was investigated by weight loss, scanning electron microscope (SEM), EDS and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis. The results showed that in corrosion media containing only sulfur, the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316 first increased and then decreased with the increase of sulfur content. In corrosion media containing naphthenic acid and sulfur, with the variations of acid value or sulfur content, the synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion has a great influence on the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316. It was indicated that the sulfur accelerated naphthenic acid corrosion below a certain sulfur content but prevented naphthenic acid corrosion above that. The corrosion products on two steels after exposure to corrosion media were investigated. The stable Cr5S8 phases detected in the corrosion products film of 316 were considered as the reason why 316 has greater corrosion resistance to that of Q235.

  10. Corrosion Behavior of Low-C Medium-Mn Steel in Simulated Marine Immersion and Splash Zone Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dazheng; Gao, Xiuhua; Su, Guanqiao; Du, Linxiu; Liu, Zhenguang; Hu, Jun

    2017-05-01

    The corrosion behavior of low-C medium-Mn steel in simulated marine immersion and splash zone environment was studied by static immersion corrosion experiment and wet-dry cyclic corrosion experiment, respectively. Corrosion rate, corrosion products, surface morphology, cross-sectional morphology, elemental distribution, potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectra were used to elucidate the corrosion behavior of low-C medium-Mn steel. The results show that corrosion rate in immersion zone is much less than that in splash zone owing to its relatively mild environment. Manganese compounds are detected in the corrosion products and only appeared in splash zone environment, which can deteriorate the protective effect of rust layer. With the extension of exposure time, corrosion products are gradually transformed into dense and thick corrosion rust from the loose and porous one in these two environments. But in splash zone environment, alloying elements of Mn appear significant enrichment in the rust layer, which decrease the corrosion resistance of the steel.

  11. Study of the uniform corrosion of non alloy and stainless steels: combined utilization of acoustic emission and electrochemical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaubert, Lionel

    2004-01-01

    In chemical and petrochemical industry, uniform corrosion induces important economic and security disappointments. The mechanisms of this damaging corrosion mode are well understood, but methods for on-line detection are badly missing. Acoustic emission technique presents, to palliate this lack, potentialities that have been studied in an instrumented laboratory loop allowing the simulation of industrial uniform corrosion conditions. In acidic media, acoustic activity is related to the hydrogen evolution resulting from proton reduction; it is therefore well correlated to the damage severity. In neutral aerated media, the deposit formation of corrosion products is not very emissive. Yet, a specific study of frequency parameters allows detection of corrosion evolution, but in that case, the quantification of corrosion rate remains difficult. A subsidiary study confirms the technique applicability in the case of 'acidic' corrosion, even in very noisy conditions. (author) [fr

  12. Electrochemistry and capillary condensation theory reveal the mechanism of corrosion in dense porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanoni, Matteo; Angst, Ueli M; Elsener, Bernhard

    2018-05-09

    Corrosion in carbonated concrete is an example of corrosion in dense porous media of tremendous socio-economic and scientific relevance. The widespread research endeavors to develop novel, environmentally friendly cements raise questions regarding their ability to protect the embedded steel from corrosion. Here, we propose a fundamentally new approach to explain the scientific mechanism of corrosion kinetics in dense porous media. The main strength of our model lies in its simplicity and in combining the capillary condensation theory with electrochemistry. This reveals that capillary condensation in the pore structure defines the electrochemically active steel surface, whose variability upon changes in exposure relative humidity is accountable for the wide variability in measured corrosion rates. We performed experiments that quantify this effect and find good agreement with the theory. Our findings are essential to devise predictive models for the corrosion performance, needed to guarantee the safety and sustainability of traditional and future cements.

  13. Lower alert rates by clustering of related drug interaction alerts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heringa, M.; Siderius, Hidde; Schreudering, A.; De Smet, Peter Agm; Bouvy, M.L.

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate to what extent clustering of related drug interaction alerts (drug-drug and drug-disease interaction alerts) would decrease the alert rate in clinical decision support systems (CDSSs). METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of drug interaction alerts

  14. System for corrosion monitoring in pipeline applying fuzzy logic mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzyakov, O. N.; Kolosova, A. L.; Andreeva, M. A.

    2018-05-01

    A list of factors influencing corrosion rate on the external side of underground pipeline is determined. Principles of constructing a corrosion monitoring system are described; the system performance algorithm and program are elaborated. A comparative analysis of methods for calculating corrosion rate is undertaken. Fuzzy logic mathematics is applied to reduce calculations while considering a wider range of corrosion factors.

  15. A Theoretical Model for Metal Corrosion Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David V. Svintradze

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many aluminum and stainless steel alloys contain thin oxide layers on the metal surface which greatly reduce the corrosion rate. Pitting corrosion, a result of localized breakdown of such films, results in accelerated dissolution of the underlying metal through pits. Many researchers have studied pitting corrosion for several decades and the exact governing equation for corrosion pit degradation has not been obtained. In this study, the governing equation for corrosion degradation due to pitting corrosion behavior was derived from solid-state physics and some solutions and simulations are presented and discussed.

  16. Carbon Dioxide Corrosion:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2008-01-01

    CO2 corrosion is a general problem in the industry and it is expensive. The focus of this study is an oil gas production related problem. CO2 corrosion is observed in offshore natural gas transportation pipelines. A general overview of the problem is presented in chapter 1. The chemical system...... with the basic thermodynamics of electrolytes in chapter 2, the extension and general description of electrolyte mass transport in chapter 3, and the electrochemical kinetics of corrosion in chapter 4. A literature overview of CO2 corrosion is shown in chapter 5 and possible extensions of the models...... and validated against heat capacity data. The model is also fitted to experimental data produced and shown in chapter 8 for SLE in the Na2CO3-NaHCO3-MEG-H2O system. The application of the above model is shown in chapter 9. Here the thermodynamic correction factors are calculated. These show how the diffusion...

  17. Modeling flow-accelerated corrosion in CANDU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrill, K.A.

    1995-11-01

    Flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) of large areas of carbon steel in various circuits of CANDU plants generates significant quantities of corrosion products. As well, the relatively rapid corrosion rate can lead to operating difficulties with some components. Three areas in the plant are identified and a simple model of mass-transfer controlled corrosion of the carbon steel is derived and applied to these areas. The areas and the significant finding for each are given below: A number of lines in the feedwater system generate sludge by FAC, which causes steam generator fouling. Prediction of the steady-state iron concentration at the feedtrain outlet compares well with measured values. Carbon steel outlet feeders connect the reactor core with the steam generators. The feeder surface provides the dissolved iron through FAC, which fouls the primary side of the steam generator tubes, and can lead to derating of the plant and difficulty in tube inspection. Segmented carbon steel divider plates in the steam generator primary head leak at an increasing rate with time. The leakage rate is strongly dependent on the tightness of the overlapping joints. which undergo FAC at an increasing rate with time. (author) 7 refs., 5 tabs., 6 figs

  18. Zircaloy-4 corrosion in PWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fyfitch, S.; Smalley, W.R.; Roberts, E.

    1985-01-01

    Zircaloy-4 waterside corrosion has been studied extensively in the nuclear industry for a number of years. Following the early crud-related corrosion failures in the Saxton test reactor, Westinghouse undertook numerous programs to minimize crud deposition on fuel rods in power reactors through primary coolant chemistry control. Modern plants today are operating with improved coolant chemistry guidelines, and crud deposition levels are very low in proportion to earlier experience. Zircaloy-4 corrosion under a variety of coolant chemistry, heat flux and exposure conditions has been studied extensively. Experience to date, even in relatively high coolant temperature plants, has indicated that -for both fuel cladding and structural components- Zircaloy-4 waterside corrosion performance has been excellent. Recognizing future industry trends, however, which will result in Zircaloy-4 being subjected to ever increasing corrosion duties, Westinghouse will continue accumulating Zircaloy-4 corrosion experience in large power plants. 13 refs.

  19. Determination of Corrosion Rate of Artificial Bone Made of Metal at Different pH Conditions using X-Ray Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutikno; Handayani, L.; Edi, S. S.; Susilo; Elvira

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to observe the mechanism and the rate of corrosion of artificial bone made of metal by using x-ray radiography technique. Artificial bones can be made of metallic materials and composites which are biomaterials. The most commonly used metal for bone graft is stainless steel. The interaction between artificial bone and human tissue will have important medical impacts that need to be observed and examined. This interaction can be a mechanical or chemical interaction. X-ray radiography technique is selected because it uses non-destructive method. This method is done by x-ray radiation exposure on the observed body part. The bone density and bone fracture can be seen on the resulted radiographic film or image on the monitor screen.

  20. Evolutionary Computation Techniques for Predicting Atmospheric Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Marref

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion occurs in many engineering structures such as bridges, pipelines, and refineries and leads to the destruction of materials in a gradual manner and thus shortening their lifespan. It is therefore crucial to assess the structural integrity of engineering structures which are approaching or exceeding their designed lifespan in order to ensure their correct functioning, for example, carrying ability and safety. An understanding of corrosion and an ability to predict corrosion rate of a material in a particular environment plays a vital role in evaluating the residual life of the material. In this paper we investigate the use of genetic programming and genetic algorithms in the derivation of corrosion-rate expressions for steel and zinc. Genetic programming is used to automatically evolve corrosion-rate expressions while a genetic algorithm is used to evolve the parameters of an already engineered corrosion-rate expression. We show that both evolutionary techniques yield corrosion-rate expressions that have good accuracy.

  1. Modeling pore corrosion in normally open gold- plated copper connectors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Moffat, Harry K.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Enos, David George; Serna, Lysle M.; Sorensen, Neil Robert

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this study is to model the electrical response of gold plated copper electrical contacts exposed to a mixed flowing gas stream consisting of air containing 10 ppb H{sub 2}S at 30 C and a relative humidity of 70%. This environment accelerates the attack normally observed in a light industrial environment (essentially a simplified version of the Battelle Class 2 environment). Corrosion rates were quantified by measuring the corrosion site density, size distribution, and the macroscopic electrical resistance of the aged surface as a function of exposure time. A pore corrosion numerical model was used to predict both the growth of copper sulfide corrosion product which blooms through defects in the gold layer and the resulting electrical contact resistance of the aged surface. Assumptions about the distribution of defects in the noble metal plating and the mechanism for how corrosion blooms affect electrical contact resistance were needed to complete the numerical model. Comparisons are made to the experimentally observed number density of corrosion sites, the size distribution of corrosion product blooms, and the cumulative probability distribution of the electrical contact resistance. Experimentally, the bloom site density increases as a function of time, whereas the bloom size distribution remains relatively independent of time. These two effects are included in the numerical model by adding a corrosion initiation probability proportional to the surface area along with a probability for bloom-growth extinction proportional to the corrosion product bloom volume. The cumulative probability distribution of electrical resistance becomes skewed as exposure time increases. While the electrical contact resistance increases as a function of time for a fraction of the bloom population, the median value remains relatively unchanged. In order to model this behavior, the resistance calculated for large blooms has been weighted more heavily.

  2. Rail base corrosion and cracking prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Rail base corrosion combined with fatigue or damage can significantly reduce rail life. Studies were done to examine the relative contribution of damage, corrosion, and fatigue on rail life. The combined effects can be separated into constituent fact...

  3. Simple relations between mean passage times and Kramers' stationary rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boilley, David; Jurado, Beatriz; Schmitt, Christelle

    2004-01-01

    The classical problem of the escape time of a metastable potential well in a thermal environment is generally studied by various quantities like Kramers' stationary escape rate, mean first passage time, nonlinear relaxation time, or mean last passage time. In addition, numerical simulations lead to the definition of other quantities as the long-time limit escape rate and the transient time. In this paper, we propose some simple analytical relations between all these quantities. In particular, we point out the hypothesis used to evaluate these various times in order to clarify their comparison and applicability, and show how average times include the transient time and the long-time limit of the escape rate

  4. Solutions of corrosion Problems in advanced Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Karlsson, Asger

    1999-01-01

    Austenitic and ferritic steels were exposed in the superheater area of a straw-fired CHP plant. The specimens were exposed for 1400 hours at 450-600°C. The rate of corrosion was assessed based on unattacked metal remaining. The corrosion products and course of corrosion for the various steel types...

  5. Corrosion resistance of zirconium in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajimura, H.; Morikawa, H.; Nagano, H.

    1987-01-01

    Slow strain rate tests are effected on zirconium in boiling nitric acid to study the influence of nitric acid concentration, of oxidizing ions (Cr and Ce) and of electric potential. Corrosion resistance is excellent and stress corrosion cracking occurs only for severe conditions: 350 mV over electric potential for corrosion with nitric acid concentration of 40 % [fr

  6. Studies on the impact, detection, and control of microbiology influenced corrosion related to pitting failures in the Russian oil and gas industry. Final CRADA report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehst, D.

    2006-09-30

    effect of carbon steel. More than three times decrease of corrosion rate on steel surface was observed after lignosulfonate electropolymerization, exceeding protective effect of standard commercially available corrosion inhibitor. Solikamsky lignin could be a promising candidate as a base for the development of the future green corrosion inhibitor. A protective effect of isothiazolones in compositions with other biocides and inhibitors was investigated. Additionally to high biocidal properties, combination of kathon 893 and copper sulfate may also produce a strong anticorrosion effect depending on concentrations of the biocides. Based on its joint biocidal and anticorrosion properties, this combination can be recommended for protection of pipelines against carbon dioxide-induced corrosion. By means of linear polarization resistance test, corrosion properties of biocides of different classes were studied. Isothiazolones can be recommended for treating oil-processing waters in Tatarstan to curb carbon dioxide - induced corrosion. A laboratory research on evaluation of the efficiency of biocides, inhibitors and penetrants by biological and physical-and-chemical methods has been carried out. It was shown that action of corrosion inhibitors and biocides strongly depends on character of their interaction with mineral substances available in waters on oil-exploration sites. It was found that one of approaches to designing environmentally safe ('green') antimicrobial formulations may be the use of synergetic combinations, which allow one to significantly decrease concentrations of biocides. It was shown that the efficacy of biocides and inhibitors depends on physicochemical characteristics of the environment. Anticorrosion and antimicrobial effects of biocides and inhibitors depended in much on the type of medium and aeration regimen. Effects of different biocides, corrosion inhibitors. penetrants and their combinations on the biofilm were investigated. It has been

  7. Performance evaluation of corrosion probes in simulated WVNS tank 8D-2 waste: WVNS tank farm process support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmore, M.R.

    1994-07-01

    Five corrosion probes were received from West Valley Nuclear Services for evaluation in simulated tank 8D-2 3rd-stage sludge wash slurry. The same waste slurry simulated was also used in a series of ongoing corrosion studies assessing the effects of in-tank sludge washing on the integrity of tank 8D-2. Two of the corrosion probes were installed in the coupon corrosion test vessels operating at ∼150 degrees F to compare performance of the probes with that observed by coupon tests conducted in the same vessels. Corrosion rate data calculated from electrical resistance measurements of the corrosion probes were evaluated for this study using two slightly different approaches. One approach uses the total length of exposure of the probe to give a ''time-averaged'' value of the corrosion rate. The other approach uses a shorter period of time (relative to the length of the test) in the calculation of corrosion rate, and is referred to as the ''instantaneous'' rate. The interpretation of the probe data and the implications of corrosion rates calculated with either of these methods are discussed in this report

  8. Research and development activities at INE concerning corrosion of final repository container materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienzler, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    The present work provides a historical overview of the research and development activities carried out at the (Nuclear) Research Center Karlsruhe (today KIT) since the beginning of the 1980s on the corrosion of materials which might be suitable for construction of containers for highly radioactive wastes. The report relates almost exclusively to the work performed by Dr. Emmanuel Smailos, who elaborated the corrosion of various materials at the Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE). The requirements for the containers and materials, which were subject to changes in time, are presented. The changes were strongly influenced by the changed perception of the use of nuclear energy. The selection of the materials under investigations, the boundary conditions for the corrosion experiments and the analytical methods are described. Results of the corrosion of the materials such as finegrained steel, Hastelloy C4, nodular cast iron, titanium-palladium and copper or copper-nickel alloys in typical salt solutions are summarized. The findings of special investigations, e.g. corrosion under irradiation or the influence of sulfide on the corrosion rates are shown. For construction of disposal canisters, experiments were conducted to determine the contact corrosion, the influence of the hydrogen embrittlement of Ti-Pd and fine-grained steels on the corrosion behavior as well as the corrosion behavior of welding and the influence of different welding processes with the resulting heat-affected zones on the corrosion behavior. The work was contributed to several European research programs and was well recognized in the USA. Investigations on the corrosion of steels in non-saline solutions and corrosion under interim storage conditions as well as under the expected conditions of the Konrad repository for low-level radioactive wastes are also described. In addition, the experiments on ceramic materials are presented and the results of the corrosion of Al 2 O 3 and ZrO 2 ceramics

  9. Engineering aspects of rate-related processes in food manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Many rate-related phenomena occur in food manufacturing processes. This review addresses four of them, all of which are topics that the author has studied in order to design food manufacturing processes that are favorable from the standpoint of food engineering. They include chromatographic separation through continuous separation with a simulated moving adsorber, lipid oxidation kinetics in emulsions and microencapsulated systems, kinetic analysis and extraction in subcritical water, and water migration in pasta.

  10. Exchange RateRelative Price Nonlinear Cointegration Relationship in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Venus Khim-Sen Liew; Chee-Keong Choong; Evan Lau; Kian-Ping Lim

    2005-01-01

    The finding of exchange rate–relative price nonlinear cointegration relationship in Malaysia, among others, suggests that nonlinear Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) equilibrium may be regarded as reference point in judging the short run misalignment of the Ringgit currency and thereby deducing effective policy actions. Moreover, economists who wish to extend the simple PPP exchange rate model into the more complicated monetary exchange models may do so comfortably, at least in the text of Malays...

  11. Corrosion of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.J.; Adolphson, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of beryllium in aqueous and elevated-temperature oxidizing environments has been extensively studied for early-intended use of beryllium in nuclear reactors and in jet and rocket propulsion systems. Since that time, beryllium has been used as a structural material in les corrosive environments. Its primary applications include gyro systems, mirror and reentry vehicle structures, and aircraft brakes. Only a small amount of information has been published that is directly related to the evaluation of beryllium for service in the less severe or normal atmospheric environments associated with these applications. Despite the lack of published data on the corrosion of beryllium in atmospheric environments, much can be deduced about its corrosion behavior from studies of aqueous corrosion and the experiences of fabricators and users in applying, handling, processing, storing, and shipping beryllium components. The methods of corrosion protection implemented to resist water and high-temperature gaseous environments provide useful information on methods that can be applied to protect beryllium for service in future long-term structural applications

  12. Corrosion control in nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, D.F.

    1986-01-01

    This article looks in detail at tribology-related hazards of corrosion in irradiated fuel reprocessing plants and tries to identify and minimize problems which could contribute to disaster. First, the corrosion process is explained. Then the corrosion aspects at each of four stages in reprocessing are examined, with particular reference to oxide fuel reprocessing. The four stages are fuel receipt and storage, fuel breakdown and dissolution, solvent extraction and product concentration and waste management. Results from laboratory and plant corrosion trails are used at the plant design stage to prevent corrosion problems arising. Operational procedures which minimize corrosion if it cannot be prevented at the design stage, are used. (UK)

  13. Relations between combustion, deposition, flue gas temperatures and corrosion in straw-fired boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie

    2004-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Additives trials in three different plants, Sønderborg waste incineration plant and Ensted woodchip and straw firing boiler, are described. Both aluminium silicate containing additives and ammonium sulphate was tested. At Sønderborg, there was a drastic decrease in Cl deposition when...... using an aluminium silicate additive, however the relative chlorine content of the deposits was unchanged. At Ensted woodchip plant, a dosage level of additives was reached which reduced the chlorine flux. For straw firing where the chlorine level in the fuel is higher and the fuel load is greater...

  14. Corrosion of high-density sintered tungsten alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batten, J.J.; Moore, B.T.

    1989-01-01

    In comparative corrosion tests, the corrosion resistance of an Australian tungsten alloy (95% W, 3.5% Ni, 1.5% Fe) was found to be superior to three other tungsten alloys and, under certain conditions, even more corrosion-resistant than pure tungsten. Corrosion resistance was evaluated after immersion in both distilled water and 5% sodium chloride solutions, and in cyclic humidity and salt mist environments. For all but the Australian alloy, the rate of corrosion in sodium chloride solution was markedly less than that in distilated water. In all cases, alloys containing copper had the greatest corrosion rates. Corrosion mechanisms were investigated using a scanning electron microscope, analysis of corrosion products and galvanic corrosion studies. For the alloys, corrosion was attributed primarily to a galvanic reaction. Whether the tungsten or binder phase of the alloy became anodic, and thus was attacked preferentially, depended upon alloy composition and corrosion environment. 16 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs

  15. Environmental Degradation of Materials: Surface Chemistry Related to Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Parallel experiments have been performed in order to develop a comprehensive model for stress cracking (SCC) in structural materials. The central objective is to determine the relationship between the activity and selectivity of the microstructure of structural materials to their dissolution kinetics and experimentally measured SCC kinetics. Zinc was chosen as a prototype metal system. The SCC behavior of two oriented single-crystal disks of zinc in a chromic oxide/sodium sulfate solution (Palmerton solution) were determined. It was found that: (1) the dissolution rate is strongly (hkil)-dependent and proportional to the exposure time in the aggressive environment; and (2) a specific slip system is selectively active to dissolution under applied stress and this slip line controls crack initiation and propagation. As a precursor to potential microgrvity experiments, electrophoretic mobility measurements of zinc particles were obtained in solutions of sodium sulfate (0.0033 M) with concentrations of dissolved oxygen from 2 to 8 ppm. The equilibrium distribution of exposed oriented planes as well as their correlation will determine the particle mobility.

  16. Studies of localized corrosion in welded aluminum alloys by the scanning reference electrode technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.; Nunes, A. C.

    1995-01-01

    Localized corrosion in welded samples of 2219-T87 Al alloy (2319 filler), 2090 Al-Li alloy (4043 and 2319 fillers), and 2195 Al-Li alloy (4043 and 2319 fillers) has been investigated using the relatively new scanning reference electrode technique. The weld beads are cathodic in all cases, leading to reduced anode/cathode ratios. A reduction in anode/cathode ratio leads to an increase in the corrosion rates of the welded metals, in agreement with results obtained in previous electrochemical and stress corrosion studies involving the overall corrosion rates of welded samples. The cathodic weld beads are bordered on both sides by strong anodic regions, with high propensity for corrosion.

  17. Sovereign ratings in the post-crisis world : an analysis of actual, shadow and relative risk ratings

    OpenAIRE

    Basu, Kaushik; De, Supriyo; Ratha, Dilip; Timmer, Hans

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the evolution of sovereign credit ratings in the wake of the global financial crisis by studying changes in actual, shadow, and relative ratings between 2008 and 2012. For countries that do not have a rating from the major rating agencies, shadow ratings are estimated as a function of macroeconomic, structural, and governance variables. The shadow rating exercise confir...

  18. Heart rate variability in sleep-related migraine without aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollono, Catello; Gnoni, Valentina; Testani, Elisa; Dittoni, Serena; Losurdo, Anna; Colicchio, Salvatore; Di Blasi, Chiara; Mazza, Salvatore; Farina, Benedetto; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2013-07-15

    This is an observational study aimed to investigate the activity of autonomic nervous system during sleep in patients with sleep-related migraine. Eight consecutive migraineurs without aura were enrolled (6 women and 2 men), aged 30 to 62 years (mean 48.1 ± 9.3 years). Inclusion criteria were: high frequency of attacks (> 5 per month) and occurrence of more than 75% of the attacks during sleep causing an awakening. Patients were compared with a control group of 55 healthy subjects (23 men and 32 women, mean age 54.2 ± 13.0 years), and with a further control group of 8 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Patient and controls underwent polysomnography and heart rate variability analysis. A significant reduction of the LF/HF ratio during N2 and N3 sleep stages was observed in migraineurs compared with controls. No differences in sleep macrostructure were observed; cyclic alternating pattern (CAP) time and CAP rate were lower in migraineurs than in controls. These findings indicate a peculiar modification of the autonomic balance during sleep in sleep-related migraine. The reduction of LF/HF ratio in NREM sleep was observed in controls, but it was quantitatively much more evident in migraineurs. Changes in LF/HF could be consequent to an autonomic unbalance which could manifest selectively (or alternatively become more evident) during sleep. These findings, together with the reduction in CAP rate, could be an expression of reduced arousability during sleep in patients with sleep-related migraine. The simultaneous involvement of the autonomic, arousal, and pain systems might suggest involvement of the hypothalamic pathways.

  19. DPC materials and corrosion environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna; Bryan, Charles R.; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Hardin, Ernest

    2014-10-01

    After an exposition of the materials used in DPCs and the factors controlling material corrosion in disposal environments, a survey is given of the corrosion rates, mechanisms, and products for commonly used stainless steels. Research needs are then identified for predicting stability of DPC materials in disposal environments. Stainless steel corrosion rates may be low enough to sustain DPC basket structural integrity for performance periods of as long as 10,000 years, especially in reducing conditions. Uncertainties include basket component design, disposal environment conditions, and the in-package chemical environment including any localized effects from radiolysis. Prospective disposal overpack materials exist for most disposal environments, including both corrosion allowance and corrosion resistant materials. Whereas the behavior of corrosion allowance materials is understood for a wide range of corrosion environments, demonstrating corrosion resistance could be more technically challenging and require environment-specific testing. A preliminary screening of the existing inventory of DPCs and other types of canisters is described, according to the type of closure, whether they can be readily transported, and what types of materials are used in basket construction.

  20. Corrosion inhibitors. Manufacture and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranney, M.W.

    1976-01-01

    Detailed information is presented relating to corrosion inhibitors. Areas covered include: cooling water, boilers and water supply plants; oil well and refinery operations; fuel and lubricant additives for automotive use; hydraulic fluids and machine tool lubes; grease compositions; metal surface treatments and coatings; and general processes for corrosion inhibitors

  1. The growing rate and the type of corrosion products of aluminium alloy AA 5052 in deionized water at temperature up to 3000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, E.G.

    1980-01-01

    The process of corrosion concerning the aluminum alloy AA5052 in deionized water at temperatures of 40 0 C, 80 0 C, 90 0 C, 140 0 C, 200 0 C and 280 0 C is studied. The following methods are used: periodic weighting of the test samples; analysis by neutronic activation of the corrosion products dissolved in water; thermogravimetric and thermodiferential analysis; analysis through X-ray diffraction and from metalografic observations of the crystals produced in the corrosion process; an optical microscope using polarized and normal light and a scanning electronic microscope. The activation energies are calculated for the corrosion film formation, and for the dissolution of the corrosion products in the deionized water. (ARHC) [pt

  2. Pitting corrosion of copper. An equilibrium - mass transport study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taxen, C.

    2002-08-01

    A mathematical model for the propagation of corrosion pits is described and used to calculate the potentials below which copper is immune to pitting. The model uses equilibrium data and diffusion coefficients and calculates the stationary concentration profiles of 26 aqueous species from the bulk water outside a corrosion pit to the site of the metal dissolution. Precipitation of oxides and salts of copper is considered. Studied conditions include water compositions from tap waters to seawater at the temperatures 25 deg C and 75 deg C. Carbonate and sulphate are aggressive towards copper because of complex formation with divalent copper. Carbonate is less aggressive in a corrosion pit than outside at the pH of the bulk. Carbonate carries acidity out from the pit, favours oxide formation and may prevent the initiation of acidic corrosion pits. The concentration profiles are used to estimate the maximum propagation rates for a corrosion pit. A high potential is found to be the most important factor for the rate of propagation. The levels of potential copper can sustain, as corrosion potentials are discussed in terms of the stability of cuprous oxide as a cathode material for oxygen reduction relative to non-conducting cupric phases

  3. Pitting corrosion of copper. An equilibrium - mass transport study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taxen, C. [Swedish Corrosion Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-08-01

    A mathematical model for the propagation of corrosion pits is described and used to calculate the potentials below which copper is immune to pitting. The model uses equilibrium data and diffusion coefficients and calculates the stationary concentration profiles of 26 aqueous species from the bulk water outside a corrosion pit to the site of the metal dissolution. Precipitation of oxides and salts of copper is considered. Studied conditions include water compositions from tap waters to seawater at the temperatures 25 deg C and 75 deg C. Carbonate and sulphate are aggressive towards copper because of complex formation with divalent copper. Carbonate is less aggressive in a corrosion pit than outside at the pH of the bulk. Carbonate carries acidity out from the pit, favours oxide formation and may prevent the initiation of acidic corrosion pits. The concentration profiles are used to estimate the maximum propagation rates for a corrosion pit. A high potential is found to be the most important factor for the rate of propagation. The levels of potential copper can sustain, as corrosion potentials are discussed in terms of the stability of cuprous oxide as a cathode material for oxygen reduction relative to non-conducting cupric phases.

  4. Online corrosion monitoring in a postcombustion CO2 capture pilot plant and its relation to solvent degradation and ammonia emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khakharia, P.; Mertens, J.; Huizinga, A.; Vroey, S. de; Sanchez Fernandez, E.; Srinivasan, S.; Vlugt, T.J.H.; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion in amine treating plants is known to cause integrity failures, plant shutdown, costly repairs, and so forth. The use of an amine treatment system for postcombustion CO2 capture brings additional challenges in terms of the flue gas quality, flue gas composition, operating conditions, scale

  5. Analysis of water radiolysis in relation to stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel at high temperatures - Effect of water radiolysis on limiting current densities of anodic and cathodic reactions under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigure, Kenkichi; Nukii, Takashi; Ono, Shoichi

    2006-01-01

    Electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) is an important measure for environmental factor in relation to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of metal materials. In the case of SCC for in-core materials in nuclear reactors, radiolysis of coolant water decisively controls ECP of metal materials under irradiation. In the previous models for ECP evaluation of stainless steel, radiolysis of reactor water in bulk was considered to calculate the bulk concentrations of the radiolysis products. In this work, the radiolysis not only in bulk but also in the diffusion layer at the interface between stainless steel and bulk water was taken into account in the evaluation of ECP. The calculation results shows that the radiolysis in the diffusion layer give significant effects on the limiting current densities of the redox reactions of the radiolysis products, H 2 O 2 and H 2 , depending on dose rate, flow rate and water chemistry, and leads to the significant increase in the ECP values in some cases, especially in hydrogen water chemistry conditions

  6. Corrosion in airframes

    OpenAIRE

    PETROVIC ZORAN C.

    2016-01-01

    The introductory chapter provides a brief reference to the issue of corrosion and corrosion damage to aircraft structures. Depending on the nature and dimensions of this non uniformity, three different categories of corrosion are defined: uniform, selective and localized corrosion. The following chapters present the forms of corrosion that can occur in three defined categories of corrosion. Conditions that cause certain types of corrosion in various corrosive environments are discussed. Examp...

  7. Do resident's leadership skills relate to ratings of technical skill?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, Samantha J; Law, Katherine E; Ray, Rebecca D; Nathwani, Jay N; DiMarco, Shannon M; D'Angelo, Anne-Lise D; Pugh, Carla M

    2016-12-01

    This study sought to compare general surgery research residents' survey information regarding self-efficacy ratings to their observed performance during a simulated small bowel repair. Their observed performance ratings were based on their leadership skills in directing their assistant. Participants were given 15 min to perform a bowel repair using bovine intestines with standardized injuries. Operative assistants were assigned to help assist with the repair. Before the procedure, participants were asked to rate their expected skills decay, task difficulty, and confidence in addressing the small bowel injury. Interactions were coded to identify the number of instructions given by the participants to the assistant during the repair. Statistical analyses assessed the relationship between the number of directional instructions and participants' perceptions self-efficacy measures. Directional instructions were defined as any dialog by the participant who guided the assistant to perform an action. Thirty-six residents (58.3% female) participated in the study. Participants who rated lower levels of decay in their intraoperative decision-making and small bowel repair skills were noted to use their assistant more by giving more instructions. Similarly, a higher number of instructions correlated with lower perceived difficulty in selecting the correct suture, suture pattern, and completing the entire surgical task. General surgery research residents' intraoperative leadership skills showed significant correlations to their perceptions of skill decay and task difficulty during a bowel repair. Evaluating resident's directional instructions may provide an additional individualized intraoperative assessment metric. Further evaluation relating to operative performance outcomes is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Corrosion Cost and Corrosion Map of Korea - Based on the Data from 2005 to 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. S.; Lim, H. K.; Kim, J. J.; Hwang, W. S.; Park, Y. S.

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion of metallic materials occurs by the reaction with corrosive environment such as atmosphere, marine, soil, urban, high temperature etc. In general, reduction of thickness and cracking and degradation are resulted from corrosion. Corrosion in all industrial facilities and infrastructure causes large economic losses as well as a large number of accidents. Economic loss by corrosion has been reported to be nearly 1-6% of GNP or GDP. In order to reduce corrosion damage of industrial facilities, corrosion map as well as a systematic investigation of the loss of corrosion in each industrial sector is needed. The Corrosion Science Society of Korea in collaboration with 15 universities and institutes has started to survey on the cost of corrosion and corrosion map of Korea since 2005. This work presents the results of the survey on cost of corrosion by Uhlig, Hoar, and input-output methods, and the evaluation of atmospheric corrosion rate of carbon steel, weathering steel, galvanized steel, copper, and aluminum in Korea. The total corrosion cost was estimated in terms of the percentage of the GDP of industry sectors and the total GDP of Korea. According to the result of Input/output method, corrosion cost of Korea was calculated as 2.9% to GDP (2005). Time of wetness was shown to be categories 3 to 4 in all exposure areas. A definite seasonal difference was observed in Korea. In summer and fall, time of wetness was higher than in other seasons. Because of short exposure period (12 months), significant corrosion trends depending upon materials and exposure corrosion environments were not revealed even though increased mass loss and decreased corrosion rate by exposure time

  9. Development of chloride-induced corrosion in pre-cracked RC beams under sustained loading: Effect of load-induced cracks, concrete cover, and exposure conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Linwen [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, LMDC, Toulouse (France); Université de Sherbrooke, Quebec (Canada); François, Raoul, E-mail: raoul.francois@insa-toulouse.fr [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, LMDC, Toulouse (France); Dang, Vu Hiep [Hanoi Architectural University, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Hanoi (Viet Nam); L' Hostis, Valérie [CEA Saclay, CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, Laboratoire d' Etude du Comportement des Bétons et des Argiles, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gagné, Richard [Université de Sherbrooke, Quebec (Canada)

    2015-01-15

    This paper deals with corrosion initiation and propagation in pre-cracked reinforced concrete beams under sustained loading during exposure to a chloride environment. Specimen beams that were cast in 2010 were compared to specimens cast in 1984. The only differences between the two sets of beams were the casting direction in relation to tensile reinforcement and the exposure conditions in the salt-fog chamber. The cracking maps, corrosion maps, chloride profiles, and cross-sectional loss of one group of two beams cast in 2010 were studied and their calculated corrosion rates were compared to that of beams cast in 1984 in order to investigate the factors influencing the natural corrosion process. Experimental results show that, after rapid initiation of corrosion at the crack tip, the corrosion process practically halted and the time elapsing before corrosion resumed depended on the exposure conditions and cover depth.

  10. Study of the Corrosion Resistance of Austenitic Stainless Steels during Conversion of Waste to Biofuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrini, Marina; Lorenzi, Sergio; Pastore, Tommaso; Pellegrini, Simone; Burattini, Mauro; Miglio, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    The paper deals with the corrosion behavior of stainless steels as candidate materials for biofuel production plants by liquefaction process of the sorted organic fraction of municipal solid waste. Corrosion tests were carried out on AISI 316L and AISI 304L stainless steels at 250 °C in a batch reactor during conversion of raw material to bio-oil (biofuel precursor), by exposing specimens either to water/oil phase or humid gas phase. General corrosion rate was measured by weight loss tests. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking was evaluated by means of U-bend specimens and slow stress rate tests at 10−6 or 10−5 s−1 strain rate. After tests, scanning electron microscope analysis was carried out to detect cracks and localized attacks. The results are discussed in relation with exposure conditions. They show very low corrosion rates strictly dependent upon time and temperature. No stress corrosion cracking was observed on U-bend specimens, under constant loading. Small cracks confined in the necking cone of specimens prove that stress corrosion cracking only occurred during slow strain rate tests at stresses exceeding the yield strength. PMID:28772682

  11. Effect of geologic repository parameters on aqueous corrosion of nuclear glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tovena, I.; Advocat, T.; Jollivet, P.; Godon, N.; Vernaz, E.

    1995-01-01

    Twenty alumino-borosilicate glass compositions containing simulated fission product oxides were defined using the experimentation plan methodology. Three additional glass compositions were also tested. Monolithic glass corrosion tests in a dilute aqueous medium at 90 deg C indicated the variation range for the initial corrosion rates. Significant but only qualitative correlations were established between the initial corrosion rate and the molar fraction of glass network forming oxides (SiO 2 + Al 2 O 3 ), and between the initial rate and the (Na 2 O + Li 2 O + B 2 O 3 ) / (SiO 2 + Al 2 O 3 ) molar ratio in the glass. The experimentation plan allowed a polynomial model to be defined relating the initial corrosion rate at 90 deg C to the oxide concentrations in the glass. Although the model is theoretically capable of predicting the corrosion rates, it does not always account for the actual data measured during other experiments; this discrepancy may be attributable either to the presence of other chemical elements (MgO) or to CaO concentrations differing from the fixed value adopted for the experimentation plan. Glass powder corrosion tests designed to simulate advanced corrosion reaction progress, account for the wide variations in the dissolved glass quantities, although no correlation exists with the glass chemical composition. (authors). 49 refs., 4 figs., 34 tabs

  12. Effect of geologic repository parameters on aqueous corrosion of nuclear glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tovena, I; Advocat, T; Jollivet, P; Godon, N; Vernaz, E

    1996-12-31

    Twenty alumino-borosilicate glass compositions containing simulated fission product oxides were defined using the experimentation plan methodology. Three additional glass compositions were also tested. Monolithic glass corrosion tests in a dilute aqueous medium at 90 deg C indicated the variation range for the initial corrosion rates. Significant but only qualitative correlations were established between the initial corrosion rate and the molar fraction of glass network forming oxides (SiO{sub 2} + Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and between the initial rate and the (Na{sub 2}O + Li{sub 2}O + B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) / (SiO{sub 2} + Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) molar ratio in the glass. The experimentation plan allowed a polynomial model to be defined relating the initial corrosion rate at 90 deg C to the oxide concentrations in the glass. Although the model is theoretically capable of predicting the corrosion rates, it does not always account for the actual data measured during other experiments; this discrepancy may be attributable either to the presence of other chemical elements (MgO) or to CaO concentrations differing from the fixed value adopted for the experimentation plan. Glass powder corrosion tests designed to simulate advanced corrosion reaction progress, account for the wide variations in the dissolved glass quantities, although no correlation exists with the glass chemical composition. (authors). 49 refs., 4 figs., 34 tabs.

  13. Corrosion '98: 53. annual conference and exposition, proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    This conference was divided into the following sections: Corrosion in Gas Treating; Problems and Solutions in Commercial Building Water Systems; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibitors; Atmospheric Corrosion; AIRPOL Update/98; Rubber Lining--Answers to Many Problems; Interference Problems; Environmental Assisted Cracking: Fundamental Research and Industrial Applications; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; New Developments in Scale and Deposit Control; Corrosion and Corrosion Protection in the Transportation Industries; What's All the Noise About--Electrochemical That Is; Refining Industry Corrosion; Corrosion Problems in Military Hardware: Case Histories, Fixes and Lessons Learned; Cathodic Protection Test Methods and Instrumentation for Underground and On-grade Pipelines and Tanks; Recent Developments in Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion in Supercritical Fluids; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Understanding and Controlling CO 2 Corrosion; Managing Corrosion with Plastics; Material Developments for Use in Exploration and Production Environments; Corrosion in Cold Regions; The Effect of Downsizing and Outsourcing on Cooling System Monitoring and Control Practices; New Developments in Mechanical and Chemical Industrial Cleaning; Mineral Scale Deposit Control in Oilfield Related Operations; Biocides in Cooling Water; Corrosion and Corrosion Control of Reinforced Concrete Structures; Materials Performance for Fossil Energy Conversion Systems; Marine corrosion; Thermal Spray--Coating and Corrosion Control; Flow Effects on Corrosion in Oil and Gas Production; Corrosion Measurement Technologies; Internal Pipeline Monitoring--Corrosion Monitoring, Intelligent Pigging and Leak Detection; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in Radioactive Liquid Waste Systems; On-line Hydrogen Permeation Monitoring Equipment and Techniques, State of the Art; Water Reuse and Recovery; Performance of Materials in High Temperature Environments; Advances in Motor

  14. Corrosion of candidate materials in Lake Rotokawa geothermal exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estill, J.C.; McCright, R.D.

    1995-05-01

    Corrosion rates were determined for CDA 613, CDA 715, A-36 carbon steel, 1020 carbon steel, and Alloy 825 flat coupons which were exposed to geothermal spring water at Paraiki site number 9 near Lake Rotokawa, New Zealand. Qualitative observations of the corrosion performance of Type 304L stainless steel and CDA 102 exposed to the same environment were noted. CDA 715, Alloy 825, 1020 carbon steel, and other alloys are being considered for the materials of construction for high-level radioactive waste containers for the United States civilian radioactive waste disposal program. Alloys CDA 613 and CDA 102 were tested to provide copper-based materials for corrosion performance comparison purposes. A36 was tested to provide a carbon steel baseline material for comparison purposes, and alloy 304L stainless steel was tested to provide an austenitic stainless steel baseline material for comparison purposes. In an effort to gather corrosion data from an environment that is rooted in natural sources of water and rock, samples of some of the proposed container materials were exposed to a geothermal spring environment. At the proposed site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, currently under consideration for high-level nuclear waste disposal, transient groundwater may come in contact with waste containers over the course of a 10,000-year disposal period. The geothermal springs environment, while extremely more aggressive than the anticipated general environment at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, could have similarities to the environment that arises at selected local sites on a container as a result of crevice corrosion, pitting corrosion, microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC), or the concentration of the ionic species due to repetitive evaporation or boiling of the groundwater near the containers. The corrosion rates were based on weight loss data obtained after six weeks exposure in a 90{degrees}C, low-pH spring with relatively high concentrations of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and Cl{sup -}.

  15. Corrosion mechanism applicable to biodegradable magnesium implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atrens, Andrej, E-mail: Andrejs.Atrens@uq.edu.au [University of Queensland, Division of Materials, Brisbane, Qld 4072 (Australia); Liu Ming; Zainal Abidin, Nor Ishida [University of Queensland, Division of Materials, Brisbane, Qld 4072 (Australia)

    2011-12-15

    Much of our understanding of the Mg corrosion mechanism is based on research using aggressive chloride based solutions like 3% NaCl, which are appropriate for understand the corrosion for applications such as auto construction. The chloride ions tend to cause break down of the partly protective surface film on the Mg alloy surface. The corrosion rate increases with exposure time until steady state is reached, which may take several weeks. An overview is provided of the aspects which determine the corrosion of Mg alloys: (i) measurement details; (ii) impurity elements Fe, Ni, Cu and Co; (iii) second phases; (iv) surface films and surface condition and (v) stress corrosion cracking (SCC). This understanding is used to help understand Mg corrosion for Mg as a biodegradable implant for medical applications. Solutions that elucidate these applications tend to form surface films and the corrosion rate tends to decrease with immersion time.

  16. Pre-oxidation and its effect on reducing high-temperature corrosion of superheater tubes during biomass firing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Kvisgaard, M.; Montgomery, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    Superheater tubes in biomass-fired power plants experience high corrosion rates due to condensation of corrosive alkali chloride-rich deposits. To explore the possibility of reducing the corrosion attack by the formation of an initial protective oxide layer, the corrosion resistance of pre......-oxidised Al and Ti-containing alloys (Kanthal APM and Nimonic 80A, respectively) was investigated under laboratory conditions mimicking biomass firing. The alloys were pre-oxidised at 900°C for 1 week. Afterwards, pre-oxidised samples, and virgin non-pre-oxidised samples as reference, were coated...... with a synthetic deposit of KCl and exposed at 560°C for 1 week to a gas mixture typical of biomass firing. Results show that pre-oxidation could hinder the corrosion attack; however, the relative success was different for the two alloys. While corrosion attack was observed on the pre-oxidised Kanthal APM, the pre...

  17. Corrosion measurement using flux gate magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashdi Shah Ahmad; Chong Cheong Wei

    2001-01-01

    The ability of fluxgate magnetometer to detect and measure quantitatively the magnetic field generated by electrochemical corrosion is presented. In this study, each sample (iron plate) was exposed to a range of increasingly corrosive environment. During the exposure, we measured the magnetic field above the sample for specific duration of time. The result shows that there is a clear relationship between corrosivity of the environment and the change in magnitude of magnetic field that was generated by the corrosion reaction. Therefore, the measurement of magnetic field might be used to determine the corrosion rates. (Author)

  18. Corrosion inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, A O

    1965-12-29

    An acid corrosion-inhibiting composition consists essentially of a sugar, and an alkali metal salt selected from the group consisting of iodides and bromides. The weight ratio of the sugar to the alkali metal salt is between 2:1 and about 20,000:1. Also, a corrosion- inhibited phosphoric acid composition comprising at least about 20 wt% of phosphoric acid and between about 0.1 wt% and about 10 wt% of molasses, and between about 0.0005 wt% and about 1 wt% of potassium iodide. The weight ratio of molasses to iodide is greater than about 2:1. (11 claims)

  19. Mechanism of Corrosion by Naphthenic Acids and Organosulfur Compounds at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peng

    Due to the law of supply and demand, the last decade has witnessed a skyrocketing in the price of light sweet crude oil. Therefore, refineries are increasingly interested in "opportunity crudes", characterized by their discounted price and relative ease of procurement. However, the attractive economics of opportunity crudes come with the disadvantage of high acid/organosulfur compound content, which could lead to corrosion and even failure of facilities in refineries. However, it is generally accepted that organosulfur compounds may form protective iron sulfide layers on the metal surface and decrease the corrosion rate. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the corrosive property of crudes at high temperatures, the mechanism of corrosion by acids (naphthenic acids) in the presence of organosulfur compounds, and methods to mitigate its corrosive effect. In 2004, an industrial project was initiated at the Institute for Corrosion and Multiphase Technology to investigate the corrosion by naphthenic acids and organosulfur compounds. In this project, for each experiment there were two experimentation phases: pretreatment and challenge. In the first pretreatment phase, a stirred autoclave was filled with a real crude oil fraction or model oil of different acidity and organosulfur compound concentration. Then, the stirred autoclave was heated to high temperatures to examine the corrosivity of the oil to different materials (specimens made from CS and 5% Cr containing steel were used). During the pretreatment, corrosion product layers were formed on the metal surface. In the second challenge phase, the steel specimens pretreated in the first phase were inserted into a rotating cylinder autoclave, called High Velocity Rig (HVR). The HVR was fed with a high-temperature oil solution of naphthenic acids to attack the iron sulfide layers. Based on the difference of specimen weight loss between the two steps, the net corrosion rate could be calculated and the protectiveness

  20. TO THE QUESTION ABOUT THE INFLUENCE OF THE STRESSES IN THE ELEMENTS OF THE REINFORCEMENT SHAFTS AT THE RATE OF CORROSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kovalenko

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of laboratory explorations the features of conducting the corrosive process in the shaft reinforcement parts under the load from lifting buckets and rock mass were determined.

  1. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.G. Mon

    2004-10-01

    The waste package design for the License Application is a double-wall waste package underneath a protective drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169480]). The purpose and scope of this model report is to document models for general and localized corrosion of the waste package outer barrier (WPOB) to be used in evaluating waste package performance. The WPOB is constructed of Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The inner vessel of the waste package is constructed of Stainless Steel Type 316 (UNS S31600). Before it fails, the Alloy 22 WPOB protects the Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel from exposure to the external environment and any significant degradation. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel provides structural stability to the thinner Alloy 22 WPOB. Although the waste package inner vessel would also provide some performance for waste containment and potentially decrease the rate of radionuclide transport after WPOB breach before it fails, the potential performance of the inner vessel is far less than that of the more corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 WPOB. For this reason, the corrosion performance of the waste package inner vessel is conservatively ignored in this report and the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). Treatment of seismic and igneous events and their consequences on waste package outer barrier performance are not specifically discussed in this report, although the general and localized corrosion models developed in this report are suitable for use in these scenarios. The localized corrosion processes considered in this report are pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]).

  2. Aspects of high temperature corrosion of boiler tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiegel, M.; Bendick, W. [Salzgitter-Mannesmann-Forschung GmbH, Duisburg (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The development of new boiler steels for power generation has to consider significant creep strength as well as oxidation and corrosion resistance. High temperature corrosion of boiler materials concerns steam oxidation as well as fireside corrosion of parts, in contact with the flue gas. It will be shown that depending on the quality of the fuel, especially chlorine and sulphur are responsible for most of the fireside corrosion problems. Corrosion mechanisms will be presented for flue gas induced corrosion (HCl) and deposit induced corrosion (chlorides and sulfates). Especially for the 700 C technology, deposit induced corrosion issues have to be considered and the mechanisms of corrosion by molten sulfates 'Hot Corrosion' will be explained. Finally, an overview will be given on the selection of suitable materials in order to minimise corrosion relates failures. (orig.)

  3. Corrosion in seawater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrikson, S.

    1988-01-01

    Highly alloyed stainless steels have been exposed to natural chlorinated and chlorine-free seawater at 35 deg. C. Simulated tube-tubesheet joints, weld joints and galvanic couples with titanium, 90/10 CuNi and NiAl bronze were tested and evaluated for corrosion. The corrosion rates of various anode materials - zinc, aluminium and soft iron - were also determined. Finally the risk of hydrogen embrittlement of tubes of ferritic stainless steels and titanium as a consequence of cathodic protection was studied. An attempt was also made to explain the cracking mechanism of the ferritic steels by means of transmission electron microscopy. One important conclusion of the project is that chlorinated seawater is considerably more corrosive to stainless steels than chlorine-free water, whereas chlorination reduces the rate of galvanic corrosion of copper materials coupled to stainless steels. Hydrogen embrittlement of ferritic stainless steels and titanium as a consequence of cathodic protection of carbon steel or cast iron in the same structure can be avoided by strict potentiostatic control of the applied potential. (author)

  4. Investigation of the Effects of Solution Temperature on the Corrosion Behavior of Austenitic Low-Nickel Stainless Steels in Citric Acid using Impedance and Polarization Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulimbayan Francis M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stainless steels may be classified according to alloy microstructure – ferritic, austenitic, martensitic, duplex, and precipitation hardening grades. Among these, austenitic grade has the largest contribution to market due to the alloy’s numerous industrial and domestic applications. In this study, the corrosion behavior of low-Nickel stainless steel in citric acid was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization techniques and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS. The corrosion current density which is directly related to corrosion rate was extracted from the generated anodic polarization curve. Increasing the temperature of the citric acid resulted to increased corrosion current densities indicating higher corrosion rates at initial corrosion condition. EIS was performed to generate Nyquist plots whose shape and size depicts the corrosion mechanism and corrosion resistance of the alloy in citric acid, respectively. All the generated Nyquist plots have depressed semi-circle shapes implying that corrosion process takes place with charge-transfer as the rate-determining step. Based from the extracted values of polarization resistance (Rp, the temperature of the solution has negative correlation with the corrosion resistance of the studied alloy.

  5. Corrosion of radioactive waste containers, case of a container made of low allow steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataillon, C.; Musy, C.; Roy, M.

    2001-01-01

    The following topics were dealt with: radioactive waste concept ANDRA, low alloy steel (XC38) container corrosion under representative storage conditions, corrosion rate and passivation effects, micrographic investigations

  6. Effects of Friction Stir Welding on Corrosion Behaviors of AA2024-T4 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ales Steve Korakan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the corrosion behavior of welded joints of AA2024-T4 Al alloy produced by friction stir welding process has been investigated. Tests were performed in an aerated 3.5% NaCl aqueous solution with pH = 7 at 20±2°C. Corrosion rate and corrosion morphology of weld regions were evaluated and compared to those of the parent metal. The microstructure of weld nugget, thermomechanical affected zone, heated affected zone, and parent metal were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. It was observed that corrosion initiated at FSW related spots and the sizes of local corrosion increased with time.

  7. Characterization of fatigue-corrosion phenomena for Zircaloy in iodine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster-Magallon, Isabelle

    1986-01-01

    In this research thesis, the acquisition of data related to crack propagation rates and to smooth specimen lifetime in corrosion-fatigue of zircaloy allowed the quantification of the influence of iodine with respect to material, to loading direction and to test frequency. A systematic fractographic examination of propagation and fatigue strength specimens allowed the fatigue-corrosion fracture scenario to be described. This scenario comprises pitting for a stress higher than a threshold stress, the development of an intergranular corrosion area limited by a threshold stress intensity factor overrun, and the propagation by fatigue-corrosion in steady regime. This propagation is an association of a quasi-cleavage which is typical of stress corrosion cracking, and a plastic deformation under fatigue. This combination leads to the sudden disappearance of cleavage, and to a ductile fracture [fr

  8. Atmospheric corrosion monitoring at the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge K-25 Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, M.

    1995-01-01

    Depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) at the US Department of Energy's K-25 Site at Oak Ridge, TN has been stored in large steel cylinders which have undergone significant atmospheric corrosion damage over the last 35 years. A detailed experimental program to characterize and monitor the corrosion damage was initiated in 1992. Large amounts of corrosion scale and deep pits are found to cover cylinder surfaces. Ultrasonic wall thickness measurements have shown uniform corrosion losses up to 20 mils (0.5 mm) and pits up to 100 mils (2.5 mm) deep. Electrical resistance corrosion probes, time-of-wetness sensors and thermocouples have been attached to cylinder bodies. Atmospheric conditions are monitored using rain gauges, relative humidity sensors and thermocouples. Long-term (16 years) data are being obtained from mild steel corrosion coupons on test racks as well as attached directly to cylinder surfaces. Corrosion rates have been found to intimately related to the times-of-wetness, both tending to be higher on cylinder tops due to apparent sheltering effects. Data from the various tests are compared, discrepancies are discussed and a pattern of cylinder corrosion as a function of cylinder position and location is described

  9. New technologies - new corrosion problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitz, E.

    1994-01-01

    Adequate resistance of materials to corrosion is equally important for classical and for new technologies. This article considers the economic consequences of corrosion damage and, in addition to the long-known GNP orientation, presents a new approach to the estimation of the costs of corrosion and corrosion protection via maintenance and especially corrosion-related maintenance. The significance of ''high-tech'', ''medium-tech'' and ''low-tech'' material and corrosion problems is assessed. Selected examples taken from new technologies in the areas of power engineering, environmental engineering, chemical engineering, and biotechnology demonstrate the great significance of the problems. It is concluded that corrosion research and corrosion prevention technology will never come to an end but will constantly face new problems. Two technologies are of particular interest since they focus attention on new methods of investigation: microelectronics and final disposal of radioactive wastes. The article closes by considering the importance of the transfer of experience and technology. Since the manufacturs and operators of machines and plant do not generally have access to the very latest knowledge, they should be kept informed through advisory services, experimental studies, databases, and further education. (orig.) [de

  10. Stress corrosion cracking growth rate of TT alloy 690 and its weld joint in simulated PWR primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, T.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, some researchers reported that the SCC growth rate (SCCGR) of cold worked thermally treated (TT) Alloy 690 was significantly different in heat by heat. But, author has hypothesized that these high SCCGRs in cold worked TT Alloy 690 could be due to the metallurgical characteristics of these heats. In order to confirm this hypothesis, this study has been started in the author's laboratory, and the following 4 new evidences were obtained. First, microcracks of carbides and voids were observed in eutectic M 23 C 6 GB carbides (primary carbides) for cold rolled laboratory heat after as cast or lightly forged condition or for chemical composition simulated Bettis'TT Alloy 690 heat, after cold rolling, before SCC test. However, microcracks in primary carbides along grain boundaries and voids were rarely detected in the cold rolled commercial heat of TT Alloy 690 used for CRDM penetrations. Secondly, the SCCGR observed in TT Alloy 690 was different in each hot working process and each heat. Comparing the SCCGRs for all heats of cold worked TT Alloy 690, the SCCGR decreased with increasing of Vickers hardness. However, in same heats of cold worked TT Alloy 690, the SCCGR increased with increasing of Vickers hardness. Thirdly, the SCCGR in cold rolled TT Alloy 690 should be integrated by the effect of hardness or cold working ratio and by the effect of existing ratio of primary M23C6 carbides with cracks and Voids due to chemical composition and the fabrication process of TT Alloy 690. Fourthly, it is argued that the high SCCGRs in highly cold rolled TT Alloy 690 are not representative of the practical situation with TT Alloy 690 in service for CRDM adapter nozzles etc. The high SCCGR of highly cold rolled TT Alloy 690 is not thought to be an accurate tool in predicting the possibility of cracking of TT Alloy 690 for CRDM adapter nozzles. (author)

  11. Underground pipeline corrosion

    CERN Document Server

    Orazem, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Underground pipelines transporting liquid petroleum products and natural gas are critical components of civil infrastructure, making corrosion prevention an essential part of asset-protection strategy. Underground Pipeline Corrosion provides a basic understanding of the problems associated with corrosion detection and mitigation, and of the state of the art in corrosion prevention. The topics covered in part one include: basic principles for corrosion in underground pipelines, AC-induced corrosion of underground pipelines, significance of corrosion in onshore oil and gas pipelines, n

  12. Boric Acid Corrosion of Concrete Rebar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang L.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Borated water leakage through spent fuel pools (SFPs at pressurized water reactors is a concern because it could cause corrosion of reinforcement steel in the concrete structure and compromise the integrity of the structure. Because corrosion rate of carbon steel in concrete in the presence of boric acid is lacking in published literature and available data are equivocal on the effect of boric acid on rebar corrosion, corrosion rate measurements were conducted in this study using several test methods. Rebar corrosion rates were measured in (i borated water flowing in a simulated concrete crack, (ii borated water flowing over a concrete surface, (iii borated water that has reacted with concrete, and (iv 2,400 ppm boric acid solutions with pH adjusted to a range of 6.0 to 7.7. The corrosion rates were measured using coupled multielectrode array sensor (CMAS and linear polarization resistance (LPR probes, both made using carbon steel. The results indicate that rebar corrosion rates are low (~1 μm/yr or lesswhen the solution pH is ~7.1 or higher. Below pH ~7.1, the corrosion rate increases with decreasing pH and can reach ~100 μm/yr in solutions with pH less than ~6.7. The threshold pH for carbon steel corrosion in borated solution is between 6.8 and 7.3.

  13. Nodular Corrosion Characteristics of Zirconium Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Gil; Jeong, Y. H.; Park, S. Y.; Lee, D. J

    2003-01-15

    This study was reported the effect of the nodular corrosion on the nuclear reactor environmental along with metallurgical influence, also suggested experimental scheme related to evaluate nodular corrosion characteristics of Zr-1 Nb alloy. Remedial strategies against the nodular corrosion should firstly develop plan to assess the effect of the water quality condition (Oxygen, Hydrogen) as well as the boiling on the nodular corrosion, secondarily establish plan to control heat treatment process to keep a good resistance on nodular corrosion in Zr-1Nb alloy as former western reactor did.

  14. Corrosion monitoring during a chemical cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delepine, J.; Feron, D.; Roy, M.

    1994-01-01

    In order to estimate the possible corrosion induced by the chemical cleaning, a corrosion monitoring has been realized during the cleaning of the secondary circuit (including the model boiler) of ORION loop. It included coupons and electrodes and has required a preliminary setting in laboratory. The electrochemical device which was used during the chemical cleaning included two reference electrodes (Ag/AgCl) and eight metallic electrodes (carbon steel, stainless steel, Alloy 600 and Alloy 690) for free corrosion potential monitoring, three other carbon steel electrodes for instantaneous corrosion rate measurements by polarization resistance and three coupling devices with different surface ratios between carbon steel and Alloy 600. The results showed a good agreement between corrosion rates measured by weight losses on coupons or by electrochemistry (polarization resistance), and an increase of the carbon steel corrosion rate when it was coupled with Alloy 600. (authors). 5 figs., 2 tabs., 3 refs

  15. Heated Aluminum Tanks Resist Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L. E.

    1983-01-01

    Simple expedient of heating foam-insulated aluminum alloy tanks prevents corrosion by salt-laden moisture. Relatively-small temperature difference between such tank and surrounding air will ensure life of tank is extended by many years.

  16. Provider-Initiated Patient Satisfaction Reporting Yields Improved Physician Ratings Relative to Online Rating Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, Benjamin F; Waddell, Brad S; Nodzo, Scott R; Lange, Jeffrey; Nocon, Allina A; Amundsen, Spencer; Tarity, T David; McLawhorn, Alexander S

    2017-09-01

    Recently, providers have begun to publicly report the results of patient satisfaction surveys from their practices. However, these outcomes have never been compared with the findings of commercial online physician rating websites. The goals of the current study were to (1) compare overall patient satisfaction ratings for orthopedic surgeons derived from provider-based third-party surveys with existing commercial physician rating websites and (2) determine the association between patient ratings and provider characteristics. The authors identified 12 institutions that provided publicly available patient satisfaction outcomes derived from third-party surveys for their orthopedic surgeons as of August 2016. Orthopedic surgeons at these institutions were eligible for inclusion (N=340 surgeons). Provider characteristics were recorded from publicly available data. Four high-traffic commercial online physician rating websites were identified: Healthgrades.com, UCompareHealthCare.com, Vitals.com, and RateMDs.com. For each surgeon, overall ratings (on a scale of 1-5), total number of ratings, and percentage of negative ratings were compared between provider-initiated internal ratings and each commercial online website. Associations between baseline factors and overall physician ratings and negative ratings were assessed. Provider-initiated internal patient satisfaction ratings showed a greater number of overall patient ratings, higher overall patient satisfaction ratings, and a lower percentage of negative comments compared with commercial online physician rating websites. A greater number of years in practice had a weak association with lower internal ratings, and an academic practice setting and a location in the Northeast were protective factors for negative physician ratings. Compared with commercial online physician rating websites, provider-initiated patient satisfaction ratings of orthopedic surgeons appear to be more favorable, with greater numbers of responses

  17. Corrosion in lithium-stainless steel thermal-convection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.; Selle, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    The corrosion of types 304L and 316 austenitic stainless steel by flowing lithium was studied in thermal-convection loops operated at 500 to 650 0 C. Both weight and compositional changes were measured on specimens distributed throughout each loop and were combined with metallographic examinations to evaluate the corrosion processes. The corrosion rate and mass transfer characteristics did not significantly differ between the two austenitic stainless steels. Addition of 500 or 1700 wt ppM N to purified lithium did not increase the dissolution rate or change the attack mode of type 316 stainless steel. Adding 5 wt % Al to the lithium reduced the weight loss of this steel by a factor of 5 relative to a pure lithium-thermal-convection loop

  18. Virtual Instrumentation Corrosion Controller for Natural Gas Pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, J.; Agnihotri, G.; Deshpande, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    Corrosion is an electrochemical process. Corrosion in natural gas (methane) pipelines leads to leakages. Corrosion occurs when anode and cathode are connected through electrolyte. Rate of corrosion in metallic pipeline can be controlled by impressing current to it and thereby making it to act as cathode of corrosion cell. Technologically advanced and energy efficient corrosion controller is required to protect natural gas pipelines. Proposed virtual instrumentation (VI) based corrosion controller precisely controls the external corrosion in underground metallic pipelines, enhances its life and ensures safety. Designing and development of proportional-integral-differential (PID) corrosion controller using VI (LabVIEW) is carried out. When the designed controller is deployed at field, it maintains the pipe to soil potential (PSP) within safe operating limit and not entering into over/under protection zone. Horizontal deployment of this technique can be done to protect all metallic structure, oil pipelines, which need corrosion protection.

  19. Recent Natural Corrosion Inhibitors for Mild Steel: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Chigondo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, reduction of corrosion has been managed by various methods including cathodic protection, process control, reduction of the metal impurity content, and application of surface treatment techniques, as well as incorporation of suitable alloys. However, the use of corrosion inhibitors has proven to be the easiest and cheapest method for corrosion protection and prevention in acidic media. These inhibitors slow down the corrosion rate and thus prevent monetary losses due to metallic corrosion on industrial vessels, equipment, or surfaces. Inorganic and organic inhibitors are toxic and costly and thus recent focus has been turned to develop environmentally benign methods for corrosion retardation. Many researchers have recently focused on corrosion prevention methods using green inhibitors for mild steel in acidic solutions to mimic industrial processes. This paper provides an overview of types of corrosion, corrosion process, and mainly recent work done on the application of natural plant extracts as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel.

  20. Review of corrosion phenomena on zirconium alloys, niobium, titanium, inconel, stainless steel, and nickel plate under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The role of nuclear fluxes in corrosion processes was investigated in ATR, ETR, PRTR, and in Hanford production reactors. Major effort was directed to zirconium alloy corrosion parameter studies. Corrosion and hydriding results are reported as a function of oxygen concentration in the coolant, flux level, alloy composition, surface pretreatment, and metallurgical condition. Localized corrosion and hydriding at sites of bonding to dissimilar metals are described. Corrosion behavior on specimens transferred from oxygenated to low-oxygen coolants in ETR and ATR experiments is compared. Mechanism studies suggest that a depression in the corrosion of the Zr--2.5Nb alloy under irradiation is due to radiation-induced aging. The radiation-induced onset of transition on several alloys is in general a gradual process which nucleates locally, causing areas of oxide prosity which eventually encompass the surface. Examination of Zry-2 process tubes reveals that accelerated corrosion has occurred in low-oxygen coolants. Hydrogen contents are relatively low, but show some localized profiles. Gross hydriding has occurred on process tubes containing aluminum spacers, apparently by a galvanic charging mechanism. Titanium paralleled Zry-2 in corrosion behavior under irradiation. Niobium corrosion was variable, but did not appear to be strongly influenced by radiation. Corrosion rates on Inconel and stainless steel were only slightly higher in-flux than out-of-reactor. Corrosion rates on nickel-plated aluminum appeared to vary substantially with preexposure treatments, but the rates generally were accelerated compared to rates on unirradiated coupons. (59 references, 11 tables, 12 figs.)

  1. The long-term acceleration of waste glass corrosion: A preliminary review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kielpinski, A.L.

    1995-07-01

    Whereas a prior conception of glass dissolution assumed a relatively rapid initial dissolution which then slowed to a smaller, fairly constant longer-term rate, some recent work suggests that these two stages are followed by a third phase of dissolution, in which the dissolution rate is accelerated with respect to what had previously been thought of as the final long-term rate. The goals of the present study are to compile experimental data which may have a bearing on this phenomena, and to provide an initial assessment of these data. The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is contracted to develop glass formulation models for vitrification of Hanford low-level waste (LLW), in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System Technology Development Program. The phenomenon of an increase in corrosion rate, following a period characterized by a low corrosion rate, has been observed by a number of researchers on a number of waste glass compositions. Despite inherent ambiguities arising from SA/V (glass surface area to solution volume ratio) and other effects, valid comparisons can be made in which accelerated corrosion was observed in one test, but not in another. Some glass compositions do not appear to attain a plateau region; it may be that the observation of continued, non-negligible corrosion in these glasses represents a passage from the initial rate to the accelerated rate. The long-term corrosion is a function of the interaction between the glass and its environment, including the leaching solution and the surrounding materials. Reaction path modeling and stability field considerations have been used with some success to predict the changes in corrosion rate over time, due to these interactions. The accelerated corrosion phenomenon highlights the need for such integrated corrosion modeling and the scenario-specific nature of a particular glass composition's durability

  2. Standard practice for determining the susceptibility of stainless steels and related Nickel-Chromium-Iron Alloys to stress-corrosion cracking in polythionic acids

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for preparing and conducting the polythionic acid test at room temperature, 22 to 25°C (72 to 77°F), to determine the relative susceptibility of stainless steels or other related materials (nickel-chromiumiron alloys) to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. 1.2 This practice can be used to evaluate stainless steels or other materials in the “as received” condition or after being subjected to high-temperature service, 482 to 815°C (900 to 1500°F), for prolonged periods of time. 1.3 This practice can be applied to wrought products, castings, and weld metal of stainless steels or other related materials to be used in environments containing sulfur or sulfides. Other materials capable of being sensitized can also be tested in accordance with this test. 1.4 This practice may be used with a variety of stress corrosion test specimens, surface finishes, and methods of applying stress. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, ...

  3. Influence of thermal aging on primary water stress corrosion cracking of cast duplex stainless steel (second report). Consideration on fractography after slow strain rate technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takuyo; Chiba, Goro; Totsuka, Nobuo; Arioka, Koji

    2003-01-01

    In order to evaluate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of cast duplex stainless steel which is used for the main coolant pipe of pressurized water reactors (PWRs), the slow strain rate technique (SSRT) and the constant load test (CLT) of the materials were performed in simulated primary water at 360degC. The cast duplex stainless steel contains ferrite phase with ranging from 8 to 23% and its mechanical properties are affected by long time thermal aging. Therefore, we paid attention to the influence of its ferrite content and thermal aging on the SCC susceptibility of this unaged and aged stainless steel and prepared three kinds of specimen with different ferrite contents (23%, 15% and 8%). The brittle fracture of the unaged specimens after SSRT mainly consists of quasi-cleavage fracture in austenitic phase. After aging, it changes to a mixture of quasi-cleavage fracture in both austenitic and ferritic phases. Microcracks were observed on the unaged specimen surfaces and aged ones for 10,000 hours at 400degC after about 10,000 hours of the CLT under the load condition of 1.2∼2.0 times of yield strength. The crack initiation sites of CLT specimens are similar to SSRT fracture surfaces. The SCC susceptibility of this 23% ferrite material increases with aging time at 400degC. The SCC susceptibility of 15% and 23% ferrite materials are higher than that of 8% ferrite material with aging condition for 30,000h at 400degC. (author)

  4. Corrosion and Wear Analysis in Marine Transport Constructions

    OpenAIRE

    Urbahs, A; Savkovs, K; Rijkuris, G; Andrejeva, D

    2018-01-01

    Corrosion is one of the most common naturally occurring processes studied by thermodynamics, which includes oxidation process, metal disruption, and its chemical and electrochemical effects under environmental influence. Corrosion of metal and equipment accounts for a considerable proportion of total corrosion losses, thus providing the impetus for further investigation and developments related to corrosion protection in order to provide transport systems and industry with corrosion preventiv...

  5. Characterisation of corrosion products on pipeline steel under cathodic protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanarde, Lise [Gaz de France Research and Development Division, 361 avenue du President Wilson, BP33, 93211 Saint Denis La Plaine (France)]|[UPR15 du CNRS, Laboratoire des Interfaces et Systemes Electrochimiques, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, C.P. 133, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Campaignolle, Xavier; Karcher, Sebastien; Meyer, Michel [Gaz de France Research and Development Division, 361 avenue du President Wilson, BP33, 93211 Saint Denis La Plaine (France); Joiret, Suzanne [UPR15 du CNRS, Laboratoire des Interfaces et Systemes Electrochimiques, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, C.P. 133, 4 Place Jussieu 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2004-07-01

    Onshore gas transmission lines are conjointly protected against external corrosion by cathodic protection (CP) and organic coatings. If both protection systems are simultaneously faulty, the pipe may be subjected to local loss of protection criteria. Consequently, the development of a corrosion due to the ground intrinsic corrosiveness may occur. To guarantee an optimal and safe use of its 31000 km buried gas transmission network, Gaz de France regularly inspects its pipelines. When indications of metal damage are suspected, excavations are realized to carry out a finer diagnosis and, if necessary, to repair. Whenever, corrosions are encountered, although it occurs very scarcely, it is necessary to evaluate its degree of gravity: activity, mechanism, and kinetics. Among corrosion defects, it is indeed essential to differentiate those active, from those older inactive at the time of excavation, since those last ones may possibly have been annihilated, by a PC reinforcement for instance. Eventually, the identification of the corrosion mechanism and its associated rate will provide an assessment of the risks encountered by other sections of the pipeline similar to that excavated. This study investigates to what extent the degree of gravity (activity, kinetics) of a corrosion can be determined by the characterization and identification of its associated corrosion products. Moreover, it will attempt to relate it to the close environment features as well as to the operating conditions of the pipe. The preliminary results presented in this paper consist in a laboratory study of the time evolution of corrosion products formed on the surface of ordinary low carbon steel samples. The specimens have been previously subjected to various polarization conditions in various aqueous media. The selected solutions are characteristic of ground waters. The main parameters considered for the definition of the media were its initial chemical composition, pH and dissolved gas composition

  6. Are international fund flows related to exchange rate dynamics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Suxiao; de Haan, Jakob; Scholtens, Bert

    2018-01-01

    Employing monthly data for 53 countries between 1996 and 2015, we investigate the relationship between international fund flows and exchange rate dynamics. We find strong co-movement between funds flows (as measured with the EPFR Global data base) and bilateral real exchange rates vis-à-vis the USD.

  7. Influence of yttria surface modification on high temperature corrosion of porous Ni22Cr alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karczewski, Jakub; Dunst, Katarzyna; Jasinski, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Protective coatings for porous alloys for high temperature use are relatively new materials. Their main drawback is high temperature corrosion. In this work protective coatings based the on Y-precursor infiltrated into the sintered Ni22Cr alloys are studied at 700°C. Effects of the amount...... of the protective phase on the resulting corrosion properties are evaluated in air and humidified hydrogen. Weight gain of the samples, their open porosities and microstructures are analyzed and compared. Results show, that by the addition of even a minor amount of the Y-precursor corrosion rates can be decreased...

  8. Aircraft Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    attribud au choix de traitements et de rev~tements spproprids. Au contrairo, dens d’sutros structures des corrosions iirportsntea se sont msnifestdes...au traitement . micaniqus qui provoque une compression de surface - h1l’spplication i1’une double protection comportant oxydation snodique et...chlore mais dans une proportion semblable b cells d’une eau de vil)e ; - lea solides, d’aprbs lea analyses chimique et criatallographique, paraissaiont

  9. Magnesium and its alloys as degradable biomaterials : Corrosion studies using potentiodynamic and EIS electrochemical techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Wolf Dieter; Nascimento, Maria Lucia; Zeddies, Miriam; Córsico, Mariana; Gassa, Liliana Mabel; Fernández Lorenzo de Mele, Mónica Alicia

    2007-01-01

    Magnesium is potentially useful for orthopaedic and cardiovascular applications. However, the corrosion rate of this metal is so high that its degradation occurs before the end of the healing process. In industrial media the behaviour of several magnesium alloys have been probed to be better than magnesium performance. However, the information related to their corrosion behaviour in biological media is insufficient. The aim of this work is to study the influence of the components of organic f...

  10. A Meta-Analysis Of Corrosion Studies for Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft (MPRA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    performed onsite. Aircraft rating was based upon the presence and/or extent of paint adhesion, paint cracking , clean ability, fluid damage, oxidation...because of corrosion control maintenance. No significant issues were observed related to paint cracking , fluid damage, corrosion, and clean ability of...HEXAMETHYLENEDIISOCYANATE 822-06-0 83194 X-310A; POLYURETHANE CATALYST XYLENE 1330-20-7 82649 X-530; HS EPOXY ENAMEL CURING SOLUTION BUTANOL 71-36-3

  11. Standard test methods for pitting and crevice corrosion resistance of stainless steels and related alloys by use of ferric Chloride solution

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the determination of the resistance of stainless steels and related alloys to pitting and crevice corrosion (see Terminology G 15) when exposed to oxidizing chloride environments. Six procedures are described and identified as Methods A, B, C, D, E, and F. 1.1.1 Method A—Ferric chloride pitting test. 1.1.2 Method B—Ferric chloride crevice test. 1.1.3 Method C—Critical pitting temperature test for nickel-base and chromium-bearing alloys. 1.1.4 Method D—Critical crevice temperature test for nickel-base and chromium-bearing alloys. 1.1.5 Method E—Critical pitting temperature test for stainless steels. 1.1.6 Method F—Critical crevice temperature test for stainless steels. 1.2 Method A is designed to determine the relative pitting resistance of stainless steels and nickel-base, chromium-bearing alloys, whereas Method B can be used for determining both the pitting and crevice corrosion resistance of these alloys. Methods C, D, E and F allow for a rankin...

  12. Corrosion of beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elston, J.; Caillat, R.

    1958-01-01

    Data are reported on the volatilization rate of beryllium oxide in moist air depending on temperature and water vapour concentration. They are concerned with powder samples or sintered shapes of various densities. For sintered samples, the volatilization rate is very low under the following conditions: - temperature: 1300 deg. C, - water vapour concentration in moist air: 25 g/m 3 , - flow rate: 12 I/hour corresponding to a speed of 40 m/hour on the surface of the sample. For calcinated powders (1300 deg. C), grain growth has been observed under a stream of moist air at 1100 deg. C. For instance, grain size changes from 0,5 to at least 2 microns after 500 hours of exposure at this temperature. Furthermore, results data are reported on corrosion of sintered beryllium oxide in pressurized water. At 250 deg. C, under a pressure of 40 kg/cm 2 water is very slightly corrosive; however, internal strains are revealed. Finally, some features on the corrosion in liquid sodium are exposed. (author) [fr

  13. Not that neglected! Base rates influence related and unrelated judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białek, Michał

    2017-06-01

    It is claimed that people are unable (or unwilling) to incorporate prior probabilities into posterior assessments, such as their estimation of the likelihood of a person with characteristics typical of an engineer actually being an engineer given that they are drawn from a sample including a very small number of engineers. This paper shows that base rates are incorporated in classifications (Experiment 1) and, moreover, that base rates also affect unrelated judgments, such as how well a provided description of a person fits a stereotypical engineer (Experiment 2). Finally, Experiment 3 shows that individuals who make both types of assessments - though using base rates to the same extent in the former judgments - are able to decrease the extent to which they incorporate base rates in the latter judgments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A mathematical model of crevice and pitting corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharland, S.M.; Tasker, P.W.

    1985-09-01

    A predictive and self-consistent mathematical model incorporating the electrochemical, chemical and ionic migration processes characterising crevice and pitting corrosion is described. The model predicts full details of the steady-state solution chemistry and electrode kinetics (and hence metal penetration rates) within the corrosion cavities as functions of the many parameters on which these depend such as external electrode potential and crevice dimensions. The crevice is modelled as a parallel-sided slot filled with a dilute sodium chloride solution. Corrosion in both one and two directions is considered. The model includes a solid hydroxide precipitation reaction and assesses the effect on the corrosion rates of consequent changes in the chemical and physical environment within the crevice. A time stepping method is developed for the study of the progression of the corrosion with a precipitation reaction included and is applied to a restricted range of parameters. The applicability of this method is justified in relation to the physical and mathematical approximations made during the construction of the model. (author)

  15. Unemployment Rate, Smoking in China: Are They Related?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Shen, Jay J; Cochran, Chris

    2016-01-08

    Studies on the relationship between unemployment rate and smoking have yielded mixed results. The issue in China has not been studied. This study aims to examine the influence of unemployment rate on smoking in China. Logit model and two-stage least squares (2SLS) estimation were used to estimate the effects. Estimations were done for 4585 individual over 45 using data from China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study conducted in Zhejiang and Gansu provinces in 2008 and 2012. A percent increase in the unemployment rate resulted in the increase in the likelihood of smoking by a combined 9.1 percent for those who smoked including a 2.9% increase for those who smoked 1-10 cigarettes per day; a 2.8% increase for those who smoked 11-20 cigarettes per day; and a 3.4% increase for those who smoked 20 cigarettes or more per day. The effects were stronger for those who were employed. Non-drinkers were more likely to engage in smoking with increased unemployment rate. 2SLS estimation revealed the same association. The unemployment rate was positively associated with smoking behavior. Smoking control and intervention strategies should focus on both the individual's characteristics and the physical environment in which unemployment rate tend to rise.

  16. Corrosion Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corrosion Testing Facility is part of the Army Corrosion Office (ACO). It is a fully functional atmospheric exposure site, called the Corrosion Instrumented Test...

  17. The dual role of microbes in corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kip, Nardy; van Veen, Johannes A

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion is the result of a series of chemical, physical and (micro) biological processes leading to the deterioration of materials such as steel and stone. It is a world-wide problem with great societal and economic consequences. Current corrosion control strategies based on chemically produced products are under increasing pressure of stringent environmental regulations. Furthermore, they are rather inefficient. Therefore, there is an urgent need for environmentally friendly and sustainable corrosion control strategies. The mechanisms of microbially influenced corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion inhibition are not completely understood, because they cannot be linked to a single biochemical reaction or specific microbial species or groups. Corrosion is influenced by the complex processes of different microorganisms performing different electrochemical reactions and secreting proteins and metabolites that can have secondary effects. Information on the identity and role of microbial communities that are related to corrosion and corrosion inhibition in different materials and in different environments is scarce. As some microorganisms are able to both cause and inhibit corrosion, we pay particular interest to their potential role as corrosion-controlling agents. We show interesting interfaces in which scientists from different disciplines such as microbiology, engineering and art conservation can collaborate to find solutions to the problems caused by corrosion.

  18. The dual role of microbes in corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kip, Nardy; van Veen, Johannes A

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion is the result of a series of chemical, physical and (micro) biological processes leading to the deterioration of materials such as steel and stone. It is a world-wide problem with great societal and economic consequences. Current corrosion control strategies based on chemically produced products are under increasing pressure of stringent environmental regulations. Furthermore, they are rather inefficient. Therefore, there is an urgent need for environmentally friendly and sustainable corrosion control strategies. The mechanisms of microbially influenced corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion inhibition are not completely understood, because they cannot be linked to a single biochemical reaction or specific microbial species or groups. Corrosion is influenced by the complex processes of different microorganisms performing different electrochemical reactions and secreting proteins and metabolites that can have secondary effects. Information on the identity and role of microbial communities that are related to corrosion and corrosion inhibition in different materials and in different environments is scarce. As some microorganisms are able to both cause and inhibit corrosion, we pay particular interest to their potential role as corrosion-controlling agents. We show interesting interfaces in which scientists from different disciplines such as microbiology, engineering and art conservation can collaborate to find solutions to the problems caused by corrosion. PMID:25259571

  19. Age-Related Differences in Speech Rate Perception Do Not Necessarily Entail Age-Related Differences in Speech Rate Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffner, Christopher C.; Newman, Rochelle S.; Dilley, Laura C.; Idsardi, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A new literature has suggested that speech rate can influence the parsing of words quite strongly in speech. The purpose of this study was to investigate differences between younger adults and older adults in the use of context speech rate in word segmentation, given that older adults perceive timing information differently from younger…

  20. The oxidation and corrosion of ODS alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation and hot corrosion of high temperature oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are reviewed. The environmental resistance of such alloys are classified by oxide growth rate, oxide volatility, oxide spalling, and hot corrosion limitations. Also discussed are environmentally resistant coatings for ODS materials. It is concluded that ODS NiCrAl and FeCrAl alloys are highly oxidation and corrosion resistant and can probably be used uncoated.

  1. Oxidation And Hot Corrosion Of ODS Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1993-01-01

    Report reviews oxidation and hot corrosion of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys, intended for use at high temperatures. Classifies environmental resistances of such alloys by rates of growth of oxides, volatilities of oxides, spalling of oxides, and limitations imposed by hot corrosion. Also discusses environmentally resistant coatings for ODS materials. Concludes ODS NICrAl and FeCrAl alloys highly resistant to oxidation and corrosion and can be used uncoated.

  2. Corrosion-Activated Micro-Containers for Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Protective Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, J. W.; Zhang, X.; Johnsey, M. N.; Pearman, B. P.; Jolley, S. T.; Calle, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    This work concerns the development of environmentally friendly encapsulation technology, specifically designed to incorporate corrosion indicators, inhibitors, and self-healing agents into a coating, in such a way that the delivery of the indicators and inhibitors is triggered by the corrosion process, and the delivery of self-healing agents is triggered by mechanical damage to the coating. Encapsulation of the active corrosion control ingredients allows the incorporation of desired autonomous corrosion control functions such as: early corrosion detection, hidden corrosion detection, corrosion inhibition, and self-healing of mechanical damage into a coating. The technology offers the versatility needed to include one or several corrosion control functions into the same coating.The development of the encapsulation technology has progressed from the initial proof-of-concept work, in which a corrosion indicator was encapsulated into an oil-core (hydrophobic) microcapsule and shown to be delivered autonomously, under simulated corrosion conditions, to a sophisticated portfolio of micro carriers (organic, inorganic, and hybrid) that can be used to deliver a wide range of active corrosion ingredients at a rate that can be adjusted to offer immediate as well as long-term corrosion control. The micro carriers have been incorporated into different coating formulas to test and optimize the autonomous corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing functions of the coatings. This paper provides an overview of progress made to date and highlights recent technical developments, such as improved corrosion detection sensitivity, inhibitor test results in various types of coatings, and highly effective self-healing coatings based on green chemistry. The NASA Kennedy Space Centers Corrosion Technology Lab at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, U.S.A. has been developing multifunctional smart coatings based on the microencapsulation of environmentally friendly corrosion

  3. Available Prediction Methods for Corrosion under Insulation (CUI): A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Burhani Nurul Rawaida Ain; Muhammad Masdi; Ismail Mokhtar Che

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion under insulation (CUI) is an increasingly important issue for the piping in industries especially petrochemical and chemical plants due to its unexpected catastrophic disaster. Therefore, attention towards the maintenance and prediction of CUI occurrence, particularly in the corrosion rates, has grown in recent years. In this study, a literature review in determining the corrosion rates by using various prediction models and method of the corrosion occurrence between the external su...

  4. Corrosion rate of parent and weld materials of F82H and JPCA steels under LBE flow with active oxygen control at 450 and 500 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Kenji; Kamata, Kinya; Ono, Mikinori; Kitano, Teruaki; Hayashi, Kenichi; Oigawa, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    Corrosion behavior of parent and weld materials of F82H and JPCA was studied in the circulating LBE loop under impinging flow. These are candidate materials for Japanese Accelerator Driven System (ADS) beam windows. Maximum temperatures were kept to 450 and 500 deg. C with 100 deg. C constant temperature difference. Main flow velocity was 0.4-0.6 m/s in every case. Oxygen concentration was controlled to 2-4 x 10 -5 mass% although there was one exception. Testing time durations were 500-3000 h. Round bar type specimens were put in the circular tube of the loop. An electron beam weld in the middle of specimens was also studied. Optical microscopy, electron microscopy, X-ray element analyses and X-ray diffraction were used to investigate corrosion in these materials. Consequently corrosion depth and stability of those oxide layers were characterized based on the analyses. For a long-term behavior a linear law is recommended to predict corrosion in the ADS target design

  5. Corrosion technology. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, I.H.

    1989-01-01

    This book has been produced for dissemination of information on corrosion technology, corrosion hazards and its control. Chapter one of this book presents an overall view of the subject and chapter 2-5 deals with electrochemical basics, types of corrosion, pourbaix diagrams and form of corrosion. The author explains polarization/kinetics of corrosion, passivity, aqueous corrosion and corrosion testing and monitoring in 6-11 chapters. The author hopes it will provide incentive to all those interested in the corrosion technology. (A.B.)

  6. Corrosion behaviour of zinc and aluminium in simulated nuclear accident environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piippo, J.; Laitinen, T.; Sirkiae, P.

    1997-02-01

    The corrosion rates of zinc and aluminium were determined in simulated large pipe break and in severe accident cases. An in situ on fine measurement technique, which is based on the resistance measurement of sample wires, was used. In the large pipe break case the corrosion rates of zinc and aluminium were determined at pH 8 and pH 10 in deaerated and in aerated solutions. Tests were also performed in aerated 0.1 M borate buffer solution at pH 9.2. Temperature range was 130 deg C - 50 deg C. The corrosion of zinc appears to be relatively fast in neutral or mildly alkaline aerated water, while both high pH and deaeration tend to reduce the corrosion rates of zinc. The aeration and pH elevation decrease the corrosion rate of aluminium. The simulation of the severe accident case took place in the pH range 3-11 in chloride containing solutions at 50 deg C temperature. The corrosion rate of aluminium was lower than that of zinc, except for the solution with pH 11, in which the corrosion rate of aluminium was practically identical to that of zinc. Both metals corroded more rapidly in the presence of chlorides in acidic and alkalic conditions than in the absence of chlorides at neutral environment. The solubility of zinc and aluminium and the stability of the corrosion products were estimated using thermodynamical calculations. The experimental results and the thermodynamical calculations were in fair agreement. (8 refs.)

  7. Investigating the Crevice Corrosion Behavior of Coated Stainless Steel in Seawater

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kain, Robert

    2000-01-01

    .... austenitic stainless steel. Testing in natural seawater has demonstrated that coatings can protect susceptible stainless steel from barnacle related crevice corrosion and localized corrosion at weldments...

  8. High temperature corrosion of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.; Ennis, P.J.

    1988-08-01

    This paper covers three main topics: 1. high temperature oxidation of metals and alloys, 2. corrosion in sulfur containing environments and 3. structural changes caused by corrosion. The following 21 subjects are discussed: Influence of implanted yttrium and lanthanum on the oxidation behaviour of beta-NiA1; influence of reactive elements on the adherence and protective properties of alumina scales; problems related to the application of very fine markers in studying the mechanism of thin scale formation; oxidation behaviour of chromia forming Co-Cr-Al alloys with or without reactive element additions; growth and properties of chromia-scales on high-temperature alloys; quantification of the depletion zone in high temperature alloys after oxidation in process gas; effects of HC1 and of N2 in the oxidation of Fe-20Cr; investigation under nuclear safety aspects of Zircaloy-4 oxidation kinetics at high temperatures in air; on the sulfide corrosion of metallic materials; high temperature sulfide corrosion of Mn, Nb and Nb-Si alloys; corrosion behaviour or NiCrAl-based alloys in air and air-SO2 gas mixtures; sulfidation of cobalt at high temperatures; preoxidation for sulfidation protection; fireside corrosion and application of additives in electric utility boilers; transport properties of scales with complex defect structures; observations of whiskers and pyramids during high temperature corrosion of iron in SO2; corrosion and creep of alloy 800H under simulated coal gasification conditions; microstructural changes of HK 40 cast alloy caused by exploitation in tubes in steam reformer installation; microstructural changes during exposure in corrosive environments and their effect on mechanical properties; coatings against carburization; mathematical modeling of carbon diffusion and carbide precipitation in Ni-Cr-based alloys. (MM)

  9. Development of Flow Accelerated Corrosion Reduction Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Min Bum; Choi, Won Yeol; Lee, Jong Chan; Lim, Dong Seok; Kwon, Byung Il; Ku, Hee Kwon; Kim, Jong Uk [FNC Tech, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Development of flow accelerated corrosion reduction technology is necessary for prevent this kind of accidents. This study deals with development of flow accelerated corrosion reduction technology through platinum injection and developed of flow accelerated corrosion reduction technology by imitating water chemical condition in PWR secondary system in practice. In addition, in order to get reliability of water chemical simulator in PWR secondary system, analyzed and compared with test result through CFD analysis. This study composed test device that can simulate water chemical environment in PWR secondary system, in order to develop flow accelerated corrosion reduction , and evaluated the ratio of corrosion in water chemical environment in PWR secondary system. In conclusion, corrosion ratio of low alloy steel material that includes more Cr and Mo was lower. And the results were confirmed to be the maximum corrosion rate in the case that replicate the 90 elbow. Additionally, inserted Pt nano particle for developing flow accelerated corrosion rate reduction technology, the test results, it was confirmed for about 80% of the flow accelerated corrosion rate reduction than before input.

  10. CREME96 and Related Error Rate Prediction Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Predicting the rate of occurrence of single event effects (SEEs) in space requires knowledge of the radiation environment and the response of electronic devices to that environment. Several analytical models have been developed over the past 36 years to predict SEE rates. The first error rate calculations were performed by Binder, Smith and Holman. Bradford and Pickel and Blandford, in their CRIER (Cosmic-Ray-Induced-Error-Rate) analysis code introduced the basic Rectangular ParallelePiped (RPP) method for error rate calculations. For the radiation environment at the part, both made use of the Cosmic Ray LET (Linear Energy Transfer) spectra calculated by Heinrich for various absorber Depths. A more detailed model for the space radiation environment within spacecraft was developed by Adams and co-workers. This model, together with a reformulation of the RPP method published by Pickel and Blandford, was used to create the CR ME (Cosmic Ray Effects on Micro-Electronics) code. About the same time Shapiro wrote the CRUP (Cosmic Ray Upset Program) based on the RPP method published by Bradford. It was the first code to specifically take into account charge collection from outside the depletion region due to deformation of the electric field caused by the incident cosmic ray. Other early rate prediction methods and codes include the Single Event Figure of Merit, NOVICE, the Space Radiation code and the effective flux method of Binder which is the basis of the SEFA (Scott Effective Flux Approximation) model. By the early 1990s it was becoming clear that CREME and the other early models needed Revision. This revision, CREME96, was completed and released as a WWW-based tool, one of the first of its kind. The revisions in CREME96 included improved environmental models and improved models for calculating single event effects. The need for a revision of CREME also stimulated the development of the CHIME (CRRES/SPACERAD Heavy Ion Model of the Environment) and MACREE (Modeling and

  11. Galvanic Corrosion between Alloy 690 and Magnetite in Alkaline Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon-Hyeok Jeon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The galvanic corrosion behavior of Alloy 690 coupled with magnetite has been investigated in an alkaline solution at 30 °C and 60 °C using a potentiodynamic polarization method and a zero resistance ammeter. The positive current values were recorded in the galvanic couple and the corrosion potential of Alloy 690 was relatively lower. These results indicate that Alloy 690 behaves as the anode of the pair. The galvanic coupling between Alloy 690 and magnetite increased the corrosion rate of Alloy 690. The temperature increase led to an increase in the extent of galvanic effect and a decrease in the stability of passive film. Galvanic effect between Alloy 690 and magnetite is proposed as an additional factor accelerating the corrosion rate of Alloy 690 steam generator tubing in secondary water.

  12. Corrosion of Nickel-Based Alloys in Ultra-High Temperature Heat Transfer Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Reddy, Ramana G.

    2017-03-01

    MgCl2-KCl binary system has been proposed to be used as high temperature reactor coolant. Due to its relatively low melting point, good heat capacity and excellent thermal stability, this system can also be used in high operation temperature concentrating solar power generation system as heat transfer fluid (HTF). The corrosion behaviors of nickel based alloys in MgCl2-KCl molten salt system at 1,000 °C were determined based on long-term isothermal dipping test. After 500 h exposure tests under strictly maintained high purity argon gas atmosphere, the weight loss and corrosion rate analysis were conducted. Among all the tested samples, Ni-201 demonstrated the lowest corrosion rate due to the excellent resistance of Ni to high temperature element dissolution. Detailed surface topography and corrosion mechanisms were also determined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS).

  13. Progress in the understanding of the long-term corrosion behaviour of copper canisters

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Fraser; Lilja, Christina; Vähänen, Marjut

    2013-07-01

    highly compacted bentonite buffer which (i) inhibits the transport of reactants to, and of corrosion products away from, the canister surface, (ii) limits the amount of atmospheric O2 initially trapped in the repository, and (iii) suppresses microbial activity close to the canister surface [5,6,9]. The environment will evolve with time as the initially trapped atmospheric O2 is consumed and as the canister cools. This evolution can be described as a transition from an early period of warm, oxidising conditions to an indefinite period of cool, anoxic conditions. In turn, this environmental evolution will impact the corrosion behaviour of the canister. Localised corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) will only be possible for a limited period of time initially when there is sufficient oxidant available to support these forms of corrosion. This aerobic phase is only expected to last a few tens or hundreds of years [10,11]. For the vast majority of the service life of the canister, the redox conditions will be determined by the absence of O2 and the presence of sulphide. Although obvious, it is important to remember that the corrosion behaviour is determined by the environmental conditions at the canister surface. Because of the presence of the compacted bentonite, the environment at the canister surface will be quite different from that in the ground water in the rock. In particular, the interfacial concentration of HS- will be small as the rate of corrosion in the presence of sulphide is transport limited [1,2,12]. The low interfacial [HS-] has important implications for various sulphur-related corrosion mechanisms. The relatively high salinity of the ground water (and, hence, of the bentonite pore water) promotes the general dissolution of copper and inhibits localised corrosion and SCC [5,6].

  14. Corrosion and alteration of materials from the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Feron, D.; Guerin, Y.; Latge, C.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, C.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Vernaz, E.; Richet, C.

    2010-01-01

    The control of the corrosion phenomenon is of prime importance for the nuclear industry. The efficiency and the safety of facilities can be affected by this phenomenon. The nuclear industry has to face corrosion for a large variety of materials submitted to various environments. Metallic corrosion operates in the hot and aqueous environment of water reactors which represent the most common reactor type in the world. Progresses made in the control of the corrosion of the different components of these reactors allow to improve their safety. Corrosion is present in the facilities of the back-end of the fuel cycle as well (corrosion in acid environment in fuel reprocessing plants, corrosion of waste containers in disposal and storage facilities, etc). The future nuclear systems will widen even more the range of materials to be studied and the situations in which they will be placed (corrosion by liquid metals or by helium impurities). Very often, corrosion looks like a patchwork of particular cases in its description. The encountered corrosion problems and their study are presented in this book according to chapters representing the main sectors of the nuclear industry and classified with respect to their phenomenology. This monograph illustrates the researches in progress and presents some results of particular importance obtained recently. Content: 1 - Introduction: context, stakes and goals; definition of corrosion; a complex science; corrosion in the nuclear industry; 2 - corrosion in water reactors - phenomenology, mechanisms, remedies: A - uniform corrosion: mechanisms, uniform corrosion of fuel cladding, in-situ measurement of generalized corrosion rate by electrochemical methods, uniform corrosion of nickel alloys, characterization of the passive layer and growth mechanisms, the PACTOLE code - an integrating tool, influence of water chemistry on corrosion and contamination, radiolysis impact on uniform corrosion; B - stress corrosion: stress corrosion cracking

  15. Assessing resistance of stabilized corrosion resistant steels to intergranular corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karas, A.; Cihal, V. Jr.; Vanek, V.; Herzan, J.; Protiva, K.; Cihal, V.

    1987-01-01

    Resistance to intergranular corrosion was determined for four types of titanium-stabilized steels from the coefficients of stabilization efficiency according to the degree the chemical composition was known. The ATA SUPER steel showed the highest resistance parameter value. The resistance of this type of steel of a specific composition, showing a relatively low value of mean nitrogen content was compared with steel of an optimized chemical composition and with low-carbon niobium stabilized, molybdenum modified steels. The comparison showed guarantees of a sufficient resistance of the steel to intergranular corrosion. The method of assessing the resistance to intergranular corrosion using the calculation of the minimum content of Cr', i.e., the effective chromium content, and the maximum effective carbon content C' giving the resistance parameter k seems to be prospective for practical use in the production of corrosion resistant steels. (author). 1 tab., 5 figs., 15 refs

  16. Relationship between Corrosion Level of Rebar Embedded in Concrete, Corrosion Potential and Current Density Measured by Non-destructive Test Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Lan; Cho, Seung Ho; Roh, Young Sook; Kim, Joong Koo

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify corrosion mechanism and develop qualitative measurement method of corrosion level. Fist of all, structural behavior of each different level of corrosion states have been evaluated. And mathematical models that can predict corrosion level in terms of electric potential and corrosion intensity are proposed. Corrosion rate in reinforcing bar was investigated in this study using accelerated corrosion method due to electric potential differences based on Faradays law. Total 288 measurement spots were designed in terms of corrosion rates, diameter of reinforcing bars, and concrete cover thickness. Corrosion current densities and corrosion potentials of concrete were measured on these specimens using Gecor device. This study suggested the relationship between corrosion levels, and measured electric current density as follows

  17. The corrosive well waters of Egypt's western desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Frank Eldridge

    1979-01-01

    The discovery that ground waters of Egypt's Western Desert are highly corrosive is lost in antiquity. Inhabitants of the oases have been aware of the troublesome property for many decades and early investigators mention it in their reports concerning the area. Introduction of modern well-drilling techniques and replacements of native wood casing with steel during the 20th century increased corrosion problems and, in what is called the New Valley Project, led to an intense search for causes and corrective treatments. This revealed that extreme corrosiveness results from combined effects of relatively acidic waters with significant concentrations of destructive sulfide ion; unfavorable ratios of sulfate and chloride to less aggressive ions; mineral equilibria and electrode potential which hinder formation of protective films; relative high chemical reaction rates because of abnormal temperatures, and high surface velocities related to well design. There is general agreement among investigators that conventional corrosion control methods such as coating metal surfaces, chemical treatment of the water, and electrolytic protection with impressed current and sacrificial electrodes are ineffective or impracticable for wells in the Western Desert's New Valley. Thus, control must be sought through the use of materials more resistant to corrosion than plain carbon steel wherever well screens and casings are necessary. Of the alternatives considered, stainless steel appears to. be the most promising where high strength and long-term services are required and the alloy's relatively high cost is acceptable. Epoxy resin-bonded fiberglass and wood appear to be practicable, relatively inexpensive alternatives for installations which do. not exceed their strength limitations. Other materials such as high strength aluminum and Monel Metal have shown sufficient promise to. merit their consideration in particular locations and uses. The limited experience with pumping in these desert

  18. Current status of studies on nodular corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Takayoshi; Kawasaki, Satoru; Echigoya, Hironori; Kinoshita, Yutaka; Kubota, Hiroyuki; Konishi, Takao; Yamanaka, Tuneyasu.

    1993-01-01

    The studies on nodular corrosion formed on the outer surface of BWR fuel cladding tubes were reviewed. Main factors affecting the corrosion behavior were material and environmental conditions and combined effect. The effects of such material conditions as fabrication process, alloy elements, texture and surface treatment and environmental factors as neutron irradiation, thermo-hydrodynamic, water chemistry, purity of the coolant and contact with foreign metals on the corrosion phenomena were surveyed. Out-of-reactor corrosion test methods and models for the corrosion mechanism were also reviewed. Suppression of the accumulated annealing temperature during tube reduction process improved the nodular corrosion resistance of Zircaloys. Improved resistance for the nodular corrosion was reported for the unirradiated Zircaloys with some additives. Detailed irradiation test under the BWR conditions is needed to confirm the trend. Concerning the environmental factors, boiling on the cladding surface due to heat flux reduces the nodular corrosion susceptibility, while oxidizing radical generated from dissolved oxygen accelerates the corrosion. Concerning corrosion mechanisms, importance of such phenomena as the depleted zone of alloying elements in zirconium matrix, reduction of H + to H 2 in oxide layer, electrochemical property of precipitates, crystallographic anisotropy of oxidation rates were revealed. (author) 59 refs

  19. Protecting solar collector systems from corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    The main cause of the reduced life of a solar heating system is corrosion of the exterior parts and the internal components. This report outlines ways of reducing the cost of solar heating by reducing the corrosion in solar heating systems, and hence increasing the system's service life. Mechanisms for corrosion are discussed: these include galvanic corrosion and crevice corrosion. Means of minimizing corrosion at the design stage are then described. Such methods, when designing the solar collector, involve ensuring proper drainage of exterior water; eliminating situations where moisture, dirt and pollutants may collect; preventing condensation inside the collector; using proper gaskets and sealants at appropriate places; and selecting optimum materials and coatings. Interior corrosion can be minimized at the design stage by choosing a good heat transfer fluid and corrosion inhibitor, in the case of systems where liquids are used; ensuring a low enough flow rate to avoid erosion; designing the system to avoid crevices; and avoiding situations where galvanic corrosion could occur. Other procedures are given for minimizing corrosion in the construction and operation of solar heating systems. 7 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. A relation to describe rate-dependent material failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voight, B

    1989-01-13

    The simple relation OmegaOmega-alpha = 0, where Omega is a measurable quantity such as strain and A and alpha are empirical constants, describes the behavior of materials in terminal stages of failure under conditions of approximately constant stress and temperature. Applicable to metals and alloys, ice, concrete, polymers, rock, and soil, the relation may be extended to conditions of variable and multiaxial stress and may be used to predict time to failure.

  1. Corrosion and alteration of materials from the nuclear industry; La Corrosion et l'alteration des materiaux du nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Feron, D.; Guerin, Y.; Latge, C.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, C.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Vernaz, E.; Richet, C.

    2010-07-01

    The control of the corrosion phenomenon is of prime importance for the nuclear industry. The efficiency and the safety of facilities can be affected by this phenomenon. The nuclear industry has to face corrosion for a large variety of materials submitted to various environments. Metallic corrosion operates in the hot and aqueous environment of water reactors which represent the most common reactor type in the world. Progresses made in the control of the corrosion of the different components of these reactors allow to improve their safety. Corrosion is present in the facilities of the back-end of the fuel cycle as well (corrosion in acid environment in fuel reprocessing plants, corrosion of waste containers in disposal and storage facilities, etc). The future nuclear systems will widen even more the range of materials to be studied and the situations in which they will be placed (corrosion by liquid metals or by helium impurities). Very often, corrosion looks like a patchwork of particular cases in its description. The encountered corrosion problems and their study are presented in this book according to chapters representing the main sectors of the nuclear industry and classified with respect to their phenomenology. This monograph illustrates the researches in progress and presents some results of particular importance obtained recently. Content: 1 - Introduction: context, stakes and goals; definition of corrosion; a complex science; corrosion in the nuclear industry; 2 - corrosion in water reactors - phenomenology, mechanisms, remedies: A - uniform corrosion: mechanisms, uniform corrosion of fuel cladding, in-situ measurement of generalized corrosion rate by electrochemical methods, uniform corrosion of nickel alloys, characterization of the passive layer and growth mechanisms, the PACTOLE code - an integrating tool, influence of water chemistry on corrosion and contamination, radiolysis impact on uniform corrosion; B - stress corrosion: stress corrosion cracking

  2. Modelling of Microbiological Influenced Corrosion – Limitations and Perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovhus, Torben Lund; Taylor, Christopher; Eckert, Rickard

    of corrosion relative to asset integrity, operators commonly use models to support decision-making. The models use qualitative, semi-quantitative or quantitative measures to help predict the rate of degradation caused by MIC and other threats. A new model that links MIC in topsides oil processing systems...... modeling tools to industry in the shortest development time. ICME development would couple our current understanding of MIC, as represented in models, with experimental data, to build a digital “twin” for optimizing performance of engineering systems, whether in the design phase or operations. Since...... functional groups of microorganisms on reaction kinetics or the significance of microbial growth kinetics on corrosion. The ability to accurately predict MIC initiation and growth is hampered by knowledge gaps regarding environmental conditions affect corrosion under biofilms. In order to manage the threat...

  3. Anti-Corrosion Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    SuperSpan RM 8000 is an anti-corrosion coating which effectively counteracts acid degradation, abrasive wear, and cracking in power industry facilities. It was developed by RM Industrial Products Company, Inc. with NERAC assistance. It had previously been necessary to shut down plants to repair or replace corroded duct-work in coal burning utilities. NASA-developed technology was especially useful in areas relating to thermoconductivity of carbon steel and the bonding characteristics of polymers. The product has sold well.

  4. Comparison of the crevice corrosion resistance of alloys 625 and 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, J.; Kehler, B.; Iloybare, G.O.; Scully, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is concerned with the corrosion resistance of candidate engineered waste package materials. A variety of waste package designs have been proposed for US and Canadian High Level Nuclear Waste Repositories. A common feature of each design is the possibility of utilizing a corrosion resistant material such as a nickel-based super alloy or titanium-based alloy. A suitable corrosion resistant material may provide (a) kinetic immunity if the combination of repository environmental conditions and alloy resistance assure both: (i) a passive condition with negligible chance of localized corrosion stabilization, as well as (ii) low enough passive dissolution rates to insure conventional corrosion allowance over geological times, (b) a second form of ''corrosion allowance,'' if it can be scientifically demonstrated that a mechanism for stifling (i.e., death) of localized corrosion propagation occurs well before waste canisters are penetrated, or (c) such a low probability of initiation and continued propagation that a tolerably low degree of penetration occurs. Unfortunately, a large database on the crevice corrosion properties of alloy 22 does not exist in comparison to alloy 625. Alloy screening tests in oxidizing acids containing FeCl3 indicate that alloy 22 is more resistant to crevice corrosion than 625 as indicated by critical pit and crevice temperatures. Differences in alloying element compositions as expressed by pitting resistance equivalency number calculations support these findings. However, these data only provide the relative ranking of these alloys in terms of crevice corrosion and do not answer the critical questions proposed above

  5. High temperature corrosion of nickel alloys by molten calcium chloride in an oxidising environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, Roger; Gittos, Mike

    2012-09-01

    A series of nickel alloys was submerged in molten calcium chloride (a molten salt proposed for and used in the nuclear industry for a variety of applications), at 850 deg. C for 72 hours under an oxidising environment. The samples were analysed in detail, in order to determine their corrosion behaviour and suitability for use under these conditions. 310 stainless steel was used as a reference material. Extensive corrosion occurred and the observed attack on the metal substrates was general and massive with corrosion rates ranging from 1.17 mm/year, for Haynes 214, to 13.3 mm/year, for 310 stainless steel. All materials showed selective leaching of chromium from the samples but the oxide layer formed was not protective, spalling away easily. The severity of the attack was not immediately visible from the corrosion rate alone: samples showed a friable scale on the surface and deep penetration of the attack beneath, up to 0.63 mm for 310 stainless steel. In some cases, the attack was clearly intergranular with chromium being depleted along the grain boundaries, whereas in others, the attack was more general. No simple correlation between alloying elements and corrosion rate was apparent, with additions of aluminium and silicon appearing to have little or no protective effect. Alloys 600 and Haynes HR-160 showed promise, with relatively low corrosion rates and penetration depths. (authors)

  6. Survey of Water Chemistry and Corrosion of NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Ki Sok; Hong, Bong Geon

    2008-06-15

    Status of water chemistry of nuclear power plant and materials corrosion has been surveyed. For PWR, system chemistry of primary coolant and secondary coolant as well as the related corrosion of materials was surveyed. For BWR, system chemistry as whole has been surveyed with its accompanying corrosion problems. Radiolysis of coolant water and activation of corrosion products also was surveyed. Future NPP such as supercritical water cooled reactor and fusion reactor has also been surveyed for their water chemistry and corrosion problems. As a result, proposal for some research items has been suggested. Some related corrosion research techniques and electrochemical fundamentals are also presented.

  7. Survey of Water Chemistry and Corrosion of NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Ki Sok; Hong, Bong Geon

    2008-06-01

    Status of water chemistry of nuclear power plant and materials corrosion has been surveyed. For PWR, system chemistry of primary coolant and secondary coolant as well as the related corrosion of materials was surveyed. For BWR, system chemistry as whole has been surveyed with its accompanying corrosion problems. Radiolysis of coolant water and activation of corrosion products also was surveyed. Future NPP such as supercritical water cooled reactor and fusion reactor has also been surveyed for their water chemistry and corrosion problems. As a result, proposal for some research items has been suggested. Some related corrosion research techniques and electrochemical fundamentals are also presented

  8. Radionuclide decay effects on waste glass corrosion and weathering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wronkiewicz, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    The release of glass components into solution, including radionuclides, may be influenced by the presence of radiolytically produced nitric acid, carboxylic acid, and transient water dissociation products such as ·OH and O 2 - . Under batch test conditions, glass corrosion has been shown to increase up to a maximum of three-to five-fold in irradiated tests relative to nonirradiated tests, while in other studies the presence of radiolytic products has actually decreased glass corrosion rates. Bicarbonate groundwaters will buffer against pH decreases and changes in corrosion rates. Under high surface area-to-solution volume (S/V) conditions, the bicarbonate buffering reservoir may be quickly overwhelmed by radiolytic acids that are concentrated in the thin films of water contacting the samples. Glass reaction rates have been shown to increase up to 10-to-15-fold due to radiation exposure under high S/V conditions. Radiation damage to solid glass materials results in bond damage and atomic displacements. This type of damage has been shown to increase the release rates of glass components up to four-fold during subsequent corrosion tests, although under actual disposal conditions, glass annealing processes may negate the solid radiation damage effects

  9. Corrosion of an Fe-12 Cr-1 Mo VW steel in thermally-convective lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    A thermal-convection loop of Fe-12 Cr-1 Mo VW steel circulated pure lithium between 500 and 350 0 C for 10,088 h. Periodic weighings of coupons at different temperatures around the loop revealed small weight losses and corrosion rates. Surface analysis showed a relatively thin corrosion layer with an underlying carbide-free zone and some depletion of chromium from the hottest specimen. While some mass transfer of chromium and nickel was detected, this mechanism did not strongly influence the weight loss process as it does with austenitic steels. Therefore, it appeared that reactions with carbon and nitrogen must be the dominant corrosion processes such that weight loss was maximized at the lowest temperature (350 0 C). Overall, the lithium-steel reactions in the temperature range of this experiment were relatively sluggish and the corrosion was not severe

  10. Electrochemical corrosion testing of metal waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, D. P.; Peterson, J. J.; Katyal, H. K.; Keiser, D. D.; Hilton, B. A.

    1999-01-01

    Electrochemical corrosion tests have been conducted on simulated stainless steel-zirconium (SS-Zr) metal waste form (MWF) samples. The uniform aqueous corrosion behavior of the samples in various test solutions was measured by the polarization resistance technique. The data show that the MWF corrosion rates are very low in groundwaters representative of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Galvanic corrosion measurements were also conducted on MWF samples that were coupled to an alloy that has been proposed for the inner lining of the high-level nuclear waste container. The experiments show that the steady-state galvanic corrosion currents are small. Galvanic corrosion will, hence, not be an important mechanism of radionuclide release from the MWF alloys

  11. Investigation the effect of porosity on corrosion of macroporous silicon in 1.0 M sodium hydroxide solution using weight loss measurements, electrochemical methods and scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Chuan; Xiang, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The dissolution of silicon wafers conforms Faraday’s laws of electrolysis. • The porosity effect on macroporous silicon corrosion was investigated. • The corrosion rate increase linearly with porosity increasing. • The porosity effect on activation parameters was obtained. - Abstract: In this study, the macroporous silicon has been fabricated by electrochemical anodization. The dissolution of n-type silicon wafers in etching solution conforms Faraday’s laws of electrolysis. The fabricated macroporous silicon with different porosity corrosion in 1.0 M NaOH was systemically investigated by weight loss measurements, electrochemical methods and scanning electron microscope. Results show that with the porosity increasing, the corrosion rate of macroporous silicon in 1.0 M NaOH increases linearly. In addition, the increase of corrosion rate of macroporous silicon with relative higher porosity was determined by the pre-exponential factor.

  12. Corrosion behavior of stainless steel and zirconium in nitric acid containing highly oxidizing species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayuzumi, Masami; Fujita, Tomonari

    1994-01-01

    Corrosion behavior of 304ELC, 310Nb stainless steels and Zirconium was investigated in the simulated dissolver solution of a reprocessing plant to obtain fundamental data for life prediction. Corrosion of heat transfer surface was also investigated in nitric acid solutions containing Ce ion. The results obtained are as follows: (1) Stainless steels showed intergranular corrosion in the simulated dissolver solution. The corrosion rate increased with time and reached to a constant value after several hundred hours of immersing time. The constant corrosion rate changed depending on potential suggesting that corrosion potential dominates the corrosion process. 310Nb showed superior corrosion resistance to 304ELC. (2) Corrosion rate of stainless steels increased in the heat transfer condition. The causes of corrosion enhancement are estimated to be higher corrosion potential and higher temperature of heat transfer surface. (3) Zirconium showed perfect passivity in all the test conditions employed. (author)

  13. A non-destructive test method to monitor corrosion products and corrosion-induced cracking in reinforced cement based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Pease, Bradley Justin; Peterova, Adela

    2011-01-01

    ) was conducted to describe the impact of water-to-cement ratio and corrosion current density (i.e., corrosion rate) on the reinforcement corrosion process. Focus was placed, in particular on the determination of the corrosion accommodating region (CAR) and time to corrosion-induced cracking. Experimental results...... showed that x-ray attenuation measurements allow determination of the actual concentrations of corrosion products averaged through the specimen thickness. The total mass loss of steel measured by x-ray attenuation was found to be in very good agreement with the calculated mass loss obtained by Faraday......’s law. Furthermore, experimental results demonstrated that the depth of penetration of corrosion products as well as time to corrosion-induced cracking is varying for the different water-to-cement ratios and applied corrosion current densities....

  14. Corrosion behavior of 2205 duplex stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, J A; Guzman, A; Zuccari, A; Thornburg, D W; Rhodes, B F; Oshida, Y; Moore, B K

    1997-07-01

    The corrosion of 2205 duplex stainless steel was compared with that of AISI type 316L stainless steel. The 2205 stainless steel is a potential orthodontic bracket material with low nickel content (4 to 6 wt%), whereas the 316L stainless steel (nickel content: 10 to 14 wt%) is a currently used bracket material. Both stainless steels were subjected to electrochemical and immersion (crevice) corrosion tests in 37 degrees C, 0.9 wt% sodium chloride solution. Electrochemical testing indicates that 2205 has a longer passivation range than 316L. The corrosion rate of 2205 was 0.416 MPY (milli-inch per year), whereas 316L exhibited 0.647 MPY. When 2205 was coupled to 316L with equal surface area ratio, the corrosion rate of 2205 reduced to 0.260 MPY, indicating that 316L stainless steel behaved like a sacrificial anode. When 316L is coupled with NiTi, TMA, or stainless steel arch wire and was subjected to the immersion corrosion test, it was found that 316L suffered from crevice corrosion. On the other hand, 2205 stainless steel did not show any localized crevice corrosion, although the surface of 2205 was covered with corrosion products, formed when coupled to NiTi and stainless steel wires. This study indicates that considering corrosion resistance, 2205 duplex stainless steel is an improved alternative to 316L for orthodontic bracket fabrication when used in conjunction with titanium, its alloys, or stainless steel arch wires.

  15. Removal of corrosion products of construction materials in heat carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A review of reported data has been made on the removal of structural material corrosion products into the heat-carrying agent of power reactors. The corrosion rate, and at the same time, removal of corrosion products into the heat-carrying agent (water) decreases with time. Thus, for example, the corrosion rate of carbon steel in boiling water at 250 deg C and O 2 concentration of 0.1 mg/1 after 3000 hr is 0.083 g/m 2 . day; after 9000 hr the corrosion rate has been reduced 2.5 times. Under static conditions the transfer rate of corrosion products into water has been smaller than in the stream and also depends on time. The corrosion rate of carbon steel under nuclear plant operating conditions is almost an order higher over that of steel Kh18N10T

  16. Corrosion properties and corrosion evolution of as-cast AZ91 alloy with rare earth yttrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, T.J.; Yang, Y.S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Minor addition of Y will increase the corrosion resistance of AZ91 alloy, and 0.3 wt.% Y is the optimum addition. → A film composed of Mg(OH) 2 , MgCO 3 , Al(OH) 3 and Al 2 O 3 is formed on the surface of AZ91 alloy with rare earth Y free. → The film of AZ91 alloy with 0.3 wt.% Y is mainly composed of Mg(OH) 2 and MgCO 3 without any Al(OH) 3 and Al 2 O 3 . → The relative quantity of MgCO 3 in the surface film of AZ91 + 0.3 wt.% Y is bigger than that of AZ91 alloy with Y free. → Y 2 O 3 phase is found in the surface film of alloy III, which benefits to stabilize the surface film. -- Abstract: The corrosion resistance property and the corrosion evolution of as-cast AZ91 alloy with rare earth Y addition are investigated by using immersion tests, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results show that the proper amount of Y in the alloys can improve the corrosion resistance of AZ91 alloys effectively. With the increment of Y, the corrosion rate of the modified AZ91 alloys by Y addition was markedly less than that of AZ91 alloy. The corrosion rate of AZ91 alloy with 0.3 wt.% Y was the slightest, but further addition of Y content over 0.3 wt.% make the corrosion heavier. The XPS analysis suggests that the compound film of AZ91 alloy with 0.3 wt.% Y is mainly composed of Mg(OH) 2 and MgCO 3 without any Al(OH) 3 and Al 2 O 3 , in addition, Y 2 O 3 phase is found in the compound film of AZ91 alloy with 0.3 wt.% Y, which benefits to stabilize the surface film.

  17. Corrosivities in a pilot-scale combustor of a British and two Illinois coals with varying chlorine contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, I.-Ming; Lytle, J.M.; Kung, S.C.; Ho, K.K.

    2000-01-01

    Many US boiler manufacturers have recommended limits on the chlorine (Cl) content (< 0.25% or < 0.3%) of coals to be used in their boilers. These limits were based primarily on extrapolation of British coal data to predict the probable corrosion behavior of US coals. Even though Cl-related boiler corrosion has not been reported by US utilities burning high-Cl Illinois coals, the manufacturer's limits affect the marketability of high-Cl Illinois coals. This study measured the relative rates of corrosion caused by two high-Cl coals (British and Illinois) and one low-Cl Illinois baseline coal under identical pilot-scale combustion conditions for about 1000 h which gave reliable comparisons. Temperatures used reflected conditions in boiler superheaters. The corrosion probes were fabricated from commercial alloy 304SS frequently used at the hottest superheater section of utility boilers. The results showed no evidence of direct correlation between the coal chlorine content and rate of corrosion. A correlation between the rate of corrosion and the metal temperature was obvious. The results suggested that the different field histories of corrosivity from burning high-Cl Illinois coal and high-Cl British coal occurred because of different metal temperatures operated in US and UK utility boilers. The results of this study can be combined into a database, which could be used for lifting the limits on chlorine contents of coals burned in utility boilers in the US.

  18. Shrinkage behaviour and related corrosion performance of low-pH cementitious materials based on OPC or CAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Calvo, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Prior to using low-pH cementitious materials in underground repositories for high level waste, the characteristics determining their long-term durability must be analysed in depth. In this sense, different shrinkage tests have been made on mortar and concrete specimens using low-pH cement formulations based on ordinary portland cement (OPC or calcium aluminate cement (CAC, with high mineral admixtures contents. They showed similar autogenous shrinkage than samples without mineral admixtures but higher drying shrinkage when materials based on OPC with high silica fume contents were considered. Besides, as the use of reinforced concrete could be required in underground repositories, the susceptibility of reinforcement to corrosion when using low-pH cementitious materials based on OPC was analyzed, considering carbon steel and galvanized steel. In the formers corrosion was detected due to the low pore solution pH but any problem was detected when galvanized reinforcement were used.Previo al empleo de materiales con cementos de bajo pH en almacenamientos geológicos profundos (AGP de residuos radiactivos de alta actividad, características relacionadas con su durabilidad a largo plazo deben ser verificadas. Así, su estabilidad volumétrica se ha analizado en morteros y hormigones de bajo pH basados en OPC o CAC, con elevados contenidos de adiciones minerales. Estos presentaron retracciones autógenas similares a las medidas en materiales convencionales, pero retracciones por secado mayores en los basados en OPC y altos contenidos de humo de sílice. Dado que en zonas de los AGP podría emplearse hormigón armado, también se evaluó la susceptibilidad a la corrosión de aceros al carbono y aceros galvanizados en materiales de bajo pH basados en OPC. Se detectó un inicio temprano de corrosión en los primeros debido al bajo pH presente en el fluido de los poros de estos materiales, sin detectarse problemas al emplear aceros galvanizados.

  19. Corrosion study in molten fluoride salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keny, S.J.; Kumbhar, A.G.; Rangarajan, S.; Gupta, V.K.; Maheshwari, N.K.; Vijayan, P.K.

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion behaviors of two alloys viz. Inconel 625 and Inconel 617 were tested in molten fluoride salts of lithium, sodium and potassium (FLiNaK) in the temperature range of 550-750 ℃ in a nickel lined Inconel vessel. Electrochemical polarization (Tafel plot) technique was used for this purpose. For both alloys, the corrosion rate was found to increase sharply beyond 650 ℃ . At 600 ℃ , Inconel 625 showed a decreasing trend in the corrosion rate over a period of 24 hours, probably due to changes in the surface conditions. After fifteen days, re-testing of Inconel 625 in the same melt showed an increase in the corrosion rate. Inconel 625 was found to be more corrosion resistant than Inconel 617. (author)

  20. Fuel corrosion processes under waste disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoesmith, D.W.

    1999-09-01

    Under the oxidizing conditions likely to be encountered in the Yucca Mountain Repository, fuel dissolution is a corrosion process involving the coupling of the anodic dissolution of the fuel with the cathodic reduction of oxidants available within the repository. The oxidants potentially available to drive fuel corrosion are environmental oxygen, supplied by the transport through the permeable rock of the mountain and molecular and radical species produced by the radiolysis of available aerated water. The mechanism of these coupled anodic and cathodic reactions is reviewed in detail. While gaps in understanding remain, many kinetic features of these reactions have been studied in considerable detail, and a reasonably justified mechanism for fuel corrosion is available. The corrosion rate is determined primarily by environmental factors rather than the properties of the fuel. Thus, with the exception of increase in rate due to an increase in surface area, pre-oxidation of the fuel has little effect on the corrosion rate

  1. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R.B. Rebak; J.H. Payer

    2006-01-01

    Alloy 22 (NO6022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nano-meters per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids

  2. Fuel corrosion processes under waste disposal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoesmith, D.W. [Univ. of Western Ontario, Dept. of Chemistry, London, Ontario (Canada)

    1999-09-01

    Under the oxidizing conditions likely to be encountered in the Yucca Mountain Repository, fuel dissolution is a corrosion process involving the coupling of the anodic dissolution of the fuel with the cathodic reduction of oxidants available within the repository. The oxidants potentially available to drive fuel corrosion are environmental oxygen, supplied by the transport through the permeable rock of the mountain and molecular and radical species produced by the radiolysis of available aerated water. The mechanism of these coupled anodic and cathodic reactions is reviewed in detail. While gaps in understanding remain, many kinetic features of these reactions have been studied in considerable detail, and a reasonably justified mechanism for fuel corrosion is available. The corrosion rate is determined primarily by environmental factors rather than the properties of the fuel. Thus, with the exception of increase in rate due to an increase in surface area, pre-oxidation of the fuel has little effect on the corrosion rate.

  3. The anti-corrosion behavior under multi-factor impingement of Hastelloy C22 coating prepared by multilayer laser cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Bai, Shu-Lin

    2018-04-01

    Hastelloy C22 coating was prepared on substrate of Q235 steel by high power multilayer laser cladding. The microstructure, hardness and anti-corrosion properties of coating were investigated. The corrosion tests in 3.5% NaCl solution were carried out with variation of impingement angle and velocity, and vibration frequency of sample. The microstructure of coating changes from equiaxed grain at the top surface to dendrites oriented at an angle of 60° to the substrate inside the coating. The corrosion rate of coating increases with the increase of impingement angle and velocity, and vibrant frequency of sample. Corrosion mechanisms relate to repassivation and depassivation of coating according to electrochemical measurements. Above results show that multilayer laser cladding can endow Hastelloy C22 coating with fine microstructures, high hardness and good anti-corrosion performances.

  4. Hanford transuranic storage corrosion review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.L.; Divine, J.R.

    1980-12-01

    The rate of atmospheric corrosion of the transuranic (TRU) waste drums at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Project, near Richland, Washington, was evaluated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The rate of corrosion is principally contingent upon the effects of humidity, airborne pollutants, and temperature. Results of the study indicate that actual penetration of barrels due to atmospheric corrosion will probably not occur within the 20-year specified recovery period. Several other US burial sites were surveyed, and it appears that there is sufficient uncertainty in the available data to prevent a clearcut statement of the corrosion rate at a specific site. Laboratory and site tests are recommended before any definite conclusions can be made. The corrosion potential at the Hanford TRU waste site could be reduced by a combination of changes in drum materials (for example, using galvanized barrels instead of the currently used mild steel barrels), environmental exposure conditions (for example, covering the barrels in one of numerous possible ways), and storage conditions

  5. Al-Co Alloys Prepared by Vacuum Arc Melting: Correlating Microstructure Evolution and Aqueous Corrosion Behavior with Co Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeliki Lekatou

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypereutectic Al-Co alloys of various Co contents (7–20 weight % (wt.% Co were prepared by vacuum arc melting, aiming at investigating the influence of the cobalt content on the microstructure and corrosion behavior. Quite uniform and directional microstructures were attained. The obtained microstructures depended on the Co content, ranging from fully eutectic growth (7 wt.% and 10 wt.% Co to coarse primary Al9Co2 predominance (20 wt.% Co. Co dissolution in Al far exceeded the negligible equilibrium solubility of Co in Al; however, it was hardly uniform. By increasing the cobalt content, the fraction and coarseness of Al9Co2, the content of Co dissolved in the Al matrix, and the hardness and porosity of the alloy increased. All alloys exhibited similar corrosion behavior in 3.5 wt.% NaCl with high resistance to localized corrosion. Al-7 wt.% Co showed slightly superior corrosion resistance than the other compositions in terms of relatively low corrosion rate, relatively low passivation current density and scarcity of stress corrosion cracking indications. All Al-Co compositions demonstrated substantially higher resistance to localized corrosion than commercially pure Al produced by casting, cold rolling and arc melting. A corrosion mechanism was formulated. Surface films were identified.

  6. Correlation of Process Data and Electrochemical Noise to Assess Kraft Digester Corrosion: Kamloops Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, SJ

    2002-05-09

    Electrochemical noise (ECN) probes were deployed in a carbon steel continuous kraft digester at five locations roughly equi-spaced from top to bottom of the vessel. Current and potential noise, the temperature at each probe location, and the value of about 60 process parameters (flow rates, liquor chemistry, etc.) were monitored continuously for a period of one year. Historical vessel inspection data, including inspections accomplished immediately prior to and immediately following probe deployment, and post-test evaluation of the probe components were used to assess/compare corrosion indications from the probes with physical changes in wall thickness and corrosion patterns on the digester shell. The results indicate that furnish composition is a significant variable influencing digester corrosion, with increasing amounts of Douglas fir in the nominal furnish correlating directly with increased corrosion activity on the ECN probes. All five probes detected changes in furnish composition approximately simultaneously, indicating rapid chemical communication through the liquor, but the effect was strongest and persisted longest relatively high in the digester. The ECN probes also indicate significant corrosion activity occurred at each probe position during shutdown/restart transients. Little or no correlation between ECN probe corrosion activity and other operational variables was observed. Post-test evaluation of the probes confirmed general corrosion of a magnitude that closely agreed with corrosion current sums calculated for each probe over the exposure period and with historical average corrosion rates for the respective locations. Further, no pitting was observed on any of the electrodes, which is consistent with the ECN data, relevant polarization curves developed for steel in liquor removed from the digester, and the post-test inspection of the digester.

  7. Review: Results of studying atmospheric corrosion in Vietnam 1995–2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Thi Hong Lien, Pham Thy San and Hoang Lam Hong

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Vietnam is situated in the wet tropical zone; thus, atmospheric conditions are characterized by high temperatures and a long time of wetness (TOW. In addition, the salt air coming in from the sea causes a high chloride concentration in coastal areas. Furthermore, Vietnam is a developing country, which means that air pollution is increasing with the development of industry. These factors result in significant damage to materials by atmospheric corrosion. In this report, the results of a recent study on the corrosion of carbon steel and zinc-galvanized steel at 6–8 testing sites in Vietnam over 10 recent years (1995–2005 are focused on as well as the effects of environmental factors on atmospheric corrosion. The results showed that the corrosion of carbon steel is dominated by TOW, whereas zinc-galvanized-steel corrosion strongly depends on the chloride ion concentration in the air. The corrosion losses of both carbon- and zinc-galvanized steel fit the power model well with high correlation coefficients. In addition, the characteristics of the Vietnamese climate are introduced in the form of distribution maps of temperature (T, relative humidity (RH, total rainfall and TOW. A relationship between TOW, T and RH was found that enabled the calculation of TOW from T and RH data, which are available at meteorological stations. Finally, atmospheric corrosivity is determined on the basis of data on TOW, Cl− and SO2 concentrations, and the carbon steel corrosion rate. It is shown that in Vietnam, TOW is so long that the corrosion rate of carbon steel is in the C3 category; nevertheless, Cl− and SO2 concentrations in the atmosphere are not high.

  8. Age-Related Racial Disparity in Suicide Rates Among U.S. Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... May 30, 2018 Age-Related Racial Disparity in Youth Suicide Rates May 21, 2018 News by Year 2018 ... May 30, 2018 Age-Related Racial Disparity in Youth Suicide Rates May 21, 2018 News by Year 2018 ...

  9. Corrosion investigations at Masnedoe combined heat and power plant. Part VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, M. [Danmarks Tekniske Univ., Dept. for Manufacturing Engineering, Kgs Lyngby (Denmark); Karlsson, A. [ENERGI E2, Power Company, Copenhagen (Denmark); Hede Larsen, O. [Elsam - Fynsvaerket, Fredericia (Denmark)

    2001-02-01

    In Denmark, straw and other types of biomass are used for generating energy in power plats. Straw is considered a carbon dioxide neutral fuel and is therefore environmentally acceptable. Masnedoe CHP Plant is a straw-fired power plant on Sjaelland, Denmark. Corrosion tests were undertaken at Masnedoe CHP Plant by building a test superheater loop and subject it to higher steam temperatures than those of the actual plant. In addition a test section welded into superheater was investigated. The conclusions from the project are as follows: 1. The corrosion rates of the steels investigated are very close to one another and differences are small. 2. For the lower steam of 450 deg. C, a parabolic kinetic of oxide growth is not seen but more a paralinear corrosion rate for TP347H and a linear corrosion rate for the 12% Cr steel. 3. At temperatures above approx. 520 deg. C metal temperature for the austenitic steels, grain boundary attack is seen as a precursor for corrosion within the metal grains. For HCM12, attack of individual metal grains is also seen. The corrosion attack leads to depletion of chromium and manganese from the surface of the alloy. It is at these temperatures general corrosion changes to grain boundary corrosion attack. 4. Over one of the test superheater loops, varying corrosion rates could be measured that could not be explained by the change in steam temperature. This was related to the flue gas direction giving a higher surface metal temperature, however, there may be other factors giving localised high heat flux and therefore a higher metal temperature. The corrosion rate was lower this year (1999-2000) than the previous year and this is attributed to the lower flue gas temperatures or other factors such as a change in fuel or combustion characteristics. It must be noted that where the flue gas temperature is assumed to be highest similar corrosion rates are observed for both 1998-1999 and 1999-2000. There is much evidence to indicate that after

  10. High temperature cyclic oxidation and hot corrosion behaviours of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    eutectic reaction below 600°C. When the temperature ... blades, consequently corrosion rate rapidly increases due ... the corrosion run. ... Figure 1. Surface macrographs of superalloys subjected to hot corrosion and oxidation .... show the oxide scales of three different chemical compo- .... Li J and Wahi R P 1995 Acta Metall.

  11. Effect of Adenine Concentration on the Corrosion Inhibition of Aisi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This gave a surface coverage of 0.8956 and corrosion penetration rate of 0.022132mm/yr. Hence, the best adenine concentration for the corrosion inhibition of alloys 304L in 1.0M sulphuric acid solution to obtain optimum inhibition efficiency is 0.011M. Keywords: Corrosion, AISI 304L Steel, Inhibition efficiency, Degree of ...

  12. Research and development activities at INE concerning corrosion of final repository container materials; F and E-Arbeiten zur Korrosion von Endlager-Behaelterwerkstoffen im INE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienzler, Bernhard

    2017-10-01

    The present work provides a historical overview of the research and development activities carried out at the (Nuclear) Research Center Karlsruhe (today KIT) since the beginning of the 1980s on the corrosion of materials which might be suitable for construction of containers for highly radioactive wastes. The report relates almost exclusively to the work performed by Dr. Emmanuel Smailos, who elaborated the corrosion of various materials at the Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE). The requirements for the containers and materials, which were subject to changes in time, are presented. The changes were strongly influenced by the changed perception of the use of nuclear energy. The selection of the materials under investigations, the boundary conditions for the corrosion experiments and the analytical methods are described. Results of the corrosion of the materials such as finegrained steel, Hastelloy C4, nodular cast iron, titanium-palladium and copper or copper-nickel alloys in typical salt solutions are summarized. The findings of special investigations, e.g. corrosion under irradiation or the influence of sulfide on the corrosion rates are shown. For construction of disposal canisters, experiments were conducted to determine the contact corrosion, the influence of the hydrogen embrittlement of Ti-Pd and fine-grained steels on the corrosion behavior as well as the corrosion behavior of welding and the influence of different welding processes with the resulting heat-affected zones on the corrosion behavior. The work was contributed to several European research programs and was well recognized in the USA. Investigations on the corrosion of steels in non-saline solutions and corrosion under interim storage conditions as well as under the expected conditions of the Konrad repository for low-level radioactive wastes are also described. In addition, the experiments on ceramic materials are presented and the results of the corrosion of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Zr

  13. Corrosion experience in nuclear waste processing at Battelle Northwest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slate, S.C.; Maness, R.F.

    1976-11-01

    Emphasis is on corrosion as related to waste storage canister. Most work has been done in support of the In-Can Melter (ICM) vitrification system. It is assumed that the canister goes through the ICM process and is then stored in a water basin. The most severe corrosion effect seen is oxidation of stainless steel (SS) surfaces in contact with gases containing oxygen during processing. The processing temperature is near 1100 0 C and furnace atmosphere, used until now, has been air with unrestricted flow to the furnace. The oxidation rate at 1100 0 C is 15.8 g/cm 2 for 304L SS. Techniques for eliminating this corrosion currently being investigated include the use of different materials, such as Inconel 601, and the use of an inert cover gas. Corrosion due to the waste melt is not as rapid as the air oxidation. This effect has been studied extensively in connection with the development of a metallic crucible melter at Battelle. Data are available on the corrosion rates of several waste compositions in contact with various materials. Long-term compatibility tests between the melt and the metal have been run; it was found the corrosion rates due to the melt or its vapor do not pose a serious problem to the waste canister. However, these rates are high enough to preclude the practical use of a metallic melter. Interim water storage of the canister may be a problem if proper corrective measurements are not taken.The canister may be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) because it will be sensitized to some extent and it will be nearly stressed to yield. The most favorable solution to SCC involves minimizing canister sensitization and stress plus providing good water quality control. It has been recommended to keep the chlorine ion concentration below 1 ppM and the pH above 10. At these conditions no failures of 304L are predicted due to SCC. It is concluded that corrosion of a canister used during the In-Can Melter process and interim storage can be controlled

  14. Long Term Corrosion/Degradation Test Six Year Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. K. Adler Flitton; C. W. Bishop; M. E. Delwiche; T. S. Yoder

    2004-09-01

    The Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) contains neutron-activated metals from non-fuel, nuclear reactor core components. The Long-Term Corrosion/Degradation (LTCD) Test is designed to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements to the environment. The test is using two proven, industry-standard methods—direct corrosion testing using metal coupons, and monitored corrosion testing using electrical/resistance probes—to determine corrosion rates for various metal alloys generally representing the metals of interest buried at the SDA, including Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, Beryllium S200F, Aluminum 6061, Zircaloy-4, low-carbon steel, and Ferralium 255. In the direct testing, metal coupons are retrieved for corrosion evaluation after having been buried in SDA backfill soil and exposed to natural SDA environmental conditions for times ranging from one year to as many as 32 years, depending on research needs and funding availability. In the monitored testing, electrical/resistance probes buried in SDA backfill soil will provide corrosion data for the duration of the test or until the probes fail. This report provides an update describing the current status of the test and documents results to date. Data from the one-year and three-year results are also included, for comparison and evaluation of trends. In the six-year results, most metals being tested showed extremely low measurable rates of general corrosion. For Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, and Ferralium 255, corrosion rates fell in the range of “no reportable” to 0.0002 mils per year (MPY). Corrosion rates for Zircaloy-4 ranged from no measurable corrosion to 0.0001 MPY. These rates are two orders of magnitude lower than those specified in

  15. Study on Corrosion-induced Crack Initiation and Propagation of Sustaining Loaded RCbeams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, X. P.; Li, Y.; Yuan, C. B.; Yang, Z.; Chen, Y.

    2018-05-01

    For 13 pieces of reinforced concrete beams with HRB500 steel bars under long-term sustained loads, at time of corrosion-induced initial crack of concrete, and corrosion-induced crack widths of 0.3mm and 1mm, corrosion of steel bars and time-varying behavior of corrosion-induced crack width were studied by the ECWD (Electro-osmosis - constant Current – Wet and Dry cycles) accelerated corrosion method. The results show that when cover thickness was between 30 and 50mm,corrosion rates of steel bars were between 0.8% and 1.7% at time of corrosion-induced crack, and decreased with increasing concrete cover thickness; when corrosion-induced crack width was 0.3mm, the corrosion rate decreased with increasing steel bar diameter, and increased with increasing cover thickness; its corrosion rate varied between 0.98% and 4.54%; when corrosion-induced crack width reached 1mm, corrosion rate of steel bars was between 4% and 4.5%; when corrosion rate of steel bars was within 5%, the maximum and average corrosion-induced crack and corrosion rate of steel bars had a good linear relationship. The calculation model predicting the maximum and average width of corrosion-induced crack is given in this paper.

  16. A STUDY OF CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOOMER, K.D.

    2007-01-01

    The Hanford reservation Tank Farms in Washington State has 177 underground storage tanks that contain approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war plutonium production. These tanks will continue to store waste until it is treated and disposed. These nuclear wastes were converted to highly alkaline pH wastes to protect the carbon steel storage tanks from corrosion. However, the carbon steel is still susceptible to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. The waste chemistry varies from tank to tank, and contains various combinations of hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, chloride, carbonate, aluminate and other species. The effect of each of these species and any synergistic effects on localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of carbon steel have been investigated with electrochemical polarization, slow strain rate, and crack growth rate testing. The effect of solution chemistry, pH, temperature and applied potential are all considered and their role in the corrosion behavior will be discussed

  17. Real time corrosion monitoring in atmosphere using automated battery driven corrosion loggers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prosek, T.; Kouril, M.; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2008-01-01

    diminishes due to corrosion. Zinc, iron, copper and nickel sensors at several thicknesses are available. Sensitivity of the corrosion measurement varies from 1 to 10 nm depending on the type and thickness of the sensor. Changes in the air corrosivity can be thus detected within hours or even tens of minutes......A logger enabling continuous measurement of corrosion rate of selected metals in indoor and outdoor atmospheres has been developed. Principle of the measurement method is based on the increasing electrical resistance of a measuring element made of the material concerned as its cross-sectional area....... The logger lifetime in medium corrosive environments is designed to be 2 years with full autonomy. Data on the sensor corrosion rate are available any time through GPRS connection or by a non-contact inductive reading without the need of retracting the logger from the exposure site....

  18. Accelerated Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    Treaty Organization, Brussels, 1971), p. 449. 14. D. 0. Sprowls, T. J. Summerson, G. M. Ugianski, S. G. Epstein, and H. L. Craig , Jr., in Stress...National Association of Corrosion Engineers Houston, TX, 1972). 22. H. L. Craig , Jr. (ed.), Stress Corrosion-New Approaches, ASTM-STP- 610 (American...62. M. Hishida and H. Nakada, Corrosion 33 (11) 403 (1977). b3. D. C. Deegan and B. E. Wilde, Corrosion 34 (6), 19 (1978). 64. S. Orman, Corrosion Sci

  19. A Fundamental study of remedial technology development to prevent stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tubing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, In Gyu; Lee, Chang Soon [Sunmoon University, Asan (Korea)

    1998-04-01

    Most of the PWR Steam generators with tubes in Alloy 600 alloy are affected by Stress Corrosion Cracking, such as PWSCC(Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking) and ODSCC(Outside Diameter Stress Corrosion Cracking). This study was undertaken to establish the background for remedial technology development to prevent SCC. in the report are included the following topics: (1) General: (i) water chemistry related factors, (ii) Pourbaix(Potential-pH) Diagram, (iii) polarization plot, (iv) corrosion mode of Alloy 600, 690, and 800, (v) IGA/SCC growth rate, (vi) material suspetibility of IGA/SCC, (vii) carbon solubility of Alloy 600 (2) Microstructures of Alloy 600 MA, Alloy 600 TT, Alloy 600 SEN Alloy 690 TT(Optical, SEM, and TEM) (3) Influencing factors for PWSCC initiation rate of Alloy 600: (i) microstructure, (ii) water chemistry(B, Li), (iii) temperature, (iv) plastic deformation, (v) stress relief annealing (4) Influencing factors for PWSCC growth rate of Alloy 600: (i) water chemistry(B, Li), (ii) Scott Model, (iii) intergranular carbide, (iv) temperature, (v) hold time (5) Laboratory conditions for ODSCC initiation rate: 1% NaOH, 316 deg C; 1% NaOH, 343 deg C; 50% NaOH, 288 deg C; 10% NaOH, 302 deg C; 10% NaOH, 316 deg C; 50% NaOH, 343 deg C (6) Sludge effects for ODSCC initiation rate: CuO, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (7) Influencing factors for PWSCC growth rate of Alloy 600: (i) Caustic concentration effect, (ii) carbonate addition effect (8) Sulfate corrosion: (i) sulfate ratio and pH effect, (ii) wastage rate of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 (9) Crevice corrosion: (i) experimental setup for crevice corrosion, (ii) organic effect, (iii) (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + NaOH) effect (10) Remedial measures for SCC: (i) Inhibitors, (ii) ZnO effect. (author). 30 refs., 174 figs., 51 tabs.

  20. Low temperature corrosion in bark fuelled, small boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindau, Leif; Goldschmidt, Barbara

    2008-05-15

    A number of small (3-12 MW), new biofuel boiler plants in southern Sweden, and (at least) in Austria, have suffered a high (wastage of mm/yrs) corrosion rate on the low temperature boiler side. This problem has been investigated with respect to its occurrence and its character by contacts with operators, by plant inspections, and by analysis of cold-side deposits. The plants affected have low feed water temperatures (< 100 deg C). The plants fire most types of Swedish biofuel: chips, bark, hog fuel, and 'GROT' (=twigs and tops). The results found give basis for a hypothesis that the corrosion results from the presence of an aqueous phase in the deposits, this phase being stabilized by dissolved salts having high solubility. It then follows that for each salt, there is a critical relative humidity (calculated from the flue gas water partial pressure and the cooling surface temperature as is common practice among boiler engineers) for both the presence of the aqueous phase and the corrosion. Some critical single salts, ZnCl{sub 2} and CaCl{sub 2} have been identified, and they give critical 'relative humidities' of 5% and 18% respectively. These figures are a lower bound. The corresponding figure, derived from the practical experience and the reported plant operational data, is between 20 and 30%. Corrosion tests have been carried out by exposing an air-cooled probe in the flue gases at a 12 MW boiler at Saevelundsverket in Alingsaas, and the material wastage at different temperatures has been measured with a profilometer. The high corrosion rates were reproduced in the tests for high relative humidities. The corrosion rate was small and not measurable (<0.1 mm/year) for relative humidity <22%. The work shows by means of indirect evidence that the corrosion critical components are ZnCl{sub 2} and possibly CaCl{sub 2} as well. The practical engineering design criterion derived from the work is that the relative humidity (calculated from the flue

  1. Corrosion problems in PWR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, J.; Suery, P.

    1976-01-01

    Examinations on pulled steam generator tubes from the Swiss nuclear power plants Beznau I and II, together with some laboratory tests, may be summarized as follows: Corrosion problems in vertical U-tube steam generators with Alloy 600 as tube material are localized towards relatively narrow regions above the tube sheet where thermohydraulic conditions and, as a consequence thereof, chemical conditions are uncontrolled. Within these zones Alloy 600 is not sufficienthy resistent to caustic or phosphate attack (caustic stress corrosion cracking and general corrosion, resp.). The mechanisms of several corrosion phenomena are not fully understood. (orig.) [de

  2. Fighting corrosion in air pollution control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rittenhouse, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that materials is the name of the game for corrosion prevention in air pollution control equipment. Whether the system is already in place, a retrofit, are specified for a new power pant, preventing corrosion is critical, because such deterioration easily undermines reliability. Hence, materials can heavily influence power plant compliance to the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments. Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, perhaps the most vulnerable area to corrosion, are expected to be the method of choice for sulfur removal in many power plants in the near term. Components of these systems have various degrees of susceptibility to corrosion and related problems

  3. Kinetics of steel corrosion in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vettegren', V.I.; Bashkarev, A.Ya.; Danchukov, K.G.; Morozov, G.I.

    2003-01-01

    Kinetics of corrosion damage accumulation in steels of different composition (Cr-Ni-Mo-Ti, Cr-Ni-Mn-N-V, Cr-Ni-N-Mn-Mo, Cr-Ni-Nb, Cr-Ni-Ti, Cr-Mn-Ni, Mn-Al-Nb-Si, Mn-Cr-Al-Si and Mn-Al-Si) in NaCl solution and in sea water was studied. It is shown that degree of corrosion damage relates to time according to the first order reaction expression. The values of corrosion activation energy and of parameter characterizing protection properties of corrosion film are determined [ru

  4. Graphene: corrosion-inhibiting coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasai, Dhiraj; Tuberquia, Juan Carlos; Harl, Robert R; Jennings, G Kane; Rogers, Bridget R; Bolotin, Kirill I

    2012-02-28

    We report the use of atomically thin layers of graphene as a protective coating that inhibits corrosion of underlying metals. Here, we employ electrochemical methods to study the corrosion inhibition of copper and nickel by either growing graphene on these metals, or by mechanically transferring multilayer graphene onto them. Cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that the graphene coating effectively suppresses metal oxidation and oxygen reduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements suggest that while graphene itself is not damaged, the metal under it is corroded at cracks in the graphene film. Finally, we use Tafel analysis to quantify the corrosion rates of samples with and without graphene coatings. These results indicate that copper films coated with graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition are corroded 7 times slower in an aerated Na(2)SO(4) solution as compared to the corrosion rate of bare copper. Tafel analysis reveals that nickel with a multilayer graphene film grown on it corrodes 20 times slower while nickel surfaces coated with four layers of mechanically transferred graphene corrode 4 times slower than bare nickel. These findings establish graphene as the thinnest known corrosion-protecting coating.

  5. Corrosion of High Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in High Temperature Water. a Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steels in high temperature water has been reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS) are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. The data on general corrosion indicate moderate corrosion rates in high temperature water up to 350 degree centigree. Considerably larger corrosion rates were observed under neutron irradiation. The works concerning to the behaviour of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking seem to conclude that in these materials is necessary to optimize the temper temperature and to carry out the post-weld heat treatments properly in order to avoid stress corrosion cracking. (Author) 40 refs.

  6. Corrosion of High Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in High Temperature Water. a Literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F.

    2000-01-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steels in high temperature water has been reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS) are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. The data on general corrosion indicate moderate corrosion rates in high temperature water up to 350 degree centigrade. Considerably larger corrosion rates were observed under neutron irradiation. The works concerning to the behaviour of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking seem to conclude that in these materials is necessary to optimize the temper temperature and to carry out the post-weld heat treatments properly in order to avoid stress corrosion cracking. (Author) 40 refs

  7. Corrosion probe. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-05-01

    Over 253 million liters of high-level waste (HLW) generated from plutonium production is stored in mild steel tanks at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. Corrosion monitoring of double-shell storage tanks (DSTs) is currently performed at Hanford using a combination of process knowledge and tank waste sampling and analysis. Available technologies for corrosion monitoring have progressed to a point where it is feasible to monitor and control corrosion by on-line monitoring of the corrosion process and direct addition of corrosion inhibitors. The electrochemical noise (EN) technique deploys EN-based corrosion monitoring probes into storage tanks. This system is specifically designed to measure corrosion rates and detect changes in waste chemistry that trigger the onset of pitting and cracking. These on-line probes can determine whether additional corrosion inhibitor is required and, if so, provide information on an effective end point to the corrosion inhibitor addition procedure. This report describes the technology, its performance, its application, costs, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned

  8. Predicting concrete corrosion of sewers using artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guangming; Keller, Jurg; Bond, Philip L; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion is often a major failure mechanism for concrete sewers and under such circumstances the sewer service life is largely determined by the progression of microbially induced concrete corrosion. The modelling of sewer processes has become possible due to the improved understanding of in-sewer transformation. Recent systematic studies about the correlation between the corrosion processes and sewer environment factors should be utilized to improve the prediction capability of service life by sewer models. This paper presents an artificial neural network (ANN)-based approach for modelling the concrete corrosion processes in sewers. The approach included predicting the time for the corrosion to initiate and then predicting the corrosion rate after the initiation period. The ANN model was trained and validated with long-term (4.5 years) corrosion data obtained in laboratory corrosion chambers, and further verified with field measurements in real sewers across Australia. The trained model estimated the corrosion initiation time and corrosion rates very close to those measured in Australian sewers. The ANN model performed better than a multiple regression model also developed on the same dataset. Additionally, the ANN model can serve as a prediction framework for sewer service life, which can be progressively improved and expanded by including corrosion rates measured in different sewer conditions. Furthermore, the proposed methodology holds promise to facilitate the construction of analytical models associated with corrosion processes of concrete sewers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Corrosion investigations of high-alloyed steels carried out in different marine area organized by European Federation of Corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birn, J.; Skalski, I.

    1999-01-01

    Research works arranged by EFC Working Party on Marine Corrosion are described. The research was performed in sea areas of Norway, Finland, Sweden, France, Italy, Poland and Netherlands. Subjected to test were three corrosion resistant steel grades; 316, 904 and UNS S 31524. Two corrosion tests were carried out in the years 1993 and 1994 each of min. 6 month duration. The results show that chemical composition of water at salinity level of more than 0.7% has not great effect on corrosion aggressivity in relation to corrosion resistant steels. On the other hand temperature of sea water has great influence on corrosion process. (author)

  10. Magnesium and its alloys as degradable biomaterials: corrosion studies using potentiodynamic and EIS electrochemical techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Dieter Müller

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is potentially useful for orthopaedic and cardiovascular applications. However, the corrosion rate of this metal is so high that its degradation occurs before the end of the healing process. In industrial media the behaviour of several magnesium alloys have been probed to be better than magnesium performance. However, the information related to their corrosion behaviour in biological media is insufficient. The aim of this work is to study the influence of the components of organic fluids on the corrosion behaviour of Mg and AZ31 and LAE442 alloys using potentiodynamic, potentiostatic and EIS techniques. Results showed localized attack in chloride containing media. The breakdown potential decreased when chloride concentration increased. The potential range of the passivation region was extended in the presence of albumin. EIS measurements showed that the corrosion behaviour of the AZ31 was very different from that of LAE442 alloy in chloride solutions.

  11. Corrosion inhibition of Armco iron by 2-mercaptobenzimidazole in sodium chloride 3% media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amar, H.; Tounsi, A.; Makayssi, A.; Derja, A.; Benzakour, J.; Outzourhit, A.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (2MBI) on the corrosion of Armco iron in NaCl media has been investigated in relation to the concentration of the inhibitor by various corrosion monitoring techniques. Surface morphology was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results obtained revealed that 2MBI is a good anodic inhibitor. The addition of increasing concentrations of 2MBI moves the corrosion potential towards positive values and reduces the corrosion rate. EIS results show that the changes in the impedance parameters (R t and C dl ) with concentrations of 2MBI is indicative of the adsorption of these molecules leading to the formation of a protective layer on iron surface. The adsorption of this compound is also found to obey Langmuir's adsorption isotherm in NaCl

  12. Corrosion behaviour of Mg/Al alloys in high humidity atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrabal, R.; Pardo, A.; Merino, M.C.; Mohedano, M.; Casajus, P. [Facultad de Quimicas, Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Merino, S. [Departamento de Tecnologia Industrial, Universidad Alfonso X El Sabio, Villanueva de la Canada, 28691 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-04-15

    The influence of relative humidity (80-90-98% RH) and temperature (25 and 50 C) on the corrosion behaviour of AZ31, AZ80 and AZ91D magnesium alloys was evaluated using gravimetric measurements. The results were compared with the data obtained for the same alloys immersed in Madrid tap water. The corrosion rates of AZ alloys increased with the RH and temperature and were influenced by the aluminium content and alloy microstructure for RH values above 90%. The initiation of corrosion was localised around the Al-Mn inclusions in the AZ31 alloy and at the centre of the {alpha}-Mg phase in the AZ80 and AZ91D alloys. The {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase acted as a barrier against corrosion. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Investigation of in-pile grown corrosion films on zirconium-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebhardt, O.; Hermann, A.; Bart, G.; Blank, H.; Ray, I.L.F.

    1996-01-01

    In-pile grown corrosion films on different fuel rod claddings (standard Zircaloy-4, extra low tin Zircaloy (ELS), and Zr2.5Nb) have been studied using a variety of experimental techniques. The aim of the investigations was to find out common features and differences between the corrosion layers grown on zirconium alloys having different composition. Methods applied were scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and electrochemical anodization. The morphological differences have been observed between the specimens that could explain the irradiation enhancement of corrosion of Zircaloy-4. The features of the compact oxide close to the oxide/metal interface have been characterized by electrochemical methods. The relationship between the thickness of this protective oxide and the overall oxide thickness has been investigated by EIS. It was found that this relation is dependent on the location of the oxide along the fuel rod and on the corrosion rate

  14. High Temperature Corrosion in Biomass-Fired Boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels; Montgomery, Melanie; Hede Larsen, Ole

    2002-01-01

    condense on superheater components. This gives rise to specific corrosion problems not previously encountered in coal-fired power plants. The type of corrosion attack can be directly ascribed to the composition of the deposit and the metal surface temperature. To avoid such high corrosion rates, woodchip...... has also been utilised as a fuel. Combustion of woodchip results in a smaller amount of ash, and potassium and chlorine are present in lesser amounts. However, significant corrosion rates were still seen. A case study of a woodchip fired boiler is described. The corrosion mechanisms in both straw-fired...... and woodchip fired boilers are discussed....

  15. Corrosion of carbon steel in oxidizing caustic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divine, J.R.; Bowen, W.M.

    1984-01-01

    A series of tests have been completed on a range of proposed waste compositions at temperatures up to 100 0 C. These tests have sought data on uniform corrosion, pitting, and stress corrosion cracking. No indication of the latter two types of corrosion was observed within the test matrix. Corrosion rates after four months were generally below 25μm/y. By the end of twelve months all results, except for very concentrated mixtures, were below 13 μm/y. Prediction equations were generated from a model fitted to the data. The equations provide a rapid means of estimating the corrosion rate for waste compositions and temperatures within the test limits

  16. Corrosion of the copper canister in the repository environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermansson, H.P.; Eriksson, Sture [Studsvik Material AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    The present report accounts for studies on copper corrosion performed at Studsvik Material AB during 1997-1999 on commission by SKI. The work has been focused on localised corrosion and electrochemistry of copper in the repository environment. The current theory of localised copper corrosion is not consistent with recent practical experiences. It is therefore desired to complete and develop the theory based on knowledge about the repository environment and evaluations of previous as well as recent experimental and field results. The work has therefore comprised a thorough compilation and up-date of literature on copper corrosion and on the repository environment. A selection of a 'working environment', defining the chemical parameters and their ranges of variation has been made and is used as a fundament for the experimental part of the work. Experiments have then been performed on the long-range electrochemical behaviour of copper in selected environments simulating the repository. Another part of the work has been to further develop knowledge about the thermodynamic limits for corrosion in the repository environment. Some of the thermodynamic work is integrated here. Especially thermodynamics for the system Cu-Cl-H-O up to 150 deg C and high chloride concentrations are outlined. However, there is also a rough overview of the whole system Cu-Fe-Cl-S-C-H-O as a fundament for the discussion. Data are normally accounted as Pourbaix diagrams. Some of the conclusions are that general corrosion on copper will probably not be of significant importance in the repository as far as transportation rates are low. However, if such rates were high, general corrosion could be disastrous, as there is no passivation of copper in the highly saline environment. The claim on knowledge of different kinds of localised corrosion and pitting is high, as pitting damages can shorten the lifetime of a canister dramatically. Normal pitting can happen in oxidising environment, but

  17. Corrosion of the copper canister in the repository environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansson, H.P.; Eriksson, Sture

    1999-12-01

    The present report accounts for studies on copper corrosion performed at Studsvik Material AB during 1997-1999 on commission by SKI. The work has been focused on localised corrosion and electrochemistry of copper in the repository environment. The current theory of localised copper corrosion is not consistent with recent practical experiences. It is therefore desired to complete and develop the theory based on knowledge about the repository environment and evaluations of previous as well as recent experimental and field results. The work has therefore comprised a thorough compilation and up-date of literature on copper corrosion and on the repository environment. A selection of a 'working environment', defining the chemical parameters and their ranges of variation has been made and is used as a fundament for the experimental part of the work. Experiments have then been performed on the long-range electrochemical behaviour of copper in selected environments simulating the repository. Another part of the work has been to further develop knowledge about the thermodynamic limits for corrosion in the repository environment. Some of the thermodynamic work is integrated here. Especially thermodynamics for the system Cu-Cl-H-O up to 150 deg C and high chloride concentrations are outlined. However, there is also a rough overview of the whole system Cu-Fe-Cl-S-C-H-O as a fundament for the discussion. Data are normally accounted as Pourbaix diagrams. Some of the conclusions are that general corrosion on copper will probably not be of significant importance in the repository as far as transportation rates are low. However, if such rates were high, general corrosion could be disastrous, as there is no passivation of copper in the highly saline environment. The claim on knowledge of different kinds of localised corrosion and pitting is high, as pitting damages can shorten the lifetime of a canister dramatically. Normal pitting can happen in oxidising environment, but there is

  18. Advanced modelling of concrete deterioration due to reinforcement corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isgor, O.B.; Razaqpur, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive model is presented for predicting the rate of steel corrosion in concrete structures and the consequent formation and propagation of cracks around the steel reinforcement. The corrosion model considers both the initiation and the propagation stages of corrosion. Processes commencing in the initiation stage, such as the transport of chloride ions and oxygen within the concrete and variation in temperature and moisture, are assumed to continue in the propagation stage while active corrosion is occurring contemporaneously. This allows the model to include the effects of changes in exposure conditions on the corrosion rate and the effects of the corrosion reactions on the transport properties of concrete. The corrosion rates are calculated by applying the finite-element solution of the Laplace equation for electrochemical potential, with appropriate boundary conditions. Because these boundary conditions are nonlinear, a nonlinear solution algorithm is used. The results of the analysis are compared with available test data, and the comparison is found to be satisfactory. (author)

  19. Microbiologically influenced corrosion in ship ballast tanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heyer, A.

    2013-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is known to be a dangerous process in ship tanks due to its rapid and yet unpredictable occurrence, leading to extremely fast local corrosion, possibly jeopardizing the structural integrity, in a relatively short time. This project focuses on a

  20. 49 CFR 193.2625 - Corrosion protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Corrosion protection. 193.2625 Section 193.2625 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2625 Corrosion protection. (a) Each operator shall determine...

  1. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses

  2. Internal corrosion control of northern pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papavinasam, S.

    2005-02-01

    The general causes of internal corrosion in pipelines were discussed along with the methods to control them. Efficient methods are needed to determine chemical efficiency for mitigating internal corrosion in transmission pipelines, particularly those used in environmentally sensitive regions in the Arctic where harsh environmental conditions prevail. According to the Office of Pipeline Safety, 15 per cent of pipeline failures in the United States from 1994 to 2000 were caused by internal corrosion. Since pipelines in the United States are slightly older than Canadian pipelines, internal corrosion is a significant issue from a Canadian perspective. There are 306,618 km of energy-related pipelines in western Canada. Between April 2001 and March 2002 there were 808 failures, of which 425 failures resulted from internal corrosion. The approach to control internal corrosion comprises of dehydrating the gases at production facilities; controlling the quality of corrosive gases such as carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulphide; and, using internal coatings. The approaches to control internal corrosion are appropriate, when supplemented by adequate integrity management program to ensure that corrosive liquids do not collect, over the operational lifetime of the pipelines, at localized areas. It was suggested that modeling of pipeline operations may need improvement. This paper described the causes, prediction and control of internal pitting corrosion. It was concluded that carbon steel equipment can continue to be used reliably and safely as pipeline materials for northern pipelines if the causes that lead to internal corrosion are scientifically and accurately predicted, and if corrosion inhibitors are properly evaluated and applied. 5 figs.

  3. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-06

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

  4. Plant applications of online corrosion monitoring: CO2 capture amine plant case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kane, R.D.; Srinivasan, S.; Khakharia, P.M.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; Mertens, J.; Vroey, S. de

    2015-01-01

    Over the past several years, there has been a significant effort to bring corrosion monitoring into the realm of online, real-time management with plant process control technology. As part of this new direction in corrosion monitoring, corrosion data (e.g. information on corrosion rate, measured

  5. Analytical model for time to cover cracking in RC structures due to rebar corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhargava, Kapilesh; Ghosh, A.K.; Mori, Yasuhiro; Ramanujam, S.

    2006-01-01

    The structural degradation of concrete structures due to reinforcement corrosion is a major worldwide problem. Reinforcement corrosion causes a volume increase due to the oxidation of metallic iron, which is mainly responsible for exerting the expansive radial pressure at the steel-concrete interface and development of hoop tensile stresses in the surrounding concrete. Cracking occurs, once the maximum hoop tensile stress exceeds the tensile strength of the concrete. The cracking begins at the steel-concrete interface and propagates outwards and eventually results in the thorough cracking of the cover concrete and this would indicate the loss of service life for the corrosion affected structures. An analytical model is proposed to predict the time required for cover cracking and the weight loss of reinforcing bar in corrosion affected reinforced concrete structures. The modelling aspects of the residual strength of cracked concrete and the stiffness contribution from the combination of reinforcement and expansive corrosion products have also been incorporated in the model. The problem is modeled as a boundary value problem and the governing equations are expressed in terms of the radial displacement. The analytical solutions are presented considering a simple two-zone model for the cover concrete, viz. cracked or uncracked. Reasonable estimation of the various parameters in the model related to the composition and properties of expansive corrosion products based on the available published experimental data has also been discussed. The performance of the proposed corrosion cracking model is then investigated through its ability to reproduce available experimental trends. Reasonably good agreement between experimental results and the analytical predictions has been obtained. It has also been found that tensile strength and initial tangent modulus of cover concrete, annual mean corrosion rate and modulus of elasticity of reinforcement plus corrosion products combined

  6. Emerging Corrosion Inhibitors for Interfacial Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Taghavikish

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion is a deterioration of a metal due to reaction with environment. The use of corrosion inhibitors is one of the most effective ways of protecting metal surfaces against corrosion. Their effectiveness is related to the chemical composition, their molecular structures and affinities for adsorption on the metal surface. This review focuses on the potential of ionic liquid, polyionic liquid (PIL and graphene as promising corrosion inhibitors in emerging coatings due to their remarkable properties and various embedment or fabrication strategies. The review begins with a precise description of the synthesis, characterization and structure-property-performance relationship of such inhibitors for anti-corrosion coatings. It establishes a platform for the formation of new generation of PIL based coatings and shows that PIL corrosion inhibitors with various heteroatoms in different form can be employed for corrosion protection with higher barrier properties and protection of metal surface. However, such study is still in its infancy and there is significant scope to further develop new structures of PIL based corrosion inhibitors and coatings and study their behaviour in protection of metals. Besides, it is identified that the combination of ionic liquid, PIL and graphene could possibly contribute to the development of the ultimate corrosion inhibitor based coating.

  7. Intergranular attack observed in radiation-enhanced corrosion of mild steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reda, R.J.; Kelly, J.L.; Harna, S.L.A.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of gamma radiation on the corrosion of AISI 1018 mild steel in deaerated brine solutions of various sodium, magnesium, and chloride ion concentrations. Immersed metal specimens were irradiated at an exposure rate of 3 x 10/sup 5/ R/h (0.3 MR/h) for up to 1250 h at a temperature of --25 C. The corrosion rates of the irradiated specimens were found to be roughly a factor of 10 greater than the rates for the non-irradiated specimens. The radiation-enhanced corrosion rate was also found to have increased with the chloride concentration. Electron micrographs revealed that the surface morphology of the specimens exposed to irradiated brines differed greatly from the non-irradiated specimens. The non-irradiated specimens had undergone uniform corrosion, while the irradiated specimens exhibited intergranular corrosion (IGC), a phenomenon not yet observed in mild steel. An explanation for this observation is offered in terms of the relative rates of formation and recombination of radiolytic species

  8. Stochastic process corrosion growth models for pipeline reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazán, Felipe Alexander Vargas; Beck, André Teófilo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Novel non-linear stochastic process corrosion growth model is proposed. •Corrosion rate modeled as random Poisson pulses. •Time to corrosion initiation and inherent time-variability properly represented. •Continuous corrosion growth histories obtained. •Model is shown to precisely fit actual corrosion data at two time points. -- Abstract: Linear random variable corrosion models are extensively employed in reliability analysis of pipelines. However, linear models grossly neglect well-known characteristics of the corrosion process. Herein, a non-linear model is proposed, where corrosion rate is represented as a Poisson square wave process. The resulting model represents inherent time-variability of corrosion growth, produces continuous growth and leads to mean growth at less-than-one power of time. Different corrosion models are adjusted to the same set of actual corrosion data for two inspections. The proposed non-linear random process corrosion growth model leads to the best fit to the data, while better representing problem physics

  9. A new corrosion monitoring technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Gerald K.

    2000-01-01

    Internal Corrosion Monitoring has relied upon 5 basic techniques. Little improvement in performance has been achieved in any of these. Many newer internal corrosion monitoring techniques have proved of little value in the field although some have instances of success in the laboratory. Industry has many high value hydrocarbon applications requiring corrosion rate monitoring for real-time problem solving and control. The high value of assets and the cost of asset replacement makes it necessary to practice cost effective process and corrosion control with sensitivity beyond the 5 basic techniques. This new metal loss technology offers this sensitivity. Traditional metal loss technology today provides either high sensitivity with short life, or conversely, long life but with substantially reduced sensitivity. The new metal loss technology offers an improved working life of sensors without significantly compromising performance. The paper discusses the limitations of existing on-line technologies and describes the performance of a new technology. This new metal loss technology was introduced at NACE Corrosion 99'. Since that time several field projects have been completed or are ongoing. This paper will discuss the new metal loss technology and report on some of the data that has been obtained.(author)

  10. Role and efforts of T3C in corrosion economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrigo, L.D.; Appleman, B.R.; Pamer, R.I.; Thompson, J.L.

    1979-11-01

    The basic purpose of T3C activity is to show how to acquire specific corrosion cost information so that overall costs for doing business can be reduced. The scope of T3C is to accumulate data, appraise methods, develop recommended practices, promote knowledge and communicate relative to the economic evaluation of corrosion and counter corrosion techniques

  11. Some observations on phosphate based corrosion inhibitors in preventing carbon steel corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anupkumar, B.; Satpathy, K.K.

    2000-01-01

    Among the various types of phosphonic acid based inhibitors assayed, namely HEDP, ATMP and a commercial corrosion inhibitor (code named Betz), it was found that Betz has the maximum amount of organic phosphate followed by HEDP and ATMP. The corrosion rate studies show that Betz gives the highest inhibition efficiency followed by HEDP and ATMP. This shows that organic phosphate plays a significant role in corrosion protection. However, it was observed that due to synergestic effect, HEDP in the presence of Zn 2+ gave a better corrosion protection than Betz. The results are discussed in the light of available literature. (author)

  12. Review of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) applied to corrosion monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabbutt, S; Picton, P; Shaw, P; Black, S

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of corrosion within an engineering system often forms an important aspect of condition monitoring but it is a parameter that is inherently difficult to measure and predict. The electrochemical nature of the corrosion process allows precise measurements to be made. Advances in instruments, techniques and software have resulted in devices that can gather data and perform various analysis routines that provide parameters to identify corrosion type and corrosion rate. Although corrosion rates are important they are only useful where general or uniform corrosion dominates. However, pitting, inter-granular corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking (stress corrosion) are examples of corrosion mechanisms that can be dangerous and virtually invisible to the naked eye. Electrochemical noise (EN) monitoring is a very useful technique for detecting these types of corrosion and it is the only non-invasive electrochemical corrosion monitoring technique commonly available. Modern instrumentation is extremely sensitive to changes in the system and new experimental configurations for gathering EN data have been proven. In this paper the identification of localised corrosion by different data analysis routines has been reviewed. In particular the application of Artificial Neural Network (ANN) analysis to corrosion data is of key interest. In most instances data needs to be used with conventional theory to obtain meaningful information and relies on expert interpretation. Recently work has been carried out using artificial neural networks to investigate various types of corrosion data in attempts to predict corrosion behaviour with some success. This work aims to extend this earlier work to identify reliable electrochemical indicators of localised corrosion onset and propagation stages.

  13. An electrochemical study of the corrosion behavior of primer coated 2219-T87 aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.; Higgins, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The corrosion behavior for 2219-T87 aluminum coated with various primers, including those used for the external tank and solid rocket boosters of the Space Shuttle Transportation System, were investigated using electrochemical techniques. Corrosion potential time, polarization resistance time, electrical resistance time, and corrosion rate time measurements were all investigated. It was found that electrical resistance time and corrosion rate time measurement were most useful for studying the corrosion behavior of painted aluminum. Electrical resistance time determination give useful information concerning the porosity of paint films, while corrosion rate time curves give important information concerning overall corrosion rates and corrosion mechanisms. In general, the corrosion rate time curves all exhibited at least one peak during the 30 day test period, which was attributed, according to the proposed mechanisms, to the onset of the hydrogen evolution reaction and the beginning of destruction of the protective properties of the paint film.

  14. An overview of erosion corrosion models and reliability assessment for corrosion defects in piping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srividya, A.; Suresh, H.N.; Verma, A.K.; Gopika, V.; Santosh

    2006-01-01

    Piping systems are part of passive structural elements in power plants. The analysis of the piping systems and their quantification in terms of failure probability is of utmost importance. The piping systems may fail due to various degradation mechanisms like thermal fatigue, erosion-corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and vibration fatigue. On examination of previous results, erosion corrosion was more prevalent and wall thinning is a time dependent phenomenon. The paper is intended to consolidate the work done by various investigators on erosion corrosion in estimating the erosion corrosion rate and reliability predictions. A comparison of various erosion corrosion models is made. The reliability predictions based on remaining strength of corroded pipelines by wall thinning is also attempted. Variables in the limit state functions are modelled using normal distributions and Reliability assessment is carried out using some of the existing failure pressure models. A steady state corrosion rate is assumed to estimate the corrosion defect and First Order Reliability Method (FORM) is used to find the probability of failure associated with corrosion defects over time using the software for Component Reliability evaluation (COMREL). (author)

  15. Electrochemical evaluation of under-deposit corrosion and its inhibition using the wire beam electrode method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan Yongjun, E-mail: yj.tan@curtin.edu.a [Western Australian Corrosion Research Group, Department of Chemistry, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth (Australia); Fwu, Young; Bhardwaj, Kriti [Western Australian Corrosion Research Group, Department of Chemistry, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth (Australia)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: A new experiment method for evaluating under-deposit corrosion and its inhibitors. Under-deposit corrosion did not occur in a CO{sub 2} saturated pure brine solution. Inhibitor imidazoline addition and O{sub 2} contamination initiated under-deposit corrosion. Inhibitor imidazoline reduced general corrosion but enhanced localised corrosion. - Abstract: A new experimental method has been applied to evaluate under-deposit corrosion and its inhibition by means of an electrochemically integrated multi-electrode array, namely the wire beam electrode (WBE). Maps showing galvanic current and corrosion potential distributions were measured from a WBE surface that was partially covered by sand. Under-deposit corrosion did not occur during the exposure of the WBE to carbon dioxide saturated brine under ambient temperature. The introduction of corrosion inhibitor imidazoline and oxygen into the brine was found to significantly affect the patterns and rates of corrosion, leading to the initiation of under-deposit corrosion over the WBE.

  16. Study on influence of native oxide and corrosion products on atmospheric corrosion of pure Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yanjie; Wang, Zhenyao; Ke, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Corrosion products layer is only formed in coastal atmosphere. •In coastal atmosphere, rate controlling step is diffusion process. •In rural atmosphere, rate controlling step is charge transfer process. •Pitting area increases greatly in coastal site, but slightly in rural site. -- Abstract: Effects of native oxide and corrosion products on atmospheric corrosion of aluminium in rural and coastal sites were studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), open-circuit potential (OCP) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques after outdoor exposure. In the rural atmosphere, only the compact, adhesive native oxide layer exists, and the rate controlling step is diffusion process, while in the coastal atmosphere, another loose, inadhesive corrosion products layer exists, and a charge transfer process controls the corrosion process. The pitting area in the coastal atmosphere increases over time more obviously than that in the rural atmosphere

  17. Effects of chemical composition on the corrosion of dental alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galo, Rodrigo; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira; Rocha, Luís Augusto; de Mattos, Maria da Glória Chiarello

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the oral environment on the corrosion of dental alloys with different compositions, using electrochemical methods. The corrosion rates were obtained from the current-potential curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The effect of artificial saliva on the corrosion of dental alloys was dependent on alloy composition. Dissolution of the ions occurred in all tested dental alloys and the results were strongly dependent on the general alloy composition. Regarding the alloys containing nickel, the Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr-Ti alloys released 0.62 mg/L of Ni on average, while the Co-Cr dental alloy released ions between 0.01 and 0.03 mg/L of Co and Cr, respectively.The open-circuit potential stabilized at a higher level with lower deviation (standard deviation: Ni-Cr-6Ti = 32 mV/SCE and Co-Cr = 54 mV/SCE). The potenciodynamic curves of the dental alloys showed that the Ni-based dental alloy with >70 wt% of Ni had a similar curve and the Co-Cr dental alloy showed a low current density and hence a high resistance to corrosion compared with the Ni-based dental alloys. Some changes in microstructure were observed and this fact influenced the corrosion behavior for the alloys. The lower corrosion resistance also led to greater release of nickel ions to the medium. The quantity of Co ions released from the Co-Cr-Mo alloy was relatively small in the solutions. In addition, the quantity of Cr ions released into the artificial saliva from the Co-Cr alloy was lower than Cr release from the Ni-based dental alloys.

  18. Corrosion in waste incineration facilities; Korrosion i avfallsfoerbraenningsanlaeggningar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staalenheim, Annika; Henderson, Pamela

    2004-11-01

    Waste is a heterogeneous fuel, often with high levels of chlorine, alkali and heavy metals. This leads to much more severe corrosion problems than combustion of fossil fuels. The corrosion rates of the materials used can be extremely high. Materials used for heat transferring parts are usually carbon steel or low alloyed steel. These are significantly cheaper than other steels. Austenitic stainless steel is also used, but is often avoided due to its sensitivity to stress corrosion cracking. More advanced materials, such as nickel base alloys, can be used in extremely aggressive environments. Since these materials are expensive and do not always have sufficient mechanical properties, they are often used as coatings on carbon steel tubes or as composite tubes. A new method, which shows good results at the first tests in plants, is electroplating with nickel. Plastic materials can be used in low temperature parts if the temperature does not exceed 150 deg C. A glass fibre inforced material is probably the best choice. The parts of the furnace that are most prone to corrosion are waterwalls where the refractory coating is lost, has not been applied to a sufficient height in the boiler or is not used at all. Failures of superheaters often occur in areas near soot blowers or on the tubes exposed to the highest flue gas temperatures. Few cases of low temperature corrosion are reported in the literature, possibly because these problems are unusual or because low temperature corrosion rarely causes costly and dramatic failures. Waterwall tubes should be made of carbon steel, because of the price and to minimise the risk for stress corrosion cracking. Usually the tubes must be covered with a more corrosion resistant material to withstand the environment in the boiler. Metal coatings can be used in less demanding environments. Refractory is probably the best protection for waterwalls from severe erosion. Surfaces in extremely corrosive areas, e.g. the fuel feed area, should

  19. The corrosion and corrosion mechanical properties evaluation for the LBB concept in VVERs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruscak, M.; Chvatal, P.; Karnik, D.

    1997-04-01

    One of the conditions required for Leak Before Break application is the verification that the influence of corrosion environment on the material of the component can be neglected. Both the general corrosion and/or the initiation and, growth of corrosion-mechanical cracks must not cause the degradation. The primary piping in the VVER nuclear power plant is made from austenitic steels (VVER 440) and low alloy steels protected with the austenitic cladding (VVER 1000). Inspection of the base metal and heterogeneous weldments from the VVER 440 showed that the crack growth rates are below 10 m/s if a low oxygen level is kept in the primary environment. No intergranular cracking was observed in low and high oxygen water after any type of testing, with constant or periodic loading. In the framework of the LBB assessment of the VVER 1000, the corrosion and corrosion mechanical properties were also evaluated. The corrosion and corrosion mechanical testing was oriented predominantly to three types of tests: stress corrosion cracking tests corrosion fatigue tests evaluation of the resistance against corrosion damage. In this paper, the methods used for these tests are described and the materials are compared from the point of view of response on static and periodic mechanical stress on the low alloyed steel 10GN2WA and weld metal exposed in the primary circuit environment. The slow strain rate tests and static loading of both C-rings and CT specimens were performed in order to assess the stress corrosion cracking characteristics. Cyclic loading of CT specimens was done to evaluate the kinetics of the crack growth under periodical loading. Results are shown to illustrate the approaches used. The data obtained were evaluated also from the point of view of comparison of the influence of different structure on the stress corrosion cracking appearance. The results obtained for the base metal and weld metal of the piping are presented here.

  20. Corrosion of mild steel, copper and brass in crude oil / seawater mixture

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrabhaDevi, S.; Sawant, S.S.; Wagh, A.B.

    Mild steel, copper and brass coupons were introduced in natural seawater containing varying amount of crude oil. Mild steel showed higher rate of corrosion in seawater containing oil and lower corrosion rate in natural as well as artificial seawater...

  1. Fuel corrosion processes under waste disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoesmith, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    The release of the majority of radionuclides from spent nuclear fuel under permanent disposal conditions will be controlled by the rate of dissolution of the UO 2 fuel matrix. In this manuscript the mechanism of the coupled anodic (fuel dissolution) and cathodic (oxidant reduction) reactions which constitute the overall fuel corrosion process is reviewed, and the many published observations on fuel corrosion under disposal conditions discussed. The primary emphasis is on summarizing the overall mechanistic behaviour and establishing the primary factors likely to control fuel corrosion. Included are discussions on the influence of various oxidants including radiolytic ones, pH, temperature, groundwater composition, and the formation of corrosion product deposits. The relevance of the data recorded on unirradiated UO 2 to the interpretation of spent fuel behaviour is included. Based on the review, the data used to develop fuel corrosion models under the conditions anticipated in Yucca Mountain (NV, USA) are evaluated

  2. Stress corrosion of low alloy steel forgings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, D.V.; Mould, P.B.; Patrick, E.C.

    1976-01-01

    The catastrophic failure of a steam turbine rotor disc at Hinkley Point 'A' Power station was shown to have been caused by the growth of a stress corrosion crack to critical dimensions. This failure has promoted great interest in the stress corrosion susceptibility of medium strength low alloy steel forgings in steam environments. Consequently, initiation and growth of stress corrosion cracks of typical disc steels have been investigated in steam and also in water at 95 0 C. Cracking has been shown to occur, predominantly in an intergranular manner, with growth rates of between 10 -9 and 10 -7 mm sec. -1 . It is observed that corrosion pitting and oxide penetration prior to the establishment of a stress corrosion crack in the plain samples. (author)

  3. Water side corrosion prevention in boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeid, A.

    1993-01-01

    Corrosion may be defined as a naturally occurring physical and chemical deterioration of a material due to reaction with the environment or surrounding atmosphere. In boilers the material is subjected on both sides to two different media which may cause severe corrosion. At the water side the content of O 2 considered one of the principal factors which determine the extent of corrosion in the boiler tubes. This paper deals with certain conditions that result in the increase of O 2 in the boiler water and hence increase the corrosion rate, to minimize the effect of these conditions a chemical treatment was carried out the results obtained indicated the success of the treatment procedure in corrosion prevention and boiler material protection. The treatment is traditional. But the study indicates how a simple mean could be applied to solve a serious problem. 4 tab

  4. Corrosion of carbon steel under waste disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, G.

    1990-01-01

    The corrosion of carbon steel has been studied in the United Kingdom under granitic groundwater conditions, with pH between 5 and 10 and possibly substantial amounts of Cl - , SO 4 2- and HCO 3 - /CO 3 2- . Corrosion modes considered include uniform corrosion under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions; passive corrosion; localized attack in the form of pitting or crevice corrosion; and environmentally assisted cracking - hydrogen embrittlement or stress corrosion cracking. Studies of these processes are being carried out in order to predict the metal thicknesses required to give container lifetimes of 500 to 1000 years. A simple uniform corrosion model predicts a corrosion rate of around 13.4 μm/a at 20C, rising to 69 μm/a at 50C and 208 μm/a at 90C. A radiation dose of 10 5 rad/h and a G-value of 2.8 for the production of oxidizing species would account for an increase in corrosion rate of 7 μm/a. This model overestimates slightly the results actually achieved for experimental samples exposed for two years, the difference being due to a protective film formed on the samples. These corrosion rates predict that the container must be 227 mm thick to withstand uniform corrosion; however, they predict very high levels of hydrogen production. Conditions will be favourable for localized or pitting corrosion for about 125 years, leading to a maximum penetration of 160 mm. Since the exposure environment cannot be predicted precisely, one cannot state that stress corrosion cracking is impossible. Thus the container must be stress relieved. Other corrosion mechanisms such as microbial corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement are not considered significant

  5. Engineering Task Plan for Fourth Generation Hanford Corrosion Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NORMAN, E.C.

    2000-01-01

    This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) describes the activities associated with the installation of cabinets containing corrosion monitoring equipment on tanks 241-AN-102 and 241-AN-107. The new cabinets (one per tank) will be installed adjacent to existing corrosion probes already installed in riser WST-RISER-016 on both tanks. The corrosion monitoring equipment to be installed utilizes the technique of electrochemical noise (EN) for monitoring waste tank corrosion. Typically, EN consists of low frequency (4 Hz) and small amplitude signals that are spontaneously generated by electrochemical reactions occurring at corroding or other surfaces. EN analysis is well suited for monitoring and identifying the onset of localized corrosion, and for measuring uniform corrosion rates. A typical EN based corrosion-monitoring system measures instantaneous fluctuations in corrosion current and potential between three nominally identical electrodes of the material of interest immersed in the environment of interest. Time-dependent fluctuations in corrosion current are described by electrochemical current noise, and time-dependent fluctuations of corrosion potential are described by electrochemical noise. The corrosion monitoring systems are designed to detect the onset of localized corrosion phenomena if tank conditions should change to allow these phenomena to occur. In addition to the EN technique, the systems also facilitate the use of the Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) technique to collect uniform corrosion rate information. LPR measures the linearity at the origin of the polarization curve for overvoltages up to a few millivolts away from the rest potential or natural corrosion potential. The slope of the current vs. voltage plot gives information on uniform corrosion rates

  6. Effect of selection for relative growth rate and bodyweight of mice on rate, composition and efficiency of growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, H.

    1974-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of selection for parameters of a growth curve, four selection lines and a control line were started from one base population. In the selection lines is selected for a large and a small relative growth rate between 21 and 29 days (RGH and RGL) and for a large and

  7. Increased corrosion resistance of the AZ80 magnesium alloy by rapid solidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghion, E; Jan, L; Meshi, L; Goldman, J

    2015-11-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and Mg-alloys are being considered as implantable biometals. Despite their excellent biocompatibility and good mechanical properties, their rapid corrosion is a major impediment precluding their widespread acceptance as implantable biomaterials. Here, we investigate the potential for rapid solidification to increase the corrosion resistance of Mg alloys. To this end, the effect of rapid solidification on the environmental and stress corrosion behavior of the AZ80 Mg alloy vs. its conventionally cast counterpart was evaluated in simulated physiological electrolytes. The microstructural characteristics were examined by optical microscopy, SEM, TEM, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The corrosion behavior was evaluated by immersion, salt spraying, and potentiodynamic polarization. Stress corrosion resistance was assessed by Slow Strain Rate Testing. The results indicate that the corrosion resistance of rapidly solidified ribbons is significantly improved relative to the conventional cast alloy due to the increased Al content dissolved in the α-Mg matrix and the correspondingly reduced presence of the β-phase (Mg17 Al12 ). Unfortunately, extrusion consolidated solidified ribbons exhibited a substantial reduction in the environmental performance and stress corrosion resistance. This was mainly attributed to the detrimental effect of the extrusion process, which enriched the iron impurities and increased the internal stresses by imposing a higher dislocation density. In terms of immersion tests, the average corrosion rate of the rapidly solidified ribbons was <0.4 mm/year compared with ∼2 mm/year for the conventionally cast alloy and 26 mm/year for the rapidly solidified extruded ribbons. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Effects of porosity on corrosion resistance of Mg alloy foam produced by powder metallurgy technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghion, E., E-mail: egyon@bgu.ac.il; Perez, Y.

    2014-10-15

    Magnesium alloy foams have the potential to serve as structural material for regular light-weight applications as well as for biodegradable scaffold implants. However, their main disadvantage relates to the high reactivity of magnesium and consequently their natural tendency to corrode in regular service conditions and in physiological environments. The present study aims at evaluating the effect of porosity on the corrosion resistance of MRI 201S magnesium alloy foams in 0.9% NaCl solution and in phosphate buffer saline solution as a simulated physiological electrolyte. The magnesium foams were produced by powder metallurgy technology using space-holding particles to control the porosity content. Machined chips were used as raw material for the production of Mg alloy powder by milling process. The microstructure of the foams was examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The corrosion behavior was evaluated by immersion test and potentiodynamic polarization analysis. The results obtained clearly demonstrate that the porosity has a significant effect on the corrosion resistance of the tested foams. Foams with 14–19% porosity have a corrosion rate of 4–10 mcd and 7–15 mcd in NaCl and phosphate buffer saline solution, respectively, compared to only 0.10 mcd for the same alloy in as cast conditions. This increased corrosion degradation of the Mg foams by more than one order of magnitude compared to the cast alloy may limit their potential application in regular and physiological environments. - Highlights: • Porosity has a detrimental effect on corrosion resistance of MRI 201S Mg foams. • 14–19% porosity increases the corrosion rate by more than one order of magnitude. • Accelerated corrosion limits the use of foams in regular/physiological environments.

  9. Online, real-time corrosion monitoring in district heating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Thorarinsdottir, R.I.

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion control in district heating systems is today performed primarily with control of the water quality. The corrosion rate is kept low by assuring low dissolved oxygen concentration, high pH and low conductivity. Corrosion failures can occur, e.g. as a result of unknown oxygen ingress, ......, precipitation of deposits or crevices. The authors describe methods used for on-line monitoring of corrosion, cover the complications and the main results of a Nordic project.......The corrosion control in district heating systems is today performed primarily with control of the water quality. The corrosion rate is kept low by assuring low dissolved oxygen concentration, high pH and low conductivity. Corrosion failures can occur, e.g. as a result of unknown oxygen ingress...

  10. On-line Corrosion Monitoring in District Heating Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Sonja; Thorarinsdottir, R.I.; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion control in district heating systems is today performed primarily with control of the water quality. The corrosion rate is kept low by assuring low dissolved oxygen concentration, high pH and low conductivity. Corrosion failures can occur, e.g. as a result of unknown oxygen ingress, ......, precipitation of deposits or crevices. The authors describe methods used for on-line monitoring of corrosion, cover the complications and the main results of a Nordic project.......The corrosion control in district heating systems is today performed primarily with control of the water quality. The corrosion rate is kept low by assuring low dissolved oxygen concentration, high pH and low conductivity. Corrosion failures can occur, e.g. as a result of unknown oxygen ingress...

  11. Monitoring Techniques for Microbially Influenced Corrosion of Carbon Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)<