WorldWideScience

Sample records for relational database model

  1. Building spatio-temporal database model based on ontological approach using relational database environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, N.; Burney, S.M.A.

    2017-01-01

    Everything in this world is encapsulated by space and time fence. Our daily life activities are utterly linked and related with other objects in vicinity. Therefore, a strong relationship exist with our current location, time (including past, present and future) and event through with we are moving as an object also affect our activities in life. Ontology development and its integration with database are vital for the true understanding of the complex systems involving both spatial and temporal dimensions. In this paper we propose a conceptual framework for building spatio-temporal database model based on ontological approach. We have used relational data model for modelling spatio-temporal data content and present our methodology with spatio-temporal ontological accepts and its transformation into spatio-temporal database model. We illustrate the implementation of our conceptual model through a case study related to cultivated land parcel used for agriculture to exhibit the spatio-temporal behaviour of agricultural land and related entities. Moreover, it provides a generic approach for designing spatiotemporal databases based on ontology. The proposed model is capable to understand the ontological and somehow epistemological commitments and to build spatio-temporal ontology and transform it into a spatio-temporal data model. Finally, we highlight the existing and future research challenges. (author)

  2. Modeling biology using relational databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitzsch, Robert M

    2003-02-01

    There are several different methodologies that can be used for designing a database schema; no one is the best for all occasions. This unit demonstrates two different techniques for designing relational tables and discusses when each should be used. These two techniques presented are (1) traditional Entity-Relationship (E-R) modeling and (2) a hybrid method that combines aspects of data warehousing and E-R modeling. The method of choice depends on (1) how well the information and all its inherent relationships are understood, (2) what types of questions will be asked, (3) how many different types of data will be included, and (4) how much data exists.

  3. A Relational Database Model and Tools for Environmental Sound Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuksel Arslan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Environmental sound recognition (ESR has become a hot topic in recent years. ESR is mainly based on machine learning (ML and ML algorithms require first a training database. This database must comprise the sounds to be recognized and other related sounds. An ESR system needs the database during training, testing and in the production stage. In this paper, we present the design and pilot establishment of a database which will assists all researchers who want to establish an ESR system. This database employs relational database model which is not used for this task before. We explain in this paper design and implementation details of the database, data collection and load process. Besides we explain the tools and developed graphical user interface for a desktop application and for the WEB.

  4. An Object-Relational Ifc Storage Model Based on Oracle Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hang; Liu, Hua; Liu, Yong; Wang, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    With the building models are getting increasingly complicated, the levels of collaboration across professionals attract more attention in the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry. In order to adapt the change, buildingSMART developed Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) to facilitate the interoperability between software platforms. However, IFC data are currently shared in the form of text file, which is defective. In this paper, considering the object-based inheritance hierarchy of IFC and the storage features of different database management systems (DBMS), we propose a novel object-relational storage model that uses Oracle database to store IFC data. Firstly, establish the mapping rules between data types in IFC specification and Oracle database. Secondly, design the IFC database according to the relationships among IFC entities. Thirdly, parse the IFC file and extract IFC data. And lastly, store IFC data into corresponding tables in IFC database. In experiment, three different building models are selected to demonstrate the effectiveness of our storage model. The comparison of experimental statistics proves that IFC data are lossless during data exchange.

  5. Relational databases

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, D A

    1986-01-01

    Relational Databases explores the major advances in relational databases and provides a balanced analysis of the state of the art in relational databases. Topics covered include capture and analysis of data placement requirements; distributed relational database systems; data dependency manipulation in database schemata; and relational database support for computer graphics and computer aided design. This book is divided into three sections and begins with an overview of the theory and practice of distributed systems, using the example of INGRES from Relational Technology as illustration. The

  6. The PMDB Protein Model Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrignanò, Tiziana; De Meo, Paolo D'Onorio; Cozzetto, Domenico; Talamo, Ivano Giuseppe; Tramontano, Anna

    2006-01-01

    The Protein Model Database (PMDB) is a public resource aimed at storing manually built 3D models of proteins. The database is designed to provide access to models published in the scientific literature, together with validating experimental data. It is a relational database and it currently contains >74 000 models for ∼240 proteins. The system is accessible at and allows predictors to submit models along with related supporting evidence and users to download them through a simple and intuitive interface. Users can navigate in the database and retrieve models referring to the same target protein or to different regions of the same protein. Each model is assigned a unique identifier that allows interested users to directly access the data. PMID:16381873

  7. Engineering the object-relation database model in O-Raid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, Prasun; Vikram, Ashish; Bhargava, Bharat

    1989-01-01

    Raid is a distributed database system based on the relational model. O-raid is an extension of the Raid system and will support complex data objects. The design of O-Raid is evolutionary and retains all features of relational data base systems and those of a general purpose object-oriented programming language. O-Raid has several novel properties. Objects, classes, and inheritance are supported together with a predicate-base relational query language. O-Raid objects are compatible with C++ objects and may be read and manipulated by a C++ program without any 'impedance mismatch'. Relations and columns within relations may themselves be treated as objects with associated variables and methods. Relations may contain heterogeneous objects, that is, objects of more than one class in a certain column, which can individually evolve by being reclassified. Special facilities are provided to reduce the data search in a relation containing complex objects.

  8. Class dependency of fuzzy relational database using relational calculus and conditional probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deni Akbar, Mohammad; Mizoguchi, Yoshihiro; Adiwijaya

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a design of fuzzy relational database to deal with a conditional probability relation using fuzzy relational calculus. In the previous, there are several researches about equivalence class in fuzzy database using similarity or approximate relation. It is an interesting topic to investigate the fuzzy dependency using equivalence classes. Our goal is to introduce a formulation of a fuzzy relational database model using the relational calculus on the category of fuzzy relations. We also introduce general formulas of the relational calculus for the notion of database operations such as ’projection’, ’selection’, ’injection’ and ’natural join’. Using the fuzzy relational calculus and conditional probabilities, we introduce notions of equivalence class, redundant, and dependency in the theory fuzzy relational database.

  9. ALGORITHM FOR DYNAMIC SCALING RELATIONAL DATABASE IN CLOUDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Boichenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the main methods of scalingdatabases (replication, sharding and their supportat the popular relational databases and NoSQLsolutions with different data models: document-oriented, key-value, column-oriented and graph.The article presents an algorithm for the dynamicscaling of a relational database (DB, that takesinto account the specifics of the different types of logic database model. This article was prepared with the support of RFBR (grant № 13-07-00749.

  10. Database modeling and design logical design

    CERN Document Server

    Teorey, Toby J; Nadeau, Tom; Jagadish, HV

    2011-01-01

    Database systems and database design technology have undergone significant evolution in recent years. The relational data model and relational database systems dominate business applications; in turn, they are extended by other technologies like data warehousing, OLAP, and data mining. How do you model and design your database application in consideration of new technology or new business needs? In the extensively revised fifth edition, you'll get clear explanations, lots of terrific examples and an illustrative case, and the really practical advice you have come to count on--with design rules

  11. Database modeling and design logical design

    CERN Document Server

    Teorey, Toby J; Nadeau, Tom; Jagadish, HV

    2005-01-01

    Database systems and database design technology have undergone significant evolution in recent years. The relational data model and relational database systems dominate business applications; in turn, they are extended by other technologies like data warehousing, OLAP, and data mining. How do you model and design your database application in consideration of new technology or new business needs? In the extensively revised fourth edition, you'll get clear explanations, lots of terrific examples and an illustrative case, and the really practical advice you have come to count on--with design rul

  12. Implementation of the Multidimensional Modeling Concepts into Object-Relational Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A key to survival in the business world is being able to analyze, plan and react to changing business conditions as fast as possible. With multidimensional models the managers can explore information at different levels of granularity and the decision makers at all levels can quickly respond to changes in the business climate-the ultimate goal of business intelligence. This paper focuses on the implementation of the multidimensional concepts into object-relational databases.

  13. BIOSPIDA: A Relational Database Translator for NCBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Matthew S; Lee, Eva K

    2010-11-13

    As the volume and availability of biological databases continue widespread growth, it has become increasingly difficult for research scientists to identify all relevant information for biological entities of interest. Details of nucleotide sequences, gene expression, molecular interactions, and three-dimensional structures are maintained across many different databases. To retrieve all necessary information requires an integrated system that can query multiple databases with minimized overhead. This paper introduces a universal parser and relational schema translator that can be utilized for all NCBI databases in Abstract Syntax Notation (ASN.1). The data models for OMIM, Entrez-Gene, Pubmed, MMDB and GenBank have been successfully converted into relational databases and all are easily linkable helping to answer complex biological questions. These tools facilitate research scientists to locally integrate databases from NCBI without significant workload or development time.

  14. O-ODM Framework for Object-Relational Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Rombaldo Jr

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Object-Relational Databases introduce new features which allow manipulating objects in databases. At present, many DBMS offer resources to manipulate objects in database, but most application developers just map class to relations tables, failing to exploit the O-R model strength. The lack of tools that aid the database project contributes to this situation. This work presents O-ODM (Object-Object Database Mapping, a persistent framework that maps objects from OO applications to database objects. Persistent Frameworks have been used to aid developers, managing all access to DBMS. This kind of tool allows developers to persist objects without solid knowledge about DBMSs and specific languages, improving the developers’ productivity, mainly when a different DBMS is used. The results of some experiments using O-ODM are shown.

  15. Cross: an OWL wrapper for teasoning on relational databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Champin, P.A.; Houben, G.J.P.M.; Thiran, Ph.; Parent, C.; Schewe, K.D.; Storey, V.C.; Thalheim, B.

    2007-01-01

    One of the challenges of the Semantic Web is to integrate the huge amount of information already available on the standard Web, usually stored in relational databases. In this paper, we propose a formalization of a logic model of relational databases, and a transformation of that model into OWL, a

  16. Relational database hybrid model, of high performance and storage capacity for nuclear engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes Neto, Jose

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work is to present the relational database, named FALCAO. It was created and implemented to support the storage of the monitored variables in the IEA-R1 research reactor, located in the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN-SP. The data logical model and its direct influence in the integrity of the provided information are carefully considered. The concepts and steps of normalization and de normalization including the entities and relations involved in the logical model are presented. It is also presented the effects of the model rules in the acquisition, loading and availability of the final information, under the performance concept since the acquisition process loads and provides lots of information in small intervals of time. The SACD application, through its functionalities, presents the information stored in the FALCAO database in a practical and optimized form. The implementation of the FALCAO database occurred successfully and its existence leads to a considerably favorable situation. It is now essential to the routine of the researchers involved, not only due to the substantial improvement of the process but also to the reliability associated to it. (author)

  17. A new relational database structure and online interface for the HITRAN database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Christian; Gordon, Iouli E.; Rothman, Laurence S.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    A new format for the HITRAN database is proposed. By storing the line-transition data in a number of linked tables described by a relational database schema, it is possible to overcome the limitations of the existing format, which have become increasingly apparent over the last few years as new and more varied data are being used by radiative-transfer models. Although the database in the new format can be searched using the well-established Structured Query Language (SQL), a web service, HITRANonline, has been deployed to allow users to make most common queries of the database using a graphical user interface in a web page. The advantages of the relational form of the database to ensuring data integrity and consistency are explored, and the compatibility of the online interface with the emerging standards of the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) project is discussed. In particular, the ability to access HITRAN data using a standard query language from other websites, command line tools and from within computer programs is described. -- Highlights: • A new, interactive version of the HITRAN database is presented. • The data is stored in a structured fashion in a relational database. • The new HITRANonline interface offers increased functionality and easier error correction

  18. Relational Database Technology: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melander, Nicole

    1987-01-01

    Describes the development of relational database technology as it applies to educational settings. Discusses some of the new tools and models being implemented in an effort to provide educators with technologically advanced ways of answering questions about education programs and data. (TW)

  19. Implementation of a fuzzy relational database. Case study: academic tutoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Saguay

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the process of implementation of a diffused relational database in the practical case of the academic tutorials of the Faculty of Engineering Sciences of the Equinoctial Technological University (UTE. For the implementation, the ANSI-SPARC database architecture was used as the methodology, which abstracts the information into levels, at the external level the functional requirements were obtained, at the conceptual level, the diffused relational model was obtained. To achieve this model, we performed the transformation of the diffuse data through mathematical models using the Fuzzy-Lookup tool and at the physical level the diffused relational database was implemented. In addition, an user interface was developed using Java through which data is entered and queries are made to the diffused relational database to verify its operation.

  20. Multilevel security for relational databases

    CERN Document Server

    Faragallah, Osama S; El-Samie, Fathi E Abd

    2014-01-01

    Concepts of Database Security Database Concepts Relational Database Security Concepts Access Control in Relational Databases      Discretionary Access Control      Mandatory Access Control      Role-Based Access Control Work Objectives Book Organization Basic Concept of Multilevel Database Security IntroductionMultilevel Database Relations Polyinstantiation      Invisible Polyinstantiation      Visible Polyinstantiation      Types of Polyinstantiation      Architectural Consideration

  1. A new relational database structure and online interface for the HITRAN database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Christian; Gordon, Iouli E.; Rothman, Laurence S.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    A new format for the HITRAN database is proposed. By storing the line-transition data in a number of linked tables described by a relational database schema, it is possible to overcome the limitations of the existing format, which have become increasingly apparent over the last few years as new and more varied data are being used by radiative-transfer models. Although the database in the new format can be searched using the well-established Structured Query Language (SQL), a web service, HITRANonline, has been deployed to allow users to make most common queries of the database using a graphical user interface in a web page. The advantages of the relational form of the database to ensuring data integrity and consistency are explored, and the compatibility of the online interface with the emerging standards of the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) project is discussed. In particular, the ability to access HITRAN data using a standard query language from other websites, command line tools and from within computer programs is described.

  2. Solving Relational Database Problems with ORDBMS in an Advanced Database Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces how to use the object-relational database management system (ORDBMS) to solve relational database (RDB) problems in an advanced database course. The purpose of the paper is to provide a guideline for database instructors who desire to incorporate the ORDB technology in their traditional database courses. The paper presents…

  3. Database and Related Activities in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Izumi; Kato, Daiji; Kato, Masatoshi; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Takako; Ding, Xiaobin; Morita, Shigeru; Kitajima, Masashi; Koike, Fumihiro; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Sakamoto, Naoki; Sasaki, Akira; Skobelev, Igor; Tsuchida, Hidetsugu; Ulantsev, Artemiy; Watanabe, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Norimasa

    2011-01-01

    We have constructed and made available atomic and molecular (AM) numerical databases on collision processes such as electron-impact excitation and ionization, recombination and charge transfer of atoms and molecules relevant for plasma physics, fusion research, astrophysics, applied-science plasma, and other related areas. The retrievable data is freely accessible via the internet. We also work on atomic data evaluation and constructing collisional-radiative models for spectroscopic plasma diagnostics. Recently we have worked on Fe ions and W ions theoretically and experimentally. The atomic data and collisional-radiative models for these ions are examined and applied to laboratory plasmas. A visible M1 transition of W 26+ ion is identified at 389.41 nm by EBIT experiments and theoretical calculations. We have small non-retrievable databases in addition to our main database. Recently we evaluated photo-absorption cross sections for 9 atoms and 23 molecules and we present them as a new database. We established a new association ''Forum of Atomic and Molecular Data and Their Applications'' to exchange information among AM data producers, data providers and data users in Japan and we hope this will help to encourage AM data activities in Japan.

  4. Databases for highway inventories. Proposal for a new model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Casan, J.A.

    2016-07-01

    Database models for highway inventories are based on classical schemes for relational databases: many related tables, in which the database designer establishes, a priori, every detail that they consider relevant for inventory management. This kind of database presents several problems. First, adapting the model and its applications when new database features appear is difficult. In addition, the different needs of different sets of road inventory users are difficult to fulfil with these schemes. For example, maintenance management services, road authorities and emergency services have different needs. In addition, this kind of database cannot be adapted to new scenarios, such as other countries and regions (that may classify roads or name certain elements differently). The problem is more complex if the language used in these scenarios is not the same as that used in the database design. In addition, technicians need a long time to learn to use the database efficiently. This paper proposes a flexible, multilanguage and multipurpose database model, which gives an effective and simple solution to the aforementioned problems. (Author)

  5. Modeling Spatial Data within Object Relational-Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuliana BOTHA

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Spatial data can refer to elements that help place a certain object in a certain area. These elements are latitude, longitude, points, geometric figures represented by points, etc. However, when translating these elements into data that can be stored in a computer, it all comes down to numbers. The interesting part that requires attention is how to memorize them in order to obtain fast and various spatial queries. This part is where the DBMS (Data Base Management System that contains the database acts in. In this paper, we analyzed and compared two object-relational DBMS that work with spatial data: Oracle and PostgreSQL.

  6. Global search tool for the Advanced Photon Source Integrated Relational Model of Installed Systems (IRMIS) database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quock, D.E.R.; Cianciarulo, M.B.

    2007-01-01

    The Integrated Relational Model of Installed Systems (IRMIS) is a relational database tool that has been implemented at the Advanced Photon Source to maintain an updated account of approximately 600 control system software applications, 400,000 process variables, and 30,000 control system hardware components. To effectively display this large amount of control system information to operators and engineers, IRMIS was initially built with nine Web-based viewers: Applications Organizing Index, IOC, PLC, Component Type, Installed Components, Network, Controls Spares, Process Variables, and Cables. However, since each viewer is designed to provide details from only one major category of the control system, the necessity for a one-stop global search tool for the entire database became apparent. The user requirements for extremely fast database search time and ease of navigation through search results led to the choice of Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX) technology in the implementation of the IRMIS global search tool. Unique features of the global search tool include a two-tier level of displayed search results, and a database data integrity validation and reporting mechanism.

  7. Relational Databases and Biomedical Big Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva, N H Nisansa D

    2017-01-01

    In various biomedical applications that collect, handle, and manipulate data, the amounts of data tend to build up and venture into the range identified as bigdata. In such occurrences, a design decision has to be taken as to what type of database would be used to handle this data. More often than not, the default and classical solution to this in the biomedical domain according to past research is relational databases. While this used to be the norm for a long while, it is evident that there is a trend to move away from relational databases in favor of other types and paradigms of databases. However, it still has paramount importance to understand the interrelation that exists between biomedical big data and relational databases. This chapter will review the pros and cons of using relational databases to store biomedical big data that previous researches have discussed and used.

  8. Migration from relational to NoSQL database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghotiya, Sunita; Mandal, Juhi; Kandasamy, Saravanakumar

    2017-11-01

    Data generated by various real time applications, social networking sites and sensor devices is of very huge amount and unstructured, which makes it difficult for Relational database management systems to handle the data. Data is very precious component of any application and needs to be analysed after arranging it in some structure. Relational databases are only able to deal with structured data, so there is need of NoSQL Database management System which can deal with semi -structured data also. Relational database provides the easiest way to manage the data but as the use of NoSQL is increasing it is becoming necessary to migrate the data from Relational to NoSQL databases. Various frameworks has been proposed previously which provides mechanisms for migration of data stored at warehouses in SQL, middle layer solutions which can provide facility of data to be stored in NoSQL databases to handle data which is not structured. This paper provides a literature review of some of the recent approaches proposed by various researchers to migrate data from relational to NoSQL databases. Some researchers proposed mechanisms for the co-existence of NoSQL and Relational databases together. This paper provides a summary of mechanisms which can be used for mapping data stored in Relational databases to NoSQL databases. Various techniques for data transformation and middle layer solutions are summarised in the paper.

  9. Data Migration between Document-Oriented and Relational Databases

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdan Walek; Cyril Klimes

    2012-01-01

    Current tools for data migration between documentoriented and relational databases have several disadvantages. We propose a new approach for data migration between documentoriented and relational databases. During data migration the relational schema of the target (relational database) is automatically created from collection of XML documents. Proposed approach is verified on data migration between document-oriented database IBM Lotus/ Notes Domino and relational database...

  10. A Relational Algebra Query Language for Programming Relational Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMaster, Kirby; Sambasivam, Samuel; Anderson, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a Relational Algebra Query Language (RAQL) and Relational Algebra Query (RAQ) software product we have developed that allows database instructors to teach relational algebra through programming. Instead of defining query operations using mathematical notation (the approach commonly taken in database textbooks), students…

  11. Automating Relational Database Design for Microcomputer Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Hao-Che

    1991-01-01

    Discusses issues involved in automating the relational database design process for microcomputer users and presents a prototype of a microcomputer-based system (RA, Relation Assistant) that is based on expert systems technology and helps avoid database maintenance problems. Relational database design is explained and the importance of easy input…

  12. Data Model and Relational Database Design for Highway Runoff Water-Quality Metadata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granato, Gregory E.; Tessler, Steven

    2001-01-01

    A National highway and urban runoff waterquality metadatabase was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration as part of the National Highway Runoff Water-Quality Data and Methodology Synthesis (NDAMS). The database was designed to catalog available literature and to document results of the synthesis in a format that would facilitate current and future research on highway and urban runoff. This report documents the design and implementation of the NDAMS relational database, which was designed to provide a catalog of available information and the results of an assessment of the available data. All the citations and the metadata collected during the review process are presented in a stratified metadatabase that contains citations for relevant publications, abstracts (or previa), and reportreview metadata for a sample of selected reports that document results of runoff quality investigations. The database is referred to as a metadatabase because it contains information about available data sets rather than a record of the original data. The database contains the metadata needed to evaluate and characterize how valid, current, complete, comparable, and technically defensible published and available information may be when evaluated for application to the different dataquality objectives as defined by decision makers. This database is a relational database, in that all information is ultimately linked to a given citation in the catalog of available reports. The main database file contains 86 tables consisting of 29 data tables, 11 association tables, and 46 domain tables. The data tables all link to a particular citation, and each data table is focused on one aspect of the information collected in the literature search and the evaluation of available information. This database is implemented in the Microsoft (MS) Access database software because it is widely used within and outside of government and is familiar to many

  13. The Moroccan Genetic Disease Database (MGDD): a database for DNA variations related to inherited disorders and disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoute, Hicham; Nahili, Halima; Abidi, Omar; Gabi, Khalid; Rouba, Hassan; Fakiri, Malika; Barakat, Abdelhamid

    2014-03-01

    National and ethnic mutation databases provide comprehensive information about genetic variations reported in a population or an ethnic group. In this paper, we present the Moroccan Genetic Disease Database (MGDD), a catalogue of genetic data related to diseases identified in the Moroccan population. We used the PubMed, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases to identify available articles published until April 2013. The Database is designed and implemented on a three-tier model using Mysql relational database and the PHP programming language. To date, the database contains 425 mutations and 208 polymorphisms found in 301 genes and 259 diseases. Most Mendelian diseases in the Moroccan population follow autosomal recessive mode of inheritance (74.17%) and affect endocrine, nutritional and metabolic physiology. The MGDD database provides reference information for researchers, clinicians and health professionals through a user-friendly Web interface. Its content should be useful to improve researches in human molecular genetics, disease diagnoses and design of association studies. MGDD can be publicly accessed at http://mgdd.pasteur.ma.

  14. WholeCellSimDB: a hybrid relational/HDF database for whole-cell model predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, Jonathan R; Phillips, Nolan C; Covert, Markus W

    2014-01-01

    Mechanistic 'whole-cell' models are needed to develop a complete understanding of cell physiology. However, extracting biological insights from whole-cell models requires running and analyzing large numbers of simulations. We developed WholeCellSimDB, a database for organizing whole-cell simulations. WholeCellSimDB was designed to enable researchers to search simulation metadata to identify simulations for further analysis, and quickly slice and aggregate simulation results data. In addition, WholeCellSimDB enables users to share simulations with the broader research community. The database uses a hybrid relational/hierarchical data format architecture to efficiently store and retrieve both simulation setup metadata and results data. WholeCellSimDB provides a graphical Web-based interface to search, browse, plot and export simulations; a JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) Web service to retrieve data for Web-based visualizations; a command-line interface to deposit simulations; and a Python API to retrieve data for advanced analysis. Overall, we believe WholeCellSimDB will help researchers use whole-cell models to advance basic biological science and bioengineering. http://www.wholecellsimdb.org SOURCE CODE REPOSITORY: URL: http://github.com/CovertLab/WholeCellSimDB. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  15. An Ontology as a Tool for Representing Fuzzy Data in Relational Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Martinez-Cruz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Several applications to represent classical or fuzzy data in databases have been developed in the last two decades. However, these representations present some limitations specially related with the system portability and complexity. Ontologies provides a mechanism to represent data in an implementation-independent and web-accessible way. To get advantage of this, in this paper, an ontology, that represents fuzzy relational database model, has been redefined to communicate users or applications with fuzzy data stored in fuzzy databases. The communication channel established between the ontology and any Relational Database Management System (RDBMS is analysed in depth throughout the text to justify some of the advantages of the system: expressiveness, portability and platform heterogeneity. Moreover, some tools have been developed to define and manage fuzzy and classical data in relational databases using this ontology. Even an application that performs fuzzy queries using the same technology is included in this proposal together with some examples using real databases.

  16. Database development and management

    CERN Document Server

    Chao, Lee

    2006-01-01

    Introduction to Database Systems Functions of a DatabaseDatabase Management SystemDatabase ComponentsDatabase Development ProcessConceptual Design and Data Modeling Introduction to Database Design Process Understanding Business ProcessEntity-Relationship Data Model Representing Business Process with Entity-RelationshipModelTable Structure and NormalizationIntroduction to TablesTable NormalizationTransforming Data Models to Relational Databases .DBMS Selection Transforming Data Models to Relational DatabasesEnforcing ConstraintsCreating Database for Business ProcessPhysical Design and Database

  17. Evaluation of relational and NoSQL database architectures to manage genomic annotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Wade L; Nelson, Brent G; Felker, Donn K; Durant, Thomas J S; Torres, Richard

    2016-12-01

    While the adoption of next generation sequencing has rapidly expanded, the informatics infrastructure used to manage the data generated by this technology has not kept pace. Historically, relational databases have provided much of the framework for data storage and retrieval. Newer technologies based on NoSQL architectures may provide significant advantages in storage and query efficiency, thereby reducing the cost of data management. But their relative advantage when applied to biomedical data sets, such as genetic data, has not been characterized. To this end, we compared the storage, indexing, and query efficiency of a common relational database (MySQL), a document-oriented NoSQL database (MongoDB), and a relational database with NoSQL support (PostgreSQL). When used to store genomic annotations from the dbSNP database, we found the NoSQL architectures to outperform traditional, relational models for speed of data storage, indexing, and query retrieval in nearly every operation. These findings strongly support the use of novel database technologies to improve the efficiency of data management within the biological sciences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An Improved Algorithm for Generating Database Transactions from Relational Algebra Specifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Dougherty

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Alloy is a lightweight modeling formalism based on relational algebra. In prior work with Fisler, Giannakopoulos, Krishnamurthi, and Yoo, we have presented a tool, Alchemy, that compiles Alloy specifications into implementations that execute against persistent databases. The foundation of Alchemy is an algorithm for rewriting relational algebra formulas into code for database transactions. In this paper we report on recent progress in improving the robustness and efficiency of this transformation.

  19. Study of relational nuclear databases and online services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Tieshuan; Guo Zhiyu; Liu Wenlong; Ye Weiguo; Feng Yuqing; Song Xiangxiang; Huang Gang; Hong Yingjue; Liu Tinjin; Chen Jinxiang; Tang Guoyou; Shi Zhaoming; Liu Chi; Chen Jiaer; Huang Xiaolong

    2004-01-01

    A relational nuclear database management and web-based services software system has been developed. Its objective is to allow users to access numerical and graphical representation of nuclear data and to easily reconstruct nuclear data in original standardized formats from the relational databases. It presents 9 relational nuclear libraries: 5 ENDF format neutron reaction databases (BROND), CENDL, ENDF, JEF and JENDL), the ENSDF database, the EXFOR database, the IAEA Photonuclear Data Library and the charged particle reaction data from the FENDL database. The computer programs providing support for database management and data retrievals are based on the Linux implementation of PHP and the MySQL software, and are platform-independent. The first version of this software was officially released in September 2001

  20. Data model and relational database design for the New England Water-Use Data System (NEWUDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessler, Steven

    2001-01-01

    The New England Water-Use Data System (NEWUDS) is a database for the storage and retrieval of water-use data. NEWUDS can handle data covering many facets of water use, including (1) tracking various types of water-use activities (withdrawals, returns, transfers, distributions, consumptive-use, wastewater collection, and treatment); (2) the description, classification and location of places and organizations involved in water-use activities; (3) details about measured or estimated volumes of water associated with water-use activities; and (4) information about data sources and water resources associated with water use. In NEWUDS, each water transaction occurs unidirectionally between two site objects, and the sites and conveyances form a water network. The core entities in the NEWUDS model are site, conveyance, transaction/rate, location, and owner. Other important entities include water resources (used for withdrawals and returns), data sources, and aliases. Multiple water-exchange estimates can be stored for individual transactions based on different methods or data sources. Storage of user-defined details is accommodated for several of the main entities. Numerous tables containing classification terms facilitate detailed descriptions of data items and can be used for routine or custom data summarization. NEWUDS handles single-user and aggregate-user water-use data, can be used for large or small water-network projects, and is available as a stand-alone Microsoft? Access database structure. Users can customize and extend the database, link it to other databases, or implement the design in other relational database applications.

  1. [A relational database to store Poison Centers calls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barelli, Alessandro; Biondi, Immacolata; Tafani, Chiara; Pellegrini, Aristide; Soave, Maurizio; Gaspari, Rita; Annetta, Maria Giuseppina

    2006-01-01

    Italian Poison Centers answer to approximately 100,000 calls per year. Potentially, this activity is a huge source of data for toxicovigilance and for syndromic surveillance. During the last decade, surveillance systems for early detection of outbreaks have drawn the attention of public health institutions due to the threat of terrorism and high-profile disease outbreaks. Poisoning surveillance needs the ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and dissemination of harmonised data about poisonings from all Poison Centers for use in public health action to reduce morbidity and mortality and to improve health. The entity-relationship model for a Poison Center relational database is extremely complex and not studied in detail. For this reason, not harmonised data collection happens among Italian Poison Centers. Entities are recognizable concepts, either concrete or abstract, such as patients and poisons, or events which have relevance to the database, such as calls. Connectivity and cardinality of relationships are complex as well. A one-to-many relationship exist between calls and patients: for one instance of entity calls, there are zero, one, or many instances of entity patients. At the same time, a one-to-many relationship exist between patients and poisons: for one instance of entity patients, there are zero, one, or many instances of entity poisons. This paper shows a relational model for a poison center database which allows the harmonised data collection of poison centers calls.

  2. A Relational Database System for Student Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertuck, Len

    1982-01-01

    Describes an APL implementation of a relational database system suitable for use in a teaching environment in which database development and database administration are studied, and discusses the functions of the user and the database administrator. An appendix illustrating system operation and an eight-item reference list are attached. (Author/JL)

  3. NETMARK: A Schema-less Extension for Relational Databases for Managing Semi-structured Data Dynamically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluf, David A.; Tran, Peter B.

    2003-01-01

    Object-Relational database management system is an integrated hybrid cooperative approach to combine the best practices of both the relational model utilizing SQL queries and the object-oriented, semantic paradigm for supporting complex data creation. In this paper, a highly scalable, information on demand database framework, called NETMARK, is introduced. NETMARK takes advantages of the Oracle 8i object-relational database using physical addresses data types for very efficient keyword search of records spanning across both context and content. NETMARK was originally developed in early 2000 as a research and development prototype to solve the vast amounts of unstructured and semi-structured documents existing within NASA enterprises. Today, NETMARK is a flexible, high-throughput open database framework for managing, storing, and searching unstructured or semi-structured arbitrary hierarchal models, such as XML and HTML.

  4. RANCANGAN DATABASE SUBSISTEM PRODUKSI DENGAN PENDEKATAN SEMANTIC OBJECT MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oviliani Yenty Yuliana

    2002-01-01

    Produksi, Semantic Object Model, Database Relational.

  5. Vertical partitioning of relational OLTP databases using integer programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amossen, Rasmus Resen

    2010-01-01

    A way to optimize performance of relational row store databases is to reduce the row widths by vertically partition- ing tables into table fractions in order to minimize the number of irrelevant columns/attributes read by each transaction. This pa- per considers vertical partitioning algorithms...... for relational row- store OLTP databases with an H-store-like architecture, meaning that we would like to maximize the number of single-sited transactions. We present a model for the vertical partitioning problem that, given a schema together with a vertical partitioning and a workload, estimates the costs...... applied to the TPC-C benchmark and the heuristic is shown to obtain solutions with costs close to the ones found using the quadratic program....

  6. Adding Hierarchical Objects to Relational Database General-Purpose XML-Based Information Managements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Chun; Knight, Chris; La, Tracy; Maluf, David; Bell, David; Tran, Khai Peter; Gawdiak, Yuri

    2006-01-01

    NETMARK is a flexible, high-throughput software system for managing, storing, and rapid searching of unstructured and semi-structured documents. NETMARK transforms such documents from their original highly complex, constantly changing, heterogeneous data formats into well-structured, common data formats in using Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and/or Extensible Markup Language (XML). The software implements an object-relational database system that combines the best practices of the relational model utilizing Structured Query Language (SQL) with those of the object-oriented, semantic database model for creating complex data. In particular, NETMARK takes advantage of the Oracle 8i object-relational database model using physical-address data types for very efficient keyword searches of records across both context and content. NETMARK also supports multiple international standards such as WEBDAV for drag-and-drop file management and SOAP for integrated information management using Web services. The document-organization and -searching capabilities afforded by NETMARK are likely to make this software attractive for use in disciplines as diverse as science, auditing, and law enforcement.

  7. Greedy Sampling and Incremental Surrogate Model-Based Tailoring of Aeroservoelastic Model Database for Flexible Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Pant, Kapil; Brenner, Martin J.; Ouellette, Jeffrey A.

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a data analysis and modeling framework to tailor and develop linear parameter-varying (LPV) aeroservoelastic (ASE) model database for flexible aircrafts in broad 2D flight parameter space. The Kriging surrogate model is constructed using ASE models at a fraction of grid points within the original model database, and then the ASE model at any flight condition can be obtained simply through surrogate model interpolation. The greedy sampling algorithm is developed to select the next sample point that carries the worst relative error between the surrogate model prediction and the benchmark model in the frequency domain among all input-output channels. The process is iterated to incrementally improve surrogate model accuracy till a pre-determined tolerance or iteration budget is met. The methodology is applied to the ASE model database of a flexible aircraft currently being tested at NASA/AFRC for flutter suppression and gust load alleviation. Our studies indicate that the proposed method can reduce the number of models in the original database by 67%. Even so the ASE models obtained through Kriging interpolation match the model in the original database constructed directly from the physics-based tool with the worst relative error far below 1%. The interpolated ASE model exhibits continuously-varying gains along a set of prescribed flight conditions. More importantly, the selected grid points are distributed non-uniformly in the parameter space, a) capturing the distinctly different dynamic behavior and its dependence on flight parameters, and b) reiterating the need and utility for adaptive space sampling techniques for ASE model database compaction. The present framework is directly extendible to high-dimensional flight parameter space, and can be used to guide the ASE model development, model order reduction, robust control synthesis and novel vehicle design of flexible aircraft.

  8. Comparative performance measures of relational and object-oriented databases using High Energy Physics data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marstaller, J.

    1993-12-01

    The major experiments at the SSC are expected to produce up to 1 Petabyte of data per year. The use of database techniques can significantly reduce the time it takes to access data. The goal of this project was to test which underlying data model, the relational or the object-oriented, would be better suited for archival and accessing high energy data. We describe the relational and the object-oriented data model and their implementation in commercial database management systems. To determine scalability we tested both implementations for 10-MB and 100-MB databases using storage and timing criteria

  9. Generic Entity Resolution in Relational Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidló, Csaba István

    Entity Resolution (ER) covers the problem of identifying distinct representations of real-world entities in heterogeneous databases. We consider the generic formulation of ER problems (GER) with exact outcome. In practice, input data usually resides in relational databases and can grow to huge volumes. Yet, typical solutions described in the literature employ standalone memory resident algorithms. In this paper we utilize facilities of standard, unmodified relational database management systems (RDBMS) to enhance the efficiency of GER algorithms. We study and revise the problem formulation, and propose practical and efficient algorithms optimized for RDBMS external memory processing. We outline a real-world scenario and demonstrate the advantage of algorithms by performing experiments on insurance customer data.

  10. Relational Database Design in Information Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Terrence A.

    1985-01-01

    Reports on database management system (dbms) applications designed by library school students for university community at University of Iowa. Three dbms design issues are examined: synthesis of relations, analysis of relations (normalization procedure), and data dictionary usage. Database planning prior to automation using data dictionary approach…

  11. Renal Gene Expression Database (RGED): a relational database of gene expression profiles in kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingzhou; Yang, Bo; Chen, Xujiao; Xu, Jing; Mei, Changlin; Mao, Zhiguo

    2014-01-01

    We present a bioinformatics database named Renal Gene Expression Database (RGED), which contains comprehensive gene expression data sets from renal disease research. The web-based interface of RGED allows users to query the gene expression profiles in various kidney-related samples, including renal cell lines, human kidney tissues and murine model kidneys. Researchers can explore certain gene profiles, the relationships between genes of interests and identify biomarkers or even drug targets in kidney diseases. The aim of this work is to provide a user-friendly utility for the renal disease research community to query expression profiles of genes of their own interest without the requirement of advanced computational skills. Availability and implementation: Website is implemented in PHP, R, MySQL and Nginx and freely available from http://rged.wall-eva.net. Database URL: http://rged.wall-eva.net PMID:25252782

  12. Database for propagation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantak, Anil V.

    1991-07-01

    A propagation researcher or a systems engineer who intends to use the results of a propagation experiment is generally faced with various database tasks such as the selection of the computer software, the hardware, and the writing of the programs to pass the data through the models of interest. This task is repeated every time a new experiment is conducted or the same experiment is carried out at a different location generating different data. Thus the users of this data have to spend a considerable portion of their time learning how to implement the computer hardware and the software towards the desired end. This situation may be facilitated considerably if an easily accessible propagation database is created that has all the accepted (standardized) propagation phenomena models approved by the propagation research community. Also, the handling of data will become easier for the user. Such a database construction can only stimulate the growth of the propagation research it if is available to all the researchers, so that the results of the experiment conducted by one researcher can be examined independently by another, without different hardware and software being used. The database may be made flexible so that the researchers need not be confined only to the contents of the database. Another way in which the database may help the researchers is by the fact that they will not have to document the software and hardware tools used in their research since the propagation research community will know the database already. The following sections show a possible database construction, as well as properties of the database for the propagation research.

  13. The representation of manipulable solid objects in a relational database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahler, D.

    1984-01-01

    This project is concerned with the interface between database management and solid geometric modeling. The desirability of integrating computer-aided design, manufacture, testing, and management into a coherent system is by now well recognized. One proposed configuration for such a system uses a relational database management system as the central focus; the various other functions are linked through their use of a common data repesentation in the data manager, rather than communicating pairwise to integrate a geometric modeling capability with a generic relational data managemet system in such a way that well-formed questions can be posed and answered about the performance of the system as a whole. One necessary feature of any such system is simplification for purposes of anaysis; this and system performance considerations meant that a paramount goal therefore was that of unity and simplicity of the data structures used.

  14. Performance assessment of EMR systems based on post-relational database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hai-Yan; Li, Jing-Song; Zhang, Xiao-Guang; Tian, Yu; Suzuki, Muneou; Araki, Kenji

    2012-08-01

    Post-relational databases provide high performance and are currently widely used in American hospitals. As few hospital information systems (HIS) in either China or Japan are based on post-relational databases, here we introduce a new-generation electronic medical records (EMR) system called Hygeia, which was developed with the post-relational database Caché and the latest platform Ensemble. Utilizing the benefits of a post-relational database, Hygeia is equipped with an "integration" feature that allows all the system users to access data-with a fast response time-anywhere and at anytime. Performance tests of databases in EMR systems were implemented in both China and Japan. First, a comparison test was conducted between a post-relational database, Caché, and a relational database, Oracle, embedded in the EMR systems of a medium-sized first-class hospital in China. Second, a user terminal test was done on the EMR system Izanami, which is based on the identical database Caché and operates efficiently at the Miyazaki University Hospital in Japan. The results proved that the post-relational database Caché works faster than the relational database Oracle and showed perfect performance in the real-time EMR system.

  15. Conceptual Model Formalization in a Semantic Interoperability Service Framework: Transforming Relational Database Schemas to OWL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Carlos; Suarez, Carlos; González, Carolina; López, Diego; Blobel, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare information is distributed through multiple heterogeneous and autonomous systems. Access to, and sharing of, distributed information sources are a challenging task. To contribute to meeting this challenge, this paper presents a formal, complete and semi-automatic transformation service from Relational Databases to Web Ontology Language. The proposed service makes use of an algorithm that allows to transform several data models of different domains by deploying mainly inheritance rules. The paper emphasizes the relevance of integrating the proposed approach into an ontology-based interoperability service to achieve semantic interoperability.

  16. The Use of a Relational Database in Qualitative Research on Educational Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winer, Laura R.; Carriere, Mario

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the use of a relational database as a data management and analysis tool for nonexperimental qualitative research, and describes the use of the Reflex Plus database in the Vitrine 2001 project in Quebec to study computer-based learning environments. Information systems are also discussed, and the use of a conceptual model is explained.…

  17. Enhanced DIII-D Data Management Through a Relational Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burruss, J. R.; Peng, Q.; Schachter, J.; Schissel, D. P.; Terpstra, T. B.

    2000-10-01

    A relational database is being used to serve data about DIII-D experiments. The database is optimized for queries across multiple shots, allowing for rapid data mining by SQL-literate researchers. The relational database relates different experiments and datasets, thus providing a big picture of DIII-D operations. Users are encouraged to add their own tables to the database. Summary physics quantities about DIII-D discharges are collected and stored in the database automatically. Meta-data about code runs, MDSplus usage, and visualization tool usage are collected, stored in the database, and later analyzed to improve computing. Documentation on the database may be accessed through programming languages such as C, Java, and IDL, or through ODBC compliant applications such as Excel and Access. A database-driven web page also provides a convenient means for viewing database quantities through the World Wide Web. Demonstrations will be given at the poster.

  18. MARC and Relational Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, Jose; Trenor, Asuncion

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the use of MARC format in relational databases and addresses problems of incompatibilities. A solution is presented that is in accordance with Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) standards and is based on experiences at the library of the Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain). (four references) (EA)

  19. An Introduction to the DB Relational Database Management System

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper is an introductory guide to using the Db programs to maintain and query a relational database on the UNIX operating system. In the past decade. increasing interest has been shown in the development of relational database management systems. Db is an attempt to incorporate a flexible and powerful relational database system within the user environment presented by the UNIX operating system. The family of Db programs is useful for maintaining a database of information that i...

  20. Monitoring of services with non-relational databases and map-reduce framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babik, M; Souto, F

    2012-01-01

    Service Availability Monitoring (SAM) is a well-established monitoring framework that performs regular measurements of the core site services and reports the corresponding availability and reliability of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) infrastructure. One of the existing extensions of SAM is Site Wide Area Testing (SWAT), which gathers monitoring information from the worker nodes via instrumented jobs. This generates quite a lot of monitoring data to process, as there are several data points for every job and several million jobs are executed every day. The recent uptake of non-relational databases opens a new paradigm in the large-scale storage and distributed processing of systems with heavy read-write workloads. For SAM this brings new possibilities to improve its model, from performing aggregation of measurements to storing raw data and subsequent re-processing. Both SAM and SWAT are currently tuned to run at top performance, reaching some of the limits in storage and processing power of their existing Oracle relational database. We investigated the usability and performance of non-relational storage together with its distributed data processing capabilities. For this, several popular systems have been compared. In this contribution we describe our investigation of the existing non-relational databases suited for monitoring systems covering Cassandra, HBase and MongoDB. Further, we present our experiences in data modeling and prototyping map-reduce algorithms focusing on the extension of the already existing availability and reliability computations. Finally, possible future directions in this area are discussed, analyzing the current deficiencies of the existing Grid monitoring systems and proposing solutions to leverage the benefits of the non-relational databases to get more scalable and flexible frameworks.

  1. Modification Semantics in Now-Relative Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp, Kristian; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard; Snodgrass, R. T.

    2004-01-01

    Most real-world databases record time-varying information. In such databases, the notion of ??the current time,?? or NOW, occurs naturally and prominently. For example, when capturing the past states of a relation using begin and end time columns, tuples that are part of the current state have some...... past time as their begin time and NOW as their end time. While the semantics of such variable databases has been described in detail and is well understood, the modification of variable databases remains unexplored. This paper defines the semantics of modifications involving the variable NOW. More...... specifically,  the problems with modifications in the presence of NOW are explored, illustrating that the main problems are with modifications of tuples that reach into the future. The paper defines the semantics of modifications?including insertions, deletions, and updates?of databases without NOW, with NOW...

  2. Database design using entity-relationship diagrams

    CERN Document Server

    Bagui, Sikha

    2011-01-01

    Data, Databases, and the Software Engineering ProcessDataBuilding a DatabaseWhat is the Software Engineering Process?Entity Relationship Diagrams and the Software Engineering Life Cycle          Phase 1: Get the Requirements for the Database          Phase 2: Specify the Database          Phase 3: Design the DatabaseData and Data ModelsFiles, Records, and Data ItemsMoving from 3 × 5 Cards to ComputersDatabase Models     The Hierarchical ModelThe Network ModelThe Relational ModelThe Relational Model and Functional DependenciesFundamental Relational DatabaseRelational Database and SetsFunctional

  3. Efficient hemodynamic event detection utilizing relational databases and wavelet analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, M.; Mark, R. G.

    2001-01-01

    Development of a temporal query framework for time-oriented medical databases has hitherto been a challenging problem. We describe a novel method for the detection of hemodynamic events in multiparameter trends utilizing wavelet coefficients in a MySQL relational database. Storage of the wavelet coefficients allowed for a compact representation of the trends, and provided robust descriptors for the dynamics of the parameter time series. A data model was developed to allow for simplified queries along several dimensions and time scales. Of particular importance, the data model and wavelet framework allowed for queries to be processed with minimal table-join operations. A web-based search engine was developed to allow for user-defined queries. Typical queries required between 0.01 and 0.02 seconds, with at least two orders of magnitude improvement in speed over conventional queries. This powerful and innovative structure will facilitate research on large-scale time-oriented medical databases.

  4. Constructing a Geology Ontology Using a Relational Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, W.; Yang, L.; Yin, S.; Ye, J.; Clarke, K.

    2013-12-01

    In geology community, the creation of a common geology ontology has become a useful means to solve problems of data integration, knowledge transformation and the interoperation of multi-source, heterogeneous and multiple scale geological data. Currently, human-computer interaction methods and relational database-based methods are the primary ontology construction methods. Some human-computer interaction methods such as the Geo-rule based method, the ontology life cycle method and the module design method have been proposed for applied geological ontologies. Essentially, the relational database-based method is a reverse engineering of abstracted semantic information from an existing database. The key is to construct rules for the transformation of database entities into the ontology. Relative to the human-computer interaction method, relational database-based methods can use existing resources and the stated semantic relationships among geological entities. However, two problems challenge the development and application. One is the transformation of multiple inheritances and nested relationships and their representation in an ontology. The other is that most of these methods do not measure the semantic retention of the transformation process. In this study, we focused on constructing a rule set to convert the semantics in a geological database into a geological ontology. According to the relational schema of a geological database, a conversion approach is presented to convert a geological spatial database to an OWL-based geological ontology, which is based on identifying semantics such as entities, relationships, inheritance relationships, nested relationships and cluster relationships. The semantic integrity of the transformation was verified using an inverse mapping process. In a geological ontology, an inheritance and union operations between superclass and subclass were used to present the nested relationship in a geochronology and the multiple inheritances

  5. The database for reaching experiments and models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Walker

    Full Text Available Reaching is one of the central experimental paradigms in the field of motor control, and many computational models of reaching have been published. While most of these models try to explain subject data (such as movement kinematics, reaching performance, forces, etc. from only a single experiment, distinct experiments often share experimental conditions and record similar kinematics. This suggests that reaching models could be applied to (and falsified by multiple experiments. However, using multiple datasets is difficult because experimental data formats vary widely. Standardizing data formats promises to enable scientists to test model predictions against many experiments and to compare experimental results across labs. Here we report on the development of a new resource available to scientists: a database of reaching called the Database for Reaching Experiments And Models (DREAM. DREAM collects both experimental datasets and models and facilitates their comparison by standardizing formats. The DREAM project promises to be useful for experimentalists who want to understand how their data relates to models, for modelers who want to test their theories, and for educators who want to help students better understand reaching experiments, models, and data analysis.

  6. Property Modelling and Databases in Product-Process Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul; Sansonetti, Sascha

    of the PC-SAFT is used. The developed database and property prediction models have been combined into a properties-software that allows different product-process design related applications. The presentation will also briefly highlight applications of the software for virtual product-process design...

  7. Applying AN Object-Oriented Database Model to a Scientific Database Problem: Managing Experimental Data at Cebaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlmann, Bryon K.

    Current scientific experiments are often characterized by massive amounts of very complex data and the need for complex data analysis software. Object-oriented database (OODB) systems have the potential of improving the description of the structure and semantics of this data and of integrating the analysis software with the data. This dissertation results from research to enhance OODB functionality and methodology to support scientific databases (SDBs) and, more specifically, to support a nuclear physics experiments database for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). This research to date has identified a number of problems related to the practical application of OODB technology to the conceptual design of the CEBAF experiments database and other SDBs: the lack of a generally accepted OODB design methodology, the lack of a standard OODB model, the lack of a clear conceptual level in existing OODB models, and the limited support in existing OODB systems for many common object relationships inherent in SDBs. To address these problems, the dissertation describes an Object-Relationship Diagram (ORD) and an Object-oriented Database Definition Language (ODDL) that provide tools that allow SDB design and development to proceed systematically and independently of existing OODB systems. These tools define multi-level, conceptual data models for SDB design, which incorporate a simple notation for describing common types of relationships that occur in SDBs. ODDL allows these relationships and other desirable SDB capabilities to be supported by an extended OODB system. A conceptual model of the CEBAF experiments database is presented in terms of ORDs and the ODDL to demonstrate their functionality and use and provide a foundation for future development of experimental nuclear physics software using an OODB approach.

  8. Dynamic tables: an architecture for managing evolving, heterogeneous biomedical data in relational database management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, John; Silberschatz, Avi; Miller, Perry L; Marenco, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Data sparsity and schema evolution issues affecting clinical informatics and bioinformatics communities have led to the adoption of vertical or object-attribute-value-based database schemas to overcome limitations posed when using conventional relational database technology. This paper explores these issues and discusses why biomedical data are difficult to model using conventional relational techniques. The authors propose a solution to these obstacles based on a relational database engine using a sparse, column-store architecture. The authors provide benchmarks comparing the performance of queries and schema-modification operations using three different strategies: (1) the standard conventional relational design; (2) past approaches used by biomedical informatics researchers; and (3) their sparse, column-store architecture. The performance results show that their architecture is a promising technique for storing and processing many types of data that are not handled well by the other two semantic data models.

  9. A C programmer's view of a relational database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifford, T.; Katz, R.; Griffiths, C.

    1990-01-01

    The AGS Distributed Control System (AGSDCS) uses a relational database (Interbase) for the storage of all data on the host system network. This includes the static data which describes the components of the accelerator complex, as well as data for application-program setup and data records that are used in analysis. By creating a mapping of each relation in the database to a C record and providing general tools for relation (record) access, all the data in the database is available in a natural fashion to all the C programs on any of the nodes of the control system. In this paper the correspondence between the Interbase relations and the C structure is detailed with examples of C 'typedefs' and relation definitions. It is also shown how the relations can be put into memory and linked (related) together when fast access is needed by programs. (orig.)

  10. Alternatives to relational database: comparison of NoSQL and XML approaches for clinical data storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ken Ka-Yin; Tang, Wai-Choi; Choi, Kup-Sze

    2013-04-01

    Clinical data are dynamic in nature, often arranged hierarchically and stored as free text and numbers. Effective management of clinical data and the transformation of the data into structured format for data analysis are therefore challenging issues in electronic health records development. Despite the popularity of relational databases, the scalability of the NoSQL database model and the document-centric data structure of XML databases appear to be promising features for effective clinical data management. In this paper, three database approaches--NoSQL, XML-enabled and native XML--are investigated to evaluate their suitability for structured clinical data. The database query performance is reported, together with our experience in the databases development. The results show that NoSQL database is the best choice for query speed, whereas XML databases are advantageous in terms of scalability, flexibility and extensibility, which are essential to cope with the characteristics of clinical data. While NoSQL and XML technologies are relatively new compared to the conventional relational database, both of them demonstrate potential to become a key database technology for clinical data management as the technology further advances. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Why Save Your Course as a Relational Database?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Gregory C.; Katz, David L.; Davis, James E.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a system that stores course materials for computer-based training programs in a relational database called Of Course! Outlines the basic structure of the databases; explains distinctions between Of Course! and other authoring languages; and describes how data is retrieved from the database and presented to the student. (Author/LRW)

  12. Jelly Views : Extending Relational Database Systems Toward Deductive Database Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Wojnicki

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper regards the Jelly View technology, which provides a new, practical methodology for knowledge decomposition, storage, and retrieval within Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS. Intensional Knowledge clauses (rules are decomposed and stored in the RDBMS founding reusable components. The results of the rule-based processing are visible as regular views, accessible through SQL. From the end-user point of view the processing capability becomes unlimited (arbitrarily complex queries can be constructed using Intensional Knowledge, while the most external queries are expressed with standard SQL. The RDBMS functionality becomes extended toward that of the Deductive Databases

  13. Advantages and disadvantages of relational and non-relational (NoSQL) databases for analytical tasks

    OpenAIRE

    Klapač, Milan

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on NoSQL databases, their use for analytical tasks and on comparison of NoSQL databases with relational and OLAP databases. The aim is to analyse the benefits of NoSQL databases and their use for analytical purposes. The first part presents the basic principles of Business Intelligence, Data Warehousing, and Big Data. The second part deals with the key features of relational and NoSQL databases. The last part of the thesis describes the properties of four basic types of NoSQ...

  14. NoSQL databases

    OpenAIRE

    Mrozek, Jakub

    2012-01-01

    This thesis deals with database systems referred to as NoSQL databases. In the second chapter, I explain basic terms and the theory of database systems. A short explanation is dedicated to database systems based on the relational data model and the SQL standardized query language. Chapter Three explains the concept and history of the NoSQL databases, and also presents database models, major features and the use of NoSQL databases in comparison with traditional database systems. In the fourth ...

  15. Relational Database Extension Oriented, Self-adaptive Imagery Pyramid Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HU Zhenghua

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available With the development of remote sensing technology, especially the improvement of sensor resolution, the amount of image data is increasing. This puts forward higher requirements to manage huge amount of data efficiently and intelligently. And how to access massive remote sensing data with efficiency and smartness becomes an increasingly popular topic. In this paper, against current development status of Spatial Data Management System, we proposed a self-adaptive strategy for image blocking and a method for LoD(level of detailmodel construction that adapts, with the combination of database storage, network transmission and the hardware of the client. Confirmed by experiments, this imagery management mechanism can achieve intelligent and efficient storage and access in a variety of different conditions of database, network and client. This study provides a feasible idea and method for efficient image data management, contributing to the efficient access and management for remote sensing image data which are based on database technology under network environment of C/S architecture.

  16. Object-relational database design-exploiting object orientation at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper applies the object-relational database paradigm in the design of a Health Management Information System. The class design, mapping of object classes to relational tables, the representation of inheritance hierarchies, and the appropriate database schema are all examined. Keywords: object relational ...

  17. The Steward Observatory asteroid relational database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Mark V.; Alvarezdelcastillo, Elizabeth M.

    1991-01-01

    The Steward Observatory Asteroid Relational Database (SOARD) was created as a flexible tool for undertaking studies of asteroid populations and sub-populations, to probe the biases intrinsic to asteroid databases, to ascertain the completeness of data pertaining to specific problems, to aid in the development of observational programs, and to develop pedagogical materials. To date, SOARD has compiled an extensive list of data available on asteroids and made it accessible through a single menu-driven database program. Users may obtain tailored lists of asteroid properties for any subset of asteroids or output files which are suitable for plotting spectral data on individual asteroids. The program has online help as well as user and programmer documentation manuals. The SOARD already has provided data to fulfill requests by members of the astronomical community. The SOARD continues to grow as data is added to the database and new features are added to the program.

  18. Data model and relational database design for the New Jersey Water-Transfer Data System (NJWaTr)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessler, Steven

    2003-01-01

    The New Jersey Water-Transfer Data System (NJWaTr) is a database design for the storage and retrieval of water-use data. NJWaTr can manage data encompassing many facets of water use, including (1) the tracking of various types of water-use activities (withdrawals, returns, transfers, distributions, consumptive-use, wastewater collection, and treatment); (2) the storage of descriptions, classifications and locations of places and organizations involved in water-use activities; (3) the storage of details about measured or estimated volumes of water associated with water-use activities; and (4) the storage of information about data sources and water resources associated with water use. In NJWaTr, each water transfer occurs unidirectionally between two site objects, and the sites and conveyances form a water network. The core entities in the NJWaTr model are site, conveyance, transfer/volume, location, and owner. Other important entities include water resource (used for withdrawals and returns), data source, permit, and alias. Multiple water-exchange estimates based on different methods or data sources can be stored for individual transfers. Storage of user-defined details is accommodated for several of the main entities. Many tables contain classification terms to facilitate the detailed description of data items and can be used for routine or custom data summarization. NJWaTr accommodates single-user and aggregate-user water-use data, can be used for large or small water-network projects, and is available as a stand-alone Microsoft? Access database. Data stored in the NJWaTr structure can be retrieved in user-defined combinations to serve visualization and analytical applications. Users can customize and extend the database, link it to other databases, or implement the design in other relational database applications.

  19. Human Thermal Model Evaluation Using the JSC Human Thermal Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant; Makinen, Janice; Cognata, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Human thermal modeling has considerable long term utility to human space flight. Such models provide a tool to predict crew survivability in support of vehicle design and to evaluate crew response in untested space environments. It is to the benefit of any such model not only to collect relevant experimental data to correlate it against, but also to maintain an experimental standard or benchmark for future development in a readily and rapidly searchable and software accessible format. The Human thermal database project is intended to do just so; to collect relevant data from literature and experimentation and to store the data in a database structure for immediate and future use as a benchmark to judge human thermal models against, in identifying model strengths and weakness, to support model development and improve correlation, and to statistically quantify a model s predictive quality. The human thermal database developed at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) is intended to evaluate a set of widely used human thermal models. This set includes the Wissler human thermal model, a model that has been widely used to predict the human thermoregulatory response to a variety of cold and hot environments. These models are statistically compared to the current database, which contains experiments of human subjects primarily in air from a literature survey ranging between 1953 and 2004 and from a suited experiment recently performed by the authors, for a quantitative study of relative strength and predictive quality of the models.

  20. Pro SQL Server 2012 relational database design and implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Davidson, Louis

    2012-01-01

    Learn effective and scalable database design techniques in a SQL Server environment. Pro SQL Server 2012 Relational Database Design and Implementation covers everything from design logic that business users will understand, all the way to the physical implementation of design in a SQL Server database. Grounded in best practices and a solid understanding of the underlying theory, Louis Davidson shows how to "get it right" in SQL Server database design and lay a solid groundwork for the future use of valuable business data. Gives a solid foundation in best practices and relational theory Covers

  1. The CEBAF Element Database and Related Operational Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larrieu, Theodore [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Slominski, Christopher [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Keesee, Marie [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Turner, Dennison [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Joyce, Michele [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The newly commissioned 12GeV CEBAF accelerator relies on a flexible, scalable and comprehensive database to define the accelerator. This database delivers the configuration for CEBAF operational tools, including hardware checkout, the downloadable optics model, control screens, and much more. The presentation will describe the flexible design of the CEBAF Element Database (CED), its features and assorted use case examples.

  2. A C programmer's view of a relational database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifford, T.; Katz, R.; Griffiths, C.

    1989-01-01

    The AGS Distributed Control System (AGSDCS) uses a relational database (Interbase) for the storage of all data on the host system network. This includes the static data which describes the components of the accelerator complex, as well as data for application program setup and data records that are used in analysis. By creating a mapping of each elation in the database to a C record and providing general tools for relation (record) across, all the data in the database is available in a natural fashion (in structures) to all the C programs on any of the nodes of the control system. In this paper the correspondence between the Interbase elations and the C structure is detailed with examples of C typedefs and relation definitions. It is also shown how the relations can be put into memory and linked (related) together when fast access is needed by programs. 1 ref., 2 tabs

  3. Database Independent Migration of Objects into an Object-Relational Database

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, A; Munir, K; Waseem-Hassan, M; Willers, I

    2002-01-01

    CERN's (European Organization for Nuclear Research) WISDOM project [1] deals with the replication of data between homogeneous sources in a Wide Area Network (WAN) using the extensible Markup Language (XML). The last phase of the WISDOM (Wide-area, database Independent Serialization of Distributed Objects for data Migration) project [2], indicates the future directions for this work to be to incorporate heterogeneous sources as compared to homogeneous sources as described by [3]. This work will become essential for the CERN community once the need to transfer their legacy data to some other source, other then Objectivity [4], arises. Oracle 9i - an Object-Relational Database (including support for abstract data types, ADTs) appears to be a potential candidate for the physics event store in the CERN CMS experiment as suggested by [4] & [5]. Consequently this database has been selected for study. As a result of this work the HEP community will get a tool for migrating their data from Objectivity to Oracle9i.

  4. Learning Ontology from Object-Relational Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaulins Andrejs

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a method of transformation of object-relational model into ontology. The offered method uses learning rules for such complex data types as object tables and collections – arrays of a variable size, as well as nested tables. Object types and their transformation into ontologies are insufficiently considered in scientific literature. This fact served as motivation for the authors to investigate this issue and to write the article on this matter. In the beginning, we acquaint the reader with complex data types and object-oriented databases. Then we describe an algorithm of transformation of complex data types into ontologies. At the end of the article, some examples of ontologies described in the OWL language are given.

  5. Database modeling to integrate macrobenthos data in Spatial Data Infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto Quintanilha

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Coastal zones are complex areas that include marine and terrestrial environments. Besides its huge environmental wealth, they also attracts humans because provides food, recreation, business, and transportation, among others. Some difficulties to manage these areas are related with their complexity, diversity of interests and the absence of standardization to collect and share data to scientific community, public agencies, among others. The idea to organize, standardize and share this information based on Web Atlas is essential to support planning and decision making issues. The construction of a spatial database integrating the environmental business, to be used on Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI is illustrated by a bioindicator that indicates the quality of the sediments. The models show the phases required to build Macrobenthos spatial database based on Santos Metropolitan Region as a reference. It is concluded that, when working with environmental data the structuring of knowledge in a conceptual model is essential for their subsequent integration into the SDI. During the modeling process it can be noticed that methodological issues related to the collection process may obstruct or prejudice the integration of data from different studies of the same area. The development of a database model, as presented in this study, can be used as a reference for further research with similar goals.

  6. Renal Gene Expression Database (RGED): a relational database of gene expression profiles in kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingzhou; Yang, Bo; Chen, Xujiao; Xu, Jing; Mei, Changlin; Mao, Zhiguo

    2014-01-01

    We present a bioinformatics database named Renal Gene Expression Database (RGED), which contains comprehensive gene expression data sets from renal disease research. The web-based interface of RGED allows users to query the gene expression profiles in various kidney-related samples, including renal cell lines, human kidney tissues and murine model kidneys. Researchers can explore certain gene profiles, the relationships between genes of interests and identify biomarkers or even drug targets in kidney diseases. The aim of this work is to provide a user-friendly utility for the renal disease research community to query expression profiles of genes of their own interest without the requirement of advanced computational skills. Website is implemented in PHP, R, MySQL and Nginx and freely available from http://rged.wall-eva.net. http://rged.wall-eva.net. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. A study on relational ENSDF databases and online services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Tieshuan; Song Xiangxiang; Ye Weiguo; Liu Wenlong; Feng Yuqing; Chen Jinxiang; Tang Guoyou; Shi Zhaoming; Guo Zhiyu; Huang Xiaolong; Liu Tingjin; China Inst. of Atomic Energy, Beijing

    2007-01-01

    A relational ENSDF library software is designed and released. Using relational databases, object-oriented programming and web-based technology, this software offers online data services of a centralized repository of data, including international ENSDF files for nuclear structure and decay data. The software can easily reconstruct nuclear data in original ENSDF format from the relational database. The computer programs providing support for database management and online data services via the Internet are based on the Linux implementation of PHP and the MySQL software, and platform independent in a wider sense. (authors)

  8. Index Selection in Relational Databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choenni, R.S.; Blanken, Henk; Chang, S.C.

    Intending to develop a tool which aims to support the physical design of relational databases can not be done without considering the problem of index selection. Generally the problem is split into a primary and secondary index selection problem and the selection is done per table. Whereas much

  9. Artificial intelligence techniques for modeling database user behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Steve; Graves, Sara J.

    1990-01-01

    The design and development of the adaptive modeling system is described. This system models how a user accesses a relational database management system in order to improve its performance by discovering use access patterns. In the current system, these patterns are used to improve the user interface and may be used to speed data retrieval, support query optimization and support a more flexible data representation. The system models both syntactic and semantic information about the user's access and employs both procedural and rule-based logic to manipulate the model.

  10. “NaKnowBase”: A Nanomaterials Relational Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    NaKnowBase is an internal relational database populated with data from peer-reviewed ORD nanomaterials research publications. The database focuses on papers describing the actions of nanomaterials in environmental or biological media including their interactions, transformations...

  11. Search extension transforms Wiki into a relational system: a case for flavonoid metabolite database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arita, Masanori; Suwa, Kazuhiro

    2008-09-17

    In computer science, database systems are based on the relational model founded by Edgar Codd in 1970. On the other hand, in the area of biology the word 'database' often refers to loosely formatted, very large text files. Although such bio-databases may describe conflicts or ambiguities (e.g. a protein pair do and do not interact, or unknown parameters) in a positive sense, the flexibility of the data format sacrifices a systematic query mechanism equivalent to the widely used SQL. To overcome this disadvantage, we propose embeddable string-search commands on a Wiki-based system and designed a half-formatted database. As proof of principle, a database of flavonoid with 6902 molecular structures from over 1687 plant species was implemented on MediaWiki, the background system of Wikipedia. Registered users can describe any information in an arbitrary format. Structured part is subject to text-string searches to realize relational operations. The system was written in PHP language as the extension of MediaWiki. All modifications are open-source and publicly available. This scheme benefits from both the free-formatted Wiki style and the concise and structured relational-database style. MediaWiki supports multi-user environments for document management, and the cost for database maintenance is alleviated.

  12. Modeling and implementing a database on drugs into a hospital intranet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, M; Joubert, M; Fieschi, D; Fieschi, M

    1998-09-01

    Our objective was to develop a drug information service, implementing a database on drugs in our university hospitals information system. Thériaque is a database, maintained by a group of pharmacists and physicians, on all the drugs available in France. Before its implementation we modeled its content (chemical classes, active components, excipients, indications, contra-indications, side effects, and so on) according to an object-oriented method. Then we designed HTML pages whose appearance translates the structure of classes of objects of the model. Fields in pages are dynamically fulfilled by the results of queries to a relational database in which information on drugs is stored. This allowed a fast implementation and did not imply to port a client application on the thousands of workstations over the network. The interface provides end-users with an easy-to-use and natural way to access information related to drugs in an internet environment.

  13. “NaKnowBase”: A Nanomaterials Relational Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    NaKnowBase is a relational database populated with data from peer-reviewed ORD nanomaterials research publications. The database focuses on papers describing the actions of nanomaterials in environmental or biological media including their interactions, transformations and poten...

  14. Exploiting relational database technology in a GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batty, Peter

    1992-05-01

    All systems for managing data face common problems such as backup, recovery, auditing, security, data integrity, and concurrent update. Other challenges include the ability to share data easily between applications and to distribute data across several computers, whereas continuing to manage the problems already mentioned. Geographic information systems are no exception, and need to tackle all these issues. Standard relational database-management systems (RDBMSs) provide many features to help solve the issues mentioned so far. This paper describes how the IBM geoManager product approaches these issues by storing all its geographic data in a standard RDBMS in order to take advantage of such features. Areas in which standard RDBMS functions need to be extended are highlighted, and the way in which geoManager does this is explained. The performance implications of storing all data in the relational database are discussed. An important distinction is made between the storage and management of geographic data and the manipulation and analysis of geographic data, which needs to be made when considering the applicability of relational database technology to GIS.

  15. Schema Design and Normalization Algorithm for XML Databases Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Abou El-Seoud

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study the problem of schema design and normalization in XML databases model. We show that, like relational databases, XML documents may contain redundant information, and this redundancy may cause update anomalies. Furthermore, such problems are caused by certain functional dependencies among paths in the document. Based on our research works, in which we presented the functional dependencies and normal forms of XML Schema, we present the decomposition algorithm for converting any XML Schema into normalized one, that satisfies X-BCNF.

  16. The Zebrafish Model Organism Database (ZFIN)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — ZFIN serves as the zebrafish model organism database. It aims to: a) be the community database resource for the laboratory use of zebrafish, b) develop and support...

  17. Domain fusion analysis by applying relational algebra to protein sequence and domain databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Kevin; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2003-05-06

    Domain fusion analysis is a useful method to predict functionally linked proteins that may be involved in direct protein-protein interactions or in the same metabolic or signaling pathway. As separate domain databases like BLOCKS, PROSITE, Pfam, SMART, PRINTS-S, ProDom, TIGRFAMs, and amalgamated domain databases like InterPro continue to grow in size and quality, a computational method to perform domain fusion analysis that leverages on these efforts will become increasingly powerful. This paper proposes a computational method employing relational algebra to find domain fusions in protein sequence databases. The feasibility of this method was illustrated on the SWISS-PROT+TrEMBL sequence database using domain predictions from the Pfam HMM (hidden Markov model) database. We identified 235 and 189 putative functionally linked protein partners in H. sapiens and S. cerevisiae, respectively. From scientific literature, we were able to confirm many of these functional linkages, while the remainder offer testable experimental hypothesis. Results can be viewed at http://calcium.uhnres.utoronto.ca/pi. As the analysis can be computed quickly on any relational database that supports standard SQL (structured query language), it can be dynamically updated along with the sequence and domain databases, thereby improving the quality of predictions over time.

  18. A data model and database for high-resolution pathology analytical image informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fusheng; Kong, Jun; Cooper, Lee; Pan, Tony; Kurc, Tahsin; Chen, Wenjin; Sharma, Ashish; Niedermayr, Cristobal; Oh, Tae W; Brat, Daniel; Farris, Alton B; Foran, David J; Saltz, Joel

    2011-01-01

    The systematic analysis of imaged pathology specimens often results in a vast amount of morphological information at both the cellular and sub-cellular scales. While microscopy scanners and computerized analysis are capable of capturing and analyzing data rapidly, microscopy image data remain underutilized in research and clinical settings. One major obstacle which tends to reduce wider adoption of these new technologies throughout the clinical and scientific communities is the challenge of managing, querying, and integrating the vast amounts of data resulting from the analysis of large digital pathology datasets. This paper presents a data model, which addresses these challenges, and demonstrates its implementation in a relational database system. This paper describes a data model, referred to as Pathology Analytic Imaging Standards (PAIS), and a database implementation, which are designed to support the data management and query requirements of detailed characterization of micro-anatomic morphology through many interrelated analysis pipelines on whole-slide images and tissue microarrays (TMAs). (1) Development of a data model capable of efficiently representing and storing virtual slide related image, annotation, markup, and feature information. (2) Development of a database, based on the data model, capable of supporting queries for data retrieval based on analysis and image metadata, queries for comparison of results from different analyses, and spatial queries on segmented regions, features, and classified objects. The work described in this paper is motivated by the challenges associated with characterization of micro-scale features for comparative and correlative analyses involving whole-slides tissue images and TMAs. Technologies for digitizing tissues have advanced significantly in the past decade. Slide scanners are capable of producing high-magnification, high-resolution images from whole slides and TMAs within several minutes. Hence, it is becoming

  19. A data model and database for high-resolution pathology analytical image informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fusheng Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The systematic analysis of imaged pathology specimens often results in a vast amount of morphological information at both the cellular and sub-cellular scales. While microscopy scanners and computerized analysis are capable of capturing and analyzing data rapidly, microscopy image data remain underutilized in research and clinical settings. One major obstacle which tends to reduce wider adoption of these new technologies throughout the clinical and scientific communities is the challenge of managing, querying, and integrating the vast amounts of data resulting from the analysis of large digital pathology datasets. This paper presents a data model, which addresses these challenges, and demonstrates its implementation in a relational database system. Context: This paper describes a data model, referred to as Pathology Analytic Imaging Standards (PAIS, and a database implementation, which are designed to support the data management and query requirements of detailed characterization of micro-anatomic morphology through many interrelated analysis pipelines on whole-slide images and tissue microarrays (TMAs. Aims: (1 Development of a data model capable of efficiently representing and storing virtual slide related image, annotation, markup, and feature information. (2 Development of a database, based on the data model, capable of supporting queries for data retrieval based on analysis and image metadata, queries for comparison of results from different analyses, and spatial queries on segmented regions, features, and classified objects. Settings and Design: The work described in this paper is motivated by the challenges associated with characterization of micro-scale features for comparative and correlative analyses involving whole-slides tissue images and TMAs. Technologies for digitizing tissues have advanced significantly in the past decade. Slide scanners are capable of producing high-magnification, high-resolution images from whole

  20. Distortion-Free Watermarking Approach for Relational Database Integrity Checking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lancine Camara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, internet is becoming a suitable way of accessing the databases. Such data are exposed to various types of attack with the aim to confuse the ownership proofing or the content protection. In this paper, we propose a new approach based on fragile zero watermarking for the authentication of numeric relational data. Contrary to some previous databases watermarking techniques which cause some distortions in the original database and may not preserve the data usability constraints, our approach simply seeks to generate the watermark from the original database. First, the adopted method partitions the database relation into independent square matrix groups. Then, group-based watermarks are securely generated and registered in a trusted third party. The integrity verification is performed by computing the determinant and the diagonal’s minor for each group. As a result, tampering can be localized up to attribute group level. Theoretical and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed technique is resilient against tuples insertion, tuples deletion, and attributes values modification attacks. Furthermore, comparison with recent related effort shows that our scheme performs better in detecting multifaceted attacks.

  1. A Relational Database Model for Managing Accelerator Control System Software at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sally Schaffner; Theodore Larrieu

    2001-01-01

    The operations software group at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility faces a number of challenges common to facilities which manage a large body of software developed in-house. Developers include members of the software group, operators, hardware engineers and accelerator physicists.One management problem has been ensuring that all software has an identified owner who is still working at the lab. In some cases, locating source code for ''orphaned'' software has also proven to be difficult. Other challenges include ensuring that working versions of all operational software are available, testing changes to operational software without impacting operations, upgrading infrastructure software (OS, compilers, interpreters, commercial packages, share/freeware, etc), ensuring that appropriate documentation is available and up to date, underutilization of code reuse, input/output file management,and determining what other software will break if a software package is upgraded. This paper will describe a relational database model which has been developed to track this type of information and make it available to managers and developers.The model also provides a foundation for developing productivity-enhancing tools for automated building, versioning, and installation of software. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE contract No. DE-AC05-84ER40150

  2. Repetitive Bibliographical Information in Relational Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Terrence A.

    1988-01-01

    Proposes a solution to the problem of loading repetitive bibliographic information in a microcomputer-based relational database management system. The alternative design described is based on a representational redundancy design and normalization theory. (12 references) (Author/CLB)

  3. Dynamic taxonomies applied to a web-based relational database for geo-hydrological risk mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, G. M.; Nigrelli, G.; Bosio, A.; Chiarle, M.; Luino, F.

    2012-02-01

    In its 40 years of activity, the Research Institute for Geo-hydrological Protection of the Italian National Research Council has amassed a vast and varied collection of historical documentation on landslides, muddy-debris flows, and floods in northern Italy from 1600 to the present. Since 2008, the archive resources have been maintained through a relational database management system. The database is used for routine study and research purposes as well as for providing support during geo-hydrological emergencies, when data need to be quickly and accurately retrieved. Retrieval speed and accuracy are the main objectives of an implementation based on a dynamic taxonomies model. Dynamic taxonomies are a general knowledge management model for configuring complex, heterogeneous information bases that support exploratory searching. At each stage of the process, the user can explore or browse the database in a guided yet unconstrained way by selecting the alternatives suggested for further refining the search. Dynamic taxonomies have been successfully applied to such diverse and apparently unrelated domains as e-commerce and medical diagnosis. Here, we describe the application of dynamic taxonomies to our database and compare it to traditional relational database query methods. The dynamic taxonomy interface, essentially a point-and-click interface, is considerably faster and less error-prone than traditional form-based query interfaces that require the user to remember and type in the "right" search keywords. Finally, dynamic taxonomy users have confirmed that one of the principal benefits of this approach is the confidence of having considered all the relevant information. Dynamic taxonomies and relational databases work in synergy to provide fast and precise searching: one of the most important factors in timely response to emergencies.

  4. BioModels Database: a repository of mathematical models of biological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelliah, Vijayalakshmi; Laibe, Camille; Le Novère, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    BioModels Database is a public online resource that allows storing and sharing of published, peer-reviewed quantitative, dynamic models of biological processes. The model components and behaviour are thoroughly checked to correspond the original publication and manually curated to ensure reliability. Furthermore, the model elements are annotated with terms from controlled vocabularies as well as linked to relevant external data resources. This greatly helps in model interpretation and reuse. Models are stored in SBML format, accepted in SBML and CellML formats, and are available for download in various other common formats such as BioPAX, Octave, SciLab, VCML, XPP and PDF, in addition to SBML. The reaction network diagram of the models is also available in several formats. BioModels Database features a search engine, which provides simple and more advanced searches. Features such as online simulation and creation of smaller models (submodels) from the selected model elements of a larger one are provided. BioModels Database can be accessed both via a web interface and programmatically via web services. New models are available in BioModels Database at regular releases, about every 4 months.

  5. Scalable Database Design of End-Game Model with Decoupled Countermeasure and Threat Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    the Army Modular Active Protection System (MAPS) program to provide end-to-end APS modeling and simulation capabilities. The SSES simulation features...research project of scalable database design was initiated in support of SSES modularization efforts with respect to 4 major software components...Iron Curtain KE kinetic energy MAPS Modular Active Protective System OLE DB object linking and embedding database RDB relational database RPG

  6. Development of Information Technology of Object-relational Databases Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentyn A. Filatov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is concerned with the development of information technology of object-relational databases design and study of object features infological and logical database schemes entities and connections.

  7. Switching the Fermilab Accelerator Control System to a relational database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shtirbu, S.

    1993-01-01

    The accelerator control system (open-quotes ACNETclose quotes) at Fermilab is using a made-in-house, Assembly language, database. The database holds device information, which is mostly used for finding out how to read/set devices and how to interpret alarms. This is a very efficient implementation, but it lacks the needed flexibility and forces applications to store data in private/shared files. This database is being replaced by an off-the-shelf relational database (Sybase 2 ). The major constraints on switching are the necessity to maintain/improve response time and to minimize changes to existing applications. Innovative methods are used to help achieve the required performance, and a layer seven gateway simulates the old database for existing programs. The new database is running on a DEC ALPHA/VMS platform, and provides better performance. The switch is also exposing problems with the data currently stored in the database, and is helping in cleaning up erroneous data. The flexibility of the new relational database is going to facilitate many new applications in the future (e.g. a 3D presentation of device location). The new database is expected to fully replace the old database during this summer's shutdown

  8. From ISIS to CouchDB: Databases and Data Models for Bibliographic Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Ramalho

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available For decades bibliographic data has been stored in non-relational databases, and thousands of libraries in developing countries still use ISIS databases to run their OPACs. Fast forward to 2010 and the NoSQL movement has shown that non-relational databases are good enough for Google, Amazon.com and Facebook. Meanwhile, several Open Source NoSQL systems have appeared. This paper discusses the data model of one class of NoSQL products, semistructured, document-oriented databases exemplified by Apache CouchDB and MongoDB, and why they are well-suited to collective cataloging applications. Also shown are the methods, tools, and scripts used to convert, from ISIS to CouchDB, bibliographic records of LILACS, a key Latin American and Caribbean health sciences index operated by the Pan-American Health Organization.

  9. Relational databases for rare disease study: application to vascular anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Jonathan A; Coltrera, Marc D

    2008-01-01

    To design a relational database integrating clinical and basic science data needed for multidisciplinary treatment and research in the field of vascular anomalies. Based on data points agreed on by the American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology (ASPO) Vascular Anomalies Task Force. The database design enables sharing of data subsets in a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant manner for multisite collaborative trials. Vascular anomalies pose diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Our understanding of these lesions and treatment improvement is limited by nonstandard terminology, severity assessment, and measures of treatment efficacy. The rarity of these lesions places a premium on coordinated studies among multiple participant sites. The relational database design is conceptually centered on subjects having 1 or more lesions. Each anomaly can be tracked individually along with their treatment outcomes. This design allows for differentiation between treatment responses and untreated lesions' natural course. The relational database design eliminates data entry redundancy and results in extremely flexible search and data export functionality. Vascular anomaly programs in the United States. A relational database correlating clinical findings and photographic, radiologic, histologic, and treatment data for vascular anomalies was created for stand-alone and multiuser networked systems. Proof of concept for independent site data gathering and HIPAA-compliant sharing of data subsets was demonstrated. The collaborative effort by the ASPO Vascular Anomalies Task Force to create the database helped define a common vascular anomaly data set. The resulting relational database software is a powerful tool to further the study of vascular anomalies and the development of evidence-based treatment innovation.

  10. Predicting Customers Churn in a Relational Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin CIMPOERU

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores how two main classical classification models work and generate predictions through a commercial solution of relational database management system (Microsoft SQL Server 2012. The aim of the paper is to accurately predict churn among a set of customers defined by various discrete and continuous variables, derived from three main data sources: the commercial transactions history; the users’ behavior or events happening on their computers; the specific identity information provided by the customers themselves. On a theoretical side, the paper presents the main concepts and ideas underlying the Decision Tree and Naïve Bayes classifiers and exemplifies some of them with actual hand-made calculations of the data being modeled by the software. On an analytical and practical side, the paper analyzes the graphs and tables generated by the classifying models and also reveal the main data insights. In the end, the classifiers’ accuracy is evaluated based on the test data method. The most accurate one is chosen for generating predictions on the customers’ data where the values of the response variable are not known.

  11. Logical database design principles

    CERN Document Server

    Garmany, John; Clark, Terry

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION TO LOGICAL DATABASE DESIGNUnderstanding a Database Database Architectures Relational Databases Creating the Database System Development Life Cycle (SDLC)Systems Planning: Assessment and Feasibility System Analysis: RequirementsSystem Analysis: Requirements Checklist Models Tracking and Schedules Design Modeling Functional Decomposition DiagramData Flow Diagrams Data Dictionary Logical Structures and Decision Trees System Design: LogicalSYSTEM DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION The ER ApproachEntities and Entity Types Attribute Domains AttributesSet-Valued AttributesWeak Entities Constraint

  12. Schema Versioning for Multitemporal Relational Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Castro, Cristina; Grandi, Fabio; Scalas, Maria Rita

    1997-01-01

    Investigates new design options for extended schema versioning support for multitemporal relational databases. Discusses the improved functionalities they may provide. Outlines options and basic motivations for the new design solutions, as well as techniques for the management of proposed schema versioning solutions, includes algorithms and…

  13. A parallel model for SQL astronomical databases based on solid state storage. Application to the Gaia Archive PostgreSQL database

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Núñez, J.; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, R.; Salgado, J.; Segovia, J. C.; Merín, B.; Aguado-Agelet, F.

    2017-07-01

    Query planning and optimisation algorithms in most popular relational databases were developed at the times hard disk drives were the only storage technology available. The advent of higher parallel random access capacity devices, such as solid state disks, opens up the way for intra-machine parallel computing over large datasets. We describe a two phase parallel model for the implementation of heavy analytical processes in single instance PostgreSQL astronomical databases. This model is particularised to fulfil two frequent astronomical problems, density maps and crossmatch computation with Quad Tree Cube (Q3C) indexes. They are implemented as part of the relational databases infrastructure for the Gaia Archive and performance is assessed. Improvement of a factor 28.40 in comparison to sequential execution is observed in the reference implementation for a histogram computation. Speedup ratios of 3.7 and 4.0 are attained for the reference positional crossmatches considered. We observe large performance enhancements over sequential execution for both CPU and disk access intensive computations, suggesting these methods might be useful with the growing data volumes in Astronomy.

  14. Solid Waste Projection Model: Database (Version 1.3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburn, C.L.

    1991-11-01

    The Solid Waste Projection Model (SWPM) system is an analytical tool developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The SWPM system provides a modeling and analysis environment that supports decisions in the process of evaluating various solid waste management alternatives. This document, one of a series describing the SWPM system, contains detailed information regarding the software and data structures utilized in developing the SWPM Version 1.3 Database. This document is intended for use by experienced database specialists and supports database maintenance, utility development, and database enhancement

  15. OCL2Trigger: Deriving active mechanisms for relational databases using Model-Driven Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Jumaily, Harith T.; Cuadra, Dolores; Martínez, Paloma

    2008-01-01

    16 pages, 10 figures.-- Issue title: "Best papers from the 2007 Australian Software Engineering Conference (ASWEC 2007), Melbourne, Australia, April 10-13, 2007, Australian Software Engineering Conference 2007". Transforming integrity constraints into active rules or triggers for verifying database consistency produces a serious and complex problem related to real time behaviour that must be considered for any implementation. Our main contribution to this work is to provide a complete appr...

  16. Integrated Space Asset Management Database and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry; Percy, Thomas; Mason, Shane

    2015-01-01

    Effective Space Asset Management is one key to addressing the ever-growing issue of space congestion. It is imperative that agencies around the world have access to data regarding the numerous active assets and pieces of space junk currently tracked in orbit around the Earth. At the center of this issues is the effective management of data of many types related to orbiting objects. As the population of tracked objects grows, so too should the data management structure used to catalog technical specifications, orbital information, and metadata related to those populations. Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Asset Management Database (SAM-D) was implemented in order to effectively catalog a broad set of data related to known objects in space by ingesting information from a variety of database and processing that data into useful technical information. Using the universal NORAD number as a unique identifier, the SAM-D processes two-line element data into orbital characteristics and cross-references this technical data with metadata related to functional status, country of ownership, and application category. The SAM-D began as an Excel spreadsheet and was later upgraded to an Access database. While SAM-D performs its task very well, it is limited by its current platform and is not available outside of the local user base. Further, while modeling and simulation can be powerful tools to exploit the information contained in SAM-D, the current system does not allow proper integration options for combining the data with both legacy and new M&S tools. This paper provides a summary of SAM-D development efforts to date and outlines a proposed data management infrastructure that extends SAM-D to support the larger data sets to be generated. A service-oriented architecture model using an information sharing platform named SIMON will allow it to easily expand to incorporate new capabilities, including advanced analytics, M&S tools, fusion techniques and user interface for

  17. Relational databases for SSC design and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, E.; Peggs, S.; Saltmarsh, C.

    1989-01-01

    Most people agree that a database is A Good Thing, but there is much confusion in the jargon used, and in what jobs a database management system and its peripheral software can and cannot do. During the life cycle of an enormous project like the SSC, from conceptual and theoretical design, through research and development, to construction, commissioning and operation, an enormous amount of data will be generated. Some of these data, originating in the early parts of the project, will be needed during commissioning or operation, many years in the future. Two of these pressing data management needs-from the magnet research and industrialization programs and the lattice design-have prompted work on understanding and adapting commercial database practices for scientific projects. Modern relational database management systems (rDBMS's) cope naturally with a large proportion of the requirements of data structures, like the SSC database structure built for the superconduction cable supplies, uses, and properties. This application is similar to the commercial applications for which these database systems were developed. The SSC application has further requirements not immediately satisfied by the commercial systems. These derive from the diversity of the data structures to be managed, the changing emphases and uses during the project lifetime, and the large amount of scientific data processing to be expected. 4 refs., 5 figs

  18. Heuristic program to design Relational Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Pereira Rosa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The great development of today’s world determines that the world level of information increases day after day, however, the time allowed to transmit this information in the classrooms has not changed. Thus, the rational work in this respect is more than necessary. Besides, if for the solution of a given type of problem we do not have a working algorism, we have, first to look for a correct solution, then the heuristic programs are of paramount importance to succeed in these aspects. Having into consideration that the design of the database is, essentially, a process of problem resolution, this article aims at proposing a heuristic program for the design of the relating database.

  19. Protein Simulation Data in the Relational Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Andrew M; Daggett, Valerie

    2012-10-01

    High performance computing is leading to unprecedented volumes of data. Relational databases offer a robust and scalable model for storing and analyzing scientific data. However, these features do not come without a cost-significant design effort is required to build a functional and efficient repository. Modeling protein simulation data in a relational database presents several challenges: the data captured from individual simulations are large, multi-dimensional, and must integrate with both simulation software and external data sites. Here we present the dimensional design and relational implementation of a comprehensive data warehouse for storing and analyzing molecular dynamics simulations using SQL Server.

  20. HIERARCHICAL ORGANIZATION OF INFORMATION, IN RELATIONAL DATABASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demian Horia

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I will present different types of representation, of hierarchical information inside a relational database. I also will compare them to find the best organization for specific scenarios.

  1. UNESCO Global Ethics Observatory: database on ethics related legislation and guidelines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ang, T.W.; Have, H.A.M.J. ten; Solbakk, J.H.; Nys, H.

    2008-01-01

    The Database on Ethics Related Legislation and Guidelines was launched in March 2007 as the fourth database of the UNESCO Global Ethics Observatory system of databases in ethics of science and technology. The database offers a collection of legal instruments searchable by region, country, bioethical

  2. On the modelling of microsegregation in steels involving thermodynamic databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, D; Bernhard, C; Michelic, S; Wieser, G; Presoly, P

    2016-01-01

    A microsegregation model involving thermodynamic database based on Ohnaka's model is proposed. In the model, the thermodynamic database is applied for equilibrium calculation. Multicomponent alloy effects on partition coefficients and equilibrium temperatures are accounted for. Microsegregation and partition coefficients calculated using different databases exhibit significant differences. The segregated concentrations predicted using the optimized database are in good agreement with the measured inter-dendritic concentrations. (paper)

  3. Insertion algorithms for network model database management systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamadolimov, Abdurashid; Khikmat, Saburov

    2017-12-01

    The network model is a database model conceived as a flexible way of representing objects and their relationships. Its distinguishing feature is that the schema, viewed as a graph in which object types are nodes and relationship types are arcs, forms partial order. When a database is large and a query comparison is expensive then the efficiency requirement of managing algorithms is minimizing the number of query comparisons. We consider updating operation for network model database management systems. We develop a new sequantial algorithm for updating operation. Also we suggest a distributed version of the algorithm.

  4. Artemis and ACT: viewing, annotating and comparing sequences stored in a relational database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Tim; Berriman, Matthew; Tivey, Adrian; Patel, Chinmay; Böhme, Ulrike; Barrell, Barclay G; Parkhill, Julian; Rajandream, Marie-Adèle

    2008-12-01

    Artemis and Artemis Comparison Tool (ACT) have become mainstream tools for viewing and annotating sequence data, particularly for microbial genomes. Since its first release, Artemis has been continuously developed and supported with additional functionality for editing and analysing sequences based on feedback from an active user community of laboratory biologists and professional annotators. Nevertheless, its utility has been somewhat restricted by its limitation to reading and writing from flat files. Therefore, a new version of Artemis has been developed, which reads from and writes to a relational database schema, and allows users to annotate more complex, often large and fragmented, genome sequences. Artemis and ACT have now been extended to read and write directly to the Generic Model Organism Database (GMOD, http://www.gmod.org) Chado relational database schema. In addition, a Gene Builder tool has been developed to provide structured forms and tables to edit coordinates of gene models and edit functional annotation, based on standard ontologies, controlled vocabularies and free text. Artemis and ACT are freely available (under a GPL licence) for download (for MacOSX, UNIX and Windows) at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute web sites: http://www.sanger.ac.uk/Software/Artemis/ http://www.sanger.ac.uk/Software/ACT/

  5. The Xeno-glycomics database (XDB): a relational database of qualitative and quantitative pig glycome repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Min; Park, Ju-Hyeong; Kim, Yoon-Woo; Kim, Kyoung-Jin; Jeong, Hee-Jin; Jang, Kyoung-Soon; Kim, Byung-Gee; Kim, Yun-Gon

    2013-11-15

    In recent years, the improvement of mass spectrometry-based glycomics techniques (i.e. highly sensitive, quantitative and high-throughput analytical tools) has enabled us to obtain a large dataset of glycans. Here we present a database named Xeno-glycomics database (XDB) that contains cell- or tissue-specific pig glycomes analyzed with mass spectrometry-based techniques, including a comprehensive pig glycan information on chemical structures, mass values, types and relative quantities. It was designed as a user-friendly web-based interface that allows users to query the database according to pig tissue/cell types or glycan masses. This database will contribute in providing qualitative and quantitative information on glycomes characterized from various pig cells/organs in xenotransplantation and might eventually provide new targets in the α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene-knock out pigs era. The database can be accessed on the web at http://bioinformatics.snu.ac.kr/xdb.

  6. A blind reversible robust watermarking scheme for relational databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chin-Chen; Nguyen, Thai-Son; Lin, Chia-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Protecting the ownership and controlling the copies of digital data have become very important issues in Internet-based applications. Reversible watermark technology allows the distortion-free recovery of relational databases after the embedded watermark data are detected or verified. In this paper, we propose a new, blind, reversible, robust watermarking scheme that can be used to provide proof of ownership for the owner of a relational database. In the proposed scheme, a reversible data-embedding algorithm, which is referred to as "histogram shifting of adjacent pixel difference" (APD), is used to obtain reversibility. The proposed scheme can detect successfully 100% of the embedded watermark data, even if as much as 80% of the watermarked relational database is altered. Our extensive analysis and experimental results show that the proposed scheme is robust against a variety of data attacks, for example, alteration attacks, deletion attacks, mix-match attacks, and sorting attacks.

  7. Solid Waste Projection Model: Database (Version 1.4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburn, C.; Cillan, T.

    1993-09-01

    The Solid Waste Projection Model (SWPM) system is an analytical tool developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The SWPM system provides a modeling and analysis environment that supports decisions in the process of evaluating various solid waste management alternatives. This document, one of a series describing the SWPM system, contains detailed information regarding the software and data structures utilized in developing the SWPM Version 1.4 Database. This document is intended for use by experienced database specialists and supports database maintenance, utility development, and database enhancement. Those interested in using the SWPM database should refer to the SWPM Database User's Guide. This document is available from the PNL Task M Project Manager (D. L. Stiles, 509-372-4358), the PNL Task L Project Manager (L. L. Armacost, 509-372-4304), the WHC Restoration Projects Section Manager (509-372-1443), or the WHC Waste Characterization Manager (509-372-1193)

  8. A relational database for physical data from TJ-II discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, E.; Portas, A.B.; Vega, J.

    2002-01-01

    A relational database (RDB) has been developed for classifying TJ-II experimental data according to physical criteria. Two objectives have been achieved: the design and the implementation of the database and the software tools for data access depending on a single software driver. TJ-II data were arranged in several tables with a flexible design, speedy performance, efficient search capacity and adaptability to meet present and future, requirements. The software has been developed to allow the access to the TJ-II RDB from a variety of computer platforms (ALPHA AXP/True64 UNIX, CRAY/UNICOS, Intel Linux, Sparc/Solaris and Intel/Windows 95/98/NT) and programming languages (FORTRAN and C/C++). The database resides in a Windows NT Server computer and is managed by Microsoft SQL Server. The access software is based on open network computing remote procedure call and follows client/server model. A server program running in the Windows NT computer controls data access. Operations on the database (through a local ODBC connection) are performed according to predefined permission protocols. A client library providing a set of basic functions for data integration and retrieval has been built in both static and dynamic link versions. The dynamic version is essential in accessing RDB data from 4GL environments (IDL and PV-WAVE among others)

  9. An Animated Introduction to Relational Databases for Many Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Suzanne W.; Goelman, Don; Borror, Connie M.; Crook, Sharon M.

    2015-01-01

    Database technology affects many disciplines beyond computer science and business. This paper describes two animations developed with images and color that visually and dynamically introduce fundamental relational database concepts and querying to students of many majors. The goal is for educators in diverse academic disciplines to incorporate the…

  10. Physical database design using Oracle

    CERN Document Server

    Burleson, Donald K

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION TO ORACLE PHYSICAL DESIGNPrefaceRelational Databases and Physical DesignSystems Analysis and Physical Database DesignIntroduction to Logical Database DesignEntity/Relation ModelingBridging between Logical and Physical ModelsPhysical Design Requirements Validation PHYSICAL ENTITY DESIGN FOR ORACLEData Relationships and Physical DesignMassive De-Normalization: STAR Schema DesignDesigning Class HierarchiesMaterialized Views and De-NormalizationReferential IntegrityConclusionORACLE HARDWARE DESIGNPlanning the Server EnvironmentDesigning the Network Infrastructure for OracleOracle Netw

  11. Brasilia’s Database Administrators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Adriana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Database administration has gained an essential role in the management of new database technologies. Different data models are being created for supporting the enormous data volume, from the traditional relational database. These new models are called NoSQL (Not only SQL databases. The adoption of best practices and procedures, has become essential for the operation of database management systems. Thus, this paper investigates some of the techniques and tools used by database administrators. The study highlights features and particularities in databases within the area of Brasilia, the Capital of Brazil. The results point to which new technologies regarding database management are currently the most relevant, as well as the central issues in this area.

  12. Database of Literature on Guided Imagery and Music and Related Topics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2015-01-01

    A March 2015 update of the largest international database on literature on Guided Imagery and Music and related topics.......A March 2015 update of the largest international database on literature on Guided Imagery and Music and related topics....

  13. Solid Waste Projection Model: Database User's Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburn, C.L.

    1993-10-01

    The Solid Waste Projection Model (SWPM) system is an analytical tool developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) specifically to address Hanford solid waste management issues. This document is one of a set of documents supporting the SWPM system and providing instructions in the use and maintenance of SWPM components. This manual contains instructions for using Version 1.4 of the SWPM database: system requirements and preparation, entering and maintaining data, and performing routine database functions. This document supports only those operations which are specific to SWPM database menus and functions and does not Provide instruction in the use of Paradox, the database management system in which the SWPM database is established

  14. Managing XML Data to optimize Performance into Object-Relational Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuliana BOTHA

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper propose some possibilities for manage XML data in order to optimize performance into object-relational databases. It is detailed the possibility of storing XML data into such databases, using for exemplification an Oracle database and there are tested some optimizing techniques of the queries over XMLType tables, like indexing and partitioning tables.

  15. Technical Aspects of Interfacing MUMPS to an External SQL Relational Database Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmak, Peter M.; Walters, Richard F.; Penrod, Gail

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes an interface connecting InterSystems MUMPS (M/VX) to an external relational DBMS, the SYBASE Database Management System. The interface enables MUMPS to operate in a relational environment and gives the MUMPS language full access to a complete set of SQL commands. MUMPS generates SQL statements as ASCII text and sends them to the RDBMS. The RDBMS executes the statements and returns ASCII results to MUMPS. The interface suggests that the language features of MUMPS make it an attractive tool for use in the relational database environment. The approach described in this paper separates MUMPS from the relational database. Positioning the relational database outside of MUMPS promotes data sharing and permits a number of different options to be used for working with the data. Other languages like C, FORTRAN, and COBOL can access the RDBMS database. Advanced tools provided by the relational database vendor can also be used. SYBASE is an advanced high-performance transaction-oriented relational database management system for the VAX/VMS and UNIX operating systems. SYBASE is designed using a distributed open-systems architecture, and is relatively easy to interface with MUMPS.

  16. A novel approach: chemical relational databases, and the role of the ISSCAN database on assessing chemical carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benigni, Romualdo; Bossa, Cecilia; Richard, Ann M; Yang, Chihae

    2008-01-01

    Mutagenicity and carcinogenicity databases are crucial resources for toxicologists and regulators involved in chemicals risk assessment. Until recently, existing public toxicity databases have been constructed primarily as "look-up-tables" of existing data, and most often did not contain chemical structures. Concepts and technologies originated from the structure-activity relationships science have provided powerful tools to create new types of databases, where the effective linkage of chemical toxicity with chemical structure can facilitate and greatly enhance data gathering and hypothesis generation, by permitting: a) exploration across both chemical and biological domains; and b) structure-searchability through the data. This paper reviews the main public databases, together with the progress in the field of chemical relational databases, and presents the ISSCAN database on experimental chemical carcinogens.

  17. [Relational database for urinary stone ambulatory consultation. Assessment of initial outcomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáenz Medina, J; Páez Borda, A; Crespo Martinez, L; Gómez Dos Santos, V; Barrado, C; Durán Poveda, M

    2010-05-01

    To create a relational database for monitoring lithiasic patients. We describe the architectural details and the initial results of the statistical analysis. Microsoft Access 2002 was used as template. Four different tables were constructed to gather demographic data (table 1), clinical and laboratory findings (table 2), stone features (table 3) and therapeutic approach (table 4). For a reliability analysis of the database the number of correctly stored data was gathered. To evaluate the performance of the database, a prospective analysis was conducted, from May 2004 to August 2009, on 171 stone free patients after treatment (EWSL, surgery or medical) from a total of 511 patients stored in the database. Lithiasic status (stone free or stone relapse) was used as primary end point, while demographic factors (age, gender), lithiasic history, upper urinary tract alterations and characteristics of the stone (side, location, composition and size) were considered as predictive factors. An univariate analysis was conducted initially by chi square test and supplemented by Kaplan Meier estimates for time to stone recurrence. A multiple Cox proportional hazards regression model was generated to jointly assess the prognostic value of the demographic factors and the predictive value of stones characteristics. For the reliability analysis 22,084 data were available corresponding to 702 consultations on 511 patients. Analysis of data showed a recurrence rate of 85.4% (146/171, median time to recurrence 608 days, range 70-1758). In the univariate and multivariate analysis, none of the factors under consideration had a significant effect on recurrence rate (p=ns). The relational database is useful for monitoring patients with urolithiasis. It allows easy control and update, as well as data storage for later use. The analysis conducted for its evaluation showed no influence of demographic factors and stone features on stone recurrence.

  18. The Network Configuration of an Object Relational Database Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Philip; Harris, W. C.

    2000-01-01

    The networking and implementation of the Oracle Database Management System (ODBMS) requires developers to have knowledge of the UNIX operating system as well as all the features of the Oracle Server. The server is an object relational database management system (DBMS). By using distributed processing, processes are split up between the database server and client application programs. The DBMS handles all the responsibilities of the server. The workstations running the database application concentrate on the interpretation and display of data.

  19. Brain Tumor Database, a free relational database for collection and analysis of brain tumor patient information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamino, Maurizio; Hamilton, David J; Castelletti, Lara; Barletta, Laura; Castellan, Lucio

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we describe the development and utilization of a relational database designed to manage the clinical and radiological data of patients with brain tumors. The Brain Tumor Database was implemented using MySQL v.5.0, while the graphical user interface was created using PHP and HTML, thus making it easily accessible through a web browser. This web-based approach allows for multiple institutions to potentially access the database. The BT Database can record brain tumor patient information (e.g. clinical features, anatomical attributes, and radiological characteristics) and be used for clinical and research purposes. Analytic tools to automatically generate statistics and different plots are provided. The BT Database is a free and powerful user-friendly tool with a wide range of possible clinical and research applications in neurology and neurosurgery. The BT Database graphical user interface source code and manual are freely available at http://tumorsdatabase.altervista.org. © The Author(s) 2013.

  20. Nonmaterialized Relations and the Support of Information Retrieval Applications by Relational Database Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Clifford A.

    1991-01-01

    Describes several aspects of the problem of supporting information retrieval system query requirements in the relational database management system (RDBMS) environment and proposes an extension to query processing called nonmaterialized relations. User interactions with information retrieval systems are discussed, and nonmaterialized relations are…

  1. Simple Logic for Big Problems: An Inside Look at Relational Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seba, Douglas B.; Smith, Pat

    1982-01-01

    Discusses database design concept termed "normalization" (process replacing associations between data with associations in two-dimensional tabular form) which results in formation of relational databases (they are to computers what dictionaries are to spoken languages). Applications of the database in serials control and complex systems…

  2. Artemis and ACT: viewing, annotating and comparing sequences stored in a relational database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Tim; Berriman, Matthew; Tivey, Adrian; Patel, Chinmay; Böhme, Ulrike; Barrell, Barclay G.; Parkhill, Julian; Rajandream, Marie-Adèle

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Artemis and Artemis Comparison Tool (ACT) have become mainstream tools for viewing and annotating sequence data, particularly for microbial genomes. Since its first release, Artemis has been continuously developed and supported with additional functionality for editing and analysing sequences based on feedback from an active user community of laboratory biologists and professional annotators. Nevertheless, its utility has been somewhat restricted by its limitation to reading and writing from flat files. Therefore, a new version of Artemis has been developed, which reads from and writes to a relational database schema, and allows users to annotate more complex, often large and fragmented, genome sequences. Results: Artemis and ACT have now been extended to read and write directly to the Generic Model Organism Database (GMOD, http://www.gmod.org) Chado relational database schema. In addition, a Gene Builder tool has been developed to provide structured forms and tables to edit coordinates of gene models and edit functional annotation, based on standard ontologies, controlled vocabularies and free text. Availability: Artemis and ACT are freely available (under a GPL licence) for download (for MacOSX, UNIX and Windows) at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute web sites: http://www.sanger.ac.uk/Software/Artemis/ http://www.sanger.ac.uk/Software/ACT/ Contact: artemis@sanger.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:18845581

  3. Database and Interim Glass Property Models for Hanford HLW Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrma, Pavel R; Piepel, Gregory F; Vienna, John D; Cooley, Scott K; Kim, Dong-Sang; Russell, Renee L

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a methodology for an increase in the efficiency and a decrease in the cost of vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) by optimizing HLW glass formulation. This methodology consists in collecting and generating a database of glass properties that determine HLW glass processability and acceptability and relating these properties to glass composition. The report explains how the property-composition models are developed, fitted to data, used for glass formulation optimization, and continuously updated in response to changes in HLW composition estimates and changes in glass processing technology. Further, the report reviews the glass property-composition literature data and presents their preliminary critical evaluation and screening. Finally the report provides interim property-composition models for melt viscosity, for liquidus temperature (with spinel and zircon primary crystalline phases), and for the product consistency test normalized releases of B, Na, and Li. Models were fitted to a subset of the screened database deemed most relevant for the current HLW composition region

  4. Persistent Functional Languages: Toward Functional Relational Databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wevers, L.

    2014-01-01

    Functional languages provide new approaches to concurrency control, based on techniques such as lazy evaluation and memoization. We have designed and implemented a persistent functional language based on these ideas, which we plan to use for the implementation of a relational database system. With

  5. Relational Database for the Geology of the Northern Rocky Mountains - Idaho, Montana, and Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causey, J. Douglas; Zientek, Michael L.; Bookstrom, Arthur A.; Frost, Thomas P.; Evans, Karl V.; Wilson, Anna B.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Boleneus, David E.; Pitts, Rebecca A.

    2008-01-01

    A relational database was created to prepare and organize geologic map-unit and lithologic descriptions for input into a spatial database for the geology of the northern Rocky Mountains, a compilation of forty-three geologic maps for parts of Idaho, Montana, and Washington in U.S. Geological Survey Open File Report 2005-1235. Not all of the information was transferred to and incorporated in the spatial database due to physical file limitations. This report releases that part of the relational database that was completed for that earlier product. In addition to descriptive geologic information for the northern Rocky Mountains region, the relational database contains a substantial bibliography of geologic literature for the area. The relational database nrgeo.mdb (linked below) is available in Microsoft Access version 2000, a proprietary database program. The relational database contains data tables and other tables used to define terms, relationships between the data tables, and hierarchical relationships in the data; forms used to enter data; and queries used to extract data.

  6. Relational databases for conditions data and event selection in ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viegas, F; Hawkings, R; Dimitrov, G

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at LHC will make extensive use of relational databases in both online and offline contexts, running to O(TBytes) per year. Two of the most challenging applications in terms of data volume and access patterns are conditions data, making use of the LHC conditions database, COOL, and the TAG database, that stores summary event quantities allowing a rapid selection of interesting events. Both of these databases are being replicated to regional computing centres using Oracle Streams technology, in collaboration with the LCG 3D project. Database optimisation, performance tests and first user experience with these applications will be described, together with plans for first LHC data-taking and future prospects

  7. Relational databases for conditions data and event selection in ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viegas, F; Hawkings, R; Dimitrov, G [CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland)

    2008-07-15

    The ATLAS experiment at LHC will make extensive use of relational databases in both online and offline contexts, running to O(TBytes) per year. Two of the most challenging applications in terms of data volume and access patterns are conditions data, making use of the LHC conditions database, COOL, and the TAG database, that stores summary event quantities allowing a rapid selection of interesting events. Both of these databases are being replicated to regional computing centres using Oracle Streams technology, in collaboration with the LCG 3D project. Database optimisation, performance tests and first user experience with these applications will be described, together with plans for first LHC data-taking and future prospects.

  8. Modelling antibody side chain conformations using heuristic database search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, D W; Kemp, G J

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a knowledge-based system which models the side chain conformations of residues in the variable domains of antibody Fv fragments. The system is written in Prolog and uses an object-oriented database of aligned antibody structures in conjunction with a side chain rotamer library. The antibody database provides 3-dimensional clusters of side chain conformations which can be copied en masse into the model structure. The object-oriented database architecture facilitates a navigational style of database access, necessary to assemble side chains clusters. Around 60% of the model is built using side chain clusters and this eliminates much of the combinatorial complexity associated with many other side chain placement algorithms. Construction and placement of side chain clusters is guided by a heuristic cost function based on a simple model of side chain packing interactions. Even with a simple model, we find that a large proportion of side chain conformations are modelled accurately. We expect our approach could be used with other homologous protein families, in addition to antibodies, both to improve the quality of model structures and to give a "smart start" to the side chain placement problem.

  9. Geroprotectors.org: a new, structured and curated database of current therapeutic interventions in aging and age-related disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalev, Alexey; Chernyagina, Elizaveta; de Magalhães, João Pedro; Barardo, Diogo; Thoppil, Harikrishnan; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Budovsky, Arie; Fraifeld, Vadim E.; Garazha, Andrew; Tsvetkov, Vasily; Bronovitsky, Evgeny; Bogomolov, Vladislav; Scerbacov, Alexei; Kuryan, Oleg; Gurinovich, Roman; Jellen, Leslie C.; Kennedy, Brian; Mamoshina, Polina; Dobrovolskaya, Evgeniya; Aliper, Alex; Kaminsky, Dmitry; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2015-01-01

    As the level of interest in aging research increases, there is a growing number of geroprotectors, or therapeutic interventions that aim to extend the healthy lifespan and repair or reduce aging-related damage in model organisms and, eventually, in humans. There is a clear need for a manually-curated database of geroprotectors to compile and index their effects on aging and age-related diseases and link these effects to relevant studies and multiple biochemical and drug databases. Here, we introduce the first such resource, Geroprotectors (http://geroprotectors.org). Geroprotectors is a public, rapidly explorable database that catalogs over 250 experiments involving over 200 known or candidate geroprotectors that extend lifespan in model organisms. Each compound has a comprehensive profile complete with biochemistry, mechanisms, and lifespan effects in various model organisms, along with information ranging from chemical structure, side effects, and toxicity to FDA drug status. These are presented in a visually intuitive, efficient framework fit for casual browsing or in-depth research alike. Data are linked to the source studies or databases, providing quick and convenient access to original data. The Geroprotectors database facilitates cross-study, cross-organism, and cross-discipline analysis and saves countless hours of inefficient literature and web searching. Geroprotectors is a one-stop, knowledge-sharing, time-saving resource for researchers seeking healthy aging solutions. PMID:26342919

  10. Set-oriented data mining in relational databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtsma, M.A.W.; Swami, Arun

    1995-01-01

    Data mining is an important real-life application for businesses. It is critical to find efficient ways of mining large data sets. In order to benefit from the experience with relational databases, a set-oriented approach to mining data is needed. In such an approach, the data mining operations are

  11. A role for relational databases in high energy physics software systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauer, R.; Slaughter, A.J.; Wolin, E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the design and initial implementation of software which uses a relational database management system for storage and retrieval of real and Monte Carlo generated events from a charm and beauty spectrometer with a vertex detector. The purpose of the software is to graphically display and interactively manipulate the events, fit tracks and vertices and calculate physics quantities. The INGRES database forms the core of the system, while the DI3000 graphics package is used to plot the events. The paper introduces relational database concepts and their applicability to high energy physics data. It also evaluates the environment provided by INGRES, particularly its usefulness in code development and its Fortran interface. Specifics of the database design we have chosen are detailed as well. (orig.)

  12. The TJ-II Relational Database Access Library: A User's Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, E.; Portas, A. B.; Vega, J.

    2003-01-01

    A relational database has been developed to store data representing physical values from TJ-II discharges. This new database complements the existing TJ-EI raw data database. This database resides in a host computer running Windows 2000 Server operating system and it is managed by SQL Server. A function library has been developed that permits remote access to these data from user programs running in computers connected to TJ-II local area networks via remote procedure cali. In this document a general description of the database and its organization are provided. Also given are a detailed description of the functions included in the library and examples of how to use these functions in computer programs written in the FORTRAN and C languages. (Author) 8 refs

  13. The standardization of data relational mode in the materials database for nuclear power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xinxuan

    1996-01-01

    A relational database needs standard data relation ships. The data relation ships include hierarchical structures and repeat set records. Code database is created and the relational database is created between spare parts and materials and properties of the materials. The data relation ships which are not standard are eliminated and all the relation modes are made to meet the demands of the 3NF (Third Norm Form)

  14. Framework Model for Database Replication within the Availability Zones

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Mughrabi, Ala'a Atallah; Owaied, Hussein

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a proposed model for database replication model in private cloud availability regions, which is an enhancement of the SQL Server AlwaysOn Layers of Protection Model presents by Microsoft in 2012. The enhancement concentrates in the database replication for private cloud availability regions through the use of primary and secondary servers. The processes of proposed model during the client send Write/Read Request to the server, in synchronous and semi synchronous replicatio...

  15. Generic Database Cost Models for Hierarchical Memory Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Manegold (Stefan); P.A. Boncz (Peter); M.L. Kersten (Martin)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractAccurate prediction of operator execution time is a prerequisite for database query optimization. Although extensively studied for conventional disk-based DBMSs, cost modeling in main-memory DBMSs is still an open issue. Recent database research has demonstrated that memory access is

  16. 3MdB: the Mexican Million Models database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisset, C.; Delgado-Inglada, G.

    2014-10-01

    The 3MdB is an original effort to construct a large multipurpose database of photoionization models. This is a more modern version of a previous attempt based on Cloudy3D and IDL tools. It is accessed by MySQL requests. The models are obtained using the well known and widely used Cloudy photoionization code (Ferland et al, 2013). The database is aimed to host grids of models with different references to identify each project and to facilitate the extraction of the desired data. We present here a description of the way the database is managed and some of the projects that use 3MdB. Anybody can ask for a grid to be run and stored in 3MdB, to increase the visibility of the grid and the potential side applications of it.

  17. The relational database system of KM3NeT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Arnauld; Bozza, Cristiano

    2016-04-01

    The KM3NeT Collaboration is building a new generation of neutrino telescopes in the Mediterranean Sea. For these telescopes, a relational database is designed and implemented for several purposes, such as the centralised management of accounts, the storage of all documentation about components and the status of the detector and information about slow control and calibration data. It also contains information useful during the construction and the data acquisition phases. Highlights in the database schema, storage and management are discussed along with design choices that have impact on performances. In most cases, the database is not accessed directly by applications, but via a custom designed Web application server.

  18. Klaim-DB: A Modeling Language for Distributed Database Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xi; Li, Ximeng; Lluch Lafuente, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    and manipulation of structured data, with integrity and atomicity considerations. We present the formal semantics of KlaimDB and illustrate the use of the language in a scenario where the sales from different branches of a chain of department stores are aggregated from their local databases. It can be seen......We present the modelling language, Klaim-DB, for distributed database applications. Klaim-DB borrows the distributed nets of the coordination language Klaim but essentially re-incarnates the tuple spaces of Klaim as databases, and provides high-level language abstractions for the access...... that raising the abstraction level and encapsulating integrity checks (concerning the schema of tables, etc.) in the language primitives for database operations benefit the modelling task considerably....

  19. Microsoft Access Small Business Solutions State-of-the-Art Database Models for Sales, Marketing, Customer Management, and More Key Business Activities

    CERN Document Server

    Hennig, Teresa; Linson, Larry; Purvis, Leigh; Spaulding, Brent

    2010-01-01

    Database models developed by a team of leading Microsoft Access MVPs that provide ready-to-use solutions for sales, marketing, customer management and other key business activities for most small businesses. As the most popular relational database in the world, Microsoft Access is widely used by small business owners. This book responds to the growing need for resources that help business managers and end users design and build effective Access database solutions for specific business functions. Coverage includes::; Elements of a Microsoft Access Database; Relational Data Model; Dealing with C

  20. Generic Database Cost Models for Hierarchical Memory Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Manegold, Stefan; Boncz, Peter; Kersten, Martin

    2002-01-01

    textabstractAccurate prediction of operator execution time is a prerequisite for database query optimization. Although extensively studied for conventional disk-based DBMSs, cost modeling in main-memory DBMSs is still an open issue. Recent database research has demonstrated that memory access is more and more becoming a significant---if not the major---cost component of database operations. If used properly, fast but small cache memories---usually organized in cascading hierarchy between CPU ...

  1. Computer Aided Design for Soil Classification Relational Database ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unique firstlady

    engineering, several developers were asked what rules they applied to identify ... classification is actually a part of all good science. As Michalski ... by a large number of soil scientists. .... and use. The calculus relational database processing is.

  2. Design and Establishment of Quality Model of Fundamental Geographic Information Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, W.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Y.; Zhang, P.; Dang, Y.; Zhao, T.

    2018-04-01

    In order to make the quality evaluation for the Fundamental Geographic Information Databases(FGIDB) more comprehensive, objective and accurate, this paper studies and establishes a quality model of FGIDB, which formed by the standardization of database construction and quality control, the conformity of data set quality and the functionality of database management system, and also designs the overall principles, contents and methods of the quality evaluation for FGIDB, providing the basis and reference for carry out quality control and quality evaluation for FGIDB. This paper designs the quality elements, evaluation items and properties of the Fundamental Geographic Information Database gradually based on the quality model framework. Connected organically, these quality elements and evaluation items constitute the quality model of the Fundamental Geographic Information Database. This model is the foundation for the quality demand stipulation and quality evaluation of the Fundamental Geographic Information Database, and is of great significance on the quality assurance in the design and development stage, the demand formulation in the testing evaluation stage, and the standard system construction for quality evaluation technology of the Fundamental Geographic Information Database.

  3. A Methodolgy, Based on Analytical Modeling, for the Design of Parallel and Distributed Architectures for Relational Database Query Processors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    Application Programs Intelligent Disk Database Controller Manangement System Operating System Host .1’ I% Figure 2. Intelligent Disk Controller Application...8217. /- - • Database Control -% Manangement System Disk Data Controller Application Programs Operating Host I"" Figure 5. Processor-Per- Head data. Therefore, the...However. these ad- ditional properties have been proven in classical set and relation theory [75]. These additional properties are described here

  4. An algorithm to transform natural language into SQL queries for relational databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Singh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Intelligent interface, to enhance efficient interactions between user and databases, is the need of the database applications. Databases must be intelligent enough to make the accessibility faster. However, not every user familiar with the Structured Query Language (SQL queries as they may not aware of structure of the database and they thus require to learn SQL. So, non-expert users need a system to interact with relational databases in their natural language such as English. For this, Database Management System (DBMS must have an ability to understand Natural Language (NL. In this research, an intelligent interface is developed using semantic matching technique which translates natural language query to SQL using set of production rules and data dictionary. The data dictionary consists of semantics sets for relations and attributes. A series of steps like lower case conversion, tokenization, speech tagging, database element and SQL element extraction is used to convert Natural Language Query (NLQ to SQL Query. The transformed query is executed and the results are obtained by the user. Intelligent Interface is the need of database applications to enhance efficient interaction between user and DBMS.

  5. Mining Views : database views for data mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blockeel, H.; Calders, T.; Fromont, É.; Goethals, B.; Prado, A.; Nijssen, S.; De Raedt, L.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a relational database model towards the integration of data mining into relational database systems, based on the so called virtual mining views. We show that several types of patterns and models over the data, such as itemsets, association rules, decision trees and clusterings, can be

  6. METODE RESET PASSWORD LEVEL ROOT PADA RELATIONAL DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (RDBMS MySQL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taqwa Hariguna

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Database merupakan sebuah hal yang penting untuk menyimpan data, dengan database organisasi akan mendapatkan keuntungan dalam beberapa hal, seperti kecepatan akases dan mengurangi penggunaan kertas, namun dengan implementasi database tidak jarang administrator database lupa akan password yang digunakan, hal ini akan mempersulit dalam proses penangganan database. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menggali cara mereset password level root pada relational database management system MySQL.

  7. [Establishment of a comprehensive database for laryngeal cancer related genes and the miRNAs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengjiao; E, Qimin; Liu, Jialin; Huang, Tingting; Liang, Chuanyu

    2015-09-01

    By collecting and analyzing the laryngeal cancer related genes and the miRNAs, to build a comprehensive laryngeal cancer-related gene database, which differs from the current biological information database with complex and clumsy structure and focuses on the theme of gene and miRNA, and it could make the research and teaching more convenient and efficient. Based on the B/S architecture, using Apache as a Web server, MySQL as coding language of database design and PHP as coding language of web design, a comprehensive database for laryngeal cancer-related genes was established, providing with the gene tables, protein tables, miRNA tables and clinical information tables of the patients with laryngeal cancer. The established database containsed 207 laryngeal cancer related genes, 243 proteins, 26 miRNAs, and their particular information such as mutations, methylations, diversified expressions, and the empirical references of laryngeal cancer relevant molecules. The database could be accessed and operated via the Internet, by which browsing and retrieval of the information were performed. The database were maintained and updated regularly. The database for laryngeal cancer related genes is resource-integrated and user-friendly, providing a genetic information query tool for the study of laryngeal cancer.

  8. Using relational databases for improved sequence similarity searching and large-scale genomic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Aaron J; Pearson, William R

    2004-10-01

    Relational databases are designed to integrate diverse types of information and manage large sets of search results, greatly simplifying genome-scale analyses. Relational databases are essential for management and analysis of large-scale sequence analyses, and can also be used to improve the statistical significance of similarity searches by focusing on subsets of sequence libraries most likely to contain homologs. This unit describes using relational databases to improve the efficiency of sequence similarity searching and to demonstrate various large-scale genomic analyses of homology-related data. This unit describes the installation and use of a simple protein sequence database, seqdb_demo, which is used as a basis for the other protocols. These include basic use of the database to generate a novel sequence library subset, how to extend and use seqdb_demo for the storage of sequence similarity search results and making use of various kinds of stored search results to address aspects of comparative genomic analysis.

  9. Mining Views : database views for data mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blockeel, H.; Calders, T.; Fromont, É.; Goethals, B.; Prado, A.

    2008-01-01

    We present a system towards the integration of data mining into relational databases. To this end, a relational database model is proposed, based on the so called virtual mining views. We show that several types of patterns and models over the data, such as itemsets, association rules and decision

  10. SFCOMPO 2.0 - A relational database of spent fuel isotopic measurements, reactor operational histories, and design data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel-Sendis, Franco; Martinez-González, Jesus; Gauld, Ian

    2017-09-01

    SFCOMPO-2.0 is a database of experimental isotopic concentrations measured in destructive radiochemical analysis of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) samples. The database includes corresponding design description of the fuel rods and assemblies, relevant operating conditions and characteristics of the host reactors necessary for modelling and simulation. Aimed at establishing a thorough, reliable, and publicly available resource for code and data validation of safety-related applications, SFCOMPO-2.0 is developed and maintained by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). The SFCOMPO-2.0 database is a Java application which is downloadable from the NEA website.

  11. Evaluated experimental database on critical heat flux in WWER FA models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artamonov, S.; Sergeev, V.; Volkov, S.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the description of the evaluated experimental database on critical heat flux in WWER FA models of new designs. This database was developed on the basis of the experimental data obtained in the years of 2009-2012. In the course of its development, the database was reviewed in terms of completeness of the information about the experiments and its compliance with the requirements of Rostekhnadzor regulatory documents. The description of the experimental FA model characteristics and experimental conditions was specified. Besides, the experimental data were statistically processed with the aim to reject incorrect ones and the sets of experimental data on critical heat fluxes (CHF) were compared for different FA models. As a result, for the fi rst time, the evaluated database on CHF in FA models of new designs was developed, that was complemented with analysis functions, and its main purpose is to be used in the process of development, verification and upgrading of calculation techniques. The developed database incorporates the data of 4183 experimental conditions obtained in 53 WWER FA models of various designs. Keywords: WWER reactor, fuel assembly, CHF, evaluated experimental data, database, statistical analysis. (author)

  12. Evaluation of relational database products for the VAX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannan, K.L.

    1985-11-01

    Four commercially available database products for the VAX/VMS operating system were evaluated for relative performance and ease of use. The products were DATATRIEVE, INGRES, Rdb, and S1032. Performance was measured in terms of elapsed time, CPU time, direct I/O counts, buffered I/O counts, and page faults. East of use is more subjective and has not been quantified here; however, discussion and tables of features as well as query syntax are included. This report describes the environment in which these products were evaluated and the characteristics of the databases used. All comparisons must be interpreted in the context of this setting

  13. Evaluation of relational database products for the VAX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannan, K.L.

    1985-11-01

    Four commercially available database products for the VAX/VMS operating system were evaluated for relative performance and ease of use. The products were DATATRIEVE, INGRES, Rdb, and S1032. Performance was measured in terms of elapsed time, CPU time, direct I/O counts, buffered I/O counts, and page faults. East of use is more subjective and has not been quantified here; however, discussion and tables of features as well as query syntax are included. This report describes the environment in which these products were evaluated and the characteristics of the databases used. All comparisons must be interpreted in the context of this setting.

  14. Designing the database for a reliability aware Model-Based System Engineering process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cressent, Robin; David, Pierre; Idasiak, Vincent; Kratz, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    This article outlines the need for a reliability database to implement model-based description of components failure modes and dysfunctional behaviors. We detail the requirements such a database should honor and describe our own solution: the Dysfunctional Behavior Database (DBD). Through the description of its meta-model, the benefits of integrating the DBD in the system design process is highlighted. The main advantages depicted are the possibility to manage feedback knowledge at various granularity and semantic levels and to ease drastically the interactions between system engineering activities and reliability studies. The compliance of the DBD with other reliability database such as FIDES is presented and illustrated. - Highlights: ► Model-Based System Engineering is more and more used in the industry. ► It results in a need for a reliability database able to deal with model-based description of dysfunctional behavior. ► The Dysfunctional Behavior Database aims to fulfill that need. ► It helps dealing with feedback management thanks to its structured meta-model. ► The DBD can profit from other reliability database such as FIDES.

  15. SmallSat Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropulos, Dolores; Bittner, David; Murawski, Robert; Golden, Bert

    2015-01-01

    The SmallSat has an unrealized potential in both the private industry and in the federal government. Currently over 70 companies, 50 universities and 17 governmental agencies are involved in SmallSat research and development. In 1994, the U.S. Army Missile and Defense mapped the moon using smallSat imagery. Since then Smart Phones have introduced this imagery to the people of the world as diverse industries watched this trend. The deployment cost of smallSats is also greatly reduced compared to traditional satellites due to the fact that multiple units can be deployed in a single mission. Imaging payloads have become more sophisticated, smaller and lighter. In addition, the growth of small technology obtained from private industries has led to the more widespread use of smallSats. This includes greater revisit rates in imagery, significantly lower costs, the ability to update technology more frequently and the ability to decrease vulnerability of enemy attacks. The popularity of smallSats show a changing mentality in this fast paced world of tomorrow. What impact has this created on the NASA communication networks now and in future years? In this project, we are developing the SmallSat Relational Database which can support a simulation of smallSats within the NASA SCaN Compatability Environment for Networks and Integrated Communications (SCENIC) Modeling and Simulation Lab. The NASA Space Communications and Networks (SCaN) Program can use this modeling to project required network support needs in the next 10 to 15 years. The SmallSat Rational Database could model smallSats just as the other SCaN databases model the more traditional larger satellites, with a few exceptions. One being that the smallSat Database is designed to be built-to-order. The SmallSat database holds various hardware configurations that can be used to model a smallSat. It will require significant effort to develop as the research material can only be populated by hand to obtain the unique data

  16. A Modeling methodology for NoSQL Key-Value databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo ROSSEL

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the field of non-relational databases. However, far too little attention has been paid to design methodology. Key-value data stores are an important component of a class of non-relational technologies that are grouped under the name of NoSQL databases. The aim of this paper is to propose a design methodology for this type of database that allows overcoming the limitations of the traditional techniques. The proposed methodology leads to a clean design that also allows for better data management and consistency.

  17. Database principles programming performance

    CERN Document Server

    O'Neil, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Database: Principles Programming Performance provides an introduction to the fundamental principles of database systems. This book focuses on database programming and the relationships between principles, programming, and performance.Organized into 10 chapters, this book begins with an overview of database design principles and presents a comprehensive introduction to the concepts used by a DBA. This text then provides grounding in many abstract concepts of the relational model. Other chapters introduce SQL, describing its capabilities and covering the statements and functions of the programmi

  18. Relational Databases: A Transparent Framework for Encouraging Biology Students to Think Informatically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Michael; Gladstone, William; Weir, Michael

    2004-01-01

    We discuss how relational databases constitute an ideal framework for representing and analyzing large-scale genomic data sets in biology. As a case study, we describe a Drosophila splice-site database that we recently developed at Wesleyan University for use in research and teaching. The database stores data about splice sites computed by a…

  19. Flexible network reconstruction from relational databases with Cytoscape and CytoSQL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laukens, Kris; Hollunder, Jens; Dang, Thanh Hai; De Jaeger, Geert; Kuiper, Martin; Witters, Erwin; Verschoren, Alain; Van Leemput, Koenraad

    2010-07-01

    Molecular interaction networks can be efficiently studied using network visualization software such as Cytoscape. The relevant nodes, edges and their attributes can be imported in Cytoscape in various file formats, or directly from external databases through specialized third party plugins. However, molecular data are often stored in relational databases with their own specific structure, for which dedicated plugins do not exist. Therefore, a more generic solution is presented. A new Cytoscape plugin 'CytoSQL' is developed to connect Cytoscape to any relational database. It allows to launch SQL ('Structured Query Language') queries from within Cytoscape, with the option to inject node or edge features of an existing network as SQL arguments, and to convert the retrieved data to Cytoscape network components. Supported by a set of case studies we demonstrate the flexibility and the power of the CytoSQL plugin in converting specific data subsets into meaningful network representations. CytoSQL offers a unified approach to let Cytoscape interact with relational databases. Thanks to the power of the SQL syntax, this tool can rapidly generate and enrich networks according to very complex criteria. The plugin is available at http://www.ptools.ua.ac.be/CytoSQL.

  20. PACSY, a relational database management system for protein structure and chemical shift analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woonghee; Yu, Wookyung; Kim, Suhkmann; Chang, Iksoo; Lee, Weontae; Markley, John L

    2012-10-01

    PACSY (Protein structure And Chemical Shift NMR spectroscopY) is a relational database management system that integrates information from the Protein Data Bank, the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank, and the Structural Classification of Proteins database. PACSY provides three-dimensional coordinates and chemical shifts of atoms along with derived information such as torsion angles, solvent accessible surface areas, and hydrophobicity scales. PACSY consists of six relational table types linked to one another for coherence by key identification numbers. Database queries are enabled by advanced search functions supported by an RDBMS server such as MySQL or PostgreSQL. PACSY enables users to search for combinations of information from different database sources in support of their research. Two software packages, PACSY Maker for database creation and PACSY Analyzer for database analysis, are available from http://pacsy.nmrfam.wisc.edu.

  1. PACSY, a relational database management system for protein structure and chemical shift analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woonghee, E-mail: whlee@nmrfam.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison, and Biochemistry Department (United States); Yu, Wookyung [Center for Proteome Biophysics, Pusan National University, Department of Physics (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Suhkmann [Pusan National University, Department of Chemistry and Chemistry Institute for Functional Materials (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Iksoo [Center for Proteome Biophysics, Pusan National University, Department of Physics (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Weontae, E-mail: wlee@spin.yonsei.ac.kr [Yonsei University, Structural Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry (Korea, Republic of); Markley, John L., E-mail: markley@nmrfam.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison, and Biochemistry Department (United States)

    2012-10-15

    PACSY (Protein structure And Chemical Shift NMR spectroscopY) is a relational database management system that integrates information from the Protein Data Bank, the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank, and the Structural Classification of Proteins database. PACSY provides three-dimensional coordinates and chemical shifts of atoms along with derived information such as torsion angles, solvent accessible surface areas, and hydrophobicity scales. PACSY consists of six relational table types linked to one another for coherence by key identification numbers. Database queries are enabled by advanced search functions supported by an RDBMS server such as MySQL or PostgreSQL. PACSY enables users to search for combinations of information from different database sources in support of their research. Two software packages, PACSY Maker for database creation and PACSY Analyzer for database analysis, are available from http://pacsy.nmrfam.wisc.eduhttp://pacsy.nmrfam.wisc.edu.

  2. PACSY, a relational database management system for protein structure and chemical shift analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woonghee; Yu, Wookyung; Kim, Suhkmann; Chang, Iksoo

    2012-01-01

    PACSY (Protein structure And Chemical Shift NMR spectroscopY) is a relational database management system that integrates information from the Protein Data Bank, the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank, and the Structural Classification of Proteins database. PACSY provides three-dimensional coordinates and chemical shifts of atoms along with derived information such as torsion angles, solvent accessible surface areas, and hydrophobicity scales. PACSY consists of six relational table types linked to one another for coherence by key identification numbers. Database queries are enabled by advanced search functions supported by an RDBMS server such as MySQL or PostgreSQL. PACSY enables users to search for combinations of information from different database sources in support of their research. Two software packages, PACSY Maker for database creation and PACSY Analyzer for database analysis, are available from http://pacsy.nmrfam.wisc.edu. PMID:22903636

  3. PACSY, a relational database management system for protein structure and chemical shift analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Woonghee; Yu, Wookyung; Kim, Suhkmann; Chang, Iksoo; Lee, Weontae; Markley, John L.

    2012-01-01

    PACSY (Protein structure And Chemical Shift NMR spectroscopY) is a relational database management system that integrates information from the Protein Data Bank, the Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank, and the Structural Classification of Proteins database. PACSY provides three-dimensional coordinates and chemical shifts of atoms along with derived information such as torsion angles, solvent accessible surface areas, and hydrophobicity scales. PACSY consists of six relational table types linked to one another for coherence by key identification numbers. Database queries are enabled by advanced search functions supported by an RDBMS server such as MySQL or PostgreSQL. PACSY enables users to search for combinations of information from different database sources in support of their research. Two software packages, PACSY Maker for database creation and PACSY Analyzer for database analysis, are available from http://pacsy.nmrfam.wisc.eduhttp://pacsy.nmrfam.wisc.edu.

  4. Examining database persistence of ISO/EN 13606 standardized electronic health record extracts: relational vs. NoSQL approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-de-Madariaga, Ricardo; Muñoz, Adolfo; Lozano-Rubí, Raimundo; Serrano-Balazote, Pablo; Castro, Antonio L; Moreno, Oscar; Pascual, Mario

    2017-08-18

    The objective of this research is to compare the relational and non-relational (NoSQL) database systems approaches in order to store, recover, query and persist standardized medical information in the form of ISO/EN 13606 normalized Electronic Health Record XML extracts, both in isolation and concurrently. NoSQL database systems have recently attracted much attention, but few studies in the literature address their direct comparison with relational databases when applied to build the persistence layer of a standardized medical information system. One relational and two NoSQL databases (one document-based and one native XML database) of three different sizes have been created in order to evaluate and compare the response times (algorithmic complexity) of six different complexity growing queries, which have been performed on them. Similar appropriate results available in the literature have also been considered. Relational and non-relational NoSQL database systems show almost linear algorithmic complexity query execution. However, they show very different linear slopes, the former being much steeper than the two latter. Document-based NoSQL databases perform better in concurrency than in isolation, and also better than relational databases in concurrency. Non-relational NoSQL databases seem to be more appropriate than standard relational SQL databases when database size is extremely high (secondary use, research applications). Document-based NoSQL databases perform in general better than native XML NoSQL databases. EHR extracts visualization and edition are also document-based tasks more appropriate to NoSQL database systems. However, the appropriate database solution much depends on each particular situation and specific problem.

  5. BUSINESS MODELLING AND DATABASE DESIGN IN CLOUD COMPUTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai-Constantin AVORNICULUI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electronic commerce is growing constantly from one year to another in the last decade, few are the areas that also register such a growth. It covers the exchanges of computerized data, but also electronic messaging, linear data banks and electronic transfer payment. Cloud computing, a relatively new concept and term, is a model of access services via the internet to distributed systems of configurable calculus resources at request which can be made available quickly with minimum management effort and intervention from the client and the provider. Behind an electronic commerce system in cloud there is a data base which contains the necessary information for the transactions in the system. Using business modelling, we get many benefits, which makes the design of the database used by electronic commerce systems in cloud considerably easier.

  6. MetRxn: a knowledgebase of metabolites and reactions spanning metabolic models and databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Akhil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasingly, metabolite and reaction information is organized in the form of genome-scale metabolic reconstructions that describe the reaction stoichiometry, directionality, and gene to protein to reaction associations. A key bottleneck in the pace of reconstruction of new, high-quality metabolic models is the inability to directly make use of metabolite/reaction information from biological databases or other models due to incompatibilities in content representation (i.e., metabolites with multiple names across databases and models, stoichiometric errors such as elemental or charge imbalances, and incomplete atomistic detail (e.g., use of generic R-group or non-explicit specification of stereo-specificity. Description MetRxn is a knowledgebase that includes standardized metabolite and reaction descriptions by integrating information from BRENDA, KEGG, MetaCyc, Reactome.org and 44 metabolic models into a single unified data set. All metabolite entries have matched synonyms, resolved protonation states, and are linked to unique structures. All reaction entries are elementally and charge balanced. This is accomplished through the use of a workflow of lexicographic, phonetic, and structural comparison algorithms. MetRxn allows for the download of standardized versions of existing genome-scale metabolic models and the use of metabolic information for the rapid reconstruction of new ones. Conclusions The standardization in description allows for the direct comparison of the metabolite and reaction content between metabolic models and databases and the exhaustive prospecting of pathways for biotechnological production. This ever-growing dataset currently consists of over 76,000 metabolites participating in more than 72,000 reactions (including unresolved entries. MetRxn is hosted on a web-based platform that uses relational database models (MySQL.

  7. Handling data redundancy and update anomalies in fuzzy relational databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.; Kerre, E.E.

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses various data redundancy and update anomaly problems that may occur with fuzzy relational databases. In coping with these problems to avoid undesirable consequences when fuzzy databases are updated via data insertion, deletion and modification, a number of fuzzy normal forms (e.g., F1NF, 0-F2NF, 0-F3NF, 0-FBCNF) are used to guide the design of relation schemes such that partial and transitive fuzzy functional dependencies (FFDs) between relation attributes are restricted. Based upon FFDs and related concepts, particular attention is paid to 0-F3NF and 0-FBCNF, and to the corresponding decomposition algorithms. These algorithms not only produce relation schemes which are either in 0-F3NF or in 0-FBCNF, but also guarantee that the information (data content and FFDs) with original schemes can be recovered with those resultant schemes

  8. [The future of clinical laboratory database management system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambe, M; Imidy, D; Matsubara, A; Sugimoto, Y

    1999-09-01

    To assess the present status of the clinical laboratory database management system, the difference between the Clinical Laboratory Information System and Clinical Laboratory System was explained in this study. Although three kinds of database management systems (DBMS) were shown including the relational model, tree model and network model, the relational model was found to be the best DBMS for the clinical laboratory database based on our experience and developments of some clinical laboratory expert systems. As a future clinical laboratory database management system, the IC card system connected to an automatic chemical analyzer was proposed for personal health data management and a microscope/video system was proposed for dynamic data management of leukocytes or bacteria.

  9. Conceptual data modeling on the KRR-1 and 2 decommissioning database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hee Seoung; Park, Seung Kook; Lee, Kune Woo; Park, Jin Ho

    2002-01-01

    A study of the conceptual data modeling to realize the decommissioning database on the KRR-1 and 2 was carried out. In this study, the current state of the abroad decommissioning databased was investigated to make a reference of the database. A scope of the construction of decommissioning database has been set up based on user requirements. Then, a theory of the database construction was established and a scheme on the decommissioning information was classified. The facility information, work information, radioactive waste information, and radiological information dealing with the decommissioning database were extracted through interviews with an expert group and also decided upon the system configuration of the decommissioning database. A code which is composed of 17 bit was produced considering the construction, scheme and information. The results of the conceptual data modeling and the classification scheme will be used as basic data to create a prototype design of the decommissioning database

  10. Verification and Validation of Tropospheric Model/Database

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Junho, choi

    1998-01-01

    A verification and validation of tropospheric models and databases has been performed based on ray tracing algorithm, statistical analysis, test on real time system operation, and other technical evaluation process...

  11. Croatian Cadastre Database Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvonko Biljecki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Cadastral Data Model has been developed as a part of a larger programme to improve products and production environment of the Croatian Cadastral Service of the State Geodetic Administration (SGA. The goal of the project was to create a cadastral data model conforming to relevant standards and specifications in the field of geoinformation (GI adapted by international organisations for standardisation under the competence of GI (ISO TC211 and OpenGIS and it implementations.The main guidelines during the project have been object-oriented conceptual modelling of the updated users' requests and a "new" cadastral data model designed by SGA - Faculty of Geodesy - Geofoto LLC project team. The UML of the conceptual model is given per all feature categories and is described only at class level. The next step was the UML technical model, which was developed from the UML conceptual model. The technical model integrates different UML schemas in one united schema.XML (eXtensible Markup Language was applied for XML description of UML models, and then the XML schema was transferred into GML (Geography Markup Language application schema. With this procedure we have completely described the behaviour of each cadastral feature and rules for the transfer and storage of cadastral features into the database.

  12. ZeBase: an open-source relational database for zebrafish laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Monica R; Hassenplug, Eric; McPhail, Rodney; Leung, Yuk Fai

    2012-03-01

    Abstract ZeBase is an open-source relational database for zebrafish inventory. It is designed for the recording of genetic, breeding, and survival information of fish lines maintained in a single- or multi-laboratory environment. Users can easily access ZeBase through standard web-browsers anywhere on a network. Convenient search and reporting functions are available to facilitate routine inventory work; such functions can also be automated by simple scripting. Optional barcode generation and scanning are also built-in for easy access to the information related to any fish. Further information of the database and an example implementation can be found at http://zebase.bio.purdue.edu.

  13. SFCOMPO 2.0 – A relational database of spent fuel isotopic measurements, reactor operational histories, and design data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel-Sendis Franco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available SFCOMPO-2.0 is a database of experimental isotopic concentrations measured in destructive radiochemical analysis of spent nuclear fuel (SNF samples. The database includes corresponding design description of the fuel rods and assemblies, relevant operating conditions and characteristics of the host reactors necessary for modelling and simulation. Aimed at establishing a thorough, reliable, and publicly available resource for code and data validation of safety-related applications, SFCOMPO-2.0 is developed and maintained by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA. The SFCOMPO-2.0 database is a Java application which is downloadable from the NEA website.

  14. A searching and reporting system for relational databases using a graph-based metadata representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Robin; Gobbi, Alberto; Lee, Man-Ling

    2005-01-01

    Relational databases are the current standard for storing and retrieving data in the pharmaceutical and biotech industries. However, retrieving data from a relational database requires specialized knowledge of the database schema and of the SQL query language. At Anadys, we have developed an easy-to-use system for searching and reporting data in a relational database to support our drug discovery project teams. This system is fast and flexible and allows users to access all data without having to write SQL queries. This paper presents the hierarchical, graph-based metadata representation and SQL-construction methods that, together, are the basis of this system's capabilities.

  15. Geospatial Database for Strata Objects Based on Land Administration Domain Model (ladm)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasorudin, N. N.; Hassan, M. I.; Zulkifli, N. A.; Rahman, A. Abdul

    2016-09-01

    Recently in our country, the construction of buildings become more complex and it seems that strata objects database becomes more important in registering the real world as people now own and use multilevel of spaces. Furthermore, strata title was increasingly important and need to be well-managed. LADM is a standard model for land administration and it allows integrated 2D and 3D representation of spatial units. LADM also known as ISO 19152. The aim of this paper is to develop a strata objects database using LADM. This paper discusses the current 2D geospatial database and needs for 3D geospatial database in future. This paper also attempts to develop a strata objects database using a standard data model (LADM) and to analyze the developed strata objects database using LADM data model. The current cadastre system in Malaysia includes the strata title is discussed in this paper. The problems in the 2D geospatial database were listed and the needs for 3D geospatial database in future also is discussed. The processes to design a strata objects database are conceptual, logical and physical database design. The strata objects database will allow us to find the information on both non-spatial and spatial strata title information thus shows the location of the strata unit. This development of strata objects database may help to handle the strata title and information.

  16. Towards a common thermodynamic database for speciation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. van der; Lomenech, C.

    2004-01-01

    Bio-geochemical speciation models and reactive transport models are reaching an operational stage, allowing simulation of complex dynamic experiments and description of field observations. For decades, the main focus has been on model performance but at present, the availability and reliability of thermodynamic data is the limiting factor of the models. Thermodynamic models applied to real and complex geochemical systems require much more extended thermodynamic databases with many minerals, colloidal phases, humic and fulvic acids, cementitious phases and (dissolved) organic complexing agents. Here we propose a methodological approach to achieve, ultimately, a common, operational database including the reactions and constants of these phases. Provided they are coherent with the general thermodynamic laws, sorption reactions are included as well. We therefore focus on sorption reactions and parameter values associated with specific sorption models. The case of sorption on goethite has been used to illustrate the way the methodology handles the problem of inconsistency and data quality. (orig.)

  17. A database for extract solutions in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, I.; Horvath, Zs.; Lukacs, B.

    1993-07-01

    The field of equations of General Relativity are coupled second order partial differential equations. Therefore no general method is known to generate solutions for prescribed initial and boundary conditions. In addition, the meaning of the particular coordinates cannot be known until the metric is not found. Therefore the result must permit arbitrary coordinate transformations, i.e. most kinds of approximating methods are improper. So exact solutions are necessary and each one is an individual product. For storage, retrieval and comparison database handling techniques are needed. A database of 1359 articles is shown (cross-referred at least once) published in 156 more important journals. It can be handled by dBase III plus on IBM PC's. (author) 5 refs.; 5 tabs

  18. CORAL Server and CORAL Server Proxy: Scalable Access to Relational Databases from CORAL Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Valassi, A; Kalkhof, A; Salnikov, A; Wache, M

    2011-01-01

    The CORAL software is widely used at CERN for accessing the data stored by the LHC experiments using relational database technologies. CORAL provides a C++ abstraction layer that supports data persistency for several backends and deployment models, including local access to SQLite files, direct client access to Oracle and MySQL servers, and read-only access to Oracle through the FroNTier web server and cache. Two new components have recently been added to CORAL to implement a model involving a middle tier "CORAL server" deployed close to the database and a tree of "CORAL server proxy" instances, with data caching and multiplexing functionalities, deployed close to the client. The new components are meant to provide advantages for read-only and read-write data access, in both offline and online use cases, in the areas of scalability and performance (multiplexing for several incoming connections, optional data caching) and security (authentication via proxy certificates). A first implementation of the two new c...

  19. NESSY, a relational PC database for nuclear structure and decay data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boboshin, I.N.; Varlamov, V.V.; Trukhanov, S.K.

    1994-11-01

    The universal relational database NESSY (New ENSDF Search SYstem) based on the international ENSDF system (Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File) is described. NESSY, which was developed for IBM compatible PC, provides high efficiency processing of ENSDF information for searches and retrievals of nuclear physics data. The principle of the database development and examples of applications are presented. (author)

  20. A Relational Database of WHO Mortality Data Prepared to Facilitate Global Mortality Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert de Roos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Detailed world mortality data such as collected by the World Health Organization gives a wealth of information about causes of death worldwide over a time span of 60 year. However, the raw mortality data in text format as provided by the WHO is not directly suitable for systematic research and data mining. In this Data Paper, a relational database is presented that is created from the raw WHO mortality data set and includes mortality rates, an ICD-code table and country reference data. This enriched database, as a corpus of global mortality data, can be readily imported in relational databases but can also function as the data source for other types of databases. The use of this database can therefore greatly facilitate global epidemiological research that may provide new clues to genetic or environmental factors in the origins of diseases.

  1. Product Licenses Database Application

    CERN Document Server

    Tonkovikj, Petar

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this project is to organize and centralize the data about software tools available to CERN employees, as well as provide a system that would simplify the license management process by providing information about the available licenses and their expiry dates. The project development process is consisted of two steps: modeling the products (software tools), product licenses, legal agreements and other data related to these entities in a relational database and developing the front-end user interface so that the user can interact with the database. The result is an ASP.NET MVC web application with interactive views for displaying and managing the data in the underlying database.

  2. CORAL Server and CORAL Server Proxy: Scalable Access to Relational Databases from CORAL Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valassi, A; Kalkhof, A; Bartoldus, R; Salnikov, A; Wache, M

    2011-01-01

    The CORAL software is widely used at CERN by the LHC experiments to access the data they store on relational databases, such as Oracle. Two new components have recently been added to implement a model involving a middle tier 'CORAL server' deployed close to the database and a tree of 'CORAL server proxies', providing data caching and multiplexing, deployed close to the client. A first implementation of the two new components, released in the summer 2009, is now deployed in the ATLAS online system to read the data needed by the High Level Trigger, allowing the configuration of a farm of several thousand processes. This paper reviews the architecture of the software, its development status and its usage in ATLAS.

  3. ARCTOS: a relational database relating specimens, specimen-based science, and archival documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrell, Gordon H.; Ramotnik, Cindy A.; McDonald, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    Data are preserved when they are perpetually discoverable, but even in the Information Age, discovery of legacy data appropriate to particular investigations is uncertain. Secure Internet storage is necessary but insufficient. Data can be discovered only when they are adequately described, and visibility increases markedly if the data are related to other data that are receiving usage. Such relationships can be built within (1) the framework of a relational database, or (1) they can be built among separate resources, within the framework of the Internet. Evolving primarily around biological collections, Arctos is a database that does both of these tasks. It includes data structures for a diversity of specimen attributes, essentially all collection-management tasks, plus literature citations, project descriptions, etc. As a centralized collaboration of several university museums, Arctos is an ideal environment for capitalizing on the many relationships that often exist between items in separate collections. Arctos is related to NIH’s DNA-sequence repository (GenBank) with record-to-record reciprocal linkages, and it serves data to several discipline-specific web portals, including the Global Biodiversity Information Network (GBIF). The University of Alaska Museum’s paleontological collection is Arctos’s recent extension beyond the constraints of neontology. With about 1.3 million cataloged items, additional collections are being added each year.

  4. Scientific Meetings Database: A New Tool for CTBT-Related International Cooperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapik, Jerzy F.; Girven, Mary L.

    1999-08-20

    The mission of international cooperation is defined in the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Ways and means of implementation were the subject of discussion during the International Cooperation Workshop held in Vienna in November 1998, and during the Regional Workshop for CTBTO International Cooperation held in Cairo, Egypt in June 1999. In particular, a database of ''Scientific and Technical Meetings Directly or Indirectly Related to CTBT Verification-Related Technologies'' was developed by the CTBTO PrepCom/PTS/International Cooperation section and integrated into the organization's various web sites in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy CTBT Research and Development Program. This database, the structure and use of which is described in this paper/presentation is meant to assist the CTBT-related scientific community in identifying worldwide expertise in the CTBT verification-related technologies and should help experts, particularly those of less technologically advanced States Signatories, to strengthen contacts and to pursue international cooperation under the Tredy regime. Specific opportunities for international cooperation, in particular those provided by active participation in the use and further development of this database, are presented in this paper and/or presentation.

  5. Imprecision and Uncertainty in the UFO Database Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gyseghem, Nancy; De Caluwe, Rita

    1998-01-01

    Discusses how imprecision and uncertainty are dealt with in the UFO (Uncertainty and Fuzziness in an Object-oriented) database model. Such information is expressed by means of possibility distributions, and modeled by means of the proposed concept of "role objects." The role objects model uncertain, tentative information about objects,…

  6. Keeping Track of Our Treasures: Managing Historical Data with Relational Database Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmann, Myron P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes the way a relational database management system manages a large historical data collection project. Shows that such databases are practical to construct. States that the programing tasks involved are not for beginners, but the rewards of having data organized are worthwhile. (GG)

  7. The KTOI Ecosystem Project Relational Database : a Report Prepared by Statistical Consulting Services for KTOI Describing the Key Components and Specifications of the KTOI Relational Database.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafii, Bahman [Statistical Consulting Services

    2009-09-24

    Data are the central focus of any research project. Their collection and analysis are crucial to meeting project goals, testing scientific hypotheses, and drawing relevant conclusions. Typical research projects often devote the majority of their resources to the collection, storage and analysis of data. Therefore, issues related to data quality should be of foremost concern. Data quality issues are even more important when conducting multifaceted studies involving several teams of researchers. Without the use of a standardized protocol, for example, independent data collection carried out by separate research efforts can lead to inconsistencies, confusion and errors throughout the larger project. A database management system can be utilized to help avoid all of the aforementioned problems. The centralization of data into a common relational unit, i.e. a relational database, shifts the responsibility for data quality and maintenance from multiple individuals to a single database manager, thus allowing data quality issues to be assessed and corrected in a timely manner. The database system also provides an easy mechanism for standardizing data components, such as variable names and values uniformly across all segments of a project. This is particularly an important issue when data are collected on a number of biological/physical response and explanatory variables from various locations and times. The database system can integrate all segments of a large study into one unit, while providing oversight and accessibility to the data collection process. The quality of all data collected is uniformly maintained and compatibility between research efforts ensured. While the physical database would exist in a central location, access will not be physically limited. Advanced database interfaces are created to operate over the internet utilizing a Web-based relational database, allowing project members to access their data from virtually anywhere. These interfaces provide users

  8. HOLLYWOOD: a comparative relational database of alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holste, Dirk; Huo, George; Tung, Vivian; Burge, Christopher B

    2006-01-01

    RNA splicing is an essential step in gene expression, and is often variable, giving rise to multiple alternatively spliced mRNA and protein isoforms from a single gene locus. The design of effective databases to support experimental and computational investigations of alternative splicing (AS) is a significant challenge. In an effort to integrate accurate exon and splice site annotation with current knowledge about splicing regulatory elements and predicted AS events, and to link information about the splicing of orthologous genes in different species, we have developed the Hollywood system. This database was built upon genomic annotation of splicing patterns of known genes derived from spliced alignment of complementary DNAs (cDNAs) and expressed sequence tags, and links features such as splice site sequence and strength, exonic splicing enhancers and silencers, conserved and non-conserved patterns of splicing, and cDNA library information for inferred alternative exons. Hollywood was implemented as a relational database and currently contains comprehensive information for human and mouse. It is accompanied by a web query tool that allows searches for sets of exons with specific splicing characteristics or splicing regulatory element composition, or gives a graphical or sequence-level summary of splicing patterns for a specific gene. A streamlined graphical representation of gene splicing patterns is provided, and these patterns can alternatively be layered onto existing information in the UCSC Genome Browser. The database is accessible at http://hollywood.mit.edu.

  9. Towards a Component Based Model for Database Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian Paul ROTARU

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to their effectiveness in the design and development of software applications and due to their recognized advantages in terms of reusability, Component-Based Software Engineering (CBSE concepts have been arousing a great deal of interest in recent years. This paper presents and extends a component-based approach to object-oriented database systems (OODB introduced by us in [1] and [2]. Components are proposed as a new abstraction level for database system, logical partitions of the schema. In this context, the scope is introduced as an escalated property for transactions. Components are studied from the integrity, consistency, and concurrency control perspective. The main benefits of our proposed component model for OODB are the reusability of the database design, including the access statistics required for a proper query optimization, and a smooth information exchange. The integration of crosscutting concerns into the component database model using aspect-oriented techniques is also discussed. One of the main goals is to define a method for the assessment of component composition capabilities. These capabilities are restricted by the component’s interface and measured in terms of adaptability, degree of compose-ability and acceptability level. The above-mentioned metrics are extended from database components to generic software components. This paper extends and consolidates into one common view the ideas previously presented by us in [1, 2, 3].[1] Octavian Paul Rotaru, Marian Dobre, Component Aspects in Object Oriented Databases, Proceedings of the International Conference on Software Engineering Research and Practice (SERP’04, Volume II, ISBN 1-932415-29-7, pages 719-725, Las Vegas, NV, USA, June 2004.[2] Octavian Paul Rotaru, Marian Dobre, Mircea Petrescu, Integrity and Consistency Aspects in Component-Oriented Databases, Proceedings of the International Symposium on Innovation in Information and Communication Technology (ISIICT

  10. Databases for INDUS-1 and INDUS-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merh, Bhavna N.; Fatnani, Pravin

    2003-01-01

    The databases for Indus are relational databases designed to store various categories of data related to the accelerator. The data archiving and retrieving system in Indus is based on a client/sever model. A general purpose commercial database is used to store parameters and equipment data for the whole machine. The database manages configuration, on-line and historical databases. On line and off line applications distributed in several systems can store and retrieve the data from the database over the network. This paper describes the structure of databases for Indus-1 and Indus-2 and their integration within the software architecture. The data analysis, design, resulting data-schema and implementation issues are discussed. (author)

  11. Project for a relational database for a radiotherapy service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, R. D.; Planes Meseguer, D.; Dorado Rodriguez, M. P.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work is to extract useful data easily to improve our working protocols and to evaluate quantitatively the results of the treatments. To do this you are implementing a database (DB) relational practice that allows the use of this information stored.

  12. Selecting a Relational Database Management System for Library Automation Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhel, Alex; O'Brien, Mike

    1989-01-01

    Describes the evaluation of four relational database management systems (RDBMSs) (Informix Turbo, Oracle 6.0 TPS, Unify 2000 and Relational Technology's Ingres 5.0) to determine which is best suited for library automation. The evaluation criteria used to develop a benchmark specifically designed to test RDBMSs for libraries are discussed. (CLB)

  13. Organizing, exploring, and analyzing antibody sequence data: the case for relational-database managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, John

    2009-01-01

    Technological advances in the acquisition of DNA and protein sequence information and the resulting onrush of data can quickly overwhelm the scientist unprepared for the volume of information that must be evaluated and carefully dissected to discover its significance. Few laboratories have the luxury of dedicated personnel to organize, analyze, or consistently record a mix of arriving sequence data. A methodology based on a modern relational-database manager is presented that is both a natural storage vessel for antibody sequence information and a conduit for organizing and exploring sequence data and accompanying annotation text. The expertise necessary to implement such a plan is equal to that required by electronic word processors or spreadsheet applications. Antibody sequence projects maintained as independent databases are selectively unified by the relational-database manager into larger database families that contribute to local analyses, reports, interactive HTML pages, or exported to facilities dedicated to sophisticated sequence analysis techniques. Database files are transposable among current versions of Microsoft, Macintosh, and UNIX operating systems.

  14. UbSRD: The Ubiquitin Structural Relational Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Joseph S; Jacobs, Tim M; Houlihan, Kevin; Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; Kuhlman, Brian

    2016-02-22

    The structurally defined ubiquitin-like homology fold (UBL) can engage in several unique protein-protein interactions and many of these complexes have been characterized with high-resolution techniques. Using Rosetta's structural classification tools, we have created the Ubiquitin Structural Relational Database (UbSRD), an SQL database of features for all 509 UBL-containing structures in the PDB, allowing users to browse these structures by protein-protein interaction and providing a platform for quantitative analysis of structural features. We used UbSRD to define the recognition features of ubiquitin (UBQ) and SUMO observed in the PDB and the orientation of the UBQ tail while interacting with certain types of proteins. While some of the interaction surfaces on UBQ and SUMO overlap, each molecule has distinct features that aid in molecular discrimination. Additionally, we find that the UBQ tail is malleable and can adopt a variety of conformations upon binding. UbSRD is accessible as an online resource at rosettadesign.med.unc.edu/ubsrd. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Completion of autobuilt protein models using a database of protein fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowtan, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Two developments in the process of automated protein model building in the Buccaneer software are described: the use of a database of protein fragments in improving the model completeness and the assembly of disconnected chain fragments into complete molecules. Two developments in the process of automated protein model building in the Buccaneer software are presented. A general-purpose library for protein fragments of arbitrary size is described, with a highly optimized search method allowing the use of a larger database than in previous work. The problem of assembling an autobuilt model into complete chains is discussed. This involves the assembly of disconnected chain fragments into complete molecules and the use of the database of protein fragments in improving the model completeness. Assembly of fragments into molecules is a standard step in existing model-building software, but the methods have not received detailed discussion in the literature

  16. Modeling Powered Aerodynamics for the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle Aerodynamic Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, David T.; Walker, Eric L.; Robinson, Philip E.; Wilson, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Modeling the aerodynamics of the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV) has presented many technical challenges to the developers of the Orion aerodynamic database. During a launch abort event, the aerodynamic environment around the LAV is very complex as multiple solid rocket plumes interact with each other and the vehicle. It is further complicated by vehicle separation events such as between the LAV and the launch vehicle stack or between the launch abort tower and the crew module. The aerodynamic database for the LAV was developed mainly from wind tunnel tests involving powered jet simulations of the rocket exhaust plumes, supported by computational fluid dynamic simulations. However, limitations in both methods have made it difficult to properly capture the aerodynamics of the LAV in experimental and numerical simulations. These limitations have also influenced decisions regarding the modeling and structure of the aerodynamic database for the LAV and led to compromises and creative solutions. Two database modeling approaches are presented in this paper (incremental aerodynamics and total aerodynamics), with examples showing strengths and weaknesses of each approach. In addition, the unique problems presented to the database developers by the large data space required for modeling a launch abort event illustrate the complexities of working with multi-dimensional data.

  17. National Database for Clinical Trials Related to Mental Illness (NDCT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Database for Clinical Trials Related to Mental Illness (NDCT) is an extensible informatics platform for relevant data at all levels of biological and...

  18. Relative aggregation operator in database fuzzy querying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminita DUMITRIU

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Fuzzy selection criteria querying relational databases include vague terms; they usually refer linguistic values form the attribute linguistic domains, defined as fuzzy sets. Generally, when a vague query is processed, the definitions of vague terms must already exist in a knowledge base. But there are also cases when vague terms must be dynamically defined, when a particular operation is used to aggregate simple criteria in a complex selection. The paper presents a new aggregation operator and the corresponding algorithm to evaluate the fuzzy query.

  19. Benefits of a relational database for computerized management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, W.W.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a computerized relational database which is the basis for a hazardous materials information management system which is comprehensive, effective, flexible and efficient. The system includes product information for Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs), labels, shipping, and the environment and is used in Dowell Schlumberger (DS) operations worldwide for a number of programs including planning, training, emergency response and regulatory compliance

  20. Solid waste projection model: Database user's guide (Version 1.0)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, F.; Stiles, D.

    1991-01-01

    The Solid Waste Projection Model (SWPM) system is an analytical tool developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) specifically to address Hanford solid waste management issues. This document is one of a set of documents supporting the SWPM system and providing instructions in the use and maintenance of SWPM components. This manual contains instructions for preparing to use Version 1 of the SWPM database, for entering and maintaining data, and for performing routine database functions. This document supports only those operations which are specific to SWPM database menus and functions, and does not provide instructions in the use of Paradox, the database management system in which the SWPM database is established. 3 figs., 1 tab

  1. Solid Waste Projection Model: Database user's guide (Version 1.3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburn, C.L.

    1991-11-01

    The Solid Waste Projection Model (SWPM) system is an analytical tool developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) specifically to address Hanford solid waste management issues. This document is one of a set of documents supporting the SWPM system and providing instructions in the use and maintenance of SWPM components. This manual contains instructions for preparing to use Version 1.3 of the SWPM database, for entering and maintaining data, and for performing routine database functions. This document supports only those operations which are specific to SWPM database menus and functions and does not provide instruction in the use of Paradox, the database management system in which the SWPM database is established

  2. Prolog as a Teaching Tool for Relational Database Interrogation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, P. A.; Samson, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    The use of the Prolog programing language is promoted as the language to use by anyone teaching a course in relational databases. A short introduction to Prolog is followed by a series of examples of queries. Several references are noted for anyone wishing to gain a deeper understanding. (MP)

  3. Sequence modelling and an extensible data model for genomic database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Peter Wei-Der [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) plans to sequence the human genome by the beginning of the next century. It will generate DNA sequences of more than 10 billion bases and complex marker sequences (maps) of more than 100 million markers. All of these information will be stored in database management systems (DBMSs). However, existing data models do not have the abstraction mechanism for modelling sequences and existing DBMS`s do not have operations for complex sequences. This work addresses the problem of sequence modelling in the context of the HGP and the more general problem of an extensible object data model that can incorporate the sequence model as well as existing and future data constructs and operators. First, we proposed a general sequence model that is application and implementation independent. This model is used to capture the sequence information found in the HGP at the conceptual level. In addition, abstract and biological sequence operators are defined for manipulating the modelled sequences. Second, we combined many features of semantic and object oriented data models into an extensible framework, which we called the ``Extensible Object Model``, to address the need of a modelling framework for incorporating the sequence data model with other types of data constructs and operators. This framework is based on the conceptual separation between constructors and constraints. We then used this modelling framework to integrate the constructs for the conceptual sequence model. The Extensible Object Model is also defined with a graphical representation, which is useful as a tool for database designers. Finally, we defined a query language to support this model and implement the query processor to demonstrate the feasibility of the extensible framework and the usefulness of the conceptual sequence model.

  4. Sequence modelling and an extensible data model for genomic database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Peter Wei-Der (California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States) Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) plans to sequence the human genome by the beginning of the next century. It will generate DNA sequences of more than 10 billion bases and complex marker sequences (maps) of more than 100 million markers. All of these information will be stored in database management systems (DBMSs). However, existing data models do not have the abstraction mechanism for modelling sequences and existing DBMS's do not have operations for complex sequences. This work addresses the problem of sequence modelling in the context of the HGP and the more general problem of an extensible object data model that can incorporate the sequence model as well as existing and future data constructs and operators. First, we proposed a general sequence model that is application and implementation independent. This model is used to capture the sequence information found in the HGP at the conceptual level. In addition, abstract and biological sequence operators are defined for manipulating the modelled sequences. Second, we combined many features of semantic and object oriented data models into an extensible framework, which we called the Extensible Object Model'', to address the need of a modelling framework for incorporating the sequence data model with other types of data constructs and operators. This framework is based on the conceptual separation between constructors and constraints. We then used this modelling framework to integrate the constructs for the conceptual sequence model. The Extensible Object Model is also defined with a graphical representation, which is useful as a tool for database designers. Finally, we defined a query language to support this model and implement the query processor to demonstrate the feasibility of the extensible framework and the usefulness of the conceptual sequence model.

  5. MAT-DB - A database for nuclear energy related materials data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over, H.H.

    2009-01-01

    The web-enabled materials database (Mat-DB) of JRC-IE has a long-term history in storing materials test data resulting from European and international research projects. The database structure and the user-guidance has bee permanently updated improved and optimized. The database is implemented in the secure ODIN portal: https://odin.jrc.ec.europa.eu of JRC-IE. This architecture guarantees fast access to confidential and public data and documentation which are stored in an inter-related document management database (DoMa). It is a part of JRC's nuclear knowledge management. Mat-DB hosts the whole pool of IAEA surveillance data of reactor pressure vessel materials from different nuclear power plants of the member states. Mat-DB contains also thousands of European GEN IV reactor systems related R and D materials data which are an important basis for the evaluating and extrapolating design data for candidate materials and setting up design rules covering high temperature exposure, irradiation and corrosion. Those data and rules would match also fusion related components. Mat-DB covers thermo-mechanical and thermo-physical properties data of engineering alloys at low, elevated and high temperatures for base materials and joints, including irradiated materials for nuclear fission and fusion applications, thermal barrier coated materials for gas turbines and properties of corroded materials. The corrosion part refers to weight gain/loss data of high temperature exposed engineering alloys and ceramic materials. For each test type the database structure reflects international test standards and recommendations. Mat-DB features an extensive library of evaluation programs for web-enabled assessment of uniaxial creep, fatigue, crack growth and high temperature corrosion properties. Evaluations can be performed after data retrieval or independently of Mat-DB by transferring other materials data in a given format to the programs. The fast evaluation processes help the user to

  6. A Relational Encoding of a Conceptual Model with Multiple Temporal Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubiani, Donatella; Montanari, Angelo

    The theoretical interest and the practical relevance of a systematic treatment of multiple temporal dimensions is widely recognized in the database and information system communities. Nevertheless, most relational databases have no temporal support at all. A few of them provide a limited support, in terms of temporal data types and predicates, constructors, and functions for the management of time values (borrowed from the SQL standard). One (resp., two) temporal dimensions are supported by historical and transaction-time (resp., bitemporal) databases only. In this paper, we provide a relational encoding of a conceptual model featuring four temporal dimensions, namely, the classical valid and transaction times, plus the event and availability times. We focus our attention on the distinctive technical features of the proposed temporal extension of the relation model. In the last part of the paper, we briefly show how to implement it in a standard DBMS.

  7. Use of Software Tools in Teaching Relational Database Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, D. R.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of state-of-the-art software tools in teaching a graduate, advanced, relational database design course. Results indicated a positive student response to the prototype of expert systems software and a willingness to utilize this new technology both in their studies and in future work applications. (JKP)

  8. New tools and methods for direct programmatic access to the dbSNP relational database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccone, Scott F; Quan, Jiaxi; Mehta, Gaurang; Bolze, Raphael; Thomas, Prasanth; Deelman, Ewa; Tischfield, Jay A; Rice, John P

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies often incorporate information from public biological databases in order to provide a biological reference for interpreting the results. The dbSNP database is an extensive source of information on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for many different organisms, including humans. We have developed free software that will download and install a local MySQL implementation of the dbSNP relational database for a specified organism. We have also designed a system for classifying dbSNP tables in terms of common tasks we wish to accomplish using the database. For each task we have designed a small set of custom tables that facilitate task-related queries and provide entity-relationship diagrams for each task composed from the relevant dbSNP tables. In order to expose these concepts and methods to a wider audience we have developed web tools for querying the database and browsing documentation on the tables and columns to clarify the relevant relational structure. All web tools and software are freely available to the public at http://cgsmd.isi.edu/dbsnpq. Resources such as these for programmatically querying biological databases are essential for viably integrating biological information into genetic association experiments on a genome-wide scale.

  9. Data-based Non-Markovian Model Inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghil, Michael

    2015-04-01

    This talk concentrates on obtaining stable and efficient data-based models for simulation and prediction in the geosciences and life sciences. The proposed model derivation relies on using a multivariate time series of partial observations from a large-dimensional system, and the resulting low-order models are compared with the optimal closures predicted by the non-Markovian Mori-Zwanzig formalism of statistical physics. Multilayer stochastic models (MSMs) are introduced as both a very broad generalization and a time-continuous limit of existing multilevel, regression-based approaches to data-based closure, in particular of empirical model reduction (EMR). We show that the multilayer structure of MSMs can provide a natural Markov approximation to the generalized Langevin equation (GLE) of the Mori-Zwanzig formalism. A simple correlation-based stopping criterion for an EMR-MSM model is derived to assess how well it approximates the GLE solution. Sufficient conditions are given for the nonlinear cross-interactions between the constitutive layers of a given MSM to guarantee the existence of a global random attractor. This existence ensures that no blow-up can occur for a very broad class of MSM applications. The EMR-MSM methodology is first applied to a conceptual, nonlinear, stochastic climate model of coupled slow and fast variables, in which only slow variables are observed. The resulting reduced model with energy-conserving nonlinearities captures the main statistical features of the slow variables, even when there is no formal scale separation and the fast variables are quite energetic. Second, an MSM is shown to successfully reproduce the statistics of a partially observed, generalized Lokta-Volterra model of population dynamics in its chaotic regime. The positivity constraint on the solutions' components replaces here the quadratic-energy-preserving constraint of fluid-flow problems and it successfully prevents blow-up. This work is based on a close

  10. Assessment of the SFC database for analysis and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, Martha A.

    1994-01-01

    SFC is one of the four clusters that make up the Integrated Work Control System (IWCS), which will integrate the shuttle processing databases at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The IWCS framework will enable communication among the four clusters and add new data collection protocols. The Shop Floor Control (SFC) module has been operational for two and a half years; however, at this stage, automatic links to the other 3 modules have not been implemented yet, except for a partial link to IOS (CASPR). SFC revolves around a DB/2 database with PFORMS acting as the database management system (DBMS). PFORMS is an off-the-shelf DB/2 application that provides a set of data entry screens and query forms. The main dynamic entity in the SFC and IOS database is a task; thus, the physical storage location and update privileges are driven by the status of the WAD. As we explored the SFC values, we realized that there was much to do before actually engaging in continuous analysis of the SFC data. Half way into this effort, it was realized that full scale analysis would have to be a future third phase of this effort. So, we concentrated on getting to know the contents of the database, and in establishing an initial set of tools to start the continuous analysis process. Specifically, we set out to: (1) provide specific procedures for statistical models, so as to enhance the TP-OAO office analysis and modeling capabilities; (2) design a data exchange interface; (3) prototype the interface to provide inputs to SCRAM; and (4) design a modeling database. These objectives were set with the expectation that, if met, they would provide former TP-OAO engineers with tools that would help them demonstrate the importance of process-based analyses. The latter, in return, will help them obtain the cooperation of various organizations in charting out their individual processes.

  11. Integration of an Evidence Base into a Probabilistic Risk Assessment Model. The Integrated Medical Model Database: An Organized Evidence Base for Assessing In-Flight Crew Health Risk and System Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saile, Lynn; Lopez, Vilma; Bickham, Grandin; FreiredeCarvalho, Mary; Kerstman, Eric; Byrne, Vicky; Butler, Douglas; Myers, Jerry; Walton, Marlei

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Integrated Medical Model (IMM) database, which is an organized evidence base for assessing in-flight crew health risk. The database is a relational database accessible to many people. The database quantifies the model inputs by a ranking based on the highest value of the data as Level of Evidence (LOE) and the quality of evidence (QOE) score that provides an assessment of the evidence base for each medical condition. The IMM evidence base has already been able to provide invaluable information for designers, and for other uses.

  12. A method to implement fine-grained access control for personal health records through standard relational database queries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujansky, Walter V; Faus, Sam A; Stone, Ethan; Brennan, Patricia Flatley

    2010-10-01

    Online personal health records (PHRs) enable patients to access, manage, and share certain of their own health information electronically. This capability creates the need for precise access-controls mechanisms that restrict the sharing of data to that intended by the patient. The authors describe the design and implementation of an access-control mechanism for PHR repositories that is modeled on the eXtensible Access Control Markup Language (XACML) standard, but intended to reduce the cognitive and computational complexity of XACML. The authors implemented the mechanism entirely in a relational database system using ANSI-standard SQL statements. Based on a set of access-control rules encoded as relational table rows, the mechanism determines via a single SQL query whether a user who accesses patient data from a specific application is authorized to perform a requested operation on a specified data object. Testing of this query on a moderately large database has demonstrated execution times consistently below 100ms. The authors include the details of the implementation, including algorithms, examples, and a test database as Supplementary materials. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. ZZ HATCHES-18, Database for radiochemical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, T.G.

    2008-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: HATCHES is a referenced, quality assured, thermodynamic database, developed by Serco Assurance for Nirex. Although originally compiled for use in radiochemical modelling work, HATCHES also includes data suitable for many other applications e.g. toxic waste disposal, effluent treatment and chemical processing. It is used in conjunction with chemical and geochemical computer programs, to simulate a wide variety of reactions in aqueous environments. The database includes thermodynamic data (the log formation constant and the enthalpy of formation for the chemical species) for the actinides, fission products and decay products. The datasets for Ni, Tc, U, Np, Pu and Am are based on the NEA reviews of the chemical thermodynamics of these elements. The data sets for these elements with oxalate, citrate and EDTA are based on the NEA-selected values. For iso-saccharinic acid, additional data (non-selected values) have been included from the NEA review as well as data derived from other sources. HATCHES also includes data for many toxic metals and for elements commonly found in groundwaters or geological materials. HARPHRQ operates by reference to the PHREEQE master species list. Thus the thermodynamic information supplied is: a) the log equilibrium constant for the formation reaction of the requested species from the PHREEQE master species for the corresponding elements; b) the enthalpy of reaction for the formation reaction of the requested species from the PHREEQE master species for the corresponding elements. This version of HATCHES has been updated since the previous release to provide consistency with the selected data from two recent publications in the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency series on chemical thermodynamics: Chemical Thermodynamics Series Volume 7 (2005): Chemical Thermodynamics of Selenium by Aeke Olin (Chairman), Bengt Nolaeng, Lars-Olof Oehman, Evgeniy Osadchii and Erik Rosen and Chemical Thermodynamics Series Volume 8

  14. Exploration of a Vision for Actor Database Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Vivek

    of these services. Existing popular approaches to building these services either use an in-memory database system or an actor runtime. We observe that these approaches have complementary strengths and weaknesses. In this dissertation, we propose the integration of actor programming models in database systems....... In doing so, we lay down a vision for a new class of systems called actor database systems. To explore this vision, this dissertation crystallizes the notion of an actor database system by defining its feature set in light of current application and hardware trends. In order to explore the viability...... of the outlined vision, a new programming model named Reactors has been designed to enrich classic relational database programming models with logical actor programming constructs. To support the reactor programming model, a high-performance in-memory multi-core OLTP database system named REACTDB has been built...

  15. YAdumper: extracting and translating large information volumes from relational databases to structured flat files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, José M; Valencia, Alfonso

    2004-10-12

    Downloading the information stored in relational databases into XML and other flat formats is a common task in bioinformatics. This periodical dumping of information requires considerable CPU time, disk and memory resources. YAdumper has been developed as a purpose-specific tool to deal with the integral structured information download of relational databases. YAdumper is a Java application that organizes database extraction following an XML template based on an external Document Type Declaration. Compared with other non-native alternatives, YAdumper substantially reduces memory requirements and considerably improves writing performance.

  16. An online database for informing ecological network models: http://kelpforest.ucsc.edu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beas-Luna, Rodrigo; Novak, Mark; Carr, Mark H; Tinker, Martin T; Black, August; Caselle, Jennifer E; Hoban, Michael; Malone, Dan; Iles, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Ecological network models and analyses are recognized as valuable tools for understanding the dynamics and resiliency of ecosystems, and for informing ecosystem-based approaches to management. However, few databases exist that can provide the life history, demographic and species interaction information necessary to parameterize ecological network models. Faced with the difficulty of synthesizing the information required to construct models for kelp forest ecosystems along the West Coast of North America, we developed an online database (http://kelpforest.ucsc.edu/) to facilitate the collation and dissemination of such information. Many of the database's attributes are novel yet the structure is applicable and adaptable to other ecosystem modeling efforts. Information for each taxonomic unit includes stage-specific life history, demography, and body-size allometries. Species interactions include trophic, competitive, facilitative, and parasitic forms. Each data entry is temporally and spatially explicit. The online data entry interface allows researchers anywhere to contribute and access information. Quality control is facilitated by attributing each entry to unique contributor identities and source citations. The database has proven useful as an archive of species and ecosystem-specific information in the development of several ecological network models, for informing management actions, and for education purposes (e.g., undergraduate and graduate training). To facilitate adaptation of the database by other researches for other ecosystems, the code and technical details on how to customize this database and apply it to other ecosystems are freely available and located at the following link (https://github.com/kelpforest-cameo/databaseui).

  17. Analisis Performansi Database Ditinjau dari Aspek Optimasi Query dan Desain Model Data Relational pada DAS dan RAID

    OpenAIRE

    Lubis, Juanda Hakim

    2015-01-01

    The amount of data that is stored in magnetic disk (floppy disk, harddisk, etc) increases 100% each year for each department for each company so an effort to maintain a database system to be optimal is needed. Designing a database is the initial step when creating a system with an optimal database performance. However, just designing the database is not enough to increase the performance of the database.One of the ways is to increase the speed of data transaction by increaseing...

  18. Chess databases as a research vehicle in psychology: Modeling large data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaci, Nemanja; Bilalić, Merim

    2017-08-01

    The game of chess has often been used for psychological investigations, particularly in cognitive science. The clear-cut rules and well-defined environment of chess provide a model for investigations of basic cognitive processes, such as perception, memory, and problem solving, while the precise rating system for the measurement of skill has enabled investigations of individual differences and expertise-related effects. In the present study, we focus on another appealing feature of chess-namely, the large archive databases associated with the game. The German national chess database presented in this study represents a fruitful ground for the investigation of multiple longitudinal research questions, since it collects the data of over 130,000 players and spans over 25 years. The German chess database collects the data of all players, including hobby players, and all tournaments played. This results in a rich and complete collection of the skill, age, and activity of the whole population of chess players in Germany. The database therefore complements the commonly used expertise approach in cognitive science by opening up new possibilities for the investigation of multiple factors that underlie expertise and skill acquisition. Since large datasets are not common in psychology, their introduction also raises the question of optimal and efficient statistical analysis. We offer the database for download and illustrate how it can be used by providing concrete examples and a step-by-step tutorial using different statistical analyses on a range of topics, including skill development over the lifetime, birth cohort effects, effects of activity and inactivity on skill, and gender differences.

  19. A Parallel Relational Database Management System Approach to Relevance Feedback in Information Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Carol; Frieder, Ophir; Holmes, David O.; Grossman, David

    1999-01-01

    Describes a scalable, parallel, relational database-drive information retrieval engine. To support portability across a wide range of execution environments, all algorithms adhere to the SQL-92 standard. By incorporating relevance feedback algorithms, accuracy is enhanced over prior database-driven information retrieval efforts. Presents…

  20. On Modeling the Behavior of Comparators for Complex Fuzzy Objects in a Fuzzy Object-Relational Database Management System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JuanM. Medina

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a parameterized definition for fuzzy comparators on complex fuzzy datatypes like fuzzy collections with conjunctive semantics and fuzzy objects. This definition and its implementation on a Fuzzy Object-Relational Database Management System (FORDBMS provides the designer with a powerful tool to adapt the behavior of these operators to the semantics of the considered application.

  1. The Erasmus insurance case and a related questionnaire for distributed database management systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. van der Made-Potuijt

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThis is the third report concerning transaction management in the database environment. In the first report the role of the transaction manager in protecting the integrity of a database has been studied [van der Made-Potuijt 1989]. In the second report a model has been given for a

  2. A database model for evaluating material accountability safeguards effectiveness against protracted theft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sicherman, A.; Fortney, D.S.; Patenaude, C.J.

    1993-07-01

    DOE Material Control and Accountability Order 5633.3A requires that facilities handling special nuclear material evaluate their effectiveness against protracted theft (repeated thefts of small quantities of material, typically occurring over an extended time frame, to accumulate a goal quantity). Because a protracted theft attempt can extend over time, material accountability-like (MA) safeguards may help detect a protracted theft attempt in progress. Inventory anomalies, and material not in its authorized location when requested for processing are examples of MA detection mechanisms. Crediting such detection in evaluations, however, requires taking into account potential insider subversion of MA safeguards. In this paper, the authors describe a database model for evaluating MA safeguards effectiveness against protracted theft that addresses potential subversion. The model includes a detailed yet practical structure for characterizing various types of MA activities, lists of potential insider MA defeat methods and access/authority related to MA activities, and an initial implementation of built-in MA detection probabilities. This database model, implemented in the new Protracted Insider module of ASSESS (Analytic System and Software for Evaluating Safeguards and Security), helps facilitate the systematic collection of relevant information about MA activity steps, and ''standardize'' MA safeguards evaluations

  3. Database Description - Yeast Interacting Proteins Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Yeast Interacting Proteins Database Database Description General information of database Database... name Yeast Interacting Proteins Database Alternative name - DOI 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc00742-000 Creator C...-ken 277-8561 Tel: +81-4-7136-3989 FAX: +81-4-7136-3979 E-mail : Database classif...s cerevisiae Taxonomy ID: 4932 Database description Information on interactions and related information obta...l Acad Sci U S A. 2001 Apr 10;98(8):4569-74. Epub 2001 Mar 13. External Links: Original website information Database

  4. PSSRdb: a relational database of polymorphic simple sequence repeats extracted from prokaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Chaitanya, Pasumarthy S; Nagarajaram, Hampapathalu A

    2011-01-01

    PSSRdb (Polymorphic Simple Sequence Repeats database) (http://www.cdfd.org.in/PSSRdb/) is a relational database of polymorphic simple sequence repeats (PSSRs) extracted from 85 different species of prokaryotes. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are the tandem repeats of nucleotide motifs of the sizes 1-6 bp and are highly polymorphic. SSR mutations in and around coding regions affect transcription and translation of genes. Such changes underpin phase variations and antigenic variations seen in some bacteria. Although SSR-mediated phase variation and antigenic variations have been well-studied in some bacteria there seems a lot of other species of prokaryotes yet to be investigated for SSR mediated adaptive and other evolutionary advantages. As a part of our on-going studies on SSR polymorphism in prokaryotes we compared the genome sequences of various strains and isolates available for 85 different species of prokaryotes and extracted a number of SSRs showing length variations and created a relational database called PSSRdb. This database gives useful information such as location of PSSRs in genomes, length variation across genomes, the regions harboring PSSRs, etc. The information provided in this database is very useful for further research and analysis of SSRs in prokaryotes.

  5. A Quantitative Analysis of the Extrinsic and Intrinsic Turnover Factors of Relational Database Support Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takusi, Gabriel Samuto

    2010-01-01

    This quantitative analysis explored the intrinsic and extrinsic turnover factors of relational database support specialists. Two hundred and nine relational database support specialists were surveyed for this research. The research was conducted based on Hackman and Oldham's (1980) Job Diagnostic Survey. Regression analysis and a univariate ANOVA…

  6. Ontological interpretation of biomedical database content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana da Silva, Filipe; Jansen, Ludger; Freitas, Fred; Schulz, Stefan

    2017-06-26

    Biological databases store data about laboratory experiments, together with semantic annotations, in order to support data aggregation and retrieval. The exact meaning of such annotations in the context of a database record is often ambiguous. We address this problem by grounding implicit and explicit database content in a formal-ontological framework. By using a typical extract from the databases UniProt and Ensembl, annotated with content from GO, PR, ChEBI and NCBI Taxonomy, we created four ontological models (in OWL), which generate explicit, distinct interpretations under the BioTopLite2 (BTL2) upper-level ontology. The first three models interpret database entries as individuals (IND), defined classes (SUBC), and classes with dispositions (DISP), respectively; the fourth model (HYBR) is a combination of SUBC and DISP. For the evaluation of these four models, we consider (i) database content retrieval, using ontologies as query vocabulary; (ii) information completeness; and, (iii) DL complexity and decidability. The models were tested under these criteria against four competency questions (CQs). IND does not raise any ontological claim, besides asserting the existence of sample individuals and relations among them. Modelling patterns have to be created for each type of annotation referent. SUBC is interpreted regarding maximally fine-grained defined subclasses under the classes referred to by the data. DISP attempts to extract truly ontological statements from the database records, claiming the existence of dispositions. HYBR is a hybrid of SUBC and DISP and is more parsimonious regarding expressiveness and query answering complexity. For each of the four models, the four CQs were submitted as DL queries. This shows the ability to retrieve individuals with IND, and classes in SUBC and HYBR. DISP does not retrieve anything because the axioms with disposition are embedded in General Class Inclusion (GCI) statements. Ambiguity of biological database content is

  7. Linking Multiple Databases: Term Project Using "Sentences" DBMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ronald S.; Rainwater, Stephen B.

    This paper describes a methodology for use in teaching an introductory Database Management System (DBMS) course. Students master basic database concepts through the use of a multiple component project implemented in both relational and associative data models. The associative data model is a new approach for designing multi-user, Web-enabled…

  8. Generic database cost models for hierarchical memory systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Manegold (Stefan); P.A. Boncz (Peter); M.L. Kersten (Martin)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractAccurate prediction of operator execution time is a prerequisite fordatabase query optimization. Although extensively studied for conventionaldisk-based DBMSs, cost modeling in main-memory DBMSs is still an openissue. Recent database research has demonstrated that memory access ismore

  9. A Space-Economic Representation of Transitive Closures in Relational Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangjun Chen

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available A composite object represented as a directed graph (digraph for short is an important data structure that requires efficient support in CAD/CAM, CASE, office systems, software management, web databases, and document databases. It is cumbersome to handle such objects in relational database systems when they involve ancestor-descendant relationships (or say, recursive relationships. In this paper, we present a new encoding method to label a digraph, which reduces the footprints of all previous strategies. This method is based on a tree labeling method and the concept of branchings that are used in graph theory for finding the shortest connection networks. A branching is a subgraph of a given digraph that is in fact a forest, but covers all the nodes of the graph. On the one hand, the proposed encoding scheme achieves the smallest space requirements among all previously published strategies for recognizing recursive relationships. On the other hand, it leads to a new algorithm for computing transitive closures for DAGs (directed acyclic graph in O(eþb time and O(nþb space, where n represents the number of the nodes of a DAG, e the numbers of the edges, and b the DAG's breadth. In addition, this method can be extended to cyclic digraphs and is especially suitable for a relational environment.

  10. Critical incidents related to cardiac arrests reported to the Danish Patient Safety Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Oluf; Maaløe, Rikke; Andersen, Henning Boje

    2010-01-01

    Background Critical incident reports can identify areas for improvement in resuscitation practice. The Danish Patient Safety Database is a mandatory reporting system and receives critical incident reports submitted by hospital personnel. The aim of this study is to identify, analyse and categorize...... critical incidents related to cardiac arrests reported to the Danish Patient Safety Database. Methods The search terms “cardiac arrest” and “resuscitation” were used to identify reports in the Danish Patient Safety Database. Identified critical incidents were then classified into categories. Results One...

  11. FALCAO - a relational database to storaging the variables monitored in the research reactor IEA-R1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes Neto, Jose; Andrade, Delvonei Alves de

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work is to introduce all initial steps for the creation of a relational database, named FALCAO, to support the storaging of the monitored variables in the IEA-R1 research reactor, located in the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN-CNEN/SP. As introduction, it is considered the modeling importance of the logic diagram and its direct influence in the integrity of the provided information. It is presented the concepts and steps of normalization and denormalization including the entities and relations involved in the logical model. It is also presented the effects of the model rules in the acquisition, loading and availability of the final information, under the performance concept, since the acquisition process, loads and provides lots of information in small intervals of time. The data logical model, considering the desired performance and the sharing information is also presented. (author)

  12. TRENDS: A flight test relational database user's guide and reference manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondi, M. J.; Bjorkman, W. S.; Cross, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    This report is designed to be a user's guide and reference manual for users intending to access rotocraft test data via TRENDS, the relational database system which was developed as a tool for the aeronautical engineer with no programming background. This report has been written to assist novice and experienced TRENDS users. TRENDS is a complete system for retrieving, searching, and analyzing both numerical and narrative data, and for displaying time history and statistical data in graphical and numerical formats. This manual provides a 'guided tour' and a 'user's guide' for the new and intermediate-skilled users. Examples for the use of each menu item within TRENDS is provided in the Menu Reference section of the manual, including full coverage for TIMEHIST, one of the key tools. This manual is written around the XV-15 Tilt Rotor database, but does include an appendix on the UH-60 Blackhawk database. This user's guide and reference manual establishes a referrable source for the research community and augments NASA TM-101025, TRENDS: The Aeronautical Post-Test, Database Management System, Jan. 1990, written by the same authors.

  13. Accessing the public MIMIC-II intensive care relational database for clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Daniel J; Lee, Joon; Silva, Ikaro; Park, Shinhyuk; Moody, George B; Celi, Leo A; Mark, Roger G

    2013-01-10

    The Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II (MIMIC-II) database is a free, public resource for intensive care research. The database was officially released in 2006, and has attracted a growing number of researchers in academia and industry. We present the two major software tools that facilitate accessing the relational database: the web-based QueryBuilder and a downloadable virtual machine (VM) image. QueryBuilder and the MIMIC-II VM have been developed successfully and are freely available to MIMIC-II users. Simple example SQL queries and the resulting data are presented. Clinical studies pertaining to acute kidney injury and prediction of fluid requirements in the intensive care unit are shown as typical examples of research performed with MIMIC-II. In addition, MIMIC-II has also provided data for annual PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenges, including the 2012 Challenge "Predicting mortality of ICU Patients". QueryBuilder is a web-based tool that provides easy access to MIMIC-II. For more computationally intensive queries, one can locally install a complete copy of MIMIC-II in a VM. Both publicly available tools provide the MIMIC-II research community with convenient querying interfaces and complement the value of the MIMIC-II relational database.

  14. Fuzzy Relational Databases: Representational Issues and Reduction Using Similarity Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prade, Henri; Testemale, Claudette

    1987-01-01

    Compares and expands upon two approaches to dealing with fuzzy relational databases. The proposed similarity measure is based on a fuzzy Hausdorff distance and estimates the mismatch between two possibility distributions using a reduction process. The consequences of the reduction process on query evaluation are studied. (Author/EM)

  15. Clinical Prediction Models for Cardiovascular Disease: The Tufts PACE CPM Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessler, Benjamin S.; Lana Lai, YH; Kramer, Whitney; Cangelosi, Michael; Raman, Gowri; Lutz, Jennifer S.; Kent, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical prediction models (CPMs) estimate the probability of clinical outcomes and hold the potential to improve decision making and individualize care. For patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) there are numerous CPMs available though the extent of this literature is not well described. Methods and Results We conducted a systematic review for articles containing CPMs for CVD published between January 1990 through May 2012. CVD includes coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure (HF), arrhythmias, stroke, venous thromboembolism (VTE) and peripheral vascular disease (PVD). We created a novel database and characterized CPMs based on the stage of development, population under study, performance, covariates, and predicted outcomes. There are 796 models included in this database. The number of CPMs published each year is increasing steadily over time. 717 (90%) are de novo CPMs, 21 (3%) are CPM recalibrations, and 58 (7%) are CPM adaptations. This database contains CPMs for 31 index conditions including 215 CPMs for patients with CAD, 168 CPMs for population samples, and 79 models for patients with HF. There are 77 distinct index/ outcome (I/O) pairings. Of the de novo models in this database 450 (63%) report a c-statistic and 259 (36%) report some information on calibration. Conclusions There is an abundance of CPMs available for a wide assortment of CVD conditions, with substantial redundancy in the literature. The comparative performance of these models, the consistency of effects and risk estimates across models and the actual and potential clinical impact of this body of literature is poorly understood. PMID:26152680

  16. Comparison of thermodynamic databases used in geochemical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandratillake, M.R.; Newton, G.W.A.; Robinson, V.J.

    1988-05-01

    Four thermodynamic databases used by European groups for geochemical modelling have been compared. Thermodynamic data for both aqueous species and solid species have been listed. When the values are directly comparable any differences between them have been highlighted at two levels of significance. (author)

  17. Evolution of computational models in BioModels Database and the Physiome Model Repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharm, Martin; Gebhardt, Tom; Touré, Vasundra; Bagnacani, Andrea; Salehzadeh-Yazdi, Ali; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Waltemath, Dagmar

    2018-04-12

    A useful model is one that is being (re)used. The development of a successful model does not finish with its publication. During reuse, models are being modified, i.e. expanded, corrected, and refined. Even small changes in the encoding of a model can, however, significantly affect its interpretation. Our motivation for the present study is to identify changes in models and make them transparent and traceable. We analysed 13734 models from BioModels Database and the Physiome Model Repository. For each model, we studied the frequencies and types of updates between its first and latest release. To demonstrate the impact of changes, we explored the history of a Repressilator model in BioModels Database. We observed continuous updates in the majority of models. Surprisingly, even the early models are still being modified. We furthermore detected that many updates target annotations, which improves the information one can gain from models. To support the analysis of changes in model repositories we developed MoSt, an online tool for visualisations of changes in models. The scripts used to generate the data and figures for this study are available from GitHub https://github.com/binfalse/BiVeS-StatsGenerator and as a Docker image at https://hub.docker.com/r/binfalse/bives-statsgenerator/ . The website https://most.bio.informatik.uni-rostock.de/ provides interactive access to model versions and their evolutionary statistics. The reuse of models is still impeded by a lack of trust and documentation. A detailed and transparent documentation of all aspects of the model, including its provenance, will improve this situation. Knowledge about a model's provenance can avoid the repetition of mistakes that others already faced. More insights are gained into how the system evolves from initial findings to a profound understanding. We argue that it is the responsibility of the maintainers of model repositories to offer transparent model provenance to their users.

  18. IAEA/NDS requirements related to database software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronyaev, V.; Zerkin, V.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The Nuclear Data Section of the IAEA disseminates data to the NDS users through Internet or on CD-ROMs and diskettes. OSU Web-server on DEC Alpha with Open VMS and Oracle/DEC DBMS provides via CGI scripts and FORTRAN retrieval programs access to the main nuclear databases supported by the networks of Nuclear Reactions Data Centres and Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Centres (CINDA, EXFOR, ENDF, NSR, ENSDF). For Web-access to data from other libraries and files, hyper-links to the files stored in ASCII text or other formats are used. Databases on CD-ROM are usually provided with some retrieval system. They are distributed in the run-time mode and comply with all license requirements for software used in their development. Although major development work is done now at the PC with MS-Windows and Linux, NDS may not at present, due to some institutional conditions, use these platforms for organization of the Web access to the data. Starting the end of 1999, the NDS, in co-operation with other data centers, began to work out the strategy of migration of main network nuclear data bases onto platforms other than DEC Alpha/Open VMS/DBMS. Because the different co-operating centers have their own preferences for hardware and software, the requirement to provide maximum platform independence for nuclear databases is the most important and desirable feature. This requirement determined some standards for the nuclear database software development. Taking into account the present state and future development, these standards can be formulated as follows: 1. All numerical data (experimental, evaluated, recommended values and their uncertainties) prepared for inclusion in the IAEA/NDS nuclear database should be submitted in the form of the ASCII text files and will be kept at NDS as a master file. 2. Databases with complex structure should be submitted in the form of the files with standard SQL statements describing all its components. All extensions of standard SQL

  19. Experience in running relational databases on clustered storage

    CERN Document Server

    Aparicio, Ruben Gaspar

    2015-01-01

    For past eight years, CERN IT Database group has based its backend storage on NAS (Network-Attached Storage) architecture, providing database access via NFS (Network File System) protocol. In last two and half years, our storage has evolved from a scale-up architecture to a scale-out one. This paper describes our setup and a set of functionalities providing key features to other services like Database on Demand [1] or CERN Oracle backup and recovery service. It also outlines possible trend of evolution that, storage for databases could follow.

  20. Artificial Radionuclides Database in the Pacific Ocean: HAM Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michio Aoyama

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The database “Historical Artificial Radionuclides in the Pacific Ocean and its Marginal Seas”, or HAM database, has been created. The database includes 90Sr, 137Cs, and 239,240Pu concentration data from the seawater of the Pacific Ocean and its marginal seas with some measurements from the sea surface to the bottom. The data in the HAM database were collected from about 90 literature citations, which include published papers; annual reports by the Hydrographic Department, Maritime Safety Agency, Japan; and unpublished data provided by individuals. The data of concentrations of 90Sr, 137Cs, and 239,240Pu have been accumulating since 1957–1998. The present HAM database includes 7737 records for 137Cs concentration data, 3972 records for 90Sr concentration data, and 2666 records for 239,240Pu concentration data. The spatial variation of sampling stations in the HAM database is heterogeneous, namely, more than 80% of the data for each radionuclide is from the Pacific Ocean and the Sea of Japan, while a relatively small portion of data is from the South Pacific. This HAM database will allow us to use these radionuclides as significant chemical tracers for oceanographic study as well as the assessment of environmental affects of anthropogenic radionuclides for these 5 decades. Furthermore, these radionuclides can be used to verify the oceanic general circulation models in the time scale of several decades.

  1. The relational clinical database: a possible solution to the star wars in registry systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, D K; Zamieroski, M

    1990-12-01

    In summary, having data from other service areas available in a relational clinical database could resolve many of the problems existing in today's registry systems. Uniting sophisticated information systems into a centralized database system could definitely be a corporate asset in managing the bottom line.

  2. Verification of road databases using multiple road models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziems, Marcel; Rottensteiner, Franz; Heipke, Christian

    2017-08-01

    In this paper a new approach for automatic road database verification based on remote sensing images is presented. In contrast to existing methods, the applicability of the new approach is not restricted to specific road types, context areas or geographic regions. This is achieved by combining several state-of-the-art road detection and road verification approaches that work well under different circumstances. Each one serves as an independent module representing a unique road model and a specific processing strategy. All modules provide independent solutions for the verification problem of each road object stored in the database in form of two probability distributions, the first one for the state of a database object (correct or incorrect), and a second one for the state of the underlying road model (applicable or not applicable). In accordance with the Dempster-Shafer Theory, both distributions are mapped to a new state space comprising the classes correct, incorrect and unknown. Statistical reasoning is applied to obtain the optimal state of a road object. A comparison with state-of-the-art road detection approaches using benchmark datasets shows that in general the proposed approach provides results with larger completeness. Additional experiments reveal that based on the proposed method a highly reliable semi-automatic approach for road data base verification can be designed.

  3. The relevance of the IFPE Database to the modelling of WWER-type fuel behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killeen, J.; Sartori, E.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the International Fuel Performance Experimental Database (IFPE Database) is to provide, in the public domain, a comprehensive and well-qualified database on zircaloy-clad UO 2 fuel for model development and code validation. The data encompass both normal and off-normal operation and include prototypic commercial irradiations as well as experiments performed in Material Testing Reactors. To date, the Database contains over 800 individual cases, providing data on fuel centreline temperatures, dimensional changes and FGR either from in-pile pressure measurements or PIE techniques, including puncturing, Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) and X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) measurements. This work in assembling and disseminating the Database is carried out in close co-operation and co-ordination between OECD/NEA and the IAEA. The majority of data sets are dedicated to fuel behaviour under LWR irradiation, and every effort has been made to obtain data representative of BWR, PWR and WWER conditions. In each case, the data set contains information on the pre-characterisation of the fuel, cladding and fuel rod geometry, the irradiation history presented in as much detail as the source documents allow, and finally any in-pile or PIE measurements that were made. The purpose of this paper is to highlight data that are relevant specifically to WWER application. To this end, the NEA and IAEA have been successful in obtaining appropriate data for both WWER-440 and WWER-1000-type reactors. These are: 1) Twelve (12) rods from the Finnish-Russian co-operative SOFIT programme; 2) Kola-3 WWER-440 irradiation; 3) MIR ramp tests on Kola-3 rods; 4) Zaporozskaya WWER-1000 irradiation; 5) Novovoronezh WWER-1000 irradiation. Before reviewing these data sets and their usefulness, the paper touches briefly on recent, more novel additions to the Database and on progress made in the use of the Database for the current IAEA FUMEX II Project. Finally, the paper describes the Computer

  4. Similarity joins in relational database systems

    CERN Document Server

    Augsten, Nikolaus

    2013-01-01

    State-of-the-art database systems manage and process a variety of complex objects, including strings and trees. For such objects equality comparisons are often not meaningful and must be replaced by similarity comparisons. This book describes the concepts and techniques to incorporate similarity into database systems. We start out by discussing the properties of strings and trees, and identify the edit distance as the de facto standard for comparing complex objects. Since the edit distance is computationally expensive, token-based distances have been introduced to speed up edit distance comput

  5. cuticleDB: a relational database of Arthropod cuticular proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willis Judith H

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The insect exoskeleton or cuticle is a bi-partite composite of proteins and chitin that provides protective, skeletal and structural functions. Little information is available about the molecular structure of this important complex that exhibits a helicoidal architecture. Scores of sequences of cuticular proteins have been obtained from direct protein sequencing, from cDNAs, and from genomic analyses. Most of these cuticular protein sequences contain motifs found only in arthropod proteins. Description cuticleDB is a relational database containing all structural proteins of Arthropod cuticle identified to date. Many come from direct sequencing of proteins isolated from cuticle and from sequences from cDNAs that share common features with these authentic cuticular proteins. It also includes proteins from the Drosophila melanogaster and the Anopheles gambiae genomes, that have been predicted to be cuticular proteins, based on a Pfam motif (PF00379 responsible for chitin binding in Arthropod cuticle. The total number of the database entries is 445: 370 derive from insects, 60 from Crustacea and 15 from Chelicerata. The database can be accessed from our web server at http://bioinformatics.biol.uoa.gr/cuticleDB. Conclusions CuticleDB was primarily designed to contain correct and full annotation of cuticular protein data. The database will be of help to future genome annotators. Users will be able to test hypotheses for the existence of known and also of yet unknown motifs in cuticular proteins. An analysis of motifs may contribute to understanding how proteins contribute to the physical properties of cuticle as well as to the precise nature of their interaction with chitin.

  6. Use of a Relational Database to Support Clinical Research: Application in a Diabetes Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomatch, Diane; Truax, Terry; Savage, Peter

    1981-01-01

    A database has been established to support conduct of clinical research and monitor delivery of medical care for 1200 diabetic patients as part of the Michigan Diabetes Research and Training Center (MDRTC). Use of an intelligent microcomputer to enter and retrieve the data and use of a relational database management system (DBMS) to store and manage data have provided a flexible, efficient method of achieving both support of small projects and monitoring overall activity of the Diabetes Center Unit (DCU). Simplicity of access to data, efficiency in providing data for unanticipated requests, ease of manipulations of relations, security and “logical data independence” were important factors in choosing a relational DBMS. The ability to interface with an interactive statistical program and a graphics program is a major advantage of this system. Out database currently provides support for the operation and analysis of several ongoing research projects.

  7. Evolution of the use of relational and NoSQL databases in the ATLAS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberis, D.

    2016-09-01

    The ATLAS experiment used for many years a large database infrastructure based on Oracle to store several different types of non-event data: time-dependent detector configuration and conditions data, calibrations and alignments, configurations of Grid sites, catalogues for data management tools, job records for distributed workload management tools, run and event metadata. The rapid development of "NoSQL" databases (structured storage services) in the last five years allowed an extended and complementary usage of traditional relational databases and new structured storage tools in order to improve the performance of existing applications and to extend their functionalities using the possibilities offered by the modern storage systems. The trend is towards using the best tool for each kind of data, separating for example the intrinsically relational metadata from payload storage, and records that are frequently updated and benefit from transactions from archived information. Access to all components has to be orchestrated by specialised services that run on front-end machines and shield the user from the complexity of data storage infrastructure. This paper describes this technology evolution in the ATLAS database infrastructure and presents a few examples of large database applications that benefit from it.

  8. Keyword Query Expansion Paradigm Based on Recommendation and Interpretation in Relational Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingqi Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the ambiguity and impreciseness of keyword query in relational databases, the research on keyword query expansion has attracted wide attention. Existing query expansion methods expose users’ query intention to a certain extent, but most of them cannot balance the precision and recall. To address this problem, a novel two-step query expansion approach is proposed based on query recommendation and query interpretation. First, a probabilistic recommendation algorithm is put forward by constructing a term similarity matrix and Viterbi model. Second, by using the translation algorithm of triples and construction algorithm of query subgraphs, query keywords are translated to query subgraphs with structural and semantic information. Finally, experimental results on a real-world dataset demonstrate the effectiveness and rationality of the proposed method.

  9. Data-based modelling of the Earth's dynamic magnetosphere: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Tsyganenko

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the main advances in the area of data-based modelling of the Earth's distant magnetic field achieved during the last two decades. The essence and the principal goal of the approach is to extract maximum information from available data, using physically realistic and flexible mathematical structures, parameterized by the most relevant and routinely accessible observables. Accordingly, the paper concentrates on three aspects of the modelling: (i mathematical methods to develop a computational "skeleton" of a model, (ii spacecraft databases, and (iii parameterization of the magnetospheric models by the solar wind drivers and/or ground-based indices. The review is followed by a discussion of the main issues concerning further progress in the area, in particular, methods to assess the models' performance and the accuracy of the field line mapping. The material presented in the paper is organized along the lines of the author Julius-Bartels' Medal Lecture during the General Assembly 2013 of the European Geosciences Union.

  10. The LHCb configuration database

    CERN Document Server

    Abadie, L; Van Herwijnen, Eric; Jacobsson, R; Jost, B; Neufeld, N

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the LHCb configuration database is to store information about all the controllable devices of the detector. The experiment's control system (that uses PVSS ) will configure, start up and monitor the detector from the information in the configuration database. The database will contain devices with their properties, connectivity and hierarchy. The ability to store and rapidly retrieve huge amounts of data, and the navigability between devices are important requirements. We have collected use cases to ensure the completeness of the design. Using the entity relationship modelling technique we describe the use cases as classes with attributes and links. We designed the schema for the tables using relational diagrams. This methodology has been applied to the TFC (switches) and DAQ system. Other parts of the detector will follow later. The database has been implemented using Oracle to benefit from central CERN database support. The project also foresees the creation of tools to populate, maintain, and co...

  11. Hydrologic Derivatives for Modeling and Analysis—A new global high-resolution database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdin, Kristine L.

    2017-07-17

    The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a new global high-resolution hydrologic derivative database. Loosely modeled on the HYDRO1k database, this new database, entitled Hydrologic Derivatives for Modeling and Analysis, provides comprehensive and consistent global coverage of topographically derived raster layers (digital elevation model data, flow direction, flow accumulation, slope, and compound topographic index) and vector layers (streams and catchment boundaries). The coverage of the data is global, and the underlying digital elevation model is a hybrid of three datasets: HydroSHEDS (Hydrological data and maps based on SHuttle Elevation Derivatives at multiple Scales), GMTED2010 (Global Multi-resolution Terrain Elevation Data 2010), and the SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission). For most of the globe south of 60°N., the raster resolution of the data is 3 arc-seconds, corresponding to the resolution of the SRTM. For the areas north of 60°N., the resolution is 7.5 arc-seconds (the highest resolution of the GMTED2010 dataset) except for Greenland, where the resolution is 30 arc-seconds. The streams and catchments are attributed with Pfafstetter codes, based on a hierarchical numbering system, that carry important topological information. This database is appropriate for use in continental-scale modeling efforts. The work described in this report was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center.

  12. A prediction model-based algorithm for computer-assisted database screening of adverse drug reactions in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Joep H G; van Hunsel, Florence P A M; Hak, Eelko; van Puijenbroek, Eugène P

    2018-02-01

    The statistical screening of pharmacovigilance databases containing spontaneously reported adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is mainly based on disproportionality analysis. The aim of this study was to improve the efficiency of full database screening using a prediction model-based approach. A logistic regression-based prediction model containing 5 candidate predictors was developed and internally validated using the Summary of Product Characteristics as the gold standard for the outcome. All drug-ADR associations, with the exception of those related to vaccines, with a minimum of 3 reports formed the training data for the model. Performance was based on the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results were compared with the current method of database screening based on the number of previously analyzed associations. A total of 25 026 unique drug-ADR associations formed the training data for the model. The final model contained all 5 candidate predictors (number of reports, disproportionality, reports from healthcare professionals, reports from marketing authorization holders, Naranjo score). The AUC for the full model was 0.740 (95% CI; 0.734-0.747). The internal validity was good based on the calibration curve and bootstrapping analysis (AUC after bootstrapping = 0.739). Compared with the old method, the AUC increased from 0.649 to 0.740, and the proportion of potential signals increased by approximately 50% (from 12.3% to 19.4%). A prediction model-based approach can be a useful tool to create priority-based listings for signal detection in databases consisting of spontaneous ADRs. © 2017 The Authors. Pharmacoepidemiology & Drug Safety Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Clinical Prediction Models for Cardiovascular Disease: Tufts Predictive Analytics and Comparative Effectiveness Clinical Prediction Model Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessler, Benjamin S; Lai Yh, Lana; Kramer, Whitney; Cangelosi, Michael; Raman, Gowri; Lutz, Jennifer S; Kent, David M

    2015-07-01

    Clinical prediction models (CPMs) estimate the probability of clinical outcomes and hold the potential to improve decision making and individualize care. For patients with cardiovascular disease, there are numerous CPMs available although the extent of this literature is not well described. We conducted a systematic review for articles containing CPMs for cardiovascular disease published between January 1990 and May 2012. Cardiovascular disease includes coronary heart disease, heart failure, arrhythmias, stroke, venous thromboembolism, and peripheral vascular disease. We created a novel database and characterized CPMs based on the stage of development, population under study, performance, covariates, and predicted outcomes. There are 796 models included in this database. The number of CPMs published each year is increasing steadily over time. Seven hundred seventeen (90%) are de novo CPMs, 21 (3%) are CPM recalibrations, and 58 (7%) are CPM adaptations. This database contains CPMs for 31 index conditions, including 215 CPMs for patients with coronary artery disease, 168 CPMs for population samples, and 79 models for patients with heart failure. There are 77 distinct index/outcome pairings. Of the de novo models in this database, 450 (63%) report a c-statistic and 259 (36%) report some information on calibration. There is an abundance of CPMs available for a wide assortment of cardiovascular disease conditions, with substantial redundancy in the literature. The comparative performance of these models, the consistency of effects and risk estimates across models and the actual and potential clinical impact of this body of literature is poorly understood. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Foundations of database systems : an introductory tutorial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paredaens, J.; Paredaens, J.; Tenenbaum, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    A very short overview is given of the principles of databases. The entity relationship model is used to define the conceptual base. Furthermore file management, the hierarchical model, the network model, the relational model and the object oriented model are discussed During the second world war,

  15. Monitoring outcomes with relational databases: does it improve quality of care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmer, Terry P

    2004-12-01

    There are 3 key ingredients in improving quality of medial care: 1) using a scientific process of improvement, 2) executing the process at the lowest possible level in the organization, and 3) measuring the results of any change reliably. Relational databases when used within these guidelines are of great value in these efforts if they contain reliable information that is pertinent to the project and used in a scientific process of quality improvement by a front line team. Unfortunately, the data are frequently unreliable and/or not pertinent to the local process and is used by persons at very high levels in the organization without a scientific process and without reliable measurement of the outcome. Under these circumstances the effectiveness of relational databases in improving care is marginal at best, frequently wasteful and has the potential to be harmful. This article explores examples of these concepts.

  16. A geospatial database model for the management of remote sensing datasets at multiple spectral, spatial, and temporal scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifimov, Gabriela; Pigeau, Grace; Arroyo-Mora, J. Pablo; Soffer, Raymond; Leblanc, George

    2017-10-01

    In this study the development and implementation of a geospatial database model for the management of multiscale datasets encompassing airborne imagery and associated metadata is presented. To develop the multi-source geospatial database we have used a Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) on a Structure Query Language (SQL) server which was then integrated into ArcGIS and implemented as a geodatabase. The acquired datasets were compiled, standardized, and integrated into the RDBMS, where logical associations between different types of information were linked (e.g. location, date, and instrument). Airborne data, at different processing levels (digital numbers through geocorrected reflectance), were implemented in the geospatial database where the datasets are linked spatially and temporally. An example dataset consisting of airborne hyperspectral imagery, collected for inter and intra-annual vegetation characterization and detection of potential hydrocarbon seepage events over pipeline areas, is presented. Our work provides a model for the management of airborne imagery, which is a challenging aspect of data management in remote sensing, especially when large volumes of data are collected.

  17. An automated database case definition for serious bleeding related to oral anticoagulant use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Andrew; Stein, C Michael; Chung, Cecilia P; Daugherty, James R; Smalley, Walter E; Ray, Wayne A

    2011-06-01

    Bleeding complications are a serious adverse effect of medications that prevent abnormal blood clotting. To facilitate epidemiologic investigations of bleeding complications, we developed and validated an automated database case definition for bleeding-related hospitalizations. The case definition utilized information from an in-progress retrospective cohort study of warfarin-related bleeding in Tennessee Medicaid enrollees 30 years of age or older. It identified inpatient stays during the study period of January 1990 to December 2005 with diagnoses and/or procedures that indicated a current episode of bleeding. The definition was validated by medical record review for a sample of 236 hospitalizations. We reviewed 186 hospitalizations that had medical records with sufficient information for adjudication. Of these, 165 (89%, 95%CI: 83-92%) were clinically confirmed bleeding-related hospitalizations. An additional 19 hospitalizations (10%, 7-15%) were adjudicated as possibly bleeding-related. Of the 165 clinically confirmed bleeding-related hospitalizations, the automated database and clinical definitions had concordant anatomical sites (gastrointestinal, cerebral, genitourinary, other) for 163 (99%, 96-100%). For those hospitalizations with sufficient information to distinguish between upper/lower gastrointestinal bleeding, the concordance was 89% (76-96%) for upper gastrointestinal sites and 91% (77-97%) for lower gastrointestinal sites. A case definition for bleeding-related hospitalizations suitable for automated databases had a positive predictive value of between 89% and 99% and could distinguish specific bleeding sites. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. A Novel Approach: Chemical Relational Databases, and the ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutagenicity and carcinogenicity databases are crucial resources for toxicologists and regulators involved in chemicals risk assessment. Until recently, existing public toxicity databases have been constructed primarily as

  19. Fedora Content Modelling for Improved Services for Research Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elbæk, Mikael Karstensen; Heller, Alfred; Pedersen, Gert Schmeltz

    A re-implementation of the research database of the Technical University of Denmark, DTU, is based on Fedora. The backbone consists of content models for primary and secondary entities and their relationships, giving flexible and powerful extraction capabilities for interoperability and reporting....... By adopting such an abstract data model, the platform enables new and improved services for researchers, librarians and administrators....

  20. Design and implementation of the ITPA confinement profile database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walters, Malcolm E-mail: malcolm.walters@ukaea.org.uk; Roach, Colin

    2004-06-01

    One key goal of the fusion program is to improve the accuracy of physics models in describing existing experiments, so as to make better predictions of the performance of future fusion devices. To support this goal, databases of experimental results from multiple machines have been assembled to facilitate the testing of physics models over a wide range of operating conditions and plasma parameters. One such database was the International Multi-Tokamak Profile Database. This database has more recently been substantially revamped to exploit newer technologies, and is now known as the ITPA confinement profile database http://www.tokamak-profiledb.ukaea.org.uk. The overall design of the updated system will be outlined and the implementation of the relational database part will be described in detail.

  1. S-World: A high resolution global soil database for simulation modelling (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoorvogel, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    There is an increasing call for high resolution soil information at the global level. A good example for such a call is the Global Gridded Crop Model Intercomparison carried out within AgMIP. While local studies can make use of surveying techniques to collect additional techniques this is practically impossible at the global level. It is therefore important to rely on legacy data like the Harmonized World Soil Database. Several efforts do exist that aim at the development of global gridded soil property databases. These estimates of the variation of soil properties can be used to assess e.g., global soil carbon stocks. However, they do not allow for simulation runs with e.g., crop growth simulation models as these models require a description of the entire pedon rather than a few soil properties. This study provides the required quantitative description of pedons at a 1 km resolution for simulation modelling. It uses the Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD) for the spatial distribution of soil types, the ISRIC-WISE soil profile database to derive information on soil properties per soil type, and a range of co-variables on topography, climate, and land cover to further disaggregate the available data. The methodology aims to take stock of these available data. The soil database is developed in five main steps. Step 1: All 148 soil types are ordered on the basis of their expected topographic position using e.g., drainage, salinization, and pedogenesis. Using the topographic ordering and combining the HWSD with a digital elevation model allows for the spatial disaggregation of the composite soil units. This results in a new soil map with homogeneous soil units. Step 2: The ranges of major soil properties for the topsoil and subsoil of each of the 148 soil types are derived from the ISRIC-WISE soil profile database. Step 3: A model of soil formation is developed that focuses on the basic conceptual question where we are within the range of a particular soil property

  2. Databases

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kunte, P.D.

    Information on bibliographic as well as numeric/textual databases relevant to coastal geomorphology has been included in a tabular form. Databases cover a broad spectrum of related subjects like coastal environment and population aspects, coastline...

  3. Development of a Comprehensive Blast-Related Auditory Injury Database (BRAID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    servicemembers included in the Blast-Related Auditory Injury Database. * Training injuries, accidents, and other noncombat injuries. †3,452 injuries...medications, exposures to ototoxic chemicals, recreational noise exposure, and other forms of temporary and persistent threshold shift. Combat marines...AC, Vecchiotti M, Kujawa SG, Lee DJ, Quesnel AM. Otologic outcomes after blast injury: The Boston Marathon experience. Otol Neurotol. 2014; 35(10

  4. A national drug related problems database: evaluation of use in practice, reliability and reproducibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Lene Juel; Birkholm, Trine; Fischer, Hanne Lis

    2014-01-01

    Background A drug related problems database (DRP-database) was developed on request by clinical pharmacists. The information from the DRP-database has only been used locally e.g. to identify focus areas and to communicate identified DRPs to the hospital wards. Hence the quality of the data...... by clinical pharmacists with categorization performed by the project group. Reproducibility was explored by re-categorization of a sample of existing records in the DRP-database by two project group members individually. Main outcome measures Observed proportion of agreement and Fleiss' kappa as measures...... reliability study of 34 clinical pharmacists showed high inter-rater reliability with the project group (Fleiss' kappa = 0.79 with 95 % CI (0.70; 0.88)), and the reproducibility study also documented high inter-rater reliability of a sample of 379 records from the DRP-database re-categorized by two project...

  5. Functional Decomposition of Modeling and Simulation Terrain Database Generation Process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yakich, Valerie R; Lashlee, J. D

    2008-01-01

    .... This report documents the conceptual procedure as implemented by Lockheed Martin Simulation, Training, and Support and decomposes terrain database construction using the Integration Definition for Function Modeling (IDEF...

  6. Accelerating Information Retrieval from Profile Hidden Markov Model Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamimi, Ahmad; Ashhab, Yaqoub; Tamimi, Hashem

    2016-01-01

    Profile Hidden Markov Model (Profile-HMM) is an efficient statistical approach to represent protein families. Currently, several databases maintain valuable protein sequence information as profile-HMMs. There is an increasing interest to improve the efficiency of searching Profile-HMM databases to detect sequence-profile or profile-profile homology. However, most efforts to enhance searching efficiency have been focusing on improving the alignment algorithms. Although the performance of these algorithms is fairly acceptable, the growing size of these databases, as well as the increasing demand for using batch query searching approach, are strong motivations that call for further enhancement of information retrieval from profile-HMM databases. This work presents a heuristic method to accelerate the current profile-HMM homology searching approaches. The method works by cluster-based remodeling of the database to reduce the search space, rather than focusing on the alignment algorithms. Using different clustering techniques, 4284 TIGRFAMs profiles were clustered based on their similarities. A representative for each cluster was assigned. To enhance sensitivity, we proposed an extended step that allows overlapping among clusters. A validation benchmark of 6000 randomly selected protein sequences was used to query the clustered profiles. To evaluate the efficiency of our approach, speed and recall values were measured and compared with the sequential search approach. Using hierarchical, k-means, and connected component clustering techniques followed by the extended overlapping step, we obtained an average reduction in time of 41%, and an average recall of 96%. Our results demonstrate that representation of profile-HMMs using a clustering-based approach can significantly accelerate data retrieval from profile-HMM databases.

  7. A web-based, relational database for studying glaciers in the Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigrelli, G.; Chiarle, M.; Nuzzi, A.; Perotti, L.; Torta, G.; Giardino, M.

    2013-02-01

    Glaciers are among the best terrestrial indicators of climate change and thus glacier inventories have attracted a growing, worldwide interest in recent years. In Italy, the first official glacier inventory was completed in 1925 and 774 glacial bodies were identified. As the amount of data continues to increase, and new techniques become available, there is a growing demand for computer tools that can efficiently manage the collected data. The Research Institute for Geo-hydrological Protection of the National Research Council, in cooperation with the Departments of Computer Science and Earth Sciences of the University of Turin, created a database that provides a modern tool for storing, processing and sharing glaciological data. The database was developed according to the need of storing heterogeneous information, which can be retrieved through a set of web search queries. The database's architecture is server-side, and was designed by means of an open source software. The website interface, simple and intuitive, was intended to meet the needs of a distributed public: through this interface, any type of glaciological data can be managed, specific queries can be performed, and the results can be exported in a standard format. The use of a relational database to store and organize a large variety of information about Italian glaciers collected over the last hundred years constitutes a significant step forward in ensuring the safety and accessibility of such data. Moreover, the same benefits also apply to the enhanced operability for handling information in the future, including new and emerging types of data formats, such as geographic and multimedia files. Future developments include the integration of cartographic data, such as base maps, satellite images and vector data. The relational database described in this paper will be the heart of a new geographic system that will merge data, data attributes and maps, leading to a complete description of Italian glacial

  8. Assessment of COPD-related outcomes via a national electronic medical record database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asche, Carl; Said, Quayyim; Joish, Vijay; Hall, Charles Oaxaca; Brixner, Diana

    2008-01-01

    The technology and sophistication of healthcare utilization databases have expanded over the last decade to include results of lab tests, vital signs, and other clinical information. This review provides an assessment of the methodological and analytical challenges of conducting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) outcomes research in a national electronic medical records (EMR) dataset and its potential application towards the assessment of national health policy issues, as well as a description of the challenges or limitations. An EMR database and its application to measuring outcomes for COPD are described. The ability to measure adherence to the COPD evidence-based practice guidelines, generated by the NIH and HEDIS quality indicators, in this database was examined. Case studies, before and after their publication, were used to assess the adherence to guidelines and gauge the conformity to quality indicators. EMR was the only source of information for pulmonary function tests, but low frequency in ordering by primary care was an issue. The EMR data can be used to explore impact of variation in healthcare provision on clinical outcomes. The EMR database permits access to specific lab data and biometric information. The richness and depth of information on "real world" use of health services for large population-based analytical studies at relatively low cost render such databases an attractive resource for outcomes research. Various sources of information exist to perform outcomes research. It is important to understand the desired endpoints of such research and choose the appropriate database source.

  9. Study on Mandatory Access Control in a Secure Database Management System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper proposes a security policy model for mandatory access control in class B1 database management system whose level of labeling is tuple. The relation-hierarchical data model is extended to multilevel relation-hierarchical data model. Based on the multilevel relation-hierarchical data model, the concept of upper-lower layer relational integrity is presented after we analyze and eliminate the covert channels caused by the database integrity. Two SQL statements are extended to process polyinstantiation in the multilevel secure environment. The system is based on the multilevel relation-hierarchical data model and is capable of integratively storing and manipulating multilevel complicated objects (e. g., multilevel spatial data) and multilevel conventional data ( e. g., integer. real number and character string).

  10. Techniques to Access Databases and Integrate Data for Hydrologic Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whelan, Gene; Tenney, Nathan D.; Pelton, Mitchell A.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ward, Duane L.; Droppo, James G.; Meyer, Philip D.; Dorow, Kevin E.; Taira, Randal Y.

    2009-06-17

    This document addresses techniques to access and integrate data for defining site-specific conditions and behaviors associated with ground-water and surface-water radionuclide transport applicable to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission reviews. Environmental models typically require input data from multiple internal and external sources that may include, but are not limited to, stream and rainfall gage data, meteorological data, hydrogeological data, habitat data, and biological data. These data may be retrieved from a variety of organizations (e.g., federal, state, and regional) and source types (e.g., HTTP, FTP, and databases). Available data sources relevant to hydrologic analyses for reactor licensing are identified and reviewed. The data sources described can be useful to define model inputs and parameters, including site features (e.g., watershed boundaries, stream locations, reservoirs, site topography), site properties (e.g., surface conditions, subsurface hydraulic properties, water quality), and site boundary conditions, input forcings, and extreme events (e.g., stream discharge, lake levels, precipitation, recharge, flood and drought characteristics). Available software tools for accessing established databases, retrieving the data, and integrating it with models were identified and reviewed. The emphasis in this review was on existing software products with minimal required modifications to enable their use with the FRAMES modeling framework. The ability of four of these tools to access and retrieve the identified data sources was reviewed. These four software tools were the Hydrologic Data Acquisition and Processing System (HDAPS), Integrated Water Resources Modeling System (IWRMS) External Data Harvester, Data for Environmental Modeling Environmental Data Download Tool (D4EM EDDT), and the FRAMES Internet Database Tools. The IWRMS External Data Harvester and the D4EM EDDT were identified as the most promising tools based on their ability to access and

  11. Techniques to Access Databases and Integrate Data for Hydrologic Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, Gene; Tenney, Nathan D.; Pelton, Mitchell A.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ward, Duane L.; Droppo, James G.; Meyer, Philip D.; Dorow, Kevin E.; Taira, Randal Y.

    2009-01-01

    This document addresses techniques to access and integrate data for defining site-specific conditions and behaviors associated with ground-water and surface-water radionuclide transport applicable to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission reviews. Environmental models typically require input data from multiple internal and external sources that may include, but are not limited to, stream and rainfall gage data, meteorological data, hydrogeological data, habitat data, and biological data. These data may be retrieved from a variety of organizations (e.g., federal, state, and regional) and source types (e.g., HTTP, FTP, and databases). Available data sources relevant to hydrologic analyses for reactor licensing are identified and reviewed. The data sources described can be useful to define model inputs and parameters, including site features (e.g., watershed boundaries, stream locations, reservoirs, site topography), site properties (e.g., surface conditions, subsurface hydraulic properties, water quality), and site boundary conditions, input forcings, and extreme events (e.g., stream discharge, lake levels, precipitation, recharge, flood and drought characteristics). Available software tools for accessing established databases, retrieving the data, and integrating it with models were identified and reviewed. The emphasis in this review was on existing software products with minimal required modifications to enable their use with the FRAMES modeling framework. The ability of four of these tools to access and retrieve the identified data sources was reviewed. These four software tools were the Hydrologic Data Acquisition and Processing System (HDAPS), Integrated Water Resources Modeling System (IWRMS) External Data Harvester, Data for Environmental Modeling Environmental Data Download Tool (D4EM EDDT), and the FRAMES Internet Database Tools. The IWRMS External Data Harvester and the D4EM EDDT were identified as the most promising tools based on their ability to access and

  12. Mandatory and Location-Aware Access Control for Relational Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Michael

    Access control is concerned with determining which operations a particular user is allowed to perform on a particular electronic resource. For example, an access control decision could say that user Alice is allowed to perform the operation read (but not write) on the resource research report. With conventional access control this decision is based on the user's identity whereas the basic idea of Location-Aware Access Control (LAAC) is to evaluate also a user's current location when making the decision if a particular request should be granted or denied. LAAC is an interesting approach for mobile information systems because these systems are exposed to specific security threads like the loss of a device. Some data models for LAAC can be found in literature, but almost all of them are based on RBAC and none of them is designed especially for Database Management Systems (DBMS). In this paper we therefore propose a LAAC-approach for DMBS and describe a prototypical implementation of that approach that is based on database triggers.

  13. Database implementation to fluidized cracking catalytic-FCC process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santana, Antonio Otavio de; Dantas, Carlos Costa; Santos, Valdemir A. dos

    2009-01-01

    A process of Fluidized Cracking Catalytic (FCC) was developed by our research group. A cold model FCC unit, in laboratory scale, was used for obtaining of the data relative to the following parameters: air flow, system pressure, riser inlet pressure, rise outlet pressure, pressure drop in the riser, motor speed of catalyst injection and density. The measured of the density is made by gamma ray transmission. For the fact of the process of FCC not to have a database until then, the present work supplied this deficiency with the implementation of a database in connection with the Matlab software. The data from the FCC unit (laboratory model) are obtained as spreadsheet of the MS-Excel software. These spreadsheets were treated before importing them as database tables. The application of the process of normalization of database and the analysis done with the MS-Access in these spreadsheets treated revealed the need of an only relation (table) for to represent the database. The Database Manager System (DBMS) chosen has been the MS-Access by to satisfy our flow of data. The next step was the creation of the database, being built the table of data, the action query, selection query and the macro for to import data from the unit FCC in study. Also an interface between the application 'Database Toolbox' (Matlab2008a) and the database was created. This was obtained through the drivers ODBC (Open Data Base Connectivity). This interface allows the manipulation of the database by the users operating in the Matlab. (author)

  14. Database implementation to fluidized cracking catalytic-FCC process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, Antonio Otavio de; Dantas, Carlos Costa, E-mail: aos@ufpe.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Santos, Valdemir A. dos, E-mail: valdemir.alexandre@pq.cnpq.b [Universidade Catolica de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Ciencia e Tecnologia

    2009-07-01

    A process of Fluidized Cracking Catalytic (FCC) was developed by our research group. A cold model FCC unit, in laboratory scale, was used for obtaining of the data relative to the following parameters: air flow, system pressure, riser inlet pressure, rise outlet pressure, pressure drop in the riser, motor speed of catalyst injection and density. The measured of the density is made by gamma ray transmission. For the fact of the process of FCC not to have a database until then, the present work supplied this deficiency with the implementation of a database in connection with the Matlab software. The data from the FCC unit (laboratory model) are obtained as spreadsheet of the MS-Excel software. These spreadsheets were treated before importing them as database tables. The application of the process of normalization of database and the analysis done with the MS-Access in these spreadsheets treated revealed the need of an only relation (table) for to represent the database. The Database Manager System (DBMS) chosen has been the MS-Access by to satisfy our flow of data. The next step was the creation of the database, being built the table of data, the action query, selection query and the macro for to import data from the unit FCC in study. Also an interface between the application 'Database Toolbox' (Matlab2008a) and the database was created. This was obtained through the drivers ODBC (Open Data Base Connectivity). This interface allows the manipulation of the database by the users operating in the Matlab. (author)

  15. Advanced approaches to intelligent information and database systems

    CERN Document Server

    Boonjing, Veera; Chittayasothorn, Suphamit

    2014-01-01

    This book consists of 35 chapters presenting different theoretical and practical aspects of Intelligent Information and Database Systems. Nowadays both Intelligent and Database Systems are applied in most of the areas of human activities which necessitates further research in these areas. In this book various interesting issues related to the intelligent information models and methods as well as their advanced applications, database systems applications, data models and their analysis, and digital multimedia methods and applications are presented and discussed both from the practical and theoretical points of view. The book is organized in four parts devoted to intelligent systems models and methods, intelligent systems advanced applications, database systems methods and applications, and multimedia systems methods and applications. The book will be interesting for both practitioners and researchers, especially graduate and PhD students of information technology and computer science, as well more experienced ...

  16. Web application and database modeling of traffic impact analysis using Google Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulianto, Budi; Setiono

    2017-06-01

    Traffic impact analysis (TIA) is a traffic study that aims at identifying the impact of traffic generated by development or change in land use. In addition to identifying the traffic impact, TIA is also equipped with mitigation measurement to minimize the arising traffic impact. TIA has been increasingly important since it was defined in the act as one of the requirements in the proposal of Building Permit. The act encourages a number of TIA studies in various cities in Indonesia, including Surakarta. For that reason, it is necessary to study the development of TIA by adopting the concept Transportation Impact Control (TIC) in the implementation of the TIA standard document and multimodal modeling. It includes TIA's standardization for technical guidelines, database and inspection by providing TIA checklists, monitoring and evaluation. The research was undertaken by collecting the historical data of junctions, modeling of the data in the form of relational database, building a user interface for CRUD (Create, Read, Update and Delete) the TIA data in the form of web programming with Google Maps libraries. The result research is a system that provides information that helps the improvement and repairment of TIA documents that exist today which is more transparent, reliable and credible.

  17. Rapid storage and retrieval of genomic intervals from a relational database system using nested containment lists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Laura K; Sivley, R Michael; Bush, William S

    2013-01-01

    Efficient storage and retrieval of genomic annotations based on range intervals is necessary, given the amount of data produced by next-generation sequencing studies. The indexing strategies of relational database systems (such as MySQL) greatly inhibit their use in genomic annotation tasks. This has led to the development of stand-alone applications that are dependent on flat-file libraries. In this work, we introduce MyNCList, an implementation of the NCList data structure within a MySQL database. MyNCList enables the storage, update and rapid retrieval of genomic annotations from the convenience of a relational database system. Range-based annotations of 1 million variants are retrieved in under a minute, making this approach feasible for whole-genome annotation tasks. Database URL: https://github.com/bushlab/mynclist.

  18. SAADA: Astronomical Databases Made Easier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, L.; Nguyen, H. N.; Motch, C.

    2005-12-01

    Many astronomers wish to share datasets with their community but have not enough manpower to develop databases having the functionalities required for high-level scientific applications. The SAADA project aims at automatizing the creation and deployment process of such databases. A generic but scientifically relevant data model has been designed which allows one to build databases by providing only a limited number of product mapping rules. Databases created by SAADA rely on a relational database supporting JDBC and covered by a Java layer including a lot of generated code. Such databases can simultaneously host spectra, images, source lists and plots. Data are grouped in user defined collections whose content can be seen as one unique set per data type even if their formats differ. Datasets can be correlated one with each other using qualified links. These links help, for example, to handle the nature of a cross-identification (e.g., a distance or a likelihood) or to describe their scientific content (e.g., by associating a spectrum to a catalog entry). The SAADA query engine is based on a language well suited to the data model which can handle constraints on linked data, in addition to classical astronomical queries. These constraints can be applied on the linked objects (number, class and attributes) and/or on the link qualifier values. Databases created by SAADA are accessed through a rich WEB interface or a Java API. We are currently developing an inter-operability module implanting VO protocols.

  19. Mathematics for Databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ir. Sander van Laar

    2007-01-01

    A formal description of a database consists of the description of the relations (tables) of the database together with the constraints that must hold on the database. Furthermore the contents of a database can be retrieved using queries. These constraints and queries for databases can very well be

  20. Xanthusbase: adapting wikipedia principles to a model organism database

    OpenAIRE

    Arshinoff, Bradley I.; Suen, Garret; Just, Eric M.; Merchant, Sohel M.; Kibbe, Warren A.; Chisholm, Rex L.; Welch, Roy D.

    2006-01-01

    xanthusBase () is the official model organism database (MOD) for the social bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. In many respects, M.xanthus represents the pioneer model organism (MO) for studying the genetic, biochemical, and mechanistic basis of prokaryotic multicellularity, a topic that has garnered considerable attention due to the significance of biofilms in both basic and applied microbiology research. To facilitate its utility, the design of xanthusBase incorporates open-source software, leve...

  1. Resource Survey Relational Database Management System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Mississippi Laboratories employ both enterprise and localized data collection systems for recording data. The databases utilized by these applications range from...

  2. Accelerating Information Retrieval from Profile Hidden Markov Model Databases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Tamimi

    Full Text Available Profile Hidden Markov Model (Profile-HMM is an efficient statistical approach to represent protein families. Currently, several databases maintain valuable protein sequence information as profile-HMMs. There is an increasing interest to improve the efficiency of searching Profile-HMM databases to detect sequence-profile or profile-profile homology. However, most efforts to enhance searching efficiency have been focusing on improving the alignment algorithms. Although the performance of these algorithms is fairly acceptable, the growing size of these databases, as well as the increasing demand for using batch query searching approach, are strong motivations that call for further enhancement of information retrieval from profile-HMM databases. This work presents a heuristic method to accelerate the current profile-HMM homology searching approaches. The method works by cluster-based remodeling of the database to reduce the search space, rather than focusing on the alignment algorithms. Using different clustering techniques, 4284 TIGRFAMs profiles were clustered based on their similarities. A representative for each cluster was assigned. To enhance sensitivity, we proposed an extended step that allows overlapping among clusters. A validation benchmark of 6000 randomly selected protein sequences was used to query the clustered profiles. To evaluate the efficiency of our approach, speed and recall values were measured and compared with the sequential search approach. Using hierarchical, k-means, and connected component clustering techniques followed by the extended overlapping step, we obtained an average reduction in time of 41%, and an average recall of 96%. Our results demonstrate that representation of profile-HMMs using a clustering-based approach can significantly accelerate data retrieval from profile-HMM databases.

  3. Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Ryan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Databases are deeply embedded in archaeology, underpinning and supporting many aspects of the subject. However, as well as providing a means for storing, retrieving and modifying data, databases themselves must be a result of a detailed analysis and design process. This article looks at this process, and shows how the characteristics of data models affect the process of database design and implementation. The impact of the Internet on the development of databases is examined, and the article concludes with a discussion of a range of issues associated with the recording and management of archaeological data.

  4. METRICS FOR DYNAMIC SCALING OF DATABASE IN CLOUDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Boichenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the main methods of scaling databases (replication, sharding and their support at the popular relational databases and NoSQL solutions with different data models: a document-oriented, key-value, column-oriented, graph. The article provides an assessment of the capabilities of modern cloud-based solution and gives a model for the organization of dynamic scaling in the cloud infrastructure. In the article are analyzed different types of metrics and are included the basic metrics that characterize the functioning parameters and database technology, as well as sets the goals of the integral metrics, necessary for the implementation of adaptive algorithms for dynamic scaling databases in the cloud infrastructure. This article was prepared with the support of RFBR grant № 13-07-00749.

  5. Evolution of the use of relational and NoSQL databases in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Barberis, Dario; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment used for many years a large database infrastructure based on Oracle to store several different types of non-event data: time-dependent detector configuration and conditions data, calibrations and alignments, configurations of Grid sites, catalogues for data management tools, job records for distributed workload management tools, run and event metadata. The rapid development of “NoSQL” databases (structured storage services) in the last five years allowed an extended and complementary usage of traditional relational databases and new structured storage tools in order to improve the performance of existing applications and to extend their functionalities using the possibilities offered by the modern storage systems. The trend is towards using the best tool for each kind of data, separating for example the intrinsically relational metadata from payload storage, and records that are frequently updated and benefit from transactions from archived information. Access to all components has to...

  6. Evolution of the use of relational and NoSQL databases in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00064378; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment used for many years a large database infrastructure based on Oracle to store several different types of non-event data: time-dependent detector configuration and conditions data, calibrations and alignments, configurations of Grid sites, catalogues for data management tools, job records for distributed workload management tools, run and event metadata. The rapid development of “NoSQL” databases (structured storage services) in the last five years allowed an extended and complementary usage of traditional relational databases and new structured storage tools in order to improve the performance of existing applications and to extend their functionalities using the possibilities offered by the modern storage systems. The trend is towards using the best tool for each kind of data, separating for example the intrinsically relational metadata from payload storage, and records that are frequently updated and benefit from transactions from archived information. Access to all components has to...

  7. Monitoring of services with non-relational databases and map-reduce framework

    CERN Document Server

    Babik, M; CERN. Geneva. IT Department

    2012-01-01

    Service Availability Monitoring (SAM) is a well-established monitoring framework that performs regular measurements of the core site services and reports the corresponding availability and reliability of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) infrastructure. One of the existing extensions of SAM is Site Wide Area Testing (SWAT), which gathers monitoring information from the worker nodes via instrumented jobs. This generates quite a lot of monitoring data to process, as there are several data points for every job and several million jobs are executed every day. The recent uptake of non-relational databases opens a new paradigm in the large-scale storage and distributed processing of systems with heavy read-write workloads. For SAM this brings new possibilities to improve its model, from performing aggregation of measurements to storing raw data and subsequent re-processing. Both SAM and SWAT are currently tuned to run at top performance, reaching some of the limits in storage and processing power of their exi...

  8. Discovery of functional and approximate functional dependencies in relational databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald S. King

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study develops the foundation for a simple, yet efficient method for uncovering functional and approximate functional dependencies in relational databases. The technique is based upon the mathematical theory of partitions defined over a relation's row identifiers. Using a levelwise algorithm the minimal non-trivial functional dependencies can be found using computations conducted on integers. Therefore, the required operations on partitions are both simple and fast. Additionally, the row identifiers provide the added advantage of nominally identifying the exceptions to approximate functional dependencies, which can be used effectively in practical data mining applications.

  9. Nuclear data processing using a database management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castilla, V.; Gonzalez, L.

    1991-01-01

    A database management system that permits the design of relational models was used to create an integrated database with experimental and evaluated nuclear data.A system that reduces the time and cost of processing was created for computers type EC or compatibles.A set of programs for the conversion from nuclear calculated data output format to EXFOR format was developed.A dictionary to perform a retrospective search in the ENDF database was created too

  10. Legume and Lotus japonicus Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirakawa, Hideki; Mun, Terry; Sato, Shusei

    2014-01-01

    Since the genome sequence of Lotus japonicus, a model plant of family Fabaceae, was determined in 2008 (Sato et al. 2008), the genomes of other members of the Fabaceae family, soybean (Glycine max) (Schmutz et al. 2010) and Medicago truncatula (Young et al. 2011), have been sequenced. In this sec....... In this section, we introduce representative, publicly accessible online resources related to plant materials, integrated databases containing legume genome information, and databases for genome sequence and derived marker information of legume species including L. japonicus...

  11. Evaluating the Cassandra NoSQL Database Approach for Genomic Data Persistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Aniceto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid advances in high-throughput sequencing techniques have created interesting computational challenges in bioinformatics. One of them refers to management of massive amounts of data generated by automatic sequencers. We need to deal with the persistency of genomic data, particularly storing and analyzing these large-scale processed data. To find an alternative to the frequently considered relational database model becomes a compelling task. Other data models may be more effective when dealing with a very large amount of nonconventional data, especially for writing and retrieving operations. In this paper, we discuss the Cassandra NoSQL database approach for storing genomic data. We perform an analysis of persistency and I/O operations with real data, using the Cassandra database system. We also compare the results obtained with a classical relational database system and another NoSQL database approach, MongoDB.

  12. Evaluating the Cassandra NoSQL Database Approach for Genomic Data Persistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniceto, Rodrigo; Xavier, Rene; Guimarães, Valeria; Hondo, Fernanda; Holanda, Maristela; Walter, Maria Emilia; Lifschitz, Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    Rapid advances in high-throughput sequencing techniques have created interesting computational challenges in bioinformatics. One of them refers to management of massive amounts of data generated by automatic sequencers. We need to deal with the persistency of genomic data, particularly storing and analyzing these large-scale processed data. To find an alternative to the frequently considered relational database model becomes a compelling task. Other data models may be more effective when dealing with a very large amount of nonconventional data, especially for writing and retrieving operations. In this paper, we discuss the Cassandra NoSQL database approach for storing genomic data. We perform an analysis of persistency and I/O operations with real data, using the Cassandra database system. We also compare the results obtained with a classical relational database system and another NoSQL database approach, MongoDB. PMID:26558254

  13. Evaluating the Cassandra NoSQL Database Approach for Genomic Data Persistency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniceto, Rodrigo; Xavier, Rene; Guimarães, Valeria; Hondo, Fernanda; Holanda, Maristela; Walter, Maria Emilia; Lifschitz, Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    Rapid advances in high-throughput sequencing techniques have created interesting computational challenges in bioinformatics. One of them refers to management of massive amounts of data generated by automatic sequencers. We need to deal with the persistency of genomic data, particularly storing and analyzing these large-scale processed data. To find an alternative to the frequently considered relational database model becomes a compelling task. Other data models may be more effective when dealing with a very large amount of nonconventional data, especially for writing and retrieving operations. In this paper, we discuss the Cassandra NoSQL database approach for storing genomic data. We perform an analysis of persistency and I/O operations with real data, using the Cassandra database system. We also compare the results obtained with a classical relational database system and another NoSQL database approach, MongoDB.

  14. Analysis of a virtual memory model for maintaining database views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsley, Kathryn C.; Hughes, Charles E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical model for predicting the performance of a new support strategy for database views. This strategy, called the virtual method, is compared with traditional methods for supporting views. The analytical model's predictions of improved performance by the virtual method are then validated by comparing these results with those achieved in an experimental implementation.

  15. Modeling of non-additive mixture properties using the Online CHEmical database and Modeling environment (OCHEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oprisiu Ioana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Online Chemical Modeling Environment (OCHEM, http://ochem.eu is a web-based platform that provides tools for automation of typical steps necessary to create a predictive QSAR/QSPR model. The platform consists of two major subsystems: a database of experimental measurements and a modeling framework. So far, OCHEM has been limited to the processing of individual compounds. In this work, we extended OCHEM with a new ability to store and model properties of binary non-additive mixtures. The developed system is publicly accessible, meaning that any user on the Web can store new data for binary mixtures and develop models to predict their non-additive properties. The database already contains almost 10,000 data points for the density, bubble point, and azeotropic behavior of binary mixtures. For these data, we developed models for both qualitative (azeotrope/zeotrope and quantitative endpoints (density and bubble points using different learning methods and specially developed descriptors for mixtures. The prediction performance of the models was similar to or more accurate than results reported in previous studies. Thus, we have developed and made publicly available a powerful system for modeling mixtures of chemical compounds on the Web.

  16. A protein relational database and protein family knowledge bases to facilitate structure-based design analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobilio, Dominick; Walker, Gary; Brooijmans, Natasja; Nilakantan, Ramaswamy; Denny, R Aldrin; Dejoannis, Jason; Feyfant, Eric; Kowticwar, Rupesh K; Mankala, Jyoti; Palli, Satish; Punyamantula, Sairam; Tatipally, Maneesh; John, Reji K; Humblet, Christine

    2010-08-01

    The Protein Data Bank is the most comprehensive source of experimental macromolecular structures. It can, however, be difficult at times to locate relevant structures with the Protein Data Bank search interface. This is particularly true when searching for complexes containing specific interactions between protein and ligand atoms. Moreover, searching within a family of proteins can be tedious. For example, one cannot search for some conserved residue as residue numbers vary across structures. We describe herein three databases, Protein Relational Database, Kinase Knowledge Base, and Matrix Metalloproteinase Knowledge Base, containing protein structures from the Protein Data Bank. In Protein Relational Database, atom-atom distances between protein and ligand have been precalculated allowing for millisecond retrieval based on atom identity and distance constraints. Ring centroids, centroid-centroid and centroid-atom distances and angles have also been included permitting queries for pi-stacking interactions and other structural motifs involving rings. Other geometric features can be searched through the inclusion of residue pair and triplet distances. In Kinase Knowledge Base and Matrix Metalloproteinase Knowledge Base, the catalytic domains have been aligned into common residue numbering schemes. Thus, by searching across Protein Relational Database and Kinase Knowledge Base, one can easily retrieve structures wherein, for example, a ligand of interest is making contact with the gatekeeper residue.

  17. Report on Approaches to Database Translation. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Leonard; Salazar, Sandra

    This report describes approaches to database translation (i.e., transferring data and data definitions from a source, either a database management system (DBMS) or a batch file, to a target DBMS), and recommends a method for representing the data structures of newly-proposed network and relational data models in a form suitable for database…

  18. Development of Pipeline Database and CAD Model for Selection of Core Security Zone in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seong Soo; Kwon, Tae Gyun; Baek, Hun Hyun; Kwon, Min Jin

    2008-07-01

    The objective of the project is to develop the pipeline database which can be used for selection of core security zones considering safety significance of pipes and to develop CAD model for 3-dimensional visualization of core security zones, for the purpose of minimizing damage and loss, enforcing security and protection on important facilities, and improving plant design preparing against emergency situations such as physical terrors in nuclear power plants. In this study, the pipeline database is developed for selection of core security zones considering safety significance of safety class 1 and 2 pipes. The database includes the information on 'pipe-room information-surrogate component' mapping, initiating events which may occur and accident mitigation functions which may be damaged by the pipe failure, and the drawing information related to 2,270 pipe segments of 30 systems. For the 3-dimensional visualization of core security zones, the CAD models on the containment building and the auxiliary building are developed using 3-D MAX tool and the demo program which can visualize the direct-X model converted from the 3-D MAX model is also developed. In addition to this, the coordinate information of all the buildings and their rooms is generated using AUTO CAD tool in order to be used as an input for 3-dimensional browsing of the VIP program

  19. Performance Comparison of Relational and Native-XML Databases using the Semantics of the Land Command and Control Information Exchange Data Model (LC2IEDM)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Denny, Ian M; Jahn, Dieter

    2005-01-01

    .... The majority of messaging systems store information in a document-centric free-text format that makes it difficult for command and control systems, relational databases, software agents and web...

  20. PrimateLit Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primate Info Net Related Databases NCRR PrimateLit: A bibliographic database for primatology Top of any problems with this service. We welcome your feedback. The PrimateLit database is no longer being Resources, National Institutes of Health. The database is a collaborative project of the Wisconsin Primate

  1. Effective modelling of percolation at the landscape scale using data-based approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selle, Benny; Lischeid, Gunnar; Huwe, Bernd

    2008-06-01

    Process-based models have been extensively applied to assess the impact of landuse change on water quantity and quality at landscape scales. However, the routine application of those models suffers from large computational efforts, lack of transparency and the requirement of many input parameters. Data-based models such as Feed-Forward Multilayer Perceptrons (MLP) and Classification and Regression Trees (CART) may be used as effective models, i.e. simple approximations of complex process-based models. These data-based approaches can subsequently be applied for scenario analysis and as a transparent management tool provided climatic boundary conditions and the basic model assumptions of the process-based models do not change dramatically. In this study, we apply MLP, CART and Multiple Linear Regression (LR) to model the spatially distributed and spatially aggregated percolation in soils using weather, groundwater and soil data. The percolation data is obtained via numerical experiments with Hydrus1D. Thus, the complex process-based model is approximated using simpler data-based approaches. The MLP model explains most of the percolation variance in time and space without using any soil information. This reflects the effective dimensionality of the process-based model and suggests that percolation in the study area may be modelled much simpler than using Hydrus1D. The CART model shows that soil properties play a negligible role for percolation under wet climatic conditions. However, they become more important if the conditions turn drier. The LR method does not yield satisfactory predictions for the spatially distributed percolation however the spatially aggregated percolation is well approximated. This may indicate that the soils behave simpler (i.e. more linear) when percolation dynamics are upscaled.

  2. Database for environmental monitoring at nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raceanu, M.; Varlam, C.; Enache, A.; Faurescu, I.

    2006-01-01

    To ensure that an assessment could be made of the impact of nuclear facilities on the local environment, a program of environmental monitoring must be established well in advance of nuclear facilities operation. Enormous amount of data must be stored and correlated starting with: location, meteorology, type sample characterization from water to different kind of food, radioactivity measurement and isotopic measurement (e.g. for C-14 determination, C-13 isotopic correction it is a must). Data modelling is a well known mechanism describing data structures at a high level of abstraction. Such models are often used to automatically create database structures, and to generate code structures used to access databases. This has the disadvantage of losing data constraints that might be specified in data models for data checking. Embodiment of the system of the present application includes a computer-readable memory for storing a definitional data table for defining variable symbols representing respective measurable physical phenomena. The definitional data table uniquely defines the variable symbols by relating them to respective data domains for the respective phenomena represented by the symbols. Well established rules of how the data should be stored and accessed, are given in the Relational Database Theory. The theory comprise of guidelines such as the avoidance of duplicating data using technique call normalization and how to identify the unique identifier for a database record. (author)

  3. Human Ageing Genomic Resources: new and updated databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacutu, Robi; Thornton, Daniel; Johnson, Emily; Budovsky, Arie; Barardo, Diogo; Craig, Thomas; Diana, Eugene; Lehmann, Gilad; Toren, Dmitri; Wang, Jingwei; Fraifeld, Vadim E

    2018-01-01

    Abstract In spite of a growing body of research and data, human ageing remains a poorly understood process. Over 10 years ago we developed the Human Ageing Genomic Resources (HAGR), a collection of databases and tools for studying the biology and genetics of ageing. Here, we present HAGR’s main functionalities, highlighting new additions and improvements. HAGR consists of six core databases: (i) the GenAge database of ageing-related genes, in turn composed of a dataset of >300 human ageing-related genes and a dataset with >2000 genes associated with ageing or longevity in model organisms; (ii) the AnAge database of animal ageing and longevity, featuring >4000 species; (iii) the GenDR database with >200 genes associated with the life-extending effects of dietary restriction; (iv) the LongevityMap database of human genetic association studies of longevity with >500 entries; (v) the DrugAge database with >400 ageing or longevity-associated drugs or compounds; (vi) the CellAge database with >200 genes associated with cell senescence. All our databases are manually curated by experts and regularly updated to ensure a high quality data. Cross-links across our databases and to external resources help researchers locate and integrate relevant information. HAGR is freely available online (http://genomics.senescence.info/). PMID:29121237

  4. Making species checklists understandable to machines - a shift from relational databases to ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenne, Nina; Tuominen, Jouni; Saarenmaa, Hannu; Hyvönen, Eero

    2014-01-01

    The scientific names of plants and animals play a major role in Life Sciences as information is indexed, integrated, and searched using scientific names. The main problem with names is their ambiguous nature, because more than one name may point to the same taxon and multiple taxa may share the same name. In addition, scientific names change over time, which makes them open to various interpretations. Applying machine-understandable semantics to these names enables efficient processing of biological content in information systems. The first step is to use unique persistent identifiers instead of name strings when referring to taxa. The most commonly used identifiers are Life Science Identifiers (LSID), which are traditionally used in relational databases, and more recently HTTP URIs, which are applied on the Semantic Web by Linked Data applications. We introduce two models for expressing taxonomic information in the form of species checklists. First, we show how species checklists are presented in a relational database system using LSIDs. Then, in order to gain a more detailed representation of taxonomic information, we introduce meta-ontology TaxMeOn to model the same content as Semantic Web ontologies where taxa are identified using HTTP URIs. We also explore how changes in scientific names can be managed over time. The use of HTTP URIs is preferable for presenting the taxonomic information of species checklists. An HTTP URI identifies a taxon and operates as a web address from which additional information about the taxon can be located, unlike LSID. This enables the integration of biological data from different sources on the web using Linked Data principles and prevents the formation of information silos. The Linked Data approach allows a user to assemble information and evaluate the complexity of taxonomical data based on conflicting views of taxonomic classifications. Using HTTP URIs and Semantic Web technologies also facilitate the representation of the

  5. Multi-dimensional database design and implementation of dam safety monitoring system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Erfeng

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available To improve the effectiveness of dam safety monitoring database systems, the development process of a multi-dimensional conceptual data model was analyzed and a logic design was achieved in multi-dimensional database mode. The optimal data model was confirmed by identifying data objects, defining relations and reviewing entities. The conversion of relations among entities to external keys and entities and physical attributes to tables and fields was interpreted completely. On this basis, a multi-dimensional database that reflects the management and analysis of a dam safety monitoring system on monitoring data information has been established, for which factual tables and dimensional tables have been designed. Finally, based on service design and user interface design, the dam safety monitoring system has been developed with Delphi as the development tool. This development project shows that the multi-dimensional database can simplify the development process and minimize hidden dangers in the database structure design. It is superior to other dam safety monitoring system development models and can provide a new research direction for system developers.

  6. PDBj Mine: design and implementation of relational database interface for Protein Data Bank Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Akira R; Yamashita, Reiko; Nakamura, Haruki

    2010-08-25

    This article is a tutorial for PDBj Mine, a new database and its interface for Protein Data Bank Japan (PDBj). In PDBj Mine, data are loaded from files in the PDBMLplus format (an extension of PDBML, PDB's canonical XML format, enriched with annotations), which are then served for the user of PDBj via the worldwide web (WWW). We describe the basic design of the relational database (RDB) and web interfaces of PDBj Mine. The contents of PDBMLplus files are first broken into XPath entities, and these paths and data are indexed in the way that reflects the hierarchical structure of the XML files. The data for each XPath type are saved into the corresponding relational table that is named as the XPath itself. The generation of table definitions from the PDBMLplus XML schema is fully automated. For efficient search, frequently queried terms are compiled into a brief summary table. Casual users can perform simple keyword search, and 'Advanced Search' which can specify various conditions on the entries. More experienced users can query the database using SQL statements which can be constructed in a uniform manner. Thus, PDBj Mine achieves a combination of the flexibility of XML documents and the robustness of the RDB. Database URL: http://www.pdbj.org/

  7. Design and implementation of relational databases relevant to the diverse needs of a tuberculosis case contact study in the Gambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, D J; Donkor, S; Brookes, R H; Fox, A; Hill, P C

    2004-09-01

    The data requirements of a large multidisciplinary tuberculosis case contact study are complex. We describe an ACCESS-based relational database system that meets our rigorous requirements for data entry and validation, while being user-friendly, flexible, exportable, and easy to install on a network or stand alone system. This includes the development of a double data entry package for epidemiology and laboratory data, semi-automated entry of ELISPOT data directly from the plate reader, and a suite of new programmes for the manipulation and integration of flow cytometry data. The double entered epidemiology and immunology databases are combined into a separate database, providing a near-real-time analysis of immuno-epidemiological data, allowing important trends to be identified early and major decisions about the study to be made and acted on. This dynamic data management model is portable and can easily be applied to other studies.

  8. Databases and their application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimm, E.C.; Bradshaw, R.H.W; Brewer, S.; Flantua, S.; Giesecke, T.; Lézine, A.M.; Takahara, H.; Williams, J.W.,Jr; Elias, S.A.; Mock, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    During the past 20 years, several pollen database cooperatives have been established. These databases are now constituent databases of the Neotoma Paleoecology Database, a public domain, multiproxy, relational database designed for Quaternary-Pliocene fossil data and modern surface samples. The

  9. The Politics of Information: Building a Relational Database To Support Decision-Making at a Public University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Debra; Hoffman, Phillip

    2001-01-01

    Describes creation of a relational database at the University of Washington supporting ongoing academic planning at several levels and affecting the culture of decision making. Addresses getting started; sharing the database; questions, worries, and issues; improving access to high-demand courses; the advising function; management of instructional…

  10. Enabling Semantic Queries Against the Spatial Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PENG, X.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The spatial database based upon the object-relational database management system (ORDBMS has the merits of a clear data model, good operability and high query efficiency. That is why it has been widely used in spatial data organization and management. However, it cannot express the semantic relationships among geospatial objects, making the query results difficult to meet the user's requirement well. Therefore, this paper represents an attempt to combine the Semantic Web technology with the spatial database so as to make up for the traditional database's disadvantages. In this way, on the one hand, users can take advantages of ORDBMS to store and manage spatial data; on the other hand, if the spatial database is released in the form of Semantic Web, the users could describe a query more concisely with the cognitive pattern which is similar to that of daily life. As a consequence, this methodology enables the benefits of both Semantic Web and the object-relational database (ORDB available. The paper discusses systematically the semantic enriched spatial database's architecture, key technologies and implementation. Subsequently, we demonstrate the function of spatial semantic queries via a practical prototype system. The query results indicate that the method used in this study is feasible.

  11. Using a Semi-Realistic Database to Support a Database Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Kwok-Bun

    2013-01-01

    A common problem for university relational database courses is to construct effective databases for instructions and assignments. Highly simplified "toy" databases are easily available for teaching, learning, and practicing. However, they do not reflect the complexity and practical considerations that students encounter in real-world…

  12. Multidimensional Databases and Data Warehousing

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The present book's subject is multidimensional data models and data modeling concepts as they are applied in real data warehouses. The book aims to present the most important concepts within this subject in a precise and understandable manner. The book's coverage of fundamental concepts includes data cubes and their elements, such as dimensions, facts, and measures and their representation in a relational setting; it includes architecture-related concepts; and it includes the querying of multidimensional databases.The book also covers advanced multidimensional concepts that are considered to b

  13. A Model-driven Role-based Access Control for SQL Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimundas Matulevičius

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays security has become an important aspect in information systems engineering. A mainstream method for information system security is Role-based Access Control (RBAC, which restricts system access to authorised users. While the benefits of RBAC are widely acknowledged, the implementation and administration of RBAC policies remains a human intensive activity, typically postponed until the implementation and maintenance phases of system development. This deferred security engineering approach makes it difficult for security requirements to be accurately captured and for the system’s implementation to be kept aligned with these requirements as the system evolves. In this paper we propose a model-driven approach to manage SQL database access under the RBAC paradigm. The starting point of the approach is an RBAC model captured in SecureUML. This model is automatically translated to Oracle Database views and instead-of triggers code, which implements the security constraints. The approach has been fully instrumented as a prototype and its effectiveness has been validated by means of a case study.

  14. Developing High-resolution Soil Database for Regional Crop Modeling in East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, E.; Ines, A. V. M.

    2014-12-01

    The most readily available soil data for regional crop modeling in Africa is the World Inventory of Soil Emission potentials (WISE) dataset, which has 1125 soil profiles for the world, but does not extensively cover countries Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania in East Africa. Another dataset available is the HC27 (Harvest Choice by IFPRI) in a gridded format (10km) but composed of generic soil profiles based on only three criteria (texture, rooting depth, and organic carbon content). In this paper, we present a development and application of a high-resolution (1km), gridded soil database for regional crop modeling in East Africa. Basic soil information is extracted from Africa Soil Information Service (AfSIS), which provides essential soil properties (bulk density, soil organic carbon, soil PH and percentages of sand, silt and clay) for 6 different standardized soil layers (5, 15, 30, 60, 100 and 200 cm) in 1km resolution. Soil hydraulic properties (e.g., field capacity and wilting point) are derived from the AfSIS soil dataset using well-proven pedo-transfer functions and are customized for DSSAT-CSM soil data requirements. The crop model is used to evaluate crop yield forecasts using the new high resolution soil database and compared with WISE and HC27. In this paper we will present also the results of DSSAT loosely coupled with a hydrologic model (VIC) to assimilate root-zone soil moisture. Creating a grid-based soil database, which provides a consistent soil input for two different models (DSSAT and VIC) is a critical part of this work. The created soil database is expected to contribute to future applications of DSSAT crop simulation in East Africa where food security is highly vulnerable.

  15. Object-oriented modeling and design of database federations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balsters, H.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a logical architecture and a general semantic framework for precise specification of so-called database federations. A database federation provides for tight coupling of a collection of heterogeneous component databases into a global integrated system. Our approach to database federation

  16. Database for environmental monitoring in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raceanu, Mircea; Varlam, Carmen; Iliescu, Mariana; Enache, Adrian; Faurescu, Ionut

    2006-01-01

    To ensure that an assessment could be made of the impact of nuclear facilities on the local environment, a program of environmental monitoring must be established well before of nuclear facility commissioning. Enormous amount of data must be stored and correlated starting with: location, meteorology, type sample characterization from water to different kind of foods, radioactivity measurement and isotopic measurement (e.g. for C-14 determination, C-13 isotopic correction it is a must). Data modelling is a well known mechanism describing data structures at a high level of abstraction. Such models are often used to automatically create database structures, and to generate the code structures used to access the databases. This has the disadvantage of losing data constraints that might be specified in data models for data checking. Embodiment of the system of the present application includes a computer-readable memory for storing a definitional data table for defining variable symbols representing the corresponding measurable physical quantities. Developing a database system implies setting up well-established rules of how the data should be stored and accessed what is commonly called the Relational Database Theory. This consists of guidelines regarding issues as how to avoid duplicating data using the technique called normalization and how to identify the unique identifier for a database record. (authors)

  17. Construction and analysis of a human hepatotoxicity database suitable for QSAR modeling using post-market safety data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Xiao; Kruhlak, Naomi L.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is one of the most common drug-induced adverse events (AEs) leading to life-threatening conditions such as acute liver failure. It has also been recognized as the single most common cause of safety-related post-market withdrawals or warnings. Efforts to develop new predictive methods to assess the likelihood of a drug being a hepatotoxicant have been challenging due to the complexity and idiosyncrasy of clinical manifestations of DILI. The FDA adverse event reporting system (AERS) contains post-market data that depict the morbidity of AEs. Here, we developed a scalable approach to construct a hepatotoxicity database using post-market data for the purpose of quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) modeling. A set of 2029 unique and modelable drug entities with 13,555 drug-AE combinations was extracted from the AERS database using 37 hepatotoxicity-related query preferred terms (PTs). In order to determine the optimal classification scheme to partition positive from negative drugs, a manually-curated DILI calibration set composed of 105 negatives and 177 positives was developed based on the published literature. The final classification scheme combines hepatotoxicity-related PT data with supporting information that optimize the predictive performance across the calibration set. Data for other toxicological endpoints related to liver injury such as liver enzyme abnormalities, cholestasis, and bile duct disorders, were also extracted and classified. Collectively, these datasets can be used to generate a battery of QSAR models that assess a drug's potential to cause DILI

  18. NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, John

    2009-01-01

    To facilitate the implementation of the Risk Management Plan, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project has developed and employed an analytical software tool called the NGNP Risk Management System (RMS). A relational database developed in Microsoft(reg s ign) Access, the RMS provides conventional database utility including data maintenance, archiving, configuration control, and query ability. Additionally, the tool's design provides a number of unique capabilities specifically designed to facilitate the development and execution of activities outlined in the Risk Management Plan. Specifically, the RMS provides the capability to establish the risk baseline, document and analyze the risk reduction plan, track the current risk reduction status, organize risks by reference configuration system, subsystem, and component (SSC) and Area, and increase the level of NGNP decision making.

  19. NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Collins

    2009-09-01

    To facilitate the implementation of the Risk Management Plan, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project has developed and employed an analytical software tool called the NGNP Risk Management System (RMS). A relational database developed in Microsoft® Access, the RMS provides conventional database utility including data maintenance, archiving, configuration control, and query ability. Additionally, the tool’s design provides a number of unique capabilities specifically designed to facilitate the development and execution of activities outlined in the Risk Management Plan. Specifically, the RMS provides the capability to establish the risk baseline, document and analyze the risk reduction plan, track the current risk reduction status, organize risks by reference configuration system, subsystem, and component (SSC) and Area, and increase the level of NGNP decision making.

  20. Integrating pattern mining in relational databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calders, T.; Goethals, B.; Prado, A.; Fürnkranz, J.; Scheffer, T.; Spiliopoulou, M.

    2006-01-01

    Almost a decade ago, Imielinski and Mannila introduced the notion of Inductive Databases to manage KDD applications just as DBMSs successfully manage business applications. The goal is to follow one of the key DBMS paradigms: building optimizing compilers for ad hoc queries. During the past decade,

  1. The Mouse Tumor Biology Database: A Comprehensive Resource for Mouse Models of Human Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupke, Debra M; Begley, Dale A; Sundberg, John P; Richardson, Joel E; Neuhauser, Steven B; Bult, Carol J

    2017-11-01

    Research using laboratory mice has led to fundamental insights into the molecular genetic processes that govern cancer initiation, progression, and treatment response. Although thousands of scientific articles have been published about mouse models of human cancer, collating information and data for a specific model is hampered by the fact that many authors do not adhere to existing annotation standards when describing models. The interpretation of experimental results in mouse models can also be confounded when researchers do not factor in the effect of genetic background on tumor biology. The Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB) database is an expertly curated, comprehensive compendium of mouse models of human cancer. Through the enforcement of nomenclature and related annotation standards, MTB supports aggregation of data about a cancer model from diverse sources and assessment of how genetic background of a mouse strain influences the biological properties of a specific tumor type and model utility. Cancer Res; 77(21); e67-70. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Integr8: enhanced inter-operability of European molecular biology databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersey, P J; Morris, L; Hermjakob, H; Apweiler, R

    2003-01-01

    The increasing production of molecular biology data in the post-genomic era, and the proliferation of databases that store it, require the development of an integrative layer in database services to facilitate the synthesis of related information. The solution of this problem is made more difficult by the absence of universal identifiers for biological entities, and the breadth and variety of available data. Integr8 was modelled using UML (Universal Modelling Language). Integr8 is being implemented as an n-tier system using a modern object-oriented programming language (Java). An object-relational mapping tool, OJB, is being used to specify the interface between the upper layers and an underlying relational database. The European Bioinformatics Institute is launching the Integr8 project. Integr8 will be an automatically populated database in which we will maintain stable identifiers for biological entities, describe their relationships with each other (in accordance with the central dogma of biology), and store equivalences between identified entities in the source databases. Only core data will be stored in Integr8, with web links to the source databases providing further information. Integr8 will provide the integrative layer of the next generation of bioinformatics services from the EBI. Web-based interfaces will be developed to offer gene-centric views of the integrated data, presenting (where known) the links between genome, proteome and phenotype.

  3. Contributions to Logical Database Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitalie COTELEA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper treats the problems arising at the stage of logical database design. It comprises a synthesis of the most common inference models of functional dependencies, deals with the problems of building covers for sets of functional dependencies, makes a synthesizes of normal forms, presents trends regarding normalization algorithms and provides a temporal complexity of those. In addition, it presents a summary of the most known keys’ search algorithms, deals with issues of analysis and testing of relational schemes. It also summarizes and compares the different features of recognition of acyclic database schemas.

  4. YMDB: the Yeast Metabolome Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewison, Timothy; Knox, Craig; Neveu, Vanessa; Djoumbou, Yannick; Guo, An Chi; Lee, Jacqueline; Liu, Philip; Mandal, Rupasri; Krishnamurthy, Ram; Sinelnikov, Igor; Wilson, Michael; Wishart, David S.

    2012-01-01

    The Yeast Metabolome Database (YMDB, http://www.ymdb.ca) is a richly annotated ‘metabolomic’ database containing detailed information about the metabolome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Modeled closely after the Human Metabolome Database, the YMDB contains >2000 metabolites with links to 995 different genes/proteins, including enzymes and transporters. The information in YMDB has been gathered from hundreds of books, journal articles and electronic databases. In addition to its comprehensive literature-derived data, the YMDB also contains an extensive collection of experimental intracellular and extracellular metabolite concentration data compiled from detailed Mass Spectrometry (MS) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) metabolomic analyses performed in our lab. This is further supplemented with thousands of NMR and MS spectra collected on pure, reference yeast metabolites. Each metabolite entry in the YMDB contains an average of 80 separate data fields including comprehensive compound description, names and synonyms, structural information, physico-chemical data, reference NMR and MS spectra, intracellular/extracellular concentrations, growth conditions and substrates, pathway information, enzyme data, gene/protein sequence data, as well as numerous hyperlinks to images, references and other public databases. Extensive searching, relational querying and data browsing tools are also provided that support text, chemical structure, spectral, molecular weight and gene/protein sequence queries. Because of S. cervesiae's importance as a model organism for biologists and as a biofactory for industry, we believe this kind of database could have considerable appeal not only to metabolomics researchers, but also to yeast biologists, systems biologists, the industrial fermentation industry, as well as the beer, wine and spirit industry. PMID:22064855

  5. The European fossil-fuelled power station database used in the SEI CASM model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, P.

    1996-01-01

    The database contains details of power stations in Europe that burn fossil-fuels. All countries are covered from Ireland to the European region of Russia as far as the Urals. The following data are given for each station: Location (country and EMEP square), capacity (net MW e and boiler size), year of commissioning, and fuels burnt. A listing of the database is included in the report. The database is primarily used for estimation of emissions and abatement costs of sulfur and nitrogen oxides in the SEI acid rain model CASM. 24 refs, tabs

  6. The European fossil-fuelled power station database used in the SEI CASM model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, P. [comp.] [Stockholm Environment Inst. at York (United Kingdom)

    1996-06-01

    The database contains details of power stations in Europe that burn fossil-fuels. All countries are covered from Ireland to the European region of Russia as far as the Urals. The following data are given for each station: Location (country and EMEP square), capacity (net MW{sub e} and boiler size), year of commissioning, and fuels burnt. A listing of the database is included in the report. The database is primarily used for estimation of emissions and abatement costs of sulfur and nitrogen oxides in the SEI acid rain model CASM. 24 refs, tabs

  7. Research of Cadastral Data Modelling and Database Updating Based on Spatio-temporal Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Feng

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The core of modern cadastre management is to renew the cadastre database and keep its currentness,topology consistency and integrity.This paper analyzed the changes and their linkage of various cadastral objects in the update process.Combined object-oriented modeling technique with spatio-temporal objects' evolution express,the paper proposed a cadastral data updating model based on the spatio-temporal process according to people's thought.Change rules based on the spatio-temporal topological relations of evolution cadastral spatio-temporal objects are drafted and further more cascade updating and history back trace of cadastral features,land use and buildings are realized.This model implemented in cadastral management system-ReGIS.Achieved cascade changes are triggered by the direct driving force or perceived external events.The system records spatio-temporal objects' evolution process to facilitate the reconstruction of history,change tracking,analysis and forecasting future changes.

  8. The Danish Testicular Cancer database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugaard, Gedske; Kier, Maria Gry Gundgaard; Bandak, Mikkel; Mortensen, Mette Saksø; Larsson, Heidi; Søgaard, Mette; Toft, Birgitte Groenkaer; Engvad, Birte; Agerbæk, Mads; Holm, Niels Vilstrup; Lauritsen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    The nationwide Danish Testicular Cancer database consists of a retrospective research database (DaTeCa database) and a prospective clinical database (Danish Multidisciplinary Cancer Group [DMCG] DaTeCa database). The aim is to improve the quality of care for patients with testicular cancer (TC) in Denmark, that is, by identifying risk factors for relapse, toxicity related to treatment, and focusing on late effects. All Danish male patients with a histologically verified germ cell cancer diagnosis in the Danish Pathology Registry are included in the DaTeCa databases. Data collection has been performed from 1984 to 2007 and from 2013 onward, respectively. The retrospective DaTeCa database contains detailed information with more than 300 variables related to histology, stage, treatment, relapses, pathology, tumor markers, kidney function, lung function, etc. A questionnaire related to late effects has been conducted, which includes questions regarding social relationships, life situation, general health status, family background, diseases, symptoms, use of medication, marital status, psychosocial issues, fertility, and sexuality. TC survivors alive on October 2014 were invited to fill in this questionnaire including 160 validated questions. Collection of questionnaires is still ongoing. A biobank including blood/sputum samples for future genetic analyses has been established. Both samples related to DaTeCa and DMCG DaTeCa database are included. The prospective DMCG DaTeCa database includes variables regarding histology, stage, prognostic group, and treatment. The DMCG DaTeCa database has existed since 2013 and is a young clinical database. It is necessary to extend the data collection in the prospective database in order to answer quality-related questions. Data from the retrospective database will be added to the prospective data. This will result in a large and very comprehensive database for future studies on TC patients.

  9. A Framework for Mapping User-Designed Forms to Relational Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Ritu

    2011-01-01

    In the quest for database usability, several applications enable users to design custom forms using a graphical interface, and forward engineer the forms into new databases. The path-breaking aspect of such applications is that users are completely shielded from the technicalities of database creation. Despite this innovation, the process of…

  10. The AMMA database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boichard, Jean-Luc; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Cloche, Sophie; Eymard, Laurence; Fleury, Laurence; Mastrorillo, Laurence; Moulaye, Oumarou; Ramage, Karim

    2010-05-01

    concern local, satellite and model data. - Documentation: catalogue of all the available data and their metadata. These tools have been developed using standard and free languages and softwares: - Linux system with an Apache web server and a Tomcat application server; - J2EE tools : JSF and Struts frameworks, hibernate; - relational database management systems: PostgreSQL and MySQL; - OpenLDAP directory. In order to facilitate the access to the data by African scientists, the complete system has been mirrored at AGHRYMET Regional Centre in Niamey and is operational there since January 2009. Users can now access metadata and request data through one or the other of two equivalent portals: http://database.amma-international.org or http://amma.agrhymet.ne/amma-data.

  11. Danish clinical databases: An overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Clinical databases contain data related to diagnostic procedures, treatments and outcomes. In 2001, a scheme was introduced for the approval, supervision and support to clinical databases in Denmark.......Clinical databases contain data related to diagnostic procedures, treatments and outcomes. In 2001, a scheme was introduced for the approval, supervision and support to clinical databases in Denmark....

  12. Clever generation of rich SPARQL queries from annotated relational schema: application to Semantic Web Service creation for biological databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollbrett, Julien; Larmande, Pierre; de Lamotte, Frédéric; Ruiz, Manuel

    2013-04-15

    In recent years, a large amount of "-omics" data have been produced. However, these data are stored in many different species-specific databases that are managed by different institutes and laboratories. Biologists often need to find and assemble data from disparate sources to perform certain analyses. Searching for these data and assembling them is a time-consuming task. The Semantic Web helps to facilitate interoperability across databases. A common approach involves the development of wrapper systems that map a relational database schema onto existing domain ontologies. However, few attempts have been made to automate the creation of such wrappers. We developed a framework, named BioSemantic, for the creation of Semantic Web Services that are applicable to relational biological databases. This framework makes use of both Semantic Web and Web Services technologies and can be divided into two main parts: (i) the generation and semi-automatic annotation of an RDF view; and (ii) the automatic generation of SPARQL queries and their integration into Semantic Web Services backbones. We have used our framework to integrate genomic data from different plant databases. BioSemantic is a framework that was designed to speed integration of relational databases. We present how it can be used to speed the development of Semantic Web Services for existing relational biological databases. Currently, it creates and annotates RDF views that enable the automatic generation of SPARQL queries. Web Services are also created and deployed automatically, and the semantic annotations of our Web Services are added automatically using SAWSDL attributes. BioSemantic is downloadable at http://southgreen.cirad.fr/?q=content/Biosemantic.

  13. Pancreatic Expression database: a generic model for the organization, integration and mining of complex cancer datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemoine Nicholas R

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic cancer is the 5th leading cause of cancer death in both males and females. In recent years, a wealth of gene and protein expression studies have been published broadening our understanding of pancreatic cancer biology. Due to the explosive growth in publicly available data from multiple different sources it is becoming increasingly difficult for individual researchers to integrate these into their current research programmes. The Pancreatic Expression database, a generic web-based system, is aiming to close this gap by providing the research community with an open access tool, not only to mine currently available pancreatic cancer data sets but also to include their own data in the database. Description Currently, the database holds 32 datasets comprising 7636 gene expression measurements extracted from 20 different published gene or protein expression studies from various pancreatic cancer types, pancreatic precursor lesions (PanINs and chronic pancreatitis. The pancreatic data are stored in a data management system based on the BioMart technology alongside the human genome gene and protein annotations, sequence, homologue, SNP and antibody data. Interrogation of the database can be achieved through both a web-based query interface and through web services using combined criteria from pancreatic (disease stages, regulation, differential expression, expression, platform technology, publication and/or public data (antibodies, genomic region, gene-related accessions, ontology, expression patterns, multi-species comparisons, protein data, SNPs. Thus, our database enables connections between otherwise disparate data sources and allows relatively simple navigation between all data types and annotations. Conclusion The database structure and content provides a powerful and high-speed data-mining tool for cancer research. It can be used for target discovery i.e. of biomarkers from body fluids, identification and analysis

  14. IntPath--an integrated pathway gene relationship database for model organisms and important pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hufeng; Jin, Jingjing; Zhang, Haojun; Yi, Bo; Wozniak, Michal; Wong, Limsoon

    2012-01-01

    relationship errors in KEGG). We turn complicated and incompatible xml data formats and inconsistent gene and gene relationship representations from different source databases into normalized and unified pathway-gene and pathway-gene pair relationships neatly recorded in simple tab-delimited text format and MySQL tables, which facilitates convenient automatic computation and large-scale referencing in many related studies. IntPath data can be downloaded in text format or MySQL dump. IntPath data can also be retrieved and analyzed conveniently through web service by local programs or through web interface by mouse clicks. Several useful analysis tools are also provided in IntPath. We have overcome in IntPath the issues of compatibility, consistency, and comprehensiveness that often hamper effective use of pathway databases. We have included four organisms in the current release of IntPath. Our methodology and programs described in this work can be easily applied to other organisms; and we will include more model organisms and important pathogens in future releases of IntPath. IntPath maintains regular updates and is freely available at http://compbio.ddns.comp.nus.edu.sg:8080/IntPath.

  15. A trait database for marine copepods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brun, Philipp Georg; Payne, Mark R.; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    was more limited for quantitative traits related to reproduction and physiology. The database may be used to investigate relationships between traits, to produce trait biogeographies, or to inform and validate trait-based marine ecosystem models. The data can be downloaded from PANGAEA, doi:10.1594/PANGAEA......, and organised the data into a structured database. We collected 9345 records for 14 functional traits. Particular attention was given to body size, feeding mode, egg size, spawning strategy, respiration rate and myelination (presence of nerve sheathing). Most records were reported on the species level, but some...

  16. A trait database for marine copepods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brun, Philipp Georg; Payne, Mark; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    , while information was more limited for quantitative traits related to reproduction and physiology. The database may be used to investigate relationships between traits, to produce trait biogeographies, or to inform and validate trait-based marine ecosystem models. The data can be downloaded from PANGAEA...... and organized the data into a structured database. We collected 9306 records for 14 functional traits. Particular attention was given to body size, feeding mode, egg size, spawning strategy, respiration rate, and myelination (presence of nerve sheathing). Most records were reported at the species level...

  17. Information structure design for databases a practical guide to data modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Mortimer, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Computer Weekly Professional Series: Information Structure Design for Databases: A Practical Guide to Data modeling focuses on practical data modeling covering business and information systems. The publication first offers information on data and information, business analysis, and entity relationship model basics. Discussions cover degree of relationship symbols, relationship rules, membership markers, types of information systems, data driven systems, cost and value of information, importance of data modeling, and quality of information. The book then takes a look at entity relationship mode

  18. The eNanoMapper database for nanomaterial safety information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeliazkova, Nina; Chomenidis, Charalampos; Doganis, Philip; Fadeel, Bengt; Grafström, Roland; Hardy, Barry; Hastings, Janna; Hegi, Markus; Jeliazkov, Vedrin; Kochev, Nikolay; Kohonen, Pekka; Munteanu, Cristian R; Sarimveis, Haralambos; Smeets, Bart; Sopasakis, Pantelis; Tsiliki, Georgia; Vorgrimmler, David; Willighagen, Egon

    2015-01-01

    The NanoSafety Cluster, a cluster of projects funded by the European Commision, identified the need for a computational infrastructure for toxicological data management of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). Ontologies, open standards, and interoperable designs were envisioned to empower a harmonized approach to European research in nanotechnology. This setting provides a number of opportunities and challenges in the representation of nanomaterials data and the integration of ENM information originating from diverse systems. Within this cluster, eNanoMapper works towards supporting the collaborative safety assessment for ENMs by creating a modular and extensible infrastructure for data sharing, data analysis, and building computational toxicology models for ENMs. The eNanoMapper database solution builds on the previous experience of the consortium partners in supporting diverse data through flexible data storage, open source components and web services. We have recently described the design of the eNanoMapper prototype database along with a summary of challenges in the representation of ENM data and an extensive review of existing nano-related data models, databases, and nanomaterials-related entries in chemical and toxicogenomic databases. This paper continues with a focus on the database functionality exposed through its application programming interface (API), and its use in visualisation and modelling. Considering the preferred community practice of using spreadsheet templates, we developed a configurable spreadsheet parser facilitating user friendly data preparation and data upload. We further present a web application able to retrieve the experimental data via the API and analyze it with multiple data preprocessing and machine learning algorithms. We demonstrate how the eNanoMapper database is used to import and publish online ENM and assay data from several data sources, how the "representational state transfer" (REST) API enables building user friendly

  19. Cleaning of scientific references in large patent databases using rule-based scoring and clustering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caron, Emiel

    2017-01-01

    Patent databases contain patent related data, organized in a relational data model, and are used to produce various patent statistics. These databases store raw data about scientific references cited by patents. For example, Patstat holds references to tens of millions of scientific journal

  20. A database of annotated promoters of genes associated with common respiratory and related diseases

    KAUST Repository

    Chowdhary, Rajesh

    2012-07-01

    Many genes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of common respiratory and related diseases (RRDs), yet the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Differential gene expression patterns in diseased and healthy individuals suggest that RRDs affect or are affected by modified transcription regulation programs. It is thus crucial to characterize implicated genes in terms of transcriptional regulation. For this purpose, we conducted a promoter analysis of genes associated with 11 common RRDs including allergic rhinitis, asthma, bronchiectasis, bronchiolitis, bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, emphysema, eczema, psoriasis, and urticaria, many of which are thought to be genetically related. The objective of the present study was to obtain deeper insight into the transcriptional regulation of these disease-associated genes by annotating their promoter regions with transcription factors (TFs) and TF binding sites (TFBSs). We discovered many TFs that are significantly enriched in the target disease groups including associations that have been documented in the literature. We also identified a number of putative TFs/TFBSs that appear to be novel. The results of our analysis are provided in an online database that is freely accessible to researchers at http://www.respiratorygenomics.com. Promoter-associated TFBS information and related genomic features, such as histone modification sites, microsatellites, CpG islands, and SNPs, are graphically summarized in the database. Users can compare and contrast underlying mechanisms of specific RRDs relative to candidate genes, TFs, gene ontology terms, micro-RNAs, and biological pathways for the conduct of metaanalyses. This database represents a novel, useful resource for RRD researchers. Copyright © 2012 by the American Thoracic Society.

  1. A database of annotated promoters of genes associated with common respiratory and related diseases

    KAUST Repository

    Chowdhary, Rajesh; Tan, Sinlam; Pavesi, Giulio; Jin, Gg; Dong, Difeng; Mathur, Sameer K.; Burkart, Arthur; Narang, Vipin; Glurich, Ingrid E.; Raby, Benjamin A.; Weiss, Scott T.; Limsoon, Wong; Liu, Jun; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2012-01-01

    Many genes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of common respiratory and related diseases (RRDs), yet the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Differential gene expression patterns in diseased and healthy individuals suggest that RRDs affect or are affected by modified transcription regulation programs. It is thus crucial to characterize implicated genes in terms of transcriptional regulation. For this purpose, we conducted a promoter analysis of genes associated with 11 common RRDs including allergic rhinitis, asthma, bronchiectasis, bronchiolitis, bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, emphysema, eczema, psoriasis, and urticaria, many of which are thought to be genetically related. The objective of the present study was to obtain deeper insight into the transcriptional regulation of these disease-associated genes by annotating their promoter regions with transcription factors (TFs) and TF binding sites (TFBSs). We discovered many TFs that are significantly enriched in the target disease groups including associations that have been documented in the literature. We also identified a number of putative TFs/TFBSs that appear to be novel. The results of our analysis are provided in an online database that is freely accessible to researchers at http://www.respiratorygenomics.com. Promoter-associated TFBS information and related genomic features, such as histone modification sites, microsatellites, CpG islands, and SNPs, are graphically summarized in the database. Users can compare and contrast underlying mechanisms of specific RRDs relative to candidate genes, TFs, gene ontology terms, micro-RNAs, and biological pathways for the conduct of metaanalyses. This database represents a novel, useful resource for RRD researchers. Copyright © 2012 by the American Thoracic Society.

  2. The HyMeX database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissebrat, Guillaume; Mastrorillo, Laurence; Ramage, Karim; Boichard, Jean-Luc; Cloché, Sophie; Fleury, Laurence; Klenov, Ludmila; Labatut, Laurent; Mière, Arnaud

    2013-04-01

    The international HyMeX (HYdrological cycle in the Mediterranean EXperiment) project aims at a better understanding and quantification of the hydrological cycle and related processes in the Mediterranean, with emphasis on high-impact weather events, inter-annual to decadal variability of the Mediterranean coupled system, and associated trends in the context of global change. The project includes long term monitoring of environmental parameters, intensive field campaigns, use of satellite data, modelling studies, as well as post event field surveys and value-added products processing. Therefore HyMeX database incorporates various dataset types from different disciplines, either operational or research. The database relies on a strong collaboration between OMP and IPSL data centres. Field data, which are 1D time series, maps or pictures, are managed by OMP team while gridded data (satellite products, model outputs, radar data...) are managed by IPSL team. At present, the HyMeX database contains about 150 datasets, including 80 hydrological, meteorological, ocean and soil in situ datasets, 30 radar datasets, 15 satellite products, 15 atmosphere, ocean and land surface model outputs from operational (re-)analysis or forecasts and from research simulations, and 5 post event survey datasets. The data catalogue complies with international standards (ISO 19115; INSPIRE; Directory Interchange Format; Global Change Master Directory Thesaurus). It includes all the datasets stored in the HyMeX database, as well as external datasets relevant for the project. All the data, whatever the type is, are accessible through a single gateway. The database website http://mistrals.sedoo.fr/HyMeX offers different tools: - A registration procedure which enables any scientist to accept the data policy and apply for a user database account. - A search tool to browse the catalogue using thematic, geographic and/or temporal criteria. - Sorted lists of the datasets by thematic keywords, by

  3. Design And Implementation Of Tool For Detecting Anti-Patterns In Relational Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Kumar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Anti-patterns are poor solution to design and im-plementation problems. Developers may introduce anti-patterns in their software systems because of time pressure lack of understanding communication and or-skills. Anti-patterns create problems in software maintenance and development. Database anti-patterns lead to complex and time consuming query process-ing and loss of integrity constraints. Detecting anti-patterns could reduce costs efforts and resources. Researchers have proposed approaches to detect anti-patterns in software development. But not much research has been done about database anti-patterns. This report presents two approaches to detect schema design anti-patterns in relational database. Our first approach is based on pattern matchingwe look into potential candidates based on schema patterns. Second approach is a machine learning based approach we generate features of possible anti-patterns and build SVMbased classifier to detect them. Here we look into these four anti-patterns a Multi-valued attribute b Nave tree based c Entity Attribute Value and dPolymorphic Association . We measure precision and recall of each approach and compare the results. SVM-based approach provides more precision and recall with more training dataset.

  4. The Effect of Relational Database Technology on Administrative Computing at Carnegie Mellon University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Cynthia; Eisenberger, Dorit

    1990-01-01

    Carnegie Mellon University's decision to standardize its administrative system development efforts on relational database technology and structured query language is discussed and its impact is examined in one of its larger, more widely used applications, the university information system. Advantages, new responsibilities, and challenges of the…

  5. MicrobesFlux: a web platform for drafting metabolic models from the KEGG database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xueyang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concurrent with the efforts currently underway in mapping microbial genomes using high-throughput sequencing methods, systems biologists are building metabolic models to characterize and predict cell metabolisms. One of the key steps in building a metabolic model is using multiple databases to collect and assemble essential information about genome-annotations and the architecture of the metabolic network for a specific organism. To speed up metabolic model development for a large number of microorganisms, we need a user-friendly platform to construct metabolic networks and to perform constraint-based flux balance analysis based on genome databases and experimental results. Results We have developed a semi-automatic, web-based platform (MicrobesFlux for generating and reconstructing metabolic models for annotated microorganisms. MicrobesFlux is able to automatically download the metabolic network (including enzymatic reactions and metabolites of ~1,200 species from the KEGG database (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes and then convert it to a metabolic model draft. The platform also provides diverse customized tools, such as gene knockouts and the introduction of heterologous pathways, for users to reconstruct the model network. The reconstructed metabolic network can be formulated to a constraint-based flux model to predict and analyze the carbon fluxes in microbial metabolisms. The simulation results can be exported in the SBML format (The Systems Biology Markup Language. Furthermore, we also demonstrated the platform functionalities by developing an FBA model (including 229 reactions for a recent annotated bioethanol producer, Thermoanaerobacter sp. strain X514, to predict its biomass growth and ethanol production. Conclusion MicrobesFlux is an installation-free and open-source platform that enables biologists without prior programming knowledge to develop metabolic models for annotated microorganisms in the KEGG

  6. Space Object Radiometric Modeling for Hardbody Optical Signature Database Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Introduction This presentation summarizes recent activity in monitoring spacecraft health status using passive remote optical nonimaging ...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Space Object Radiometric Modeling for Hardbody Optical Signature Database Generation...It is beneficial to the observer/analyst to understand the fundamental optical signature variability associated with these detection and

  7. The OECD FIRE database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angner, A.; Berg, H.P.; Roewekamp, M.; Werner, W.; Gauvain, J.

    2007-01-01

    Realistic modelling of fire scenarios is still difficult due to the scarcity of reliable data needed for deterministic and probabilistic fire safety analysis. Therefore, it has been recognized as highly important to establish a fire event database on an international level. In consequence, several member countries of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD have decided in 2000 to establish the International Fire Data Exchange Project (OECD FIRE) to encourage multilateral co-operation in the collection and analysis of data related to fire events at nuclear power plants. This paper presents the OECD FIRE project objectives, work scope and current status of the OECD FIRE database after 3 years of operation as well as first preliminary statistical insights gained from the collected data. (orig.)

  8. Axiomatic Specification of Database Domain Statics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, Roelf J.

    1987-01-01

    In the past ten years, much work has been done to add more structure to database models 1 than what is represented by a mere collection of flat relations (Albano & Cardelli [1985], Albano et al. [1986], Borgida eta. [1984], Brodie [1984], Brodie & Ridjanovic [1984], Brodie & Silva (1982], Codd

  9. An object-oriented language-database integration model: The composition filters approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aksit, Mehmet; Bergmans, Lodewijk; Vural, Sinan; Vural, S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper introduces a new model, based on so-called object-composition filters, that uniformly integrates database-like features into an object-oriented language. The focus is on providing persistent dynamic data structures, data sharing, transactions, multiple views and associative access,

  10. An Object-Oriented Language-Database Integration Model: The Composition-Filters Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aksit, Mehmet; Bergmans, Lodewijk; Vural, S.; Vural, Sinan; Lehrmann Madsen, O.

    1992-01-01

    This paper introduces a new model, based on so-called object-composition filters, that uniformly integrates database-like features into an object-oriented language. The focus is on providing persistent dynamic data structures, data sharing, transactions, multiple views and associative access,

  11. Clever generation of rich SPARQL queries from annotated relational schema: application to Semantic Web Service creation for biological databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years, a large amount of “-omics” data have been produced. However, these data are stored in many different species-specific databases that are managed by different institutes and laboratories. Biologists often need to find and assemble data from disparate sources to perform certain analyses. Searching for these data and assembling them is a time-consuming task. The Semantic Web helps to facilitate interoperability across databases. A common approach involves the development of wrapper systems that map a relational database schema onto existing domain ontologies. However, few attempts have been made to automate the creation of such wrappers. Results We developed a framework, named BioSemantic, for the creation of Semantic Web Services that are applicable to relational biological databases. This framework makes use of both Semantic Web and Web Services technologies and can be divided into two main parts: (i) the generation and semi-automatic annotation of an RDF view; and (ii) the automatic generation of SPARQL queries and their integration into Semantic Web Services backbones. We have used our framework to integrate genomic data from different plant databases. Conclusions BioSemantic is a framework that was designed to speed integration of relational databases. We present how it can be used to speed the development of Semantic Web Services for existing relational biological databases. Currently, it creates and annotates RDF views that enable the automatic generation of SPARQL queries. Web Services are also created and deployed automatically, and the semantic annotations of our Web Services are added automatically using SAWSDL attributes. BioSemantic is downloadable at http://southgreen.cirad.fr/?q=content/Biosemantic. PMID:23586394

  12. Biomine: predicting links between biological entities using network models of heterogeneous databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eronen Lauri

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biological databases contain large amounts of data concerning the functions and associations of genes and proteins. Integration of data from several such databases into a single repository can aid the discovery of previously unknown connections spanning multiple types of relationships and databases. Results Biomine is a system that integrates cross-references from several biological databases into a graph model with multiple types of edges, such as protein interactions, gene-disease associations and gene ontology annotations. Edges are weighted based on their type, reliability, and informativeness. We present Biomine and evaluate its performance in link prediction, where the goal is to predict pairs of nodes that will be connected in the future, based on current data. In particular, we formulate protein interaction prediction and disease gene prioritization tasks as instances of link prediction. The predictions are based on a proximity measure computed on the integrated graph. We consider and experiment with several such measures, and perform a parameter optimization procedure where different edge types are weighted to optimize link prediction accuracy. We also propose a novel method for disease-gene prioritization, defined as finding a subset of candidate genes that cluster together in the graph. We experimentally evaluate Biomine by predicting future annotations in the source databases and prioritizing lists of putative disease genes. Conclusions The experimental results show that Biomine has strong potential for predicting links when a set of selected candidate links is available. The predictions obtained using the entire Biomine dataset are shown to clearly outperform ones obtained using any single source of data alone, when different types of links are suitably weighted. In the gene prioritization task, an established reference set of disease-associated genes is useful, but the results show that under favorable

  13. Database specification for the Worldwide Port System (WPS) Regional Integrated Cargo Database (ICDB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faby, E.Z.; Fluker, J.; Hancock, B.R.; Grubb, J.W.; Russell, D.L. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Loftis, J.P.; Shipe, P.C.; Truett, L.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-03-01

    This Database Specification for the Worldwide Port System (WPS) Regional Integrated Cargo Database (ICDB) describes the database organization and storage allocation, provides the detailed data model of the logical and physical designs, and provides information for the construction of parts of the database such as tables, data elements, and associated dictionaries and diagrams.

  14. GIS-based hydrogeological databases and groundwater modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogu, Radu Constantin; Carabin, Guy; Hallet, Vincent; Peters, Valerie; Dassargues, Alain

    2001-12-01

    Reliability and validity of groundwater analysis strongly depend on the availability of large volumes of high-quality data. Putting all data into a coherent and logical structure supported by a computing environment helps ensure validity and availability and provides a powerful tool for hydrogeological studies. A hydrogeological geographic information system (GIS) database that offers facilities for groundwater-vulnerability analysis and hydrogeological modelling has been designed in Belgium for the Walloon region. Data from five river basins, chosen for their contrasting hydrogeological characteristics, have been included in the database, and a set of applications that have been developed now allow further advances. Interest is growing in the potential for integrating GIS technology and groundwater simulation models. A "loose-coupling" tool was created between the spatial-database scheme and the groundwater numerical model interface GMS (Groundwater Modelling System). Following time and spatial queries, the hydrogeological data stored in the database can be easily used within different groundwater numerical models. Résumé. La validité et la reproductibilité de l'analyse d'un aquifère dépend étroitement de la disponibilité de grandes quantités de données de très bonne qualité. Le fait de mettre toutes les données dans une structure cohérente et logique soutenue par les logiciels nécessaires aide à assurer la validité et la disponibilité et fournit un outil puissant pour les études hydrogéologiques. Une base de données pour un système d'information géographique (SIG) hydrogéologique qui offre toutes les facilités pour l'analyse de la vulnérabilité des eaux souterraines et la modélisation hydrogéologique a été établi en Belgique pour la région Wallonne. Les données de cinq bassins de rivières, choisis pour leurs caractéristiques hydrogéologiques différentes, ont été introduites dans la base de données, et un ensemble d

  15. Evaluating parallel relational databases for medical data analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rintoul, Mark Daniel; Wilson, Andrew T.

    2012-03-01

    Hospitals have always generated and consumed large amounts of data concerning patients, treatment and outcomes. As computers and networks have permeated the hospital environment it has become feasible to collect and organize all of this data. This raises naturally the question of how to deal with the resulting mountain of information. In this report we detail a proof-of-concept test using two commercially available parallel database systems to analyze a set of real, de-identified medical records. We examine database scalability as data sizes increase as well as responsiveness under load from multiple users.

  16. Historical return on investment and improved quality resulting from development and mining of a hospital laboratory relational database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimhall, Bradley B; Hall, Timothy E; Walczak, Steven

    2006-01-01

    A hospital laboratory relational database, developed over eight years, has demonstrated significant cost savings and a substantial financial return on investment (ROI). In addition, the database has been used to measurably improve laboratory operations and the quality of patient care.

  17. Performance of a TV white space database with different terrain resolutions and propagation models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Fanan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive Radio has now become a realistic option for the solution of the spectrum scarcity problem in wireless communication. TV channels (the primary user can be protected from secondary-user interference by accurate prediction of TV White Spaces (TVWS by using appropriate propagation modelling. In this paper we address two related aspects of channel occupancy prediction for cognitive radio. Firstly we investigate the best combination of empirical propagation model and spatial resolution of terrain data for predicting TVWS by examining the performance of three propagation models (Extended-Hata, Davidson-Hata and Egli in the TV band 470 to 790 MHz along with terrain data resolutions of 1000, 100 and 30 m, when compared with a comprehensive set of propagation measurements taken in randomly-selected locations around Hull, UK. Secondly we describe how such models can be integrated into a database-driven tool for cognitive radio channel selection within the TVWS environment.

  18. A Novel Approach: Chemical Relational Databases, and the Role of the ISSCAN Database on Assessing Chemical Carcinogenity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutagenicity and carcinogenicity databases are crucial resources for toxicologists and regulators involved in chemicals risk assessment. Until recently, existing public toxicity databases have been constructed primarily as "look-up-tables" of existing data, and most often did no...

  19. RA radiological characterization database application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steljic, M.M; Ljubenov, V.Lj. . E-mail address of corresponding author: milijanas@vin.bg.ac.yu; Steljic, M.M.)

    2005-01-01

    Radiological characterization of the RA research reactor is one of the main activities in the first two years of the reactor decommissioning project. The raw characterization data from direct measurements or laboratory analyses (defined within the existing sampling and measurement programme) have to be interpreted, organized and summarized in order to prepare the final characterization survey report. This report should be made so that the radiological condition of the entire site is completely and accurately shown with the radiological condition of the components clearly depicted. This paper presents an electronic database application, designed as a serviceable and efficient tool for characterization data storage, review and analysis, as well as for the reports generation. Relational database model was designed and the application is made by using Microsoft Access 2002 (SP1), a 32-bit RDBMS for the desktop and client/server database applications that run under Windows XP. (author)

  20. Benchmarking the CEMDATA07 database to model chemical degradation of concrete using GEMS and PHREEQC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacques, Diederik; Wang, Lian; Martens, Evelien; Mallants, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Thermodynamic equilibrium modelling of degradation of cement and concrete systems by chemically detrimental reactions as carbonation, sulphate attack and decalcification or leaching processes requires a consistent thermodynamic database with the relevant aqueous species, cement minerals and hydrates. The recent and consistent database CEMDATA07 is used as the basis in the studies of the Belgian near-surface disposal concept being developed by ONDRAF/NIRAS. The database is consistent with the thermodynamic data in the Nagra/PSI-Thermodynamic Database. When used with the GEMS thermodynamic code, thermodynamic modelling can be performed at temperatures different from the standard temperature of 25 C. GEMS calculates thermodynamic equilibrium by minimizing the Gibbs free energy of the system. Alternatively, thermodynamic equilibrium can also be calculated by solving a nonlinear system of mass balance equations and mass action equations, as is done in PHREEQC. A PHREEQC-database for the cement systems at temperatures different from 25 C is derived from the thermodynamic parameters and models from GEMS. A number of benchmark simulations using PHREEQC and GEM-Selektor were done to verify the implementation of the CEMDATA07 database in PHREEQC-databases. Simulations address a series of reactions that are relevant to the assessment of long-term cement and concrete durability. Verification calculations were performed for different systems with increasing complexity: CaO-SiO 2 -CO 2 , CaO-Al 2 O 3 -SO 3 -CO 2 , and CaO-SiO 2 -Al 2 O 3 -Fe 2 O 3 -MgO-SO 3 -CO 2 . Three types of chemical degradation processes were simulated: (1) carbonation by adding CO 2 to the bulk composition, (2) sulphate attack by adding SO 3 to the bulk composition, and (3) decalcification/leaching by putting the cement solid phase sequentially in contact with pure water. An excellent agreement between the simulations with GEMS and PHREEQC was obtained

  1. The commercial use of segmentation and predictive modeling techniques for database marketing in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, PC; Spring, PN; Hoekstra, JC; Leeflang, PSH

    Although the application of segmentation and predictive modeling is an important topic in the database marketing (DBM) literature, no study has yet investigated the extent of adoption of these techniques. We present the results of a Dutch survey involving 228 database marketing companies. We find

  2. GiSAO.db: a database for ageing research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grillari Johannes

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Age-related gene expression patterns of Homo sapiens as well as of model organisms such as Mus musculus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster are a basis for understanding the genetic mechanisms of ageing. For an effective analysis and interpretation of expression profiles it is necessary to store and manage huge amounts of data in an organized way, so that these data can be accessed and processed easily. Description GiSAO.db (Genes involved in senescence, apoptosis and oxidative stress database is a web-based database system for storing and retrieving ageing-related experimental data. Expression data of genes and miRNAs, annotation data like gene identifiers and GO terms, orthologs data and data of follow-up experiments are stored in the database. A user-friendly web application provides access to the stored data. KEGG pathways were incorporated and links to external databases augment the information in GiSAO.db. Search functions facilitate retrieval of data which can also be exported for further processing. Conclusions We have developed a centralized database that is very well suited for the management of data for ageing research. The database can be accessed at https://gisao.genome.tugraz.at and all the stored data can be viewed with a guest account.

  3. Integrating Relational Databases and Constraint Languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Reichhardt; Hansen, Bo S.; Lucas, Peter

    1989-01-01

    A new structure of application programs is suggested, which separates the algorithmic parts from factual information (data and rules). The latter is to be stored in a repository that can be shared among multiple applications. It is argued that rules stating pure relations are better suited...... for sharing among different applications than procedural or functional rules because these latter rules always determine inputs and outputs.To support such a repository, an extended relational algebra is explored. This algebra serves as the semantic model for a proposed rules language and is the basis...

  4. Development of an integrated database management system to evaluate integrity of flawed components of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mun, H. L.; Choi, S. N.; Jang, K. S.; Hong, S. Y.; Choi, J. B.; Kim, Y. J.

    2001-01-01

    The object of this paper is to develop an NPP-IDBMS(Integrated DataBase Management System for Nuclear Power Plants) for evaluating the integrity of components of nuclear power plant using relational data model. This paper describes the relational data model, structure and development strategy for the proposed NPP-IDBMS. The NPP-IDBMS consists of database, database management system and interface part. The database part consists of plant, shape, operating condition, material properties and stress database, which are required for the integrity evaluation of each component in nuclear power plants. For the development of stress database, an extensive finite element analysis was performed for various components considering operational transients. The developed NPP-IDBMS will provide efficient and accurate way to evaluate the integrity of flawed components

  5. D Digital Model Database Applied to Conservation and Research of Wooden Construction in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y.

    2013-07-01

    Protected by the Tai-Hang Mountains, Shanxi Province, located in north central China, is a highly prosperous, densely populated valley and considered to be one of the cradles of Chinese civilization. Its continuous habitation and rich culture have given rise to a large number of temple complexes and pavilions. Among these structures, 153 can be dated as early as from the Tang dynasty (618- 907C.E.) to the end of the Yuan dynasty (1279-1368C.E.) in Southern Shanxi area. The buildings are the best-preserved examples of wooden Chinese architecture in existence, exemplifying historic building technology and displaying highly intricate architectural decoration and detailing. They have survived war, earthquakes, and, in the last hundred years, neglect. In 2005, a decade-long conservation project was initiated by the State Administration of Cultural Heritage of China (SACH) to conserve and document these important buildings. The conservation process requires stabilization, conservation of important features, and, where necessary, partial dismantlement in order to replace unsound structural elements. Project team of CHCC have developed a practical recording system that created a record of all building components prior to and during the conservation process. After that we are trying to establish a comprehensive database which include all of the 153 earlier buildings, through which we can easily entering, browse, indexing information of the wooden construction, even deep into component details. The Database can help us to carry out comparative studies of these wooden structures, and, provide important support for the continued conservation of these heritage buildings. For some of the most important wooden structure, we have established three-dimensional models. Connected the Database with 3D Digital Model based on ArcGIS, we have developed 3D Digital Model Database for these cherish buildings. The 3D Digital Model Database helps us set up an integrate information inventory

  6. Database Aspects of Location-Based Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    2004-01-01

    in the databases underlying high-quality services. Several integrated representations - which capture different aspects of the same infrastructure - are needed. Further, all other content that can be related to geographical space must be integrated with the infrastructure representations. The chapter describes...... the general concepts underlying one approach to data modeling for location-based services. The chapter also covers techniques that are needed to keep a database for location-based services up to date with the reality it models. As part of this, caching is touched upon briefly. The notion of linear referencing......Adopting a data management perspective on location-based services, this chapter explores central challenges to data management posed by location-based services. Because service users typically travel in, and are constrained to, transportation infrastructures, such structures must be represented...

  7. Analysis of functionality free CASE-tools databases design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Gavrilov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction in the educational process of database design CASEtechnologies requires the institution of significant costs for the purchase of software. A possible solution could be the use of free software peers. At the same time this kind of substitution should be based on even-com representation of the functional characteristics and features of operation of these programs. The purpose of the article – a review of the free and non-profi t CASE-tools database design, as well as their classifi cation on the basis of the analysis functionality. When writing this article were used materials from the offi cial websites of the tool developers. Evaluation of the functional characteristics of CASEtools for database design made exclusively empirically with the direct work with software products. Analysis functionality of tools allow you to distinguish the two categories CASE-tools database design. The first category includes systems with a basic set of features and tools. The most important basic functions of these systems are: management connections to database servers, visual tools to create and modify database objects (tables, views, triggers, procedures, the ability to enter and edit data in table mode, user and privilege management tools, editor SQL-code, means export/import data. CASE-system related to the first category can be used to design and develop simple databases, data management, as well as a means of administration server database. A distinctive feature of the second category of CASE-tools for database design (full-featured systems is the presence of visual designer, allowing to carry out the construction of the database model and automatic creation of the database on the server based on this model. CASE-system related to this categories can be used for the design and development of databases of any structural complexity, as well as a database server administration tool. The article concluded that the

  8. Integrating heterogeneous databases in clustered medic care environments using object-oriented technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakore, Arun K.; Sauer, Frank

    1994-05-01

    The organization of modern medical care environments into disease-related clusters, such as a cancer center, a diabetes clinic, etc., has the side-effect of introducing multiple heterogeneous databases, often containing similar information, within the same organization. This heterogeneity fosters incompatibility and prevents the effective sharing of data amongst applications at different sites. Although integration of heterogeneous databases is now feasible, in the medical arena this is often an ad hoc process, not founded on proven database technology or formal methods. In this paper we illustrate the use of a high-level object- oriented semantic association method to model information found in different databases into an integrated conceptual global model that integrates the databases. We provide examples from the medical domain to illustrate an integration approach resulting in a consistent global view, without attacking the autonomy of the underlying databases.

  9. An Integrated Enterprise Accelerator Database for the SLC Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Since its inception in the early 1980's, the SLC Control System has been driven by a highly structured memory-resident real-time database. While efficient, its rigid structure and file-based sources makes it difficult to maintain and extract relevant information. The goal of transforming the sources for this database into a relational form is to enable it to be part of a Control System Enterprise Database that is an integrated central repository for SLC accelerator device and Control System data with links to other associated databases. We have taken the concepts developed for the NLC Enterprise Database and used them to create and load a relational model of the online SLC Control System database. This database contains data and structure to allow querying and reporting on beamline devices, their associations and parameters. In the future this will be extended to allow generation of EPICS and SLC database files, setup of applications and links to other databases such as accelerator maintenance, archive data, financial and personnel records, cabling information, documentation etc. The database is implemented using Oracle 8i. In the short term it will be updated daily in batch from the online SLC database. In the longer term, it will serve as the primary source for Control System static data, an R and D platform for the NLC, and contribute to SLC Control System operations

  10. A two term model of the confinement in Elmy H-modes using the global confinement and pedestal databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Two different physical models of the H-mode pedestal are tested against the joint pedestal-core database. These models are then combined with models for the core and shown to give a good fit to the ELMy H-mode database. Predictions are made for the next step tokamaks ITER and FIRE. (author)

  11. An expression database for roots of the model legume Medicago truncatula under salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Daofeng; Su, Zhen; Dong, Jiangli; Wang, Tao

    2009-11-11

    Medicago truncatula is a model legume whose genome is currently being sequenced by an international consortium. Abiotic stresses such as salt stress limit plant growth and crop productivity, including those of legumes. We anticipate that studies on M. truncatula will shed light on other economically important legumes across the world. Here, we report the development of a database called MtED that contains gene expression profiles of the roots of M. truncatula based on time-course salt stress experiments using the Affymetrix Medicago GeneChip. Our hope is that MtED will provide information to assist in improving abiotic stress resistance in legumes. The results of our microarray experiment with roots of M. truncatula under 180 mM sodium chloride were deposited in the MtED database. Additionally, sequence and annotation information regarding microarray probe sets were included. MtED provides functional category analysis based on Gene and GeneBins Ontology, and other Web-based tools for querying and retrieving query results, browsing pathways and transcription factor families, showing metabolic maps, and comparing and visualizing expression profiles. Utilities like mapping probe sets to genome of M. truncatula and In-Silico PCR were implemented by BLAT software suite, which were also available through MtED database. MtED was built in the PHP script language and as a MySQL relational database system on a Linux server. It has an integrated Web interface, which facilitates ready examination and interpretation of the results of microarray experiments. It is intended to help in selecting gene markers to improve abiotic stress resistance in legumes. MtED is available at http://bioinformatics.cau.edu.cn/MtED/.

  12. An expression database for roots of the model legume Medicago truncatula under salt stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Jiangli

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medicago truncatula is a model legume whose genome is currently being sequenced by an international consortium. Abiotic stresses such as salt stress limit plant growth and crop productivity, including those of legumes. We anticipate that studies on M. truncatula will shed light on other economically important legumes across the world. Here, we report the development of a database called MtED that contains gene expression profiles of the roots of M. truncatula based on time-course salt stress experiments using the Affymetrix Medicago GeneChip. Our hope is that MtED will provide information to assist in improving abiotic stress resistance in legumes. Description The results of our microarray experiment with roots of M. truncatula under 180 mM sodium chloride were deposited in the MtED database. Additionally, sequence and annotation information regarding microarray probe sets were included. MtED provides functional category analysis based on Gene and GeneBins Ontology, and other Web-based tools for querying and retrieving query results, browsing pathways and transcription factor families, showing metabolic maps, and comparing and visualizing expression profiles. Utilities like mapping probe sets to genome of M. truncatula and In-Silico PCR were implemented by BLAT software suite, which were also available through MtED database. Conclusion MtED was built in the PHP script language and as a MySQL relational database system on a Linux server. It has an integrated Web interface, which facilitates ready examination and interpretation of the results of microarray experiments. It is intended to help in selecting gene markers to improve abiotic stress resistance in legumes. MtED is available at http://bioinformatics.cau.edu.cn/MtED/.

  13. An Interoperable Cartographic Database

    OpenAIRE

    Slobodanka Ključanin; Zdravko Galić

    2007-01-01

    The concept of producing a prototype of interoperable cartographic database is explored in this paper, including the possibilities of integration of different geospatial data into the database management system and their visualization on the Internet. The implementation includes vectorization of the concept of a single map page, creation of the cartographic database in an object-relation database, spatial analysis, definition and visualization of the database content in the form of a map on t...

  14. SPIRE Data-Base Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuechsel, C. F.

    1984-01-01

    Spacelab Payload Integration and Rocket Experiment (SPIRE) data-base management system (DBMS) based on relational model of data bases. Data bases typically used for engineering and mission analysis tasks and, unlike most commercially available systems, allow data items and data structures stored in forms suitable for direct analytical computation. SPIRE DBMS designed to support data requests from interactive users as well as applications programs.

  15. An Investigation of the Fine Spatial Structure of Meteor Streams Using the Relational Database ``Meteor''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, A. V.; Yumagulov, E. Z.

    2003-05-01

    We have restored and ordered the archive of meteor observations carried out with a meteor radar complex ``KGU-M5'' since 1986. A relational database has been formed under the control of the Database Management System (DBMS) Oracle 8. We also improved and tested a statistical method for studying the fine spatial structure of meteor streams with allowance for the specific features of application of the DBMS. Statistical analysis of the results of observations made it possible to obtain information about the substance distribution in the Quadrantid, Geminid, and Perseid meteor streams.

  16. The eNanoMapper database for nanomaterial safety information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Jeliazkova

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The NanoSafety Cluster, a cluster of projects funded by the European Commision, identified the need for a computational infrastructure for toxicological data management of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs. Ontologies, open standards, and interoperable designs were envisioned to empower a harmonized approach to European research in nanotechnology. This setting provides a number of opportunities and challenges in the representation of nanomaterials data and the integration of ENM information originating from diverse systems. Within this cluster, eNanoMapper works towards supporting the collaborative safety assessment for ENMs by creating a modular and extensible infrastructure for data sharing, data analysis, and building computational toxicology models for ENMs.Results: The eNanoMapper database solution builds on the previous experience of the consortium partners in supporting diverse data through flexible data storage, open source components and web services. We have recently described the design of the eNanoMapper prototype database along with a summary of challenges in the representation of ENM data and an extensive review of existing nano-related data models, databases, and nanomaterials-related entries in chemical and toxicogenomic databases. This paper continues with a focus on the database functionality exposed through its application programming interface (API, and its use in visualisation and modelling. Considering the preferred community practice of using spreadsheet templates, we developed a configurable spreadsheet parser facilitating user friendly data preparation and data upload. We further present a web application able to retrieve the experimental data via the API and analyze it with multiple data preprocessing and machine learning algorithms.Conclusion: We demonstrate how the eNanoMapper database is used to import and publish online ENM and assay data from several data sources, how the “representational state

  17. Nuclear materials thermo-physical property database and property analysis using the database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yeong Seok

    2002-02-01

    It is necessary that thermo-physical properties and understand of nuclear materials for evaluation and analysis to steady and accident states of commercial and research reactor. In this study, development of nuclear materials thermo-properties database and home page. In application of this database, it is analyzed of thermal conductivity, heat capacity, enthalpy, and linear thermal expansion of fuel and cladding material and compared thermo-properties model in nuclear fuel performance evaluation codes with experimental data in database. Results of compare thermo-property model of UO 2 fuel and cladding major performance evaluation code, both are similar

  18. An Interoperable Cartographic Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodanka Ključanin

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of producing a prototype of interoperable cartographic database is explored in this paper, including the possibilities of integration of different geospatial data into the database management system and their visualization on the Internet. The implementation includes vectorization of the concept of a single map page, creation of the cartographic database in an object-relation database, spatial analysis, definition and visualization of the database content in the form of a map on the Internet. 

  19. The Danish (Q)SAR Database Update Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Nikolai Georgiev; Dybdahl, Marianne; Abildgaard Rosenberg, Sine

    2013-01-01

    The Danish (Q)SAR Database is a collection of predictions from quantitative structure–activity relationship ((Q)SAR) models for over 70 environmental and human health-related endpoints (covering biodegradation, metabolism, allergy, irritation, endocrine disruption, teratogenicity, mutagenicity......, carcinogenicity and others), each of them available for 185,000 organic substances. The database has been available online since 2005 (http://qsar.food.dtu.dk). A major update project for the Danish (Q)SAR database is under way, with a new online release planned in the beginning of 2015. The updated version...... will contain more than 600,000 discrete organic structures and new, more precise predictions for all endpoints, derived by consensus algorithms from a number of state-of-the-art individual predictions. Copyright © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd....

  20. The IAEA inventory databases related to radioactive material entering the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastogi, R.C.; Sjoeblom, K.L.

    1999-01-01

    Contracting Parties to the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and other Matter (LC 1972) have requested the IAEA to develop an inventory of radioactive material entering the marine environment from all sources. The rationale for developing and maintaining the inventory is related to its use as an information base with which the impact of radionuclides entering the marine environment from different sources can be assessed and compared. Five anthropogenic sources of radionuclides entering the marine environment can be identified. These sources are: radioactive waste disposal at sea; accidents and losses at sea involving radioactive material; discharge of low level liquid effluents from land-based nuclear facilities; the fallout from nuclear weapons testing; and accidental releases from land-based nuclear facilities. The first two of these sources are most closely related to the objective of the LC 1972 and its request to the IAEA. This paper deals with the Agency's work on developing a database on radioactive material entering the marine environment from these two sources. The database has the acronym RAMEM (RAdioactive Material Entering the Marine Environment). It includes two modules: inventory of radioactive waste disposal at sea and inventory of accidents and losses at sea involving radioactive material

  1. Blood pressure variability in relation to outcome in the International Database of Ambulatory blood pressure in relation to Cardiovascular Outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Thijs, Lutgarde; Richart, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring provides information not only on the BP level but also on the diurnal changes in BP. In the present review, we summarized the main findings of the International Database on Ambulatory BP in relation to Cardiovascular Outcome (IDACO) with regard to risk...

  2. BDVC (Bimodal Database of Violent Content): A database of violent audio and video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera Martínez, Jose Luis; Mijes Cruz, Mario Humberto; Rodríguez Vázqu, Manuel Antonio; Rodríguez Espejo, Luis; Montoya Obeso, Abraham; García Vázquez, Mireya Saraí; Ramírez Acosta, Alejandro Álvaro

    2017-09-01

    Nowadays there is a trend towards the use of unimodal databases for multimedia content description, organization and retrieval applications of a single type of content like text, voice and images, instead bimodal databases allow to associate semantically two different types of content like audio-video, image-text, among others. The generation of a bimodal database of audio-video implies the creation of a connection between the multimedia content through the semantic relation that associates the actions of both types of information. This paper describes in detail the used characteristics and methodology for the creation of the bimodal database of violent content; the semantic relationship is stablished by the proposed concepts that describe the audiovisual information. The use of bimodal databases in applications related to the audiovisual content processing allows an increase in the semantic performance only and only if these applications process both type of content. This bimodal database counts with 580 audiovisual annotated segments, with a duration of 28 minutes, divided in 41 classes. Bimodal databases are a tool in the generation of applications for the semantic web.

  3. The Danish Testicular Cancer database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Gedske; Kier, Maria Gry Gundgaard; Bandak, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The nationwide Danish Testicular Cancer database consists of a retrospective research database (DaTeCa database) and a prospective clinical database (Danish Multidisciplinary Cancer Group [DMCG] DaTeCa database). The aim is to improve the quality of care for patients with testicular cancer (TC......) in Denmark, that is, by identifying risk factors for relapse, toxicity related to treatment, and focusing on late effects. STUDY POPULATION: All Danish male patients with a histologically verified germ cell cancer diagnosis in the Danish Pathology Registry are included in the DaTeCa databases. Data...... collection has been performed from 1984 to 2007 and from 2013 onward, respectively. MAIN VARIABLES AND DESCRIPTIVE DATA: The retrospective DaTeCa database contains detailed information with more than 300 variables related to histology, stage, treatment, relapses, pathology, tumor markers, kidney function...

  4. An Updating System for the Gridded Population Database of China Based on Remote Sensing, GIS and Spatial Database Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohuan Yang

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution of population is closely related to land use and land cover (LULC patterns on both regional and global scales. Population can be redistributed onto geo-referenced square grids according to this relation. In the past decades, various approaches to monitoring LULC using remote sensing and Geographic Information Systems (GIS have been developed, which makes it possible for efficient updating of geo-referenced population data. A Spatial Population Updating System (SPUS is developed for updating the gridded population database of China based on remote sensing, GIS and spatial database technologies, with a spatial resolution of 1 km by 1 km. The SPUS can process standard Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS L1B data integrated with a Pattern Decomposition Method (PDM and an LULC-Conversion Model to obtain patterns of land use and land cover, and provide input parameters for a Population Spatialization Model (PSM. The PSM embedded in SPUS is used for generating 1 km by 1 km gridded population data in each population distribution region based on natural and socio-economic variables. Validation results from finer township-level census data of Yishui County suggest that the gridded population database produced by the SPUS is reliable.

  5. An Updating System for the Gridded Population Database of China Based on Remote Sensing, GIS and Spatial Database Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaohuan; Huang, Yaohuan; Dong, Pinliang; Jiang, Dong; Liu, Honghui

    2009-01-01

    The spatial distribution of population is closely related to land use and land cover (LULC) patterns on both regional and global scales. Population can be redistributed onto geo-referenced square grids according to this relation. In the past decades, various approaches to monitoring LULC using remote sensing and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) have been developed, which makes it possible for efficient updating of geo-referenced population data. A Spatial Population Updating System (SPUS) is developed for updating the gridded population database of China based on remote sensing, GIS and spatial database technologies, with a spatial resolution of 1 km by 1 km. The SPUS can process standard Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS L1B) data integrated with a Pattern Decomposition Method (PDM) and an LULC-Conversion Model to obtain patterns of land use and land cover, and provide input parameters for a Population Spatialization Model (PSM). The PSM embedded in SPUS is used for generating 1 km by 1 km gridded population data in each population distribution region based on natural and socio-economic variables. Validation results from finer township-level census data of Yishui County suggest that the gridded population database produced by the SPUS is reliable. PMID:22399959

  6. The Danish Testicular Cancer database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daugaard G

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Gedske Daugaard,1 Maria Gry Gundgaard Kier,1 Mikkel Bandak,1 Mette Saksø Mortensen,1 Heidi Larsson,2 Mette Søgaard,2 Birgitte Groenkaer Toft,3 Birte Engvad,4 Mads Agerbæk,5 Niels Vilstrup Holm,6 Jakob Lauritsen1 1Department of Oncology 5073, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, 3Department of Pathology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, 4Department of Pathology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, 5Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, 6Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark Aim: The nationwide Danish Testicular Cancer database consists of a retrospective research database (DaTeCa database and a prospective clinical database (Danish Multidisciplinary Cancer Group [DMCG] DaTeCa database. The aim is to improve the quality of care for patients with testicular cancer (TC in Denmark, that is, by identifying risk factors for relapse, toxicity related to treatment, and focusing on late effects. Study population: All Danish male patients with a histologically verified germ cell cancer diagnosis in the Danish Pathology Registry are included in the DaTeCa databases. Data collection has been performed from 1984 to 2007 and from 2013 onward, respectively. Main variables and descriptive data: The retrospective DaTeCa database contains detailed information with more than 300 variables related to histology, stage, treatment, relapses, pathology, tumor markers, kidney function, lung function, etc. A questionnaire related to late effects has been conducted, which includes questions regarding social relationships, life situation, general health status, family background, diseases, symptoms, use of medication, marital status, psychosocial issues, fertility, and sexuality. TC survivors alive on October 2014 were invited to fill in this questionnaire including 160 validated questions

  7. A virtual observatory for photoionized nebulae: the Mexican Million Models database (3MdB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisset, C.; Delgado-Inglada, G.; Flores-Fajardo, N.

    2015-04-01

    Photoionization models obtained with numerical codes are widely used to study the physics of the interstellar medium (planetary nebulae, HII regions, etc). Grids of models are performed to understand the effects of the different parameters used to describe the regions on the observables (mainly emission line intensities). Most of the time, only a small part of the computed results of such grids are published, and they are sometimes hard to obtain in a user-friendly format. We present here the Mexican Million Models dataBase (3MdB), an effort to resolve both of these issues in the form of a database of photoionization models, easily accessible through the MySQL protocol, and containing a lot of useful outputs from the models, such as the intensities of 178 emission lines, the ionic fractions of all the ions, etc. Some examples of the use of the 3MdB are also presented.

  8. International Shock-Wave Database: Current Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levashov, Pavel

    2013-06-01

    Shock-wave and related dynamic material response data serve for calibrating, validating, and improving material models over very broad regions of the pressure-temperature-density phase space. Since the middle of the 20th century vast amount of shock-wave experimental information has been obtained. To systemize it a number of compendiums of shock-wave data has been issued by LLNL, LANL (USA), CEA (France), IPCP and VNIIEF (Russia). In mid-90th the drawbacks of the paper handbooks became obvious, so the first version of the online shock-wave database appeared in 1997 (http://www.ficp.ac.ru/rusbank). It includes approximately 20000 experimental points on shock compression, adiabatic expansion, measurements of sound velocity behind the shock front and free-surface-velocity for more than 650 substances. This is still a useful tool for the shock-wave community, but it has a number of serious disadvantages which can't be easily eliminated: (i) very simple data format for points and references; (ii) minimalistic user interface for data addition; (iii) absence of history of changes; (iv) bad feedback from users. The new International Shock-Wave database (ISWdb) is intended to solve these and some other problems. The ISWdb project objectives are: (i) to develop a database on thermodynamic and mechanical properties of materials under conditions of shock-wave and other dynamic loadings, selected related quantities of interest, and the meta-data that describes the provenance of the measurements and material models; and (ii) to make this database available internationally through the Internet, in an interactive form. The development and operation of the ISWdb is guided by an advisory committee. The database will be installed on two mirrored web-servers, one in Russia and the other in USA (currently only one server is available). The database provides access to original experimental data on shock compression, non-shock dynamic loadings, isentropic expansion, measurements of sound

  9. Experience using a distributed object oriented database for a DAQ system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bee, C.P.; Eshghi, S.; Jones, R.

    1996-01-01

    To configure the RD13 data acquisition system, we need many parameters which describe the various hardware and software components. Such information has been defined using an entity-relation model and stored in a commercial memory-resident database. during the last year, Itasca, an object oriented database management system (OODB), was chosen as a replacement database system. We have ported the existing databases (hs and sw configurations, run parameters etc.) to Itasca and integrated it with the run control system. We believe that it is possible to use an OODB in real-time environments such as DAQ systems. In this paper, we present our experience and impression: why we wanted to change from an entity-relational approach, some useful features of Itasca, the issues we meet during this project including integration of the database into an existing distributed environment and factors which influence performance. (author)

  10. PK/DB: database for pharmacokinetic properties and predictive in silico ADME models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moda, Tiago L; Torres, Leonardo G; Carrara, Alexandre E; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2008-10-01

    The study of pharmacokinetic properties (PK) is of great importance in drug discovery and development. In the present work, PK/DB (a new freely available database for PK) was designed with the aim of creating robust databases for pharmacokinetic studies and in silico absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) prediction. Comprehensive, web-based and easy to access, PK/DB manages 1203 compounds which represent 2973 pharmacokinetic measurements, including five models for in silico ADME prediction (human intestinal absorption, human oral bioavailability, plasma protein binding, blood-brain barrier and water solubility). http://www.pkdb.ifsc.usp.br

  11. Development of a relational database for nuclear material (NM) accounting in RC and I Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, M.B.; Ramakumar, K.L.; Venugopal, V.

    2011-01-01

    A relational database for the nuclear material accounting in RC and I Group has been developed with MYSQL for Back-End and JAVA for Front-End development. Back-End has been developed to avoid any data redundancy, to provide random access of the data and to retrieve the required information from database easily. JAVA Applet and Java Swing components of JAVA programming have been used in the Front-End development. Front-End has been developed to provide data security, data integrity, to generate inventory status report at the end of accounting period, and also to have a quick look of some required information on computer screen. The database has been tested for the data of three quarters of the year 2009. It has been implemented from 1st January, 2010 for the accounting of nuclear material in RC and I Group. (author)

  12. Development of a relational database for nuclear material (NM) accounting in RC and I Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, M B; Ramakumar, K L; Venugopal, V [Radioanalytical Chemistry Division, Radiochemistry and Isotope Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2011-07-01

    A relational database for the nuclear material accounting in RC and I Group has been developed with MYSQL for Back-End and JAVA for Front-End development. Back-End has been developed to avoid any data redundancy, to provide random access of the data and to retrieve the required information from database easily. JAVA Applet and Java Swing components of JAVA programming have been used in the Front-End development. Front-End has been developed to provide data security, data integrity, to generate inventory status report at the end of accounting period, and also to have a quick look of some required information on computer screen. The database has been tested for the data of three quarters of the year 2009. It has been implemented from 1st January, 2010 for the accounting of nuclear material in RC and I Group. (author)

  13. Database and modeling assessments of the CANDU 3, PIUS, ALMR, and MHTGR designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, D.E.; Meyer, R.O.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the research program to support the preapplication reviews of the CANDU 3, PIUS, ALMR, and MHTGR designs, the NRC has completed preliminary assessments of databases and modeling capabilities. To ensure full coverage of all four designs, a detailed assessment methodology was developed that follows the broad logic of the NRC's Code Scaling, Applicability, and Uncertainty (CSAU) methodology. This paper describes the methodology of the database assessments and presents examples of the assessment process using preliminary results for the ALMR design

  14. Modeling livestock population structure: a geospatial database for Ontario swine farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Salah Uddin; O'Sullivan, Terri L; Poljak, Zvonimir; Alsop, Janet; Greer, Amy L

    2018-01-30

    Infectious diseases in farmed animals have economic, social, and health consequences. Foreign animal diseases (FAD) of swine are of significant concern. Mathematical and simulation models are often used to simulate FAD outbreaks and best practices for control. However, simulation outcomes are sensitive to the population structure used. Within Canada, access to individual swine farm population data with which to parameterize models is a challenge because of privacy concerns. Our objective was to develop a methodology to model the farmed swine population in Ontario, Canada that could represent the existing population structure and improve the efficacy of simulation models. We developed a swine population model based on the factors such as facilities supporting farm infrastructure, land availability, zoning and local regulations, and natural geographic barriers that could affect swine farming in Ontario. Assigned farm locations were equal to the swine farm density described in the 2011 Canadian Census of Agriculture. Farms were then randomly assigned to farm types proportional to the existing swine herd types. We compared the swine population models with a known database of swine farm locations in Ontario and found that the modeled population was representative of farm locations with a high accuracy (AUC: 0.91, Standard deviation: 0.02) suggesting that our algorithm generated a reasonable approximation of farm locations in Ontario. In the absence of a readily accessible dataset providing details of the relative locations of swine farms in Ontario, development of a model livestock population that captures key characteristics of the true population structure while protecting privacy concerns is an important methodological advancement. This methodology will be useful for individuals interested in modeling the spread of pathogens between farms across a landscape and using these models to evaluate disease control strategies.

  15. Development and validation of a facial expression database based on the dimensional and categorical model of emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Tomomi; Umemura, Hiroyuki

    2018-01-15

    The present study describes the development and validation of a facial expression database comprising five different horizontal face angles in dynamic and static presentations. The database includes twelve expression types portrayed by eight Japanese models. This database was inspired by the dimensional and categorical model of emotions: surprise, fear, sadness, anger with open mouth, anger with closed mouth, disgust with open mouth, disgust with closed mouth, excitement, happiness, relaxation, sleepiness, and neutral (static only). The expressions were validated using emotion classification and Affect Grid rating tasks [Russell, Weiss, & Mendelsohn, 1989. Affect Grid: A single-item scale of pleasure and arousal. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 57(3), 493-502]. The results indicate that most of the expressions were recognised as the intended emotions and could systematically represent affective valence and arousal. Furthermore, face angle and facial motion information influenced emotion classification and valence and arousal ratings. Our database will be available online at the following URL. https://www.dh.aist.go.jp/database/face2017/ .

  16. [Establishment of the database of the 3D facial models for the plastic surgery based on network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhe; Zhang, Hai-Lin; Zhang, Zheng-Guo; Qiao, Qun

    2008-07-01

    To collect the three-dimensional (3D) facial data of 30 facial deformity patients by the 3D scanner and establish a professional database based on Internet. It can be helpful for the clinical intervention. The primitive point data of face topography were collected by the 3D scanner. Then the 3D point cloud was edited by reverse engineering software to reconstruct the 3D model of the face. The database system was divided into three parts, including basic information, disease information and surgery information. The programming language of the web system is Java. The linkages between every table of the database are credibility. The query operation and the data mining are convenient. The users can visit the database via the Internet and use the image analysis system to observe the 3D facial models interactively. In this paper we presented a database and a web system adapt to the plastic surgery of human face. It can be used both in clinic and in basic research.

  17. Using relational databases to collect and store discrete-event simulation results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poderys, Justas; Soler, José

    2016-01-01

    , export the results to a data carrier file and then process the results stored in a file using the data processing software. In this work, we propose to save the simulation results directly from a simulation tool to a computer database. We implemented a link between the discrete-even simulation tool...... and the database and performed performance evaluation of 3 different open-source database systems. We show, that with a right choice of a database system, simulation results can be collected and exported up to 2.67 times faster, and use 1.78 times less disk space when compared to using simulation software built...

  18. Keyword Search in Databases

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Jeffrey Xu; Chang, Lijun

    2009-01-01

    It has become highly desirable to provide users with flexible ways to query/search information over databases as simple as keyword search like Google search. This book surveys the recent developments on keyword search over databases, and focuses on finding structural information among objects in a database using a set of keywords. Such structural information to be returned can be either trees or subgraphs representing how the objects, that contain the required keywords, are interconnected in a relational database or in an XML database. The structural keyword search is completely different from

  19. Dictionary as Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Derrick

    1996-01-01

    Discussion of dictionaries as databases focuses on the digitizing of The Oxford English dictionary (OED) and the use of Standard Generalized Mark-Up Language (SGML). Topics include the creation of a consortium to digitize the OED, document structure, relational databases, text forms, sequence, and discourse. (LRW)

  20. Application of Large-Scale Database-Based Online Modeling to Plant State Long-Term Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Masatoshi; Ogai, Harutoshi

    Recently, attention has been drawn to the local modeling techniques of a new idea called “Just-In-Time (JIT) modeling”. To apply “JIT modeling” to a large amount of database online, “Large-scale database-based Online Modeling (LOM)” has been proposed. LOM is a technique that makes the retrieval of neighboring data more efficient by using both “stepwise selection” and quantization. In order to predict the long-term state of the plant without using future data of manipulated variables, an Extended Sequential Prediction method of LOM (ESP-LOM) has been proposed. In this paper, the LOM and the ESP-LOM are introduced.

  1. Flashflood-related mortality in southern France: first results from a new database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinet Freddy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 25 years, flash floods in the South of France have killed almost 250 people. The protection of prone populations is a priority for the French government. It is also a goal of the 2007 European flood directive. However, no accurate database exists gathering the fatalities due to floods in France. Fatalities are supposed to be rare and hazardous, mainly due to individual behaviour. A Ph. D. work has initiated the building of a database gathering a detailed analysis of the circumstances of death and the profiles of the deceased (age, gender…. The study area covers the French Mediterranean departments prone to flash floods over the period 1988-2015. This presentation details the main features of the sample, 244 fatalities collected through newspapers completed with field surveys near police services and municipalities. The sample is broken down between huge events that account for two thirds of the fatalities and “small” events (34 % of the fatalities. Deaths at home account for 35 % of the total number of fatalities, mainly during huge events. 30 % of fatalities are related to vehicles. The last part of the work explains the relations between fatalities and prevention and how better knowledge of flood-related deaths can help to improve flood prevention. The given example shows the relationship between flood forecasting and fatalities. Half of the deaths took place in a small watershed (<150 km2. It emphasizes the need for the dissemination of a complementary system of flash flood forecast based on forecasted rainfall depth and adapted to small watersheds.

  2. Inference Attacks and Control on Database Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamed Turkanovic

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Today’s databases store information with sensitivity levels that range from public to highly sensitive, hence ensuring confidentiality can be highly important, but also requires costly control. This paper focuses on the inference problem on different database structures. It presents possible treats on privacy with relation to the inference, and control methods for mitigating these treats. The paper shows that using only access control, without any inference control is inadequate, since these models are unable to protect against indirect data access. Furthermore, it covers new inference problems which rise from the dimensions of new technologies like XML, semantics, etc.

  3. Advances in knowledge discovery in databases

    CERN Document Server

    Adhikari, Animesh

    2015-01-01

    This book presents recent advances in Knowledge discovery in databases (KDD) with a focus on the areas of market basket database, time-stamped databases and multiple related databases. Various interesting and intelligent algorithms are reported on data mining tasks. A large number of association measures are presented, which play significant roles in decision support applications. This book presents, discusses and contrasts new developments in mining time-stamped data, time-based data analyses, the identification of temporal patterns, the mining of multiple related databases, as well as local patterns analysis.  

  4. Guided Imagery and Music Bibliography and GIM/Related Literature Refworks Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2010-01-01

    Bibliografi og database over litteratur om den receptive musikterapimetode Guided Imagery and Music......Bibliografi og database over litteratur om den receptive musikterapimetode Guided Imagery and Music...

  5. 3D DIGITAL MODEL DATABASE APPLIED TO CONSERVATION AND RESEARCH OF WOODEN CONSTRUCTION IN CHINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zheng

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Protected by the Tai-Hang Mountains, Shanxi Province, located in north central China, is a highly prosperous, densely populated valley and considered to be one of the cradles of Chinese civilization. Its continuous habitation and rich culture have given rise to a large number of temple complexes and pavilions. Among these structures, 153 can be dated as early as from the Tang dynasty (618- 907C.E. to the end of the Yuan dynasty (1279–1368C.E. in Southern Shanxi area. The buildings are the best-preserved examples of wooden Chinese architecture in existence, exemplifying historic building technology and displaying highly intricate architectural decoration and detailing. They have survived war, earthquakes, and, in the last hundred years, neglect. In 2005, a decade-long conservation project was initiated by the State Administration of Cultural Heritage of China (SACH to conserve and document these important buildings. The conservation process requires stabilization, conservation of important features, and, where necessary, partial dismantlement in order to replace unsound structural elements. Project team of CHCC have developed a practical recording system that created a record of all building components prior to and during the conservation process. After that we are trying to establish a comprehensive database which include all of the 153 earlier buildings, through which we can easily entering, browse, indexing information of the wooden construction, even deep into component details. The Database can help us to carry out comparative studies of these wooden structures, and, provide important support for the continued conservation of these heritage buildings. For some of the most important wooden structure, we have established three-dimensional models. Connected the Database with 3D Digital Model based on ArcGIS, we have developed 3D Digital Model Database for these cherish buildings. The 3D Digital Model Database helps us set up an integrate

  6. PseudoBase: a database with RNA pseudoknots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Batenburg, F H; Gultyaev, A P; Pleij, C W; Ng, J; Oliehoek, J

    2000-01-01

    PseudoBase is a database containing structural, functional and sequence data related to RNA pseudo-knots. It can be reached at http://wwwbio. Leiden Univ.nl/ approximately Batenburg/PKB.html. This page will direct the user to a retrieval page from where a particular pseudoknot can be chosen, or to a submission page which enables the user to add pseudoknot information to the database or to an informative page that elaborates on the various aspects of the database. For each pseudoknot, 12 items are stored, e.g. the nucleotides of the region that contains the pseudoknot, the stem positions of the pseudoknot, the EMBL accession number of the sequence that contains this pseudoknot and the support that can be given regarding the reliability of the pseudoknot. Access is via a small number of steps, using 16 different categories. The development process was done by applying the evolutionary methodology for software development rather than by applying the methodology of the classical waterfall model or the more modern spiral model.

  7. Filling Terrorism Gaps: VEOs, Evaluating Databases, and Applying Risk Terrain Modeling to Terrorism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagan, Ross F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-29

    This paper aims to address three issues: the lack of literature differentiating terrorism and violent extremist organizations (VEOs), terrorism incident databases, and the applicability of Risk Terrain Modeling (RTM) to terrorism. Current open source literature and publicly available government sources do not differentiate between terrorism and VEOs; furthermore, they fail to define them. Addressing the lack of a comprehensive comparison of existing terrorism data sources, a matrix comparing a dozen terrorism databases is constructed, providing insight toward the array of data available. RTM, a method for spatial risk analysis at a micro level, has some applicability to terrorism research, particularly for studies looking at risk indicators of terrorism. Leveraging attack data from multiple databases, combined with RTM, offers one avenue for closing existing research gaps in terrorism literature.

  8. Series of agriculture in the statistical office of the Republic of Serbia database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović-Radović Jelena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this Paper have been to examine which data on agriculture can be found in the Statistical Office of the Republic of Serbia Database, and what are the possibilities for the use of the Database in the research and analysis of agriculture. The Statistical Office of the Republic of Serbia Database physically represents normalized database formed in DBMS SQL Server. The methodological approach to the Paper subject is primarily related to modelling and the way of using Database. The options of accession, filtering and downloading of data from the Database are explained. The technical characteristics of the Database were described, indicators of agriculture listed and the possibilities of using Database were analysed. We examined whether these possibilities could be improved. It was concluded that improvements were possible, first, by enriching Database with data that are now only available in printed publications of the Office, and then, through methodological and technical improvements by redesigning the Database modelled on cloud founded databases. Also, the application of the achievements of the new multidisciplinary scientific field - Visual Analytics would improve visualization, interactive data analysis and data management.

  9. "Mr. Database" : Jim Gray and the History of Database Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanwahr, Nils C

    2017-12-01

    Although the widespread use of the term "Big Data" is comparatively recent, it invokes a phenomenon in the developments of database technology with distinct historical contexts. The database engineer Jim Gray, known as "Mr. Database" in Silicon Valley before his disappearance at sea in 2007, was involved in many of the crucial developments since the 1970s that constitute the foundation of exceedingly large and distributed databases. Jim Gray was involved in the development of relational database systems based on the concepts of Edgar F. Codd at IBM in the 1970s before he went on to develop principles of Transaction Processing that enable the parallel and highly distributed performance of databases today. He was also involved in creating forums for discourse between academia and industry, which influenced industry performance standards as well as database research agendas. As a co-founder of the San Francisco branch of Microsoft Research, Gray increasingly turned toward scientific applications of database technologies, e. g. leading the TerraServer project, an online database of satellite images. Inspired by Vannevar Bush's idea of the memex, Gray laid out his vision of a Personal Memex as well as a World Memex, eventually postulating a new era of data-based scientific discovery termed "Fourth Paradigm Science". This article gives an overview of Gray's contributions to the development of database technology as well as his research agendas and shows that central notions of Big Data have been occupying database engineers for much longer than the actual term has been in use.

  10. A consolidated and standardized relational database for ER data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zygmunt, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    The three US Department of Energy (DOE) installations on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Y-12, and K-25) were established during World War II as part of the Manhattan Project that ''built the bomb.'' That research, and work in more recent years, has resulted in the generation of radioactive materials and other toxic wastes. Lockheed Martin Energy Systems manages the three Oak Ridge installations (as well as the Environmental Restoration (ER) programs at the DOE plants in Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky). DOE Oak Ridge Operations has been mandated by federal and state agreements to provide a consolidated repository of environmental data and is tasked to support environmental data management activities at all five installations. The Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (OREIS) was initiated to fulfill these requirements. The primary use of OREIS data is to provide access to project results by regulators. A secondary use is to serve as background data for other projects. This paper discusses the benefits of a consolidated and standardized database; reasons for resistance to the consolidation of data; implementing a consolidated database, including attempts at standardization, deciding what to include in the consolidated database, establishing lists of valid values, and addressing quality control (QC) issues; and the evolution of a consolidated database, which includes developing and training a user community, dealing with configuration control issues, and incorporating historical data. OREIS is used to illustrate these topics

  11. Development of the ECODAB into a relational database for Escherichia coli O-antigens and other bacterial polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Macias, Miguel A; Ståhle, Jonas; Lütteke, Thomas; Widmalm, Göran

    2015-03-01

    Escherichia coli O-antigen database (ECODAB) is a web-based application to support the collection of E. coli O-antigen structures, polymerase and flippase amino acid sequences, NMR chemical shift data of O-antigens as well as information on glycosyltransferases (GTs) involved in the assembly of O-antigen polysaccharides. The database content has been compiled from scientific literature. Furthermore, the system has evolved from being a repository to one that can be used for generating novel data on its own. GT specificity is suggested through sequence comparison with GTs whose function is known. The migration of ECODAB to a relational database has allowed the automation of all processes to update, retrieve and present information, thereby, endowing the system with greater flexibility and improved overall performance. ECODAB is freely available at http://www.casper.organ.su.se/ECODAB/. Currently, data on 169 E. coli unique O-antigen entries and 338 GTs is covered. Moreover, the scope of the database has been extended so that polysaccharide structure and related information from other bacteria subsequently can be added, for example, from Streptococcus pneumoniae. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Method and electronic database search engine for exposing the content of an electronic database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stappers, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to an electronic database search engine comprising an electronic memory device suitable for storing and releasing elements from the database, a display unit, a user interface for selecting and displaying at least one element from the database on the display unit, and control

  13. An empirical modeling tool and glass property database in development of US-DOE radioactive waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, I.; Gan, H.

    1997-01-01

    An integrated glass database has been developed at the Vitreous State Laboratory of Catholic University of America. The major objective of this tool was to support glass formulation using the MAWS approach (Minimum Additives Waste Stabilization). An empirical modeling capability, based on the properties of over 1000 glasses in the database, was also developed to help formulate glasses from waste streams under multiple user-imposed constraints. The use of this modeling capability, the performance of resulting models in predicting properties of waste glasses, and the correlation of simple structural theories to glass properties are the subjects of this paper. (authors)

  14. SKPDB: a structural database of shikimate pathway enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Azevedo Walter F

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The functional and structural characterisation of enzymes that belong to microbial metabolic pathways is very important for structure-based drug design. The main interest in studying shikimate pathway enzymes involves the fact that they are essential for bacteria but do not occur in humans, making them selective targets for design of drugs that do not directly impact humans. Description The ShiKimate Pathway DataBase (SKPDB is a relational database applied to the study of shikimate pathway enzymes in microorganisms and plants. The current database is updated regularly with the addition of new data; there are currently 8902 enzymes of the shikimate pathway from different sources. The database contains extensive information on each enzyme, including detailed descriptions about sequence, references, and structural and functional studies. All files (primary sequence, atomic coordinates and quality scores are available for downloading. The modeled structures can be viewed using the Jmol program. Conclusions The SKPDB provides a large number of structural models to be used in docking simulations, virtual screening initiatives and drug design. It is freely accessible at http://lsbzix.rc.unesp.br/skpdb/.

  15. 16th East-European Conference on Advances in Databases and Information Systems (ADBIS 2012)

    CERN Document Server

    Härder, Theo; Wrembel, Robert; Advances in Databases and Information Systems

    2013-01-01

    This volume is the second one of the 16th East-European Conference on Advances in Databases and Information Systems (ADBIS 2012), held on September 18-21, 2012, in Poznań, Poland. The first one has been published in the LNCS series.   This volume includes 27 research contributions, selected out of 90. The contributions cover a wide spectrum of topics in the database and information systems field, including: database foundation and theory, data modeling and database design, business process modeling, query optimization in relational and object databases, materialized view selection algorithms, index data structures, distributed systems, system and data integration, semi-structured data and databases, semantic data management, information retrieval, data mining techniques, data stream processing, trust and reputation in the Internet, and social networks. Thus, the content of this volume covers the research areas from fundamentals of databases, through still hot topic research problems (e.g., data mining, XML ...

  16. Development of thermodynamic databases for geochemical calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, R.C. [Monitor Scientific, L.L.C., Denver, Colorado (United States); Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Shibata, Masahiro; Yui, Mikazu [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Neyama, Atsushi [Computer Software Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    Two thermodynamic databases for geochemical calculations supporting research and development on geological disposal concepts for high level radioactive waste are described in this report. One, SPRONS.JNC, is compatible with thermodynamic relations comprising the SUPCRT model and software, which permits calculation of the standard molal and partial molal thermodynamic properties of minerals, gases, aqueous species and reactions from 1 to 5000 bars and 0 to 1000degC. This database includes standard molal Gibbs free energies and enthalpies of formation, standard molal entropies and volumes, and Maier-Kelly heat capacity coefficients at the reference pressure (1 bar) and temperature (25degC) for 195 minerals and 16 gases. It also includes standard partial molal Gibbs free energies and enthalpies of formation, standard partial molal entropies, and Helgeson, Kirkham and Flowers (HKF) equation-of-state coefficients at the reference pressure and temperature for 1147 inorganic and organic aqueous ions and complexes. SPRONS.JNC extends similar databases described elsewhere by incorporating new and revised data published in the peer-reviewed literature since 1991. The other database, PHREEQE.JNC, is compatible with the PHREEQE series of geochemical modeling codes. It includes equilibrium constants at 25degC and l bar for mineral-dissolution, gas-solubility, aqueous-association and oxidation-reduction reactions. Reaction enthalpies, or coefficients in an empirical log K(T) function, are also included in this database, which permits calculation of equilibrium constants between 0 and 100degC at 1 bar. All equilibrium constants, reaction enthalpies, and log K(T) coefficients in PHREEQE.JNC are calculated using SUPCRT and SPRONS.JNC, which ensures that these two databases are mutually consistent. They are also internally consistent insofar as all the data are compatible with basic thermodynamic definitions and functional relations in the SUPCRT model, and because primary

  17. Development of thermodynamic databases for geochemical calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, R.C.; Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Shibata, Masahiro; Yui, Mikazu; Neyama, Atsushi

    1999-09-01

    Two thermodynamic databases for geochemical calculations supporting research and development on geological disposal concepts for high level radioactive waste are described in this report. One, SPRONS.JNC, is compatible with thermodynamic relations comprising the SUPCRT model and software, which permits calculation of the standard molal and partial molal thermodynamic properties of minerals, gases, aqueous species and reactions from 1 to 5000 bars and 0 to 1000degC. This database includes standard molal Gibbs free energies and enthalpies of formation, standard molal entropies and volumes, and Maier-Kelly heat capacity coefficients at the reference pressure (1 bar) and temperature (25degC) for 195 minerals and 16 gases. It also includes standard partial molal Gibbs free energies and enthalpies of formation, standard partial molal entropies, and Helgeson, Kirkham and Flowers (HKF) equation-of-state coefficients at the reference pressure and temperature for 1147 inorganic and organic aqueous ions and complexes. SPRONS.JNC extends similar databases described elsewhere by incorporating new and revised data published in the peer-reviewed literature since 1991. The other database, PHREEQE.JNC, is compatible with the PHREEQE series of geochemical modeling codes. It includes equilibrium constants at 25degC and l bar for mineral-dissolution, gas-solubility, aqueous-association and oxidation-reduction reactions. Reaction enthalpies, or coefficients in an empirical log K(T) function, are also included in this database, which permits calculation of equilibrium constants between 0 and 100degC at 1 bar. All equilibrium constants, reaction enthalpies, and log K(T) coefficients in PHREEQE.JNC are calculated using SUPCRT and SPRONS.JNC, which ensures that these two databases are mutually consistent. They are also internally consistent insofar as all the data are compatible with basic thermodynamic definitions and functional relations in the SUPCRT model, and because primary

  18. Database automation of accelerator operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casstevens, B.J.; Ludemann, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC) is a variable energy, multiparticle accelerator that produces beams of energetic heavy ions which are used as probes to study the structure of the atomic nucleus. To accelerate and transmit a particular ion at a specified energy to an experimenter's apparatus, the electrical currents in up to 82 magnetic field producing coils must be established to accuracies of from 0.1 to 0.001 percent. Mechanical elements must also be positioned by means of motors or pneumatic drives. A mathematical model of this complex system provides a good approximation of operating parameters required to produce an ion beam. However, manual tuning of the system must be performed to optimize the beam quality. The database system was implemented as an on-line query and retrieval system running at a priority lower than the cyclotron real-time software. It was designed for matching beams recorded in the database with beams specified for experiments. The database is relational and permits searching on ranges of any subset of the eleven beam categorizing attributes. A beam file selected from the database is transmitted to the cyclotron general control software which handles the automatic slewing of power supply currents and motor positions to the file values, thereby replicating the desired parameters

  19. REPLIKASI UNIDIRECTIONAL PADA HETEROGEN DATABASE

    OpenAIRE

    Hendro Nindito; Evaristus Didik Madyatmadja; Albert Verasius Dian Sano

    2013-01-01

    The use of diverse database technology in enterprise today can not be avoided. Thus, technology is needed to generate information in real time. The purpose of this research is to discuss a database replication technology that can be applied in heterogeneous database environments. In this study we use Windows-based MS SQL Server database to Linux-based Oracle database as the goal. The research method used is prototyping where development can be done quickly and testing of working models of the...

  20. DataCell: Exploiting the Power of Relational Databases for Efficient Stream Processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Liarou (Erietta); M.L. Kersten (Martin)

    2009-01-01

    htmlabstractDesigned for complex event processing, DataCell is a research prototype database system in the area of sensor stream systems. Under development at CWI, it belongs to the MonetDB database system family. CWI researchers innovatively built a stream engine directly on top of a database

  1. Towards cloud-centric distributed database evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Seybold, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The area of cloud computing also pushed the evolvement of distributed databases, resulting in a variety of distributed database systems, which can be classified in relation databases, NoSQL and NewSQL database systems. In general all representatives of these database system classes claim to provide elasticity and "unlimited" horizontal scalability. As these characteristics comply with the cloud, distributed databases seem to be a perfect match for Database-as-a-Service systems (DBaaS).

  2. Towards Cloud-centric Distributed Database Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Seybold, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The area of cloud computing also pushed the evolvement of distributed databases, resulting in a variety of distributed database systems, which can be classified in relation databases, NoSQL and NewSQL database systems. In general all representatives of these database system classes claim to provide elasticity and "unlimited" horizontal scalability. As these characteristics comply with the cloud, distributed databases seem to be a perfect match for Database-as-a-Service systems (DBaaS).

  3. Migration Between NoSQL Databases

    OpenAIRE

    Opačak, Damir

    2013-01-01

    The thesis discusses the differences and, consequently, potential problems that may arise when migrating between different types of NoSQL databases. The first chapters introduce the reader to the issues of relational databases and present the beginnings of NoSQL databases. The following chapters present different types of NoSQL databases and some of their representatives with the aim to show specific features of NoSQL databases and the fact that each of them was developed to solve specifi...

  4. SynechoNET: integrated protein-protein interaction database of a model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Woo-Yeon; Kang, Sungsoo; Kim, Byoung-Chul; Oh, Jeehyun; Cho, Seongwoong; Bhak, Jong; Choi, Jong-Soon

    2008-01-01

    Background Cyanobacteria are model organisms for studying photosynthesis, carbon and nitrogen assimilation, evolution of plant plastids, and adaptability to environmental stresses. Despite many studies on cyanobacteria, there is no web-based database of their regulatory and signaling protein-protein interaction networks to date. Description We report a database and website SynechoNET that provides predicted protein-protein interactions. SynechoNET shows cyanobacterial domain-domain interactio...

  5. Investigation of an artificial intelligence technology--Model trees. Novel applications for an immediate release tablet formulation database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Q; Rowe, R C; York, P

    2007-06-01

    This study has investigated an artificial intelligence technology - model trees - as a modelling tool applied to an immediate release tablet formulation database. The modelling performance was compared with artificial neural networks that have been well established and widely applied in the pharmaceutical product formulation fields. The predictability of generated models was validated on unseen data and judged by correlation coefficient R(2). Output from the model tree analyses produced multivariate linear equations which predicted tablet tensile strength, disintegration time, and drug dissolution profiles of similar quality to neural network models. However, additional and valuable knowledge hidden in the formulation database was extracted from these equations. It is concluded that, as a transparent technology, model trees are useful tools to formulators.

  6. The ChArMEx database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré, Hélène; Belmahfoud, Nizar; Boichard, Jean-Luc; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Cloché, Sophie; Descloitres, Jacques; Fleury, Laurence; Focsa, Loredana; Henriot, Nicolas; Mière, Arnaud; Ramage, Karim; Vermeulen, Anne; Boulanger, Damien

    2015-04-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/) aims at a scientific assessment of the present and future state of the atmospheric environment in the Mediterranean Basin, and of its impacts on the regional climate, air quality, and marine biogeochemistry. The project includes long term monitoring of environmental parameters , intensive field campaigns, use of satellite data and modelling studies. Therefore ChARMEx scientists produce and need to access a wide diversity of data. In this context, the objective of the database task is to organize data management, distribution system and services, such as facilitating the exchange of information and stimulating the collaboration between researchers within the ChArMEx community, and beyond. The database relies on a strong collaboration between ICARE, IPSL and OMP data centers and has been set up in the framework of the Mediterranean Integrated Studies at Regional And Locals Scales (MISTRALS) program data portal. ChArMEx data, either produced or used by the project, are documented and accessible through the database website: http://mistrals.sedoo.fr/ChArMEx. The website offers the usual but user-friendly functionalities: data catalog, user registration procedure, search tool to select and access data... The metadata (data description) are standardized, and comply with international standards (ISO 19115-19139; INSPIRE European Directive; Global Change Master Directory Thesaurus). A Digital Object Identifier (DOI) assignement procedure allows to automatically register the datasets, in order to make them easier to access, cite, reuse and verify. At present, the ChArMEx database contains about 120 datasets, including more than 80 in situ datasets (2012, 2013 and 2014 summer campaigns, background monitoring station of Ersa...), 25 model output sets (dust model intercomparison, MEDCORDEX scenarios...), a high resolution emission inventory over the Mediterranean... Many in situ datasets

  7. Data-mining analysis of the global distribution of soil carbon in observational databases and Earth system models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Shoji; Nanko, Kazuki; Ťupek, Boris; Lehtonen, Aleksi

    2017-03-01

    Future climate change will dramatically change the carbon balance in the soil, and this change will affect the terrestrial carbon stock and the climate itself. Earth system models (ESMs) are used to understand the current climate and to project future climate conditions, but the soil organic carbon (SOC) stock simulated by ESMs and those of observational databases are not well correlated when the two are compared at fine grid scales. However, the specific key processes and factors, as well as the relationships among these factors that govern the SOC stock, remain unclear; the inclusion of such missing information would improve the agreement between modeled and observational data. In this study, we sought to identify the influential factors that govern global SOC distribution in observational databases, as well as those simulated by ESMs. We used a data-mining (machine-learning) (boosted regression trees - BRT) scheme to identify the factors affecting the SOC stock. We applied BRT scheme to three observational databases and 15 ESM outputs from the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) and examined the effects of 13 variables/factors categorized into five groups (climate, soil property, topography, vegetation, and land-use history). Globally, the contributions of mean annual temperature, clay content, carbon-to-nitrogen (CN) ratio, wetland ratio, and land cover were high in observational databases, whereas the contributions of the mean annual temperature, land cover, and net primary productivity (NPP) were predominant in the SOC distribution in ESMs. A comparison of the influential factors at a global scale revealed that the most distinct differences between the SOCs from the observational databases and ESMs were the low clay content and CN ratio contributions, and the high NPP contribution in the ESMs. The results of this study will aid in identifying the causes of the current mismatches between observational SOC databases and ESM outputs

  8. The ChArMEx database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré, Helene; Belmahfoud, Nizar; Boichard, Jean-Luc; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Descloitres, Jacques; Fleury, Laurence; Focsa, Loredana; Henriot, Nicolas; Mastrorillo, Laurence; Mière, Arnaud; Vermeulen, Anne

    2014-05-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/) aims at a scientific assessment of the present and future state of the atmospheric environment in the Mediterranean Basin, and of its impacts on the regional climate, air quality, and marine biogeochemistry. The project includes long term monitoring of environmental parameters, intensive field campaigns, use of satellite data and modelling studies. Therefore ChARMEx scientists produce and need to access a wide diversity of data. In this context, the objective of the database task is to organize data management, distribution system and services, such as facilitating the exchange of information and stimulating the collaboration between researchers within the ChArMEx community, and beyond. The database relies on a strong collaboration between OMP and ICARE data centres and has been set up in the framework of the Mediterranean Integrated Studies at Regional And Locals Scales (MISTRALS) program data portal. All the data produced by or of interest for the ChArMEx community will be documented in the data catalogue and accessible through the database website: http://mistrals.sedoo.fr/ChArMEx. At present, the ChArMEx database contains about 75 datasets, including 50 in situ datasets (2012 and 2013 campaigns, Ersa background monitoring station), 25 model outputs (dust model intercomparison, MEDCORDEX scenarios), and a high resolution emission inventory over the Mediterranean. Many in situ datasets have been inserted in a relational database, in order to enable more accurate data selection and download of different datasets in a shared format. The database website offers different tools: - A registration procedure which enables any scientist to accept the data policy and apply for a user database account. - A data catalogue that complies with metadata international standards (ISO 19115-19139; INSPIRE European Directive; Global Change Master Directory Thesaurus). - Metadata forms to document

  9. Ocean Drilling Program: Janus Web Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    JANUS Database Send questions/comments about the online database Request data not available online Janus database Search the ODP/TAMU web site ODP's main web site Janus Data Model Data Migration Overview in Janus Data Types and Examples Leg 199, sunrise. Janus Web Database ODP and IODP data are stored in

  10. Network-based Database Course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J.N.; Knudsen, Morten; Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard

    A course in database design and implementation has been de- signed, utilizing existing network facilities. The course is an elementary course for students of computer engineering. Its purpose is to give the students a theoretical database knowledge as well as practical experience with design...... and implementation. A tutorial relational database and the students self-designed databases are implemented on the UNIX system of Aalborg University, thus giving the teacher the possibility of live demonstrations in the lecture room, and the students the possibility of interactive learning in their working rooms...

  11. Very fast road database verification using textured 3D city models obtained from airborne imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulatov, Dimitri; Ziems, Marcel; Rottensteiner, Franz; Pohl, Melanie

    2014-10-01

    Road databases are known to be an important part of any geodata infrastructure, e.g. as the basis for urban planning or emergency services. Updating road databases for crisis events must be performed quickly and with the highest possible degree of automation. We present a semi-automatic algorithm for road verification using textured 3D city models, starting from aerial or even UAV-images. This algorithm contains two processes, which exchange input and output, but basically run independently from each other. These processes are textured urban terrain reconstruction and road verification. The first process contains a dense photogrammetric reconstruction of 3D geometry of the scene using depth maps. The second process is our core procedure, since it contains various methods for road verification. Each method represents a unique road model and a specific strategy, and thus is able to deal with a specific type of roads. Each method is designed to provide two probability distributions, where the first describes the state of a road object (correct, incorrect), and the second describes the state of its underlying road model (applicable, not applicable). Based on the Dempster-Shafer Theory, both distributions are mapped to a single distribution that refers to three states: correct, incorrect, and unknown. With respect to the interaction of both processes, the normalized elevation map and the digital orthophoto generated during 3D reconstruction are the necessary input - together with initial road database entries - for the road verification process. If the entries of the database are too obsolete or not available at all, sensor data evaluation enables classification of the road pixels of the elevation map followed by road map extraction by means of vectorization and filtering of the geometrically and topologically inconsistent objects. Depending on the time issue and availability of a geo-database for buildings, the urban terrain reconstruction procedure has semantic models

  12. Development of a relational database to capture and merge clinical history with the quantitative results of radionuclide renography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folks, Russell D; Savir-Baruch, Bital; Garcia, Ernest V; Verdes, Liudmila; Taylor, Andrew T

    2012-12-01

    Our objective was to design and implement a clinical history database capable of linking to our database of quantitative results from (99m)Tc-mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3) renal scans and export a data summary for physicians or our software decision support system. For database development, we used a commercial program. Additional software was developed in Interactive Data Language. MAG3 studies were processed using an in-house enhancement of a commercial program. The relational database has 3 parts: a list of all renal scans (the RENAL database), a set of patients with quantitative processing results (the Q2 database), and a subset of patients from Q2 containing clinical data manually transcribed from the hospital information system (the CLINICAL database). To test interobserver variability, a second physician transcriber reviewed 50 randomly selected patients in the hospital information system and tabulated 2 clinical data items: hydronephrosis and presence of a current stent. The CLINICAL database was developed in stages and contains 342 fields comprising demographic information, clinical history, and findings from up to 11 radiologic procedures. A scripted algorithm is used to reliably match records present in both Q2 and CLINICAL. An Interactive Data Language program then combines data from the 2 databases into an XML (extensible markup language) file for use by the decision support system. A text file is constructed and saved for review by physicians. RENAL contains 2,222 records, Q2 contains 456 records, and CLINICAL contains 152 records. The interobserver variability testing found a 95% match between the 2 observers for presence or absence of ureteral stent (κ = 0.52), a 75% match for hydronephrosis based on narrative summaries of hospitalizations and clinical visits (κ = 0.41), and a 92% match for hydronephrosis based on the imaging report (κ = 0.84). We have developed a relational database system to integrate the quantitative results of MAG3 image

  13. Uncertainty Modeling for Database Design using Intuitionistic and Rough Set Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Definition. An intuitionistic rough relation R is a sub- set of the set cross product P(D1)× P(D2) × · · ·× P( Dm )× Dµ.× Dv. For a specific relation, R...that aj ∈ dij for all j. The interpretation space is the cross product D1× D2 × · · ·× Dm × Dµ× Dv but is limited for a given re- lation R to the set...systems, Journal of Information Science 11 (1985), 77–87. [7] T. Beaubouef and F. Petry, Rough Querying of Crisp Data in Relational Databases, Third

  14. Moving Observer Support for Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukauskas, Linas

    Interactive visual data explorations impose rigid requirements on database and visualization systems. Systems that visualize huge amounts of data tend to request large amounts of memory resources and heavily use the CPU to process and visualize data. Current systems employ a loosely coupled...... architecture to exchange data between database and visualization. Thus, the interaction of the visualizer and the database is kept to the minimum, which most often leads to superfluous data being passed from database to visualizer. This Ph.D. thesis presents a novel tight coupling of database and visualizer....... The thesis discusses the VR-tree, an extension of the R-tree that enables observer relative data extraction. To support incremental observer position relative data extraction the thesis proposes the Volatile Access Structure (VAST). VAST is a main memory structure that caches nodes of the VR-tree. VAST...

  15. Using a relational database to improve mortality and length of stay for a department of surgery: a comparative review of 5200 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Darwin N; Behrns, Kevin E

    2013-07-01

    The emphasis on high-quality care has spawned the development of quality programs, most of which focus on broad outcome measures across a diverse group of providers. Our aim was to investigate the clinical outcomes for a department of surgery with multiple service lines of patient care using a relational database. Mortality, length of stay (LOS), patient safety indicators (PSIs), and hospital-acquired conditions were examined for each service line. Expected values for mortality and LOS were derived from University HealthSystem Consortium regression models, whereas expected values for PSIs were derived from Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality regression models. Overall, 5200 patients were evaluated from the months of January through May of both 2011 (n = 2550) and 2012 (n = 2650). The overall observed-to-expected (O/E) ratio of mortality improved from 1.03 to 0.92. The overall O/E ratio for LOS improved from 0.92 to 0.89. PSIs that predicted mortality included postoperative sepsis (O/E:1.89), postoperative respiratory failure (O/E:1.83), postoperative metabolic derangement (O/E:1.81), and postoperative deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolus (O/E:1.8). Mortality and LOS can be improved by using a relational database with outcomes reported to specific service lines. Service line quality can be influenced by distribution of frequent reports, group meetings, and service line-directed interventions.

  16. Hyperdatabase: A schema for browsing multiple databases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepherd, M A [Dalhousie Univ., Halifax (Canada). Computer Science Div.; Watters, C R [Waterloo Univ., Waterloo (Canada). Computer Science Dept.

    1990-05-01

    In order to insure effective information retrieval, a user may need to search multiple databases on multiple systems. Although front end systems have been developed to assist the user in accessing different systems, they access one retrieval system at a time and the search has to be repeated for each required database on each retrieval system. More importantly, the user interacts with the results as independent sessions. This paper models multiple bibliographic databases distributed over one or more retrieval systems as a hyperdatabase, i.e., a single virtual database. The hyperdatabase is viewed as a hypergraph in which each node represents a bibliographic item and the links among nodes represent relations among the items. In the response to a query, bibliographic items are extracted from the hyperdatabase and linked together to form a transient hypergraph. This hypergraph is transient in the sense that it is ``created`` in response to a query and only ``exists`` for the duration of the query session. A hypertext interface permits the user to browse the transient hypergraph in a nonlinear manner. The technology to implement a system based on this model is available now, consisting of powerful workstation, distributed processing, high-speed communications, and CD-ROMs. As the technology advances and costs decrease such systems should be generally available. (author). 13 refs, 5 figs.

  17. Hyperdatabase: A schema for browsing multiple databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, M.A.; Watters, C.R.

    1990-05-01

    In order to insure effective information retrieval, a user may need to search multiple databases on multiple systems. Although front end systems have been developed to assist the user in accessing different systems, they access one retrieval system at a time and the search has to be repeated for each required database on each retrieval system. More importantly, the user interacts with the results as independent sessions. This paper models multiple bibliographic databases distributed over one or more retrieval systems as a hyperdatabase, i.e., a single virtual database. The hyperdatabase is viewed as a hypergraph in which each node represents a bibliographic item and the links among nodes represent relations among the items. In the response to a query, bibliographic items are extracted from the hyperdatabase and linked together to form a transient hypergraph. This hypergraph is transient in the sense that it is ''created'' in response to a query and only ''exists'' for the duration of the query session. A hypertext interface permits the user to browse the transient hypergraph in a nonlinear manner. The technology to implement a system based on this model is available now, consisting of powerful workstation, distributed processing, high-speed communications, and CD-ROMs. As the technology advances and costs decrease such systems should be generally available. (author). 13 refs, 5 figs

  18. Technical report on implementation of reactor internal 3D modeling and visual database system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeun Seung; Eom, Young Sam; Lee, Suk Hee; Ryu, Seung Hyun

    1996-06-01

    In this report was described a prototype of reactor internal 3D modeling and VDB system for NSSS design quality improvement. For improving NSSS design quality several cases of the nuclear developed nation's integrated computer aided engineering system, such as Mitsubishi's NUWINGS (Japan), AECL's CANDID (Canada) and Duke Power's PASCE (USA) were studied. On the basis of these studies the strategy for NSSS design improvement system was extracted and detail work scope was implemented as follows : 3D modelling of the reactor internals were implemented by using the parametric solid modeler, a prototype system of design document computerization and database was suggested, and walk-through simulation integrated with 3D modeling and VDB was accomplished. Major effects of NSSS design quality improvement system by using 3D modeling and VDB are the plant design optimization by simulation, improving the reliability through the single design database system and engineering cost reduction by improving productivity and efficiency. For applying the VDB to full scope of NSSS system design, 3D modelings of reactor coolant system and nuclear fuel assembly and fuel rod were attached as appendix. 2 tabs., 31 figs., 7 refs. (Author) .new

  19. Technical report on implementation of reactor internal 3D modeling and visual database system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeun Seung; Eom, Young Sam; Lee, Suk Hee; Ryu, Seung Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-01

    In this report was described a prototype of reactor internal 3D modeling and VDB system for NSSS design quality improvement. For improving NSSS design quality several cases of the nuclear developed nation`s integrated computer aided engineering system, such as Mitsubishi`s NUWINGS (Japan), AECL`s CANDID (Canada) and Duke Power`s PASCE (USA) were studied. On the basis of these studies the strategy for NSSS design improvement system was extracted and detail work scope was implemented as follows : 3D modelling of the reactor internals were implemented by using the parametric solid modeler, a prototype system of design document computerization and database was suggested, and walk-through simulation integrated with 3D modeling and VDB was accomplished. Major effects of NSSS design quality improvement system by using 3D modeling and VDB are the plant design optimization by simulation, improving the reliability through the single design database system and engineering cost reduction by improving productivity and efficiency. For applying the VDB to full scope of NSSS system design, 3D modelings of reactor coolant system and nuclear fuel assembly and fuel rod were attached as appendix. 2 tabs., 31 figs., 7 refs. (Author) .new.

  20. Analysis and comparison of NoSQL databases with an introduction to consistent references in big data storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziedzic, Adam; Mulawka, Jan

    2014-11-01

    NoSQL is a new approach to data storage and manipulation. The aim of this paper is to gain more insight into NoSQL databases, as we are still in the early stages of understanding when to use them and how to use them in an appropriate way. In this submission descriptions of selected NoSQL databases are presented. Each of the databases is analysed with primary focus on its data model, data access, architecture and practical usage in real applications. Furthemore, the NoSQL databases are compared in fields of data references. The relational databases offer foreign keys, whereas NoSQL databases provide us with limited references. An intermediate model between graph theory and relational algebra which can address the problem should be created. Finally, the proposal of a new approach to the problem of inconsistent references in Big Data storage systems is introduced.

  1. Report on the database structuring project in fiscal 1996 related to the 'surveys on making databases for energy saving (2)'; 1996 nendo database kochiku jigyo hokokusho. Sho energy database system ka ni kansuru chosa 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    With an objective to support promotion of energy conservation in such countries as Japan, China, Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia, Taiwan and Korea, primary information on energy conservation in each country was collected, and the database was structured. This paper summarizes the achievements in fiscal 1996. Based on the survey result on the database project having been progressed to date, and on various data having been collected, this fiscal year has discussed structuring the database for distribution and proliferation of the database. In the discussion, requirements for the functions to be possessed by the database, items of data to be recorded in the database, and processing of the recorded data were put into order referring to propositions on the database circumstances. Demonstrations for the database of a proliferation version were performed in the Philippines, Indonesia and China. Three hundred CDs for distribution in each country were prepared. Adjustments and confirmation on operation of the supplied computers were carried out, and the operation explaining meetings were held in China and the Philippines. (NEDO)

  2. Categorical database generalization in GIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Key words: Categorical database, categorical database generalization, Formal data structure, constraints, transformation unit, classification hierarchy, aggregation hierarchy, semantic similarity, data model,

  3. Value of shared preclinical safety studies - The eTOX database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Katharine; Barber, Chris; Cases, Montserrat; Marc, Philippe; Steger-Hartmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A first analysis of a database of shared preclinical safety data for 1214 small molecule drugs and drug candidates extracted from 3970 reports donated by thirteen pharmaceutical companies for the eTOX project (www.etoxproject.eu) is presented. Species, duration of exposure and administration route data were analysed to assess if large enough subsets of homogenous data are available for building in silico predictive models. Prevalence of treatment related effects for the different types of findings recorded were analysed. The eTOX ontology was used to determine the most common treatment-related clinical chemistry and histopathology findings reported in the database. The data were then mined to evaluate sensitivity of established in vivo biomarkers for liver toxicity risk assessment. The value of the database to inform other drug development projects during early drug development is illustrated by a case study.

  4. Nuclear plant operations, maintenance, and configuration management using three-dimensional computer graphics and databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tutos, N.C.; Reinschmidt, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation has developed the Plant Digital Model concept as a new approach to Configuration Mnagement of nuclear power plants. The Plant Digital Model development is a step-by-step process, based on existing manual procedures and computer applications, and is fully controllable by the plant managers and engineers. The Plant Digital Model is based on IBM computer graphics and relational database management systems, and therefore can be easily integrated with existing plant databases and corporate management-information systems

  5. Web interfaces to relational databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, W. H.

    1996-01-01

    This reports on a project to extend the capabilities of a Virtual Research Center (VRC) for NASA's Advanced Concepts Office. The work was performed as part of NASA's 1995 Summer Faculty Fellowship program and involved the development of a prototype component of the VRC - a database system that provides data creation and access services within a room of the VRC. In support of VRC development, NASA has assembled a laboratory containing the variety of equipment expected to be used by scientists within the VRC. This laboratory consists of the major hardware platforms, SUN, Intel, and Motorola processors and their most common operating systems UNIX, Windows NT, Windows for Workgroups, and Macintosh. The SPARC 20 runs SUN Solaris 2.4, an Intel Pentium runs Windows NT and is installed on a different network from the other machines in the laboratory, a Pentium PC runs Windows for Workgroups, two Intel 386 machines run Windows 3.1, and finally, a PowerMacintosh and a Macintosh IIsi run MacOS.

  6. Final Report on Atomic Database Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, J.; Gui, Z.; Moses, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    Atomic physics in hot dense plasmas is essential for understanding the radiative properties of plasmas either produced terrestrially such as in fusion energy research or in space such as the study of the core of the sun. Various kinds of atomic data are needed for spectrum analysis or for radiation hydrodynamics simulations. There are many atomic databases accessible publicly through the web, such as CHIANTI (an atomic database for spectroscopic diagnostics for astrophysical plasmas) from Naval Research Laboratory [1], collaborative development of TOPbase (The Opacity Project for astrophysically abundant elements) [2], NIST atomic spectra database from NIST [3], TOPS Opacities from Los Alamos National Laboratory [4], etc. Most of these databases are specific to astrophysics, which provide energy levels, oscillator strength f and photoionization cross sections for astrophysical elements ( Z=1-26). There are abundant spectrum data sources for spectral analysis of low Z elements. For opacities used for radiation transport, TOPS Opacities from LANL is the most valuable source. The database provides mixed opacities from element for H (Z=1) to Zn (Z=30) The data in TOPS Opacities is calculated by the code LEDCOP. In the Fusion Technology Institute, we also have developed several different models to calculate atomic data and opacities, such as the detailed term accounting model (DTA) and the unresolved transition array (UTA) model. We use the DTA model for low-Z materials since an enormous number of transitions need to be computed for medium or high-Z materials. For medium and high Z materials, we use the UTA model which simulates the enormous number of transitions by using a single line profile to represent a collection of transition arrays. These models have been implemented in our computing code JATBASE and RSSUTA. For plasma populations, two models are used in JATBASE, one is the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) model and the second is the non-LTE model. For the

  7. A7DB: a relational database for mutational, physiological and pharmacological data related to the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sansom Mark SP

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs are pentameric proteins that are important drug targets for a variety of diseases including Alzheimer's, schizophrenia and various forms of epilepsy. One of the most intensively studied nAChR subunits in recent years has been α7. This subunit can form functional homomeric pentamers (α75, which can make interpretation of physiological and structural data much simpler. The growing amount of structural, pharmacological and physiological data for these receptors indicates the need for a dedicated and accurate database to provide a means to access this information in a coherent manner. Description A7DB http://www.lgics.org/a7db/ is a new relational database of manually curated experimental physiological data associated with the α7 nAChR. It aims to store as much of the pharmacology, physiology and structural data pertaining to the α7 nAChR. The data is accessed via web interface that allows a user to search the data in multiple ways: 1 a simple text query 2 an incremental query builder 3 an interactive query builder and 4 a file-based uploadable query. It currently holds more than 460 separately reported experiments on over 85 mutations. Conclusions A7DB will be a useful tool to molecular biologists and bioinformaticians not only working on the α7 receptor family of proteins but also in the more general context of nicotinic receptor modelling. Furthermore it sets a precedent for expansion with the inclusion of all nicotinic receptor families and eventually all cys-loop receptor families.

  8. Mobile Source Observation Database (MSOD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Mobile Source Observation Database (MSOD) is a relational database being developed by the Assessment and Standards Division (ASD) of the US Environmental...

  9. Nuclear technology databases and information network systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Shuichi; Kikuchi, Yasuyuki; Minakuchi, Satoshi

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the databases related to nuclear (science) technology, and information network. Following contents are collected in this paper: the database developed by JAERI, ENERGY NET, ATOM NET, NUCLEN nuclear information database, INIS, NUclear Code Information Service (NUCLIS), Social Application of Nuclear Technology Accumulation project (SANTA), Nuclear Information Database/Communication System (NICS), reactor materials database, radiation effects database, NucNet European nuclear information database, reactor dismantling database. (J.P.N.)

  10. Database security in the cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Sakhi, Imal

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is to get an overview of the database services available in cloud computing environment, investigate the security risks associated with it and propose the possible countermeasures to minimize the risks. The thesis also analyzes two cloud database service providers namely; Amazon RDS and Xeround. The reason behind choosing these two providers is because they are currently amongst the leading cloud database providers and both provide relational cloud databases which makes ...

  11. The CAPEC Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Lund; Abildskov, Jens; Harper, Peter Mathias

    2001-01-01

    in the compound. This classification makes the CAPEC database a very useful tool, for example, in the development of new property models, since properties of chemically similar compounds are easily obtained. A program with efficient search and retrieval functions of properties has been developed.......The Computer-Aided Process Engineering Center (CAPEC) database of measured data was established with the aim to promote greater data exchange in the chemical engineering community. The target properties are pure component properties, mixture properties, and special drug solubility data....... The database divides pure component properties into primary, secondary, and functional properties. Mixture properties are categorized in terms of the number of components in the mixture and the number of phases present. The compounds in the database have been classified on the basis of the functional groups...

  12. Database Description - Trypanosomes Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Trypanosomes Database Database Description General information of database Database name Trypanosomes Database...stitute of Genetics Research Organization of Information and Systems Yata 1111, Mishima, Shizuoka 411-8540, JAPAN E mail: Database...y Name: Trypanosoma Taxonomy ID: 5690 Taxonomy Name: Homo sapiens Taxonomy ID: 9606 Database description The... Article title: Author name(s): Journal: External Links: Original website information Database maintenance s...DB (Protein Data Bank) KEGG PATHWAY Database DrugPort Entry list Available Query search Available Web servic

  13. Documentation of databases in the Wilmar Planning tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiviluioma, J.; Meimbom, P.

    2006-01-01

    The Wilmar Planning tool consists of a number of databases and models as shown in Figure 1. This report documents the design of the following subparts of the Wilmar Planning tool: 1. The Scenario database holding the scenario trees generated from the Scenario Tree Creation model. 2. The Input database holding input data to the Joint Market model and the Long-term model apart from the scenario trees. 3. The output database containing the results of a Joint Market model run. The Wilmar Planning Tool is developed in the project Wind Power Integration in Liberalised Electricity Markets (WILMAR) supported by EU (contract ENK5-CT-2002-00663). (LN)

  14. Computer Aided Design for Soil Classification Relational Database ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper focuses on the problems associated with classification, storage and retrieval of information on soil data, such as the incompatibility of soil data semantics; inadequate documentation, and lack of indexing; hence it is pretty difficult to efficiently access large database. Consequently, information on soil is very difficult ...

  15. Data-based mathematical modeling of vectorial transport across double-transfected polarized cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomé, Kilian; Rius, Maria; Letschert, Katrin; Keller, Daniela; Timmer, Jens; Keppler, Dietrich

    2007-09-01

    Vectorial transport of endogenous small molecules, toxins, and drugs across polarized epithelial cells contributes to their half-life in the organism and to detoxification. To study vectorial transport in a quantitative manner, an in vitro model was used that includes polarized MDCKII cells stably expressing the recombinant human uptake transporter OATP1B3 in their basolateral membrane and the recombinant ATP-driven efflux pump ABCC2 in their apical membrane. These double-transfected cells enabled mathematical modeling of the vectorial transport of the anionic prototype substance bromosulfophthalein (BSP) that has frequently been used to examine hepatobiliary transport. Time-dependent analyses of (3)H-labeled BSP in the basolateral, intracellular, and apical compartments of cells cultured on filter membranes and efflux experiments in cells preloaded with BSP were performed. A mathematical model was fitted to the experimental data. Data-based modeling was optimized by including endogenous transport processes in addition to the recombinant transport proteins. The predominant contributions to the overall vectorial transport of BSP were mediated by OATP1B3 (44%) and ABCC2 (28%). Model comparison predicted a previously unrecognized endogenous basolateral efflux process as a negative contribution to total vectorial transport, amounting to 19%, which is in line with the detection of the basolateral efflux pump Abcc4 in MDCKII cells. Rate-determining steps in the vectorial transport were identified by calculating control coefficients. Data-based mathematical modeling of vectorial transport of BSP as a model substance resulted in a quantitative description of this process and its components. The same systems biology approach may be applied to other cellular systems and to different substances.

  16. A Case for Database Filesystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, P A; Hax, J C

    2009-05-13

    Data intensive science is offering new challenges and opportunities for Information Technology and traditional relational databases in particular. Database filesystems offer the potential to store Level Zero data and analyze Level 1 and Level 3 data within the same database system [2]. Scientific data is typically composed of both unstructured files and scalar data. Oracle SecureFiles is a new database filesystem feature in Oracle Database 11g that is specifically engineered to deliver high performance and scalability for storing unstructured or file data inside the Oracle database. SecureFiles presents the best of both the filesystem and the database worlds for unstructured content. Data stored inside SecureFiles can be queried or written at performance levels comparable to that of traditional filesystems while retaining the advantages of the Oracle database.

  17. ARCPHdb: A comprehensive protein database for SF1 and SF2 helicase from archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moukhtar, Mirna; Chaar, Wafi; Abdel-Razzak, Ziad; Khalil, Mohamad; Taha, Samir; Chamieh, Hala

    2017-01-01

    Superfamily 1 and Superfamily 2 helicases, two of the largest helicase protein families, play vital roles in many biological processes including replication, transcription and translation. Study of helicase proteins in the model microorganisms of archaea have largely contributed to the understanding of their function, architecture and assembly. Based on a large phylogenomics approach, we have identified and classified all SF1 and SF2 protein families in ninety five sequenced archaea genomes. Here we developed an online webserver linked to a specialized protein database named ARCPHdb to provide access for SF1 and SF2 helicase families from archaea. ARCPHdb was implemented using MySQL relational database. Web interfaces were developed using Netbeans. Data were stored according to UniProt accession numbers, NCBI Ref Seq ID, PDB IDs and Entrez Databases. A user-friendly interactive web interface has been developed to browse, search and download archaeal helicase protein sequences, their available 3D structure models, and related documentation available in the literature provided by ARCPHdb. The database provides direct links to matching external databases. The ARCPHdb is the first online database to compile all protein information on SF1 and SF2 helicase from archaea in one platform. This database provides essential resource information for all researchers interested in the field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Literature Review and Database of Relations Between Salinity and Aquatic Biota: Applications to Bowdoin National Wildlife Refuge, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Robert A.; Tangen, Brian A.; Laubhan, Murray K.; Finocchiaro, Raymond G.; Stamm, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Long-term accumulation of salts in wetlands at Bowdoin National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Mont., has raised concern among wetland managers that increasing salinity may threaten plant and invertebrate communities that provide important habitat and food resources for migratory waterfowl. Currently, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is evaluating various water management strategies to help maintain suitable ranges of salinity to sustain plant and invertebrate resources of importance to wildlife. To support this evaluation, the USFWS requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provide information on salinity ranges of water and soil for common plants and invertebrates on Bowdoin NWR lands. To address this need, we conducted a search of the literature on occurrences of plants and invertebrates in relation to salinity and pH of the water and soil. The compiled literature was used to (1) provide a general overview of salinity concepts, (2) document published tolerances and adaptations of biota to salinity, (3) develop databases that the USFWS can use to summarize the range of reported salinity values associated with plant and invertebrate taxa, and (4) perform database summaries that describe reported salinity ranges associated with plants and invertebrates at Bowdoin NWR. The purpose of this report is to synthesize information to facilitate a better understanding of the ecological relations between salinity and flora and fauna when developing wetland management strategies. A primary focus of this report is to provide information to help evaluate and address salinity issues at Bowdoin NWR; however, the accompanying databases, as well as concepts and information discussed, are applicable to other areas or refuges. The accompanying databases include salinity values reported for 411 plant taxa and 330 invertebrate taxa. The databases are available in Microsoft Excel version 2007 (http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2009/5098/downloads/databases_21april2009.xls) and contain

  19. National Database of Geriatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kannegaard, Pia Nimann; Vinding, Kirsten L; Hare-Bruun, Helle

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the National Database of Geriatrics is to monitor the quality of interdisciplinary diagnostics and treatment of patients admitted to a geriatric hospital unit. STUDY POPULATION: The database population consists of patients who were admitted to a geriatric hospital unit....... Geriatric patients cannot be defined by specific diagnoses. A geriatric patient is typically a frail multimorbid elderly patient with decreasing functional ability and social challenges. The database includes 14-15,000 admissions per year, and the database completeness has been stable at 90% during the past......, percentage of discharges with a rehabilitation plan, and the part of cases where an interdisciplinary conference has taken place. Data are recorded by doctors, nurses, and therapists in a database and linked to the Danish National Patient Register. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: Descriptive patient-related data include...

  20. Executing Complexity-Increasing Queries in Relational (MySQL) and NoSQL (MongoDB and EXist) Size-Growing ISO/EN 13606 Standardized EHR Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-de-Madariaga, Ricardo; Muñoz, Adolfo; Castro, Antonio L; Moreno, Oscar; Pascual, Mario

    2018-03-19

    This research shows a protocol to assess the computational complexity of querying relational and non-relational (NoSQL (not only Structured Query Language)) standardized electronic health record (EHR) medical information database systems (DBMS). It uses a set of three doubling-sized databases, i.e. databases storing 5000, 10,000 and 20,000 realistic standardized EHR extracts, in three different database management systems (DBMS): relational MySQL object-relational mapping (ORM), document-based NoSQL MongoDB, and native extensible markup language (XML) NoSQL eXist. The average response times to six complexity-increasing queries were computed, and the results showed a linear behavior in the NoSQL cases. In the NoSQL field, MongoDB presents a much flatter linear slope than eXist. NoSQL systems may also be more appropriate to maintain standardized medical information systems due to the special nature of the updating policies of medical information, which should not affect the consistency and efficiency of the data stored in NoSQL databases. One limitation of this protocol is the lack of direct results of improved relational systems such as archetype relational mapping (ARM) with the same data. However, the interpolation of doubling-size database results to those presented in the literature and other published results suggests that NoSQL systems might be more appropriate in many specific scenarios and problems to be solved. For example, NoSQL may be appropriate for document-based tasks such as EHR extracts used in clinical practice, or edition and visualization, or situations where the aim is not only to query medical information, but also to restore the EHR in exactly its original form.

  1. Executing Complexity-Increasing Queries in Relational (MySQL) and NoSQL (MongoDB and EXist) Size-Growing ISO/EN 13606 Standardized EHR Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-de-Madariaga, Ricardo; Muñoz, Adolfo; Castro, Antonio L; Moreno, Oscar; Pascual, Mario

    2018-01-01

    This research shows a protocol to assess the computational complexity of querying relational and non-relational (NoSQL (not only Structured Query Language)) standardized electronic health record (EHR) medical information database systems (DBMS). It uses a set of three doubling-sized databases, i.e. databases storing 5000, 10,000 and 20,000 realistic standardized EHR extracts, in three different database management systems (DBMS): relational MySQL object-relational mapping (ORM), document-based NoSQL MongoDB, and native extensible markup language (XML) NoSQL eXist. The average response times to six complexity-increasing queries were computed, and the results showed a linear behavior in the NoSQL cases. In the NoSQL field, MongoDB presents a much flatter linear slope than eXist. NoSQL systems may also be more appropriate to maintain standardized medical information systems due to the special nature of the updating policies of medical information, which should not affect the consistency and efficiency of the data stored in NoSQL databases. One limitation of this protocol is the lack of direct results of improved relational systems such as archetype relational mapping (ARM) with the same data. However, the interpolation of doubling-size database results to those presented in the literature and other published results suggests that NoSQL systems might be more appropriate in many specific scenarios and problems to be solved. For example, NoSQL may be appropriate for document-based tasks such as EHR extracts used in clinical practice, or edition and visualization, or situations where the aim is not only to query medical information, but also to restore the EHR in exactly its original form. PMID:29608174

  2. The ATLAS TAGS database distribution and management - Operational challenges of a multi-terabyte distributed database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viegas, F; Nairz, A; Goossens, L; Malon, D; Cranshaw, J; Dimitrov, G; Nowak, M; Gamboa, C; Gallas, E; Wong, A; Vinek, E

    2010-01-01

    The TAG files store summary event quantities that allow a quick selection of interesting events. This data will be produced at a nominal rate of 200 Hz, and is uploaded into a relational database for access from websites and other tools. The estimated database volume is 6TB per year, making it the largest application running on the ATLAS relational databases, at CERN and at other voluntary sites. The sheer volume and high rate of production makes this application a challenge to data and resource management, in many aspects. This paper will focus on the operational challenges of this system. These include: uploading the data from files to the CERN's and remote sites' databases; distributing the TAG metadata that is essential to guide the user through event selection; controlling resource usage of the database, from the user query load to the strategy of cleaning and archiving of old TAG data.

  3. Database Description - SKIP Stemcell Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us SKIP Stemcell Database Database Description General information of database Database name SKIP Stemcell Database...rsity Journal Search: Contact address http://www.skip.med.keio.ac.jp/en/contact/ Database classification Human Genes and Diseases Dat...abase classification Stemcell Article Organism Taxonomy Name: Homo sapiens Taxonomy ID: 9606 Database...ks: Original website information Database maintenance site Center for Medical Genetics, School of medicine, ...lable Web services Not available URL of Web services - Need for user registration Not available About This Database Database

  4. Database Description - Arabidopsis Phenome Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Arabidopsis Phenome Database Database Description General information of database Database n... BioResource Center Hiroshi Masuya Database classification Plant databases - Arabidopsis thaliana Organism T...axonomy Name: Arabidopsis thaliana Taxonomy ID: 3702 Database description The Arabidopsis thaliana phenome i...heir effective application. We developed the new Arabidopsis Phenome Database integrating two novel database...seful materials for their experimental research. The other, the “Database of Curated Plant Phenome” focusing

  5. Replikasi Unidirectional pada Heterogen Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendro Nindito

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of diverse database technology in enterprise today can not be avoided. Thus, technology is needed to generate information in real time. The purpose of this research is to discuss a database replication technology that can be applied in heterogeneous database environments. In this study we use Windows-based MS SQL Server database to Linux-based Oracle database as the goal. The research method used is prototyping where development can be done quickly and testing of working models of the interaction process is done through repeated. From this research it is obtained that the database replication technolgy using Oracle Golden Gate can be applied in heterogeneous environments in real time as well.

  6. Assessing the quality of life history information in publicly available databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorson, James T; Cope, Jason M; Patrick, Wesley S

    2014-01-01

    Single-species life history parameters are central to ecological research and management, including the fields of macro-ecology, fisheries science, and ecosystem modeling. However, there has been little independent evaluation of the precision and accuracy of the life history values in global and publicly available databases. We therefore develop a novel method based on a Bayesian errors-in-variables model that compares database entries with estimates from local experts, and we illustrate this process by assessing the accuracy and precision of entries in FishBase, one of the largest and oldest life history databases. This model distinguishes biases among seven life history parameters, two types of information available in FishBase (i.e., published values and those estimated from other parameters), and two taxa (i.e., bony and cartilaginous fishes) relative to values from regional experts in the United States, while accounting for additional variance caused by sex- and region-specific life history traits. For published values in FishBase, the model identifies a small positive bias in natural mortality and negative bias in maximum age, perhaps caused by unacknowledged mortality caused by fishing. For life history values calculated by FishBase, the model identified large and inconsistent biases. The model also demonstrates greatest precision for body size parameters, decreased precision for values derived from geographically distant populations, and greatest between-sex differences in age at maturity. We recommend that our bias and precision estimates be used in future errors-in-variables models as a prior on measurement errors. This approach is broadly applicable to global databases of life history traits and, if used, will encourage further development and improvements in these databases.

  7. The Neotoma Paleoecology Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, E. C.; Ashworth, A. C.; Barnosky, A. D.; Betancourt, J. L.; Bills, B.; Booth, R.; Blois, J.; Charles, D. F.; Graham, R. W.; Goring, S. J.; Hausmann, S.; Smith, A. J.; Williams, J. W.; Buckland, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Neotoma Paleoecology Database (www.neotomadb.org) is a multiproxy, open-access, relational database that includes fossil data for the past 5 million years (the late Neogene and Quaternary Periods). Modern distributional data for various organisms are also being made available for calibration and paleoecological analyses. The project is a collaborative effort among individuals from more than 20 institutions worldwide, including domain scientists representing a spectrum of Pliocene-Quaternary fossil data types, as well as experts in information technology. Working groups are active for diatoms, insects, ostracodes, pollen and plant macroscopic remains, testate amoebae, rodent middens, vertebrates, age models, geochemistry and taphonomy. Groups are also active in developing online tools for data analyses and for developing modules for teaching at different levels. A key design concept of NeotomaDB is that stewards for various data types are able to remotely upload and manage data. Cooperatives for different kinds of paleo data, or from different regions, can appoint their own stewards. Over the past year, much progress has been made on development of the steward software-interface that will enable this capability. The steward interface uses web services that provide access to the database. More generally, these web services enable remote programmatic access to the database, which both desktop and web applications can use and which provide real-time access to the most current data. Use of these services can alleviate the need to download the entire database, which can be out-of-date as soon as new data are entered. In general, the Neotoma web services deliver data either from an entire table or from the results of a view. Upon request, new web services can be quickly generated. Future developments will likely expand the spatial and temporal dimensions of the database. NeotomaDB is open to receiving new datasets and stewards from the global Quaternary community

  8. Review on management of horticultural plant germplasm resources and construction of related database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Jingxian

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The advances of databases on horticulture germplasm resources from China and abroad was briefly reviewed and the key technologies were discussed in details,especially in descriptors of data collection of germplasm resources. The prospective and challenges of databases were also discussed. It was evident that there was an urgent need to develop the databases of horticulture germplasm resources,with increasing diversity of germplasm,more user friendly and systematically access to the databases.

  9. The Fluka Linebuilder and Element Database: Tools for Building Complex Models of Accelerators Beam Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Mereghetti, A; Cerutti, F; Versaci, R; Vlachoudis, V

    2012-01-01

    Extended FLUKA models of accelerator beam lines can be extremely complex: heavy to manipulate, poorly versatile and prone to mismatched positioning. We developed a framework capable of creating the FLUKA model of an arbitrary portion of a given accelerator, starting from the optics configuration and a few other information provided by the user. The framework includes a builder (LineBuilder), an element database and a series of configuration and analysis scripts. The LineBuilder is a Python program aimed at dynamically assembling complex FLUKA models of accelerator beam lines: positions, magnetic fields and scorings are automatically set up, and geometry details such as apertures of collimators, tilting and misalignment of elements, beam pipes and tunnel geometries can be entered at user’s will. The element database (FEDB) is a collection of detailed FLUKA geometry models of machine elements. This framework has been widely used for recent LHC and SPS beam-machine interaction studies at CERN, and led to a dra...

  10. Database and prediction model for CANDU pressure tube diameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, J.Y.; Park, J.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    The pressure tube (PT) diameter is basic data in evaluating the CCP (critical channel power) of a CANDU reactor. Since the CCP affects the operational margin directly, an accurate prediction of the PT diameter is important to assess the operational margin. However, the PT diameter increases by creep owing to the effects of irradiation by neutron flux, stress, and reactor operating temperatures during the plant service period. Thus, it has been necessary to collect the measured data of the PT diameter and establish a database (DB) and develop a prediction model of PT diameter. Accordingly, in this study, a DB for the measured PT diameter data was established and a neural network (NN) based diameter prediction model was developed. The established DB included not only the measured diameter data but also operating conditions such as the temperature, pressure, flux, and effective full power date. The currently developed NN based diameter prediction model considers only extrinsic variables such as the operating conditions, and will be enhanced to consider the effect of intrinsic variables such as the micro-structure of the PT material. (author)

  11. Reactome graph database: Efficient access to complex pathway data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korninger, Florian; Viteri, Guilherme; Marin-Garcia, Pablo; Ping, Peipei; Wu, Guanming; Stein, Lincoln; D’Eustachio, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Reactome is a free, open-source, open-data, curated and peer-reviewed knowledgebase of biomolecular pathways. One of its main priorities is to provide easy and efficient access to its high quality curated data. At present, biological pathway databases typically store their contents in relational databases. This limits access efficiency because there are performance issues associated with queries traversing highly interconnected data. The same data in a graph database can be queried more efficiently. Here we present the rationale behind the adoption of a graph database (Neo4j) as well as the new ContentService (REST API) that provides access to these data. The Neo4j graph database and its query language, Cypher, provide efficient access to the complex Reactome data model, facilitating easy traversal and knowledge discovery. The adoption of this technology greatly improved query efficiency, reducing the average query time by 93%. The web service built on top of the graph database provides programmatic access to Reactome data by object oriented queries, but also supports more complex queries that take advantage of the new underlying graph-based data storage. By adopting graph database technology we are providing a high performance pathway data resource to the community. The Reactome graph database use case shows the power of NoSQL database engines for complex biological data types. PMID:29377902

  12. Reactome graph database: Efficient access to complex pathway data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Fabregat

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactome is a free, open-source, open-data, curated and peer-reviewed knowledgebase of biomolecular pathways. One of its main priorities is to provide easy and efficient access to its high quality curated data. At present, biological pathway databases typically store their contents in relational databases. This limits access efficiency because there are performance issues associated with queries traversing highly interconnected data. The same data in a graph database can be queried more efficiently. Here we present the rationale behind the adoption of a graph database (Neo4j as well as the new ContentService (REST API that provides access to these data. The Neo4j graph database and its query language, Cypher, provide efficient access to the complex Reactome data model, facilitating easy traversal and knowledge discovery. The adoption of this technology greatly improved query efficiency, reducing the average query time by 93%. The web service built on top of the graph database provides programmatic access to Reactome data by object oriented queries, but also supports more complex queries that take advantage of the new underlying graph-based data storage. By adopting graph database technology we are providing a high performance pathway data resource to the community. The Reactome graph database use case shows the power of NoSQL database engines for complex biological data types.

  13. Reactome graph database: Efficient access to complex pathway data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabregat, Antonio; Korninger, Florian; Viteri, Guilherme; Sidiropoulos, Konstantinos; Marin-Garcia, Pablo; Ping, Peipei; Wu, Guanming; Stein, Lincoln; D'Eustachio, Peter; Hermjakob, Henning

    2018-01-01

    Reactome is a free, open-source, open-data, curated and peer-reviewed knowledgebase of biomolecular pathways. One of its main priorities is to provide easy and efficient access to its high quality curated data. At present, biological pathway databases typically store their contents in relational databases. This limits access efficiency because there are performance issues associated with queries traversing highly interconnected data. The same data in a graph database can be queried more efficiently. Here we present the rationale behind the adoption of a graph database (Neo4j) as well as the new ContentService (REST API) that provides access to these data. The Neo4j graph database and its query language, Cypher, provide efficient access to the complex Reactome data model, facilitating easy traversal and knowledge discovery. The adoption of this technology greatly improved query efficiency, reducing the average query time by 93%. The web service built on top of the graph database provides programmatic access to Reactome data by object oriented queries, but also supports more complex queries that take advantage of the new underlying graph-based data storage. By adopting graph database technology we are providing a high performance pathway data resource to the community. The Reactome graph database use case shows the power of NoSQL database engines for complex biological data types.

  14. Comparison of the Frontier Distributed Database Caching System with NoSQL Databases

    CERN Document Server

    Dykstra, David

    2012-01-01

    One of the main attractions of non-relational "NoSQL" databases is their ability to scale to large numbers of readers, including readers spread over a wide area. The Frontier distributed database caching system, used in production by the Large Hadron Collider CMS and ATLAS detector projects for Conditions data, is based on traditional SQL databases but also has high scalability and wide-area distributability for an important subset of applications. This paper compares the major characteristics of the two different approaches and identifies the criteria for choosing which approach to prefer over the other. It also compares in some detail the NoSQL databases used by CMS and ATLAS: MongoDB, CouchDB, HBase, and Cassandra.

  15. FY 1993 annual report. Survey and study on establishment of databases for body functions; 1993 nendo shintai kino database no kochiku ni kansuru chosa kenkyu hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-03-01

    As part of the health/welfare-related information collection, analysis and information service project, establishment of the databases is surveyed and studied for human life technology and body functions of the aged in the aging society. The survey/study on establishment of the human life technology for the aged covers concept of human life technology, systems of the databases for human life technology, and techniques for the database systems. The case study on the human life technology databases for the aged takes up everyday life behaviors of the aged as the models, and analyzes human and life characteristics in everyday life, to clarify the human characteristic, human performance and human life technology design data to be stored in the databases. The validity of the method developed by this project is tested for their behaviors, such as bathing and outgoing. For establishment of the databases for body functions of the aged, literature surveys and interviews are conducted for the technological trends. (NEDO)

  16. Observational database for studies of nearby universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaisina, E. I.; Makarov, D. I.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Kaisin, S. S.

    2012-01-01

    We present the description of a database of galaxies of the Local Volume (LVG), located within 10 Mpc around the Milky Way. It contains more than 800 objects. Based on an analysis of functional capabilities, we used the PostgreSQL DBMS as a management system for our LVG database. Applying semantic modelling methods, we developed a physical ER-model of the database. We describe the developed architecture of the database table structure, and the implemented web-access, available at http://www.sao.ru/lv/lvgdb.

  17. Teaching Databases at Southampton University

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Ken

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we describe some of the issues faced when designing a database systems course that will be a compulsory component for second year undergraduates in computer science. The main goal is to give an overview of database systems starting from Codd’s classical paper through to practical implementation using a SQL server (MySQL) For conceptual modelling, we chose UML because of the prior knowledge of the target class. The logical model is derived from the conceptual model and we place ...

  18. Development of a computational database for application in Probabilistic Safety Analysis of nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, Vagner dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work is to present the computational database that was developed to store technical information and process data on component operation, failure and maintenance for the nuclear research reactors located at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, IPEN), in São Paulo, Brazil. Data extracted from this database may be applied in the Probabilistic Safety Analysis of these research reactors or in less complex quantitative assessments related to safety, reliability, availability and maintainability of these facilities. This database may be accessed by users of the corporate network, named IPEN intranet. Professionals who require the access to the database must be duly registered by the system administrator, so that they will be able to consult and handle the information. The logical model adopted to represent the database structure is an entity-relationship model, which is in accordance with the protocols installed in IPEN intranet. The open-source relational database management system called MySQL, which is based on the Structured Query Language (SQL), was used in the development of this work. The PHP programming language was adopted to allow users to handle the database. Finally, the main result of this work was the creation a web application for the component reliability database named PSADB, specifically developed for the research reactors of IPEN; furthermore, the database management system provides relevant information efficiently. (author)

  19. Authority Control and Linked Bibliographic Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clack, Doris H.

    1988-01-01

    Explores issues related to bibliographic database authority control, including the nature of standards, quality control, library cooperation, centralized and decentralized databases and authority control systems, and economic considerations. The implications of authority control for linking large scale databases are discussed. (18 references)…

  20. Ontology to relational database transformation for web application development and maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmudi, Kamal; Inggriani Liem, M. M.; Akbar, Saiful

    2018-03-01

    Ontology is used as knowledge representation while database is used as facts recorder in a KMS (Knowledge Management System). In most applications, data are managed in a database system and updated through the application and then they are transformed to knowledge as needed. Once a domain conceptor defines the knowledge in the ontology, application and database can be generated from the ontology. Most existing frameworks generate application from its database. In this research, ontology is used for generating the application. As the data are updated through the application, a mechanism is designed to trigger an update to the ontology so that the application can be rebuilt based on the newest ontology. By this approach, a knowledge engineer has a full flexibility to renew the application based on the latest ontology without dependency to a software developer. In many cases, the concept needs to be updated when the data changed. The framework is built and tested in a spring java environment. A case study was conducted to proof the concepts.