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Sample records for related reactive arthritis

  1. Reactive Arthritis

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    Eren Erken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is an acute, sterile, non-suppurative and inflammatory arthropaty which has occured as a result of an infectious processes, mostly after gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract infections. Reiter syndrome is a frequent type of reactive arthritis. Both reactive arthritis and Reiter syndrome belong to the group of seronegative spondyloarthropathies, associated with HLA-B27 positivity and characterized by ongoing inflammation after an infectious episode. The classical triad of Reiter syndrome is defined as arthritis, conjuctivitis and urethritis and is seen only in one third of patients with Reiter syndrome. Recently, seronegative asymmetric arthritis and typical extraarticular involvement are thought to be adequate for the diagnosis. However, there is no established criteria for the diagnosis of reactive arthritis and the number of randomized and controlled studies about the therapy is not enough. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 283-299

  2. Reactive arthritis in relation to internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint: a case control study.

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    Lund, Bodil; Holmlund, Anders; Wretlind, Bengt; Jalal, Shah; Rosén, Annika

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to find out if reactive arthritis was involved in the aetiology of chronic closed lock of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) by looking for bacterial antigens in the synovial membrane of the TMJ, and by studying the antibody serology and carriage of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) B27 in patients with chronic closed lock. Patients with reciprocal clicking and healthy subjects acted as controls. We studied a total of 43 consecutive patients, 15 with chronic closed lock, 13 with reciprocal clicking, and 15 healthy controls with no internal derangements of the TMJ. Venous blood samples were collected from all subjects for measurement of concentrations of HLA tissue antigen and serology against Chlamydia trachomatis, Yersinia enterocolitica, Salmonella spp., Campylobacter jejuni, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Samples of synovial tissue from patients with closed lock and reciprocal clicking were obtained during discectomy and divided into two pieces, the first of which was tested by strand displacement amplification for the presence of C trachomatis, and the second of which was analysed for the presence of species-specific bacterial DNA using 16s rRNA pan-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). There were no significant differences between the groups in the incidence of antibodies against M pneumoniae, Salmonella spp. or Y enterocolitica. No patient had antibodies towards C trachomatis or C jejuni. We found no bacterial DNA in the synovial fluid from any patient. The HLA B27 antigen was present in 2/15 subjects in both the closed lock and control groups, and none in the reciprocal clicking group. In conclusion, reactive arthritis does not seem to be the mechanism of internal derangement of the TMJ. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Reactive arthritis associated with Mycoplasma genitalium urethritis.

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    Chrisment, D; Machelart, I; Wirth, G; Lazaro, E; Greib, C; Pellegrin, J-L; Bébéar, C; Peuchant, O

    2013-11-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is an important cause of sexually transmitted infections that is gaining recognition and is an independent cause of acute and chronic nongonococcal urethritis in men. M. genitalium has been implicated as a possible causative factor in reactive arthritis. We report a case of reactive arthritis complicating M. genitalium urethritis in an HLA-B27-positive patient. © 2013.

  4. [Reiter disease or reactive arthritis?].

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    Eppinger, S; Schmitt, J; Meurer, M

    2006-04-01

    There is an ongoing international discussion on whether the condition reactive arthritis should be named after a former Nazi functionary. The German dermatological community should participate in this debate. In 1916, Hans Reiter described a disease with the symptoms urethritis, conjunctivitis, and arthritis, which was later named after him. After becoming titular professor in May 1918, Reiter was appointed director of the regional public health department Mecklenburg-Schwerin in 1926. At the same time he taught social hygiene at the University of Rostock, where he was appointed full professor in 1928. In 1931, Hans Reiter became a member of the National Socialist German Workers Party (NSDAP). In July 1932 he was elected representative of the NSDAP to the seventh assembly of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. After becoming its acting director in July 1933, Reiter was appointed president of the Reich public health department in Berlin on October 1, 1933. Both his excellent professional qualifications, as well as his National Socialist attitudes, were considered key criteria for taking over this important position. As the president of the Reich public health department, Reiter was said to have known about the conduct of experiments with typhus-fever at the concentration camp Buchenwald in which 250 humans died. From the end of the Second World War until 1947, Reiter was imprisoned in the Nuremberg Prison for War Criminals, but never convicted of a crime.

  5. Reactive Chlamydial Arthritis and Ophtalmopathies

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    А.К. Pavliuchenko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Oculopathies in reactive chlamydial arthritis are diagnosed in 63 % of patients, with «conjunctivitis — uveitis — scleritis — glaucoma — cataract — keratitis» ratio as 13 : 8 : 2 : 2 : 1 : 1, and the nature of eye pathology is closely related to the severity of inflammatory process in uroge­nitalia and general activity of the disease, influences the le­vel of antichlamidial antibodies in the blood, prevalence, severity of joint syndrome and rates of its progression, development of cardiopath

  6. Imaging Reactive Oxygen Species in Arthritis

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    Wei-Tsung Chen

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS have been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of arthritides. Luminol was used as the primary reporter of ROS and photons resulting from the chemiluminescence reaction were detected using a super-cooled CCD photon counting system. Luminol was injected intravenously into groups of animals with different models of arthritis. Imaging signal correlated well with the severity of arthritis in focal and pan-arthritis as determined by histological measurement of ROS by formazan. Measurements were highly reproducible, sensitive, and repeatable. In vivo chemiluminescence imaging is expected to become a useful modality to elucidate the role of ROS in the pathogenesis of arthritides and in determining therapeutic efficacy of protective therapies.

  7. INVESTIGATION OF CYTOKINE PROFILE IN PATIENTS WITH REACTIVE ARTHRITIS

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    T. V. Gaponova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Pathogenesis of reactive arthritis (ReA is not clear yet. Several trials suggest that increased production of proinflammatory cytokines is responsible for development of arthritis in ReA, while other studies report that Th1 cytokine response in ReA is impaired in favor of Th2 response. The aim of our study was to investigate serum levels of cytokines IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, TNFα, IFNγ and IL-1Ra in the patients with ReA of different etiology, as compared with infection-related arthritis. The results of our study had demonstrated that serum levels of IL-1β and TNFα in the patients with ReA were significantly higher, whereas IL-1Ra, IL-4, IL-6 proved to be significantly lower than in healthy controls. Serum levels of IL-6 were significantly higher in patients with chronic ReA, as compared to the cases of acute and recurrent ReA. No significant differences in cytokine profiles were found between the patients with ReA, and the persons with infection-related arthritis. The data obtained are, generally, suggestive for proinflammatory Th1 cytokine profile in ReA patients studied, this confirming the mostly assumed pathogenetic hypothesis for reactive arthritis where an underlying cytokine imbalance is suggested. (Med. Immunol., 2008, vol. 10, N 2-3, pp 167-172.

  8. Poststaphylococcal coagulase negative reactive arthritis: a case report.

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    Krasniqi, Xhevdet; Rexhepi, Sylejman; Gashi, Masar; Berisha, Blerim; Abazi, Flora; Koçinaj, Dardan

    2009-12-18

    We report a case of a 49-year-old patient who developed poststaphylococcal coagulase negative reactive arthritis. The woman presented with constitutional symptoms, arthritis, urinary infection and conjunctivitis. The blood culture was positive for the staphylococcal coagulase negative infection. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein were elevated, whereas the rheumatoid factor was negative. Radiographic findings confirmed diagnosis of pleuropneumonia, and one year later of chronic asymmetric sacroileitis. Physicians should be aware of possible reactive arthritis after staphylococcal coagulase negative bacteremia.

  9. Reactive Arthritis Caused by Yersinia enterocolitica Enteritis.

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    Honda, Kazuya; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Izumi, Yasumori; Tsuji, Yoshika; Kawahara, Chieko; Michitsuji, Toru; Higashi, Shuntaro; Kawakami, Atsushi; Migita, Kiyoshi

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of reactive arthritis (ReA) triggered by Yersinia enterocolitica enteritis. A 24-year-old Japanese man developed polyarthritis in the lower limbs. Two weeks prior to these symptoms, he noted diarrhea, right lower abdominal pain and a fever. Y. enterocolitica was not isolated from a stool culture; however, he was diagnosed with ReA based on the colonoscopic findings of a high anti-Y. enterocolitica antibody titer and HLA-B27 antigen positivity. Following treatment with methotrexate and steroids, his arthritis improved. This is the first reported Japanese case of ReA in the English literature after a gastrointestinal infection caused by Y. enterocolitica.

  10. Reactive arthritis induced by recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis

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    Allison Marr

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile colitis is a common infection that can be difficult to resolve and may result in recurrent infections. Reactive arthritis is a rare presentation of this disease and its treatment is not well differentiated in the literature. We describe a case of reactive arthritis occurring in a patient with a history of recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis while currently receiving a taper of oral vancomycin. His arthritis symptoms resolved with corticosteroids and continued treatment with anticlostridial antibiotics.

  11. Peripheral Neuropathy in Chlamydia Reactive Arthritis

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    O.V. Syniachenko

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Relevance. Peripheral neuropathy (PNP in urogenital chlamydia reactive arthritis (CRA is described as single observations, and many clinical and pathogenetic aspects of this lesion of the nervous system remain unclear. Objective of the study: to evaluate the incidence and nature of the clinical course of PNP in CRA, the connection of the nerve and joint injuries, to explore the questions of pathogenetic constructions of this neuropathy, to identify risk factors. Material and methods. We observed 101 patients with CRA, mean age of them was 32 years, disease duration — 4 years, and the male to female ratio — 1 : 1. In 90 % of CRA cases, Chlamydia trochamatis was found in prostatic secretions, in scraps from the urethra, the cervix, the vaginal wall, in 83 % — positive serologic tests for chlamydia infection. Results. Signs of PNP in CRA were in 19 % of patients in the ratio of mononeuropathy to polyneuropathy as 1 : 1, with motor, sensory and mixed disorders in a ratio of 1 : 3 : 6, the presence of autonomic changes in every second patient and more frequent distal localization of the process in the hands, which is influenced by the severity of the articular syndrome, high levels of antichlamydia antibodies in the blood, and the axonal and demyelinating indicators of electroneuromyography — by the severity of urogenital lesions and the presence of Guillain-Barre syndrome. A high rate of arthritis progression is a prognosis-negative sign of PNP course in patients with CRA. The pathogenic constructions of PNP involve the inflammatory immune proteins, disturbances of vascular endothelial function and physicochemical surface rheological pro­perties of the serum. Conclusion. PNP takes place in every fifth patient with CRA, correlates with clinical and laboratory signs of joint disease, and in the future will be useful to identify actively this pathology of the nervous system for the subsequent timely rehabilitation, and CRA

  12. Three cases of reactive arthritis secondary to lymphogranuloma venereum.

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    Perry, Melissa E O; White, John A

    2015-01-01

    We describe 3 cases of sexually acquired reactive arthritis following rectal lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) infection in London men who have sex with men. While sexually acquired reactive arthritis is well recognized following urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis infections, the association with rectal infection by LGV-associated serovars of C. trachomatis has been seldom reported, and thus the organism might not be sought by clinicians. The recognition of the various clinical syndromes of LGV by all clinicians, including rheumatologists, is essential given the endemicity of LGV in European men who have sex with men.

  13. Features of Onset and Clinical Course of Reactive Arthritis in Children

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    I.S. Lebets

    2013-09-01

    Results. Reactive arthritis of chlamydial etiology is characterized by lesion of large and medium-sized joints of the lower limbs, which is often accompanied by short-term morning stiffness and rapid onset of transient hypomyatrophy. Reiter’s disease may develop rarely. Mycoplasma-induced reactive arthritis is characterized by debut with arthritis of knee, ankle, wrist and small joints of the hand, the development of bursitis and hypomyatrophy. Feature of Ureaplasma arthritis is the formation of bursitis in the heel and tendinitis. Reactive arthritis associated with elevated titers to antistreptolysin O differs with polymorphism of articular syndrome manifestations and, to some extent, of similarity with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Unspecified reactive arthritis has a number of the general features with others reactive arthritis and it is characterized by rather benign clinical course, long preservation of joints function and low laboratory activity. Relapse rate of reactive arthritis increases with an increase of duration of illness.

  14. HETEROGENEITY OF POLYCLONAL IMMUNOGLOBULINS NUCLEASE ACTIVITY IN RHEUMATOID AND REACTIVE ARTHRITIS

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    M. V. Volkova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic properties of immunoglobulins are widely studied within recent years. It was found that nuclease activity of immunoglobulins is increased in systemic autoimmune diseases. Given some pathogenetic features of rheumatoid arthritis and reactive arthritis, it is appropriate to clarify the nature of nuclease activity in these diseases. Determination of DNAse activity of immunoglobulins with different DNA substrates, and search for specific substrates for distinct clinical entities could serve these purposes. The aim of present work is to determine DNase activity of the polyclonal class G immunoglobulins in rheumatoid and reactive arthritis using various methods.Different methods are used to evaluate nuclease activity. In this paper we present newly developed and modified techniques for determination of DNAse activity of polyclonal IgGs. Particular attention was paid to the electrophoretic method of DNase activity assessment. Polyclonal IgG isolated from blood serum of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and reactive arthritis were used for assays. In this study, we demonstrated the presence of an inhomogeneous DNase activity of immunoglobulins in relation to different substrates.Along with calf thymus DNA, we used bacterial plasmid DNA and PCR products based on bacterial gene sequences. Levels of DNase activity by rivanol clot method with calf thymus DNA as substrate proved to be higher in patients with rheumatoid arthritis than the control values (p < 0.01. DNase abzyme activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis was elevated, as compared to the patients with reactive arthritis (p < 0.01.When examining ability of the IgG to hydrolyze procaryotic DNA (bacterial plasmid DNA and PCR products, based on bacterial genes, we obtained heterogeneous results. Different Ig samples showed varying degrees of DNA hydrolysis. Abzyme hydrolysis of DNA substrates longer than 700 bp was more pronounced, as compared to short DNA substrates (100 base pairs

  15. The role of lipopolysaccharide injected systemically in the reactivation of collagen-induced arthritis in mice

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    Yoshino, Shin; Ohsawa, Motoyasu

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the role of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the reactivation of autoimmune disease by using collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice in which autoimmunity to the joint cartilage component type II collagen (CII) was involved.CIA was induced by immunization with CII emulsified with complete Freund's adjuvant at the base of the tail (day 0) followed by a booster injection on day 21. Varying doses of LPS from E. coli were i.p. injected on day 50.Arthritis began to develop on day 25 after immunization with CII and reached a peak on day 35. Thereafter, arthritis subsided gradually but moderate joint inflammation was still observed on day 50. An i.p. injection of LPS on day 50 markedly reactivated arthritis on a dose-related fashion. Histologically, on day 55, there were marked oedema of synovium which had proliferated by the day of LPS injection, new formation of fibrin, and intense infiltration of neutrophils accompanied with a large number of mononuclear cells. The reactivation of CIA by LPS was associated with increases in anti-CII IgG and IgG2a antibodies as well as various cytokines including IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-1β, and TNF-α. LPS from S. enteritidis, S. typhimurium, and K. neumoniae and its component, lipid A from E. coli also reactivated the disease. Polymyxin B sulphate suppressed LPS- or lipid A-induced reactivation of CIA.These results suggest that LPS may play an important role in the reactivation of autoimmune joint inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis in humans. PMID:10742285

  16. Acute Rheumatic Fever versus Post-Streptococcal Reactive Arthritis

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    Ashry, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatic fever is an inflammatory disease that may develop after a Group A streptococcal infection and can involve the heart, joints, skin, and brain. A migrating polyarthritis after throat infection with group A β-haemolytic streptococci is classically attributed to acute rheumatic fever (ARF). Sterile non-migratory arthritis may occur as a separate entity, the so called post streptococcal reactive arthritis (PSRA). This study aimed to identify clinical and serological differences of patients with reactive arthritis after infection with Lance field group Aβ-haemolytic streptococci, compared with acute rheumatic fever. Hundred and twenty patients were recruited for the study , they were classified into two groups according to the diagnosis of ARF and PSRA patients consecutively seen in the Rheumatology and the Pediatric wards. Clinical and laboratory data were assessed through a questionnaire. The diagnosis of rheumatic fever was made based on revised modified Jones' criteria, while the diagnosis of post streptococcal reactive arthritis was made based on Deighton criteria; these associated with laboratory data, electrocardiography, chest X-ray, and bi-dimensional echocardiography. Results revealed no significant differences between both groups as regard age where ρ>0.05, while there were a significant difference regarding the date of antecedent upper respiratory tract infection (ρ 0.05). Regarding the cardio logical changes P-R interval by ECG was prolonged in 19 patients (31.67%)and Echo study showed changes in 12 patient (20%) of cases of ARF patient only. On the basis of simple laboratory variables and management, it ws possible to differentiate ARF from PSRA patients. So it could be concluded that these two conditions are actually distinct identities

  17. A Case of Reactive Arthritis Associated With Lymphogranuloma Venereum Infection in a Woman.

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    Foschi, Claudio; Banzola, Nicoletta; Gaspari, Valeria; D'Antuono, Antonietta; Cevenini, Roberto; Marangoni, Antonella

    2016-09-01

    We report the first case of reactive arthritis associated with lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) in an Italian human immunodeficiency virus-negative woman with urogenital and rectal Chlamydia trachomatis L2 serovar infection. The LGV-associated arthritis has to be considered even when classic symptoms of arthritis are missing and in case of asymptomatic or cryptic LGV localizations.

  18. Effect of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on the C-reactive protein level in rheumatoid arthritis

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    Tarp, Simon; Bartels, Else M.; Bliddal, Henning

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of oral nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, with a prespecified focus on the different NSAIDs.......To evaluate the effects of oral nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, with a prespecified focus on the different NSAIDs....

  19. HIGH PREVALENCE OF REACTIVE ARTHRITIS IN RUSSIA: OVERDIAGNOSIS OR REALITY?

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    R. M. Balabanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis (ReA is one of the types of spondyloarthritis. According to the statistics reports by the Ministry of Health of Russia, the prevalence of ReA in 2013 was 42.8 per 100,000 adult population, 99, and 172.4 per 100,000 children aged 0–14 and 15–17 years, respectively. There is a wide scatter of ReA detection rates in both the federal districts and subjects of the Russian Federation, which may be associated with both the spread of sexually transmitted infections, asymptomatic trigger Chlamydia infection, and overdiagnosis of ReA.

  20. Poncet's disease: Reactive arthritis accompanying tuberculosis. Two case reports and a review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.-J.A. Kroot (Eric-Jan); J.M.W. Hazes (Mieke); E.M. Colin (Edgar); R.J.E.M. Dolhain (Radboud)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractObjective. Reactive arthritis (ReA) in tuberculosis (TB) is known as Poncet's disease. It is a rare aseptic form of arthritis observed in patients with active TB. We present two such patients and review the literature on Poncet's disease. Methods. Two patients who were identified with

  1. THE SOURCE OF INFECTION AND THE MOST FREQUENT CAUSES OF REACTIVE ARTHRITIS IN KOSOVO

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    Lahu, Ali; Bajraktari, Ismet H.; Lahu, Shqipdon?; Saiti, Valton; Kryeziu, Avni; Sherifi, Fadil; Durmishi, Bastri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Reactive arthritis is an autoimmune condition which emerges as a counteraction towards an infection which has a focus elsewhere in the body. The purpose of this study is isolation of causative agents of reactive arthritis and ascertains the source of infection. The study has been carried out in the Rheumatology Clinic in Prishtina and specialized ambulance O.S. ?Vendenisi-AL? in Besiana, whereas isolation of causative agents has been carried out in the National Institute for Pub...

  2. THE SOURCE OF INFECTION AND THE MOST FREQUENT CAUSES OF REACTIVE ARTHRITIS IN KOSOVO.

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    Lahu, Ali; Bajraktari, Ismet H; Lahu, Shqipdonë; Saiti, Valton; Kryeziu, Avni; Sherifi, Fadil; Durmishi, Bastri

    2016-06-01

    Reactive arthritis is an autoimmune condition which emerges as a counteraction towards an infection which has a focus elsewhere in the body. The purpose of this study is isolation of causative agents of reactive arthritis and ascertains the source of infection. The study has been carried out in the Rheumatology Clinic in Prishtina and specialized ambulance O.S. "Vendenisi-AL" in Besiana, whereas isolation of causative agents has been carried out in the National Institute for Public Health (NIPH). The study has prospective, comparative and analytical feature. Out of 100 patients, 66% were males and 34% females. Among males we have noticed domination of post-urethritis and post-streptococcic reactive arthritis, whereas among females dominates reactive arthritis of enteral etiology. The study concludes that: urogenital tract was the source of infection with 66% of cases, nasopharyngeal tract with 19% of cases, and enteral tract with 15% of cases respectively. Predominantly presents bacteria are E. Coli with 21%, Staphylococcus aureus with 20%, Streptococcus B. hem. gr. A with 16% of cases respectively and other species. frequency of arthritis with urogenital etiology was 2:1 in favor of males, with nasopharyngeal etiology 3:1 in favor of males, whereas in arthritis with enteral etiology we have noticed a slight dominance in favor of females.

  3. Reactive Arthritis Secondary to Cauda Equina Injury following Spine Fracture: A Case Report

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    Xiao Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 38-year-old man presented with a one-month history of muscle weakness and dysesthesia in the lower extremities, urinary retention, and urinary tract infection after lumbar burst fracture resulted from high fall. During the rehabilitation in our hospital, he had arthritis in both the ankle and knee. However, the patient was treated as gouty arthropathy initially. The arthritis was completely remitted in a few days after the patient was diagnosed as reactive arthritis and started with sulfasalazine therapy and there was no recurrence during 4 months of follow-up. Based on this case, early recognition of reactive arthritis is of major importance to avoid delayed initiation of appropriate treatment in the patients with polyarthritis secondary to neurogenic bladder following cauda equina injury after spine fracture.

  4. Reactive arthritis induced by bacterial vaginosis: Prevention with an effective treatment

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    Zohreh Aminzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 42-year-old woman with reactive arthritis induced by bacterial vaginosis who presented with oligoarthritis with an additive form, arthralgia, and enthesitis. She hasn′t had a history of diarrhea or dysuria or vaginal secretion, or sexually transmitted infections (STIs. The laboratory tests were normal except for a high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR. Her pelvic examination revealed homogeneous white grey and malodorous vaginal discharge on the vaginal wall and Pap smear and Gram-stained smear of vaginal swab was consistent with bacterial vaginosis. She responded to metronidazole therapy and her six-month follow up hasn′t shown recurrence of arthritis. As reactive arthritis (ReA is a paradigm of a rheumatic disease in which the initiating infectious cause is known, so early use of antimicrobial drugs may prevent the development of musculoskeletal symptoms which are triggered by infections.

  5. The humoral immune response to Chlamydia trachomatis in patients with acute reactive arthritis

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    Larsen, B; Birkelund, Svend; Mordhorst, CH

    1994-01-01

    . trachomatis cysteine rich outer membrane protein 2 (Omp2) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were detected in 10 patients. Thus 40% of the patients presented antibodies specific for C. trachomatis. There was no correlation between acute reactive arthritis and antibodies to heat-shock proteins GroEL, GroES and DnaK....

  6. EXPERIENCE OF DESOXIRIBONUCLEATE SODIUM IMMUNOMODULATOR APPLICATION IN TREATMENT FOR REACTIVE ARTHRITIS OF CHLAMYDIA AETIOLOGY AMONG CHILDREN

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    L.A. Balykova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Researchers compared efficacy of the conventional therapy (oilment with non steriod anti-inflammatory medication, diclofena sodium and azithromycin among children with reactive arthritis of Chlamydia etiology and treatment with introduction of gluccosaminilmuramildi peptide and desoxiribonucleate sodium immunomodulators. The article shows that application of immunomodulators in combination with the conventional therapy provided for the decrease of the articular syndrome intensity, reduced the need of the patients in local corticosteroids and conduced to the reduction of the lab process activity indices. Further more, they noticed reduced recurrence of the antibodies to Chlamydias and their titers in the blood serum, while general intensity of the antiinflammatory effects from the combined therapy, which included glucosaminilmuramildipeptide and desoxiribonucleate sodium immunomodulators along with the antibiotic, proved to be comparable.Key words: children, reactive arthritis, chlamydia infection, immunomodulators.

  7. A case of reactive arthritis in a Ranger Indoctrination Program (RIP) student.

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    Hart, Robert S; Detro, John F

    2009-01-01

    Musculoskeletal complaints comprise the majority of cases encountered by military physicians when evaluating young active duty Soldier-athletes. This is a case of reactive arthritis in a 19-year-old active duty Soldier-athlete whose failure to improve with conservative therapy initiated further investigation. When evaluating what appear to be routine overuse injuries, it is important to actively include other potential causes of musculoskeletal complaints in the differential diagnosis. Further investigation of disease in patients whose symptoms and complaints do not improve with routine conservative care is paramount. Reactive arthritis, though self-limiting in two-thirds of those affected, can become a chronic disabling disease affecting as many as 40 out of 100 patients. Current theories suggest the persistent presence of non-culturable bacteria and bacterial antigens residing in the joint synovia as the etiology of the disease state. There is no curative therapy for reactive arthritis and management is focused on the treatment of symptoms with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), immunomodulator therapy, and antibiotics if an infectious source is suspected.

  8. Disease flare of ankylosing spondylitis presenting as reactive arthritis with seropositivity: a case report

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    Manoj EM

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Concurrent rheumatoid factor seropositivity is occasionally detected in ankylosing spondylitis and often causes confusion in clinical routine. Overlap between various seronegative arthritides is a known but uncommon association. Differentiation of spondyloarthropathy from rheumatoid arthritis is important, since the natural history, complications, treatments and prognosis of the two diseases differ significantly. Case presentation Here, we report the case of a 47-year-old Sri Lankan man who had a long history of intermittent joint pains worsening following a recent episode of self-resolving non-bloody diarrhea. Subsequently, he developed a skin rash suggestive of keratoderma blenorrhagica and circinate balanitis. He had classical radiological evidence of ankylosing spondylosis (previously undiagnosed associated with human leukocyte antigen B27 antigen, but was positive for rheumatoid factor. Conclusions A disease flare of ankylosing spondylitis prompted by a minor diarrheal illness showing well documented features of reactive arthritis is remarkable. The prognostic implications of seropositivity in spondyloarthritis are discussed.

  9. Low pretreatment levels of myeloid-related protein-8/14 and C-reactive protein predict poor adherence to treatment with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

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    Alberdi-Saugstrup, Mikel; Nielsen, Susan; Mathiessen, Pernille

    2017-01-01

    inhibitor treatment in JIA patients naive to biologics and investigated if baseline myeloid-related protein (MRP)-8/14 and C-reactive protein (CRP) were predictive of treatment response. One hundred fifty-two patients were included in a unicenter observational, prospective study from 2002 to 2015, excluding......, and 90 were achieved by 61, 55, 38, and 10 % of the patients, and 23 % achieved a status of ID. Treatment adherence: 51 % withdrew from treatment due to lack of clinical effect, while 32 % continued treatment or withdrew due to disease remission. Increased MRP-8/14 concentrations at treatment initiation...... was associated with ID after 1 year (OR 1.55, CI 1.06–2.25, p = 0.02). Treatment withdrawal due to lack of effect was associated with low baseline levels of both MRP-8/14 (685 vs. 1235 ng/ml, p 

  10. Psychophysiology of proactive and reactive relational aggression.

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    Murray-Close, Dianna; Holterman, Leigh Ann; Breslend, Nicole L; Sullivan, Alexandra

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the joint effects of parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system reactivity to social and non-social stressors on proactive (i.e., goal-directed, unemotional) and reactive (i.e., emotional, impulsive) functions of relational aggression. Two hundred and forty-seven (M age =18.77years) participants completed a series of stressor tasks while their sympathetic arousal (i.e., skin conductance) and parasympathetic arousal (i.e., respiratory sinus arrhythmia) were assessed. Participants also provided self-reports of their aggressive behavior. In the standardized social stressor only, physiological reactivity was related to aggression, such that respiratory sinus arrhythmia augmentation predicted proactive relational aggression whereas heightened skin conductance reactivity predicted reactive relational aggression. Finally, in the context of low skin conductance reactivity, respiratory sinus arrhythmia augmentation was related to heightened proactive and reactive aggression, whereas respiratory sinus arrhythmia withdrawal was protective. Results suggest that the benefits hypothesized to accompany respiratory sinus arrhythmia withdrawal may only occur among individuals with low "fight or flight" stress responses. Findings extend research on the physiological indicators of aggression to relational aggression, and highlight the importance of assessing functions of aggression, as well as physiological reactivity to multiple stressors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Orofacial symptoms related to temporomandibular joint arthritis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: smallest detectable difference in self-reported pain intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoustrup, Peter; Kristensen, Kasper D; Verna, Carlalberta; Küseler, Annelise; Herlin, Troels; Pedersen, Thomas K

    2012-12-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) may lead to mandibular growth disturbances and interfere with optimal joint and muscle function. Orofacial symptoms are common clinical findings in relation to TMJ arthritis in adolescence. Knowledge about their clinical manifestation is important for TMJ arthritis diagnosis, treatment choice, and outcome evaluation. The aim of our prospective observational study was to evaluate and describe the frequency, the main complaints, and the localization of TMJ arthritis-related orofacial symptoms. The smallest detectable differences (SDD) for minimal, average, and maximal pain were estimated. Thirty-three patients with JIA and arthritis-related orofacial symptoms in relation to 55 affected TMJ were included in our questionnaire study (mean age 14.11 yrs). Calculation of the SDD was based on a duplicate assessment 45 min after the first questionnaire was completed. The majority of the patients had common orofacial symptoms during mastication and maximal mouth opening procedures. Persistent orofacial symptoms were rare. The TMJ area in combination with the masseter muscle region was the orofacial region where symptoms were most common. The SDD for minimal, average, and maximal pain were between 10 and 14 mm on a visual analog scale. Our study offers new knowledge about TMJ arthritis-related orofacial symptoms that may aid diagnosis and clinical decision-making. We suggest that TMJ arthritis-related orofacial symptoms could be understood as products of the primary TMJ inflammation in combination with secondary myogenic and functional issues.

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients ...

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life ...

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  17. The state of immunological reactivity and nonspecific protection factor (lysozyme in children with reactive arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Savvo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. An improvement of diagnostics and prognostication of ReA clinical course in children on the base of studying the immunological reactivity and non-specific protection factor (lysozyme.Materials and methods. Examination of children took place in the municipal children’s cardiorheumatologic department of MHPI “Kharkov municipal children’s clinical hospital № 24" and municipal children’s polyclinic of the Kharkov city (№ 1, 2, 7, 12, 13, 14, 23.40 children with ReA underwent immunological examinations, detection of sIgA in the saliva and lysozyme in the blood serum in acute period and in 9–12 months after the beginning of disease. 19 children (47,5 % – 2–6 years old, 21 children (52,5 %. – 7–14 years old. Boys – 22 (55,0 %, girls – 18 (45,0 %. The mean age of children in group was 7,2±0,32. The control group included 32 healthy children. The mean age of children in group was 7,4±0,54.The ReA diagnosis was set according to the order of Ukrainian MHP of 19.07.2005 № 362 “Protocol of diagnostics and treatment of disease of musculoskeletal system and connective tissue in children ICD-D М00-М25 arthropathies”.Immunological examinations included the study of indices of cellular, humoral, monocytic-phagocytic links of immunity, content of cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, detection of sIgA and index of nonspecific protection factor (lysozyme.Assessment of results of researches was carried out using STATISTICА program for Windows (version 10.0, Microsoft Excel 2012, MATLAB 2015a.Results. In the ReA acute period in children was observed depression of T-system on the background of activation of immunity B-system as the reliable decrease of СD8, СD25 and increase of СD21. There was revealed an increase of IL-6, increase of phagocytic number, spontaneous NBT-test and spontaneous neutrophils activity index.The sIgA level reliably exceeded the standard. At determination of lysozyme the blood serum of patients with ReA in acute

  18. Geographic Variations in Arthritis Prevalence, Health-Related Characteristics, and Management - United States, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, Kamil E; Moss, Susan; Croft, Janet B; Helmick, Charles G; Theis, Kristina A; Brady, Teresa J; Murphy, Louise B; Hootman, Jennifer M; Greenlund, Kurt J; Lu, Hua; Wang, Yan

    2018-03-16

    Doctor-diagnosed arthritis is a common chronic condition affecting an estimated 23% (54 million) of adults in the United States, greatly influencing quality of life and costing approximately $300 billion annually. The geographic variations in arthritis prevalence, health-related characteristics, and management among states and territories are unknown. Therefore, public health professionals need to understand arthritis in their areas to target dissemination of evidence-based interventions that reduce arthritis morbidity. 2015. The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System is an annual, random-digit-dialed landline and cellular telephone survey of noninstitutionalized adults aged ≥18 years residing in the United States. Self-reported data are collected from the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, and Puerto Rico. Unadjusted and age-standardized prevalences of arthritis, arthritis health-related characteristics, and arthritis management were calculated. County-level estimates were calculated using a validated statistical modeling method. In 2015, in the 50 states and the District of Columbia, median age-standardized prevalence of arthritis was 23.0% (range: 17.2%-33.6%). Modeled prevalence of arthritis varied considerably by county (range: 11.2%-42.7%). In 13 states that administered the arthritis management module, among adults with arthritis, the age-standardized median percentage of participation in a self-management education course was 14.5% (range: 9.1%-19.0%), being told by a health care provider to engage in physical activity or exercise was 58.5% (range: 52.3%-61.9%), and being told to lose weight to manage arthritis symptoms (if overweight or obese) was 44.5% (range: 35.1%-53.2%). Respondents with arthritis who lived in the quartile of states with the highest prevalences of arthritis had the highest percentages of negative health-related characteristics (i.e., arthritis-attributable activity limitations, arthritis-attributable severe joint pain

  19. Reactivation of cutaneous and mucocutaneous tegumentary leishmaniasis in rheumatoid arthritis patients: an emerging problem?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Maia de Souza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic condition that is frequent in patients living in tropical areas exposed to leishmaniasis. RA therapy involves immunosuppressant drugs such as methotrexate (MTX, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs and prednisone. We report an unusual presentation of cutaneous (CL or mucocutaneous leishmaniasis (ML in RA patients from an endemic area of leishmaniasis. A 51-year-old woman noted a cutaneous ulcer on her left ankle during MTX and prednisone RA therapy. Initially diagnosed as a venous stasis ulcer, the aspirate of the injury revealed the presence of Leishmania DNA. A 73-year-old woman presenting non-ulcerated, infiltrated and painful erythematous nodules inside her nostrils while receiving MTX, anti-TNF mAb, and prednisone for RA, had also the aspirate of injuries showing the presence of Leishmania DNA. Both patients healed after the therapy with liposomal amphotericin. The RA therapy has changed to low-dose prednisone, without further reactivation episodes. Both cases suggest that CL or ML can reactivate after administration of an immunosuppressant for RA treatment. Therefore, immunosuppressive treatments for RA should be carefully prescribed in patients from endemic areas or with a history of CL and ML.

  20. Pain Treatment in Arthritis-Related Pain: Beyond NSAIDs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Laar, Mart A F J; Pergolizzi Jr., Joseph V.; Mellinghoff, Hans-Ulrich; Merchante, Ignacio Morón; Nalamachu, Srinivas; O'Brien, Joanne; Perrot, Serge; Raffa, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Managing pain from chronic conditions, such as, but not limited to, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, requires the clinician to balance the need for effective analgesia against safety risks associated with analgesic agents. Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis pain is incompletely

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of ... Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center Scleroderma Center Sjogren’s Syndrome ...

  2. Use of Pentosan Polysulfate in the Local Treatment of Reactive Arthritis in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Danylov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study — to examine the efficacy of pentosan polysulfate in the local treatment of reactive arthritis (ReA in children and to determine its safety. Materials and methods. The study included 56 children aged 5 to 15 years who were treated at the surgical department № 2 of Children’s Municipal Clinical Hospital № 1 for primary articular syndrome; purulent pathology and rheumatologic diseases were not confirmed in them during examination. In the diagnosis, we have used laboratory methods (complete blood count, urinalysis, determination of C-reactive protein, rheumatoid factor, circulating immune complexes, seromucoid, ASLO, electrocardiography, ultrasound investigation (UI of the abdominal organs. All children were consulted by a cardiologist. In some cases, radiography and joint puncture were conducted. Also, all patients underwent UI of the affected joints on the LogiQ-5 device with gauges from 7.5 to 10.5 MHz. To study the action of this drug, we allocated 2 groups: the main (27 people, in which in addition to basic therapy, Thrombocid gel was applied topically, and control one (29 persons, identical in age and sex with the main group, in which we used only basic therapy. Evaluating the effectiveness of pentosan polysulphate (Thrombocid was based on the dynamics of local manifestations and ultrasound picture of the affected joints, determined on days 3, 5 and 7. Research results. It was revealed that a in few weeks, the appearance of ReA was preceded by the following factors: acute respiratory disease (63 %, diarrhea (2 %, trauma (6 %, in the rest (29 % of patients, possible causal factors have not been detected. By the number of affected joints at the onset of ReA, mainly monoarthritis (52 children — 93 % has been diagnosed, oligoarthritis (2 — 3.5% and symmetrical joint disease (2 — 3.5 % occurred rarely. In ReA, the disease most often manifested by arthritis of the knee (60.47 ± 3.28 % or hip (34.14

  3. Long-term mortality outcome in patients with reactive amyloidosis associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Takeshi; Tanabe, Naohito; Harada, Takashi; Murakami, Syuichi; Hasegawa, Hisashi; Sakatsume, Minoru; Nakano, Masaaki; Gejyo, Fumitake

    2006-07-01

    It is well established that amyloidosis is a serious clinical complication that can influence the prognosis of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The purpose of the study was to obtain information on the survival and the hemodialysis (HD) of patients with amyloidosis. Eighty patients (9 men and 71 women) who were diagnosed with amyloidosis by biopsy and definite or classical RA were studied retrospectively. The average duration of RA prior to the diagnosis of amyloidosis was 15.4+/-9.4 years. The average period from the diagnosis of amyloidosis to death was 67.4 months. Forty-nine patients died of the disease (32 cases with HD and 17 cases without HD). Thirty-one patients lived (7 cases with HD and 24 cases without HD). Regarding the survival of these patients, 49 (61.3%) of the 80 patients have died. Survival rate at 28 months was 75%; at 67 months, it was 50%; and at 111 months, it was down to 25%. Mortality rate was 11.9% per year. Survival rate in dialysis at 9.8 months was 75%; at 60.6 months, it dropped to 50%; and at 100.0 months, to 25%. As for patients' survival, high onset age of amyloidosis was the major determining factor for poor survival in these patients (ppatients also had poor survival (p=0.07). The long-term results were very encouraging to initiate HD in patients with end-stage renal disease due to reactive amyloidosis associated with RA.

  4. Role of reactive oxygen species in rheumatoid arthritis synovial T lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remans, Philip Herman Jozef

    2006-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis, an inflammatory infiltrate accumulates and persists in the synovial membrane. Synovial T cells display a number of particular characteristics. While displaying markers of recent activation, synovial T lymphocytes respond poorly to mitogenic stimuli and their cytokine

  5. Involvement of interleukin-8 in dialysis-related arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, F; Miyazaki, T; Aoyama, I; Tsukushi, S; Sato, M; Yamazaki, C; Shimokata, K; Niwa, T

    1998-04-01

    To elucidate the role of interleukin (IL)-8, a chemotactic factor for neutrophils, in dialysis-related arthritis (DRA) of patients on long-term hemodialysis, the concentration of IL-8 was measured in the synovial fluids of DRA patients with acute arthralgia and joint swelling, and was compared with those in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and patients with osteoarthritis (OA). We noted a marked elevation of IL-8 in the joint fluids of patients with DRA and RA as compared with OA. Furthermore, to determine the role of IL-8 in synovitis, we examined the in vivo effect of intra-articular injection of human recombinant IL-8 on leukocyte infiltration into the joint space of rabbits. A single injection of IL-8 to the joints of rabbits induced rapid infiltration of neutrophils into the joint space and synovial tissues, which reached a maximum in four hours. The oral administration of indometacin farnesil (a prodrug that is converted to indomethacin after intestinal absorption) before the injection of IL-8 alleviated the infiltration of neutrophils. When human synovial cells were incubated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, the expression of IL-8 mRNA and IL-8 production in the cultured synovial cells were increased. The TNF-alpha-stimulated expression of IL-8 mRNA and IL-8 production in the cultured synovial cells were markedly inhibited by dexamethasone. In conclusion, IL-8 levels were markedly elevated in the joint fluids of patients with DRA. Interleukin-8 released from synovial cells may be an important factor to induce acute inflammation in DRA. Dexamethasone and indomethacin may be effective for DRA by inhibiting the production and chemotactic actions of IL-8, respectively.

  6. Portal hypertension and an atypical reactive arthritis like presentation in a patient infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moushumi Lodh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reactive arthritis (ReA is defined as a peripheral arthritis lasting longer than 1 month, associated with urethritis, cervicitis, or diarrhea. The reported annual incidence of ReA is approximately 30-40 cases per 100,000 adults, occurring commonly in the age group of 16 and 35 years. It is known to be associated with gastrointestinal infections with Shigella, Salmonella, and Campylobacter species and other microorganisms, as well as with genitourinary infections (especially with Chlamydia trachomatis. Case Report: This article reports the case of a 53-year-old, post-right total hip replacement, Indian man, with ReA, who presented with fever, respiratory distress, and abdominal discomfort. He complained of itching, tingling sensation, pain on urination, and retention of urine. He had right hip joint pain for 3 weeks, inability to move right leg since 10 days, and melena since 1 week. Laboratory tests revealed anemia, high liver and kidney function tests, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C reactive protein, procalcitonin and occult blood in stool. He tested positive for hepatitis C virus genotype 3. Gastroduodenoscopy revealed multiple apthoid ulcers at D2 and large gastric varix. Ultrasonography of whole abdomen revealed cholelithiasis and splenomegaly. Skin lesions and arthritis led to the diagnosis of associated ReA. The patient was managed conservatively and discharged in a stable condition. Conclusions: Our case is unlike classical ReA because the patient is older, HLA B27 negative, and without florid urethritis. Admitted for fever and lower urinary tract symptoms, along with respiratory distress, the primary objective of the emergency doctors was to prevent the patient from progressing to organ failure. The diagnosis of underlying atypical/incomplete ReA could easily have been missed without adequate awareness, dermatological consultation, and a skin biopsy.

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary ...

  8. Experimentally challenged reactivity of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis in patients with recently diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, J. C.; Geenen, R.; Godaert, G. L.; Glaudemans, K. A.; Lafeber, F. P.; van Doornen, L. J.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    2001-01-01

    There is evidence that the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis is subresponsive in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We assessed HPA axis responses to experimental stressors mimicking daily life challenges in patients with RA to determine whether HPA axis activity is associated with Th1

  9. Reactivation of pulmonary tuberculosis (TBC) with the use of antagonist of the tumor necrosis factor alpha (FNTα) in rheumatoid arthritis: On purpose of a case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez V, Jose B; Medina V, Yimy F; Parga, Roberto; Restrepo, Jose Felix; Iglesias G, Antonio; Rondon, Federico

    2005-01-01

    Woman 56 years old, with history of rheumatoid arthritis who develops reactivation of pulmonary tuberculosis (TBC) after 1 year of treatment with biological therapy (antagonist of the tumor necrosis factor alpha). It is discussed pathophysiologic mechanisms, diagnostic approach, treatment of TBC and some recommendations for the use of biological therapy in patients with rheumatic disease

  10. Safety and efficacy of anti-tumor necrosis factor α therapy in ten patients with recent-onset refractory reactive arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Alain; Chatelus, Emmanuel; Wendling, Daniel; Berthelot, Jean-Marie; Dernis, Emmanuelle; Houvenagel, Eric; Morel, Jacques; Richer, Olivier; Schaeverbeke, Thierry; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Sibilia, Jean

    2011-05-01

    There are few treatments for reactive arthritis (ReA). Since concentrations of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) are high in the serum and joints of patients with persistent ReA, this cytokine could be targeted in patients who do not respond to nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). We under-took this study to investigate the safety and efficacy of TNF antagonists in patients with recent-onset and refractory ReA. All French rheumatology and internal medicine practitioners registered on the Club Rhumatisme et Inflammation web site were asked to report on patients with ReA (defined by the criteria of the Third International Workshop on Reactive Arthritis) who had received anti-TNF therapy within the 12 months following the triggering infection. Tolerance and efficacy were retrospectively assessed using a standardized questionnaire. Ten patients with ReA previously refractory to NSAIDs and DMARDs, for which there was clinical and microbiologic evidence of a triggering bacterial infection, received anti-TNF therapy within a median of 6 months (range 2-12 months) between the beginning of ReA and the initiation of the treatment. The median followup was 20.6 months (range 6-50 months). We observed no severe adverse event and no infection related to the bacterium that triggered the ReA. Anti-TNF therapy was rapidly effective in 9 patients (90%), as shown by the rapid effect on a visual analog scale pain score, tender joint count, swollen joint count, and extraarticular manifestations, and by the corticosteroid-sparing effect. Anti-TNF therapy appears to be a safe and effective treatment of rheumatic and extraarticular manifestations in patients with recent-onset and refractory ReA, with a corticosteroid-sparing effect. Thus, TNFα could be a relevant target for ReA therapy.

  11. Characteristics of Rheumatoid Arthritis relative to HLA-DR in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Arfaj, Abdurhman S.

    2001-01-01

    The objective was to determine the clinical characteristics of rheumatoid arthritis in Saudi Arabia in relation to human leukocyte antigen type. A group of 91 rheumatoid arthritis patients, 72 females and 19 males were studied for the various clinical, laboratory and radiological parameters along with human leukocyte antigen-DR phenotypes. Since human leukocyte antigen-DR10 was most commonly associated with rheumatoid arthritis in our population, we compared those patients with human leukocyte antigen-DR10 to those without. The comparison yielded differences in the presence of rheumatoid nodules, erosions, corticosteroid treatment, and joint involvement at presentation, hemoglobin levels, and white cell count. Only the last 3 parameters showed a statistical significance. Human leukocyte antigen type of Saudi patients with rheumatoid arthritis influenced the course of the disease but only to a limited extent. (author)

  12. Juvenil idiopatisk arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlin, Troels

    2002-01-01

    The new classification of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is described in this review. Clinical characteristics divide JIA in to subtypes: systemic, oligoarticular (persistent and extended type), RF-positive and--negative polyarticular, enthesitis-related arthritis and psoriatic arthritis...

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life ...

  14. Predictive Factors Related to the Efficacy of Golimumab in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuaki Kanbe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the predictive factors related to clinical efficacy and radiographic progression at 24 weeks by looking at the serum levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and interleukin (IL-6 including baseline characteristics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA treated with golimumab, serum concentrations of TNF-α and IL-6 were analyzed every 4 weeks up to 24 weeks in 47 patients treated with golimumab. Baseline levels of the Disease Activity Score 28 C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP and Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI scores were also assessed. Radiographic progression using the van der Heijde-modified Sharp (vdH-S score was assessed in 29 patients. Multiple regression analyses related to the DAS28-CRP score and delta total sharp score at 24 weeks was undertaken using the baseline characteristics of patients and serum concentrations of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-3, TNF-α, and IL–6. The DAS28-CRP score and SDAI decreased significantly at 4 weeks up to 24 weeks compared with baseline. Serum levels of TNF-α were not changed significantly up to 24 weeks compared with baseline, but those of IL-6 decreased significantly at 4 weeks up to 8 weeks. Multiple regression analyses showed that disease duration and serum levels of MMP-3 were related significantly to the DAS28-CRP score at 24 weeks. Radiographic progression was related significantly to disease duration with regard to joint space narrowing and bone erosion. However, serum levels of TNF-α and IL-6 were not correlated significantly with the DAS28-CRP score and radiographic progression. These data suggest that decreasing serum levels of IL-6 significantly, MMP-3, and disease duration are predictive factors for RA activity in patients taking golimumab.

  15. Cardiovascular reactivity and proactive and reactive relational aggression among women with and without a history of sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray-Close, Dianna; Rellini, Alessandra H

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the association between cardiovascular reactivity and proactive and reactive functions of relational aggression among women with and without a history of sexual abuse. Heart rate reactivity, blood pressure reactivity, and respiratory sinus arrhythmia reactivity while recounting a relational stressor (e.g., being left out) were assessed. Participants provided self-reports of relational aggression and a history of sexual abuse prior to age 16. Results indicated that cardiovascular reactivity was only associated with relational aggression among women with a history of sexual abuse. In addition, whereas blunted reactivity was associated with proactive relational aggression, exaggerated reactivity was associated with reactive relational aggression. These findings highlight the importance of considering contextual moderators of the association between cardiovascular reactivity and aggression; moreover, results highlight distinct cardiovascular correlates of different functions of aggression. Finally, the findings underscore the need for additional research examining the physiological correlates of aggressive behavior among women. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Outcome of patients with reactive amyloidosis associated with rheumatoid arthritis in dialysis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Takeshi; Tanabe, Naohito; Sato, Hiroe; Ajiro, Jyunya; Wada, Yoko; Murakami, Syuichi; Hasegawa, Hisashi; Sakatsume, Minoru; Nakano, Masaaki; Gejyo, Fumitake

    2006-10-01

    The aim was to analyze the clinical outcome of a group of 51 patients diagnosed with systemic amyloidosis associated with rheumatoid arthritis who received hemodialysis (HD) as renal replacement therapy. We monitored the clinical course of the disease and factors that could influence survival. Determination of the onset of the underlying disorder was made retrospectively by reviewing the patient's chart when a diagnosis of amyloid was confirmed. During a 96.9 person-year follow-up, 42 patients died. Survival of these 51 patients from the initiation of HD at 251 days was 50%. Poor prognosis in amyloid patients was mainly due to a large number of sudden deaths immediately following HD therapy. Out of 51 patients 21 needed unplanned initiation of HD. The unplanned initiation was significantly associated with poor survival. Seventy-five percentile of creatinine clearance (Ccr) was 9.7 ml/min, and 75% of these patients who initiated HD had highly impaired renal functional states. These data indicated that amyloidotic patients with HD showed a high mortality rate; therefore, planned initiation of HD was highly recommended to improve the patient's survival. Particular attention was given to the Ccr levels, because the levels of serum creatinine may not be a useful marker for some patients with amyloidosis.

  17. Familial aggregation of arthritis-related diseases in seropositive and seronegative rheumatoid arthritis: a register-based case-control study in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisell, Thomas; Hellgren, Karin; Alfredsson, Lars; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Klareskog, Lars; Askling, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to estimate the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA) associated with a family history of non-RA arthritis-related diseases. This familial co-aggregation is of clinical interest since it is often encountered when assessing family history of RA specifically, but also informative on the genetic overlap between these diseases. Since anticitrullinated peptide antibodies/rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive and RF-negative RA have both specific and shared genetic factors, the familial co-aggregation was assessed separately for seropositive and seronegative disease. Nested case-control study in prospectively recorded Swedish total population data. The Multi-Generation Register identified first-degree relatives. RA and arthritis-related diseases were ascertained through the nationwide patient register. RA serology was based on International Classification of Diseases tenth revision coded diagnoses, mainly reflecting RF. Familial risks were calculated using conditional logistic regression. Results were replicated using the Swedish rheumatology register. Familial co-aggregation was found between RA and every studied arthritis-related disease, but the magnitude varied widely, from juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) (seropositive RA OR=3.98 (3.01 to 5.26); seronegative RA OR=5.70 (3.47 to 9.36)) to osteoarthritis (seropositive RA OR=1.03 (1.00 to 1.06); seronegative RA OR=1.05 (1.00 to 1.09)). The familial co-aggregation pattern of non-RA arthritis-related diseases was overall similar for seropositive and seronegative RA. Among those with family history of RA, relatives' other arthritis-related diseases conferred little or no additional risk. Although family history of several arthritis-related diseases may be useful to predict RA (eg, lupus and JIA), others (eg, osteoarthritis and arthralgia) are less useful. Seropositive and seronegative RA had rather similar familial co-aggregation patterns with arthritis-related diseases, suggesting that the two RA

  18. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: relation to growth and disease activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnhart, Birgitte; Juul, Anders; Nielsen, Susan

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) has been identified as a prognostic marker of progressive joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. In this population based study we evaluated associations between plasma concentrations of COMP, disease activity, and growth velocity...... in patients with recent-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). COMP levels in JIA and healthy children were compared with those in healthy adults. Plasma levels of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1), which has been associated with COMP expression and growth velocity, were studied in parallel. METHODS......: 87 patients with JIA entered the study, including oligoarticular JIA (n = 34), enthesitis-related arthritis (n = 8), polyarticular rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive JIA (n = 2), polyarticular RF-negative JIA (n = 27), systemic JIA (n = 6), and undifferentiated JIA (n = 10). Plasma levels of COMP were...

  19. Cardiovascular diseases-related hospital admissions of patients with inflammatory arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ursum, J.; Nielen, M.M.J.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Peters, M.J.L.; Schellevis, F.G.; Nurmohamed, M.T.; Korevaar, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Patients with inflammatory arthritis (IA) have an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), suggesting a high rate of CVD-related hospitalizations, but data on this topic are limited. Our study addressed hospital admissions for CVD in a primary care-based population of patients

  20. Large-scale linkage analysis of 1302 affected relative pairs with rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamshere, Marian L; Segurado, Ricardo; Moskvina, Valentina; Nikolov, Ivan; Glaser, Beate; Holmans, Peter A

    2007-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is the most common systematic autoimmune disease and its etiology is believed to have both strong genetic and environmental components. We demonstrate the utility of including genetic and clinical phenotypes as covariates within a linkage analysis framework to search for rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci. The raw genotypes of 1302 affected relative pairs were combined from four large family-based samples (North American Rheumatoid Arthritis Consortium, United Kingdom, European Consortium on Rheumatoid Arthritis Families, and Canada). The familiality of the clinical phenotypes was assessed. The affected relative pairs were subjected to autosomal multipoint affected relative-pair linkage analysis. Covariates were included in the linkage analysis to take account of heterogeneity within the sample. Evidence of familiality was observed with age at onset (p << 0.001) and rheumatoid factor (RF) IgM (p << 0.001), but not definite erosions (p = 0.21). Genome-wide significant evidence for linkage was observed on chromosome 6. Genome-wide suggestive evidence for linkage was observed on chromosomes 13 and 20 when conditioning on age at onset, chromosome 15 conditional on gender, and chromosome 19 conditional on RF IgM after allowing for multiple testing of covariates. PMID:18466440

  1. An update on the management of hepatitis C virus-related arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzi, Carlo; D'Amico, Emilio; D'Angelo, Salvatore; Gilio, Michele; Leccese, Pietro; Olivieri, Ignazio

    2014-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related arthritis is an uncommon disease belonging to the autoimmune disorders due to the chronic stimulus exerted by the virus on the immune system. It shows two clinical subsets: a symmetrical polyarthritis resembling rheumatoid arthritis but less aggressive and an intermittent mono-oligoarthritis involving the lower limbs. We extensively review the current literature using the largest electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE and COCHRANE) with regard to HCV-related arthritis (HCVrA) and studies focusing on the co-existence of HCV and other kinds of arthritides. The therapeutic approach to HCVrA remains largely empirical, because few studies have been published on this topic. Mainstream treatment based on the administration of hydroxychloroquine and low doses of corticosteroid is still largely preferred. Cyclosporine represents a useful alternative due to its antiviral properties. Anti-TNF agents are safe, but their hypothetic use appears excessive for a mild disorder such as HCVrA. IFN-α (and more recently pegylated IFN-α) when administered as a component of the combined (IFN-α + ribavirin) anti-HCV therapy can promote the appearance or the worsening of several autoimmune HCV-related disorders, including arthritis. New and forthcoming antiviral molecules will be used in the near future for a revolutionary IFN-free treatment.

  2. Activation of iNKT Cells Prevents Salmonella-Enterocolitis and Salmonella-Induced Reactive Arthritis by Downregulating IL-17-Producing γδT Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariángeles Noto Llana

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis (ReA is an inflammatory condition of the joints that arises following an infection. Salmonella enterocolitis is one of the most common infections leading to ReA. Although the pathogenesis remains unclear, it is known that IL-17 plays a pivotal role in the development of ReA. IL-17-producers cells are mainly Th17, iNKT, and γδT lymphocytes. It is known that iNKT cells regulate the development of Th17 lineage. Whether iNKT cells also regulate γδT lymphocytes differentiation is unknown. We found that iNKT cells play a protective role in ReA. BALB/c Jα18−/− mice suffered a severe Salmonella enterocolitis, a 3.5-fold increase in IL-17 expression and aggravated inflammation of the synovial membrane. On the other hand, activation of iNKT cells with α-GalCer abrogated IL-17 response to Salmonella enterocolitis and prevented intestinal and joint tissue damage. Moreover, the anti-inflammatory effect of α-GalCer was related to a drop in the proportion of IL-17-producing γδT lymphocytes (IL17-γδTcells rather than to a decrease in Th17 cells. In summary, we here show that iNKT cells play a protective role against Salmonella-enterocolitis and Salmonella-induced ReA by downregulating IL17-γδTcells.

  3. Myelofibrosis-Related Arthritis Successfully Treated with Hydroxyurea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Guillot

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 62-year-old woman suffering from one-year lasting, nonerosive peripheral arthritides with general health impairment and high acute-phase reactant levels was admitted to rheumatology department. The patient had suffered from chronic polyarthralgia and a thrombocytosis had been discovered 9 years before, with a recent increase in platelet count. All immunological blood tests were negative. Corticosteroid and methotrexate treatments improved pain, swollen joint count, and systemic inflammation. However, joints remained stiff and painful with two swollen wrists and persistent thrombocytosis. An iliac bone marrow biopsy was performed, showing primary myelofibrosis. Hydroxyurea treatment (500 mg per day allowed to achieve complete and prolonged clinical and biological remission. After 6 months, a new disease flare occurred. The patient reached remission again after hydroxyurea dose increased to 1500 mg per day. This supports the hypothesis of idiopathic myelofibrosis-associated seronegative polyarthritis. This is the first reported case in which haemopathy-targeted treatment using hydroxyurea induced arthritis remission.

  4. Quality of life and Related Factors in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosharafeh Chaleshgar kordasiabi

    2016-12-01

    planners, and clinical specialists. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate QOL and the factors affecting it in patients with RA.Methods: This descriptive-analytical study was performed in 185 RA patients (2014 at Shariati Hospital. The participants were chosen through convenience sampling. The data collection tools included a form on demographic and clinical factors, health status (arthritis impact measurement scale2 [AIMS2], and SF20 QOL questionnaire. Data was analyzed in SPSS 16 using descriptive, univariate, and multivariate regression analysis.Results: The patients had a mean age of 46.97±11.47 years, and most of the patients were female (80.5%, 67.6% of whom were housewives. In general, 90% of the patients had diploma or lower education. Mean of physical dimension of QOL was lower and social and role dimensions were higher than other dimensions. Univariate analysis regression showed that QOL have significant negative relationship with age, disease duration, disease activity score (DAS and significant positive relationship with education and health status. In multivariate regression analysis, health status, DAS, and education explained 71.7% of QOL. Conclusion: Our results highlighted the influence of demographic and diseaserelated factors on QOL. Thus, they should be implemented in designing educational programs to increase QOL in RA patients.

  5. Psoriatic Arthritis: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Handouts Psoriatic arthritis (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Psoriatic Arthritis updates ... this? GO MEDICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA Psoriatic arthritis Related Health Topics Arthritis Psoriasis National Institutes of Health The primary ...

  6. High Prevalence of Gallstone Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A New Comorbidity Related to Dyslipidemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gómez, María Carmen; de Lama, Eugenia; Ordoñez-Palau, Sergi; Nolla, Joan Miquel; Corbella, Emili; Pintó, Xavier

    2017-08-01

    To assess the prevalence of gallstone disease and identify associated risk factors in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients compared to the general population. Eighty-four women with rheumatoid arthritis were included in the study. Each patient was assessed via a structured interview, physical examination, abdominal ultrasound and blood test including lipid profile. The prevalence of gallstone disease in rheumatoid arthritis was compared with data from a study of the Spanish population matched by age groups. Twenty-eight of the 84 women had gallstone disease (33.3%). RA women with and without gallstone disease were similar in most of the variables assessed, except for older age and menopausal status in the former. A greater prevalence of gallstone disease was seen in rheumatoid arthritis patients compared to the general population of the same age; however, the differences were significant only in women aged 60 or older (45.5% versus 23.1% respectively, P-value .008). The age-adjusted OR of developing gallstone disease in RA women compared with general population women was 2,3 (95% CI: 1.3-4.1). A significantly higher HDL3-c subfraction and higher apoA-I/HDL and HDL3-c/TC ratios were observed in patients with gallstone disease. Women with rheumatoid arthritis may have a predisposition to gallstones that can manifest in middle or older age compared with women in the general population. This situation could be related to chronic inflammation and HDL metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ... Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Connect With ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Rheumatoid arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... in my area? Other Names for This Condition arthritis, rheumatoid RA Related Information How are genetic conditions and ...

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ... Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Rheumatology Course ...

  10. Anti-TNF therapy for juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeraro, Francesco; Arcidiacono, Barbara; Nascimbeni, Giuseppe; Angi, Martina; Parolini, Barbara; Costagliola, Ciro

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis is the most common type of uveitis in childhood and one of the main causes of visual impairment in children. The introduction of biological treatment has widened the range of therapeutic options for children with uveitis refractory to standard nonbiologic immunosuppressants. Data from clinical trials suggest that both adalimumab and infliximab have demonstrated effectiveness and safety in open-label studies, although no large, randomized, controlled trials have been reported so far. The role of etanercept in treating juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis is not yet well defined. In our experience, anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy has been shown to be more effective than steroids and/or methotrexate in treating uveitis. Up to now, tumor necrosis factor blocking compounds have been reserved for the treatment of the most severe cases of refractory uveitis, and larger prospective clinical trials are required in order to better assess the safety of these new compounds. PMID:24711694

  11. Anti-TNF therapy for juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeraro, Francesco; Arcidiacono, Barbara; Nascimbeni, Giuseppe; Angi, Martina; Parolini, Barbara; Costagliola, Ciro

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis is the most common type of uveitis in childhood and one of the main causes of visual impairment in children. The introduction of biological treatment has widened the range of therapeutic options for children with uveitis refractory to standard nonbiologic immunosuppressants. Data from clinical trials suggest that both adalimumab and infliximab have demonstrated effectiveness and safety in open-label studies, although no large, randomized, controlled trials have been reported so far. The role of etanercept in treating juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis is not yet well defined. In our experience, anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy has been shown to be more effective than steroids and/or methotrexate in treating uveitis. Up to now, tumor necrosis factor blocking compounds have been reserved for the treatment of the most severe cases of refractory uveitis, and larger prospective clinical trials are required in order to better assess the safety of these new compounds.

  12. Motivation-related predictors of physical activity engagement and vitality in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-an Yu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study tests the Basic Psychological Needs Theory (within the Self-determination framework, in relation to the prediction of physical activity and well-being among rheumatoid arthritis patients. Motivation regulations for physical activity were also considered in the process model. A total of 207 patients (150 females, mean age = 58 ± 11 years completed a questionnaire pack and structural equation modelling was used to test expected relationships. Autonomy support provided by important other(s regarding physical activity positively predicted rheumatoid arthritis patients’ need satisfaction which positively related to autonomous reasons for physical activity participation. Autonomous motivation positively predicted reported physical activity participation levels and feelings of vitality.

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have ... and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid ...

  14. Age and racial/ethnic disparities in arthritis-related hip and knee surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Dorothy D; Manheim, Larry M; Song, Jing; Sohn, Min-Woong; Feinglass, Joseph M; Chang, Huan J; Chang, Rowland W

    2008-02-01

    Nearly 18 million Americans experience limitations due to their arthritis. Documented disparities according to racial/ethnic groups in the use of surgical interventions such as knee and hip arthroplasty are largely based on data from Medicare beneficiaries age 65 or older. Whether there are disparities among younger adults has not been previously addressed. This study assesses age-specific racial/ethnic differences in arthritis-related knee and hip surgeries. Longitudinal (1998-2004) Health and Retirement Study. National probability sample of US community-dwelling adults. A total of 2262 black, 1292 Hispanic, and 13,159 white adults age 51 and older. The outcome is self-reported 2-year use of arthritis-related hip or knee surgery. Independent variables are demographic (race/ethnicity, age, gender), health needs (arthritis, chronic diseases, obesity, physical activity, and functional limitations), and medical access (income, wealth, education, and health insurance). Longitudinal data methods using discrete survival analysis are used to validly account for repeated (biennial) observations over time. Analyses use person-weights, stratum, and sampling error codes to provide valid inferences to the US population. Black adults under the age of 65 years report similar age/gender adjusted rates of hip/knee arthritis surgeries [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.87-2.38] whereas older blacks (age 65+) have significantly lower rates (HR = 0.38, CI = 0.16-0.55) compared with whites. These relationships hold controlling for health and economic differences. Both under age 65 years (HR = 0.64, CI = 0.12-1.44) and older (age 65+) Hispanic adults (HR = 0.60, CI = 0.32-1.10) report lower utilization rates, although not statistically different than whites. A large portion of the Hispanic disparity is explained by economic differences. These national data document lower rates of arthritis-related hip/knee surgeries for older black versus white adults age 65 or

  15. Motivation-related predictors of physical activity engagement and vitality in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, C.-a.; Rouse, P. C.; Van Zanten, J. V. J.; Metsios, G. S.; Ntoumanis, N.; Kitas, G. D.; Duda, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    This study tests the Basic Psychological Needs Theory (within the Self-determination framework), in relation to the prediction of physical activity and well-being among rheumatoid arthritis patients. Motivation regulations for physical activity were also considered in the process model. A total of 207 patients (150 females, mean age = 58 ± 11 years) completed a questionnaire pack and structural equation modelling was used to test expected relationships. Autonomy support provided by important ...

  16. Foot related impairments and disability in juvenile idiopathic arthritis persist despite modern day treatment paradigms

    OpenAIRE

    Hendry, Gordon J; Gardner-Medwin, Janet; Watt, Gordon F; Woodburn, Jim; McColl, John H; Sturrock, Roger D

    2011-01-01

    Background: Foot problems such as synovitis, growth disturbance and deformity are considered common in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and have been previously reported in over 90% of cases. The medical management of JIA appears to have improved recently however little is known about the impact of new regimes on localised joints such as in the foot. This pilot study aimed to investigate the prevalence of foot related impairments and disability, and survey the medical and podiatric managem...

  17. Relations among several nuclear and electronic density functional reactivity indexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrent-Sucarrat, Miquel; Luis, Josep M.; Duran, Miquel; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro; Solà, Miquel

    2003-11-01

    An expansion of the energy functional in terms of the total number of electrons and the normal coordinates within the canonical ensemble is presented. A comparison of this expansion with the expansion of the energy in terms of the total number of electrons and the external potential leads to new relations among common density functional reactivity descriptors. The formulas obtained provide explicit links between important quantities related to the chemical reactivity of a system. In particular, the relation between the nuclear and the electronic Fukui functions is recovered. The connection between the derivatives of the electronic energy and the nuclear repulsion energy with respect to the external potential offers a proof for the "Quantum Chemical le Chatelier Principle." Finally, the nuclear linear response function is defined and the relation of this function with the electronic linear response function is given.

  18. Memory reactivation during rest supports upcoming learning of related content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Margaret L.; Preston, Alison R.

    2014-01-01

    Although a number of studies have highlighted the importance of offline processes for memory, how these mechanisms influence future learning remains unknown. Participants with established memories for a set of initial face–object associations were scanned during passive rest and during encoding of new related and unrelated pairs of objects. Spontaneous reactivation of established memories and enhanced hippocampal–neocortical functional connectivity during rest was related to better subsequent learning, specifically of related content. Moreover, the degree of functional coupling during rest was predictive of neural engagement during the new learning experience itself. These results suggest that through rest-phase reactivation and hippocampal–neocortical interactions, existing memories may come to facilitate encoding during subsequent related episodes. PMID:25331890

  19. Memory reactivation during rest supports upcoming learning of related content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Margaret L; Preston, Alison R

    2014-11-04

    Although a number of studies have highlighted the importance of offline processes for memory, how these mechanisms influence future learning remains unknown. Participants with established memories for a set of initial face-object associations were scanned during passive rest and during encoding of new related and unrelated pairs of objects. Spontaneous reactivation of established memories and enhanced hippocampal-neocortical functional connectivity during rest was related to better subsequent learning, specifically of related content. Moreover, the degree of functional coupling during rest was predictive of neural engagement during the new learning experience itself. These results suggest that through rest-phase reactivation and hippocampal-neocortical interactions, existing memories may come to facilitate encoding during subsequent related episodes.

  20. Arthritis - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  1. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... use one or more of the following: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to treat pain and inflammation. Corticosteroids injected into painful joints or applied to skin sores. Antibiotics to fight the bacterial infection that triggered the ...

  2. Relational victimization and proactive versus reactive relational aggression: The moderating effects of respiratory sinus arrhythmia and skin conductance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Caitlin R; Abaied, Jamie L

    2015-01-01

    This research examined the moderating effect of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) on the associations between relational victimization and reactive and proactive relational aggression. Both branches of the ANS, the parasympathetic nervous system (indexed by respiratory sinus arrhythmia reactivity; RSA-Reactivity) and the sympathetic nervous system (indexed by skin conductance level reactivity; SCL-Reactivity), were examined. Emerging adults (N = 168) self-reported on relational victimization and proactive and reactive relational aggression; RSA-Reactivity and SCL-Reactivity were assessed in response to a laboratory stressor. Relational victimization predicted heightened reactive relational aggression given RSA augmentation/high SCL-Reactivity (i.e., coactivation) and RSA withdrawal/low SCL-Reactivity (i.e., coinhibition). In addition, relational victimization predicted heightened reactive relational aggression given RSA augmentation/low SCL-Reactivity (i.e., reciprocal parasympathetic activation). This study extends previous research on relational victimization and provides novel evidence that (a) exposure to relational victimization is associated with reactive relational aggression, but not proactive relational aggression, and (b) parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system reactivity jointly moderate the link between relational victimization and reactive relational aggression. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Health-related quality of life of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Which factors are of significance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, L.; Sørensen, J.; Ostergaard, M.

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease causing joint pain, loss of function and decreased health-related quality of life (HRQoL). HRQoL in RA patients is associated with several risk factors; in this paper the evidence relating to the most important risk factors is reviewed....... Modern medical therapy has improved HRQoL in RA patients, while demographic factors (female sex and older age), low socioeconomic status (in terms of education and position in the work force) and the presence of comorbid conditions appear to be associated with poorer HRQoL Udgivelsesdato: 2008/3/3...

  4. Radiographic progression of rheumatoid arthritis related to some clinical and laboratory parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, A. de; Graudal, H.

    1980-01-01

    In 188 patients followed for 3 to 12 years, the radiologic course of rheumatoid arthritis was assessed in 20 joint groups. A severe course in most joints was related to the presence of rheumatoid factor and to high values of the ESR. Granulocyte-specific antinuclear antibodies were related to a severe course in most joints. The presence of nodules, the Rose-Waaler titre and the presence of organ non-specific antinuclear antibodies were generally unrelated to the course of the disease. (Auth.)

  5. IS MANUAL THERAPY A RATIONAL APPROACH TO IMPROVING HEALTH-RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE IN PEOPLE WITH ARTHRITIS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Melainie

    2002-01-01

    Background: People with arthritic disease are advised to participate in gentle exercise on a regular basis, and pursue long-term medication regimes. Alternative therapies are also used by people with arthritis, and may sometimes be recommended by rheumatologists and other medical personnel. Alternative therapies may be divided into two types: active therapies, in which the patient takes a driving role, and passive therapies, in which the therapy cannot proceed unless driven by a therapist. Objective: To review the effectiveness of manual therapy in improving the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of people with two common arthritis conditions: Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Discussion: Massage, and other passive (practitioner-driven) manual therapies, have been anecdotally reported to improve health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in people with arthritis. Many manual therapists consult with patients who have arthritic diseases, receive referrals from rheumatologists, and consider the arthritic diseases to be within their field of practise. Although there is empirical evidence that manual therapy with some types of arthritis is beneficial, the level of effectiveness however is under-researched. Medical authorities are reluctant to endorse manual therapies for arthritis due to a lack of scientific evidence demonstrating efficacy, safety, and cost effectiveness. PMID:17987169

  6. Testing of the preliminary OMERACT validation criteria for a biomarker to be regarded as reflecting structural damage endpoints in rheumatoid arthritis clinical trials: the example of C-reactive protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keeling, Stephanie O.; Landewe, Robert; van der Heijde, Desiree; Bathon, Joan; Boers, Maarten; Garnero, Patrick; Geusens, Piet; El-Gabalawy, Hani; Inman, Robert D.; Kraus, Virginia B.; Kvien, Tore K.; Mease, Philip J.; Ostergaard, Mikkel; Ritchlin, Chris; Syversen, Silje W.; Maksymowych, Walter P.

    2007-01-01

    A list of 14 criteria for guiding the validation of a soluble biomarker as reflecting structural damage endpoints in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) clinical trials was drafted by an international working group after a Delphi consensus exercise. C-reactive protein (CRP), a soluble biomarker extensively

  7. Anti-adalimumab antibodies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, Sanna T; Aalto, Kristiina; Kotaniemi, Kaisu M; Kivelä, Tero T

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the association of adalimumab trough levels and anti-adalimumab antibodies with activity of uveitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis. This was a retrospective observational case series in a clinical setting at the Department of Ophthalmology, Helsinki University Hospital, Finland in 2014-2016. Thirty-one paediatric patients with chronic anterior juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis in 58 eyes and who had been on adalimumab ≥6 months were eligible for the study. Uveitis activity during adalimumab treatment, adalimumab trough levels and anti-adalimumab antibody levels were recorded. Anti-adalimumab antibody levels ≥12 AU /ml were detected in nine patients (29%). This level of anti-adalimumab antibodies was associated with a higher grade of uveitis (puveitis that was not in remission (p=0.001) and with lack of concomitant methotrexate therapy (p=0.043). In patients with anti-adalimumab antibody levels uveitis (p=0.86). Adalimumab treatment might be better guided by monitoring anti-adalimumab antibody formation in treating JIA-related uveitis.

  8. Acute Hepatitis E Virus infection with coincident reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus infection in an immunosuppressed patient with rheumatoid arthritis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultze, Detlev; Mani, Bernhard; Dollenmaier, Günter; Sahli, Roland; Zbinden, Andrea; Krayenbühl, Pierre Alexandre

    2015-10-29

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the most recently discovered of the hepatotropic viruses, and is considered an emerging pathogen in developed countries with the possibility of fulminant hepatitis in immunocompromised patients. Especially in the latter elevated transaminases should be taken as a clue to consider HEV infection, as it can be treated by discontinuation of immunosuppression and/or ribavirin therapy. To our best knowledge, this is a unique case of autochthonous HEV infection with coincident reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in an immunosuppressed patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A 68-year-old Swiss woman with RA developed hepatitis initially diagnosed as methotrexate-induced liver injury, but later diagnosed as autochthonous HEV infection accompanied by reactivation of her latent EBV infection. She showed confounding serological results pointing to three hepatotropic viruses (HEV, Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and EBV) that could be resolved by detection of HEV and EBV viraemia. The patient recovered by temporary discontinuation of immunosuppressive therapy. In immunosuppressed patients with RA and signs of liver injury, HEV infection should be considered, as infection can be treated by discontinuation of immunosuppression. Although anti-HEV-IgM antibody assays can be used as first line virological tools, nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT) for detection of HEV RNA are recommended--as in our case--if confounding serological results from other hepatotropic viruses are obtained. After discontinuation of immunosuppressive therapy, our patient recovered from both HEV infection and reactivation of latent EBV infection without sequelae.

  9. Impact of socioeconomic status on the course of rheumatoid arthritis and on related use of health care services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobi, Catharina E.; Mol, Geert D.; Boshuizen, Hendriek C.; Rupp, Ines; Dinant, Huibert J.; van den Bos, Geertrudis A. M.

    2003-01-01

    Objective. To quantify the impact of socioeconomic status (SES) among patients with rheumatoid arthritis on 1) health outcomes and related health care utilization in relation to disease duration and 2) changes in health outcomes and related health care utilization over a 2-year period. Methods. A

  10. Validity and Agreement between the 28-Joint Disease Activity Score Based on C-Reactive Protein and Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielung, Louise; Christensen, Robin; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To validate the agreement between the 28-joint disease activity score based on erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28-ESR) and the 28-joint disease activity score based on C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) in a group of Danish patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Data from 109...... Danish RA patients initiating biologic treatment were analysed at baseline and following one year of treatment. Participants were retrospectively enrolled from a previous cohort study and were considered eligible for this project if CRP and ESR were measured at baseline and at the follow-up visit...... are interchangeable when assessing RA patients and the two versions of DAS28 are comparable between studies....

  11. Anti-TNF therapy for juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semeraro F

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Francesco Semeraro,1 Barbara Arcidiacono,2 Giuseppe Nascimbeni,1 Martina Angi,1 Barbara Parolini,2 Ciro Costagliola31Eye Clinic, Department of Neurological Sciences and Vision, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy; 2Department of Ophthalmology, S. Anna Hospital, Brescia, Italy; 3Eye Clinic, Department of Health Sciences, University of Molise, Campobasso, ItalyAbstract: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis is the most common type of uveitis in childhood and one of the main causes of visual impairment in children. The introduction of biological treatment has widened the range of therapeutic options for children with uveitis refractory to standard nonbiologic immunosuppressants. Data from clinical trials suggest that both adalimumab and infliximab have demonstrated effectiveness and safety in open-label studies, although no large, randomized, controlled trials have been reported so far. The role of etanercept in treating juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis is not yet well defined. In our experience, anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy has been shown to be more effective than steroids and/or methotrexate in treating uveitis. Up to now, tumor necrosis factor blocking compounds have been reserved for the treatment of the most severe cases of refractory uveitis, and larger prospective clinical trials are required in order to better assess the safety of these new compounds.Keywords: adalimumab, etanercept, infliximab

  12. Sialylated Autoantigen-Reactive IgG Antibodies Attenuate Disease Development in Autoimmune Mouse Models of Lupus Nephritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannic C. Bartsch

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Pro- and anti-inflammatory effector functions of IgG antibodies (Abs depend on their subclass and Fc glycosylation pattern. Accumulation of non-galactosylated (agalactosylated; G0 IgG Abs in the serum of rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients reflects severity of the diseases. In contrast, sialylated IgG Abs are responsible for anti-inflammatory effects of the intravenous immunoglobulin (pooled human serum IgG from healthy donors, administered in high doses (2 g/kg to treat autoimmune patients. However, whether low amounts of sialylated autoantigen-reactive IgG Abs can also inhibit autoimmune diseases is hardly investigated. Here, we explore whether sialylated autoantigen-reactive IgG Abs can inhibit autoimmune pathology in different mouse models. We found that sialylated IgG auto-Abs fail to induce inflammation and lupus nephritis in a B cell receptor (BCR transgenic lupus model, but instead are associated with lower frequencies of pathogenic Th1, Th17 and B cell responses. In accordance, the transfer of small amounts of immune complexes containing sialylated IgG Abs was sufficient to attenuate the development of nephritis. We further showed that administration of sialylated collagen type II (Col II-specific IgG Abs attenuated the disease symptoms in a model of Col II-induced arthritis and reduced pathogenic Th17 cell and autoantigen-specific IgG Ab responses. We conclude that sialylated autoantigen-specific IgG Abs may represent a promising tool for treating pathogenic T and B cell immune responses in autoimmune diseases.

  13. New aspects of osteoporosis: Bone mineral content (BMC) measurement in osteoporosis associated with drugs, arthritis, and related conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, M.D.; Shapiro, B.

    1987-01-01

    Sensitive, non-invasive measurements of bone mineral content (BMC) provide the means to identify and characterize, prior to the development of symptoms, osteoporosis associated with drugs, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes mellitus, anorexia nervosa and immobilization. Moreover, BMC can be used to effectively screen populations at risk for the development of osteoporosis and longitudinal studies in individual patients can be used to guide effective anti-osteopenia therapy. This review will briefly detail recent BMC measurements in osteoporosis due to drugs, arthritis and related conditions. (orig.) [de

  14. New aspects of osteoporosis: Bone mineral content (BMC) measurement in osteoporosis associated with drugs, arthritis, and related conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, M.D.; Shapiro, B.

    1987-02-01

    Sensitive, non-invasive measurements of bone mineral content (BMC) provide the means to identify and characterize, prior to the development of symptoms, osteoporosis associated with drugs, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes mellitus, anorexia nervosa and immobilization. Moreover, BMC can be used to effectively screen populations at risk for the development of osteoporosis and longitudinal studies in individual patients can be used to guide effective anti-osteopenia therapy. This review will briefly detail recent BMC measurements in osteoporosis due to drugs, arthritis and related conditions.

  15. Dissociative recombination in reactive flows related to planetary atmospheric entries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bultel Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Dissociative Recombination (DR processes play a significant role in plasma chemistry. This article illustrates this role from the modeling point of view in the case of reactive flows related to atmospheric entry plasmas. Two situations are investigated, for which the studied plasma is nitrogen. The first configuration corresponds to the relaxation process behind a strong shock wave moving at high Mach number in a shock tube, the second one to the recombination taking place in an expanding plasma flowing in a diverging nozzle. In both cases, the collisional-radiative model CoRaM-N2, involving N2, N, N2+, N+ and electrons, is implemented in an Eulerian 1D code able to compute the aerodynamic fields; calculations are performed in standard conditions. We show that, according to the rate coefficients used for the DR processes, the population density of the charged species especially N2+ is strongly modified only for the post-shock flow.

  16. Hypermethylation of MST1 in IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis and rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuhara, Takataro; Tomiyama, Takashi [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The Third Department of Internal Medicine, JST CREST, Kansai Medical University, 2-5-1 Shin-machi, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1010 (Japan); Yasuda, Kaneki [Department of Urology and Andrology, Kansai Medical University, 2-5-1 Shin-machi, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1010 (Japan); Ueda, Yoshihiro [Department of Molecular Genetics, Institute of Biomedical Science, and JST CREST, Kansai Medical University, 2-5-1 Shin-machi, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1010 (Japan); Ozaki, Yoshio; Son, Yonsu; Nomura, Shosaku [Department of the First Department of Internal Medicine, Kansai Medical University, 2-5-1 Shin-machi, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1010 (Japan); Uchida, Kazushige; Okazaki, Kazuichi [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The Third Department of Internal Medicine, JST CREST, Kansai Medical University, 2-5-1 Shin-machi, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1010 (Japan); Kinashi, Tatsuo, E-mail: kinashi@takii.kmu.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Genetics, Institute of Biomedical Science, and JST CREST, Kansai Medical University, 2-5-1 Shin-machi, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1010 (Japan)

    2015-08-07

    The serine/threonine kinase Mst1 plays important roles in the control of immune cell trafficking, proliferation, and differentiation. Previously, we reported that Mst1 was required for thymocyte selection and regulatory T-cell functions, thereby the prevention of autoimmunity in mice. In humans, MST1 null mutations cause T-cell immunodeficiency and hypergammaglobulinemia with autoantibody production. RASSF5C(RAPL) is an activator of MST1 and it is frequently methylated in some tumors. Herein, we investigated methylation of the promoter regions of MST1 and RASSF5C(RAPL) in leukocytes from patients with IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Increased number of CpG methylation in the 5′ region of MST1 was detected in AIP patients with extrapancreatic lesions, whereas AIP patients without extrapancreatic lesions were similar to controls. In RA patients, we detected a slight increased CpG methylation in MST1, although the overall number of methylation sites was lower than that of AIP patients with extrapancreatic lesions. There were no significant changes of the methylation levels of the CpG islands in the 5′ region of RASSF5C(RAPL) in leukocytes from AIP and RA patients. Consistently, we found a significantly down-regulated expression of MST1 in regulatory T cells of AIP patients. Our results suggest that the decreased expression of MST1 in regulatory T cells due to hypermethylation of the promoter contributes to the pathogenesis of IgG4-related AIP. - Highlights: • Mst1 controls immune cells trafficking, cell proliferation and differentiation. • Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is an idiopathic pancreatitis affecting multiple organs. • Decreased MST1 expression and increased CpG methylation of promoter of MST1 in AIP. • Slight increased CpG methylation of MST1 in rheumatoid arthritis patients. • MST1 contributes pathogenesis of IgG4-related AIP.

  17. Hypermethylation of MST1 in IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis and rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuhara, Takataro; Tomiyama, Takashi; Yasuda, Kaneki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Yoshio; Son, Yonsu; Nomura, Shosaku; Uchida, Kazushige; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Kinashi, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Mst1 plays important roles in the control of immune cell trafficking, proliferation, and differentiation. Previously, we reported that Mst1 was required for thymocyte selection and regulatory T-cell functions, thereby the prevention of autoimmunity in mice. In humans, MST1 null mutations cause T-cell immunodeficiency and hypergammaglobulinemia with autoantibody production. RASSF5C(RAPL) is an activator of MST1 and it is frequently methylated in some tumors. Herein, we investigated methylation of the promoter regions of MST1 and RASSF5C(RAPL) in leukocytes from patients with IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Increased number of CpG methylation in the 5′ region of MST1 was detected in AIP patients with extrapancreatic lesions, whereas AIP patients without extrapancreatic lesions were similar to controls. In RA patients, we detected a slight increased CpG methylation in MST1, although the overall number of methylation sites was lower than that of AIP patients with extrapancreatic lesions. There were no significant changes of the methylation levels of the CpG islands in the 5′ region of RASSF5C(RAPL) in leukocytes from AIP and RA patients. Consistently, we found a significantly down-regulated expression of MST1 in regulatory T cells of AIP patients. Our results suggest that the decreased expression of MST1 in regulatory T cells due to hypermethylation of the promoter contributes to the pathogenesis of IgG4-related AIP. - Highlights: • Mst1 controls immune cells trafficking, cell proliferation and differentiation. • Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is an idiopathic pancreatitis affecting multiple organs. • Decreased MST1 expression and increased CpG methylation of promoter of MST1 in AIP. • Slight increased CpG methylation of MST1 in rheumatoid arthritis patients. • MST1 contributes pathogenesis of IgG4-related AIP

  18. Costs in Relation to Disability, Disease Activity, and Health-related Quality of Life in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallman, Johan K; Eriksson, Jonas K; Nilsson, Jan-Åke

    2016-01-01

    between-patient associations) and by generalized estimating equations (GEE), using all observations to also account for within-patient associations of HAQ/DAS28/EQ-5D to costs. RESULTS: Regardless of the methodology (linear or GEE regression), HAQ was most closely related to both cost types, while work......OBJECTIVE: To compare how costs relate to disability, disease activity, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Antitumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF)-treated patients with RA in southern Sweden (n = 2341) were monitored 2005-2010. Health Assessment...... Questionnaire (HAQ), 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28), and EQ-5D scores were linked to register-derived costs of antirheumatic drugs (excluding anti-TNF agents), patient care, and work loss from 30 days before to 30 days after each visit (n = 13,289). Associations of HAQ/DAS28/EQ-5D to healthcare...

  19. Predictors of Stenosing Tenosynovitis in the Hand and Hand-Related Activity Limitations in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ursum, J.; Horsten, N.C.; Hoeksma, A.F.; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; Knol, D.L.; van Schaardenburg, D.; Dekker, J.; Roorda, L.D.

    2011-01-01

    Ursum J, Horsten NC, Hoeksma AF, Dijkmans BA, Knol DL, van Schaardenburg D, Dekker J, Roorda LD. Predictors of stenosing tenosynovitis in the hand and hand-related activity limitations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Objectives To identify early predictors of stenosing tenosynovitis in the

  20. Predictors of stenosing tenosynovitis in the hand and hand-related activity limitations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ursum, J.; Horsten, N.C.; Hoeksma, A.F.; Dijkmans, B.A.; Knol, D.L.; Schaardenburg, D. van; Dekker, J.; Roorda, L.D.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To identify early predictors of stenosing tenosynovitis in the hand and hand-related activity limitations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Design: A longitudinal study of an inception cohort. Setting: A large outpatient clinic. Participants: Consecutive patients who attended

  1. Hypotonic stress promotes ATP release, reactive oxygen species production and cell proliferation via TRPV4 activation in rheumatoid arthritis rat synovial fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Fen; Hui, Zhenhai; Wei, Wei; Yang, Jianyu; Chen, Ziyuan; Guo, Bu; Xing, Fulin; Zhang, Xinzheng; Pan, Leiting; Xu, Jingjun

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and systemic autoimmune-disease with complex and unclear etiology. Hypotonicity of synovial fluid is a typical characteristic of RA, which may play pivotal roles in RA pathogenesis. In this work, we studied the responses of RA synovial fibroblasts to hypotonic stress in vitro and further explored the underlying mechanisms. Data showed that hyposmotic solutions significantly triggered increases in cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca 2+ ] c ) of synoviocytes. Subsequently, it caused rapid release of ATP, as well as remarkable production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Meanwhile, hypotonic stimulus promoted the proliferation of synovial fibroblasts. These effects were almost abolished by calcium-free buffer and significantly inhibited by gadolinium (III) chloride (a mechanosensitive Ca 2+ channel blocker) and ruthenium red (a transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) blocker). 4α-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, a specific agonist of TRPV4, also mimicked hypotonic shock-induced responses shown above. In contrast, voltage-gated channel inhibitors verapamil and nifedipine had little influences on these responses. Furthermore, RT-PCR and western blotting evidently detected TRPV4 expression at mRNA and protein level in isolated synoviocytes. Taken together, our results indicated that hypotonic stimulus resulted in ATP release, ROS production, and cell proliferation depending on Ca 2+ entry through activation of TRPV4 channel in synoviocytes. - Highlights: • Hypotonic stress evokes Ca 2+ entry in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts. • Hypotonic stress induces rapid ATP release and ROS production in synoviocytes. • Hypotonic stimulation promotes the proliferation of synovial fibroblasts. • TRPV4 controls hypotonic-induced responses in synoviocytes.

  2. High Concentrations of Angiopoietin-Like Protein 4 Detected in Serum from Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Can Be Explained by Non-Specific Antibody Reactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Makoveichuk

    Full Text Available Angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4 is suggested to be a master regulator of plasma triglyceride metabolism. Our aim was to study whether the previously reported high levels of ANGPTL4 detected in serum from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA by ELISA was due to any specific molecular form of this protein (oligomers, monomers or fragments. ANGPTL4 levels were first determined in serum from 68 RA patients and 43 age and sex matched control subjects and the mean values differed by a factor of 5.0. Then, ANGPTL4 was analyzed after size exclusion chromatography (SEC of serum samples. With serum from one of the RA patients with high levels of ANGPTL4, the dominant reactivity was found in fractions corresponding to high-molecular weight proteins. In addition, a minor peak of reactivity eluting late from the column was found both in the patient and in controls. By the use of HeteroBlock®, and by careful selection of antibodies, we documented non-specific reactions for ANGPTL4 in 39% of samples from the RA patients, most likely due to cross-reactivity of the antibodies with rheumatoid factor (RF. The corresponding figure for control subjects was 6.3%. After corrections for non-specific reactions, the mean level of ANGPTL4 in serum from RA patients was still significantly higher than in control individuals (mean levels were 101±62 and 67±39 ng/ml respectively, P = 0.02. We re-analyzed samples from our previously published studies on ANGPL4 levels in patients on hemodialysis and patients with diabetes type 2. These samples did not show false positive reactions. The levels of ANGPTL4 were comparable to those detected previously.

  3. High Concentrations of Angiopoietin-Like Protein 4 Detected in Serum from Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Can Be Explained by Non-Specific Antibody Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makoveichuk, Elena; Ruge, Toralph; Nilsson, Solveig; Södergren, Anna; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2017-01-01

    Angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) is suggested to be a master regulator of plasma triglyceride metabolism. Our aim was to study whether the previously reported high levels of ANGPTL4 detected in serum from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by ELISA was due to any specific molecular form of this protein (oligomers, monomers or fragments). ANGPTL4 levels were first determined in serum from 68 RA patients and 43 age and sex matched control subjects and the mean values differed by a factor of 5.0. Then, ANGPTL4 was analyzed after size exclusion chromatography (SEC) of serum samples. With serum from one of the RA patients with high levels of ANGPTL4, the dominant reactivity was found in fractions corresponding to high-molecular weight proteins. In addition, a minor peak of reactivity eluting late from the column was found both in the patient and in controls. By the use of HeteroBlock®, and by careful selection of antibodies, we documented non-specific reactions for ANGPTL4 in 39% of samples from the RA patients, most likely due to cross-reactivity of the antibodies with rheumatoid factor (RF). The corresponding figure for control subjects was 6.3%. After corrections for non-specific reactions, the mean level of ANGPTL4 in serum from RA patients was still significantly higher than in control individuals (mean levels were 101±62 and 67±39 ng/ml respectively, P = 0.02). We re-analyzed samples from our previously published studies on ANGPL4 levels in patients on hemodialysis and patients with diabetes type 2. These samples did not show false positive reactions. The levels of ANGPTL4 were comparable to those detected previously.

  4. Arthritis in the buff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothschild, B.; Williams, E.M.; Poteat, G.B.; Woods, R.

    1987-01-01

    Understanding the significance of radiologic perturbations in articular diseases is facilitated by correlation with its representation in intact macerated skeletons (from the collections of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History). Classic skeletal involvement is illustrated grossly and radiographically for the following conditions: rheumatoid arthritis calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease, osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, reactive (Reiter syndrome, psoriatic arthritis) diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, and infectious arthritis. Distribution and lesion character is reviewed. Visualization of the gross bone lesion ''in the buff'' provides clear explanation of its radiologic appearance and facilitates the transition from x-ray image to the pathophysiology proposed in the interpretation

  5. Arthritis-related work transitions: a prospective analysis of reported productivity losses, work changes, and leaving the labor force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gignac, Monique A M; Cao, Xingshan; Lacaille, Diane; Anis, Aslam H; Badley, Elizabeth M

    2008-12-15

    To prospectively examine arthritis-related productivity losses, work changes, and leaving employment, the relationships among these work transitions, and the factors associated with them. Participants with inflammatory arthritis or osteoarthritis were interviewed at 4 time points, 18 months apart, using a structured questionnaire. At baseline (T1), all participants (n = 490; 381 women, 109 men) were employed. At T2, T3, and T4, the sample decreased to 413, 372, and 349 participants, respectively. Respondents were recruited using community advertising and from rheumatology and rehabilitation clinics. Work transitions considered were productivity losses (absenteeism, job disruptions), work changes (reduced hours, changing jobs), and leaving employment. Also measured were demographic, illness, work context, and psychological variables. Generalized estimation equations modeled predictors of work transitions over time. Although 63.1% of respondents remained employed throughout the study, work transitions were common (reported by 76.5% of participants). Productivity losses, especially job disruptions such as being unable to take on extra work, were the most frequently reported. Work transitions were related to subsequently making other work transitions, including leaving employment. Age, sex, education, activity limitations, control, depression, and arthritis-work spillover were also associated with work transitions. This study sheds light on a process of diverse employment changes that may occur in the lives of many individuals with arthritis. It emphasizes the interrelationships among work transitions, as well as other factors in predicting work transitions, and it provides insight into work changes that may signal impending difficulties with remaining employed.

  6. Health-related quality of life in midlife women in Qatar: relation to arthritis and symptoms of joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Linda M; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Verjee, Mohamud; Ghomrawi, Hassan

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been poorly documented in the Middle East and North African region, including the State of Qatar. Given that musculoskeletal pain is commonly reported among midlife women, we evaluated the association between self-report of either OA or RA and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among midlife women in Qatar. In addition, HRQoL among women in Qatar was compared with that of women in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN). A cross-sectional study was conducted among 841 women 40 to 60 years recruited from primary care centers in Qatar. Face-to-face interviews were conducted and included measures of self-reported OA and RA, health-related symptom experience, and HRQoL using the SF-36 health survey. Most women were obese (75.5%) and reported being bothered by aches and stiffness in joints (71.6%). Prevalence of self-reported OA and RA was 4.8% and 4.3%, respectively. OA was significantly associated with reduced physical function (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 2.97; P=0.003). RA was also significantly related to reduced physical function (adjusted OR, 2.94; P = 0.01) and role physical (adjusted OR, 2.67; P = 0.01). When compared with women from the SWAN, women from the current study had significantly lower mean scores for bodily pain (53.0 vs. 68.9, P = 0.0001) and for vitality (49.9 vs. 54.8, P = 0.0001). Self-report of OA or RA was associated with significant disability in our sample. Because symptoms of aches and stiff joints were so frequently reported, arthritis may be under-diagnosed, especially given the high rates of obesity observed.

  7. Health-related Quality of Life in Midlife Women in Qatar: Relation to Arthritis and Symptoms of Joint Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Linda M.; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Verjee, Mohamud; Ghomrawi, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Objective The prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been poorly documented in the Middle East and North African region, including the State of Qatar. Given that musculoskeletal pain is commonly reported among midlife women, we evaluated the association between self-report of either OA or RA and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among midlife women in Qatar. Additionally, HRQoL among women in Qatar was compared to that of women in the Study of Women Across the Nation (SWAN). Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 841 women 40–60 years recruited from primary-care centers in Qatar. Face-to-face interviews were conducted and included measures of self-reported OA and RA, health-related symptom experience, and HRQoL using the SF-36 health survey. Results Most women were obese (75.5%) and reported being bothered by aches and stiffness in joints (71.6%). Prevalence of self-reported OA and RA was 4.8% and 4.3%, respectively. OA was significantly associated with reduced physical function (adjusted OR, 2.97; p=0.003). RA was also significantly related to reduced physical function (adjusted OR, 2.94; p=0.01) as well as role physical (adjusted OR, 2.67; p=0.01). When compared to women from the SWAN, women from the current study had significantly lower mean scores for bodily pain (53.0 vs 68.9, p=0.0001) and for vitality (49.9 vs 54.8, p=0.0001). Conclusions Self-report of OA or RA was associated with significant disability in our sample. Since symptoms of aches and stiff joints were so frequently reported, arthritis may be under-diagnosed, especially given the high rates of obesity observed. PMID:26382317

  8. Gonococcal arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI); Disseminated gonococcemia; Septic arthritis - gonococcal arthritis ... Gonococcal arthritis is an infection of a joint. It occurs in people who have gonorrhea , which is caused by ...

  9. AMPA/kainate glutamate receptors contribute to inflammation, degeneration and pain related behaviour in inflammatory stages of arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Cleo S; Williams, Anwen S; Gilbert, Sophie J; Harvey, Ann K; Evans, Bronwen A; Mason, Deborah J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Synovial fluid glutamate concentrations increase in arthritis. Activation of kainate (KA) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) glutamate receptors (GluRs) increase interleukin-6 (IL-6) release and cause arthritic pain, respectively. We hypothesised that AMPA and KA GluRs are expressed in human arthritis, and that intra-articular NBQX (AMPA/KA GluR antagonist) prevents pain and pathology in antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Methods GluR immunohistochemistry was related to synovial inflammation and degradation in osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A single intra-articular NBQX injection was given at induction, and knee swelling and gait of AIA and AIA+NBQX rats compared over 21 days, before imaging, RT-qPCR, histology and immunohistochemistry of joints. Effects of NBQX on human primary osteoblast (HOB) activity were determined. Results AMPAR2 and KA1 immunolocalised to remodelling bone, cartilage and synovial cells in human OA and RA, and rat AIA. All arthritic tissues showed degradation and synovial inflammation. NBQX reduced GluR abundance, knee swelling (parthritis. PMID:24130267

  10. The effects of rose hip (Rosa canina) on plasma antioxidative activity and C-reactive protein in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and normal controls: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkeskov, Bente; Christensen, Robin; Bügel, Susanne; Bliddal, Henning; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Christensen, Lars Porskjær; Andersen, Jens Rikardt

    2011-08-15

    Rose hip (Rosa canina) has been used as an herbal remedy against a wide range of ailments including inflammatory disorders. The anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of rose hips have been evaluated in vitro and active constituents have been isolated. Rose hip contains antioxidant nutrients and an anti-inflammatory galactolipid. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease where activated cells release reactive oxygen substances. Thus it could be relevant to investigate if rose hip had an anti-inflammatory and/or antioxidant effect in this situation. In this open case-control study 20 female patients with RA and 10 female controls were given 10.5 g rose hip powder daily (Litozin®) for 28 days. Blood samples were analysed at baseline and follow-up for the capacity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and catalase and the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP). The participants kept a food diary for the first 3 days and the last 3 days of the intervention period. The RA-patients completed The Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire at baseline and follow-up. CRP-concentrations of both patients and healthy controls did not change. Nor was any effect found on the activity of antioxidant enzymes. There was no difference in food intake at baseline, but in the last week the RA-group reduced their energy intake. 10.5 g Litozin® in 28 days had neither effect on clinical symptoms or laboratory measurements in patients with RA or healthy controls. This is in contrast to previous intervention studies with rose hip powder that found a reduction in the concentration of CRP. The results of the present study indicate that a daily amount of approximately 10 g rose hip powder for one month has no anti-inflammatory and/or antioxidant effect. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Availability, need for, and use of work accommodations and benefits: are they related to employment outcomes in people with arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gignac, Monique A M; Cao, Xingshan; McAlpine, Jessica

    2015-05-01

    To examine the availability, need, and use of workplace policies for workers with osteoarthritis (OA) and inflammatory arthritis (IA) and their association with employment outcomes. Participants (n = 219) were employed, ages ≥25 years, and diagnosed with OA or IA. They were recruited through community advertising and rheumatology clinics in 2 Canadian provinces. Respondents completed a 35-45-minute telephone interview assessing demographics (age, sex), health (diagnosis, pain, activity limitations), work context (job control), employment outcomes (workplace activity limitations, absenteeism, productivity losses, reduced hours), benefits (extended health, short-term leaves), and accommodations (flexible hours, modified schedules, special equipment/adaptations, work-at-home arrangements). Regression analyses examined differences in benefit/accommodation need and use. Many participants reported that arthritis impacted their work. But with the exception of extended health benefits, ∼50-65% of participants reported not needing each individual benefit/accommodation, although only 7.3% of respondents reported needing no benefits or accommodations at all. Greater job control and education were associated with greater perceived need and use of benefits/accommodations. Need was also associated with greater activity limitations, and disclosure of arthritis was related to use of benefits/accommodations. Participants needing but not using workplace policies often had significantly poorer employment outcomes compared to those using benefits/accommodations. Findings are relevant to workers with arthritis and to employers. Results suggest that individuals with arthritis are unlikely to be a drain on workplace resources. Many individuals do not use benefits/accommodations until needed, and among those using them, there were generally positive relationships with diverse employment outcomes. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  12. Psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, L.H.; Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis

  13. Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  14. Gadolinium-DTPA in rheumatoid arthritis and related diseases: First results with dynamic magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiser, M.F.; Bongartz, G.P.; Erlemann, R.; Sittek, H.; Peters, P.E.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty-four joints (19 knees, 15 wrists) of 31 patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and related disorders were examined prior to and following intravenous administration of Gadolinium-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg body weight). T1-weighted spin-echo sequences and the gradient-echo technique FLASH were applied. FLASH scanning was used for the registration of the time-dependent changes of signal intensity following Gd-DTPA. Synovial proliferations exhibited a rapid and marked increase of signal intensity whereas fatty tissue, bone marrow, muscle and synovial effusion demonstrated only minor changes, causing enhanced contrast between synovial pannus and joint effusion or other neighbouring structures. Within the synovial pannus, ratios (absolute signal increase) of 131.3 ± 53.4% and 122.9 ± 51.1% were found in T1-weighted spin-echo and in FLASH sequences respectively. The average signal increase gradient of pannus (108.2 ± 70.6%/min) was significantly (p<0.001) different from muscle (13.4 ± 7.8%/min), fatty tissue (10.2 ± 8.4%/min), bone marrow (5.5 ± 7.1%/min), and joint effusion (14.7 ± 7.8%/min). (orig.)

  15. Social media for arthritis-related comparative effectiveness and safety research and the impact of direct-to-consumer advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jeffrey R; Chen, Lang; Higginbotham, Phillip; Nowell, W Benjamin; Gal-Levy, Ronit; Willig, James; Safford, Monika; Coe, Joseph; O'Hara, Kaitlin; Sa'adon, Roee

    2017-03-07

    Social media may complement traditional data sources to answer comparative effectiveness/safety questions after medication licensure. The Treato platform was used to analyze all publicly available social media data including Facebook, blogs, and discussion boards for posts mentioning inflammatory arthritis (e.g. rheumatoid, psoriatic). Safety events were self-reported by patients and mapped to medical ontologies, resolving synonyms. Disease and symptom-related treatment indications were manually redacted. The units of analysis were unique terms in posts. Pre-specified conditions (e.g. herpes zoster (HZ)) were selected based upon safety signals from clinical trials and reported as pairwise odds ratios (ORs); drugs were compared with Fisher's exact test. Empirically identified events were analyzed using disproportionality analysis and reported as relative reporting ratios (RRRs). The accuracy of a natural language processing (NLP) classifier to identify cases of shingles associated with arthritis medications was assessed. As of October 2015, there were 785,656 arthritis-related posts. Posts were predominantly US posts (75%) from patient authors (87%) under 40 years of age (61%). For HZ posts (n = 1815), ORs were significantly increased with tofacitinib versus other rheumatoid arthritis therapies. ORs for mentions of perforated bowel (n = 13) were higher with tocilizumab versus other therapies. RRRs associated with tofacitinib were highest in conditions related to baldness and hair regrowth, infections and cancer. The NLP classifier had a positive predictive value of 91% to identify HZ. There was a threefold increase in posts following television direct-to-consumer advertisement (p = 0.04); posts expressing medication safety concerns were significantly more frequent than favorable posts. Social media is a challenging yet promising data source that may complement traditional approaches for comparative effectiveness research for new medications.

  16. Proximity to traffic, ambient air pollution, and community noise in relation to incident rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Roos, Anneclaire J; Koehoorn, Mieke; Tamburic, Lillian; Davies, Hugh W; Brauer, Michael

    2014-10-01

    The risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been associated with living near traffic; however, there is evidence suggesting that air pollution may not be responsible for this association. Noise, another traffic-generated exposure, has not been studied as a risk factor for RA. We investigated proximity to traffic, ambient air pollution, and community noise in relation to RA in the Vancouver and Victoria regions of British Columbia, Canada. Cases and controls were identified in a cohort of adults that was assembled using health insurance registration records. Incident RA cases from 1999 through 2002 were identified by diagnostic codes in combination with prescriptions and type of physician (e.g., rheumatologist). Controls were matched to RA cases by age and sex. Environmental exposures were assigned to each member of the study population by their residential postal code(s). We estimated relative risks using conditional logistic regression, with additional adjustment for median income at the postal code. RA incidence was increased with proximity to traffic, with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.37 (95% CI: 1.11, 1.68) for residence ≤ 50 m from a highway compared with residence > 150 m away. We found no association with traffic-related exposures such as PM2.5, nitrogen oxides, or noise. Ground-level ozone, which was highest in suburban areas, was associated with an increased risk of RA (OR = 1.26; 95% CI: 1.18, 1.36 per interquartile range increase). Our study confirms a previously observed association of RA risk with proximity to traffic and suggests that neither noise levels nor traffic-related air pollutants are responsible for this relationship. Additional investigation of neighborhood and individual correlates of residence near roadways may provide new insight into risk factors for RA.

  17. Health-related quality of life for patients with rheumatoid arthritis foot involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickman, Amy M; Pinzur, Michael S; Kadanoff, Ruth; Juknelis, Dainius

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a common disabling form of arthritis that frequently affects the hands and feet. With time, the majority of affected individuals will become disabled. Sixty-nine consecutively selected mild to moderately affected individuals with rheumatoid arthritis provided demographic data and agreed to complete the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment (SFMA) instrument. Focus group subjects selectively used minimally adaptive nonprescription footwear. Control subjects had similar disease expression, but did not alter their choice of footwear due to their disease. Adult patients with rheumatoid arthritis demonstrate a significant negative impact on their quality of life with mild or moderate disease expression, as evidenced by poor scores in all six domains of the SFMA. Subjects who used even mildly adaptive nonprescription footwear demonstrated a statistically significant negative impact in mobility (p expression. Focus subjects also demonstrated a trend to less favorable scores in the arm and hand domain. Mean scores of the daily activity, emotional status, and bother index domains fared worse than population norms, but there was no statistical difference between subjects using, or not using, adaptive footwear. Individuals affected with mild to moderate rheumatoid arthritis are disabled as compared with the general population. There is a severe negative impact on mobility and functional capacity when the disease process begins to affect their feet.

  18. Relations of Proactive and Reactive Dimensions of Aggression to Overt and Covert Narcissism in Nonclinical Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossati, Andrea; Borroni, Serena; Eisenberg, Nancy; Maffei, Cesare

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing acknowledgement of the multidimensionality of narcissism and that different types of narcissism may relate differently to other domains of functioning. Similarly, aggression—a frequently discussed correlate of narcissism--is a heterogeneous construct. In the present study, the relations of proactive and reactive aggression with overt and covert manifestations of narcissism were examined in a sample of 674 Italian high school students (mean age = 15.5 years, SD = 2.1 years). Overt narcissism was positively related to both proactive and reactive subtypes of aggression, whereas covert narcissism related only to reactive aggression. Vanity, Authority, Exhibitionism, and Exploitativeness were the components of overt narcissism related to Proactive Aggression (all remained unique correlates when controlling for Reactive Aggression), whereas Reactive Aggression was associated with the Exhibitionism, Superiority, and Entitlement subscales (only the latter was uniquely related when controlling for Proactive Aggression). PMID:19918915

  19. Peer Relations and Peer Deviance as Predictors of Reactive and Proactive Aggression among High School Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uz Bas, Asli; Öz Soysal, Fatma Selda

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate associations between reactive and proactive aggression and peer relations and peer deviance among high school girls. A total of 442 high school students participated in this study. Reactive-Proactive Aggression Questionnaire, the Peer Relations Scale, and the Peer Deviance Scale were used to collect data. Results…

  20. Lung manifestation in rheumatoid arthritis: High-resolution CT in mutual relation to skeletal changes and laboratory parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Leisse, C.; Meyer, O.; Genth, E.; Guenther, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: It has been the aim of the following study to evaluate pulmonary changes in rheumatoid arthritis with high-resolution CT and to assess their correlation with joint manifestation and laboratory paramters. Material and methods: The authors prospectively performed computed tomography (CT) in 83 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and graded pulmonary changes for frequency and severity. Included were patients with 6-7/7 ARA, BSR>25/1 min and mean disease duration of 12 years (range, 1-44). Data of medical and drug histories, smoking habits, blood levels of rheumatoid factor (RF), antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and C-reactive protein as well as the degree of joint involvement were taken into account. Results: 58 patients (70%) had pathological CT scans showing the following abnormalities: Interlobular thickening (44.5%), intralobular thickening (34%), nonseptal linear attenuation (35%), nodular or linear pleural thickening (32.5%), ground-glass pattern (19%), centrilobular nodules (13%), honeycombing (13%) and bronchiolectasis (9%). Intralobular thickening, honeycombing and pleural thickening were associated with a higher degree of joint manifestation; pleural thickening, honeycombing and ground-glass pattern were associated with a higher level of rheumatoid factor. There was no relationship between pulmonary changes and either the duration of the disease, antinuclear antibodies (ANA) or C-reactive protein. Conclusion: CT may be a useful noninvasive tool for recognition of RA-associated lung disease. Interstitial lung changes are frequent and they are independent of the duration of the disease. Pulmonary interstitial changes are more frequent and more severe in RF-positive patients and in case of more severe joint involvement. (orig.) [de

  1. Effect of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on the C-reactive protein level in rheumatoid arthritis: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarp, Simon; Bartels, Else M; Bliddal, Henning; Furst, Daniel E; Boers, Maarten; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Rasmussen, Mette; Christensen, Robin

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the effects of oral nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, with a prespecified focus on the different NSAIDs. We performed a systematic search in Medline via PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBase via OVID, the Institute for Scientific Information Web of Science, and other sources. Eligible trials were parallel-group, randomized, placebo-controlled trials of oral NSAID therapy in RA patients for which there were extractable CRP data. Standardized mean differences (SMDs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated from the differences in means of CRP levels between groups (active treatment minus placebo) divided by the pooled SDs. For the meta-analysis, a random-effects model was used to estimate the overall change in CRP level, and stratified analysis was used to examine differences among NSAIDs. We included 19 trials of 10 different NSAIDs. Overall, NSAIDs showed no effect on the CRP level (SMD 0.01 [95% CI -0.03, 0.06], P = 0.62). However, the prespecified stratified analysis indicated varying effects on the CRP level according to the different NSAIDs; lumiracoxib caused a statistically significant and consistent (I(2) = 0%) increase in the CRP level (SMD 0.13 [95% CI 0.01, 0.25], P = 0.037), whereas naproxen caused a statistically significant and consistent (I(2) = 0%) decrease in the CRP level (SMD -0.11 [95% CI -0.20, -0.02], P = 0.022). Overall, NSAIDs have no effect on the CRP level. However, the nonselective NSAID naproxen was associated with a significant decrease in the CRP level, whereas the cyclooxygenase 2-selective NSAID lumiracoxib was associated with a significant increase in the CRP level. This finding is interesting considering the suspected influence of NSAIDs on cardiovascular complications. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  2. Role of 30 kDa antigen of enteric bacterial pathogens as a possible arthritogenic factor in post-dysenteric reactive arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malkit Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reactive arthritis (ReA/Reiter′s syndrome (RS may be caused as a sequel of infections caused by enteric bacterial pathogens, although the mechanisms through, which different pathogens cause similar disease are not clear. Aim: This study was done to look for the presence and role of any common bacterial antigen among the pathogens isolated from such patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 51 patients of ReA and 75 controls (three groups of 25 subjects each: Group 1: Patients who did not develop arthritic complications within 3 months after bacillary dysentery/diarrhea; Group 2: Patients with other arthritic diseases and Group 3: Normal healthy subjects were included. The isolated enteric pathogens were tested to detect the immunodominant antigens. Results and Conclusions: A common 30 kDa antigen was found to be specifically present among seven arthritogenic enteric bacterial strains belonging to three genera, Salmonella, Shigella and Hafnia. Post-dysenteric ReA patients′ sera show higher levels of immunoglobulin G, immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin A antibodies against this antigen as compared to the controls. Lymphocytes of ReA patients recognize this antigen, proliferate and produce interleukin-2 in response to this antigen more than the lymphocytes of controls. 30 kDa antigen may be a common arthritogenic factor associated with post-dysenteric ReA/RS. The association of Hafnia alvei with post-dysenteric ReA is described for the first time. Four cases of mycobacterial ReA had an association with this antigen, suggesting that the arthritogenic antigen of mycobacteria and enteric bacteria may be of a similar nature.

  3. Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients with Arthritis: A Cross-Sectional Survey among Middle-Aged Adults in Chongqing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunshuang Rao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Arthritis is a common disease in China, but few studies have been conducted to explore the associated health-related quality of life (HRQoL and its influencing factors in Chongqing, China. This study aimed to explore the association of arthritis and HRQoL and probe factors affecting HRQoL among arthritis patients. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Chongqing, China. A total of 1224 adults were included in the analysis. Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36 was used to measure HRQoL. Multiple linear regression models (stepwise and covariance analysis models were used to examine the association of arthritis with HRQoL and analyze factors associated with HRQoL among arthritis patients. Results: Participants with arthritis had poorer HRQoL than those without. Among arthritis patients, the female was associated with a poorer state of physical functioning (p < 0.05; unemployed patients had a poorer state of role-physical than employed patients (p < 0.05; low average monthly income was associated with a poorer state of physical functioning (p < 0.01; childhood non-breastfeeding history was associated with a poorer state of social functioning (p < 0.01; average or dissatisfied attitude to current living conditions was associated with a poorer state of vitality and mental health (p < 0.05 for all; moreover, poor or general appetite was associated with a poorer state of role-physical, general health, social functioning, bodily pain, and role-emotional (p < 0.01 for all. Conclusions: Arthritis patients have worse HRQoL than those without in the Chinese population. Female, low socioeconomic status, childhood non-breastfeeding history, average or dissatisfied attitude to current living conditions and poor or general appetite were associated with poorer state of HRQoL among Chinese arthritis patients.

  4. Overview of the radiology of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, P.A.; Job-Deslandre, C.H.; Lalande, G.; Adamsbaum, C.

    2000-01-01

    Plain films remain the basic tool for diagnosis and follow-up evaluation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In this paper, we review the new classification of JIA: systemic arthritis, oligoarthritis (persistent), oligoarthritis (extended), polyarticular arthritis (rheumatoid factor negative), polyarticular arthritis (rheumatoid factor positive), enthesitis related arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and unclassified arthritis. We will also review regional abnormalities of three stages: an early stage, an intermediate stage, a late stage, as well as the differential diagnosis

  5. Discordant inflammatory changes in the apophyseal and sacroiliac joints: serial observations in enthesitis-related arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amies, Thomas; Vendhan, Kanimozhi; Humphries, Paul; Sen, Debajit; Ioannou, Yiannis; Hall-Craggs, Margaret A

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the extent to which inflammation of the sacroiliac joints (SIJs) and apophyseal joints (AJs) changes concordantly after treatment in enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA). Methods: A retrospective study was performed with institutional review board approval. 31 young patients with ERA who had been scanned between March 2009 and November 2014 were included. All patients had post-contrast imaging of the SIJs and lumbar spine and short tau inversion-recovery (STIR) images of the SIJs. The severity of sacroiliitis was scored using a modification of an established technique, and inflammation of the AJs was evaluated using a recently described grading system. The changes in SIJ and AJ scores after treatment were classified as either concordant or discordant, and the proportion of scan pairs in these groups was recorded. In addition, the correlation between change in SIJ STIR score (Δnfla) and change in AJ score (ΔAJ) was assessed using Spearman's correlation coefficient. Results: Of a total of 43 scan pairs, the changes in inflammation were concordant in 16 scan pairs and discordant in 27 scan pairs. There was no significant correlation between Δnfla and ΔAJ (R = 0.14, p = 0.37). Conclusion: Inflammatory changes in the SIJs and AJs are often discordant. This may be a reason why patients experience ongoing back pain despite apparent improvement in one or the other site. Advances in knowledge: Inflammation may behave differently at different anatomical sites. The SIJs and AJs should both be imaged in patients with ERA with back pain. PMID:27376529

  6. TREATMENT APPROACH FOR JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS-RELATED UVEITIS: 2012 UPDATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Zulian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic anterior uveitis is the most common extra-articular complication of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is more frequent in the early onset forms with a higher prevalence in the oligoarticular (40% than in other juvenile idiopathic arthritis subtypes (5–14%. The risk for severe visual impairment is still high due to the development of sight-threatening complications (synechiae, band keratopathy, cataract, glaucoma, cystoid macular oedema. Treatment is not standardized and requires a complex decision-making process, involving a close collaboration between paediatric ophthalmologist and rheumatologist. Topical therapy alone is often inadequate to control ocular inflammation and bulbar injections are too invasive to perform in children therefore immunosuppressive treatment is often advocated. Low dose methotrexate is the second-line agent mostly used although no controlled studies comparing effects of early to late methotrexate treatment have been reported. Mycophenolate mofetil is effective in controlling inflammation in methotrexate -refractory patients. Its efficacy, however, seems to be more relevant in intermediate or posterior uveitis, than in juvenile idiopathic arthritis uveitis and scleritis. Anti-TNFα agents, namely infliximab and adalimimab showed effectiveness in open-label studies but no wide controlled trials have been reported so far. Adalimimab is as effective as infliximab but has an easier way of administration and a better drug tolerance. Abatacept should be used in anti-TNF refractory patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis uveitis.

  7. Hydroxychloroquine decreases Th17-related cytokines in systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Cruz da Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Hydroxychloroquine is an antimalarial agent that has been used in systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis treatment for many years. Recently, novel mechanisms of action have been proposed, thereby broadening the therapeutic perspective of this medication. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immunomodulatory activity of hydroxychloroquine in T helper 17 (Th17 cytokines in healthy individuals and patients. METHODS: Eighteen female patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (mean age 39.0±12.9 years and 13 female patients with rheumatoid arthritis (mean age 51.5±7.7 years were recruited from Universidade Federal de Pernambuco-Brazil. The patients were included after fulfilling four classification criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis from the American College of Rheumatology. After being stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and ionomycin in the absence or presence of different concentrations of hydroxychloroquine, the interleukin 6, 17 and 22 levels were quantified with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in culture supernatants of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals and patients. RESULTS: We demonstrated that in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy volunteers and in systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis patients, there was a significant reduction in the IL-6, IL-17 and IL-22 supernatant levels after adding hydroxychloroquine. CONCLUSIONS Our in vitro results demonstrated that hydroxychloroquine inhibits IL-6, IL-17 and IL-22 production and contributes to a better understanding of the mechanism of action of this medication.

  8. Social Participation and Health Related Quality of Life in Early and Established Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benka, Jozef; Nagyova, Iveta; Rosenberger, Jaroslav; Macejova, Zelmira; Lazurova, Ivica; van der Klink, Jac L. L.; Groothoff, Johan W.; van Dijk, Jitse P.

    Social participation has been recognized as one of the key variables to be addressed in disability research yet few studies addressed the association between restriction in participation and quality of life in the context of rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this study was to explore the associations

  9. Synovial tissue heterogeneity in rheumatoid arthritis in relation to disease activity and biomarkers in peripheral blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baarsen, Lisa G. M.; Wijbrandts, Carla A.; Timmer, Trieneke C. G.; van der Pouw Kraan, Tineke C. T. M.; Tak, Paul P.; Verweij, Cornelis L.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the clinical relevance of synovial tissue subtypes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to search for peripheral blood (PB) markers that may serve as biomarkers for tissue subtypes. METHODS: Gene expression analysis using complementary DNA microarrays was applied on paired

  10. Reactive and Pre-Emptive Language-Related Episodes and Verbal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies have shown that most Nigerian secondary school students exhibit gross deficiency in verbal communication. Scholars have attributed this problem mainly to the non-use of reactive and pre-emptive language related episodes (LRE's) in the instructional process. Hence, this study investigated the impact of reactive ...

  11. Testing of the preliminary OMERACT validation criteria for a biomarker to be regarded as reflecting structural damage endpoints in rheumatoid arthritis clinical trials: the example of C-reactive protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keeling, Stephanie O; Landewe, Robert; van der Heijde, Desiree

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A list of 14 criteria for guiding the validation of a soluble biomarker as reflecting structural damage endpoints in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) clinical trials was drafted by an international working group after a Delphi consensus exercise. C-reactive protein (CRP), a soluble biomarker...... of individual criteria in the draft set. METHODS: A systematic literature review was conducted to elicit evidence in support of each specific criterion composing the 14-criteria draft set. A summary of the key literature findings per criterion was presented to both the working group and to participants...

  12. Infectious Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ...

  13. Newer biological agents in rheumatoid arthritis: impact on health-related quality of life and productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Vibeke; Singh, Jasvinder A

    2010-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is significantly impaired as a result of pain, deficits in physical function and fatigue associated with this disease. Decrements in HR-QOL are also associated with an increased probability of no longer working, absence from work due to RA-associated sickness, and reduced productivity while at work or in the home, all of which have consequences for the patient as well as society. HR-QOL and productivity are thus important components in the assessment of outcomes in RA, and assessment of HR-QOL is now recommended in clinical trials that assess the efficacy of new treatments for RA. Measures to assess HR-QOL include the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36), EuroQol (EQ-5D) and the Health Utilities Index - Mark 3 (HUI3); these measures not only provide an indication of the clinical (i.e. statistical) efficacy of a treatment, but also provide information on whether this efficacy is truly 'meaningful' from a patient's perspective. These measures have been utilized in clinical trials of biological agents in patients with RA, including tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (etanercept, infliximab, adalimumab, certolizumab pegol and golimumab), the co-stimulatory inhibitor molecule abatacept, the B-cell depletion agent rituximab and the interleukin-6 receptor antagonist tocilizumab, and have demonstrated that these agents can significantly improve HR-QOL. Assessment of work productivity in patients with RA and the impact of treatment is a practical way to measure disability from RA from individual and societal perspectives. As RA affects women three times more frequently than men, there is also a critical need for productivity assessment within the home as well as participation in family/social/leisure activities. Data from recent trials of biological agents demonstrate that these agents can reverse disease-related decrements in productivity and limitations in participation in family

  14. High-Methionine Diet Attenuates Severity of Arthritis and Modulates IGF-I Related Gene Expressions in an Adjuvant Arthritis Rats Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxin Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis, a synthesized form of adjuvant arthritis exhibited throughout many animal species, inhibits liver function and circulation of IGF-I and contributes to the degradation of skeletal muscle mass. One of the primary goals of the present study is determining whether a high-Methionine (high-Met diet is capable of reducing the adverse effects of arthritis, namely, loss of body mass. Following adjuvant injection, forty arthritic rats were randomly assigned to either a control group with a basal diet or a high-Met group with the same basal diet + 0.5% Methionine. After 14 days all rats were terminated. The high-Met group exhibited an increase in body weight and food intake in comparison with the control group (P<0.05. High-Met diet debilitated arthritis-induced surges in the gastrocnemius in both atrogin-1 and the MuRF1 expressions; however, it was observed to have little to no effect on atrogin-1 and MuRF1 gene expression in soleus. At the same time, high-Met diet rats experienced a rise in IGF-I, with lowering of IGFBP-3 gene expression in the gastrocnemius and the soleus. These data suggest that arthritis severity can be partly attenuated by high-Met diet.

  15. Arthritis Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vision Leadership News Partners & Sponsors Careers Code of Ethics Financials Annual Report Contact Us Privacy Policy Terms & Conditions Donate Press Store Blog Community Local Offices Kids Get Arthritis Too Español Arthritis Today Social Media Newsletters Sign Up for E-Newsletters Arthritis Foundation ...

  16. Relation cellular- molecular between serum IL10 levels and hyperalgesia variation in adjuvant- induced arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenab Akhtari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regarding to the important anti-inflammatory role of IL10 during inflammation process and hyperalgesia and edema variation during CFA-induced arthritis and also the increase of Spinal mu opioid receptor (mOR expression, in this study researchers investigate the role of serum IL10 level on mOR expression and edema and hyperalgesia variation during different stages of Complete Freund`s Adjuvant (CFA - induced arthritis in male Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Mono-arthritis was induced by CFA and inflammatory symptoms (hyperalgesia and edema were assessed on 0, 3, 7, 14th and 21st days of study. Anti-IL10 was administered during the 21 days of study in different experimental groups. mOR expression were detected by western blotting on 0, 3,7, 14th and 21st days of study. Data was analyzed by SPSS statistical software version 19 with using one way ANOVA (post hoc Tokey's. Results: Our results showed that anti-IL10 administration in AA group (Adjuvant Arthritis caused an increase in the paw volume and hyperalgesia until 21st of study. Our study stated that there were no significant differences in spinal mOR expression between AA and AA+anti-IL10rats. Conclusion: Our study confirmed that anti-IL10administration caused to hyperalgesia and edema during AA inflammation. Also these findings suggested that mOR expression increased in chronic phase of AA inflammation, however an increase in the level of spinal mu opioid receptor (mOR expression during AA inflammation is not mediated directly via the effect of serum IL-10.

  17. Serum Biomarkers for Discrimination between Hepatitis C-Related Arthropathy and Early Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siloşi, Isabela; Boldeanu, Lidia; Biciuşcă, Viorel; Bogdan, Maria; Avramescu, Carmen; Taisescu, Citto; Padureanu, Vlad; Boldeanu, Mihail Virgil; Dricu, Anica; Siloşi, Cristian Adrian

    2017-06-19

    In the present study, we aimed to estimate the concentrations of cytokines (interleukin 6, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, TNF-α) and auto-antibodies (rheumatoid factor IgM isotype, IgM-RF, antinuclear auto-antibodies, ANA, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies IgG isotype, IgG anti-CCP3.1, anti-cardiolipin IgG isotype, IgG anti-aCL) in serum of patients with eRA (early rheumatoid arthritis) and HCVrA (hepatitis C virus-related arthropathy) and to assess the utility of IL-6, TNF-α together with IgG anti-CCP and IgM-RF in distinguishing between patients with true eRA and HCVrA, in the idea of using them as differential immunomarkers. Serum samples were collected from 54 patients (30 diagnosed with eRA-subgroup 1 and 24 with HCVrA-subgroup 2) and from 28 healthy control persons. For the evaluation of serum concentrations of studied cytokines and auto-antibodies, we used immunoenzimatique techniques. The serum concentrations of both proinflammatory cytokines were statistically significantly higher in patients of subgroup 1 and subgroup 2, compared to the control group ( p < 0.0001). Our study showed statistically significant differences of the mean concentrations only for ANA and IgG anti-CCP between subgroup 1 and subgroup 2. We also observed that IL-6 and TNF-α better correlated with auto-antibodies in subgroup 1 than in subgroup 2. In both subgroups of patients, ROC curves indicated that IL-6 and TNF-α have a higher diagnostic utility as markers of disease. In conclusion, we can say that, due to high sensitivity for diagnostic accuracy, determination of serum concentrations of IL-6 and TNF-α, possibly in combination with auto-antibodies, could be useful in the diagnosis and distinguishing between patients with true eRA and HCV patients with articular manifestation and may prove useful in the monitoring of the disease course.

  18. Psychological state is related to the remission of the Boolean-based definition of patient global assessment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusama, Mie; Miura, Yasushi; Yukioka, Kumiko; Kuroiwa, Takanori; Yukioka, Chikako; Inoue, Miyako; Nakanishi, Tae; Murata, Norikazu; Takai, Noriko; Higashi, Kayoko; Kuritani, Taro; Maeda, Keiji; Sano, Hajime; Yukioka, Masao; Nakahara, Hideko

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate whether the psychological state is related to the Boolean-based definition of patient global assessment (PGA) remission in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients with RA who met the criteria of swollen joint count (SJC) ≤ 1, tender joint count (TJC) ≤ 1 and C-reactive protein (CRP) ≤ 1 were divided into two groups, PGA remission group (PGA ≤ 1 cm) and non-remission group (PGA > 1 cm). Anxiety was evaluated utilizing the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety (HADS-A), while depression was evaluated with HADS-Depression (HADS-D) and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Comparison analyses were done between the PGA remission and non-remission groups in HADS-A, HADS-D and CES-D. Seventy-eight patients met the criteria for SJC ≤ 1, TJC ≤ 1 and CRP ≤ 1. There were no significant differences between the PGA remission group (n = 45) and the non-remission group (n = 33) in age, sex, disease duration and Steinbrocker's class and stage. HADS-A, HADS-D and CES-D scores were significantly lower in the PGA remission group. Patients with RA who did not meet the PGA remission criteria despite good disease condition were in a poorer psychological state than those who satisfied the Boolean-based definition of clinical remission. Psychological support might be effective for improvement of PGA, resulting in the attainment of true remission.

  19. Instrumental and Reactive Functions and Overt and Relational Forms of Aggression: Developmental Trajectories and Prospective Associations during Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojanen, Tiina; Kiefer, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the development of adolescent self-reported instrumental-overt, instrumental-relational, reactive-overt, and reactive-relational aggression during middle school ("N" = 384; 12-14 years; 53% boys). Growth modeling indicated average increases in instrumental-relational aggression, and decreases in reactive-overt and…

  20. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Barut

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common chronic rheumatic disease of unknown aetiology in childhood and predominantly presents with peripheral arthritis. The disease is divided into several subgroups, according to demographic characteristics, clinical features, treatment modalities and disease prognosis. Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, which is one of the most frequent disease subtypes, is characterized by recurrent fever and rash. Oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, common among young female patients, is usually accompanied by anti-nuclear antibodie positivity and anterior uveitis. Seropositive polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, an analogue of adult rheumatoid arthritis, is seen in less than 10% of paediatric patients. Seronegative polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, an entity more specific for childhood, appears with widespread large- and small-joint involvement. Enthesitis-related arthritis is a separate disease subtype, characterized by enthesitis and asymmetric lower-extremity arthritis. This disease subtype represents the childhood form of adult spondyloarthropathies, with human leukocyte antigen-B27 positivity and uveitis but commonly without axial skeleton involvement. Juvenile psoriatic arthritis is characterized by a psoriatic rash, accompanied by arthritis, nail pitting and dactylitis. Disease complications can vary from growth retardation and osteoporosis secondary to treatment and disease activity, to life-threatening macrophage activation syndrome with multi-organ insufficiency. With the advent of new therapeutics over the past 15 years, there has been a marked improvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis treatment and long-term outcome, without any sequelae. The treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients involves teamwork, including an experienced paediatric rheumatologist, an ophthalmologist, an orthopaedist, a paediatric psychiatrist and a physiotherapist. The primary goals

  1. An earlier time of scan is associated with greater threat-related amygdala reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranger, David A A; Margolis, Seth; Hariri, Ahmad R; Bogdan, Ryan

    2017-08-01

    Time-dependent variability in mood and anxiety suggest that related neural phenotypes, such as threat-related amygdala reactivity, may also follow a diurnal pattern. Here, using data from 1,043 young adult volunteers, we found that threat-related amygdala reactivity was negatively coupled with time of day, an effect which was stronger in the left hemisphere (β = -0.1083, p-fdr = 0.0012). This effect was moderated by subjective sleep quality (β = -0.0715, p-fdr = 0.0387); participants who reported average and poor sleep quality had relatively increased left amygdala reactivity in the morning. Bootstrapped simulations suggest that similar cross-sectional samples with at least 300 participants would be able to detect associations between amygdala reactivity and time of scan. In control analyses, we found no associations between time and V1 activation. Our results provide initial evidence that threat-related amygdala reactivity may vary diurnally, and that this effect is potentiated among individuals with average to low sleep quality. More broadly, our results suggest that considering time of scan in study design or modeling time of scan in analyses, as well as collecting additional measures of circadian variation, may be useful for understanding threat-related neural phenotypes and their associations with behavior, such as fear conditioning, mood and anxiety symptoms, and related phenotypes. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. Arthritis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Arthritis Page Content Article Body Arthritis is an inflammation ... with antibiotics, even if arthritis develops. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) has previously been ...

  3. Psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    In the past 10 years, a number of well-controlled surveys of psoriatic patients selective for the presence of arthritis have been conducted. A Canadian group reported that of 100 patients admitted to the hospital for treatment of psoriasis, 32 had clinical or radiologic evidence of psoriatic arthritis, and 17 had both types of evidence. Eighty patients with radiologic evidence of spinal or sacroiliac involvement were asymptomatic, and seven had clinical evidence of peripheral arthritis but without radiologic evidence. The authors concluded that psoriatic arthritis is a common event in patients with severe psoriasis and that it is associated with more extensive skin disease than is found in patients without arthritis. The information gathered from these epidemiologic studies coupled with clinical, radiologic, and serologic characteristics have provided the basis for the current belief that psoriatic arthritis is indeed a distinct entity

  4. Work Productivity and Costs Related to Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruntorádová, Klára; Klimeš, Jiří; Šedová, Liliana; Štolfa, Jiří; Doležal, Tomáš; Petříková, Alena

    2014-09-01

    To determine and compare the impact of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and psoriasis on work productivity, to calculate the productivity costs (PC), and to map out factors that influence (functional status and disease activity) work productivity. The Work Productivity and Activity Impairment questionnaire was used to evaluate productivity losses of patients with RA (n = 77), AS (n = 230), and psoriasis (n = 93). Demographic data, patient-reported outcomes (PROs) (Health Assessment Questionnaire [HAQ] and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index [BASDAI]), and clinical parameters (Disease Activity Score in 28 joints [DAS28], body surface area [BSA], and Psoriasis Area and Severity Index [PASI]) were collected. The correlations among PROs, clinical parameters, and overall productivity loss were examined, and multiple regression models were used to examine relationships among parameters and productivity loss. PC were calculated using the friction cost approach. Mean patient age and disease duration were 47.1 and 15.7 years, respectively. The mean HAQ and DAS28 in patients with RA were 1.22 and 5.6, respectively. The mean BASDAI score in patients with AS was 4.43. The mean BSA and PASI score in patients with psoriasis were 21.1% and 12.9, respectively. The percentage of patients with psoriatic arthritis (in those with psoriasis) was 24.7%. We did not find significant differences in Work Productivity and Activity Impairment domains among various diagnoses. Patients with AS, RA, and psoriasis reported overall work productivity losses of 40.9%, 42.9%, and 42.8%, respectively. Daily activity impairments were approximately 50.0%. Overall work productivity loss strongly correlated with PROs, whereas correlations with clinical parameters were weak. The HAQ and BASDAI were identified as major predictors of productivity impairment. The greatest loss in productivity was in those with psoriatic arthritis; however, it was not significant. In

  5. IFN-αα induced psoriatic arthritis and HCV-related liver cirrhosis. Therapeutic options and patient’s opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Piga

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in the setting of Psoriatic Arthritis is an additional variable to be considered in the therapeutic approach to the disease because of the complications of an immunosuppressive treatment in the course of a chronic infection and the possible hepatotoxicity of many drugs conventionally used to treat psoriatic arthritis. The case reported explores the therapeutic options in a patient with IFN-α induced psoriatic arthritis, characterised by severe arthritis and psoriasis but also the concomitant presence of HCV chronic hepatitis, in light of the patient’s concerns

  6. Oxytocin receptor genetic variation relates to empathy and stress reactivity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Sarina M; Saslow, Laura R; Garcia, Natalia; John, Oliver P; Keltner, Dacher

    2009-12-15

    Oxytocin, a peptide that functions as both a hormone and neurotransmitter, has broad influences on social and emotional processing throughout the body and the brain. In this study, we tested how a polymorphism (rs53576) of the oxytocin receptor relates to two key social processes related to oxytocin: empathy and stress reactivity. Compared with individuals homozygous for the G allele of rs53576 (GG), individuals with one or two copies of the A allele (AG/AA) exhibited lower behavioral and dispositional empathy, as measured by the "Reading the Mind in the Eyes" Test and an other-oriented empathy scale. Furthermore, AA/AG individuals displayed higher physiological and dispositional stress reactivity than GG individuals, as determined by heart rate response during a startle anticipation task and an affective reactivity scale. Our results provide evidence of how a naturally occurring genetic variation of the oxytocin receptor relates to both empathy and stress profiles.

  7. [Acute anterior myocardial infarction as presenting feature of antiphospholipid syndrome related lupus arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capilla-Geay, E; Poyet, R; Brocq, F X; Pons, F; Kerebel, S; Foucault, G; Jego, C; Cellarier, G R

    2016-05-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is an autoimmune disorder causing venous and arterial thrombosis. Acute coronary complications are rare but potentially dramatic. We report a 39-year-old woman who presented with an acute anterior myocardial infarction after intravenous corticosteroids as part of the treatment of lupus arthritis and revealing antiphospholipid syndrome. Emergency coronary angiography was performed with drug-eluting stent angioplasty despite the need for anticoagulation and dual antiplatelet therapy. Antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy management is pivotal in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome and acute coronary syndrome to prevent thrombosis recurrence. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Therapy and pharmacological properties of hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine in treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainsford, K D; Parke, Ann L; Clifford-Rashotte, Matthew; Kean, W F

    2015-10-01

    This review examines the pharmacokinetics, modes of action and therapeutic properties of the anti-malarial drugs, hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) and chloroquine (CQ), in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and related conditions, as well as osteoarthritis (OA). Both HCQ and CQ have historically been employed successfully for the treatment of SLE and RA for over 70 years. HCQ has been used extensively for SLE where it has a good reputation for controlling the dermatological complications in SLE. It has also been reported to effectively control the symptoms of Sjøgren's syndrome, as well as preventing thrombosis in phospholipid antibody (aPL) syndrome. In RA and SLE, HCQ is preferred because of the lower incidence of gastrointestinal adverse reactions compared with CQ and it might have a lower risk of ocular adverse reactions. There is increasing evidence that HCQ may reduce atherosclerosis and risks of cardiovascular disease in rheumatic patients. Both HCQ and CQ have been shown to improve glycaemia and reduce the risks of type II diabetes mellitus. Although both HCQ and CQ are effective in low-moderate RA, HCQ is now preferred as part of combination therapy for more severe disease. The advantages of combination therapy are that the doses of the individual drugs may be lowered so reducing adverse reactions. Both HCQ and CQ are diastereoisomers, have basic properties and are given as the sulphate and phosphate salts. While being relatively well absorbed orally and with good bioavailability, they have long and variable plasma terminal elimination half-lives (approximately 40-60 days). This reflects their high volume of distribution, V D (HCQ 44,000L; CQ 65,000L) which extends into aqueous compartments, long mean residence time (HCQ 1300 h; CQ 900 h) and with about half the drugs (metabolites) undergoing renal clearance. The strong binding to melanin reflects the ocular injury and dermatological properties of these drugs. The

  9. Stress-related anhedonia is associated with ventral striatum reactivity to reward and transdiagnostic psychiatric symptomatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral-Frías, Nadia S.; Nikolova, Yuliya S.; Michalski, Lindsay J.; Baranger, David A.A.; Hariri, Ahmad R.; Bogdan, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Background Early life stress (ELS) is consistently associated with increased risk for subsequent psychopathology. Individual differences in neural response to reward may confer vulnerability to stress-related psychopathology. Using data from the ongoing Duke Neurogenetics Study, the present study examined whether reward-related ventral striatum (VS) reactivity moderates the relationship between retrospectively reported ELS and anhedonic symptomatology. We further assessed whether individual differences in reward-related VS reactivity were associated with other depressive symptoms and problematic alcohol use via stress-related anhedonic symptoms and substance use-associated coping. Method Blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was collected while participants (n = 906) completed a card-guessing task, which robustly elicits VS reactivity. ELS, anhedonic symptoms, other depressive symptoms, coping behavior, and alcohol use behavior were assessed with self-report questionnaires. Linear regressions were run to examine whether VS reactivity moderated the relationship between ELS and anhedonic symptoms. Structural equation models examined whether this moderation was indirectly associated with other depression symptoms and problematic alcohol use through its association with anhedonia. Results Analyses of data from 820 participants passing quality control procedures revealed that the VS × ELS interaction was associated with anhedonic symptoms (p = 0.011). Moreover, structural equation models indirectly linked this interaction to non-anhedonic depression symptoms and problematic alcohol use through anhedonic symptoms and substance-related coping. Conclusions These findings suggest that reduced VS reactivity to reward is associated with increased risk for anhedonia in individuals exposed to ELS. Such stress-related anhedonia is further associated with other depressive symptoms and problematic alcohol use through substance-related coping

  10. Neuroticism and extraversion in relation to physiological stress reactivity during adolescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, Brittany E.; Stam, Jacqueline; Huizink, Anja C.; Willemen, Agnes M.; Westenberg, P. Michiel; Branje, Susan; Meeus, W.H.J.; Koot, Hans M.; van Lier, Pol A. C.

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined mean level and change in extraversion and neuroticism across adolescence in relation to physiological stress reactivity to social evaluation. Adolescents (n=327) from the Dutch general population reported on personality measures at five annual assessments. At age 17 years,

  11. Display Rule Application in a Disappointing Situation and Children's Emotional Reactivity: Relations with Social Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, David J.; O'Neil, Robin; Parke, Ross D.

    2000-01-01

    Examined associations among emotion display rule use, negative emotional reactivity, and fourth-graders' social competence. Found negative relation between self-reported negative emotional coping strategies and observed measures of display rule use. Found children who reported using more effective coping strategies for managing negative emotions…

  12. Serological cross-reactivity between Merkel cell polyomavirus and two closely related chimpanzee polyomaviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme T J Nicol

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic analyses based on the major capsid protein sequence indicate that Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV and chimpanzee polyomaviruses (PtvPyV1, PtvPyV2, and similarly Trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyomavirus (TSPyV and the orangutan polyomavirus (OraPyV1 are closely related. The existence of cross-reactivity between these polyomaviruses was therefore investigated. The findings indicated serological identity between the two chimpanzee polyomaviruses investigated and a high level of cross-reactivity with Merkel cell polyomavirus. In contrast, cross-reactivity was not observed between TSPyV and OraPyV1. Furthermore, specific antibodies to chimpanzee polyomaviruses were detected in chimpanzee sera by pre-incubation of sera with the different antigens, but not in human sera.

  13. Reactivation of Reward-Related Patterns from Single Past Episodes Supports Memory-Based Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, G Elliott; Büchel, Christian

    2016-03-09

    Rewarding experiences exert a strong influence on later decision making. While decades of neuroscience research have shown how reinforcement gradually shapes preferences, decisions are often influenced by single past experiences. Surprisingly, relatively little is known about the influence of single learning episodes. Although recent work has proposed a role for episodes in decision making, it is largely unknown whether and how episodic experiences contribute to value-based decision making and how the values of single episodes are represented in the brain. In multiple behavioral experiments and an fMRI experiment, we tested whether and how rewarding episodes could support later decision making. Participants experienced episodes of high reward or low reward in conjunction with incidental, trial-unique neutral pictures. In a surprise test phase, we found that participants could indeed remember the associated level of reward, as evidenced by accurate source memory for value and preferences to re-engage with rewarded objects. Further, in a separate experiment, we found that high-reward objects shown as primes before a gambling task increased financial risk taking. Neurally, re-exposure to objects in the test phase led to significant reactivation of reward-related patterns. Importantly, individual variability in the strength of reactivation predicted value memory performance. Our results provide a novel demonstration that affect-related neural patterns are reactivated during later experience. Reactivation of value information represents a mechanism by which memory can guide decision making. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/362868-13$15.00/0.

  14. Examination of arthritis-related work place activity limitations and intermittent disability over four-and-a-half years and its relationship to job modifications and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gignac, Monique A M; Cao, Xingshan; Tang, Kenneth; Beaton, Dorcas E

    2011-07-01

    To examine the type, degree, and episodic nature of arthritis-related work place activity limitations and the consistency of the relationship of activity limitations to job modifications and work place outcomes. Using an interviewer-administered structured questionnaire, individuals with osteoarthritis (OA) or inflammatory arthritis (IA) were interviewed at 4 time points, 18 months apart. At baseline, all participants (n = 490; 381 women, 109 men) were employed. Respondents were recruited using community advertising and from rheumatology and rehabilitation clinics. The Workplace Activity Limitations Scale (WALS) assessed arthritis-related disability with job tasks. Job modifications/accommodations (e.g., scheduling changes), work place outcomes (e.g., absenteeism), demographics, illness, and work context were also measured. Repeated cross-sectional logistic regressions examined levels of WALS disability with job modifications and outcomes at each time point. Similar levels of activity limitations were found comparing OA and IA with fewer difficulties with global aspects of work (e.g., scheduling) than with specific tasks (e.g., working with hands). Three-quarters of the participants had episodic or intermittent WALS difficulty over time. Medium and high levels of work place activity limitations were significantly associated with job modifications, and high WALS difficulty was consistently related to negative work outcomes. Many individuals with arthritis report some difficulty with work place activities. However, these difficulties are often intermittent and may not result in changes to work productivity until they are consistently high. This is important for designing work place interventions and for employers, insurers, and the government to understand to avoid viewing individuals with arthritis as a permanent drain on work place and health resources. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  15. Clinical features of children with enthesitis-related juvenile idiopathic arthritis / juvenile spondyloarthritis followed in a French tertiary care pediatric rheumatology centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goirand, Maxime; Breton, Sylvain; Chevallier, Frédéric; Duong, Ngoc-Phoi; Uettwiller, Florence; Melki, Isabelle; Mouy, Richard; Wouters, Carine; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Job-Deslandre, Chantal; Quartier, Pierre

    2018-04-02

    Childhood-onset spondyloarthropathies usually start with enthesitis and peripheral arthritis. However, axial disease may develop afterward. Patients are most often classified, following revised (Edmonton 2011) ILAR criteria, as enthesitis-related arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, or unclassified juvenile idiopathic arthritis, particularly in cases of psoriasis in the patient or a first-degree relative. In adults, peripheral spondyloarthritis is classified by ASAS criteria. We retrospectively studied patients with childhood-onset spondyloarthropathies followed for more than one year in our referral centre. We did not exclude patients with a personal or familial history of psoriasis. We included 114 patients followed between January 2008 and December 2015 for a median of 2.5 years (IQR = 2.3). Sixty-nine per-cent of patients fulfilled the revised ILAR classification criteria for enthesitis-related arthritis, and 92% the ASAS criteria for peripheral spondyolarthritis (p <  0.001). Axial disease and sacroiliitis were rare at disease onset. However, they appeared during follow-up in 63% and 47% of cases respectively, after a median disease duration of 2.6 (IC 95% [2.2-4.4]) and 5.3 years (IC 95% [4.1-7.7]), respectively. Multivariable analysis showed that familial history of spondyloarthritis was associated with the presence of sacroiliitis and active disease at the latest follow-up (OR = 3.61 [1.5-8.7], p <  0.01 and 2.98 [1.2-7.3], p = 0.02, respectively). Axial involvement developed in most patients within five years. Revised Edmonton criteria were less sensitive than ASAS criteria to classify patients as having childhood-onset spondyloarthropathies. The main risk factor for both sacroiliitis and persistent active disease was a familial history of spondyloarthritis.

  16. Cognitive reactivity to success and failure relate uniquely to manic and depression tendencies and combine in bipolar tendencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raes, Filip; Ghesquière, Ine; Van Gucht, Dinska

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined simultaneously the relations between cognitive reactivity to success and failure, on the one hand, and depression, manic, and bipolar tendencies, on the other hand. Participants (161 students) completed measures of success and failure reactivity, current manic and depressive symptoms, and tendencies towards depression, mania, and bipolarity. Results showed that respondents with a greater tendency towards depression evidenced greater (negative) reactivity to failure, whereas those with a greater tendency toward mania evidenced greater (positive) reactivity to success. Depression vulnerability was unrelated to success reactivity, and manic vulnerability was unrelated to failure reactivity. Tendencies toward bipolarity correlated significantly with both failure and success reactivity in a negative and positive manner, respectively. These findings add to the growing body of literature, suggesting that different features or cognitive tendencies are related to depression vulnerability versus manic vulnerability and imply that these "mirrored" cognitive features both form part of vulnerability to bipolar disorder.

  17. Cognitive Reactivity to Success and Failure Relate Uniquely to Manic and Depression Tendencies and Combine in Bipolar Tendencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Raes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined simultaneously the relations between cognitive reactivity to success and failure, on the one hand, and depression, manic, and bipolar tendencies, on the other hand. Participants (161 students completed measures of success and failure reactivity, current manic and depressive symptoms, and tendencies towards depression, mania, and bipolarity. Results showed that respondents with a greater tendency towards depression evidenced greater (negative reactivity to failure, whereas those with a greater tendency toward mania evidenced greater (positive reactivity to success. Depression vulnerability was unrelated to success reactivity, and manic vulnerability was unrelated to failure reactivity. Tendencies toward bipolarity correlated significantly with both failure and success reactivity in a negative and positive manner, respectively. These findings add to the growing body of literature, suggesting that different features or cognitive tendencies are related to depression vulnerability versus manic vulnerability and imply that these “mirrored” cognitive features both form part of vulnerability to bipolar disorder.

  18. Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Topics Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases Arthritis is often used to refer to any ... primary immunodeficiency syndrome March 11, 2013 Arthritis and Rheumatic Disease News Research Brief | January 9, 2017 Tofacitinib Shows ...

  19. High Concentrations of Angiopoietin-Like Protein 4 Detected in Serum from Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Can Be Explained by Non-Specific Antibody Reactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Makoveichuk, Elena; Ruge, Toralph; Nilsson, Solveig; S?dergren, Anna; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2017-01-01

    Angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) is suggested to be a master regulator of plasma triglyceride metabolism. Our aim was to study whether the previously reported high levels of ANGPTL4 detected in serum from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by ELISA was due to any specific molecular form of this protein (oligomers, monomers or fragments). ANGPTL4 levels were first determined in serum from 68 RA patients and 43 age and sex matched control subjects and the mean values differed by a fac...

  20. Retinal toxicity related to hydroxychloroquine in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telek, Hande Husniye; Yesilirmak, Nilufer; Sungur, Gulten; Ozdemir, Yaprak; Yesil, Nesibe Karahan; Ornek, Firdevs

    2017-12-01

    To compare the retinal toxicity due to hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) use in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using multifocal electroretinography (mfERG), fundus autofluorescence (FAF) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Patients who were using HCQ due to SLE and RA, and healthy subjects evaluated in this study. Central foveal thickness (CFT), inner-outer segment (IS-OS) junction irregularity, retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, mfERG and FAF measurements were performed to evaluate retinal toxicity. Study included 35 eyes of 35 SLE patients, 40 eyes of 40 RA patients and 20 eyes of 20 healthy subjects. In SLE group, retinal abnormality was found in three eyes with mfERG, in one eye with FAF and in four eyes with OCT. In RA group, retinal abnormality was found in 10 eyes with mfERG, in five eyes with FAF and in nine eyes with OCT. A statistically significant difference was found with respect to mfERG between "eyes with abnormal responses and without abnormal responses" and "eyes with abnormal responses and controls" (p < 0.05). A statistically significant difference was found with respect to CFT between "eyes with IS-OS junction irregularities and without IS-OS junction irregularities" and "eyes with/without IS-OS junction irregularities and controls" (p < 0.05). The use of HCQ seems to cause retinal toxicity more often in RA patients compared to SLE patients. For the early detection of retinal changes, OCT and mfERG can be used as screening tools due to their higher sensitivity rates compared to other tests.

  1. [Low bone mineral density in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Prevalence and related factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo Zavala, Rocío; Núñez Cuadros, Esmeralda; Martín Pedraz, Laura; Díaz-Cordovés Rego, Gisela; Sierra Salinas, Carlos; Urda Cardona, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    Height adjustment is currently recommended for Z-score bone mineral density (BMD) assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. At present there are no studies that evaluate the prevalence of low BMD in paediatric patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) in Spain following current recommendations. To evaluate low BMD in JIA in paediatric patients with JIA in Spain following the latest recommendations, as well as to assess associated factors. Observational cross-sectional study of Spanish JIA patients from 5 to 16 years-old, followed-up in a Paediatric Rheumatology Unit between July 2014 and July 2015. Anthropometric, clinical and treatment data were recorded. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, and bone metabolism parameters were collected, and a completed diet and exercise questionnaire was obtained. A total of 92 children participated. The population prevalence estimation of low BMD was less than 5% (95% CI). A significant positive correlation was found in the multiple linear regression analysis between the body mass index percentile (B: 0.021; P<.001) and lean mass index (B: 0.0002; P=.012), and BMD Z-score adjusted for height (Z-SAH). A significant negative correlation was found between fat mass index (B: -0.0001; P=.018) and serum type I collagen N-propeptide (B: -0,0006; P=.036) and Z-SAH. Low BMD prevalence in JIA patients in our population is low. An adequate nutritional status and the prevalence of lean over fat mass seem to promote the acquisition of bone mass. Those JIA patients with lower BMD could be subjected to an increase of bone turnover. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Work-related social support modulates effects of early life stress on limbic reactivity during stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leicht-Deobald, Ulrich; Bruch, Heike; Bönke, Luisa; Stevense, Amie; Fan, Yan; Bajbouj, Malek; Grimm, Simone

    2017-12-15

    Early life stress (ELS) affects stress- reactivity via limbic brain regions implicated such as hippocampus and amygdala. Social support is a major protective factor against ELS effects, while subjects with ELS experience reportedly perceive less of it in their daily life. The workplace, where most adults spend a substantial amount of time in their daily lives, might serve as a major resource for social support. Since previous data demonstrated that social support attenuates stress reactivity, we here used a psychosocial stress task to test the hypothesis that work-related social support modulates the effects of ELS. Results show decreased amygdala reactivity during stress in ELS subjects who report high levels of work- related social support, thereby indicating a signature for reduced stress reactivity. However, this effect was only observable on the neural, but not on the behavioral level, since social support had no buffering effect regarding the subjective experience of stress in daily life as well as regarding feelings of uncontrollability induced by the stress task. Accordingly, our data suggest that subjects with ELS experiences might benefit from interventions targeted at lowering their subjective stress levels by helping them to better perceive the availability of social support in their daily lives.

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arthritis Program CDC-RFA-DP18-1803 NOFO FAQs Attachment 1 Attachment 2 Key Public Health Messages Policy Resources Partners ... mood and the ability to move. Classes take place at local Ys, parks, and community centers. These ...

  4. Rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Firestein's Textbook of Rheumatology . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 70. Garneau E. Rheumatoid arthritis. In: ... FF, ed. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2018 . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:1125-1128. June RR, Moreland LW. Rheumatoid ...

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health- ... on this website. Copyright Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center © 2018 Patient Privacy Johns Hopkins Rheumatology

  6. Long-Term Health-Related Quality of Life in German Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in Comparison to German General Population

    OpenAIRE

    Barth, Swaantje; Haas, Johannes-Peter; Schlichtiger, Jenny; Molz, Johannes; Bisdorff, Betty; Michels, Hartmut; Hügle, Boris; Radon, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Objective Aims of the study were to investigate health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in adult patients with former diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA), to compare their HRQOL with the general population and to identify factors related to a poor outcome. Methods In 2012, a cross-sectional survey was performed by mailing a questionnaire to a large cohort of former and current patients of the German Centre for Rheumatology in Children and Adolescents. Only adult patients (?18 year...

  7. IMAGING OF PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D'Angelo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Imaging of psoriatic arthritis (PsA is important for two reasons: the differential diagnosis from other arthritides and the assessment of structural damage that can be inhibited by the new drugs such as the anti-TNFα agents. Plain film radiographic findings of peripheral arthritis have been important in elaborating the concept of PsA as a separate disease entity. Characteristic aspects of psoriatic peripheral arthritis help the differentiation from rheumatoid arthritis. High-resolution ultrasonography (US, US combined with power Doppler (PDUS and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can be used to image joint synovitis of PsA. Radiologic features of spondylitis associated with psoriasis are similar to spondylitis associated with reactive arthritis and differ from those of primary ankylosing spondylitis (AS and the spondylitis associated with inflammatory bowel disease. MRI is very sensitive for the early diagnosis of sacroiliitis. There have been no MRI studies on the spine of patients with PsA. In primary AS bone oedema in the vertebral bodies is an indicator of active disease and can ameliorate during anti-TNFα therapy. Historically, plain film radiography have played a pivotal role in defining enthesitis lesions of SpA. However, entheseal bone changes appear late. US and MRI have proved to be a highly sensitive and non invasive tools. Recent US and MRI studies on both finger and toe dactylitis have established that dactylitis is due to flexor tenosynovitis and marked adjacent soft tissue swelling with a variable degree of small joint synovitis. There is no evidence of enthesitis of the insertion of the flexor digitorum tendons and of the attachment of the caspsule of the digit joints. Key words: Enthesitis, dactylitis, spondyloarthritis, ultrasound, magnetic resonance, imaging

  8. Rheumatoid arthritis and the incidence of influenza and influenza-related complications: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blumentals William A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA are known to be at increased risk of infection, particularly if they are taking drugs with immunomodulatory effects. There is a need for more information on the risk of influenza in patients with RA. Methods A retrospective cohort study was carried out using data gathered from a large US commercial health insurance database (Thomson Reuters Medstat MarketScan from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2007. Patients were ≥18 years of age, with at least two RA claims diagnoses. The database was scanned for incidence of seasonal influenza and its complications on or up to 30 days after an influenza diagnosis in RA patients and matched controls. Other factors accounted for included medical conditions, use of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs, use of biological agents, influenza vaccination and high- or low-dose corticosteroids. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs were calculated for influenza and its complications in patients with RA. Results 46,030 patients with RA and a matching number of controls had a median age of 57 years. The incidence of influenza was higher in RA patients than in controls (409.33 vs 306.12 cases per 100,000 patient-years, and there was a 2.75-fold increase in incidence of complications in RA. Presence or absence of DMARDs or biologics had no significant effect. The adjusted IRR of influenza was statistically significant in patients aged 60–69 years, and especially among men. A significantly increased rate of influenza complications was observed in women and in both genders combined (but not in men only when all age groups were combined. In general, the risk of influenza complications was similar in RA patients not receiving DMARDs or biologics to that in all RA patients. Pneumonia rates were significantly higher in women with RA. Rates of stroke/myocardial infarction (MI were higher in men, although statistical significance was borderline. Conclusions RA is

  9. Treatment efficacy and methotrexate-related toxicity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis receiving methotrexate in combination with adalimumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmester, Gerd R; Kaeley, Gurjit S; Kavanaugh, Arthur F; Gabay, Cem; MacCarter, Daryl K; Nash, Peter; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Goss, Sandra L; Rodila, Ramona; Chen, Kun; Kupper, Hartmut; Kalabic, Jasmina

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with a combination of methotrexate (MTX)+adalimumab (ADA) is more effective than ADA monotherapy. We assessed the toxicity of different doses of MTX and treatment efficacy of ADA+MTX in two trials. Data originated from CONCERTO, in patients with early RA initiating ADA+ 2.5, 5, 10 or 20 mg/week MTX for 26 weeks; and MUSICA, in patients with an inadequate response to MTX initiating ADA+ 7.5 or 20 mg/week MTX for 24 weeks. Efficacy was assessed by the American College of Rheumatology 50 (ACR50). Patient-reported MTX-related toxicity information was collected at each visit on 18 prespecified MTX-related adverse events (AE) in the MTX label. In CONCERTO, ACR50 rates increased over time, ranging from 54% to 68% at week 26, while AE rates remained steady, ranging from 2.4% to 17.8% at week 26. Of 395 patients, 113 (28.6%) reported 345 MTX-related AEs, including one serious AE (SAE, excessive fatigue and/or malaise); 10 AEs (in two patients) led to study discontinuation. In MUSICA, ACR50 rates increased over time, and were 32.3% and 37.5% at week 24, while MTX-related AE rates remained steady and were 6.5% at week 24. Of 309 patients, 71 (23%) reported 185 MTX-related AEs, including 5 SAEs (four infections and one fever/chills); six AEs (in four patients) led to study discontinuation. In patients with RA initiating ADA+MTX combination, treatment efficacy was achieved and increased throughout both trials, while rates of MTX-related AEs remained steady. MTX-related AEs were observed in up to 30% of patients and most were mild. MTX was discontinued by 0.5%-1.3% of patients. MUSICA (NCT01185288), CONCERTO (NCT01185301), Post results.

  10. Emotional hyper-reactivity in borderline personality disorder is related to trauma and interpersonal themes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Christina; Arens, Elisabeth A; Stopsack, Malte; Spitzer, Carsten; Barnow, Sven

    2014-12-15

    Heightened emotional reactivity is one of the core features of borderline personality disorder (BPD). However, recent findings could not provide evidence for a general emotional hyper-reactivity in BPD. The present study examines the emotional responding to self-relevant pictures in dependency of the thematic category (e.g., trauma, interpersonal interaction) in patients with BPD. Therefore, women with BPD (n=31), women with major depression disorder (n=29) and female healthy controls (n=33) rated pictures allocated to thematically different categories (violence, sexual abuse, interaction, non-suicidal self-injury, and suicide) regarding self-relevance, arousal, valence and the urge of non-suicidal self-injury. Compared to both control groups, patients with BPD reported higher self-relevance regarding all categories, but significantly higher emotional ratings only for pictures showing sexual abuse and interpersonal themes. In addition, patients with BPD and comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder showed higher emotional reactivity in violence pictures. Our data provide clear evidence that patients with BPD show a specific emotional hyper-reactivity with respect to schema-related triggers like trauma and interpersonal situations. Future studies are needed to investigate physiological responses to these self-relevant themes in patients with BPD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Elevated tissue transglutaminase antibodies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis children: Relation to neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and disease activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha E. Gheith

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Subclinical gut inflammation is described in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, so has joint involvement been related to celiac disease (CD. The well-known involvement of tissue transglutaminase (tTG in the pathogenesis of CD stimulated progress in the field of autoimmune diseases. Aim of the work: To screen JIA children for tTG antibodies and to detect its relation to the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR and disease activity. Patients and methods: The study included 44 JIA children with 44 matched controls. All subjects had no GIT symptoms suggestive of CD. Disease activity was assessed using the juvenile arthritis disease activity score in 27 joints (JADAS-27. The tTG antibodies (IgA and IgG were assessed. Results: The patients mean age was 12.5 ± 2.8 years and disease duration 5.01 ± 2.9 years; Female:Male 3.4:1. The mean JADAS-27 score was 12.6 ± 2.04. tTG antibodies were positive in 43.2% of the patients compared to 18.2% control (p = 0.01. Antibodies positivity was comparable according to gender and subtypes. The NLR in JIA children (1.62 ± 0.58 was significantly higher than in control (1.3 ± 0.5 (p = 0.006. Those with positive tTG antibodies had a significantly reduced body mass index (p = 0.02 and increased NLR (p = 0.02 compared to those with negative tTG. Only NLR and JADAS-27 would significantly predict antibodies positivity (p = 0.037 and p = 0.04, respectively. Conclusion: Increased tTG antibodies are frequent in JIA children raising the possibility of an associated subclinical CD. Markedly reduced BMI and increased NLR could forecast the presence of these antibodies. In addition to the JADAS-27, the NLR is a simple test that could predict this association and could be a useful biomarker.

  12. Relations of children's proactive and reactive assertiveness to peer acceptance: moderating effects of social interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han-Jong

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies on the social outcome of assertiveness reported mixed findings, failing to support the assumption that assertiveness promotes peer acceptance. In an attempt to provide explanations for the inconsistencies in prior findings, this study proposed making a distinction between proactive and reactive assertiveness and examined the moderating effects of social interest. A total of 441 fifth and sixth graders (232 boys, 209 girls; M age = 10.6 yr., SD = 0.6) participated in the study. Results indicated that proactive assertiveness was positively related to peer acceptance regardless of social interest. By contrast, reactive assertiveness was positively related to peer acceptance but only when social interest is high. When social interest is low, it was negatively associated with peer acceptance.

  13. Synthesis of gallium nitride and related oxides via ammonobasic reactive sublimation (ARS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández-Hernández, Luis Alberto; Aguilar-Hernández, Jorge R.; Mejía-García, Concepción; Cruz-Gandarilla, Francisco; Contreras-Puente, Gerardo [Escuela Superior de Física y Matemáticas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Ciudad de México (Mexico); Moure-Flores, Francisco de [Facultad de Química, Materiales-Energía, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro (Mexico); Melo-Pereira, Osvaldo de, E-mail: schwarzerengelxv@hotmail.com [Facultad de Física, Universidad de La Habana, La Habana (Cuba)

    2017-11-15

    Ammonobasic reactive sublimation (ARS) is proposed as a novel method to synthesize GaN and related oxides. Results indicate that GaN growth occurs by a nitriding process of Ga and related oxides, establishing a direct dependence on NH{sub 4} OH amount added as a primary chemical reactive. The samples were grown on p-type Si (111) substrates inside a tube furnace, employing GaN powder and NH{sub 4} OH. The characterizations of the samples were carried out by XRD, SEM, EDS and PL techniques, revealing the influence of NH{sub 4} OH on the improvement of GaN synthesis and the enhancement of its optical and structural properties. (author)

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Appointments • Support Our Research Arthritis Information Disease Information Rheumatoid Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Ankylosing Spondylitis Osteoarthritis Gout Lyme Disease Osteoporosis News Rheumatoid Arthritis News ...

  15. Qigong Exercise and Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Marks

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Arthritis is a chronic condition resulting in considerable disability, particularly in later life. Aims: The first aim of this review was to summarize and synthesize the research base concerning the use of Qigong exercises as a possible adjunctive strategy for promoting well-being among adults with arthritis. A second was to provide related intervention directives for health professionals working or who are likely to work with this population in the future. Methods: Material specifically focusing on examining the nature of Qigong for minimizing arthritis disability, pain and dependence and for improving life quality was sought. Results: Collectively, despite almost no attention to this topic, available data reveal that while more research is indicated, Qigong exercises—practiced widely in China for many centuries as an exercise form, mind-body and relaxation technique—may be very useful as an intervention strategy for adults with different forms of painful disabling arthritis. Conclusion: Health professionals working with people who have chronic arthritis can safely recommend these exercises to most adults with this condition with the expectation they will heighten the life quality of the individual, while reducing pain and depression in adults with this condition.

  16. Fatal acute pancreatitis associated with reactive AA amyloidosis in rheumatoid arthritis with end-stage renal disease: a report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Takeshi; Sato, Hiroe; Hasegawa, Hisashi; Wada, Yoko; Murakami, Shuichi; Saeki, Takako; Nakano, Masaaki; Narita, Ichiei

    2011-01-01

    We report three cases of fatal pancreatitis associated with systemic AA amyloidosis in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). All of the patients showed end-stage renal failure, and hemodialysis was introduced during the course of treatment. Autopsy was performed on two of the three patients, and this revealed amyloid deposition on the vascular walls in the pancreas. It was strongly suggested that the acute pancreatitis in all three patients was attributable to deposition of amyloid in vascular and pancreatic tissues. Acute pancreatitis is considered to be a rare complication of end-stage amyloidosis associated with RA, and is frequently fatal. It is important to treat RA patients intensively to avoid such deposition of amyloid.

  17. Physiological stress reactivity and physical and relational aggression: the moderating roles of victimization, type of stressor, and child gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray-Close, Dianna; Crick, Nicki R; Tseng, Wan-Ling; Lafko, Nicole; Burrows, Casey; Pitula, Clio; Ralston, Peter

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the association between physiological reactivity to peer stressors and physical and relational aggression. Potential moderation by actual experiences of peer maltreatment (i.e., physical and relational victimization) and gender were also explored. One hundred ninety-six children (M = 10.11 years, SD = 0.64) participated in a laboratory stress protocol during which their systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and skin conductance reactivity to recounting a relational stressor (e.g., threats to relationships) and an instrumental stressor (e.g., threats to physical well-being, dominance, or property) were assessed. Teachers provided reports of aggression and victimization. In both boys and girls, physical aggression was associated with blunted physiological reactivity to relational stress and heightened physiological reactivity to instrumental stress, particularly among youth higher in victimization. In girls, relational aggression was most robustly associated with blunted physiological reactivity to relational stressors, particularly among girls exhibiting higher levels of relational victimization. In boys, relational aggression was associated with heightened physiological reactivity to both types of stressors at higher levels of peer victimization and blunted physiological reactivity to both types of stressors at lower levels of victimization. Results underscore the shared and distinct emotional processes underlying physical and relational aggression in boys and girls.

  18. Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies are associated with neutrophil extracellular traps in the sputum in relatives of rheumatoid arthritis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoruelle, M. Kristen; Harrall, Kylie K.; Ho, Linh; Purmalek, Monica M.; Seto, Nickie L.; Rothfuss, Heather M.; Weisman, Michael H.; Solomon, Joshua J.; Fischer, Aryeh; Okamoto, Yuko; Kelmenson, Lindsay B.; Parish, Mark C.; Feser, Marie; Fleischer, Chelsie; Anderson, Courtney; Mahler, Michael; Norris, Jill M.; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Cherrington, Brian D.; Holers, V. Michael; Deane, Kevin D.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Studies suggest that rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-related autoimmunity is initiated at a mucosal site. However, the factors associated with the mucosal generation of this autoimmunity are unknown, especially in individuals who are at-risk for future RA. Therefore, we tested anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibodies in the sputum of RA-free first-degree relatives (FDRs) of RA patients and patients with classifiable RA. Methods We evaluated induced sputum and serum from 67 FDRs and 20 RA subjects for anti-CCP-IgA and anti-CCP-IgG, with cut-off levels for positivity determined in a control population. Sputum was also evaluated for cell counts, neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) using sandwich ELISAs for protein/nucleic acid complexes, and total citrulline. Results Sputum anti-CCP-IgA and/or anti-CCP-IgG was positive in 17/67 (25%) FDRs and 14/20 (70%) RA subjects, including a portion of FDRs who were serum anti-CCP negative. In FDRs, elevations of sputum anti-CCP-IgA and anti-CCP-IgG were associated with elevated sputum cell counts and levels of NET complexes. Anti-CCP-IgA was associated with ever-smoking and elevated sputum citrulline levels. Conclusions Anti-CCP is elevated in the sputum of FDRs, including seronegative FDRs, suggesting the lung may be one site of anti-CCP generation in this population. The association of anti-CCP with elevated cell counts and NET levels in FDRs supports a hypothesis that local airway inflammation and NET formation may drive anti-CCP production in the lung and may promote the early stages of RA development. Longitudinal studies are needed to follow the evolution of these processes relative to the development of systemic autoimmunity and articular RA. PMID:28182854

  19. MRI of the transverse and alar ligaments in rheumatoid arthritis: feasibility and relations to atlantoaxial subluxation and disease activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetti, Nils; Kraakenes, Jostein; Roervik, Jarle; Espeland, Ansgar [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Section for Radiology, Department of Surgical Sciences, Bergen (Norway); Alsing, Rikke; Brun, Johan Gorgas [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Section for Rheumatology, Institute of Medicine, Bergen (Norway); Gilhus, Nils Erik [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Section for Neurology, Department of Clinical Medicine, Bergen (Norway)

    2010-03-15

    Dysfunctional transverse and alar craniovertebral ligaments can cause instability and osseous destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study examined (1) the feasibility of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of these ligaments in RA and (2) the relation between ligament high-signal changes and atlantoaxial subluxation and RA duration/severity. Consecutive RA patients (n=46) underwent clinical examination, functional radiography, and high-resolution MRI. Two blinded radiologists rated MRI image quality, graded ligament high-signal changes 0-3 on proton-weighted sequences using an existing grading system, and assessed cervical spine rheumatic changes on short tau inversion recovery images. Agreement was analyzed using kappa and relations using multiple logistic regression. MRI images had good quality in 42 (91.3%) of 46 patients and were interpretable in 44 (32 women and 12 men, median age/disease duration 60.4/9.1 years). MRI grades 2-3 changes of the transverse and alar ligaments showed moderate and good interobserver agreement (kappa 0.59 and 0.78), respectively, and prevalence 31.8% and 34.1%. Such ligament changes were more frequent with increasing anterior atlantoaxial subluxation (p=0.012 transverse, p=0.028 alar), higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p=0.003 transverse), positive rheumatoid factor (p=0.002 alar), and neck pain (p = 0.004 alar). This first study of high-resolution MRI of these ligaments in RA showed high feasibility and relations with atlantoaxial subluxation, RA disease activity, and neck pain. The clinical usefulness of such MRI needs further evaluation. (orig.)

  20. MRI of the transverse and alar ligaments in rheumatoid arthritis: feasibility and relations to atlantoaxial subluxation and disease activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetti, Nils; Kraakenes, Jostein; Roervik, Jarle; Espeland, Ansgar; Alsing, Rikke; Brun, Johan Gorgas; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2010-01-01

    Dysfunctional transverse and alar craniovertebral ligaments can cause instability and osseous destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study examined (1) the feasibility of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of these ligaments in RA and (2) the relation between ligament high-signal changes and atlantoaxial subluxation and RA duration/severity. Consecutive RA patients (n=46) underwent clinical examination, functional radiography, and high-resolution MRI. Two blinded radiologists rated MRI image quality, graded ligament high-signal changes 0-3 on proton-weighted sequences using an existing grading system, and assessed cervical spine rheumatic changes on short tau inversion recovery images. Agreement was analyzed using kappa and relations using multiple logistic regression. MRI images had good quality in 42 (91.3%) of 46 patients and were interpretable in 44 (32 women and 12 men, median age/disease duration 60.4/9.1 years). MRI grades 2-3 changes of the transverse and alar ligaments showed moderate and good interobserver agreement (kappa 0.59 and 0.78), respectively, and prevalence 31.8% and 34.1%. Such ligament changes were more frequent with increasing anterior atlantoaxial subluxation (p=0.012 transverse, p=0.028 alar), higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p=0.003 transverse), positive rheumatoid factor (p=0.002 alar), and neck pain (p = 0.004 alar). This first study of high-resolution MRI of these ligaments in RA showed high feasibility and relations with atlantoaxial subluxation, RA disease activity, and neck pain. The clinical usefulness of such MRI needs further evaluation. (orig.)

  1. Health-related quality of life: validity, reliability, and responsiveness of SF-36, 15D, EQ-5D RAQoL, and HAQ in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, L.; Sørensen, J.; Østergaard, Morten

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare validity, reliability, and responsiveness of generic and disease specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) instruments in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Two samples of patients completed the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36), EuroQol (EQ)-5D...... and VAS pain were responsive to both improvement and deterioration. CONCLUSION: All instruments were valid measures for HRQOL in RA. The RAQoL and HAQ displayed the best reliability, while the SF-36 bodily pain scale and VAS pain were the most responsive. The choice of instrument should depend......, 15D, Rheumatoid Arthritis Quality of Life Scale (RAQoL), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), and visual analog scales (VAS) for pain, fatigue, and global RA. Validity (convergent, discriminant, and known-groups) was evaluated in a cross-section of 200 patients. Reliability was evaluated...

  2. Interpersonal workplace stressors and well-being: a multi-wave study of employees with and without arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Phillip T; Smith, Bruce W; Strobel, Kari R; Zautra, Alex J

    2002-08-01

    The within-person influence of interpersonal stressors on affective well-being and physical well-being was investigated for 109 women with and without arthritis. Participants were interviewed on a weekly basis for 12 consecutive weeks, and the prospective data were analyzed by using hierarchical linear modeling. Overall, interpersonal workplace stressors independently predicted both well-being outcomes. Interpersonal stressors outside the workplace were related to negative affect but not to arthritis symptoms. Compared with healthy controls, arthritis patients' ratings of negative affect were equally reactive to workplace stressors. Neuroticism did not moderate stressor reactivity for either dependent variable but did predict mean levels of negative affect. The data support the hypothesis that the psychosocial environment of the workplace contributes unique effects on well-being.

  3. Gouty arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelemy, C.R.; Nakayama, D.A.; Lightfoot, R.W. Jr.; Wortmann, R.L.; Carrera, G.F.

    1984-01-01

    A prospective analysis of 60 patients with gout was undertaken to evaluate the radiographic spectrum of gouty arthritis in patients treated in the era of hypouricemic therapy. Twenty-two of these patients were clinically tophaceous; 36 were considered to have radiographic findings diagnostic of gouty arthritis by strict radiographic criteria. Up to 24% of the patients denied symptoms in joints with radiographic changes of gout; 42% with no evidence of tophi on clinical examination had radiographic changes characteristic of gout. Radiographic assessment can be extremely helpful in the management of gout by documenting the degree and extent of bony involvement, particularly in patients with limited symptoms or without clinical tophi. (orig.)

  4. CHANGES IN THE LEVELS OF ANGIOTENSIN II, ALDOSTERONE, AND FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS IN RELATION TO CLINICAL FEATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Komarova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II, aldosterone, and fibroblast growth factor (FGF stimulate neoangiogenesis, fibroblast proliferation, and elaboration of proinflammatory cytokines, which in turn contributes to increased pannus mass and the development of joint tissue destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA.Objective: to establish the specific features of changes in the blood levels of angiotensin II, aldosterone, and FGF in patients with RA in relation to the duration and severity of the disease.Subjects and methods. Examinations were made in 194 patients diagnosed with RA without comorbidity; the patients’ mean age was 47.7±10.2 years; the disease duration was 3.82±3.43 years. DAS28 scores for RA were calculated based on C-reactive protein levels. An enzyme immunoassay was used to determine the serum levels of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACCPA, angiotensin II, aldosterone, and FGF.Results and discussion. All the examinees were ascertained to have increases in the concentration of angiotensin II and aldosterone in blood by twice and in that of FGF by 2.5 times compared to the controls (p < 0.05. In patients with a RA duration of < 2 years, the blood level of angiotensin II was 25% higher than in those with a RA duration of > 5 years and the concentrations of aldosterone and FGF in patients with long-term RA were twice as high as in those with early RA. In patients with high RA activity, the blood level of angiotensin II was 1.5-fold higher than in those with low and moderate disease activity (p < 0.05. In patients with a high blood ACCPA level, the concentrations of angiotensin II, aldosterone, and FGF were 20, 30, and 25%, respectively, higher than in those with low ACCPA levels. The correlation of DAS28 with blood angiotensin II levels increased with enhanced RA activity. The high aldosterone and FGF values in RA patients are associated with the progression of joint radiographic changes.

  5. Skin Conductance Level Reactivity Moderates the Association Between Parental Psychological Control and Relational Aggression in Emerging Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Caitlin R; Abaied, Jamie L

    2016-04-01

    When studying factors that may heighten risk for relational aggression in youth, it is important to consider characteristics of both the individual and their environment. This research examined the associations between parental psychological control and reactive and proactive relational aggression in emerging adults in college. Given that sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activation may underlie differences between reactive and proactive aggression and has been shown to moderate the effects of parenting on youth development, the moderating role of SNS reactivity [indexed by skin conductance level reactivity (SCLR)] was also examined. Emerging adults (N = 180; 77.2 % female) self-reported on perceptions of parental psychological control and reactive and proactive relational aggression. SCLR was assessed in response to an interpersonal laboratory challenge task. Parental psychological control was positively associated with reactive relational aggression only for emerging adults who exhibited high SCLR. Parental psychological control was positively associated with proactive relational aggression only among emerging adults who showed low SCLR. This study extends previous research on parenting and aggression and suggests that parental psychological control is differentially associated with reactive versus proactive relational aggression, depending on emerging adults' SCLR to interpersonal stress.

  6. Association of MASP-2 levels and MASP2 gene polymorphisms with rheumatoid arthritis in patients and their relatives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Goeldner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease 2 (MASP-2 is a key protein of the lectin pathway of complement. MASP-2 levels have been associated with different polymorphisms within MASP2 gene as well as with the risk for inflammatory disorders and infections. Despite its clinical importance, MASP-2 remains poorly investigated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. METHODS: In this case-control study, we measured MASP-2 serum levels in 156 RA patients, 44 patient relatives, and 100 controls from Southern Brazil, associating the results with nine MASP2 polymorphisms in all patients, 111 relatives, and 230 controls genotyped with multiplex SSP-PCR. RESULTS: MASP-2 levels were lower in patients than in controls and relatives (medians 181 vs. 340 or 285 ng/ml, respectively, P<0.0001. Conversely, high MASP-2 levels were associated with lower susceptibility to RA and to articular symptoms independently of age, gender, ethnicity, smoking habit, anti-CCP and rheumatoid factor positivity (OR = 0.05 [95%CI = 0.019-0.13], P<0.0001 between patients and controls; OR = 0.12, [95%CI = 0.03-0.45], P = 0.002 between patients and relatives; OR = 0.06, [95%CI = 0.004-0.73], P = 0.03 between relatives with and without articular symptoms. MASP2 haplotypes *2A1 and *2B1-i were associated with increased susceptibility to RA (OR = 3.32 [95%CI = 1.48-7.45], P = 0.004. Deficiency-causing p.120G and p.439H substitutions were associated with five times increased susceptibility to articular symptoms in relatives (OR = 5.13 [95%CI = 1.36-20.84], P = 0.02. There was no association of MASP-2 levels or MASP2 polymorphisms with autoantibodies, Sjögren's syndrome, nodules and functional class. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we found the first evidence that MASP-2 deficiency might play an important role in the development of RA and articular symptoms among relatives of RA patients.

  7. Proactive, Reactive, and Romantic Relational Aggression in Adulthood: Measurement, Predictive Validity, Gender Differences, and Association with Intermittent Explosive Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Murray-Close, Dianna; Ostrov, Jamie M.; Nelson, David A.; Crick, Nicki R.; Coccaro, Emil F.

    2009-01-01

    The psychometric properties of a recently introduced adult self-report of relational aggression are presented. Specifically, the predictive utility of proactive and reactive peer-directed relational aggression, as well as romantic relational aggression, are explored in a large (N = 1387) study of adults. The measure had adequate reliability and validity and the subscales demonstrated unique predictive abilities for a number of dependent variables. In particular, reactive but not proactive rel...

  8. Second order elasticity at hypersonic frequencies of reactive polyurethanes as seen by generalized Cauchy relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipp, M; Vergnat, C; Mueller, U; Sanctuary, R; Baller, J; Krueger, J K; Possart, W; Alnot, P

    2009-01-01

    The non-equilibrium process of polymerization of reactive polymers can be accompanied by transition phenomena like gelation or the chemical glass transition. The sensitivity of the mechanical properties at hypersonic frequencies-including the generalized Cauchy relation-to these transition phenomena is studied for three different polyurethanes using Brillouin spectroscopy. As for epoxies, the generalized Cauchy relation surprisingly holds true for the non-equilibrium polymerization process and for the temperature dependence of polyurethanes. Neither the sol-gel transition nor the chemical and thermal glass transitions are visible in the representation of the generalized Cauchy relation. Taking into account the new results and combining them with general considerations about the elastic properties of the isotropic state, an improved physical foundation of the generalized Cauchy relation is proposed.

  9. Second order elasticity at hypersonic frequencies of reactive polyurethanes as seen by generalized Cauchy relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, M; Vergnat, C; Müller, U; Sanctuary, R; Baller, J; Possart, W; Alnot, P; Krüger, J K

    2009-01-21

    The non-equilibrium process of polymerization of reactive polymers can be accompanied by transition phenomena like gelation or the chemical glass transition. The sensitivity of the mechanical properties at hypersonic frequencies-including the generalized Cauchy relation-to these transition phenomena is studied for three different polyurethanes using Brillouin spectroscopy. As for epoxies, the generalized Cauchy relation surprisingly holds true for the non-equilibrium polymerization process and for the temperature dependence of polyurethanes. Neither the sol-gel transition nor the chemical and thermal glass transitions are visible in the representation of the generalized Cauchy relation. Taking into account the new results and combining them with general considerations about the elastic properties of the isotropic state, an improved physical foundation of the generalized Cauchy relation is proposed.

  10. Second order elasticity at hypersonic frequencies of reactive polyurethanes as seen by generalized Cauchy relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philipp, M; Vergnat, C; Mueller, U; Sanctuary, R; Baller, J; Krueger, J K [Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, Universite du Luxembourg, 162A, avenue de la Faiencerie, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Possart, W [Fachbereich Werkstoffwissenschaften, Universitaet des Saarlandes, D-66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Alnot, P [LPMI, Universite Nancy (France)], E-mail: martine.philipp@uni.lu

    2009-01-21

    The non-equilibrium process of polymerization of reactive polymers can be accompanied by transition phenomena like gelation or the chemical glass transition. The sensitivity of the mechanical properties at hypersonic frequencies-including the generalized Cauchy relation-to these transition phenomena is studied for three different polyurethanes using Brillouin spectroscopy. As for epoxies, the generalized Cauchy relation surprisingly holds true for the non-equilibrium polymerization process and for the temperature dependence of polyurethanes. Neither the sol-gel transition nor the chemical and thermal glass transitions are visible in the representation of the generalized Cauchy relation. Taking into account the new results and combining them with general considerations about the elastic properties of the isotropic state, an improved physical foundation of the generalized Cauchy relation is proposed.

  11. Reactive oxygen species-related activities of nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haohao; Yin, Jun-Jie; Wamer, Wayne G; Zeng, Mingyong; Lo, Y Martin

    2014-03-01

    Nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides are among the most widely used engineered and naturally occurring nanostructures, and the increasing incidence of biological exposure to these nanostructures has raised concerns about their biotoxicity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced oxidative stress is one of the most accepted toxic mechanisms and, in the past decades, considerable efforts have been made to investigate the ROS-related activities of iron nanostructures. In this review, we summarize activities of nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides in ROS-related redox processes, addressing in detail the known homogeneous and heterogeneous redox mechanisms involved in these processes, intrinsic ROS-related properties of iron nanostructures (chemical composition, particle size, and crystalline phase), and ROS-related bio-microenvironmental factors, including physiological pH and buffers, biogenic reducing agents, and other organic substances. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Diesel-related hydrocarbons can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in megacities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Dunmore

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocarbons are key precursors to two priority air pollutants, ozone and particulate matter. Those with two to seven carbons have historically been straightforward to observe and have been successfully reduced in many developed cities through air quality policy interventions. Longer chain hydrocarbons released from diesel vehicles are not considered explicitly as part of air quality strategies and there are few direct measurements of their gaseous abundance in the atmosphere. This study describes the chemically comprehensive and continuous measurements of organic compounds in a developed megacity (London, which demonstrate that on a seasonal median basis, diesel-related hydrocarbons represent only 20–30 % of the total hydrocarbon mixing ratio but comprise more than 50 % of the atmospheric hydrocarbon mass and are a dominant local source of secondary organic aerosols. This study shows for the first time that 60 % of the winter primary hydrocarbon hydroxyl radical reactivity is from diesel-related hydrocarbons and using the maximum incremental reactivity scale, we predict that they contribute up to 50 % of the ozone production potential in London. Comparing real-world urban composition with regulatory emissions inventories in the UK and US highlights a previously unaccounted for, but very significant, under-reporting of diesel-related hydrocarbons; an underestimation of a factor ~4 for C9 species rising to a factor of over 70 for C12 during winter. These observations show that hydrocarbons from diesel vehicles can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in cities with high diesel fleet fractions. Future control of urban particulate matter and ozone in such locations requires a shift in policy focus onto gas phase hydrocarbons released from diesels as this vehicle type continues to displace gasoline world-wide.

  13. Cervical Myelopathy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Mukerji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Involvement of the cervical spine is common in rheumatoid arthritis. Clinical presentation can be variable, and symptoms may be due to neck pain or compressive myeloradiculopathy. We discuss the pathology, grading systems, clinical presentation, indications for surgery and surgical management of cervical myelopathy related to rheumatoid arthritis in this paper. We describe our surgical technique and results. We recommend early consultation for surgical management when involvement of the cervical spine is suspected in rheumatoid arthritis. Even patients with advanced cervical myelopathy should be discussed for surgical treatment, since in our experience improvement in function after surgery is common.

  14. Thumb Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Thumb Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields ...

  15. Relative Stabilities and Reactivities of Isolated Versus Conjugated Alkenes: Reconciliation Via a Molecular Orbital Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiriou-Leventis, Chariklia; Hanna, Samir B.; Leventis, Nicholas

    1996-04-01

    The well-accepted practice of generating a pair of molecular orbitals, one of lower energy and another of higher energy than the original pair of overlapping atomic orbitals, and the concept of a particle in a one-dimensional box are implemented in a simplified, nonmathematical method that explains the relative stabilities and reactivities of alkenes with conjugated versus isolated double bonds. In this method, Huckel-type MO's of higher polyenes are constructed by energy rules of linear combination of atomic orbitals. One additional rule is obeyed: bonding molecular orbitals overlap only with bonding molecular orbitals, and antibonding molecular orbitals overlap only with antibonding molecular orbitals.

  16. Psychometric properties of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Health-Related Quality of Life (CDC HRQOL items in adults with arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeVellis Robert

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measuring health-related quality of life (HRQOL is important in arthritis and the SF-36v2 is the current state-of-the-art. It is only emerging how well the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC HRQOL measures HRQOL for people with arthritis. This study's purpose is to assess the psychometric properties of the 9-item CDC HRQOL (4-item Healthy Days Core Module and 5-item Healthy Days Symptoms Module in an arthritis sample using the SF-36v2 as a comparison. Methods In Fall 2002, a cross-sectional study acquired survey data including the CDC HRQOL and SF-36v2 from 2 North Carolina populations of adult patients reporting osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and fibromyalgia; 2182 (52% responded. The first item of both the CDC HRQOL and the SF-36v2 was general health (GEN. All 8 other CDC HRQOL items ask for the number of days in the past 30 days that respondents experienced various aspects of HRQOL. Exploratory principal components analyses (PCA were conducted on each sample and the combined samples of the CDC HRQOL. The multitrait-multimethod matrix (MTMM was used to compute correlations between each trait (physical health and mental health and between each method of measurement (CDC HRQOL and SF36v2. The relative contribution of the CDC HRQOL in predicting the physical component summary (PCS and the mental component summary (MCS was determined by regressing the CDC HRQOL items on the PCS and MCS scales. Results All 9 CDC HRQOL items loaded primarily onto 1 factor (explaining 57% of the item variance representing a reasonable solution for capturing overall HRQOL. After rotation a 2 factor interpretation for the 9 items was clear, with 4 items capturing physical health (physical, activity, pain, and energy days and 3 items capturing mental health (mental, depression, and anxiety days. All of the loadings for these two factors were greater than 0.70. The CDC HRQOL physical health factor correlated with PCS (r = -.78, p 2

  17. Understanding the Determinants of Health-Related Quality of Life in Rheumatoid Arthritis-Associated Interstitial Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natalini, Jake G.; Swigris, Jeff J.; Morisset, Julie; Elicker, Brett M.; Jones, Kirk D.; Fischer, Aryeh; Collard, Harold R.; Lee, Joyce S.

    2017-01-01

    Rationale Health-related quality of life (HRQL) is impaired among patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Little is understood about HRQL in specific subtypes of ILD. Objectives The aim of this study was to characterize and identify clinical determinants of HRQL among patients with rheumatoid arthritis-associated interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD) and compare them to patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Methods We identified patients with a diagnosis of RA-ILD and IPF from an ongoing longitudinal cohort of ILD patients. HRQL was measured at their baseline visit using the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), versions 1 and 2. Regression models were used to characterize and understand the relationship between selected baseline clinical covariates, the physical component score (PCS) and mental component score (MCS) of the SF-36. Measurements and Main Results RA-ILD patients (n=50) were more likely to be younger and female compared to IPF patients (n=50). After controlling for age and pulmonary function, RA-ILD patients had a lower HRQL compared to IPF patients, as measured by the PCS (P=0.03), with significant differences in two of four PCS domains – bodily pain (P<0.01) and general health (P=0.01). Clinical covariates most strongly associated with a lower PCS in RA-ILD patients compared to IPF patients were the presence of joint pain or stiffness and dyspnea severity (P<0.01). Mental and emotional health, as measured by the MCS, was similar between RA-ILD and IPF patients. Conclusion The physical components of HRQL appear worse in RA-ILD patients compared to IPF patients as measured by the PCS of the SF-36. Differences in the PCS of the SF-36 can be explained in part by dyspnea severity and joint symptoms among patients with RA-ILD. PMID:28502413

  18. Logistic regression models for predicting physical and mental health-related quality of life in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alishiri, Gholam Hossein; Bayat, Noushin; Fathi Ashtiani, Ali; Tavallaii, Seyed Abbas; Assari, Shervin; Moharamzad, Yashar

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop two logistic regression models capable of predicting physical and mental health related quality of life (HRQOL) among rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. In this cross-sectional study which was conducted during 2006 in the outpatient rheumatology clinic of our university hospital, Short Form 36 (SF-36) was used for HRQOL measurements in 411 RA patients. A cutoff point to define poor versus good HRQOL was calculated using the first quartiles of SF-36 physical and mental component scores (33.4 and 36.8, respectively). Two distinct logistic regression models were used to derive predictive variables including demographic, clinical, and psychological factors. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each model were calculated. Poor physical HRQOL was positively associated with pain score, disease duration, monthly family income below 300 US$, comorbidity, patient global assessment of disease activity or PGA, and depression (odds ratios: 1.1; 1.004; 15.5; 1.1; 1.02; 2.08, respectively). The variables that entered into the poor mental HRQOL prediction model were monthly family income below 300 US$, comorbidity, PGA, and bodily pain (odds ratios: 6.7; 1.1; 1.01; 1.01, respectively). Optimal sensitivity and specificity were achieved at a cutoff point of 0.39 for the estimated probability of poor physical HRQOL and 0.18 for mental HRQOL. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the physical and mental models were 73.8, 87, 83.7% and 90.38, 70.36, 75.43%, respectively. The results show that the suggested models can be used to predict poor physical and mental HRQOL separately among RA patients using simple variables with acceptable accuracy. These models can be of use in the clinical decision-making of RA patients and to recognize patients with poor physical or mental HRQOL in advance, for better management.

  19. Memory's aging echo: age-related decline in neural reactivation of perceptual details during recollection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Ian M; Cervantes, Sasha N; Gray, Stephen J; Gallo, David A

    2014-09-01

    Episodic memory decline is a hallmark of normal cognitive aging. Here, we report the first event-related fMRI study to directly investigate age differences in the neural reactivation of qualitatively rich perceptual details during recollection. Younger and older adults studied pictures of complex scenes at different presentation durations along with descriptive verbal labels, and these labels subsequently were used during fMRI scanning to cue picture recollections of varying perceptual detail. As expected from prior behavioral work, the two age groups subjectively rated their recollections as containing similar amounts of perceptual detail, despite objectively measured recollection impairment in older adults. In both age groups, comparisons of retrieval trials that varied in recollected detail revealed robust activity in brain regions previously linked to recollection, including hippocampus and both medial and lateral regions of the prefrontal and posterior parietal cortex. Critically, this analysis also revealed recollection-related activity in visual processing regions that were active in an independent picture-perception task, and these regions showed age-related reductions in activity during recollection that cannot be attributed to age differences in response criteria. These fMRI findings provide new evidence that aging reduces the absolute quantity of perceptual details that are reactivated from memory, and they help to explain why aging reduces the reliability of subjective memory judgments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Extremes in vitamin K status of bone are related to bone ultrasound properties in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Summeren, M. J. H.; Vermeer, C.; Engelbert, R. H. H.; Schurgers, L. J.; Takken, T.; Fischer, K.; Kuis, W.

    2008-01-01

    Osteopenia is a common complication of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In adults, low bone density and increased fracture risk are associated with low vitamin K status of bone. The vitamin K-dependent protein osteocalcin plays an important role in bone metabolism. Its activity depends upon

  1. Severe Macular Edema in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis-Related Uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pia Paroli

    2013-01-01

    unilateral macular edema. OCT revealed massive macular thickening (range from 550 μm to 1214 μm. Conclusions. Macular edema appeared in female adolescent patients in eyes with long-dating CAU submitted to cataract surgery. In such patients, in presence of age-related microvascular changes due to the enhancer effect of sex hormones, cataract extraction should be a factor triggering the retinal complication.

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health- ...

  3. Microglia are involve in pain related behaviors during the acute and chronic phase of arthritis inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Nasseri

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: Pain is one of the main protests of inflammatory diseases, hence, understanding the mechanisms which involved in the induction and persistence of pain is essential. Microglia is a contributing factor in the onset and maintenance of inflammation. Increased microglial   activation increases the level of central pro-inflammatory cytokines and the development of central sensitization following inflammation. The aim of this study was evaluate the relation of spinal microglia activity with pain related behaviors during Complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA-induced inflammation.Materials and Methods: Inflammation caused by subcutaneous injection of Complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA in a single dose to the animals right hind paw. The edema and hyperalgesia caused by inflammation, respectively are measured by Plethysmometer and Radiant Heat, on days 0,7,14 and 21. Spinal Iba-1 protein expression was detected by Western blotting. Minocycline hydrochloride (Sigma, U.S.A was administered i.p. at a dose of 40mg/kg daily.Results: Our study findings indicated that CFA injection to right hindpaw of rats increased paw volume and hyperalgesia significantly during different stages of study, while Minocycline treatment significantly reduced paw volume and hyperalgesia. CFA injection into the right hindpaw of the rat increases the expression of molecules Ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule -1 (Iba-1 on different days of study, while Minocycline administration reduced spinal Iba-1 expression significantly compared to the CFA group.Conclusion: The results of this study indicated the significant roles of microglia activation in deterioration of pain related behaviors during different stages of CFA-induced inflammation. The steady injection of Minocycline (as a microglia inhibitor could reduce the inflammatory symptoms.Keywords: Inflammation, pain, microglia, minocycline

  4. CRP genotype and haplotype associations with serum C-reactive protein level and DAS28 in untreated early rheumatoid arthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammitzbøll, Christian Gytz; Steffensen, Rudi; Bøgsted, Martin

    2014-01-01

    investigated: rs11265257, rs1130864, rs1205, rs1800947, rs2808632, rs3093077 and rs876538. The genotype and haplotype associations with CRP and DAS28 levels were evaluated using linear regression analysis adjusted for age, sex and treatment. RESULTS: The minor allele of rs1205 C > T was associated......INTRODUCTION: Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CRP gene are implicated in the regulation of the constitutional C-reactive protein (CRP) expression and its response to proinflammatory stimuli. Previous reports suggest that these effects may have an impact on clinical decision...

  5. Arthritis in America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Arthritis in America Time to Take Action! Language: English ( ... by about 40% by being physically active. Problem Arthritis is common and a growing health threat. Arthritis ...

  6. What Is Juvenile Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Initiative Breadcrumb Home Health Topics English Español Juvenile Arthritis Basics In-Depth Download Download EPUB Download PDF What is it? Points To Remember About Juvenile Arthritis Juvenile arthritis is the term used to describe ...

  7. Association Between Stress-Related Sleep Reactivity and Metacognitive Beliefs About Sleep in Insomnia Disorder: Preliminary Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palagini, Laura; Bruno, Rosa Maria; Paolo, Toti; Caccavale, Lisa; Gronchi, Alessia; Mauri, Mauro; Riemann, Dieter; Drake, Christopher L

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the relation between stress-related sleep reactivity and metacognitive beliefs about sleep in subjects with insomnia disorder (93) and in a group of healthy controls (30) a set of variables, including Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test (FIRST) and Metacognition Questionnaire-Insomnia (MCQ-I), have been used. Internal consistency of the Italian version of FIRST was studied. Univariate correlation, regression analysis, and principal component analysis were also performed. The Italian version of FIRST showed good internal consistency and discriminant validity. Sleep reactivity was higher in women (p sleep (p sleep reactivity. Therapeutic strategies acting selectively on metacognition to reduce stress-related sleep reactivity in insomnia may be useful.

  8. Proactive, reactive, and romantic relational aggression in adulthood: measurement, predictive validity, gender differences, and association with Intermittent Explosive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray-Close, Dianna; Ostrov, Jamie M; Nelson, David A; Crick, Nicki R; Coccaro, Emil F

    2010-04-01

    The psychometric properties of a recently introduced adult self-report of relational aggression are presented. Specifically, the predictive utility of proactive and reactive peer-directed relational aggression, as well as romantic relational aggression, are explored in a large (N=1387) study of adults. The measure had adequate reliability and validity and the subscales demonstrated unique predictive abilities for a number of dependent variables. In particular, reactive but not proactive relational aggression was uniquely associated with history of abuse, hostile attribution biases, and feelings of distress regarding relational provocation situations. Reactive relational aggression was also more strongly related to anger and hostility than proactive aggression. In addition, relational aggression in the context of romantic relationships was uniquely related to anger, hostility, impulsivity, history of abuse, hostile attribution biases, and emotional sensitivity to relational provocations, even when controlling for peer-directed relational aggression. Gender differences in overall levels of relational aggression were not observed; however, males were most likely to engage in peer-directed proactive and reactive relational aggression whereas females were most likely to engage in romantic relational aggression. In a second study (N=150), relational aggression was higher in a sample of adults with Intermittent Explosive Disorder than in a sample of healthy controls or psychiatric controls. The findings highlight the importance of assessing subtypes of relational aggression in adult samples. Ways in which this measure may extend research in psychology and psychiatry are discussed. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Kinetic determinations of accurate relative oxidation potentials of amines with reactive radical cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Ian R; Wosinska, Zofia M; Farid, Samir

    2006-01-01

    Accurate oxidation potentials for organic compounds are critical for the evaluation of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of their radical cations. Except when using a specialized apparatus, electrochemical oxidation of molecules with reactive radical cations is usually an irreversible process, providing peak potentials, E(p), rather than thermodynamically meaningful oxidation potentials, E(ox). In a previous study on amines with radical cations that underwent rapid decarboxylation, we estimated E(ox) by correcting the E(p) from cyclic voltammetry with rate constants for decarboxylation obtained using laser flash photolysis. Here we use redox equilibration experiments to determine accurate relative oxidation potentials for the same amines. We also describe an extension of these experiments to show how relative oxidation potentials can be obtained in the absence of equilibrium, from a complete kinetic analysis of the reversible redox kinetics. The results provide support for the previous cyclic voltammetry/laser flash photolysis method for determining oxidation potentials.

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Lungs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the lungs? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect your lungs? Answers from April Chang-Miller, ... know. Arthritis Foundation. http://www.arthritis.org/about-arthritis/types/rheumatoid-arthritis/articles/lung-disease-rheumatoid-arthritis.php. Accessed ...

  11. Cytotoxicity of InP/ZnS quantum dots related to reactive oxygen species generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibli, Hicham; Carlini, Lina; Park, Soonhyang; Dimitrijevic, Nada M.; Nadeau, Jay L.

    2011-06-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) quantum dots (QDs) have emerged as a presumably less hazardous alternative to cadmium-based particles, but their cytotoxicity has not been well examined. Although their constituent elements are of very low toxicity to cells in culture, they nonetheless exhibit phototoxicity related to generation of reactive oxygen species by excited electrons and/or holes interacting with water and molecular oxygen. Using spin-trap electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and reporter assays, we find a considerable amount of superoxide and a small amount of hydroxyl radical formed under visible illumination of biocompatible InP QDs with a single ZnS shell, comparable to what is seen with CdTe. A double thickness shell reduces the reactive oxygen species concentration approximately two-fold. Survival assays in five cell lines correspondingly indicate a distinct reduction in toxicity with the double-shell InP QDs. Toxicity varies significantly across cell lines according to the efficiency of uptake, being overall significantly less than what is seen with CdTe or CdSe/ZnS. This indicates that InP QDs are a useful alternative to cadmium-containing QDs, while remaining capable of electron-transfer processes that may be undesirable or which may be exploited for photosensitization applications.

  12. Cytotoxicity of InP/ZnS quantum dots related to reactive oxygen species generation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chibli, H.; Carlini, L.; Park, S.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Nadeau, J. L. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( CSE); (McGill Univ.)

    2011-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) quantum dots (QDs) have emerged as a presumably less hazardous alternative to cadmium-based particles, but their cytotoxicity has not been well examined. Although their constituent elements are of very low toxicity to cells in culture, they nonetheless exhibit phototoxicity related to generation of reactive oxygen species by excited electrons and/or holes interacting with water and molecular oxygen. Using spin-trap electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and reporter assays, we find a considerable amount of superoxide and a small amount of hydroxyl radical formed under visible illumination of biocompatible InP QDs with a single ZnS shell, comparable to what is seen with CdTe. A double thickness shell reduces the reactive oxygen species concentration approximately two-fold. Survival assays in five cell lines correspondingly indicate a distinct reduction in toxicity with the double-shell InP QDs. Toxicity varies significantly across cell lines according to the efficiency of uptake, being overall significantly less than what is seen with CdTe or CdSe/ZnS. This indicates that InP QDs are a useful alternative to cadmium-containing QDs, while remaining capable of electron-transfer processes that may be undesirable or which may be exploited for photosensitization applications.

  13. Schistosome infection intensity is inversely related to auto-reactive antibody levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Mutapi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In animal experimental models, parasitic helminth infections can protect the host from auto-immune diseases. We conducted a population-scale human study investigating the relationship between helminth parasitism and auto-reactive antibodies and the subsequent effect of anti-helminthic treatment on this relationship. Levels of antinuclear antibodies (ANA and plasma IL-10 were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in 613 Zimbabweans (aged 2-86 years naturally exposed to the blood fluke Schistosoma haematobium. ANA levels were related to schistosome infection intensity and systemic IL-10 levels. All participants were offered treatment with the anti-helminthic drug praziquantel and 102 treated schoolchildren (5-16 years were followed up 6 months post-antihelminthic treatment. ANA levels were inversely associated with current infection intensity but were independent of host age, sex and HIV status. Furthermore, after allowing for the confounding effects of schistosome infection intensity, ANA levels were inversely associated with systemic levels of IL-10. ANA levels increased significantly 6 months after anti-helminthic treatment. Our study shows that ANA levels are attenuated in helminth-infected humans and that anti-helminthic treatment of helminth-infected people can significantly increase ANA levels. The implications of these findings are relevant for understanding both the aetiology of immune disorders mediated by auto-reactive antibodies and in predicting the long-term consequences of large-scale schistosomiasis control programs.

  14. Lipoprotein cholesterol fractions are related to markers of inflammation in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Anna-Helene; Pedersen, Freddy Karup; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2016-01-01

    disease activity (JADAS27), biomarkers of inflammation (myelo-related protein complex 8/14 (MRP8/14), C-reactive protein (CRP), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR)), body mass index (BMI), waist-to-height ratio (WtH ratio), and PA were explored. RESULTS: Mean values for TC, LDLc, and HDLc...... in the patients were within the normal range for Danish Children. HDLc was negatively correlated with MRP8/14 (r = -0.343, CI -0.474 to -0.201, p MRP8/14 correlated positively...... with CRP, JADAS27 and WtH ratio (r = 0.277, CI 0.142 to 0.413, p = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Levels of cholesterol fractions in patients with JIA were found within the normal range. Nonetheless, the level of HDLc was negatively associated with the level of the inflammatory marker MRP8/14, which is in accordance...

  15. Lack of Resilience Is Related to Stress-Related Sleep Reactivity, Hyperarousal, and Emotion Dysregulation in Insomnia Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palagini, Laura; Moretto, Umberto; Novi, Martina; Masci, Isabella; Caruso, Danila; Drake, Christopher L; Riemann, Dieter

    2018-05-15

    According to the diathesis-stress model of insomnia, insomnia may develop in vulnerable individuals in response to stress. Resilience is a psychobiological factor that determines an individual's capacity to adapt successfully to stressful events and low resilience increases vulnerability for development of mental disorders. The aim was to explore resilience in subjects with insomnia and its relationship with the factors that contribute to its development and perpetuation. The study consisted of 58 subjects with Insomnia Disorder according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition and 38 good sleepers. Resilience Scale for Adults (RSA), Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test (FIRST), Pre-sleep Arousal Scale (PSAS), and Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS) were administered while taking into account psychiatric symptoms. Differences in means between groups were assessed using t test or Mann-Whitney U /Wilcoxon test. Linear/multivariable regression analyses and mediation analyses were performed. Subjects with insomnia (24 females, mean age 49 ± 2.1 years) had lower RSA and higher FIRST, DERS, and PSAS scores than good sleepers (22 females, mean age 47.2 ± 1.2 years). After controlling for anxiety/depressive symptoms, low resilience correlated with high stress-related sleep reactivity ( P = .004), pre-sleep cognitive hyperarousal ( P = .01) and emotion dysregulation ( P = .01). Emotion dysregulation mediated the relationship between low resilience and cognitive hyperarousal (Z = 2.06, P = .03). Subjects with insomnia showed low resilience, which was related to high stress-related sleep reactivity, emotional dysregulation, and hyperarousal. If resilience helps to minimize the extent of pathogenesis in the developmental process, an early identification of vulnerable candidates should be useful for preventing insomnia development and maintenance. A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 709. © 2018 American

  16. Vitamin D status in rheumatoid arthritis patients: relation to clinical manifestations, disease activity, quality of life and fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheita, Tamer A; Sayed, Safaa; Gheita, Heba A; Kenawy, Sanaa A

    2016-03-01

    To assess vitamin D levels in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and to find their relation to clinical parameters, fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), quality of life (QoL) and disease activity. The study included 63 RA patients and 62 controls. Clinical examination and laboratory investigations were performed. For patients, the Disease Activity Score (DAS-28), QoL index, Health Assessment Questionnaire II (HAQ II) and Modified Larsen score were calculated. 25-OH-vitamin D was measured in patients and controls. The patients' mean age was 41.59 ± 9.69 years and disease duration 5.89 ± 3.67 years. The level of vitamin D in RA patients was significantly lower (23.11 ± 12.71 ng/mL) than that in the controls (32.59 ± 13.06 ng/mL) (P = 0.005) being deficient in 50.8%, insufficient in 23.8% and normal in 25.4%. The RA patients with FMS (n = 33) had significantly lower levels of vitamin D (19.08 ± 10.59 ng/mL) than those without (27.55 ± 13.51 ng/mL) (P = 0.008). The difference was significant on comparing those receiving hydroxychloroquine (17.39 ± 7.84 ng/mL) to those not (31.85 ± 13.85 ng/mL) (P < 0.001). Vitamin D significantly correlated with QoL index (r = 0.58, P < 0.001) and negatively with HAQ II (r = -0.36, P = 0.004) and BMI (r = -0.39, P = 0.001). Special attention is required regarding vitamin D levels in RA patients with FMS and decreased QoL. Vitamin D should be corrected and supplementation considered among the RA management armamentarium. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Urological comorbidities in Egyptian rheumatoid arthritis patients: Risk factors and relation to disease activity and functional status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa Niazy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the work: To assess the urological disorders in rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients, analyse the risk factors and to find their relation to disease activity and functional status. Patients and methods: 291 RA patients (253 females and 38 males; F:M 6.7:1 and 242 matched controls were included. Urological disorders in the form of urinary tract infections (UTI, urolithiasis and acute urine retention (AUR were assessed, risk factors were analysed. Disease activity score (DAS-28 and modified health assessment questionnaire (mHAQ were calculated. Results: RA patients had more frequent urological disorders (38.14% than controls (20.66%, more UTI (p < 0.001 and this difference persisted in females (p < 0.001. Urolithiasis tended to be more frequent in RA patients (p = 0.3; the difference was significant between the female patients and controls (p = 0.04. Urinary stones were comparable between the male patients and controls (p = 0.2. RA patients had more AUR (4.8% than the controls (2.1% (p = 0.07. Asthmatic patients particularly the females had more UTI (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001 respectively. UTIs were observed with higher steroid doses (p = 0.04 and urolithiasis were noticed more in hypertensive female patients (p = 0.03. Patients with higher DAS-28 and mHAQ developed more urological comorbidities (p0.49 and p = 0.82 respectively. UTI and urolithiasis were detected in patients with higher DAS 28 (p = 0.1 and p = 0.4 respectively. Conclusion: RA patients were found to have more urological disorders. Bronchial asthma, hypertension and higher steroid doses may increase risk for urinary comorbidities in RA. Patients with higher DAS28 and mHAQ had more urological comorbidities, however without statistically significant difference.

  18. Aetiology of arthritis in hospitalised children: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aupiais, Camille; Ilharreborde, Brice; Doit, Catherine; Blachier, Audrey; Desmarest, Marie; Job-Deslandre, Chantal; Mazda, Keyvan; Faye, Albert; Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Alberti, Corinne; Lorrot, Mathie

    2015-08-01

    Arthritis in children has many causes and includes septic and viral arthritis, reactive arthritis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). We aimed to describe the different types of arthritis among children hospitalised for a first episode of arthritis. Retrospective, descriptive case series study. A French tertiary care centre. Children under 16 years of age hospitalised for an arthritis episode between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2009. Demographic and clinical features were compared with χ(2) or Fisher's exact tests and non-parametric tests. 173 children were hospitalised for a first episode of arthritis during the study period, with a male/female ratio of 1.14. The most frequent cause of hospitalisation was septic arthritis (43.4% of cases, 69.3% of which were due to Kingella kingae and 10.7% to Staphylococcus aureus). JIA was responsible for 8.1% of cases and arthritis without any definitive diagnosis for 40.4%. Median age at diagnosis was 2.7 years (IQR 0.3-14.6) and was lower in the septic arthritis group (1.5 years; 1.1-3.4) than in the JIA group (4.7 years; 2.5-10.9) (p<0.01). Septic arthritis involved a single joint in 97.3% of cases, while JIA involved four joints in 14.3% of cases and two to four joints in 28.6% of cases (p<0.01). Septic arthritis was the most frequent cause of arthritis in hospitalised children. Despite the increasing application of microbiological molecular methods to synovial fluid analysis, further measures are required to improve the diagnosis of arthritis of unknown cause. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Socioeconomic status and risk of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line Merete Blak; Jacobsen, Søren; Klarlund, Mette

    2006-01-01

    To examine whether markers of socioeconomic status (SES) are associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and if so, whether selected lifestyle-related factors could explain this association.......To examine whether markers of socioeconomic status (SES) are associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and if so, whether selected lifestyle-related factors could explain this association....

  20. Tuning the Relative Stability and Reactivity of Manganese Dioxygen and Peroxo Intermediates via Systematic Ligand Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Julie A

    2015-10-20

    Many fundamental processes of life depend on the chemical energy stored in the O–O bond of dioxygen (O2), the majority of which is derived from photosynthetic H2O oxidation. Key steps in these processes involve Mn-, Fe-, or Cu-promoted formation or cleavage of O–O and O–H bonds, the mechanisms of which are not fully understood, especially with Mn. Metal–peroxo and high-valent metal–oxo species are proposed to be involved as intermediates. The metal ion properties that favor O–O and O–H bond formation versus cleavage have yet to be systematically explored. Herein we examine the O2 reactivity of a series of structurally related Mn(II) complexes and show that several metastable intermediates are observed, the relative stabilities of which depend on subtle differences in ligand architecture. We show that in contrast to Fe and Cu complexes, O2 binds irreversibly to Mn(II). By crystallizing an entire series of the first reported examples of Mn(III)–OOR peroxos as well as an O2-derived binuclear trans-μ-1,2-bridged Mn(III)–peroxo with varying degrees of O–O bond activation, we demonstrate that there are distinct correlations between spectroscopic, structural, and reactivity properties. Rate-limiting O–O bond cleavage is shown to afford a reactive species capable of abstracting H atoms from 2,4-tBu2-PhOH or 1,4-cyclohexadiene, depending on the ligand substituents. The weakly coordinated N-heterocycle Mn···Npy,quino distance is shown to correlate with the peroxo O–O bond length and modulate the π overlap between the filled πv*(O–O) and Mn dxz orbitals. We also show that there is a strong correlation between the peroxo → Mn charge transfer (CT) band and the peroxo O–O bond length. The energy difference between the CT bands associated with the peroxos possessing the shortest and longest O–O bonds shows that these distances are spectroscopically distinguishable. We show that we can use this spectroscopic parameter to estimate the O

  1. Reactive Balance in Individuals With Chronic Stroke: Biomechanical Factors Related to Perturbation-Induced Backward Falling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salot, Pooja; Patel, Prakruti; Bhatt, Tanvi

    2016-03-01

    An effective compensatory stepping response is the first line of defense for preventing a fall during sudden large external perturbations. The biomechanical factors that contribute to heightened fall risk in survivors of stroke, however, are not clearly understood. It is known that impending sensorimotor and balance deficits poststroke predispose these individuals to a risk of fall during sudden external perturbations. The purpose of this study was to examine the mechanism of fall risk in survivors of chronic stroke when exposed to sudden, slip-like forward perturbations in stance. This was a cross-sectional study. Fourteen individuals with stroke, 14 age-matched controls (AC group), and 14 young controls (YC group) were exposed to large-magnitude forward stance perturbations. Postural stability was computed as center of mass (COM) position (XCOM/BOS) and velocity (ẊCOM/BOS) relative to the base of support (BOS) at first step lift-off (LO) and touch-down (TD) and at second step TD. Limb support was quantified as vertical hip descent (Zhip) from baseline after perturbation onset. All participants showed a backward balance loss, with 71% of the stroke group experiencing a fall compared with no falls in the control groups (AC and YC groups). At first step LO, no between-group differences in XCOM/BOS and ẊCOM/BOS were noted. At first step TD, however, the stroke group had a significantly posterior XCOM/BOS and backward ẊCOM/BOS compared with the control groups. At second step TD, individuals with stroke were still more unstable (more posterior XCOM/BOS and backward ẊCOM/BOS) compared with the AC group. Individuals with stroke also showed greater peak Zhip compared with the control groups. Furthermore, the stroke group took a larger number of steps with shorter step length and delayed step initiation compared with the control groups. Although the study highlights the reactive balance deficits increasing fall risk in survivors of stroke compared with healthy

  2. Psoriatic arthritis: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Ferrer, A; Laiz-Alonso, A

    2014-12-01

    Advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis and clinical aspects of the disease justify the present review. Studies have identified common inflammatory pathways related to the innate immune response, such as the IL-12/IL-23 axis, along with numerous genes that affect susceptibility to both diseases and influence phenotypic development. Interest has grown in biomarkers that can be used for early diagnosis or prognosis or to predict joint destruction and the response to treatment. Recent reports describe important differences between the effects of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologics on the process of new bone formation. Other issues that have been discussed include the need for reliable screening methods, particularly for early detection of oligoarticular arthritis, and for protocols to guide referral to specialists, especially in newly created multidisciplinary practices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of MR imaging guided steroid injection of the sacroiliac joints for the treatment of children with refractory enthesitis-related arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, J.; Tzaribachev, N.; Thomas, C.; Claussen, C.D.; Carrino, J.A.; Lewin, J.S.; Pereira, P.L.

    2011-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that MR imaging guided triamcinolone acetonide injection into the sacroiliac joints of children with enthesitis-related arthritis is feasible, accurate and safe; and effectively reduces sacroiliac inflammation and disease progression. A retrospective analysis of 14 children (6/14 [43%] female, 8/14 (57%) male; mean age, 13.2 years; range, 6-16 years) who received MR imaging guided sacroiliac joint injections at 0.2 Tesla or 1.5 Tesla for enthesitis-related arthritis and acute sacroilitis refractory to medical therapy was performed. 20 mg triamcinolone acetonide were injected. Assessed were intra-articular drug delivery; image quality, duration, and complications. Success of therapy was defined by change of sacroiliac inflammation. Remission time and erosions were assessed by follow-up MRI (range, 10-22 months). Twenty four procedures resulted in intra-articular injection. Image quality was sufficient. No complications occurred. Procedure time was 40 min. Sedation time was 22 min. Success of therapy was achieved in 11/14 (79%) children. Sacroiliac inflammation decreased significantly (-59%). Median remission time was 13.7 months. No erosions occurred. MR imaging guided steroid injection of the sacroiliac joints is feasible, accurate, and safe and can effectively reduce sacroiliac inflammatory activity and may therefore aid in the prevention of disease progression. (orig.)

  4. Evaluation of MR imaging guided steroid injection of the sacroiliac joints for the treatment of children with refractory enthesitis-related arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, J. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Tzaribachev, N. [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Hematology, Oncology and General Pediatrics, University Children' s Hospital, Tuebingen (Germany); Klinikum Bad Bramstedt, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Bad Bramstedt (Germany); Thomas, C.; Claussen, C.D. [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Carrino, J.A.; Lewin, J.S. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Pereira, P.L. [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); SLK-Kliniken Heilbronn, Department of Radiology, Minimally Invasive Therapies and Nuclearmedicine, Heilbronn (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    To test the hypothesis that MR imaging guided triamcinolone acetonide injection into the sacroiliac joints of children with enthesitis-related arthritis is feasible, accurate and safe; and effectively reduces sacroiliac inflammation and disease progression. A retrospective analysis of 14 children (6/14 [43%] female, 8/14 (57%) male; mean age, 13.2 years; range, 6-16 years) who received MR imaging guided sacroiliac joint injections at 0.2 Tesla or 1.5 Tesla for enthesitis-related arthritis and acute sacroilitis refractory to medical therapy was performed. 20 mg triamcinolone acetonide were injected. Assessed were intra-articular drug delivery; image quality, duration, and complications. Success of therapy was defined by change of sacroiliac inflammation. Remission time and erosions were assessed by follow-up MRI (range, 10-22 months). Twenty four procedures resulted in intra-articular injection. Image quality was sufficient. No complications occurred. Procedure time was 40 min. Sedation time was 22 min. Success of therapy was achieved in 11/14 (79%) children. Sacroiliac inflammation decreased significantly (-59%). Median remission time was 13.7 months. No erosions occurred. MR imaging guided steroid injection of the sacroiliac joints is feasible, accurate, and safe and can effectively reduce sacroiliac inflammatory activity and may therefore aid in the prevention of disease progression. (orig.)

  5. Ghrelin levels in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: relation to anti-tumor necrosis factor treatment and disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiozoglou-Lampoudi, Thomais; Trachana, Maria; Agakidis, Charalampos; Pratsidou-Gertsi, Polyxeni; Taparkou, Anna; Lampoudi, Sotiria; Kanakoudi-Tsakalidou, Florentia

    2011-10-01

    Studies in adults with rheumatoid arthritis reported low serum ghrelin that increased following anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) infusion. Data on juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are lacking. The aim of this pilot study was to explore serum ghrelin levels in patients with JIA and the possible association with anti-TNF treatment, disease activity, and nutritional status. Fifty-two patients with JIA (14/52 on anti-TNF treatment) were studied. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis was inactive in 3 of 14 anti-TNF-treated patients and in 11 of 38 non-anti-TNF-treated patients. The nutritional status, energy intake/requirements, appetite, and fasting serum ghrelin levels were assessed. Ghrelin control values were obtained from 50 individuals with minor illness matched for age, sex, and body mass index. Ghrelin levels in patients with JIA were significantly lower than in controls (P ghrelin levels were comparable to control values only in 3 patients with anti-TNF-induced remission. Ghrelin in non-anti-TNF-treated patients in remission was low. Multiple regression analysis showed that disease activity (P = .002, CI = -84.16 to -20.01) and anti-TNF treatment (P = .003, CI = -82.51 to -18.33) were significant independent predictors of ghrelin after adjusting for other potential confounders. Ghrelin did not correlate with nutritional status, energy balance, and appetite. Serum ghrelin is low in patients with JIA and is restored to values similar to those in controls following anti-TNF-induced remission. Our study provides evidence that TNF blockade is independently associated with serum ghrelin, which possibly contributes to anti-TNF-induced remission. These preliminary results could form the basis for future research. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. In patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration, physical activity may influence C-reactive protein levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subhi, Yousif; Singh, Amardeep; Falk, Mads Krüger

    2014-01-01

    Association of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with C-reactive protein (CRP) was previously reported, indicating a relation to systemic low-grade inflammation. However, visual impairment limits physical activity, and physical activity modulates CRP levels. Here, we investigated...

  7. Effect of Relative Humidity and CO2 Concentration on the Properties of Carbonated Reactive MgO Cement Based Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilan, Yaroslav

    Sustainability of modern concrete industry recently has become an important topic of scientific discussion, and consequently there is an effort to study the potential of the emerging new supplementary cementitious materials. This study has a purpose to investigate the effect of reactive magnesia (reactive MgO) as a replacement for general use (GU) Portland Cements and the effect of environmental factors (CO2 concentrations and relative humidity) on accelerated carbonation curing results. The findings of this study revealed that improvement of physical properties is related directly to the increase in CO2 concentrations and inversely to the increase in relative humidity and also depends much on %MgO in the mixture. The conclusions of this study helped to clarify the effect of variable environmental factors and the material replacement range on carbonation of reactive magnesia concrete materials, as well as providing an assessment of the optimal conditions for the effective usage of the material.

  8. Oscillatory brain activity related to control mechanisms during laboratory-induced reactive aggression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike M Krämer

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive behavior is a common reaction in humans after an interpersonal provocation, but little is known about the underlying brain mechanisms. The present study analyzed oscillatory brain activity while participants were involved in an aggressive interaction to examine the neural processes subserving the associated decision and evaluation processes. Participants were selected from a larger sample because of their high scores in trait aggressiveness. We used a competitive reaction time task that induces aggressive behavior through provocation. Each trial is separated in a decision phase, during which the punishment for the opponent is set, and an outcome phase, during which the actual punishment is applied or received. We observed provocation-related differences during the decision phase in the theta band which differed depending on participants’ aggressive behavior: High provocation was associated with an increased frontal theta response in participants refraining from retaliation, but with reduced theta power in those who got back to the opponent. Moreover, more aggressive decisions after being punished were associated with a decrease of frontal theta power. Non-aggressive and aggressive participants differed also in their outcome-related response: Being punished led to an increased frontal theta power compared to win trials in the latter only, pointing to differences in evaluation processes associated with their different behavioral reactions. The data thus support previous evidence for a role of prefrontal areas in the control of reactive aggression and extend behavioral studies on associations between aggression or violence and impaired prefrontal functions.

  9. Alpha-amylase reactivity in relation to psychopathic traits in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Andrea L; Remmel, Rheanna J; Raine, Adrian; Schug, Robert A; Gao, Yu; Granger, Douglas A

    2015-04-01

    Recent investigations of the psychobiology of stress in antisocial youth have benefited from a multi-system measurement model. The inclusion of salivary alpha-amylase (sAA), a surrogate marker of autonomic/sympathetic nervous system (ANS) activity, in addition to salivary cortisol, a biomarker of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis functioning, has helped define a more complete picture of individual differences and potential dysfunction in the stress response system of these individuals. To the authors' knowledge, no studies have examined sAA in relation to antisocial behavior in adults or in relation to psychopathic traits specifically. In the present study, we examined sAA, in addition to salivary cortisol, in a relatively large sample (n=158) of adult males (M age=36.81, range=22-67 years; 44% African-American, 34% Caucasian, 16% Hispanic) recruited from temporary employment agencies with varying levels of psychopathic traits. Males scoring highest in psychopathy were found to have attenuated sAA reactivity to social stress compared to those scoring lower in psychopathy. No differential relationships with the different factors of psychopathy were observed. In contrast to studies of antisocial youth, there were no interactions between sAA and cortisol levels in relation to psychopathy, but there was a significant interaction between pre-stressor levels of sAA and cortisol. Findings reveal potential regulatory deficits in the fast-acting, 'fight or flight', component of the stress response in adult males with psychopathic traits, as well as abnormalities in how this system may interact with the HPA axis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give ...

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression ...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and Diagnosis Rheumatoid Arthritis: What is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ...

  13. Development and validation of a new instrument to measure health-related quality of life in patients with psoriatic arthritis: the VITACORA-19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre-Alonso, Juan Carlos; Gratacós, Jordi; Rey-Rey, José Santos; Valdazo de Diego, Juan Pablo; Urriticoechea-Arana, Ana; Daudén, Esteban; Moreno, Mireia; Zarco-Montejo, Pedro; Collantes-Estévez, Eduardo; Fernández-López, Juan Antonio

    2014-10-01

    To develop/validate an instrument to measure health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), for use in clinical studies. An item pool of 35 items was generated following standardized procedures. Item reduction was performed using clinimetric and psychometric approaches after administration to 66 patients with PsA. The resulting instrument, the VITACORA-19, consists of 19 items. Its validity content, internal consistency, test-retest reliability, known groups/convergent validity, and sensitivity to change were tested in a longitudinal and multicenter study conducted in 10 hospitals in Spain, with 323 patients who also completed the EuroQol 5-dimensional questionnaire (EQ-5D) and a health status transition item. There were 3 study groups: group A (n = 209, patients with PsA), group B (n = 71, patients with arthritis without psoriatic aspect, patients with arthrosis, and patients with dermatitis), and group C (n = 43, healthy controls). The questionnaire was considered easy/very easy to answer by 94.7% of the patients with PsA. The factorial analysis clearly identified only 1 factor. Cronbach's alpha coefficient and interclass correlation coefficients exceeded 0.90. Statistically significant differences (p measure HRQoL in patients with PsA, has good validity, reliability, and sensitivity to change.

  14. Sleep spindle-related reactivation of category-specific cortical regions after learning face-scene associations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Til O; Mölle, Matthias; Diedrichs, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Newly acquired declarative memory traces are believed to be reactivated during NonREM sleep to promote their hippocampo-neocortical transfer for long-term storage. Yet it remains a major challenge to unravel the underlying neuronal mechanisms. Using simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG......-coupled reactivation of brain regions representing the specific task stimuli was traced during subsequent NonREM sleep with EEG-informed fMRI. Relative to the control task, learning face-scene associations triggered a stronger combined activation of neocortical and hippocampal regions during subsequent sleep. Notably......) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) recordings in humans, we show that sleep spindles play a key role in the reactivation of memory-related neocortical representations. On separate days, participants either learned face-scene associations or performed a visuomotor control task. Spindle...

  15. In etanercept-treated psoriatic arthritis patients clinical improvement correlated with an increase of serum cortisol relative to other adrenal hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzeni, F; Sarzi-Puttini, P; DePortu, S; Cutolo, M; Carrabba, M; Straub, R H

    2008-01-01

    In patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), long-term therapy with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibodies sensitizes the pituitary gland and improves adrenal androgen secretion in prednisolone-naïve patients. However, whether this is similar in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is not known. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of 12 weeks of etanercept treatment upon the function of the HPA axis in patients with PsA. Eleven prednisolone-naïve patients (mean age 47.3+/-8.9 years) with PsA were included. We measured serum levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17OHP), cortisol, and androstenedione (ASD), at baseline and at 4 and 12 weeks after initiation of anti-TNF therapy (etanercept, 50 mg every week as a single dose by sc. injection). Clinical improvement was assessed using the Disease Activity Score-28 (DAS-28). Mean levels of serum ACTH, serum cortisol, serum 17OHP and serum ASD did not markedly change during 12 weeks of etanercept treatment. Similarly, the ratio of serum cortisol divided by serum ACTH did not change during 12 weeks of anti-TNF treatment. However, an increase of serum cortisol relative to serum 17OHP or ASD was related to clinical improvement. This indicates that improvement was linked to higher serum cortisol levels relative to others adrenal hormones. This is the first study to demonstrate baseline serum levels and the course of HPA axis-related hormones in patients with PsA. An increase of serum cortisol relative to others adrenocortical hormones (i.e., androstenedione and ACTH) was accompanied by clinical improvement.

  16. C-reactive protein in relation to early atherosclerosis and periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakob, Maha; Meurman, Jukka H; Jogestrand, Tomas; Nowak, Jacek; Söder, Per-Östen; Söder, Birgitta

    2012-02-01

    Periodontitis may affect atherosclerosis via the chronic inflammation. We investigated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in relation to early vascular atherosclerotic changes in non-symptomatic subjects with and without long-term periodontitis. Carotid ultrasonography with calculation of common carotid artery intima-media area (cIMA) was performed, and hsCRP and atherosclerosis risk factors were analysed in randomly chosen 93 patients with periodontitis and 41 controls. The relationship between hsCRP, cIMA and atherosclerosis risk factors was evaluated with multiple logistic regression analysis. Women displayed lower hsCRP (p periodontitis, cIMA values were higher than in controls. Periodontitis appeared to be a major predictor for increased cIMA (odds ratio, 3.82; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-12.26). Neither of these factors was significantly associated with hsCRP which thus appeared not sensitive enough to be a marker for periodontitis or atherosclerosis. Hence, irrespective of low hsCRP levels, periodontitis appeared to increase the risk for atherosclerosis.

  17. Association between stress-related sleep reactivity and cognitive processes in insomnia disorder and insomnia subgroups: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palagini, Laura; Faraguna, Ugo; Mauri, Mauro; Gronchi, Alessia; Morin, Charles M; Riemann, Dieter

    2016-03-01

    Stress-related sleep reactivity, sleep-related cognitions, and psychological factors play an important role in insomnia. The aim was to investigate their possible association in Insomnia Disorder, insomnia subgroups, and healthy subjects. The cross-sectional study consisted of 93 subjects who met diagnostic criteria for Insomnia Disorder according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5) and of 30 healthy subjects. Survey instruments included the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test (FIRST), Dysfunctional Beliefs about Sleep scale (DBAS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS). Descriptive statistics, Pearson correlations, χ(2)-test, and multiple linear regression were performed. FIRST and SAS best determined the insomnia subjects vs good sleepers (FIRST χ(2) = 109.6, p insomnia, stress-related sleep reactivity, and psychological factors, such as anxiety symptoms, may distinguish insomnia subjects from good sleepers; (2) sleep reactivity and sleep-related cognitions seem interrelated, unhelpful beliefs may affect the stress reactivity; (3) psychological factors may influence sleep quality and the severity of insomnia; (4) these important sleep-related variables may have similar associations in insomnia subgroups; they may constitute the core factors for insomnia development and maintenance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Use and effects of custom-made therapeutic footwear on lower-extremity-related pain and activity limitations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: A prospective observational study of a cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Rutger; Buijsmann, Saskia; Siemonsma, Petra C; Boers, Maarten; Lankhorst, Gustaaf J; Roorda, Leo D

    2014-06-01

    An estimated 55-90% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis have foot problems. Therapeutic footwear is frequently prescribed as part of usual care, but data on its use and effect is incomplete. This study aimed to investigate the use and effects of therapeutic footwear. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis receiving custom-made therapeutic footwear for the first time formed an inception cohort. Patients reported their therapeutic footwear use on 3 consecutive days in activity diaries 14 and 20 weeks after delivery of the footwear. The Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) was used as the primary outcome of lower-extremity-related pain and activity limitations, and the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) as a secondary outcome measure of activity limitations, both at baseline and 26 weeks after therapeutic footwear delivery. The cohort comprised 114 rheumatoid arthritis patients (median disease duration 10 years). Mean (standard deviation) therapeutic footwear use was 54 (25)% of the time patients were out of bed. The median (interquartile range) WOMAC score improved from 41 (27-59) to 31 (16-45) (p footwear was used with moderate intensity by most rheumatoid arthritis patients and was associated with a substantial decrease in pain and activity limitations. Therapeutic footwear is a relevant treatment option for patients with rheumatoid arthritis and foot problems.

  19. Hearing status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadzadeh, A; Daraei, M; Jalessi, M; Peyvandi, A A; Amini, E; Ranjbar, L A; Daneshi, A

    2017-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is thought to induce conductive hearing loss and/or sensorineural hearing loss. This study evaluated the function of the middle ear and cochlea, and the related factors. Pure tone audiometry, speech reception thresholds, speech discrimination scores, tympanometry, acoustic reflexes, and distortion product otoacoustic emissions were assessed in rheumatoid arthritis patients and healthy volunteers. Pure tone audiometry results revealed a higher bone conduction threshold in the rheumatoid arthritis group, but there was no significant difference when evaluated according to the sensorineural hearing loss definition. Distortion product otoacoustic emissions related prevalence of conductive or mixed hearing loss, tympanometry values, acoustic reflexes, and speech discrimination scores were not significantly different between the two groups. Sensorineural hearing loss was significantly more prevalent in patients who used azathioprine, cyclosporine and etanercept. Higher bone conduction thresholds in some frequencies were detected in rheumatoid arthritis patients that were not clinically significant. Sensorineural hearing loss is significantly more prevalent in refractory rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  20. Relation between coal rank, char reactivity, textural properties and NO emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenillas, A.; Rubiera, F.; Parra, J.B.; Pis, J.J. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, Oviedo (Spain)

    1999-07-01

    A low volatile bituminous coal was pyrolysed at different heating rates to produce chars with different textural properties. There was a linear relationship between char reactivity and active surface area. The effect of coal rank on coal char textural properties was studied using a range of bituminous coals. The influence of textural properties and reactivity on NO emissions, and on the heterogeneous reduction of NO is discussed. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Ankle arthritis predicts polyarticular disease course and unfavourable outcome in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjörnsson, Anna-Clara; Aalto, Kristiina; Broström, Eva W

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the occurrence, clinical characteristics and prognostic factors associated with ankle arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). METHODS: 440 children with JIA were followed for eight years in a prospective Nordic population-based cohort study. Data...... on remission was available for 427 of these children. Occurrence of clinically assessed ankle arthritis was analysed in relation to JIA category, clinical characteristics and remission data eight years after disease onset. RESULTS: In 440 children with JIA, 251 (57%) experienced ankle arthritis during...... the first eight years of disease. Ankle arthritis was least common in the persistent oligoarticular category (25%) and most common in children with extended oligoarticular (83%) and polyarticular RF-negative (85%) JIA. Children who developed ankle arthritis during the first year of disease were younger...

  2. Three-Week Bright-Light Intervention Has Dose-Related Effects on Threat-Related Corticolimbic Reactivity and Functional Coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, Patrick M; Madsen, Martin K; Mc Mahon, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    environmental stimuli (e.g., threat) and may underlie these effects. Serotonin signaling modulates this circuit and is implicated in the pathophysiology of seasonal and other affective disorders. METHODS: We evaluated the effects of a bright-light intervention protocol on threat-related corticolimbic reactivity......-related amygdala and prefrontal reactivity in a dose-dependent manner. Conversely, amygdala-prefrontal and intraprefrontal functional coupling increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner. Genotype status significantly moderated bright-light intervention effects on intraprefrontal functional coupling....... CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to evaluate the effects of clinically relevant bright-light intervention on threat-related brain function. We show that amygdala-prefrontal reactivity and communication are significantly affected by bright-light intervention, an effect partly moderated by genotype...

  3. Adiponectin and C - reactive protein Relationship in the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Relation to Cardiovascular Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shousha, M.A.; Soliman, S.

    2008-01-01

    The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), one of the most common reproductive abnormalities, shares some components of the metabolic cardiovascular syndrome. Therefore, PCOS patients may represent the largest group of women at high risk for the development of early-onset cardiovascular disease (CVD) and/or diabetes. The adipokine, adiponectin inhibits vascular inflammation and acts as an endogenous modulator of obesity - linked diseases. High - sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is recently debated as a risk factor and mediator for atherosclerosis. The objective of this study was to investigate the relation between adiponectin and hs- CRP in The Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and to identify their relation to Cardiovascular Disease. Adiponectin and hs- CRP measurements were undertaken in 90 PCOS patients and 70 body mass index-matched controls with regular menstrual cycles. Whereas 36.8% of the PCOS patients had CRP levels above 5 mg/liter, only 9.6% of the controls exhibited high CRP levels (P < 0.001). The mean ± SD was 5.46 ± 7.0 in the PCOS group vs. 2.04 ± 1.9 mg/liter in the control (P < 0.001). The body mass index, white blood cell count, TSH, glucose, cholesterol, and homocysteine levels were not significantly different between the two groups. CRP levels are elevated in patients with PCOS and may be a marker of early cardiovascular risk in these patients. The plasma adiponectin levels being significantly lower in these patients. These results suggest that elevation of CRP and reduction of adiponectin could emerge as mediators of atherogenesis and insulin resistance. (author)

  4. Analyses of associations between reactive oxygen metabolites and antioxidant capacity and related factors among healthy adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamae, Kazuyoshi; Eto, Toshiharu; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Nakamaru, Shingo; Koshikawa, Kazunori; Sakuma, Kazuhiko; Hirano, Takeshi

    2013-12-01

    Evidence based on epidemiologic investigations using biochemical parameter is meaningful for health promotion and administration among adolescents. We conducted Reactive Oxygen Metabolites (ROM) and Biological Antioxidant Potentials (BAP) tests, along with a questionnaire survey, for a sample of 74 high school students (16.51±0.11 years of aged mean±SE), to investigate the associations between ROM, BAP, and related factors, including BMI and blood biochemical data. Venous blood samples (approximately 7cc) were collected. At the same time, each individual's information was obtained from the questionnaire. The mental health status was investigated using the Center for Epidemiologic Study Depression scale (CES-D) included in the same questionnaire. The mean values and standard errors of all variables were calculated. In addition, the relationships between ROM and BAP with these factors were analyzed. The results revealed the preferred levels of ROM (261.95 ± 9.52 U.CARR) and, BAP (2429.89±53.39 µmol/L) and blood biochemical data. Few significant relationships between two markers and related factors were found. So, we detected a cluster with an imbalance between ROM and BAP, which means low antioxidant ability, whereas the other clusters had conditions with moderate balance or good balance between them. Moreover, we determined the Oxidative stress-Antioxidant capacity ratio (OAR), using the ROM and BAP values, in order to clarify the characteristic of the detected clusters.However, comparative analyses across the three clusters did not yield significant differences in all related factors. No correlations between ROM, BAP and related factors were indicated, although significant association between ROM and BAP was observed (R2=0.1156, R=0.340, P=0.013). The reason for these results can be explained by the influences of good health and young age. On the other hand, present study suggests that some latent problems among adolescents may be related to unhealthy

  5. Some safety related characteristics of Phenix, a 250 MWe fast reactor -1989 and 1990 negative reactivity trip investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaumont, J.M.; Goux, D.; Martin, L.

    1993-01-01

    The main characteristics of the Phenix core control are summarized. The current state of the investigations related to the 1989 and 1990 negative reactivity transients are presented with emphasis on the results of the very low power tests recently performed. (authors). 5 figs., 2 refs

  6. The relation between work-induced neuroendocrine reactivity and recovery, subjective need for recovery, and health status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluiter, JK; Frings-Dresen, MHW; van der Beek, AJ; Meijman, TF

    Objectives: The purpose of this cross-sectional study with repeated measurements was to find out to what extent neuroendocrine reactivity during work and neuroendocrine recovery from work, and work characteristics, are related to subjective need for recovery and perceived health status. Methods:

  7. Reactive and Proactive Subtypes of Relational and Physical Aggression in Middle Childhood: Links to Concurrent and Longitudinal Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieson, Lindsay C.; Crick, Nicki R.

    2010-01-01

    Peer aggression in children is a serious issue that school psychologists often encounter on a daily basis. To develop a better understanding of aggression, it is important to look at specific subtypes of aggression and how they are related to adjustment difficulties. Past research has examined the links between reactive and proactive physical…

  8. Reactive, anxious and possessive forms of jealousy and their relation to relationship quality among heterosexuals and homosexuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barelds, Dick P. H.; Dijkstra, Pieternel

    2006-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between relational quality and three different types of jealousy-reactive, anxious and possessive jealousy. The sample consisted of 76 gay men, 79 lesbians, 70 heterosexual women and 70 heterosexual men. Findings show that different types of jealousy

  9. Evidence-based diagnostics: adult septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Christopher R; Schuur, Jeremiah D; Everett, Worth W; Pines, Jesse M

    2011-08-01

    % to 38%). With the exception of joint surgery (positive likelihood ratio [+LR] = 6.9) or skin infection overlying a prosthetic joint (+LR = 15.0), history, physical examination, and serum tests do not significantly alter posttest probability. Serum inflammatory markers such as white blood cell (WBC) counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) are not useful acutely. The interval LR for synovial white blood cell (sWBC) counts of 0 × 10(9)-25 × 10(9)/L was 0.33; for 25 × 10(9)-50 × 10(9)/L, 1.06; for 50 × 10(9)-100 × 10(9)/L, 3.59; and exceeding 100 × 10(9)/L, infinity. Synovial lactate may be useful to rule in or rule out the diagnosis of septic arthritis with a +LR ranging from 2.4 to infinity, and negative likelihood ratio (-LR) ranging from 0 to 0.46. Rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of synovial fluid may identify the causative organism within 3 hours. Based on 56% sensitivity and 90% specificity for sWBC counts of >50 × 10(9)/L in conjunction with best-evidence estimates for diagnosis-related risk and treatment-related risk/benefit, the arthrocentesis test threshold is 5%, with a treatment threshold of 39%. Recent joint surgery or cellulitis overlying a prosthetic hip or knee were the only findings on history or physical examination that significantly alter the probability of nongonococcal septic arthritis. Extreme values of sWBC (>50 × 10(9)/L) can increase, but not decrease, the probability of septic arthritis. Future ED-based diagnostic trials are needed to evaluate the role of clinical gestalt and the efficacy of nontraditional synovial markers such as lactate. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  10. PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS: CLASSIFICATION, CLINICAL PRESENTATION, DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Korotaev

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available soriatic arthritis (PsA is a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints, spine and entheses from a group of spondyloarthritis (SpA, which is usually observed in patients with psoriasis (Ps. The diagnosis of PsA is based on the CASPAR criteria for psoriatic arthritis. The disease results from interactions between genetic, immunological and environmental factors. The main clinical manifestations of PsA include peripheral arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, and spondylitis. PsA must be differentiated from rheumatoid arthritis, gout, reactive arthritis, osteoarthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. Due to the fact that PsA is a clinically heterogeneous disease, its activity is assessed using complex indices, by taking into account that the patient has arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, and spondylitis. The goal of treatment for PsA is to achieve remission or minimal activity of the main clinical manifestations of the disease, to slow down or prevent radiographic progression, to increase life expectancy and quality of life in the patients, and to reduce the risk of comorbidities, which is achieved through a wide range of drugs of different classes. Therapy should be chosen based on the clinical manifestations of PsA and comorbidities in the patients. 

  11. Inter- relationship between rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkarnikar, J; Thomas, B S; Rao, S K

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal medicine defines a rapidly emerging branch of Periodontology focusing on establishing a strong relationship between periodontal health and systemic health. It is speculated that the major common dysregulation which links Periodontitis with Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is being played by the mediators of immune inflammatory response. To determine whether there is any relationship between periodontal disease and Rheumatoid arthritis. A total of 100 patients were included for the present study which was divided into two groups: one group (cases) included 50 patients attending the Department of Orthopedics, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal who were diagnosed of Rheumatoid arthritis. Another subject population included 50 patients as controls attending the Department of Oral Medicine, Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Manipal with age and gender matched with those of rheumatoid arthritis group. Specific measures for periodontitis included plaque index, gingival index, number of missing teeth, and radiographic alveolar bone loss scores. Measures of rheumatoid arthritis included health assessment questionaires, levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Various periodontal parameters were compared between the cases and controls. The average alveolar bone loss was statistically more severe in Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) group than in the controls although there were similar plaque index in both the groups. The gingival index was statistically higher in the RA group. The Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) and C- Reactive Protein (CRP) levels of RA patients were also significantly associated with the severity of periodontal disease. There was a significant association between Rheumatoid arthritis and Periodontitis which may be due to a common underlying deregulation of the inflammatory response in these individuals.

  12. Procoagulant reactivity to laboratory acute mental stress in Africans and Caucasians, and its relation to depressive symptoms: the SABPA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Känel, R; Hamer, M; Malan, N T; Scheepers, K; Meiring, M; Malan, L

    2013-11-01

    The risk of cardiovascular disease is dramatically increasing in Africans (black). The prothrombotic stress response contributes to atherothrombotic disease and is modulated by depressive symptoms. We examined coagulation reactivity to acute mental stress and its relation to psychological well-being in Africans relative to Caucasians (white). A total of 102 African and 165 Caucasian school teachers underwent the Stroop Color-Word Conflict test. Circulating levels of von Willebrand factor (VWF) antigen, fibrinogen, and D-dimer were measured before and after the Stroop. Cardiovascular reactivity measures were also obtained. All participants completed the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the General Health Questionnaire-28 for the assessment of depressive symptoms and total psychological distress, respectively. After controlling for covariates, resting levels of VWF, fibrinogen, and D-dimer were higher in Africans than in Caucasians (all p-values ≤0.006). Depressive symptoms and psychological distress were not significantly associated with resting coagulation measures. Stress reactivity in VWF (pstress when compared with Caucasians. Ethnic differences in the vascular adrenergic stress response might partially explain this finding. Depressive symptoms were associated with exaggerated VWF reactivity in Africans relative to Caucasians. The clinical implications of these findings for Africans need further study.

  13. Forms of Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Forms of Arthritis Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents Today, ... of Linda Saisselin Osteoarthritis (OA) — the form of arthritis typically occurring during middle or old age, this ...

  14. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  15. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... joints. This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve 5 or more large and ... no known prevention for JIA. Alternative Names Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ...

  16. Serum C-reactive protein concentration and genotype in relation to ischemic stroke subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladenvall, Claes; Jood, Katarina; Blomstrand, Christian; Nilsson, Staffan; Jern, Christina; Ladenvall, Per

    2006-08-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) has evolved as an inflammatory risk marker of cardiovascular disease. Several single-nucleotide polymorphisms at the CRP locus have been found to be associated with CRP levels. The aim of the present study was to investigate CRP levels and genetic variants in etiological subtypes of ischemic stroke. The Sahlgrenska Academy Study on Ischemic Stroke (SAHLSIS) comprises 600 consecutive ischemic stroke cases (18 to 69 years) and 600 matched controls from western Sweden. Stroke subtypes were defined by the TOAST classification. Serum CRP levels were determined by a high-sensitivity immunometric assay. CRP levels were significantly higher for all ischemic stroke subtypes compared with controls, both in the acute phase and at the 3-month follow-up. After adjustment for traditional risk factors, CRP at follow-up was related to higher odds ratios (ORs) of overall ischemic stroke (OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.43) and large-vessel disease (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.09 to 2.00). The CRP -286C>T>A, 1059G>C, and 1444C>T single-nucleotide polymorphisms showed significant associations with CRP levels. However, neither CRP genotypes nor haplotypes showed an association to overall ischemic stroke. This is the first large study on CRP in different TOAST subtypes in a young ischemic stroke population. CRP levels differed between etiological subtypes of ischemic stroke both in the acute phase and at the 3-month follow-up. CRP at follow-up was associated with overall ischemic stroke and the large-vessel disease subtype. Genetic variants at the CRP locus were associated with CRP levels, but no association was detected for overall ischemic stroke.

  17. Septic arthritis: a 12 years retrospective study in a rheumatological university clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Riato

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Septic arthritis is a disabling and potentially life-threatening condition that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment. The most important risk factors are joint prosthesis, pre-existing joint disease and immunosuppressive drugs. The aim of our study therefore was to revaluate all septic arthritis cases discharged from our Rheumatologic Unit in the last 12 years, to assess the risk factors, the clinical and laboratory characteristics, the causative microorganisms and its possible increase in frequency. Methods: The medical records of 42 consecutive patients with septic arthritis discharged from our Rheumatology Unit between January 1995 and December 2006 were reviewed. The patients ranged in age from 23 to 90 and there isn’t gender predominance. Septic arthritis was diagnosed based on the finding of purulent material in the joint space and/or the isolation of a bacterial pathogen from joint fluid. Demographic data, risk factors, co-morbidity, clinical manifestations, time interval between symptoms onset and diagnosis, treatment and laboratory data including serum white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C reactive protein (CRP, synovial white blood cells and culture results were analysed. We considered these parameters in the whole population and in two different age groups (≤60, >60 and tried to determine if there was a change of microorganisms involved in septic arthritis during the years. Results: Of 42 patients, 47% were aged 60 and younger. Only 10 patients were admitted to our unit before 2001. A predisposing factor was recorded in 90,5% of cases: 15 patients had rheumatoid arthritis, 8 were diabetic, 6 had seronegative arthritis, 4 had a connective tissue disease, 8 patients had a prosthetic infection and 3 were subjected recently to arthrocentesis. We found that patients aged 60 and younger were more frequently affected by joint disease and had a synovial white blood cell count lower than patients

  18. Reactivity to smoking- and food-related cues in currently dieting and non-dieting young women smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, Rebecca A; Higgs, Suzanne

    2011-04-01

    There is some evidence to suggest that young women dieters who smoke experience greater cigarette cravings in the presence of food-related related cues. The aim of this experiment was to examine reactivity to both smoking-related and water cues by dieting and non-dieting women smokers in the presence or absence of food cues. Eighteen female undergraduates attended two sessions (food present and food absent). At each session, participants were presented with a cigarette and water cue in a counterbalanced order. Pre- and post-cue measures included the brief version of the Questionnaire for Smoking Urges, heart rate and self-reported mood. All smokers showed enhanced reactivity (increased craving and heart rate) to smoking versus water cues. For dieters there was a larger increase in cigarette craving and heart rate in response to the smoking-related cues in the presence of food compared with the absence of food, whereas for non-dieters there was a smaller increase in cigarette craving and heart rate in response to the smoking-related cues in the presence of food compared with the absence of food. Mood and appetite ratings were not significantly affected by either cue type or session. The results suggest that cue reactivity to smoking-related cues is modulated by the presence of incentive stimuli relevant to the individual.

  19. Anticardiolipin antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, A; Woods, R; Dowding, V; Roden, D; Barry, C

    1987-10-01

    Anticardiolipin antibody (ACA) was present in the sera of 49% of 90 consecutive patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The ACA was absent in 30 control patients with osteoarthritis. C-reactive protein levels equal to or exceeding 7 mg/dl were found in 10 patients all of whom were ACA positive. ACA was present in a larger proportion of rheumatoid factor (RF) positive than of RF negative patients. Male sex and extra-articular manifestations of RA were both more common in ACA positive than ACA negative patients. In the ACA positive group the lupus anticoagulant and VDRL tests were negative. However, a small number of patients had evidence of vascular events.

  20. Emotions related to participation restrictions as experienced by patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: a qualitative interview study (the Swedish TIRA project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Östlund, Gunnel; Björk, Mathilda; Thyberg, Ingrid; Thyberg, Mikael; Valtersson, Eva; Stenström, Birgitta; Sverker, Annette

    2014-01-01

    Psychological distress is a well-known complication in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but knowledge regarding emotions and their relationship to participation restrictions is scarce. The objective of the study was to explore emotions related to participation restrictions by patients with early RA. In this study, 48 patients with early RA, aged 20-63 years, were interviewed about participation restrictions using the critical incident technique. Information from transcribed interviews was converted into dilemmas and linked to International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) participation codes. The emotions described were condensed and categorized. Hopelessness and sadness were described when trying to perform daily activities such as getting up in the mornings and getting dressed, or not being able to perform duties at work. Sadness was experienced in relation to not being able to continue leisure activities or care for children. Examples of fear descriptions were found in relation to deteriorating health and fumble fear, which made the individual withdraw from activities as a result of mistrusting the body. Anger and irritation were described in relation to domestic and employed work but also in social relations where the individual felt unable to continue valued activities. Shame or embarrassment was described when participation restrictions became visible in public. Feelings of grief, aggressiveness, fear, and shame are emotions closely related to participation restrictions in everyday life in early RA. Emotions related to disability need to be addressed both in clinical settings in order to optimize rehabilitative multi-professional interventions and in research to achieve further knowledge.

  1. Psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankowski, Artur Jacek; Łebkowska, Urszula Maria; Ćwikła, Jarosław; Walecka, Irena; Walecki, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory joint disease which develops in patients with psoriasis. It is characteristic that the rheumatoid factor in serum is absent. Etiology of the disease is still unclear but a number of genetic associations have been identified. Inheritance of the disease is multilevel and the role of environmental factors is emphasized. Immunology of PsA is also complex. Inflammation is caused by immunological reactions leading to release of kinins. Destructive changes in bones usually appear after a few months from the onset of clinical symptoms. Typically PsA involves joints of the axial skeleton with an asymmetrical pattern. The spectrum of symptoms include inflammatory changes in attachments of articular capsules, tendons, and ligaments to bone surface. The disease can have divers clinical course but usually manifests as oligoarthritis. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of PsA. Classical radiography has been used for this purpose for over a hundred years. It allows to identify late stages of the disease, when bone tissue is affected. In the last 20 years many new imaging modalities, such as ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR), have been developed and became important diagnostic tools for evaluation of rheumatoid diseases. They enable the assessment and monitoring of early inflammatory changes. As a result, patients have earlier access to modern treatment and thus formation of destructive changes in joints can be markedly delayed or even avoided

  2. Reactive, anxious and possessive forms of jealousy and their relation to relationship quality among heterosexuals and homosexuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barelds, Dick P H; Dijkstra, Pieternel

    2006-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between relational quality and three different types of jealousy-reactive, anxious and possessive jealousy. The sample consisted of 76 gay men, 79 lesbians, 70 heterosexual women and 70 heterosexual men. Findings show that different types of jealousy affect relationship quality differently and do so differently for homosexuals and heterosexuals. Among heterosexuals and especially gay men--but not among lesbians--anxious jealousy was negatively related to relationship quality. In contrast, among heterosexuals--but not among gay men or lesbians--reactive jealousy was positively related to relationship quality. The present study shows that distinguishing between different types of jealousy is necessary to entangle the diverse effects of jealousy on the quality of homosexual and heterosexual relationships.

  3. Total shoulder replacement in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneppen, O; Fruensgaard, S; Johannsen, Hans Viggo

    1996-01-01

    A prospective study of 62 Neer mark II total shoulder arthroplasties performed during the period from 1981 to 1990 on 51 patients with rheumatoid arthritis was undertaken to evaluate factors associated with component loosening and proximal humeral migration. Thirty-two (51%) showed proximal......, range of movement, abduction force, or function. The risk of clinical asymptomatic loosening is a relatively late complication that is eventually followed by pronounced bone destruction related to the loose component. Long-term radiographic control of total shoulders with rheumatoid arthritis...... is recommended. Hemiarthroplasty with a cemented humeral prosthesis may be a better treatment in the end stage of rheumatoid arthritis of the shoulder....

  4. Social Information Processing, Moral Reasoning, and Emotion Attributions: Relations with Adolescents' Reactive and Proactive Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenio, William F.; Adams, Erin; Gold, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Connections between adolescents' social information processing (SIP), moral reasoning, and emotion attributions and their reactive and proactive aggressive tendencies were assessed. One hundred mostly African American and Latino 13- to 18-year-olds from a low-socioeconomic-status (SES) urban community and their high school teachers participated.…

  5. Occupational status and job stress in relation to cardiovascular stress reactivity in Japanese workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirokawa, Kumi; Ohira, Tetsuya; Nagayoshi, Mako; Kajiura, Mitsugu; Imano, Hironori; Kitamura, Akihiko; Kiyama, Masahiko; Okada, Takeo; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of occupational status and job stress factors on cardiovascular stress reactivity in Japanese workers. In this baseline assessment between 2001 and 2009 in Osaka, Japan, we examined 928 healthy Japanese employees (330 men, 598 women) from two occupational statuses: managers/professionals and general workers. A brief job stress questionnaire was used to evaluate job stress levels. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP), heart rate, heart rate variability (high-frequency [HF], low-frequency [LF], LF/HF], and peripheral blood flow were measured at rest and during two stressful tasks. Changes in stress reactivity were calculated as the difference between the measured variables during the tasks and the rest period. Men showed inverse associations between quantitative job overload and DBP, heart rate, and LF/HF, between physical demands and blood pressure (SBP, DBP), and between a poor physical environment and HF. Men also had positive associations between qualitative job overload and heart rate, and between physical demands and peripheral blood flow (all p occupational status, significant associations between job stress and changes in stress reactivity were observed in male managers/professionals and female general workers (p stress levels are associated with changes in cardiovascular stress reactivity in men and women. Occupational status may modify these associations.

  6. Blood Monocyte Subsets and Selected Cardiovascular Risk Markers in Rheumatoid Arthritis of Short Duration in relation to Disease Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Klimek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate blood monocyte subsets and functional monocyte properties in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA of short duration in the context of cardiovascular (CV risk and disease activity. Methods. We studied conventional markers of CV risk, intima media thickness (IMT, and blood monocyte subsets in 27 patients aged 41 ± 10 years with RA of short duration (median 12 months and 22 healthy controls. The RA subjects were divided into low (DAS28: 2.6–5.1 and high (DAS28 > 5.1 disease activity. Results. RA patients exhibited increased levels of intermediate (CD14++CD16+ monocytes with decreased CD45RA expression compared to controls, increased counts of classical (CD14++CD16− monocytes, and decreased percentages of nonclassical (CD14+CD16++ monocytes. Patients with high disease activity had lower HLA DR expression on classical monocytes compared to low disease activity patients. There were no differences in monocyte subsets between subjects with DAS > 5.1 and DAS ≤ 5.1. There were no significant intergroup differences in IMT and the majority of classical CV risk factors. Conclusions. Patients with RA of short duration show alteration in peripheral blood monocyte subsets despite the fact that there is no evidence of subclinical atherosclerosis. Disease activity assessed with DAS28 was associated with impaired functional properties but not with a shift in monocyte subpopulations.

  7. Identification of pathogenic genes related to rheumatoid arthritis through integrated analysis of DNA methylation and gene expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Ma, Shiyun; Wang, Huailiang; Su, Hang; Su, Ke; Li, Longjie

    2017-11-15

    The purpose of our study was to identify new pathogenic genes used for exploring the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To screen pathogenic genes of RA, an integrated analysis was performed by using the microarray datasets in RA derived from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. The functional annotation and potential pathways of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were further discovered by Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) enrichment analysis. Afterwards, the integrated analysis of DNA methylation and gene expression profiling was used to screen crucial genes. In addition, we used RT-PCR and MSP to verify the expression levels and methylation status of these crucial genes in 20 synovial biopsy samples obtained from 10 RA model mice and 10 normal mice. BCL11B, CCDC88C, FCRLA and APOL6 were both up-regulated and hypomethylated in RA according to integrated analysis, RT-PCR and MSP verification. Four crucial genes (BCL11B, CCDC88C, FCRLA and APOL6) identified and analyzed in this study might be closely connected with the pathogenesis of RA. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. P-wave velocity anisotropy related to sealed fractures reactivation tracing the structural diagenesis in carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matonti, C.; Guglielmi, Y.; Viseur, S.; Garambois, S.; Marié, L.

    2017-05-01

    Fracture properties are important in carbonate reservoir characterization, as they are responsible for a large part of the fluid transfer properties at all scales. It is especially true in tight rocks where the matrix transfer properties only slightly contribute to the fluid flow. Open fractures are known to strongly affect seismic velocities, amplitudes and anisotropy. Here, we explore the impact of fracture evolution on the geophysical signature and directional Vp anisotropy of fractured carbonates through diagenesis. For that purpose, we studied a meter-scale, parallelepiped quarry block of limestone using a detailed structural and diagenetic characterization, and numerous Vp measurements. The block is affected by two en-échelon fracture clusters, both being formed in opening mode (mode 1) and cemented, but only one being reactivated in shear. We compared the diagenetic evolution of the fractures, which are almost all 100% filled with successive calcite cements, with the P-wave velocities measured across this meter-scale block of carbonate, which recorded the tectonic and diagenetic changes of a South Provence sedimentary basin. We found that a directional Vp anisotropy magnitude as high as 8-16% correlates with the reactivated fractures' cluster dip angle, which is explained by the complex filling sequence and softer material present inside the fractures that have been reactivated during the basin's tectonic inversion. We show that although a late karstification phase preferentially affected these reactivated fractures, it only amplified the pre-existing anisotropy due to tectonic shear. We conclude that Vp anisotropy measurements may help to identify the fracture sealing/opening processes associated with polyphased tectonic history, the anisotropy being independent of the current stress-state. This case shows that velocity anisotropies induced by fractures resulted here from a cause that is different from how these features have often been interpreted

  9. The Surface Reactivities of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Their Related Toxicities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Lei

    After 20 years of extensive exploration, people are more and more convinced on the great potentials of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the applications of many different areas. On the other hand, the properties and toxicities have also been closely watched for the safe utilization. In this dissertation I focus on the surface properties of SWCNTs and their related toxicities. In chapter 2, we revealed the generation of peroxyl radical by the unmodified SWCNT and the poly(ethylene glycol) functionalized SWCNT in aqueous solution with capillary electrophoresis (CE) and a reactive oxygen species (ROS) indicator, 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (H2DCF). According to the results, we identified peroxyl radical, ROO• as the major ROS in our system. Peroxyl radical could be produced from the adsorption of oxygen on the SWCNT surface. In chapter 3, we studied oxidation of several biologically relevant reducing agents in the presence of SWCNTs in aqueous solutions. H2DCF and several small antioxidants (vitamin C, Trolox, and cysteine), and a high-molecular-weight ROS scavenger (bovine serum albumin (BSA)) were selected as reductants. We revealed that the unmodified or carboxylated SWCNT played duplex roles by acting as both oxidants and catalysts in the reaction. In chapter 4, we confirmed that SWCNTs bind to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) at a site proximate to the enzyme's activity center and participating in the ET process, enhancing the activity of (HRP) in the solution-based redox reaction. The capability of SWCNT in receiving electrons and the direct attachment of HRP to the surface of SWCNT strongly affected the enzyme activity due to the direct involvement of SWCNT in ET. In chapter 5, the toxicity of SWCNTs coated with different concentrations of BSA to a human fibroblast cell line was explored. The result indicates that the toxicity of SWCNTs decrease with the higher coating degree as assumed. Then we choose mitochondrion to study the interactions between

  10. Neurofeedback Effects on Evoked and Induced EEG Gamma Band Reactivity to Drug-related Cues in Cocaine Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrell, Timothy; El-Baz, Ayman; Baruth, Joshua; Tasman, Allan; Sokhadze, Guela; Stewart, Christopher; Sokhadze, Estate

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Preoccupation with drug and drug-related items is a typical characteristic of cocaine addicted individuals. It has been shown in multiple accounts that prolonged drug use has a profound effect on the EEG recordings of drug addicts when compared to controls during cue reactivity tests. Cue reactivity refers to a phenomenon in which individuals with a history of drug abuse exhibit excessive psychophysiological responses to cues associated with their drug of choice. One of the aims of this pilot study was to determine the presence of an attentional bias to preferentially process drug-related cues using evoked and induced gamma reactivity measures in cocaine addicts before and after biobehavioral treatment based on neurofeedback. Another aim was to show that central SMR amplitude increase and frontal theta control is possible in an experimental outpatient drug users group over 12 neurofeedback sessions. Method Ten current cocaine abusers participated in this pilot research study using neurofeedback combined with Motivational Interviewing sessions. Eight of them completed all planned pre- and post –neurofeedback cue reactivity tests with event-related EEG recording and clinical evaluations. Cue reactivity test represented a visual oddball task with images from the International Affective Picture System and drug-related pictures. Evoked and induced gamma responses to target and non-target drug cues were analyzed using wavelet analysis. Results Outpatient subjects with cocaine addiction completed the biobehavioral intervention and successfully increased SMR while keeping theta practically unchanged in 12 sessions of neurofeedback training. The addition of Motivational Interviewing helped retain patients in the study. Clinical evaluations immediately after completion of the treatment showed decreased self-reports on depression and stress scores, and urine tests collaborated reports of decreased use of cocaine and marijuana. Effects of neurofeedback resulted

  11. The Relations Between Maternal Prenatal Anxiety or Stress and Child's Early Negative Reactivity or Self-Regulation: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korja, Riikka; Nolvi, Saara; Grant, Kerry Ann; McMahon, Cathy

    2017-12-01

    In the present review, we examine the association between maternal prenatal stress or anxiety and children's early negative reactivity or self-regulation. The review includes 32 studies that focus on pregnancy-related anxiety, state or trait anxiety, perceived stress, and stressful life events in relation to child's crying, temperament, or behavior during the first 2 years of life. We searched four electronic databases and 32 studies were selected based on the inclusion criteria. Twenty-three studies found an association between maternal prenatal anxiety or stress and a child's negative reactivity or self-regulation, and typically the effect sizes varied from low to moderate. The association was found regardless of the form of prenatal stress or anxiety and the trimester in which the prenatal stress or anxiety was measured. In conclusion, several forms of prenatal anxiety and stress may increase the risk of emotional and self-regulatory difficulties during the first 2 years of life.

  12. Occupational status and job stress in relation to cardiovascular stress reactivity in Japanese workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumi Hirokawa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effects of occupational status and job stress factors on cardiovascular stress reactivity in Japanese workers. In this baseline assessment between 2001 and 2009 in Osaka, Japan, we examined 928 healthy Japanese employees (330 men, 598 women from two occupational statuses: managers/professionals and general workers. A brief job stress questionnaire was used to evaluate job stress levels. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP, heart rate, heart rate variability (high-frequency [HF], low-frequency [LF], LF/HF], and peripheral blood flow were measured at rest and during two stressful tasks. Changes in stress reactivity were calculated as the difference between the measured variables during the tasks and the rest period. Men showed inverse associations between quantitative job overload and DBP, heart rate, and LF/HF, between physical demands and blood pressure (SBP, DBP, and between a poor physical environment and HF. Men also had positive associations between qualitative job overload and heart rate, and between physical demands and peripheral blood flow (all p < 0.05. Women showed inverse associations between qualitative job overload and SBP, and showed positive associations between qualitative job overload and peripheral blood flow, and between a poor physical environment and SBP (all p < 0.05. When stratified by occupational status, significant associations between job stress and changes in stress reactivity were observed in male managers/professionals and female general workers (p < 0.05. Job stress levels are associated with changes in cardiovascular stress reactivity in men and women. Occupational status may modify these associations.

  13. Behavioral phenotype relates to physiological differences in immunological and stress responsiveness in reactive and proactive birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusch, Elizabeth A; Navara, Kristen J

    2018-05-15

    It has now been demonstrated in many species that individuals display substantial variation in coping styles, generally separating into two major behavioral phenotypes that appear to be linked to the degree of physiological stress responsiveness. Laying hens are perfect examples of these dichotomous phenotypes; white laying hens are reactive, flighty, and exhibit large hormonal and behavioral responses to both acute and chronic stress, while brown laying hens are proactive, exploratory, and exhibit low hormonal and behavioral responses to stress. Given the linkages between stress physiology and many other body systems, we hypothesized that behavioral phenotype would correspond to additional physiological responses beyond the stress response, in this case, immunological responses. Because corticosterone is widely known to be immunosuppressive, we predicted that the reactive white hens would show more dampened immune responses than the proactive brown hens due to their exposure to higher levels of corticosterone throughout life. To assess immune function in white and brown hens, we compared febrile responses, corticosterone elevations, feed consumption, and egg production that occurred in response an injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline, inflammatory responses to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) injection in the toe web, innate phagocytic activity in whole blood, and antibody responses to an injection of Sheep Red Blood Cells (SRBCs). Contrary to our predictions, white hens had significantly greater swelling of the toe web in response to PHA and showed a greater inhibition of feeding and reproductive output in response to LPS. These results indicated that reactive individuals are more reactive in both stress and immunological responsiveness. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Age-related differences in emotional reactivity, regulation, and rejection sensitivity in adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Silvers, Jennifer A.; McRae, Kateri; Gross, James J.; Remy, Katherine A.; Ochsner, Kevin N.; Gabrieli, John D. E.

    2012-01-01

    Although adolescents’ emotional lives are thought to be more turbulent than those of adults, it is unknown whether this difference is attributable to developmental changes in emotional reactivity or emotion regulation. Study 1 addressed this question by presenting healthy individuals aged 10–23 with negative and neutral pictures and asking them to respond naturally or use cognitive reappraisal to down-regulate their responses on a trial-by-trial basis. Results indicated that age exerted both ...

  15. Modifying memory for a museum tour in older adults: Reactivation-related updating that enhances and distorts memory is reduced in ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Jacques, Peggy L; Montgomery, Daniel; Schacter, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    Memory reactivation, the activation of a latent memory trace when we are reminded of a past experience, strengthens memory but can also contribute to distortions if new information present during reactivation is integrated with existing memory. In a previous study in young adults we found that the quality of memory reactivation, manipulated using the principle of encoding specificity and indexed by recollection ratings, modulated subsequent true and false memories for events experienced during a museum tour. Here in this study, we examined age-related changes in the quality of memory reactivation on subsequent memory. Memories of museum stops in young and older adults were reactivated and then immediately followed by the presentation of a novel lure photo from an alternate tour version (i.e., reactivation plus new information). There was an increase in subsequent true memories for reactivated targets and for subsequent false memories for lures that followed reactivated targets, when compared to baseline target and lure photos. However, the influence of reactivation on subsequent memories was reduced in older adults. These data reveal that ageing alters reactivation-related updating processes that allow memories to be strengthened and updated with new information, consequently reducing memory distortions in older adults compared to young adults.

  16. Technical note: An inverse method to relate organic carbon reactivity to isotope composition from serial oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Hemingway

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Serial oxidation coupled with stable carbon and radiocarbon analysis of sequentially evolved CO2 is a promising method to characterize the relationship between organic carbon (OC chemical composition, source, and residence time in the environment. However, observed decay profiles depend on experimental conditions and oxidation pathway. It is therefore necessary to properly assess serial oxidation kinetics before utilizing decay profiles as a measure of OC reactivity. We present a regularized inverse method to estimate the distribution of OC activation energy (E, a proxy for bond strength, using serial oxidation. Here, we apply this method to ramped temperature pyrolysis or oxidation (RPO analysis but note that this approach is broadly applicable to any serial oxidation technique. RPO analysis directly compares thermal reactivity to isotope composition by determining the E range for OC decaying within each temperature interval over which CO2 is collected. By analyzing a decarbonated test sample at multiple masses and oven ramp rates, we show that OC decay during RPO analysis follows a superposition of parallel first-order kinetics and that resulting E distributions are independent of experimental conditions. We therefore propose the E distribution as a novel proxy to describe OC thermal reactivity and suggest that E vs. isotope relationships can provide new insight into the compositional controls on OC source and residence time.

  17. Technical note: An inverse method to relate organic carbon reactivity to isotope composition from serial oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Jordon D.; Rothman, Daniel H.; Rosengard, Sarah Z.; Galy, Valier V.

    2017-11-01

    Serial oxidation coupled with stable carbon and radiocarbon analysis of sequentially evolved CO2 is a promising method to characterize the relationship between organic carbon (OC) chemical composition, source, and residence time in the environment. However, observed decay profiles depend on experimental conditions and oxidation pathway. It is therefore necessary to properly assess serial oxidation kinetics before utilizing decay profiles as a measure of OC reactivity. We present a regularized inverse method to estimate the distribution of OC activation energy (E), a proxy for bond strength, using serial oxidation. Here, we apply this method to ramped temperature pyrolysis or oxidation (RPO) analysis but note that this approach is broadly applicable to any serial oxidation technique. RPO analysis directly compares thermal reactivity to isotope composition by determining the E range for OC decaying within each temperature interval over which CO2 is collected. By analyzing a decarbonated test sample at multiple masses and oven ramp rates, we show that OC decay during RPO analysis follows a superposition of parallel first-order kinetics and that resulting E distributions are independent of experimental conditions. We therefore propose the E distribution as a novel proxy to describe OC thermal reactivity and suggest that E vs. isotope relationships can provide new insight into the compositional controls on OC source and residence time.

  18. European Clearinghouse. Incidents related to reactivity management. Contributing factors, failure modes and corrective actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruynooghe, Christiane; Noel, Marc

    2009-01-01

    This work is part of the European Clearinghouse on Nuclear Power Plant Operational Experience Feedback (NPP-OEF) activity carried out at the Joint Research Centre/Institute for Energy (JRC/IE) with the participation of nine EU Regulatory Authorities. It investigates the 1999 Shika-1 criticality event together with other shortcomings in reactivity management reported to the IAE4 Incident Reporting System in the period 1981-2008. The aim of the work was to identify reactivity control failure modes, reactor status and corrective actions. Initiating factors and associated root causes were also analysed. Five of the 7 factors identified for all events were present in the 1999 Shika-1 event where criticality has been unexpectedly reached and maintained during 15 minutes. Most of the events resulted in changes in procedures, material or staff and management training. The analysis carried out put in evidence that in several instances appropriate communication based on operational experience feedback would have prevented incident to occur. This paper also summarises the action taken at power plants and by the regulatory bodies in different countries to avoid repetition of similar events. It identifies insights that might be useful to reduce the likelihood of operational events caused by shortcomings in reactivity management. (orig.)

  19. Comparable Efficacy of Abatacept Used as First-line or Second-line Biological Agent for Severe Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis-related Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birolo, Carolina; Zannin, Maria Elisabetta; Arsenyeva, Svetlana; Cimaz, Rolando; Miserocchi, Elisabetta; Dubko, Margarita; Deslandre, Chantal Job; Falcini, Fernanda; Alessio, Maria; La Torre, Francesco; Denisova, Ekaterina; Martini, Giorgia; Nikishina, Irina; Zulian, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    Abatacept (ABA) has recently been proposed as second-line treatment in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis refractory to anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF) agents, but little is known about its efficacy as a first-line approach. The aim of the present study was to compare the safety and efficacy of ABA as a first-line biological agent (ABA-1) with that of ABA as a second-line treatment after 1 or more anti-TNF agents (ABA-2), in patients with severe JIA-related uveitis. In this multicenter study, we collected data on patients with severe JIA-related uveitis treated with ABA as a first-line or second-line biological agent. Changes in frequency of uveitis flares/year and ocular complications before and after ABA treatment, clinical remission, and side effects were recorded. Thirty-five patients with a mean age of 10.8 years were treated with ABA for a mean period of 19.6 months. In 4 patients, ABA administration was discontinued, owing to inefficacy on arthritis in 3 cases and allergic reaction in 1. Thirty-one patients, 14 in the ABA-1 group and 17 in the ABA-2 group, completed the 12-month followup period; of these, 17 (54.8%) had clinical remission. The mean frequency of uveitis flares decreased from 4.1 to 1.2 in the ABA-1 group (p = 0.002) and from 3.7 to 1.2 in the ABA-2 group (p = 0.004). Preexisting ocular complications improved or remained stable in all but 5 patients, all in the ABA-2 group. No significant difference was found between the efficacy of the 2 treatment modalities. ABA confirmed its good safety profile. ABA, used as first-line biological treatment or after 1 or more anti-TNF agents, induces a comparable improvement in severe refractory JIA-related uveitis.

  20. Medicines, injections, and supplements for arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthritis - medications; Arthritis - steroid injections; Arthritis - supplements; Arthritis - hyaluronic acid ... the-counter pain relievers can help with your arthritis symptoms. "Over-the-counter" means you can buy ...

  1. Newly reported lupus and rheumatoid arthritis in relation to deployment within proximity to a documented open-air burn pit in Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kelly A; Smith, Besa; Granado, Nisara S; Boyko, Edward J; Gackstetter, Gary D; Ryan, Margaret A K; Phillips, Christopher J; Smith, Tyler C

    2012-06-01

    To assess the relationship between possible exposure to smoke from documented open-air burn pits and newly reported lupus and rheumatoid arthritis among Millennium Cohort participants who have deployed in support of operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Prospectively assessed self-reported lupus and rheumatoid arthritis among deployers who completed both 2004-2006 and 2007-2008 questionnaires. After exclusions, more than 18,000 participants were deployed, including more than 3000 participants deployed within a 3-mile radius of a documented burn pit. After adjustment, proximity within 3 miles of a burn pit was not significantly associated with rheumatoid arthritis or lupus in general; however, one location was associated with lupus, although few cases were at this site (n = 2). Results indicate deployers potentially exposed to documented burn pits in the combined three-camp analysis were not at an elevated risk of lupus or rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. Temporomandibular Joint Septic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Frojo, MD

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Infection of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ is a rare pediatric condition resulting from the introduction of pathogens into the joint by hematogenous seeding, local extension, or trauma. Early recognition of the typical signs and symptoms including fever, trismus, preauricular swelling, and TMJ region tenderness are critical in order to initiate further evaluation and prevent feared complications of fibrosis, ankylosis, abnormal facial structure, or persistence of symptoms. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography with ancillary laboratory analysis including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and white blood cell count are beneficial in confirming the suspected diagnosis and monitoring response to therapy. Initial intervention should include empiric parenteral antibiotics, early mandibular mobilization, and joint decompression to provide synovial fluid for analysis including cultures. This report describes a case of TMJ bacterial arthritis in a healthy 6-year-old male who was promptly treated nonsurgically with intravenous antibiotics and localized needle joint decompression with return to normal function after completion of oral antibiotics and physical therapy.

  3. Hepatitis B Virus Reactivation After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Patients With Hepatitis B Virus-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Hoon; Park, Joong-Won; Kim, Tae Hyun; Koh, Dong Wook; Lee, Woo Jin; Kim, Chang-Min

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) influences hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation and chronic hepatitis B (CHB) exacerbation in patients with HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: Of the 48 HCC patients with HBV who underwent 3D-CRT to the liver, 16 underwent lamivudine therapy before and during 3D-CRT (Group 1) and 32 did not receive antiviral therapy before 3D-CRT (Group 2). To analyze spontaneous HBV reactivation, we included a control group of 43 HCC patients who did not receive any specific treatment for HCC or CHB. Results: The cumulative rate of radiation-induced liver disease for Groups 1 and 2 was 12.5% (2 of 16) and 21.8% (7 of 32), respectively (p > 0.05). The cumulative rate of HBV reactivation was significantly greater in Group 2 (21.8%, 7 of 32) than in Group 1 (0%, 0/16) or the control group (2.3%, 1 of 43; p 0.05 each). The CHB exacerbations in the 4 Group 2 patients had radiation-induced liver disease features but were differentiated by serum HBV DNA changes. Two of these patients required antiviral therapy and effectively recovered with lamivudine therapy. Conclusions: In patients with HBV-related HCC undergoing 3D-CRT, HBV reactivation and consequent CHB exacerbation should be considered in the differential diagnosis of radiation-induced liver disease, and antiviral therapy might be considered for the prevention of liver function deterioration after RT

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and what other conditions are associated with RA. Learning more about your condition will allow you to ... Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Yoga for Arthritis ...

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and Alternative Medicine for ... Patient Update Transitioning the JRA Patient to an Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information ...

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of RA is made, what happens to your ... Link Below To Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and Diagnosis Rheumatoid Arthritis: What is Happening to the Joints? ...

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic Arthritis 101 ... Patient to an Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of ...

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have ...

  9. Autonomic reactivity and romantic relational aggression among female emerging adults: moderating roles of social and cognitive risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray-Close, Dianna

    2011-04-01

    This study investigates the association between autonomic arousal in response to a relational stressor and the perpetration of relational aggression against romantic partners. In addition, the moderating role of social risk (relational victimization by a romantic partner) and cognitive risk (hostile attribution biases) was explored. Skin conductance, heart rate, and respiratory sinus arrhythmia during an experience of exclusion were assessed in a sample of female emerging adults (N=131). Participants provided self-reports of romantic relational aggression, romantic relational victimization, and hostile attribution biases. Results indicated that both heightened and blunted reactivity served as risk factors for the perpetration of romantic relational aggression depending on women's social and contextual risks. Implications for understanding the development of intimate aggression are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. TLR4 endogenous ligand MRP8/14 level in enthesitis-related arthritis and its association with disease activity and TLR4 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mujeeb T; Myles, Arpita; Gaur, Priyanka; Misra, Ramnath; Aggarwal, Amita

    2014-02-01

    Enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA) is an inflammatory disease of childhood that lacks autoantibodies. Overexpression of surface-expressed Toll-like receptors (TLRs) has been found in ERA. Myeloid-related proteins (MRPs) 8 and 14 are calcium binding proteins that act as an endogenous ligand of TLR4. MRP8/14 levels are elevated in patients with systemic-onset arthritis. Thus we studied the role of MRP8/14 in ERA. The study enrolled patients with ERA. Plasma and SF levels of MRP8/14 were measured by ELISA and TLR4 expression on peripheral blood and SF monocytes was measured by two-colour flow cytometry. Control plasma samples were collected from 48 blood bank donors. Of the 69 patients, 67 were male, with a mean age of 15.2 (s.d. 2.7) years and a disease duration of 5 (s.d. 3) years. Median plasma levels of MRP8/14 were higher in patients (10 862.3 ng/ml) than controls (4426.1 ng/ml, P < 0.0001). Patients with active disease (11 669.5 ng/ml) had higher levels as compared with inactive disease (4421.8 ng/ml, P < 0.0001). Plasma MRP8/14 levels decreased on follow-up after 3 months only in patients who responded to treatment (P = 0.012). MRP8/14 levels were negatively correlated with the frequency of CD14(+)TLR4(+) cells (r = -0.372, P = 0.02). MRP8/14 levels were higher in SF as compared with plasma (15 858.45 ng/ml, P = 0.024). The frequency of CD14(+)TLR4(+) cells was higher in SF as compared with peripheral blood. MRP8/14 levels are increased in the plasma of ERA patients and are higher in those with active disease and the levels decrease in patients who respond to treatment, suggesting that it may be a good biomarker during follow-up.

  11. Effect of Reactive Black 5 azo dye on soil processes related to C and N cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadeeja Rehman

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Azo dyes are one of the largest classes of synthetic dyes being used in textile industries. It has been reported that 15–50% of these dyes find their way into wastewater that is often used for irrigation purpose in developing countries. The effect of azo dyes contamination on soil nitrogen (N has been studied previously. However, how does the azo dye contamination affect soil carbon (C cycling is unknown. Therefore, we assessed the effect of azo dye contamination (Reactive Black 5, 30 mg kg−1 dry soil, bacteria that decolorize this dye and dye + bacteria in the presence or absence of maize leaf litter on soil respiration, soil inorganic N and microbial biomass. We found that dye contamination did not induce any change in soil respiration, soil microbial biomass or soil inorganic N availability (P > 0.05. Litter evidently increased soil respiration. Our study concludes that the Reactive Black 5 azo dye (applied in low amount, i.e., 30 mg kg−1 dry soil contamination did not modify organic matter decomposition, N mineralization and microbial biomass in a silty loam soil.

  12. Chronotherapy for rheumatoid arthritis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    To H

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hideto To Department of Medical Pharmaceutics, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, Toyama, Japan Abstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an autoimmune disorder of unknown etiology. Morning stiffness, a characteristic feature of RA, shows a 24-hour rhythm. Cytokines, which are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of RA, also exhibit a 24-hour rhythm, with a peak in the early morning. These rhythms have been attributed to the endogenous hormone balance and changes in expression levels of clock-related genes. Chronotherapy based on the 24-hour rhythm of RA has been performed using glucocorticoids and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. In a previous study, it was reported that modified-release prednisone tablets were administered to patients with RA at night, which demonstrated that the severity of morning stiffness was markedly less than that in patients receiving the standard treatment. Methotrexate (MTX is the most frequently used RA drug worldwide. In a basic study, cytokines and inflammatory responses in RA model animals showed 24-hour rhythms, based on which MTX was administered and exerted dosing time-dependent antirheumatic effects. Plasma C-reactive protein and cytokine levels also exhibit 24-hour rhythms in patients with RA, with peaks occurring in the early morning. MTX has been shown to markedly inhibit the exacerbation of arthritis in patients with RA when it is administered as inflammatory responses and tumor necrosis factor-α levels begin to increase. Tacrolimus (TAC is an immunosuppressive agent that is administered to patients who undergo organ transplants. Since one of the mechanisms of action of TAC is the inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production, it is used as an RA therapeutic drug. When TAC was previously administered in the early light or early dark phase to RA model animals, the group treated in the early light phase had notably inhibited

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Rheumatology Course ...

  14. Exhaustion-related changes in cardiovascular and cortisol reactivity to acute psychosocial stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Peter; Österberg, Kai; Wallergård, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    -pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activations in both V-TSST sessions, together with habituation of cortisol and heart rate in the second session, but without any significant group differences. However, the former ED patients showed considerable variation in self-reported signs...... cortisol samples were collected. In addition, high frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV), heart rate (HR), t-wave amplitude (TWA), and α-amylase were assessed to examine stress reactivity and habituation in the autonomic nervous system (ANS). The initial analyses showed clear hypothalamic...... of exhaustion (SMBQ). This led us to assign former ED patients with lower ratings into the low SMBQ group (LOWS) and those with higher ratings to the high SMBQ group (HIGHS). When repeating the analyses a different picture emerged; the HIGHS showed a lower cortisol response to the V-TSST than did the LOWS. Both...

  15. Increased Kappa/Lambda Hybrid Antibody in Serum Is a Novel Biomarker Related to Disease Activity and Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lang Yi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The κ/λ hybrid antibodies in normal human serum were reported recently, but their clinical relevance has not yet been explored. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is one of the major joint diseases, and the early diagnosis and treatment of RA remain a challenge. Here, we developed a double-sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system to quantify relative serum κ/λ hybrid antibody levels in RA patients, osteoarthritis (OA patients, and healthy controls (HC in order to assess their potential use as a serological biomarker of early disease and clinical activity and to preliminarily investigate their immunomodulatory roles in RA. Surprisingly, we found that κ/λ hybrid antibody was markedly increased in both early and established RA. Serum κ/λ hybrid antibody levels were significantly correlated with clinical indexes and inflammatory markers in RA. Further analysis showed a positive correlation between κ/λ hybrid antibody levels and the 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28. In conclusion, serum κ/λ hybrid antibodies in RA were identified for the first time. High levels of κ/λ hybrid antibody may be a useful tool in distinguishing early RA from OA and HC. We suggest κ/λ hybrid antibody as a marker for disease activity. The increased κ/λ hybrid antibodies were associated with inflammatory conditions in RA.

  16. Increased Kappa/Lambda Hybrid Antibody in Serum Is a Novel Biomarker Related to Disease Activity and Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Lang; Hao, Mingju; Lu, Tian; Lin, Guigao; Chen, Lida; Gao, Ming; Fan, Gaowei; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Guojing; Yang, Xin; Li, Yulong; Zhang, Kuo; Zhang, Rui; Han, Yanxi; Wang, Lunan; Li, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    The κ/λ hybrid antibodies in normal human serum were reported recently, but their clinical relevance has not yet been explored. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the major joint diseases, and the early diagnosis and treatment of RA remain a challenge. Here, we developed a double-sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system to quantify relative serum κ/λ hybrid antibody levels in RA patients, osteoarthritis (OA) patients, and healthy controls (HC) in order to assess their potential use as a serological biomarker of early disease and clinical activity and to preliminarily investigate their immunomodulatory roles in RA. Surprisingly, we found that κ/λ hybrid antibody was markedly increased in both early and established RA. Serum κ/λ hybrid antibody levels were significantly correlated with clinical indexes and inflammatory markers in RA. Further analysis showed a positive correlation between κ/λ hybrid antibody levels and the 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28). In conclusion, serum κ/λ hybrid antibodies in RA were identified for the first time. High levels of κ/λ hybrid antibody may be a useful tool in distinguishing early RA from OA and HC. We suggest κ/λ hybrid antibody as a marker for disease activity. The increased κ/λ hybrid antibodies were associated with inflammatory conditions in RA.

  17. Which patients improve the most from arthritis rehabilitation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagel, Sofia; Lindqvist, Elisabet; Petersson, Ingemar F

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in arthritis rehabilitation performed by multidisciplinary teams in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis. Predictors of change in health-related quality of life and the proportion of patients with clinical improvement were investi...

  18. Long-Term Health-Related Quality of Life in German Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in Comparison to German General Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaantje Barth

    Full Text Available Aims of the study were to investigate health-related quality of life (HRQOL in adult patients with former diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA, to compare their HRQOL with the general population and to identify factors related to a poor outcome.In 2012, a cross-sectional survey was performed by mailing a questionnaire to a large cohort of former and current patients of the German Centre for Rheumatology in Children and Adolescents. Only adult patients (≥18 years with a diagnosis compatible with JIA were included (n = 2592; response 66%. The questionnaire included information about HRQOL (EQ5D, disease-related questions and socio-demographics. Prevalence and 95% confidence intervals (CI of problems with mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain and anxiety/depression were standardized to the German general population. Factors associated with low HRQOL in JIA patients were identified using logistic regression models.Sixty-two percent of the study population was female; age range was 18-73 years. In all dimensions, JIA patients reported statistically significantly more problems than the general population with largest differences in the pain dimension (JIA patients 56%; 95%CI 55-58%; general population 28%; 26-29% and the anxiety/depression dimension (28%; 27-29% vs. 4%; 4-5%. Lower HRQOL in JIA patients was associated with female sex, older age, lower level of education, still being under rheumatic treatment and disability.HRQOL in adult JIA patients is considerably lower than in the general population. As this cohort includes historic patients the new therapeutic schemes available today are expected to improve HRQOL in future.

  19. Long-Term Health-Related Quality of Life in German Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in Comparison to German General Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Swaantje; Haas, Johannes-Peter; Schlichtiger, Jenny; Molz, Johannes; Bisdorff, Betty; Michels, Hartmut; Hügle, Boris; Radon, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Aims of the study were to investigate health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in adult patients with former diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA), to compare their HRQOL with the general population and to identify factors related to a poor outcome. In 2012, a cross-sectional survey was performed by mailing a questionnaire to a large cohort of former and current patients of the German Centre for Rheumatology in Children and Adolescents. Only adult patients (≥18 years) with a diagnosis compatible with JIA were included (n = 2592; response 66%). The questionnaire included information about HRQOL (EQ5D), disease-related questions and socio-demographics. Prevalence and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of problems with mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain and anxiety/depression were standardized to the German general population. Factors associated with low HRQOL in JIA patients were identified using logistic regression models. Sixty-two percent of the study population was female; age range was 18-73 years. In all dimensions, JIA patients reported statistically significantly more problems than the general population with largest differences in the pain dimension (JIA patients 56%; 95%CI 55-58%; general population 28%; 26-29%) and the anxiety/depression dimension (28%; 27-29% vs. 4%; 4-5%). Lower HRQOL in JIA patients was associated with female sex, older age, lower level of education, still being under rheumatic treatment and disability. HRQOL in adult JIA patients is considerably lower than in the general population. As this cohort includes historic patients the new therapeutic schemes available today are expected to improve HRQOL in future.

  20. Hand and wrist arthritis of Behcet disease: Imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, Shunsuke; Ehara, Shigeru; Hitachi, Shin; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2010-01-01

    Background: Reports on arthritis in Behcet disease are relatively scarce, and imaging features vary. Purpose: To document the various imaging features of articular disorders of the hand and wrist in Behcet disease. Material and Methods: Four patients, four women aged 26 to 65 years, fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of Behcet disease, with imaging findings of hand and wrist arthritis, were seen in two institutions. Radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were studied to elucidate the pattern and distribution. Results: Both non-erosive arthritis and erosive arthritis of different features were noted: one with non-erosive synovitis of the wrist, one with wrist synovitis with minimal erosion, and two with erosive arthritis of the distal interphalangeal joint. Conclusion: Imaging manifestations of arthritis of Behcet disease vary, and may be similar to other seronegative arthritides

  1. Patterns of cancer-related internet searches: reactiveness; risks; the role of affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Paulo Roberto Vasconcellos; Castiel, Luis David; Ferreira, Franciso Romão

    2016-03-01

    The popularization of ICTs and the availability of information have not influenced the habits of prevention - cancers are lately diagnosed, as before in the scarcity of information era. This paper analyzes patterns of accesses to the National Cancer Institute website (already described in previous articles) as well as contradictions between the purposes and results of cancer prevention campaigns. We identified a reactive pattern of queries which was indifferent to information on prevention, but interested in treatment technologies and news about celebrity's diseases. These findings contrast with the paradigm of the best data for decision making, based in the heteronomy of "banking education", its means and efficacy. We discussthe symbolic power of campaigns under the theoretical framework of emotional heuristic models - analytical tools rarely employed in studies of risks, but here considered essential elements to the comprehention of public perception of health. Ambiguities are portrayed and as well as its pendulum between certainties and uncertainties in the midst on which they are formed. It is discussed the risk tripartition - as perception, analysis and policy, the latest posed as a public clash between the first concerning the major risks aligned to their historical circumstances.

  2. A systematic review and meta-analyses on C-reactive protein in relation to periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskevas, Spiros; Huizinga, John D; Loos, Bruno G

    2008-04-01

    Elevated plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) is regarded as a risk predictor for cardiovascular diseases. This systematic review explored the robustness of observations that CRP is elevated in periodontitis. Similarly, the effect of periodontal therapy on CRP levels was investigated. Selection of publications was based on: (1) cross-sectional (case-control) studies; (2) longitudinal (treatment) studies; (3) high-sensitivity CRP measurement; (4) median and/or mean (+/-SD) values presented; and (5) subjects with no systemic disorders. Screening of the initially 448 identified studies and reference checking resulted in 18 suitable papers. The majority of the studies showed that CRP levels are higher in patients than in controls. Often, studies showed that patients had CRP levels >2.1 mg/l. A meta-analysis of 10 cross-sectional studies showed that the weighted mean difference (WMD) of CRP between patients and controls was 1.56 mg/l (pperiodontal therapy. Eligible treatment studies in a meta-analysis demonstrated a WMD of reductions of CRP after therapy of 0.50 mg/L (95% CI 0.08-0.93) (p=0.02). There is strong evidence from cross-sectional studies that plasma CRP in periodontitis is elevated compared with controls. There is modest evidence on the effect of periodontal therapy in lowering the levels of CRP.

  3. Free radicals and related reactive species as mediators of tissue injury and disease: implications for Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehrer, James P; Klotz, Lars-Oliver

    2015-01-01

    A radical is any molecule that contains one or more unpaired electrons. Radicals are normal products of many metabolic pathways. Some exist in a controlled (caged) form as they perform essential functions. Others exist in a free form and interact with various tissue components. Such interactions can cause both acute and chronic dysfunction, but can also provide essential control of redox regulated signaling pathways. The potential roles of endogenous or xenobiotic-derived free radicals in several human pathologies have stimulated extensive research linking the toxicity of numerous xenobiotics and disease processes to a free radical mechanism. In recent years, improvements in analytical methodologies, as well as the realization that subtle effects induced by free radicals and oxidants are important in modulating cellular signaling, have greatly improved our understanding of the roles of these reactive species in toxic mechanisms and disease processes. However, because free radical-mediated changes are pervasive, and a consequence as well as a cause of injury, whether such species are a major cause of tissue injury and human disease remains unclear. This concern is supported by the fact that the bulk of antioxidant defenses are enzymatic and the findings of numerous studies showing that exogenously administered small molecule antioxidants are unable to affect the course of most toxicities and diseases purported to have a free radical mechanism. This review discusses cellular sources of various radical species and their reactions with vital cellular constituents, and provides examples of selected disease processes that may have a free radical component.

  4. Interactions between C-Reactive Protein Genotypes with Markers of Nutritional Status in Relation to Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelie Nienaber-Rousseau

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation, as indicated by C-reactive protein concentrations (CRP, is a risk factor for chronic diseases. Both genetic and environmental factors affect susceptibility to inflammation. As dietary interventions can influence inflammatory status, we hypothesized that dietary effects could be influenced by interactions with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the CRP gene. We determined 12 CRP SNPs, as well as various nutrition status markers in 2010 black South Africans and analyzed their effect on CRP. Interactions were observed for several genotypes with obesity in determining CRP. Lipid intake modulated the pro-inflammatory effects of some SNPs, i.e., an increase in both saturated fatty acid and monounsaturated fatty acid intake in those homozygous for the polymorphic allele at rs2808630 was associated with a larger increase in CRP. Those harboring the minor alleles at rs3093058 and rs3093062 presented with significantly higher CRP in the presence of increased triglyceride or cholesterol intake. When harboring the minor allele of these SNPs, a high omega-6 to -3 ratio was, however, found to be anti-inflammatory. Carbohydrate intake also modulated CRP SNPs, as HbA1C and fasting glucose levels interacted with some SNPs to influence the CRP. This investigation highlights the impact that nutritional status can have on reducing the inherent genetic susceptibility to a heightened systemic inflammatory state.

  5. The epigenetic landscape related to reactive oxygen species formation in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kietzmann, Thomas; Petry, Andreas; Shvetsova, Antonina; Gerhold, Joachim M; Görlach, Agnes

    2017-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are among the leading causes of death worldwide. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can act as damaging molecules but also represent central hubs in cellular signalling networks. Increasing evidence indicates that ROS play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, although the underlying mechanisms and consequences of pathophysiologically elevated ROS in the cardiovascular system are still not completely resolved. More recently, alterations of the epigenetic landscape, which can affect DNA methylation, post-translational histone modifications, ATP-dependent alterations to chromatin and non-coding RNA transcripts, have been considered to be of increasing importance in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. While it has long been accepted that epigenetic changes are imprinted during development or even inherited and are not changed after reaching the lineage-specific expression profile, it becomes more and more clear that epigenetic modifications are highly dynamic. Thus, they might provide an important link between the actions of ROS and cardiovascular diseases. This review will provide an overview of the role of ROS in modulating the epigenetic landscape in the context of the cardiovascular system. This article is part of a themed section on Redox Biology and Oxidative Stress in Health and Disease. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v174.12/issuetoc. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. Arthritis and Veterans

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-09

    One in three veterans has arthritis. This podcast provides information on how veterans can improve their quality of life with physical activity and other arthritis management strategies.  Created: 11/9/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/9/2015.

  7. Arthritis: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lift your mood and make you feel more positive. Learn about physical activity for people with arthritis and CDC-recommended physical ... Top of Page 6. How does being overweight affect arthritis? It’s ... physical activity and diet changes can help you lose weight. ...

  8. Pain-related stress in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and salivary cortisol reactivity to socio-emotional stress in 3-month-old very preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzi, Livio; Giusti, Lorenzo; Fumagalli, Monica; Tasca, Hilarj; Ciceri, Francesca; Menozzi, Giorgia; Mosca, Fabio; Morandi, Francesco; Borgatti, Renato; Montirosso, Rosario

    2016-10-01

    Very preterm (VPT) infants are hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and exposed to varying levels of skin-breaking procedures (pain-related stress), even in absence of severe clinical conditions. Repeated and prolonged pain exposure may alter hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis reactivity in VPT infants. During the post-discharge period, altered HPA axis reactivity has been documented in response to non-social stressors, using salivary cortisol as a biomarker. However, little is known about the effects of NICU pain-related stress on subsequent HPA axis reactivity to socio-emotional stress in infants. We examined the relationship between pain-related stress in NICU and HPA axis reactivity (i.e., salivary cortisol reactivity) to an age-appropriate socio-emotional condition in 37 healthy VPT infants compared to 53 full-term (FT) controls. The number of skin-breaking procedures was obtained across NICU stay for VPT infants. At 3 months (corrected age for prematurity), all infants participated in the maternal Face-to-Face Still-Face (FFSF) procedure, in order to assess HPA axis reactivity to socio-emotional stress (i.e., maternal unresponsiveness). VPT infants exhibited a blunted salivary cortisol reactivity, which was associated with the amount of skin-breaking procedures during NICU: greater pain-related stress predicted lower salivary cortisol reactivity, adjusting for neonatal confounders. These findings further advance our knowledge of how early exposure to pain-related stress in NICU contributes to the programming of an altered HPA axis reactivity to socio-emotional stress in 3-month-old VPT infants, even in the absence of major perinatal complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A Prospective Study of Lupus and Rheumatoid Arthritis in Relation to Deployment in Support of Iraq and Afghanistan: The Millennium Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly A. Jones

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to prospectively assess the association between deployment in support of the operations in Iraq and Afghanistan and newly reported lupus and rheumatoid arthritis while also considering the effects of demographic, behavioral, and occupational characteristics. A total of 77,047 (2001–2003 and 31,110 (2004–2006 participants completed the baseline Millennium Cohort questionnaire and were resurveyed approximately every 3 years. Longitudinal analyses were used to assess the adjusted association between deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan with and without combat exposures and newly reported disease. After adjusting, deployment was not significantly associated with newly reported lupus compared with nondeployers. However, compared with nondeployers, deployers with and without combat exposures were significantly less likely to newly report rheumatoid arthritis. Women, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic participants had a significantly elevated risk for both diseases. Overall, deployment was not associated with an increased risk of newly reported lupus or rheumatoid arthritis.

  10. Influence of route of administration/drug formulation and other factors on adherence to treatment in rheumatoid arthritis (pain related) and dyslipidemia (non-pain related).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fautrel, Bruno; Balsa, Alejandro; Van Riel, Piet; Casillas, Marta; Capron, Jean-Philippe; Cueille, Carine; de la Torre, Inmaculada

    2017-07-01

    A comprehensive review was performed to investigate the effect of route of administration on medication adherence and persistence in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to compare adherence/persistence with oral medications between RA and a non-painful disease (dyslipidemia). Comprehensive database searches were performed to identify studies investigating medication adherence and/or persistence in adults with RA receiving conventional synthetic or biologic agents. Similar searches were performed for studies of patients with dyslipidemia receiving statins. Studies had to be published after 1998 in English and involve ≥6 months' follow up. Adherence and persistence were compared between the different routes of drug administration in RA, and between the two diseases for oral medications. A total of 35 and 28 papers underwent data extraction for RA and dyslipidemia, respectively. Within the constraints of the analysis, adherence and persistence rates appeared broadly similar for the different routes of drug administration in RA. Adherence to oral medications was also broadly similar across the two diseases, but persistence was lower in dyslipidemia. Poor adherence has clinical consequences in both diseases: greater disease activity and risk of flare in RA, and increased serum cholesterol levels and risk of heart and cerebrovascular disease in dyslipidemia. Over 1-3 years, poor adherence to biologic RA medications led to increased resource use and medical costs but lower total direct costs due to reduced biologic drug costs. Conversely, poor adherence to dyslipidemia medications resulted in increased total direct costs. In both diseases, adherence improved with patient education/support. The route of drug administration and the symptomatic (pain) nature of the disease do not appear to be dominant factors for drug adherence or persistence in RA. The wide range of adherence and persistence values and definitions across studies made comparisons between drug formulations and

  11. [Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbiti, Mohammed; Bouhamidi, Bahia; Louzi, Lhoussaine

    2017-01-01

    Acute septic arthritis is rare. It is associated with poor prognosis in terms of mortality and morbidity. We report the case of a 61-year old patient with spontaneous Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis. He suffered from complicated diabetes associated with positive blood cultures and synovial fluid cultures. Patient's evolution was favorable thanks to early diagnosis and initiation of adequate antibiotic therapy. Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis is rare. On that basis we conducted a literature review of cases of Proteus mirabilis pyogenic arthritis to highlight the risk factors, pathogenesis, treatment and evolution of these diseases. Diagnosis is commonly based on microbiological analysis, early articular puncture biopsy is performed before the initiation of antibiotic treatment, direct examination, culture and antibiogram which are useful as guidance for antibiotic therapy. Septic arthritis is a diagnostic and therapeutic emergency; early management of this disease allows total healing without after-effects.

  12. Diagnostic value of tolerance-related gene expression measured in the recipient alloantigen-reactive T cell fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dong-Gyun; Park, Youn-Hee; Kim, Sung-Eun; Jeong, Seong-Hee; Kim, Song-Cheol

    2013-08-01

    The efficient development of tolerance-inducing therapies and safe reduction of immunosuppression should be supported by early diagnosis and prediction of tolerance in transplantation. Using mouse models of donor-specific tolerance to allogeneic skin and islet grafts we tested whether measurement of tolerance-related gene expression in their alloantigen-reactive peripheral T cell fraction efficiently reflected the tolerance status of recipients. We found that Foxp3, Nrn1, and Klrg1 were preferentially expressed in conditions of tolerance compared with rejection or unmanipulated controls if their expression is measured in CD69(+) T cells prepared from coculture of recipient peripheral T cells and donor antigen-presenting cells. The same pattern of gene expression was observed in recipients grafted with either skin or islets, recipients of different genetic origins, and even those taking immunosuppressive drugs. These findings suggest that the expression of tolerance-related genes in the alloantigen-reactive T cell fraction could be used to detect tolerance in the clinic. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Infusion-related reactions to infliximab in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in a clinical practice setting: relationship to dose, antihistamine pretreatment, and infusion number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Michael J; Weber, Deborah A; Guthrie, Judith A; Bykerk, Vivian P; Lee, Peter; Keystone, Edward C

    2004-10-01

    We describe infusion-related reactions to infliximab (during infusion or within 1 hour postinfusion) in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated in a quaternary care center. We followed 113 patients for a mean of 60.6 +/- 28.9 weeks, obtaining 10.5 +/- 4.9 infusions per patient. We observed 1183 infusions resulting in 104 infusion reactions (8.8%). All reactions resolved within several hours following cessation of the infusion and none was serious enough to warrant hospitalization. Reactions included allergic reactions (pruritus, urticaria) in 4.2% of infusions, cardiopulmonary (hypotension, hypertension, tachycardia) in 3.0%, and miscellaneous reactions (headache, nausea, vomiting) in 2.0%. Reactions occurred in 8.0% of 3 mg/kg infusions and in 10.3% of 5 mg/kg infusions. Reactions occurred in 13.2% of infusions that involved antihistamine pretreatment compared to only 7.5% of infusions that involved no pretreatment. At both infliximab doses, there was a similar frequency of infusion reactions in patients pretreated due to a previous infusion (12.6%) compared to those pretreated strictly based on infusion number (14.7%). A number of the reactions involving antihistamine pretreatment may be explained by known side effects of diphenhydramine, including headache, dizziness, nausea, and palpitations. Infusion-related reactions to infliximab were infrequent, rarely severe, and easily manageable. The frequency of reactions was equivalent in patients treated with 3 mg/kg compared to 5 mg/kg. Reactions were significantly more frequent in infusions where patients were pretreated with the antihistamine diphenhydramine, compared to those not involving pretreatment.

  14. Serum levels of pregnenolone and 17-hydroxypregnenolone in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus: relation to other adrenal hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Daniela; Falk, Werner; Dorner, Monika; Schölmerich, Jürgen; Straub, Rainer H

    2003-02-01

    In patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), low levels of adrenal steroids have been repeatedly demonstrated, but the site of alteration has not been exactly described because measurements of serum pregnenolone and 17-hydroxypregnenolone (17OHPreg) together with other adrenal steroids have never been performed. We measured serum levels of adrenal hormones such as pregnenolone, 17OHPreg, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), DHEA sulfate (DHEAS), progesterone (P), 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17OHP), androstenedione (ASD), and cortisol in 24 healthy controls, 24 patients with RA, and 24 patients with SLE. Serum levels of pregnenolone were similar in RA and SLE patients as compared to healthy controls irrespective of prior prednisolone therapy. In all RA and SLE patients (including those with prior prednisolone treatment), serum levels of all measured hormones except pregnenolone were significantly lower as compared to controls. In RA patients without prior prednisolone treatment, serum levels of 17OHPreg, DHEA, cortisol, and ASD were similar to controls, and serum levels of P, 17OHP, and DHEAS were significantly lower as compared to controls. In SLE patients without prior prednisolone treatment, serum levels of 17OHPreg and cortisol were similar, and serum levels of P, 17OHP, ASD, DHEA, and DHEAS were significantly lower as compared to controls. The primary hormone of the adrenal steroid cascade, pregnenolone, is almost normal in RA and SLE irrespective of corticosteroid treatment. In patients with RA, we believe that there is a near normal P450scc reaction and a normal double step P450c17 reaction. In SLE patients, the P450scc reaction also seems normal but the second step of the P450c17 reaction seems to be inhibited. In both diseases, cortisol levels remain relatively stable at the expense of other adrenal hormones. This study revealed distinct changes of steroid pathways that are related to the disease entities.

  15. Self-efficacy for exercise, more than disease-related factors, is associated with objectively assessed exercise time and sedentary behaviour in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, K M; Pieper, C F; Hall, K S; St Clair, E W; Kraus, W E

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, reports of physical activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were limited to self-report methods and/or leisure-time physical activity. Our objectives were to assess, determine correlates of, and compare to well-matched controls both exercise and sedentary time in a typical clinical cohort of RA. Persons with established RA (seropositive or radiographic erosions; n = 41) without diabetes or cardiovascular disease underwent assessments of traditional and disease-specific correlates of physical activity and 7 days of triaxial accelerometry. Twenty-seven age, gender, and body mass index (BMI)-matched controls were assessed. For persons with RA, objectively measured median (25th-75th percentile) exercise time was 3 (1-11) min/day; only 10% (n = 4) of participants exercised for ≥ 30 min/day. Time spent in sedentary activities was 92% (89-95%). Exercise time was not related to pain but was inversely related to disease activity (r = -0.3, p self-efficacy for endurance activity (r = 0.4, p self-efficacy for endurance activity (r = -0.4, p self-efficacy for physical activity but similar amounts of exercise and sedentary time. For persons with RA and without diabetes or cardiovascular disease, time spent in exercise was well below established guidelines and activity patterns were predominantly sedentary. For optimal care in RA, in addition to promoting exercise, clinicians should consider assessing sedentary behaviour and self-efficacy for exercise. Future interventions might determine whether increased self-efficacy can increase physical activity in RA.

  16. Item response theory analysis of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Health-Related Quality of Life (CDC HRQOL) items in adults with arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielenz, Thelma J; Callahan, Leigh F; Edwards, Michael C

    2016-03-12

    Examine the feasibility of performing an item response theory (IRT) analysis on two of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention health-related quality of life (CDC HRQOL) modules - the 4-item Healthy Days Core Module (HDCM) and the 5-item Healthy days Symptoms Module (HDSM). Previous principal components analyses confirm that the two scales both assess a mix of mental (CDC-MH) and physical health (CDC-PH). The purpose is to conduct item response theory (IRT) analysis on the CDC-MH and CDC-PH scales separately. 2182 patients with self-reported or physician-diagnosed arthritis completed a cross-sectional survey including HDCM and HDSM items. Besides global health, the other 8 items ask the number of days that some statement was true; we chose to recode the data into 8 categories based on observed clustering. The IRT assumptions were assessed using confirmatory factor analysis and the data could be modeled using an unidimensional IRT model. The graded response model was used for IRT analyses and CDC-MH and CDC-PH scales were analyzed separately in flexMIRT. The IRT parameter estimates for the five-item CDC-PH all appeared reasonable. The three-item CDC-MH did not have reasonable parameter estimates. The CDC-PH scale is amenable to IRT analysis but the existing The CDC-MH scale is not. We suggest either using the 4-item Healthy Days Core Module (HDCM) and the 5-item Healthy days Symptoms Module (HDSM) as they currently stand or the CDC-PH scale alone if the primary goal is to measure physical health related HRQOL.

  17. Superior oblique tendon (Brown’s syndrome as the presenting finding in childhood onset HLA-B27-related enthesitis and juvenile idiopathic oligoarticular arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pham

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We report two patients who presented with Brown’s syndrome. The first is a 7-year-old boy who at the time of his diagnosis was also found to have enthesitis and HLA-B27 positivity. The second patient was diagnosed with bilateral Brown’s syndrome at 13 months of age. At age 7 she developed a persistent oligoarticular arthritis and unilateral anterior iritis consistent with the oligoarticular Juvenile Idiopatic Arthritis (JIA phenotype. These cases highlight ophthalmologic findings and diagnostic considerations with respect to Brown’s syndrome and associated childhood onset rheumatologic disease.

  18. Link between rheumatoid arthritis and chronic periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Kaczyński

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic periodontitis is an infectious disease associated with the progressive destruction of periodontal tissues. In recent years, more and more data indicate an existing relationship between periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis. The link between both diseases has been confirmed in multiple studies. Despite the fact that this association might be based on shared environmental and genetic risk factors, a possible causal relation was advocated by experimental, epidemiological and interventional studies, with the leading role of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Individuals with chronic periodontitis are at an increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis, as well as rheumatoid arthritis patients are at an increased risk of chronic periodontitis and more severe forms of periodontitis. Furthermore, there is a correlation between the activity in both diseases – patients with more severe periodontitis suffer from more active rheumatoid arthritis. Intervention attempts were also performed, which demonstrated that eliminating periodontal infection and inflammation can affect the severity of rheumatoid arthritis. In this paper, we review the current knowledge about the link between both diseases, focusing on its clinical implications. Will periodontal treatment become a part of standard therapy for rheumatoid arthritis?

  19. Burden of childhood-onset arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassett Afton L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Juvenile arthritis comprises a variety of chronic inflammatory diseases causing erosive arthritis in children, often progressing to disability. These children experience functional impairment due to joint and back pain, heel pain, swelling of joints and morning stiffness, contractures, pain, and anterior uveitis leading to blindness. As children who have juvenile arthritis reach adulthood, they face possible continuing disease activity, medication-associated morbidity, and life-long disability and risk for emotional and social dysfunction. In this article we will review the burden of juvenile arthritis for the patient and society and focus on the following areas: patient disability; visual outcome; other medical complications; physical activity; impact on HRQOL; emotional impact; pain and coping; ambulatory visits, hospitalizations and mortality; economic impact; burden on caregivers; transition issues; educational occupational outcomes, and sexuality. The extent of impact on the various aspects of the patients', families' and society's functioning is clear from the existing literature. Juvenile arthritis imposes a significant burden on different spheres of the patients', caregivers' and family's life. In addition, it imposes a societal burden of significant health care costs and utilization. Juvenile arthritis affects health-related quality of life, physical function and visual outcome of children and impacts functioning in school and home. Effective, well-designed and appropriately tailored interventions are required to improve transitioning to adult care, encourage future vocation/occupation, enhance school function and minimize burden on costs.

  20. The oxygen reactivity index and its relation to sensor technology in patients with severe brain lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengler, Julius; Frenzel, Christin; Vajkoczy, Peter; Horn, Peter; Wolf, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    The oxygen reactivity index (ORx) has been introduced to assess the status of cerebral autoregulation after traumatic brain injury (TBI) or subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Currently, there is some controversy about whether the ORx depends on the type of PbrO2-sensor technology used for its calculation. To examine if the probe technology does matter, we compared the ORx and the resulting optimal cerebral perfusion pressures (CPPopt) of simultaneously implanted Licox (CC1.SB, Integra Neuroscience, France) and Neurovent-PTO (Raumedic, Germany) probes in patients after aneurysmal SAH or severe TBI. Licox and Raumedic probes were implanted side by side in 11 patients after TBI or SAH. ORx and CPPopt were recorded continuously. The equivalence of both probes was examined using Bland-Altman analyses. The mean difference in ORx was 0.1, with Licox producing higher values. The limits of agreement regarding ORx ranged from -0.6 to +0.7. When both probes' ORx values were compared in each patient, no specific pattern in their relationship was seen. The mean difference in CPPopt was 0 mmHg with limits of agreement between -16.5 and +16.4 mmHg. Owing to the rather limited number of patients, we view the results of this study as preliminary. The main result is that Licox and Raumedic showed consistent differences in ORx and CPPopt. Therefore, ORx values of both probes cannot be interchanged and should not be viewed as equivalent. This should be taken into consideration when discussing ORx data generated by different PbrO2 probe types.

  1. Analysis of four serum biomarkers in rheumatoid arthritis: association with extra articular manifestations in patients and arthralgia in relatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia R. Nass

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: To evaluate the frequency of four serum biomarkers in RA patients and their relatives and identify possible associations with clinical findings of the disease. Methods: This was a transversal analytical study. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP, anti-mutated citrullinated vimentin (anti-MCV and IgA-rheumatoid factor (RF were determined by ELISA and IgM-RF by latex agglutination in 210 RA patients, 198 relatives and 92 healthy controls from Southern Brazil. Clinical and demographic data were obtained through charts review and questionnaires. Results: A higher positivity for all antibodies was observed in RA patients when compared to relatives and controls (p < 0.0001. IgA-RF was more frequent in relatives compared to controls (14.6% vs. 5.4%, p = 0.03, OR = 2.98; 95% CI = 1.11-7.98 whereas anti-CCP was the most common biomarker among RA patients (75.6%. Concomitant positivity for the four biomarkers was more common in patients (46.2%, p < 0.0001. Relatives and controls were mostly positive for just one biomarker (20.2%, p < 0.0001 and 15.2%, p = 0.016, respectively. No association was observed between the number of positive biomarkers and age of disease onset, functional class or tobacco exposure. In seronegative patients predominate absence of extra articular manifestations (EAMs (p = 0.01; OR = 3.25; 95% CI = 1.16-10.66. Arthralgia was present in positive relatives, regardless the type of biomarker. Conclusions: A higher number of biomarkers was present in RA patients with EAMs. Positivity of biomarkers was related to arthralgia in relatives. These findings reinforce the link between distinct biomarkers and the pathophysiologic mechanisms of AR.

  2. Reactive Kripke semantics

    CERN Document Server

    Gabbay, Dov M

    2013-01-01

    This text offers an extension to the traditional Kripke semantics for non-classical logics by adding the notion of reactivity. Reactive Kripke models change their accessibility relation as we progress in the evaluation process of formulas in the model. This feature makes the reactive Kripke semantics strictly stronger and more applicable than the traditional one. Here we investigate the properties and axiomatisations of this new and most effective semantics, and we offer a wide landscape of applications of the idea of reactivity. Applied topics include reactive automata, reactive grammars, rea

  3. Rheumatoid arthritis and bacterial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N L Prokopjeva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To study features of bacterial infections course in pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and changes of laboratory measures after focus of infection sanation. Material and methods. 46 pts with definite rheumatoid arthritis were examined at the time of comorbid infection (Cl detection and after infection focus sanation. Bacteriological test with evaluation of flora sensitivity to antibiotics by disco-diffusion method was performed at baseline and after the course of antibacterial therapy to assess its efficacy. Hemogram, serum fibrinogen, rheumatoid factor, circulating immune complexes (CIC, C-reactive protein levels were assessed. Serum interleukin (IL 1(3, IL6 and neopterin concentrations were examined by immune-enzyme assay in a part of pts. Typical clinical features of Cl were present in only 28 (60,9% pts. 13 (28,3% pts had fever, 12 (26,0% — leukocytosis, 15 (32,6% — changes of leucocyte populations. Some laboratory measures (thrombocytes, fibrinogen, CIC, neopterin levels significantly decreased (p<0,05 after infection focus sanation without correction of disease modifying therapy. Cl quite often develop as asymptomatic processes most often in pts with high activity and can induce disturbances promoting appearance of endothelial dysfunction, atherothrombosis and reduction of life duration. So timely detection and proper sanation of infection focuses should be performed in pts with RA

  4. The Reliability of Disease Activity Score in 28 Joints-C-Reactive Protein Might Be Overestimated in a Subgroup of Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients, When the Score Is Solely Based on Subjective Parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen Hansen, Inger Marie; Asmussen Andreasen, Rikke; Van Bui Hansen, Mark Nam

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Disease Activity Score in 28 Joints (DAS28) is a scoring system to evaluate disease activity and treatment response in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A DAS28 score of greater than 3.2 is a well-described limit for treatment intensification; however, the reliability of DAS28 might be overe......BACKGROUND: Disease Activity Score in 28 Joints (DAS28) is a scoring system to evaluate disease activity and treatment response in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A DAS28 score of greater than 3.2 is a well-described limit for treatment intensification; however, the reliability of DAS28 might...... be overestimated. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of DAS28 in RA, especially focusing on a subgroup of patients with a DAS28 score of greater than 3.2. METHODS: Data from RA patients registered in the local part of Danish DANBIO Registry were collected in May 2015. Patients were....... Patients with central sensitization and psychological problems and those with false-positive diagnosis of RA are at high risk of overtreatment.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where...

  5. Menstrual arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    McDonagh, J E; Singh, M M; Griffiths, I D

    1993-01-01

    The menstrual cycle is characterised by variations in the absolute and relative concentrations of the hormones of the hypothalamic pituitary ovarian axis, which in turn affect cell function and cytokine and heat shock protein production. Menstruation involves the shedding of the secretory endometrium, which is part of the mucosal associated lymphoid tissue and hence is rich in immunologically competent cells such as CD8 T cells and macrophages. The case is reported here of a patient presentin...

  6. Richter transformation driven by Epstein-Barr virus reactivation during therapy-related immunosuppression in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Barchino, Maria J; Sarasquete, Maria E; Panizo, Carlos; Morscio, Julie; Martinez, Antonio; Alcoceba, Miguel; Fresquet, Vicente; Gonzalez-Farre, Blanca; Paiva, Bruno; Young, Ken H; Robles, Eloy F; Roa, Sergio; Celay, Jon; Larrayoz, Marta; Rossi, Davide; Gaidano, Gianluca; Montes-Moreno, Santiago; Piris, Miguel A; Balanzategui, Ana; Jimenez, Cristina; Rodriguez, Idoia; Calasanz, Maria J; Larrayoz, Maria J; Segura, Victor; Garcia-Muñoz, Ricardo; Rabasa, Maria P; Yi, Shuhua; Li, Jianyong; Zhang, Mingzhi; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y; Puig-Moron, Noemi; Orfao, Alberto; Böttcher, Sebastian; Hernandez-Rivas, Jesus M; Miguel, Jesus San; Prosper, Felipe; Tousseyn, Thomas; Sagaert, Xavier; Gonzalez, Marcos; Martinez-Climent, Jose A

    2018-05-01

    The increased risk of Richter transformation (RT) in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) due to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation during immunosuppressive therapy with fludarabine other targeted agents remains controversial. Among 31 RT cases classified as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), seven (23%) showed EBV expression. In contrast to EBV - tumours, EBV + DLBCLs derived predominantly from IGVH-hypermutated CLL, and they also showed CLL-unrelated IGVH sequences more frequently. Intriguingly, despite having different cellular origins, clonally related and unrelated EBV + DLBCLs shared a previous history of immunosuppressive chemo-immunotherapy, a non-germinal centre DLBCL phenotype, EBV latency programme type II or III, and very short survival. These data suggested that EBV reactivation during therapy-related immunosuppression can transform either CLL cells or non-tumoural B lymphocytes into EBV + DLBCL. To investigate this hypothesis, xenogeneic transplantation of blood cells from 31 patients with CLL and monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) was performed in Rag2 -/- IL2γc -/- mice. Remarkably, the recipients' impaired immunosurveillance favoured the spontaneous outgrowth of EBV + B-cell clones from 95% of CLL and 64% of MBL patients samples, but not from healthy donors. Eventually, these cells generated monoclonal tumours (mostly CLL-unrelated but also CLL-related), recapitulating the principal features of EBV + DLBCL in patients. Accordingly, clonally related and unrelated EBV + DLBCL xenografts showed indistinguishable cellular, virological and molecular features, and synergistically responded to combined inhibition of EBV replication with ganciclovir and B-cell receptor signalling with ibrutinib in vivo. Our study underscores the risk of RT driven by EBV in CLL patients receiving immunosuppressive therapies, and provides the scientific rationale for testing ganciclovir and ibrutinib in EBV + DLBCL. Copyright © 2018 Pathological

  7. Association between helplessness, disability, and disease activity with health-related quality of life among rheumatoid arthritis patients in a multiethnic Asian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Yu Heng; Koh, Ee Tzun; Leong, Khai Pang; Wee, Hwee-Lin

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the association between helplessness, disability, and disease activity with health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in a multiethnic cohort of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients in Singapore. This cross-sectional study was conducted at Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology, from October 2010 to October 2011. All patients fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology 1987 criteria for RA. Socio-demographics, clinical, and patient-reported outcome (PRO) variables were collected. HRQoL outcomes were Short Form 36 (SF-36) physical and mental component summary (PCS and MCS) scores and Short Form 6 Dimensions (SF-6D) utilities. Stepwise multiple linear regression analyses were performed using HRQoL outcomes as dependent variables in separate models and with adjustment for helplessness (Rheumatology Attitudes Index, RAI), disability (Health Assessment Questionnaire, HAQ), and disease activity (Disease Activity in 28 joints) followed by socio-demographic, clinical, and PRO variables. Complete data were provided by 473 consenting subjects [mean (SD) age: 60.02 (11.04) years, 85 % female, 77 % Chinese]. After adjustment for all measured covariates, only RAI and HAQ scores remained significantly associated with SF-36 MCS (β: -0.9, p < 0.001; β: -7.0, p < 0.001) and SF-6D utilities (β: -0.005, p < 0.001; β: -0.081, p < 0.001), respectively, while only HAQ scores were significantly associated with SF-36 PCS (β: -7.7, p < 0.001). Interventions to address the sense of helplessness and to prevent or reduce disability could improve HRQoL of RA patients.

  8. Heated hatha yoga to target cortisol reactivity to stress and affective eating in women at risk for obesity-related illnesses: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Lindsey B; Medina, Johnna L; Baird, Scarlett O; Rosenfield, David; Powers, Mark B; Smits, Jasper A J

    2016-06-01

    Cortisol reactivity to stress is associated with affective eating, an important behavioral risk factor for obesity and related metabolic diseases. Yoga practice is related to decreases in stress and cortisol levels, thus emerging as a potential targeted complementary intervention for affective eating. This randomized controlled trial examined the efficacy of a heated, hatha yoga intervention for reducing cortisol reactivity to stress and affective eating. Females (N = 52; ages 25-46 years; 75% White) at risk for obesity and related illnesses were randomly assigned to 8 weeks of Bikram Yoga practice or to waitlist control. Cortisol reactivity to a laboratory stress induction were measured at Weeks 0 (pretreatment) and 9 (posttreatment). Self-reported binge eating frequency and coping motives for eating were assessed at Weeks 0, 3, 6, and 9. Among participants with elevated cortisol reactivity at pretreatment ("high reactors"), those randomized to the yoga condition evidenced greater pre- to posttreatment reductions in cortisol reactivity (p = .042, d = .85), but there were not significant condition differences for the "low reactors" (p = .178, d = .53). Yoga participants reported greater decreases in binge eating frequency (p = .040, d = .62) and eating to cope with negative affect (p = .038, d = .54). This study provides preliminary support for the efficacy of heated hatha yoga for treating physiological stress reactivity and affective eating among women at risk for obesity-related illnesses. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Influence of rheumatoid arthritis-related morning stiffness on productivity at work: results from a survey in 11 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Kalle; Buttgereit, Frank; Tuominen, Risto

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of morning stiffness on productivity at work and to estimate the work-related economic consequences of morning stiffness among patients with RA-related morning stiffness in 11 European countries. The original sample comprised 1061 RA patients from 11 European countries (Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Norway, Poland, Spain, Sweden and UK). They had been diagnosed with RA and experience morning stiffness three or more times per week. Data were collected by interviews. Women comprised 77.9 % of the sample, the average age was 50.4 years, and 84.3 % had RA diagnosed for more than 2 years. Overall costs of RA-related morning stiffness was calculated to be 27,712€ per patient per year, varying from 4965€ in Spain to 66,706€ in Norway. On average, 96 % of the overall production losses were attributed to early retirement, with a markedly lower level (77 %) in Italy than in other countries (p productivity losses due to late work arrivals and working while sick showed considerable variation across the countries represented in the study. Overall, the average annual cost of late arrivals (0.8 % of the total costs) was approximately half of the costs attributed to sick leave (1.7 %) and working while sick (1.5 %). Morning stiffness due to RA causes significant production losses and is a significant cost burden throughout Europe. There seem to be notable differences in the impact of morning stiffness on productivity between European countries.

  10. Is impaired control of reactive stepping related to falls during inpatient stroke rehabilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Avril; Inness, Elizabeth L; Wong, Jennifer S; Fraser, Julia E; McIlroy, William E

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with stroke fall more often than age-matched controls. Although many focus on the multifactorial nature of falls, the fundamental problem is likely the ability for an individual to generate reactions to recover from a loss of balance. Stepping reactions to recover balance are particularly important to balance recovery, and individuals with stroke have difficulty executing these responses to prevent a fall following a loss of balance. The purpose of this study is to determine if characteristics of balance recovery steps are related to falls during inpatient stroke rehabilitation. We conducted a retrospective review of individuals with stroke attending inpatient rehabilitation (n = 136). Details of falls experienced during inpatient rehabilitation were obtained from incident reports, nursing notes, and patient interviews. Stepping reactions were evoked using a "release-from-lean" postural perturbation. Poisson regression was used to determine characteristics of stepping reactions that were related to increased fall frequency relative to length of stay. In all, 20 individuals experienced 29 falls during inpatient rehabilitation. The characteristics of stepping reactions significantly related to increased fall rates were increased frequency of external assistance to prevent a fall to the floor, increased frequency of no-step responses, increased frequency of step responses with inadequate foot clearance, and delayed time to initiate stepping responses. Impaired control of balance recovery steps is related to increased fall rates during inpatient stroke rehabilitation. This study informs the specific features of stepping reactions that can be targeted with physiotherapy intervention during inpatient rehabilitation to improve dynamic stability control and potentially prevent falls.

  11. Ameliorative effects of low dose/low dose-rate irradiation on reactive oxygen species-related diseases model mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Takaharu

    2008-01-01

    Living organisms have developed complex biological system which protects themselves against environmental radiation, and irradiation with proper dose, dose-rate and irradiation time can stimulate their biological responses against oxidative stress evoked by the irradiation. Because reactive oxygen species are involved in various human diseases, non-toxic low dose/low dose-rate radiation can be utilized for the amelioration of such diseases. In this study, we used mouse experimental models for fatty liver, nephritis, diabetes, and ageing to elucidate the ameliorative effect of low dose/low dose-rate radiation in relation to endogenous antioxidant activity. Single irradiation at 0.5 Gy ameliorates carbon tetrachloride-induced fatty liver. The irradiation increases hepatic anti-oxidative system involving glutathione and glutathione peroxidase, suggesting that endogenous radical scavenger is essential for the ameliorative effect of low dose radiation on carbon tetrachloride-induced fatty liver. Single irradiation at 0.5 Gy ameliorates ferric nitrilotriacetate-induced nephritis. The irradiation increases catalase and decreases superoxide dismutase in kidney. The result suggests that low dose radiation reduced generation of hydroxide radical generation by reducing cellular hydroperoxide level. Single irradiation at 0.5 Gy at 12 week of age ameliorates incidence of type I diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice through the suppression of inflammatory activity of splenocytes, and resultant apoptosis of β-cells in pancreas. The irradiation activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase, which coordinately diminish intracellular reactive oxygen species. Continuous irradiation at 0.70 mGy/hr from 10 week of age elongates life span, and suppresses alopecia in type II diabetesmice. The irradiation improved glucose clearance without affecting insulin-resistance, and increased pancreatic catalase activity. The results suggest that continuous low dose-rate irradiation protect

  12. People Getting a Grip on Arthritis: A Knowledge Transfer Strategy to Empower Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Lineker, Sydney; Bell, Mary; Wells, George; Casimiro, Lynn; Egan, Mary; Cranney, Ann; Tugwell, Peter; Wilson, Keith G.; De Angelis, Gino; Loew, Laurianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was twofold. First, to help people with arthritis become aware of and utilize Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and Osteoarthritis (OA) Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) as they relate to self-management strategies. Second, to evaluate the impact of specific Knowledge Translation (KT) activities on CPG uptake. More…

  13. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kaas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustion to the patient. The patients often must give up their hobbies and in some cases even their jobs. In most serious cases, even common daily activities including self–servicing actions become an obstacle to the patient. It is therefore logical that the psyche of a patient with such disease is considerably strained. One of the partial goals of the study consisted in mapping the subjectively perceived quality of life of rheumatoid arthritis patients in facet 8, "negative feelings", and in ascertaining whether there is statistically significant relation to facets 1, "pain and discomfort", and 2, "energy and fatigue". Another goal consisted in comparing the subjectively perceived quality of life between men and women with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as between population of rheumatoid arthritis patients and control healthy population. The study was implemented within the research project of the Grant Agency of the University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice number 120/2012/S, „Reflection of quality of life in nursing", under use of two standardized questionnaires, WHOQOL–100 and HAQ. This article presents exclusively the data acquired based on the WHOQOL–100 questionnaire. The research set consisted of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis from all over the Czech Republic. The size of the set was determined by a statistician at 200 individuals suffering from the disease, in a ratio of 150 women and 50 men. The selection set was derived from the basic set of rheumatoid arthritis patients and

  14. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kaas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustion to the patient. The patients often must give up their hobbies and in some cases even their jobs. In most serious cases, even common daily activities including self-servicing actions become an obstacle to the patient. It is therefore logical that the psyche of a patient with such disease is considerably strained. One of the partial goals of the study consisted in mapping the subjectively perceived quality of life of rheumatoid arthritis patients in facet 8, "negative feelings", and in ascertaining whether there is statistically significant relation to facets 1, "pain and discomfort", and 2, "energy and fatigue". Another goal consisted in comparing the subjectively perceived quality of life between men and women with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as between population of rheumatoid arthritis patients and control healthy population. The study was implemented within the research project of the Grant Agency of the University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice number 120/2012/S, "Reflection of quality of life in nursing", under use of two standardized questionnaires, WHOQOL-100 and HAQ. This article presents exclusively the data acquired based on the WHOQOL-100 questionnaire. The research set consisted of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis from all over the Czech Republic. The size of the set was determined by a statistician at 200 individuals suffering from the disease, in a ratio of 150 women and 50 men. The selection set was derived from the basic set of rheumatoid arthritis patients and can

  15. Review: Selenium contamination, fate, and reactive transport in groundwater in relation to human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Ryan T.

    2017-06-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential micro-nutrient for humans, but can be toxic at high levels of intake. Se deficiency and Se toxicity are linked with serious diseases, with some regions worldwide experiencing Se deficiency due to Se-poor rocks and soils and other areas dealing with Se toxicity due to the presence of Se-enriched geologic materials. In addition, Se is consumed primarily through plants that take up Se from soil and through animal products that consume these plants. Hence, the soil and groundwater system play important roles in determining the effect of Se on human health. This paper reviews current understanding of Se fate and transport in soil and groundwater systems and its relation to human health, with a focus on alluvial systems, soil systems, and the interface between alluvial systems and Cretaceous shale that release Se via oxidation processes. The review focuses first on the relation between Se and human health, followed by a summary of Se distribution in soil-aquifer systems, with an emphasis on the quantitative relationship between Se content in soil and Se concentration in underlying groundwater. The physical, chemical, and microbial processes that govern Se fate and transport in subsurface systems then are presented, followed by numerical modeling techniques used to simulate these processes in study regions and available remediation strategies for either Se-deficient or Se-toxic regions. This paper can serve as a guide to any field, laboratory or modeling study aimed at assessing Se fate and transport in groundwater systems and its relation to human health.

  16. Reactive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aceto, Luca; Ingolfsdottir, Anna; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    A reactive system comprises networks of computing components, achieving their goals through interaction among themselves and their environment. Thus even relatively small systems may exhibit unexpectedly complex behaviours. As moreover reactive systems are often used in safety critical systems......, the need for mathematically based formal methodology is increasingly important. There are many books that look at particular methodologies for such systems. This book offers a more balanced introduction for graduate students and describes the various approaches, their strengths and weaknesses, and when...... they are best used. Milner's CCS and its operational semantics are introduced, together with the notions of behavioural equivalences based on bisimulation techniques and with recursive extensions of Hennessy-Milner logic. In the second part of the book, the presented theories are extended to take timing issues...

  17. Arthritis and IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain and stiffness in the lower spine and sacroiliac joints (at the bottom of the back). Interestingly, ... addition to causing arthritis of the spine and sacroiliac joints, ankylosing spondylitis can cause inflammation of the ...

  18. Tofacitinib in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Shun; Tsai, Tsen-Fang

    2017-11-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a heterogeneous disease that has been difficult to manage until the recent advent of biologics. However, there are still unmet medical needs for newer agents. Tofacitinib is a Janus family of kinases inhibitor approved for treating rheumatoid arthritis in many countries and psoriasis in Russia. We reviewed the evidences of tofacitinib in psoriatic arthritis treatment. The efficacy and safety profiles result from Phase III clinical trials (OPAL BROADEN and OPAL BEYOND) and one open-label extension study (OPAL BALANCE). Both tofacitinib 5 or 10 mg twice a day were superior to placebo for American College of Rheumatology 20% improvement criteria response at 3 months and showed significant improvement of skin, enthesitis and dactylitis. Tofacitinib is a promising treatment option for psoriatic arthritis.

  19. Arthritis and the Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... RAC) Information OIG Opioid and Chronic Pain Management OSHA Off-Label Use Physician Payment Sunshine Act (Open ... perhaps only five percent of the most serious cases, usually of rheumatoid arthritis, result in such severe ...

  20. Can innate and autoimmune reactivity forecast early and advance stages of age-related macular degeneration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamus, Grazyna

    2017-03-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of central vision loss in persons over 55years of age in developed countries. AMD is a complex disease in which genetic, environmental and inflammatory factors influence its onset and progression. Elevation in serum anti-retinal autoantibodies, plasma and local activation of complement proteins of the alternative pathway, and increase in secretion of proinflammatory cytokines have been seen over the course of disease. Genetic studies of AMD patients confirmed that genetic variants affecting the alternative complement pathway have a major influence on AMD risk. Because the heterogeneity of this disease, there is no sufficient strategy to identify the disease onset and progression sole based eye examination, thus identification of reliable serological biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and response to treatment by sampling patient's blood is necessary. This review provides an outline of the current knowledge on possible serological (autoantibodies, complement factors, cytokines, chemokines) and related genetic biomarkers relevant to the pathology of AMD, and discusses their application for prediction of disease activity and prognosis in AMD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Body awareness in persons diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Lööf

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Living with rheumatoid arthritis (RA poses physiological and psychological demands on a person. RA is a autoimmune disease that can cause pain, disability, and suffering. The ability to notice bodily inner sensations and stimuli (body awareness, BA is described in the literature in ways that could have either a positive or a negative impact on a person's health. The concept of BA is complex and a thorough understanding is needed about what BA means from the patient's perspective. This study was therefore conducted to acquire greater insight into this phenomenon. The study is grounded in a phenomenological life-world perspective. Eighteen narrative interviews were conducted in patients (age range 23–78 years with RA. The interviews were analyzed using the Empirical Phenomenological Psychological method. General characteristics were found running through all 18 interviews, indicating that the disease resulted in a higher degree of negatively toned BA. BA was either a reactive process of searching or controlling after disease-related symptoms or a reactive process triggered by emotions. BA was an active process of taking an inventory of abilities. All participants had the ability to shift focus from BA to the outside world. Four typologies were identified: “A reactive process on symptoms,” “A reactive process on emotional triggers,” “An active process of taking an inventory of abilities,” and “A shifting from BA to the outside world.” In conclusion, because BA can be both positively and negatively toned, health care professionals must have a good understanding of when BA is positive and when it is negative in relation to the patient. RA had caused a higher degree of negatively toned BA. Thus, the ability to shift attention from BA to activity in the outside world could sometimes be beneficial for the patient's general health.

  2. Dissolved gas geochemical signatures of the ground waters related to the 2011 El Hierro magmatic reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, F.; Hernández, P. A.; Padrón, E.; Pérez, N. M.; Sumino, H.; Melián, G. V.; Padilla, G. D.; Barrancos, J.; Dionis, S.; Nolasco, D.; Calvo, D.; Hernández, I.; Peraza, M. D.

    2012-04-01

    El Hierro Island is the south westernmost and the youngest island of the Canary archipelago (Restinga village (at the southernmost part of El Hierro island), suggesting the existence of a submarine eruption. Since October 12, frequent episodes of, turbulent gas emission and foaming, and the appearance of steamy lava fragments has been observed on the sea surface. Instituto Volcanologico de Canarias (INVOLCAN) started a hydrogeochemical program on August 2011 in order to evaluate the temporal evolution of dissolved gases on four different observation points (vertical and horizontal wells) of El Hierro. Three wells are located on the north of the island (where the seismic activity occurred at the beginning of the volcano-seismic unrest) and one horizontal well (gallery) in the south. At each observation point the concentration of dissolved helium, CO2, N2, O2 and Ar and the isotopic composition of He, C-CO2 and Ar have been measured three times per week. Significant increases on the dissolved gases content, mainly on CO2 and He/CO2 ratio, have been measured at all the observation points prior to the increasing of released seismic energy. Isotopic composition of dissolved helium, measured as 3He/4He ratio, showed an significant increase (from 1-3 RA up to 7.2 RA, being RA the isotopic 3He/4He ratio on air) at all the observation points 20 days before the occurrence of the submarine eruption and these relatively high 3He/4He values have been maintained along the volcanic unrest period. The isotopic composition of CO2 has showed also significant changes in relation to the release of seismic energy. The results observed on this dissolved gases study have been tremendously beneficial on the volcanic surveillance tools to study and forecast the evolution of the seismic-volcanic crisis.

  3. Glucocorticoid receptor gene polymorphism and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheplyagina Larisa A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1 has been suggested as a candidate gene affecting juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA course and prognosis. The purpose of this study is to investigate the glucocorticoid receptor gene BclI polymorphism (rs41423247 in JIA patients, the gene's role in susceptibility to juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and its associations with JIA activity, course and bone mineralization. Methods One hundred twenty-two Caucasian children with JIA and 143 healthy ethnically matched controls were studied. We checked markers of clinical and laboratory activity: morning stiffness, Ritchie Articular Index (RAI, swollen joint count (SJC, tender joint count (TJC, physician's visual analog scale (VAS, hemoglobin level (Hb, leukocyte count (L, platelet count (Pl, Westergren erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP, albumin, DAS and DAS28. Bone mineralization was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA of lumbar spine L1-L4. Assessments of bone metabolism included osteocalcin, C-terminal telopeptide (CTT, parathyroid hormone (PTH, total and ionized calcium, inorganic phosphate and total alkaline phosphatase (TAP. BclI polymorphism was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism. Results No association was observed between glucocorticoid receptor gene polymorphism and the presence or absence of JIA. In girls with JIA, the presence of the G allele was associated with an unfavorable arthritis course, a younger age of onset of arthritis (p = 0.0017, and higher inflammatory activity. The higher inflammatory activity was demonstrated by the following: increased time of morning stiffness (p = 0.02, VAS (p = 0.014, RAI (p = 0.048, DAS (p = 0.035, DAS28 (p = 0.05, Pl (p = 0.003, L (p = 0.046, CRP (p = 0.01. In addition, these patients had bone metabolism disturbances as follows: decreased BA (p = 0.0001, BMC (p = 0.00007, BMD (0.005 and Z score (p = 0.002; and

  4. Association of HPA axis-related genetic variation with stress reactivity and aggressive behaviour in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muráni Eduard

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stress, elicited for example by aggressive interactions, has negative effects on various biological functions including immune defence, reproduction, growth, and, in livestock, on product quality. Stress response and aggressiveness are mutually interrelated and show large interindividual variation, partly attributable to genetic factors. In the pig little is known about the molecular-genetic background of the variation in stress responsiveness and aggressiveness. To identify candidate genes we analyzed association of DNA markers in each of ten genes (CRH g.233C>T, CRHR1 c.*866_867insA, CRHBP c.51G>A, POMC c.293_298del, MC2R c.306T>G, NR3C1 c.*2122A>G, AVP c.207A>G, AVPR1B c.1084A>G, UCN g.1329T>C, CRHR2 c.*13T>C related to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA axis, one of the main stress-response systems, with various stress- and aggression-related parameters at slaughter. These parameters were: physiological measures of the stress response (plasma concentrations of cortisol, creatine kinase, glucose, and lactate, adrenal weight (which is a parameter reflecting activity of the central branch of the HPA axis over time and aggressive behaviour (measured by means of lesion scoring in the context of psychosocial stress of mixing individuals with different aggressive temperament. Results The SNP NR3C1 c.*2122A>G showed association with cortisol concentration (p = 0.024, adrenal weight (p = 0.003 and aggressive behaviour (front lesion score, p = 0.012; total lesion score p = 0.045. The SNP AVPR1B c.1084A>G showed a highly significant association with aggressive behaviour (middle lesion score, p = 0.007; total lesion score p = 0.003. The SNP UCN g.1329T>C showed association with adrenal weight (p = 0.019 and aggressive behaviour (front lesion score, p = 0.029. The SNP CRH g.233C>T showed a significant association with glucose concentration (p = 0.002, and the polymorphisms POMC c.293_298del and MC2R c.306T>G with adrenal

  5. Enhanced reactivity and related optical changes of Ag nanoparticles on amorphous Al2O3 supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peláez, R J; Castelo, A; Afonso, C N; Borrás, A; Espinós, J P; Riedel, S; Leiderer, P; Boneberg, J

    2013-01-01

    Pairs of samples containing Ag nanoparticles (NPs) of different dimensions have been produced under the same conditions but on different substrates, namely standard glass slides and a thin layer of amorphous aluminum oxide (a-Al 2 O 3 ) on-glass. Upon storage in ambient conditions (air and room temperature) the color of samples changed and a blue-shift and damping of the surface plasmon resonance was observed. The changes are weaker for the samples on-glass and tend to saturate after 12 months. In contrast, the changes for the samples on a-Al 2 O 3 appear to be still progressing after 25 months. While x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows a slight sulfurization and negligible oxidation of the Ag for the on-glass samples upon 25 months aging, it shows that Ag is strongly oxidized for the on a-Al 2 O 3 samples and sulfurization is negligible. Both optical and chemical results are consistent with the production of a shell at the expense of a reduction of the metal core dimensions, the latter being responsible for the blue-shift and related to the small ( 2 O 3 supports goes along with specific morphological changes of the Ag NPs and the observation of nitrogen. (paper)

  6. Relative effects of demand and control on task-related cardiovascular reactivity, task perceptions, performance accuracy, and mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Niamh; James, Jack E

    2009-05-01

    The hypothesis that work control has beneficial effects on well-being is the basis of the widely applied, yet inconsistently supported, Job Demand Control (JDC) Model [Karasek, R.A., 1979. Job demands, job decision latitude and mental strain: Implications for job redesign. Adm. Sci. Q. 24, 285-308.; Karasek, R., Theorell, T., 1990. Healthy Work: Stress, Productivity, and the Reconstruction of Working Life. Basic Books, Oxford]. The model was tested in an experiment (N=60) using a cognitive stressor paradigm that sought to prevent confounding between demand and control. High-demand was found to be associated with deleterious effects on physiological, subjective, and performance outcomes. In contrast, few main effects were found for control. Evidence for the buffer interpretation of the JDC Model was limited to a significant demand-control interaction for performance accuracy, whereas substantial support was found for the strain interpretation of the model [van der Doef, M., Maes, S., 1998. The job demand-control(-support) model and physical health outcomes: A review of the strain and buffer hypotheses. Psychol. Health 13, 909-936., van der Doef, M., Maes, S., 1999. The Job Demand-Control(-Support) model and psychological well-being: A review of 20 years of empirical research. Work Stress 13, 87-114]. Manipulation checks revealed that objective control altered perceptions of control but not perceptions of demand. It is suggested that beneficial effects of work-related control are unlikely to occur in the absence of reductions in perceived demand. Thus, contrary to the propositions of Karasek and colleagues, demand and control do not appear to be independent factors.

  7. Intra-articular administration of an antibody against CSF-1 receptor reduces pain-related behaviors and inflammation in CFA-induced knee arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Vazquez, P A; Morado-Urbina, C E; Castañeda-Corral, G; Acosta-Gonzalez, R I; Kitaura, H; Kimura, K; Takano-Yamamoto, T; Jiménez-Andrade, J M

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have shown that blockade of colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) or its receptor (CSF-1R) inhibits disease progression in rodent models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA); however, the role of the CSF-1/CSF-1R pathway in RA-induced pain and functional deficits has not been studied. Thus, we examined the effect of chronic intra-articular administration of a monoclonal anti-CSF-1R antibody (AFS98) on spontaneous pain, knee edema and functional disabilities in mice with arthritis. Unilateral arthritis was produced by multiple injections of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into the right knee joint of adult male ICR mice. CFA-injected mice were then treated twice weekly from day 10 until day 25 with anti-CSF-1R antibody (3 and 10 μg/5 μL per joint), isotype control (rat IgG 10 μg/5 μL per joint) or PBS (5 μl/joint). Knee edema, spontaneous flinching, vertical rearing and horizontal exploratory activity were assessed at different days. Additionally, counts of peripheral leukocytes and body weight were measured to evaluate general health status. Intra-articular treatment with anti-CSF-1R antibody significantly increased horizontal exploratory activity and vertical rearing as well as reduced spontaneous flinching behavior and knee edema as compared to CFA-induced arthritis mice treated with PBS. Treatment with this antibody neither significantly affect mouse body weight nor the number of peripheral leukocytes. These results suggest that blockade of CSF-1R at the initial injury site (joint) could represent a therapeutic alternative for improving the functional disabilities and attenuating pain and inflammation in patients with RA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Significance of clinical evaluation of the metacarpophalangeal joint in relation to synovial/bone pathology in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis detected by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Millicent A; White, Lawrence M; Gladman, Dafna D; Inman, Robert D; Chaya, Sam; Lax, Matthew; Salonen, David; Weber, Deborah A; Guthrie, Judy A; Pomeroy, Emma; Podbielski, Dominik; Keystone, Edward C

    2009-12-01

    Rheumatologists base many clinical decisions regarding the management of inflammatory joint diseases on joint counts performed at clinic. We investigated the reliability and accuracy of physically examining the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints to detect inflammatory synovitis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the gold standard. MCP joints 2 to 5 in both hands of 5 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 5 with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) were assessed by 5 independent examiners for joint-line swelling (visually and by palpation); joint-line tenderness by palpation (tender joint count, TJC) and stress pain; and by MRI (1.5 Tesla superconducting magnet). Interrater reliability was assessed using kappa statistics, and agreement between examination and corresponding MRI assessment was assessed by Fisher's exact tests (p 0.8) and positive predictive value (= 0.8). For PsA, significant associations exist between TJC and MRI synovitis scores (p < 0.01) and stress pain and MRI edema scores (p < 0.04). Assessment of swelling by palpation was not significantly associated with synovitis or edema as determined by MRI in RA or PsA (p = 0.54-1.0). In inflammatory arthritis, disease activity in MCP joints can be reliably assessed at the bedside by examining for joint-line tenderness (TJC) and visual inspection for swelling. Clinical assessment may have to be complemented by other methods for evaluating disease activity in the joint, such as MRI, particularly in patients with PsA.

  9. Heated hatha yoga to target cortisol reactivity to stress and affective eating in women at risk for obesity-related illnesses: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopkins, L.B.; Medina, J.L.; Baird, S.O.; Rosenfield, D.; Powers, M.B.; Smits, J.A.J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Cortisol reactivity to stress is associated with affective eating, an important behavioral risk factor for obesity and related metabolic diseases. Yoga practice is related to decreases in stress and cortisol levels, thus emerging as a potential targeted complementary intervention for

  10. Health-related quality of life in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis – child’s and parent’s point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Mańczak

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the quality of life (QoL of children suffering from juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA in Poland, to compare QoL of children with JIA and healthy children, and to compare children’s and parents’ assessments of QoL. Material and methods: The KIDSCREEN-52 questionnaire (children’s and parents’ version was used to assess the quality of life. The QoL in JIA patients and healthy peers from European and Polish reference groups was compared by the t-test. The Bland-Altman method was used to evaluate child and parent assessment agreement. Results : Eighty-nine questionnaires were obtained from children (median age: 14 years; 62% female; JIA history longer than 1 year and 84 questionnaires from parents. The QoL of JIA patients was lower than in healthy peers from the European reference group in terms of physical well-being (p < 0.001, psychological well-being (p = 0.011, autonomy (p < 0.001 and social support and peers (p < 0.001. The QoL of JIA patients compared with the QoL of children from the Polish reference group was lower only in terms of physical well-being (p < 0.001, whereas it was higher in terms of moods and emotions (p = 0.023, parent relations and home life (p = 0.005 and financial resources (p < 0.001. In most terms the assessment performed by the parent was lower than the child’s. The most significant differences were observed for physical well-being (p < 0.001, psychological well-being (p = 0.016, and self-perception (p = 0.013. Conclusions : The present study is the first assessment of QoL of JIA children in Poland. In our study the quality of life in JIA children was lower than in healthy peers. Discrepancies between the assessment of the child’s QoL performed by the child and the parent were found. Both assessments should be taken into account in clinical practice as well as in research studies.

  11. Health related quality of life in rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, diabetes mellitus, end stage renal disease and geriatric subjects. Experience from a General Hospital in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambriz Murillo, Yesenia; Menor Almagro, Raul; Campos-González, Israel David; Cardiel, Mario H

    2015-01-01

    Chronic diseases have a great impact in the morbidity and mortality and in the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients around the world. The impact of rheumatic diseases has not been fully recognized. We conducted a comparative study to evaluate the HRQoL in different chronic diseases. The aim of the present study was to assess the HRQoL and identify specific areas affected in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA), diabetes mellitus, end-stage renal disease, geriatric subjects and a control group. We conducted a cross-sectional study, in a General Hospital in Morelia, Mexico. All patients met classification criteria for RA, OA, diabetes mellitus, end-stage renal disease; the geriatric subjects group was≥65 years, and the control group≥30 years. Demographic characteristics were recorded, different instruments were applied: SF-36, visual analogue scale for pain, patient's and physician's global assessments, Beck Depression Inventory and specific instruments (DAS-28, HAQ-Di, WOMAC, Diabetes Quality of Life [DQOL] and Kidney Disease Questionnaire of Life [KDQOL]). Biochemical measures: erythrocyte sedimentation rate, blood count, glucose, HbA1C, serum creatinine and urea. We evaluated 290 subjects (control group: 100; geriatric subjects: 30 and 160 for the rest of groups). Differences were detected in baseline characteristics (Prenal disease group (±SD: 48.06±18.84 x/SD). The general health was the principal affected area in RA. The pain was higher in rheumatic diseases: OA (5.2±2.4) and RA (5.1±3). HAQ was higher in OA compared to RA (1.12±0.76 vs 0.82±0.82, respectively; P=.001). Forty five percent of all subjects had depression. The HRQoL in RA patients is poor and comparable to other chronic diseases (end-stage renal disease and diabetes mellitus). Rheumatic diseases should be considered high impact diseases and therefore should receive more attention. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and what other conditions are associated with RA. Learning more about your condition will allow you to ... Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic Arthritis 101 2010 E.S.C.A.P.E. Study Patient Update Transitioning ...

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are available, what is happening in the immune system and what other conditions are associated with RA. ... Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. Updated: ...

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Rheumatology Course ...

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Connect With ...

  16. Arthritis in America PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the March 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Many adults in the United States have arthritis. Learn how to reduce the pain of arthritis, as well as manage the condition.

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Rheumatology Course ...

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to take a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take ... She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing ...

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spondylitis News Osteoarthritis News Gout News Osteoporosis News Lupus News Fibromyalgia News Patient Corner Arthritis Drug Information ... Connect With Us Johns Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center ...

  20. RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AND PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Kosheleva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA generally starts at the age when many women have already become mothers; however, it may occur in childhood or adolescence. Furthermore, there has been recently a women’s tendency to plan pregnacy for a more mature age, which necessitates a discussion about gestation in this disease. Investigation of mechanisms pregnancy can influence the development of RA both in the gestation and long-term periods is of important theoretical and practical value. The results of these investigations may be used to develop new treatments for RA and management tactics for patients during pregnancy and lactation. The  aper gives the data available in the literature on fertility in RA, impact of pregnancy on its activity and that of RA on the course and outcomes of gestation, as well as current ideas on lactation and use of oral contraceptives in RA. Particular attention is given to drug therapy in pregnant and breastfeeding women with RA: groups of anti-rheumatic drugs are considered in detail in relation to the safety of or a potential risk from their use. A therapeutic algorithm and recommendations for pregnancy planning and a follow-up of patients with RA during gestation are proposed.

  1. Tofacitinib attenuates arthritis manifestations and reduces the pathogenic CD4 T cells in adjuvant arthritis rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertel, Smadar; Mahagna, Hussein; Karmon, Gidi; Watad, Abdulla; Amital, Howard

    2017-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by pronounced inflammation and leukocyte infiltration in affected joints. Tofacitinib is new agent, a selective inhibitor of Janus kinase (JAK) signaling pathways mediated by JAK1 and JAK3 and inhibits the key transcription factors STAT1 and STAT3. We investigated the action mechanisms of tofacitinib in rats with adjuvant-induced-arthritis (AIA). AIA-rats were treated orally with tofacitinib or with methotrexate. Arthritis severity and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were evaluated, splenic cells were examined by flow cytometry and cytokines were analyzed by real-time PCR. Tofacitinib markedly reduced the clinical status of treated rats in comparison to control group. Reduced joints inflammation and down-regulated serum CRP levels reflected the clinical manifestations of the treated rats. Tofacitinib down-regulated significantly the frequency of CD4 + IFN-γ + T cells and reduced IL-1β mRNA expression levels in the spleen of the treated rats. These results show that tofacitinib attenuated arthritis severity, modified splenic populations and cytokine imbalance. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Sedentary behaviour in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Tanja; Beyer, Nina; Aadahl, Mette

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite increasing interest in investigating sedentary behaviour (SB) in the general population and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is little documentation of the subjective experiences of SB in patients with RA. This study aimed to examine how patients with RA...... modification of physical activity level causing increase in SB, especially during periods of disease flare. Prioritizing and planning of SB also functioned as part of self-management strategies. 3) It has nothing to do with my arthritis; for some patients, SB was not related to RA, but simply reflected a way...

  3. Examination of the relation between periodontal health status and cardiovascular risk factors: serum total and high density lipoprotein cholesterol, C-reactive protein, and plasma fibrinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T; Trevisan, M; Genco, R J; Falkner, K L; Dorn, J P; Sempos, C T

    2000-02-01

    Using data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994), the authors examined the relation between periodontal health and cardiovascular risk factors: serum total and high density lipoprotein cholesterol, C-reactive protein, and plasma fibrinogen. A total of 10,146 participants were included in the analyses of cholesterol and C-reactive protein and 4,461 in the analyses of fibrinogen. Periodontal health indicators included the gingival bleeding index, calculus index, and periodontal disease status (defined by pocket depth and attachment loss). While cholesterol and fibrinogen were analyzed as continuous variables, C-reactive protein was dichotomized into two levels. The results show a significant relation between indicators of poor periodontal status and increased C-reactive protein and fibrinogen. The association between periodontal status and total cholesterol level is much weaker. No consistent association between periodontal status and high density lipoprotein cholesterol was detectable. Similar patterns of association were observed for participants aged 17-54 years and those 55 years and older. In conclusion, this study suggests that total cholesterol, C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen are possible intermediate factors that may link periodontal disease to elevated cardiovascular risk.

  4. REM-Enriched Naps Are Associated with Memory Consolidation for Sad Stories and Enhance Mood-Related Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Médhi Gilson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that emotion and affect modulate the relation between sleep and cognition. In the present study, we investigated the role of rapid-eye movement (REM sleep in mood regulation and memory consolidation for sad stories. In a counterbalanced design, participants (n = 24 listened to either a neutral or a sad story during two sessions, spaced one week apart. After listening to the story, half of the participants had a short (45 min morning nap. The other half had a long (90 min morning nap, richer in REM and N2 sleep. Story recall, mood evolution and changes in emotional response to the re-exposure to the story were assessed after the nap. Although recall performance was similar for sad and neutral stories irrespective of nap duration, sleep measures were correlated with recall performance in the sad story condition only. After the long nap, REM sleep density positively correlated with retrieval performance, while re-exposure to the sad story led to diminished mood and increased skin conductance levels. Our results suggest that REM sleep may not only be associated with the consolidation of intrinsically sad material, but also enhances mood reactivity, at least on the short term.

  5. REM-Enriched Naps Are Associated with Memory Consolidation for Sad Stories and Enhance Mood-Related Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilson, Médhi; Deliens, Gaétane; Leproult, Rachel; Bodart, Alice; Nonclercq, Antoine; Ercek, Rudy; Peigneux, Philippe

    2015-12-29

    Emerging evidence suggests that emotion and affect modulate the relation between sleep and cognition. In the present study, we investigated the role of rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep in mood regulation and memory consolidation for sad stories. In a counterbalanced design, participants (n = 24) listened to either a neutral or a sad story during two sessions, spaced one week apart. After listening to the story, half of the participants had a short (45 min) morning nap. The other half had a long (90 min) morning nap, richer in REM and N2 sleep. Story recall, mood evolution and changes in emotional response to the re-exposure to the story were assessed after the nap. Although recall performance was similar for sad and neutral stories irrespective of nap duration, sleep measures were correlated with recall performance in the sad story condition only. After the long nap, REM sleep density positively correlated with retrieval performance, while re-exposure to the sad story led to diminished mood and increased skin conductance levels. Our results suggest that REM sleep may not only be associated with the consolidation of intrinsically sad material, but also enhances mood reactivity, at least on the short term.

  6. Fos Protein Expression in Olfactory-Related Brain Areas after Learning and after Reactivation of a Slowly Acquired Olfactory Discrimination Task in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roullet, Florence; Lienard, Fabienne; Datiche, Frederique; Cattarelli, Martine

    2005-01-01

    Fos protein immunodetection was used to investigate the neuronal activation elicited in some olfactory-related areas after either learning of an olfactory discrimination task or its reactivation 10 d later. Trained rats (T) progressively acquired the association between one odor of a pair and water-reward in a four-arm maze. Two groups of…

  7. Fluctuations in [¹¹C]SB207145 PET binding associated with change in threat-related amygdala reactivity in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, Patrick MacDonald; Haahr, Mette Ewers; Jensen, Christian Gaden

    2015-01-01

    resonance imaging while performing a gender discrimination task of fearful, angry, and neutral faces. This offered a unique opportunity to evaluate whether individual fluctuations in central serotonin levels, indexed by change in [11C]SB207145 binding, predicted changes in threat-related reactivity (ie...

  8. Urinary albumin excretion and its relation with C-reactive protein and the metabolic syndrome in the prediction Of type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brantsma, AH; Bakker, SJL; Hillege, HL; De Zeeuw, D; De Jong, PE; Gansevoort, RT

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - To investigate urinary albumin excretion (UAE) and its relation with C-reactive protein (CRP) and the metabolic syndrome in the prediction of the development of type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We used data from the Prevention of Renal and Vascular End Stage Disease

  9. Vasculitis and inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Richard A; Scott, David G I

    2016-10-01

    Vasculitis has been described in most types of inflammatory arthritis. The best described and most widely recognised form is rheumatoid vasculitis. The incidence of systemic rheumatoid vasculitis has declined significantly following the general early use of methotrexate in the 1990s, and it is now a rare form of vasculitis. Treatment of rheumatoid vasculitis is conventionally with glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide, but there is an increasing role for rituximab similar to that in other types of vasculitis. Despite these developments the mortality of rheumatoid vasculitis remains high. Vasculitis in other types of inflammatory arthritis is less well described and the treatment remains empirical. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Imaging in Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Østergaard, Mikkel; Terslev, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory joint disease characterized by arthritis and often enthesitis in patients with psoriasis, presenting a wide range of manifestations in various patterns. Imaging procedures are primarily conventional radiography, ultrasonography (US), and magnetic...... resonance imaging (MRI); other modalities such as computed tomography are not used routinely. Imaging is an integral part of management of PsA. In this article, we provide an overview of the status, virtues, and limitations of imaging modalities in PsA, focusing on radiography, US, and MRI....

  11. Children’s Autonomic Nervous System Reactivity Moderates the Relations between Family Adversity and Sleep Problems in Latino 5-Year Olds in the CHAMACOS Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbey Alkon

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sleep problems are common for young children especially if they live in adverse home environments. Some studies investigate if young children may also be at a higher risk of sleep problems if they have a specific biological sensitivity to adversity. This paper addresses the research question, does the relations between children’s exposure to family adversities and their sleep problems differ depending on their autonomic nervous system’s sensitivity to challenges? As part of a larger cohort study of Latino, low-income families, we assessed the cross-sectional relations among family demographics (education, marital status, adversities [routines, major life events (MLE], and biological sensitivity as measured by autonomic nervous system (ANS reactivity associated with parent-rated sleep problems when the children were 5 years old. Mothers were interviewed in English or Spanish and completed demographic, family, and child measures. The children completed a 15-min standardized protocol while continuous cardiac measures of the ANS [respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA, preejection period (PEP] were collected during resting and four challenge conditions. Reactivity was defined as the mean of the responses to the four challenge conditions minus the first resting condition. Four ANS profiles, co-activation, co-inhibition, reciprocal low RSA and PEP reactivity, and reciprocal high RSA and PEP reactivity, were created by dichotomizing the reactivity scores as high or low reactivity. Logistic regression models showed there were significant main effects for children living in families with fewer daily routines having more sleep problems than for children living in families with daily routines. There were significant interactions for children with low PEP reactivity and for children with the reciprocal, low reactivity profiles who experienced major family life events in predicting children’s sleep problems. Children who had a reciprocal, low reactivity

  12. Outcome of ankle arthrodesis in posttraumatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B S Narayana Gowda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ankle arthrodesis is still a gold standard salvage procedure for the management of ankle arthritis. There are several functional and mechanical benefits of ankle arthrodesis, which make it a viable surgical procedure in the management of ankle arthritis. The functional outcomes following ankle arthrodesis are not very well known. The purpose of this study was to perform a clinical and radiographic evaluation of ankle arthrodesis in posttraumatic arthritis performed using Charnley′s compression device. Materials and Methods: Between January 2006 and December 2009 a functional assessment of 15 patients (10 males and 5 females who had undergone ankle arthrodesis for posttraumatic arthritis and/or avascular necrosis (AVN talus (n=6, malunited bimalleolar fracture (n=4, distal tibial plafond fractures (n=3, medial malleoli nonunion (n=2. All the patients were assessed clinically and radiologically after an average followup of 2 years 8 months (range 1-5.7 years. Results: All patients had sound ankylosis and no complications related to the surgery. Scoring the patients with the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot scale, we found that 11 of the 15 had excellent results, two had good, and two showed fair results. They were all returned to their preinjury activities. Conclusion: We conclude that, the ankle arthrodesis can still be considered as a standard procedure in ankle arthritis. On the basis of these results, patients should be counseled that an ankle fusion will help to relieve pain and to improve overall function. Still, one should keep in mind that it is a salvage procedure that will cause persistent alterations in gait with a potential for deterioration due to the development of subtalar arthritis.

  13. Osteoprotegerin in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis: cross talk between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    arthritis (JRA) and to determine its relation to clinical and laboratory markers of disease ... osteoprotegerin were assayed by ELISA in the patient and control groups. Joints were .... Assay procedure: Diluted standards, quality controls and ...

  14. MR imaging findings of acute gouty arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gyung Kyu; Lee, Jee Young; Suh, Jin Suck

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical and MR imaging features of acute gouty arthritis and to define the characteristic findings that would be helpful for differentiating acute gouty arthritis from septic arthritis. The authors retrospectively studied seven patients who suffered from acute gouty arthritis. The MR imaging findings were analyzed by two musculoskeletal radiologists who focused on joint effusion, subchondral bone erosion, bone marrow edema, synovial thickening (regular and even, or irregular and nodular), and the soft tissue changes (edema or abscess). The clinical records of the patients were reviewed with regard to age and gender, the clinical presentation and the laboratory findings (serum uric acid, WBC, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein and synovial fluid culture). The patients consisted of six men and one woman whose mean age was 41 years (age range:24-65 years). The joints involved were the knee (n=6), and ankle (n=1). Two patients had medical histories of gouty attacks that involved the first metatarsophalangeal joint. In six cases, the serum uric acid level during acute attacks was elevated. In all the patients, the affected joint became swollen, hot, erythematous and extremely tender, and this was accompanied by a high ESR and a high C-reactive protein level at the time of presentation. The results of Gram stain and culture of the synovial fluid were negative. In all patients, the MR images showed large amounts of joint effusion, thick irregular and nodular synovial thickening and soft tissue edema without subchondral bone erosions and soft tissue abscess. In one case, subchondral bone marrow edema of the medial femoral condyle was present. In five cases, there were multiple low signal foci in the joint on the spin-echo T2-weighted MR image. Even though the MR imaging findings of acute gouty arthritis are nonspecific, it should be considered as a possible diagnosis when a large amount of joint effusion

  15. Children's and mothers' cardiovascular reactivity to a standardized laboratory stressor: Unique relations with maternal anxiety and overcontrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borelli, Jessica L; Burkhart, Margaret L; Rasmussen, Hannah F; Smiley, Patricia A; Hellemann, Gerhard

    2018-04-01

    Research documents bidirectional associations between parental overcontrol (OC) and children's anxiety; OC may place children at risk for anxiety and also may occur in response to children's requests for help. However, to date no studies have examined children's or parents' in-the-moment emotional responses to OC. Using a community sample of mothers and school-age children, we examine the individual and interactive influences of maternal OC, maternal anxiety, children's help-seeking, and children's anxiety in predicting physiological reactivity in response to a stressor faced by children and observed by mothers, predicting that for children of higher anxiety mothers, higher OC will be associated with increases in reactivity (decreases in respiratory sinus arrhythmia [RSA]), whereas for higher anxiety mothers themselves, engaging in OC will be associated with reductions in physiological reactivity (decreases in heart rate). Multilevel modeling suggested that for children of higher anxiety mothers, greater peak OC is associated with greater reductions in RSA (increases in reactivity) after the onset of OC. In contrast, for higher anxiety mothers themselves, greater peak OC was linked with attenuations in heart rate. Effects held when controlling for children's anxiety and help-seeking, and no pattern of effects was observed with analyses in which children's help-seeking was the predictor or children's anxiety was the moderator, suggesting that in this case, physiological reactivity is uniquely associated with the interaction between maternal OC and anxiety. Among mothers with higher anxiety, OC may serve a regulatory function, reducing physiological reactivity, while exacerbating children's reactivity. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Physical and Mental Health Consequences of War-related Stressors Among Older Adults: An Analysis of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Arthritis in Northern Vietnamese War Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korinek, Kim; Loebach, Peter; Teerawichitchainan, Bussarawan

    2017-10-01

    We examine the impacts of trauma exposures and family stressors associated with the Vietnam War on musculoskeletal health and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) outcomes in elderly Vietnamese who were widely impacted by the war as young adults. Noting that wars' impacts extend beyond male veterans in most survivor populations, we give attention to male and female war survivors placed in a variety of roles vis-a-vis the war. Utilizing data from the 2010 Vietnam Health and Aging Pilot Study (N = 405), we use logistic and Poisson regression models to estimate the effect of wartime trauma exposures and family stressors on disabling arthritis and PTSD symptoms in male and female northern Vietnamese adults aged 55 and older. The odds of experiencing recent PTSD symptoms are greater in respondents who report involvement in killing/causing severe injury and who observed war atrocities. In women, PTSD is positively correlated with war era child death and spousal separation. Arthritis also exhibits a significant, positive association with killing/causing severe injury. Our study provides insights into the burden of conflict upon health among populations of the global south that survived war and are now entering older adulthood. The pattern of results, indicating greatest suffering among those who inflicted or failed to prevent bodily harm or loss of life, is consistent with the concept of moral injury. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Pubertal-related changes in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis reactivity and cytokine secretion in response to an immunological stressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, K H; Bain, Z A; Padow, V A; Lui, P; Klein, Z A; Romeo, R D

    2011-02-01

    Pubertal development is marked by profound changes in stress reactivity. For example, following a brief stressor, such as foot shock, ether inhalation or restraint, prepubertal rats display a prolonged adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone response that takes twice as long to return to baseline compared to adults. Pubertal-related differences in the recovery of the hormonal stress response following a more protracted systemic stressor, such as an immunological challenge, have not yet been investigated. Moreover, it is unclear whether an immunological stressor leads to a differential cytokine response in animals before and after pubertal maturation. To examine these issues, we used a single injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.1 mg/kg) to induce a hormonal stress and innate immune response and measured plasma ACTH, corticosterone, and the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in prepubertal and adult male rats 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 24 h after LPS exposure. In a follow-up experiment, we assessed neural activation, as indexed by FOS immunohistochemistry, in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) in prepubertal and adult males 0, 4, 8, or 24 h after a 0.1 mg/kg injection of LPS. By contrast to the prolonged response observed in prepubertal animals following a variety of acute stressors, we found that corticosterone and IL-6 responses induced by LPS recover toward baseline faster in prepubertal compared to adult rats. Along with these different peripheral responses, we also found that LPS-induced neural activation in the PVN of prepubertal animals showed a faster return to baseline compared to adults. Together, these data indicate that prepubertal and adult animals react in distinct ways, both peripherally and centrally, to an immunological stressor. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neuroendocrinology © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Work-related allergy and asthma in spice mill workers - The impact of processing dried spices on IgE reactivity patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Walt, Anita; Lopata, Andreas L; Nieuwenhuizen, Natalie E; Jeebhay, Mohamed F

    2010-01-01

    Three spice mill workers developed work-related allergy and asthma after prolonged exposure to high levels (>10 mg/m(3)) of inhalable spice dust. Patterns of sensitization to a variety of spices and putative allergens were identified. Work-related allergy and asthma were assessed on history, clinical evaluation, pulmonary function and fractional exhaled nitric oxide. Specific IgE reactivity to a range of common inhalant, food and spice allergens was evaluated using ImmunoCAP and allergen microarray. The presence of non-IgE-mediated reactions was determined by basophil stimulation (CAST-ELISA). Specific allergens were identified by immunoblotting to extracts of raw and dried processed garlic, onion and chili pepper. Asthma was confirmed in all 3 subjects, with work-related patterns prominent in worker 1 and 3. Sensitization to multiple spices and pollen was observed in both atopic workers 1 and 2, whereas garlic and chili pepper sensitization featured in all 3 workers. Microarray analysis demonstrated prominent profilin reactivity in atopic worker 2. Immunoblotting demonstrated a 50-kDa cross-reactive allergen in garlic and onion, and allergens of approximately 40 and 52 kDa in chili pepper. Dry powdered garlic and onion demonstrated greater IgE binding. This study demonstrated IgE reactivity to multiple spice allergens in workers exposed to high levels of inhalable spice dust. Processed garlic and onion powder demonstrated stronger IgE reactivity than the raw plant. Atopy and polysensitization to various plant profilins, suggesting pollen-food syndrome, represent additional risk factors for sensitizer-induced work-related asthma in spice mill workers. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Arthritis Pain Reliever

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-12-27

    Learn more about the benefits of physical activity and the types and amounts of exercise helpful for people with arthritis.  Created: 12/27/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/27/2011.

  20. MP Joint Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy MP Joint Arthritis Email to a friend * required ...

  1. C-reactive protein levels in relation to various features of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease among obese patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, Esther; Anty, Rodolphe; Tordjman, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major hepatic consequence of obesity. It has been suggested that the high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is an obesity-independent surrogate marker of severity of NAFLD, especially development of non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis (NASH), but th......Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major hepatic consequence of obesity. It has been suggested that the high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is an obesity-independent surrogate marker of severity of NAFLD, especially development of non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis (NASH...

  2. Influence of the physicochemical and aromatic properties on the chemical reactivity and its relation with carcinogenic and anticoagulant effect of 17β-aminoestrogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soriano-Correa, Catalina, E-mail: socc@puma2.zaragoza.unam.mx [Química Computacional, FES-Zaragoza, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Iztapalapa, Mexico City (Mexico); Raya, Angélica [Unidad Profesional Interdisciplinaria de Ingeniería Campus Guanajuato, Instituto Politécnico Nacional (IPN), Silao de la Victoria, Guanajuato (Mexico); Barrientos-Salcedo, Carolina [Laboratorio de Química Médica y Quimiogenómica, Facultad de Bioanálisis Campus Veracruz - Boca del Río, Universidad Veracruzana, Veracruz (Mexico); Esquivel, Rodolfo O. [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa (UAM-Iztapalapa), Mexico City (Mexico)

    2014-06-25

    Highlights: • The aromatic A-ring of 17β-aminoestrogens contribute to its anticoagulant effect. • The electron-donor substituent groups favored the basicity of 17β-aminoestrogens. • The physicochemical properties are important in the carcinogenic effect of anticoagulant molecules. - Abstract: Activity of steroid hormones is dependent upon a number of factors, as solubility, transport and metabolism. The functional differences caused by structural modifications could exert an influence on the chemical reactivity and biological effect. The goal of this work is to study the influence of the physicochemical and aromatic properties on the chemical reactivity and its relation with the carcinogenic risk that can associate with the anticoagulant effect of 17β-aminoestrogens using quantum-chemical descriptors at the DFT-B3LYP, BH and HLYP and M06-2X levels. The relative acidity of (H1) of the hydroxyl group increases with electron-withdrawing groups. Electron-donor groups favor the basicity. The steric hindrance of the substituents decreases the aromatic character and consequently diminution the carcinogenic effect. Density descriptors: hardness, electrophilic index, atomic charges, molecular orbitals, electrostatic potential and their geometric parameters permit analyses of the chemical reactivity and physicochemical features and to identify some reactive sites of 17β-aminoestrogens.

  3. Anti-inflammatory effects of polyphenols in arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliviero, Francesca; Scanu, Anna; Zamudio-Cuevas, Yessica; Punzi, Leonardo; Spinella, Paolo

    2018-03-01

    Polyphenols have been extensively investigated with regard to their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulant properties in many inflammatory chronic conditions. The aim of this review is to summarise how these compounds can modulate the inflammatory pathways which characterise the most prevalent arthropathies including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and crystal-induced arthritis. Among polyphenols, epigallocatechin gallate, carnosol, hydroxytyrosol, curcumin, resveratrol, kaempferol and genistein have been the most widely investigated in arthritis. The most important results of the studies outlined in this article show how polyphenolic compounds are able to inhibit the expression and the release of a number of pro-inflammatory mediators and proteolytic enzymes, the activity of different transcriptional factors and the production of reactive oxygen species in vitro. Studies on animal models of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and gout show interesting results in terms of reduced tissue damage, restored cartilage homeostasis, and decreased levels of uric acid, respectively. Despite the multiple protective effects of polyphenols, there are no dietary recommendations for patients affected by rheumatic diseases. Future studies, including intervention trials, should be conducted to determine the relevance of polyphenols consumption or supplementation in arthritis. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Age-Related Features of Reactive Catecholamine Shifts in the Spinal Cord in Acute Somatic Pain: Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Ovsyannikov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the age-related features of an adrenergic response of the central nervous system to acute somatic pain (ASP.Subjects and methods: The spinal cord (SC levels of adrenaline (A, noradrenaline (NA, and dopamine (DA were studied in albino male rats of five age groups: 1 neonatal (2—4-day rats; 2 17—18-day rats that began to see; 3 monthly rats; 4 sexually mature (3—4 month ones; and 5 old ones aged over 2 years. ASP was reproduced by electrodermal stimulation of the rat tail; the levels of catecholamines (CA were measured by spectrofluorimetric microassay.Results. During postnatal ontogenesis, the rats were found to have a phase pattern of physiological changes in the spinal concentrations of CA: a decrease in their high neonatal levels (due to DA by the time the animals began to see; their progressive increase by prepuberty (due to NA and in sexually maturity (due to A and DA, and a reduction in all CA fractions in old rats. ASP was attended by a rise in the SC concentration of CA in the neonatal animals and by clearly-cut reactive shifts in all fractions in the old ones. With A and DA increases, the SC concentrations of NA halved in the rats that began to see and had ASP; the amount of CA remained unchanged as compared with the controls. In prepubertal and sexually mature male rats, there was a reduction in the spinal CA pool, but due to different components: to A and NA in 35-day rats and to A and DA in 3-month ones.Conclusion. Age-related changes in the pattern of a spinal CA response in rats with ASP show a ontogenetic trend in the development of adrenal responsiveness from the immature generalized forms of an early postnatal period to the definitive differentiated economic reactions of the hypo-to-normergic type and then to the hyperergic destructive reactions of old age. 

  5. Indirect costs of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Raciborski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that in Poland about 400,000 persons in general suffer from inflammatory joint diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Epidemiological surveys documenting the frequency and disturbance of musculoskeletal disorders in the Polish population are few in number. Most of the estimations are based on epidemiological data from other countries (prevalence of 0.5–1%. According to the data of the National Health Fund in Poland 135,000–157,000 persons in total are treated because of rheumatoid arthritis per year [ICD10 (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems: M05, M06]. In the case of this group of diseases indirect costs significantly outweigh the direct costs. Indirect costs increase together with activity level of the disease. The cost analysis of productivity loss of RA patients indicates that sickness absenteeism and informal care are the most burdensome. At the national level it amounts in total from 1.2 billion to 2.8 billion PLN per year, depending on the method of analysis. These costs could be significantly reduced through early diagnosis and introduction of effective treatment.

  6. Monohalogenated acetamide-induced cellular stress and genotoxicity are related to electrophilic softness and thiol/thiolate reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pals, Justin A; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J; Xia, Menghang; Attene-Ramos, Matias S

    2017-08-01

    Haloacetamides (HAMs) are cytotoxic, genotoxic, and mutagenic byproducts of drinking water disinfection. They are soft electrophilic compounds that form covalent bonds with the free thiol/thiolate in cysteine residues through an S N 2 reaction mechanism. Toxicity of the monohalogenated HAMs (iodoacetamide, IAM; bromoacetamide, BAM; or chloroacetamide, CAM) varied depending on the halogen substituent. The aim of this research was to investigate how the halogen atom affects the reactivity and toxicological properties of HAMs, measured as induction of oxidative/electrophilic stress response and genotoxicity. Additionally, we wanted to determine how well in silico estimates of electrophilic softness matched thiol/thiolate reactivity and in vitro toxicological endpoints. Each of the HAMs significantly induced nuclear Rad51 accumulation and ARE signaling activity compared to a negative control. The rank order of effect was IAM>BAM>CAM for Rad51, and BAM≈IAM>CAM for ARE. In general, electrophilic softness and in chemico thiol/thiolate reactivity provided a qualitative indicator of toxicity, as the softer electrophiles IAM and BAM were more thiol/thiolate reactive and were more toxic than CAM. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Concurrent attenuated reactivity of alpha-amylase and cortisol is related to disruptive behavior in male adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouw, M.; Jansen, L.M.C.; Vermeiren, R.R.J.M.; Doreleijers, T.A.H.; van de Ven, P.M.; Popma, A.

    2012-01-01

    Attenuated reactivity of salivary alpha-amylase has been proposed as a specific sympathetic marker of disruptive behavior in juveniles and may have additional value to studying other autonomic parameters and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity. Investigating the interrelationships between

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis: "You Are Not Alone."

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis: "You Are Not Alone." Past Issues / Summer 2014 ... Alternative Medicine http://nccam.nih.gov NIHSeniorHealth.gov—Rheumatoid Arthritis ... ...

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Eyes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the eyes? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect the eyes? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that primarily affects the ...

  10. Thyroid disorders in patients with newly diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis is associated with poor initial treatment response evaluated by disease activity score in 28 joints-C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emamifar, Amir; Hangaard, Jørgen; Jensen Hansen, Inger Marie

    2017-01-01

    peptide antibody (anti-CCP), and antinuclear antibody (ANA), and also disease activity score in 28 joints-C-reactive protein at the time of diagnosis and after 4 months (±1–2 months) of treatment initiation were extracted from Danish Danbio Registry. Patients’ electronic hospital records for the past 10...... years were reviewed to reveal if they had been diagnosed with thyroid disorders or they had abnormal thyroid test.In all, 439 patients were included, female 60.1%, mean age 64.6 ± 15.0 years and disease duration 2.6 ± 1.7 years. Prevalence of thyroid disorders was 69/439 (15.7%) and hypothyroidism...... treatment compared with patients with isolated RA after 4 months of treatment (P = .02). There were no associations between thyroid disorders and age, disease duration, and also IgM RF positivity.Presence of thyroid disorders in RA patients is suggestive of a more aggressive disease and poor outcome...

  11. Serum Levels of Anticyclic Citrullinated Peptide Antibodies, Interleukin-6, Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, and C-Reactive Protein Are Associated with Increased Carotid Intima-Media Thickness: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of a Cohort of Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients without Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Del Mercado, Mónica; Nuñez-Atahualpa, Lourdes; Figueroa-Sánchez, Mauricio; Gómez-Bañuelos, Eduardo; Rocha-Muñoz, Alberto Daniel; Martín-Márquez, Beatriz Teresita; Martínez-García, Erika Aurora; Macias-Reyes, Héctor; Gamez-Nava, Jorge Ivan; Navarro-Hernandez, Rosa Elena; Nuñez-Atahualpa, María Alejandra; Andrade-Garduño, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The main cause of death in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is cardiovascular events. We evaluated the relationship of anticyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibody levels with increased carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) in RA patients. Methods. Forty-five anti-CCP positive and 37 anti-CCP negative RA patients, and 62 healthy controls (HC) were studied. All groups were assessed for atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) and cIMT. Anti-CCP, C-reactive protein (CRP), and levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results. The anti-CCP positive RA patients showed increased cIMT compared to HC and anti-CCP negative (P < 0.001). Anti-CCP positive versus anti-CCP negative RA patients, had increased AIP, TNFα and IL-6 (P < 0.01), and lower levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) (P = 0.02). The cIMT correlated with levels of anti-CCP (r = 0.513, P = 0.001), CRP (r = 0.799, P < 0.001), TNFα (r = 0.642, P = 0.001), and IL-6 (r = 0.751, P < 0.001). In multiple regression analysis, cIMT was associated with CRP (P < 0.001) and anti-CCP levels (P = 0.03). Conclusions. Levels of anti-CCP and CRP are associated with increased cIMT and cardiovascular risk supporting a clinical role of the measurement of cIMT in RA in predicting and preventing cardiovascular events. PMID:25821796

  12. Serum Levels of Anticyclic Citrullinated Peptide Antibodies, Interleukin-6, Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, and C-Reactive Protein Are Associated with Increased Carotid Intima-Media Thickness: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of a Cohort of Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients without Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Vázquez-Del Mercado

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main cause of death in rheumatoid arthritis (RA is cardiovascular events. We evaluated the relationship of anticyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP antibody levels with increased carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT in RA patients. Methods. Forty-five anti-CCP positive and 37 anti-CCP negative RA patients, and 62 healthy controls (HC were studied. All groups were assessed for atherogenic index of plasma (AIP and cIMT. Anti-CCP, C-reactive protein (CRP, and levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα and interleukin-6 (IL-6 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results. The anti-CCP positive RA patients showed increased cIMT compared to HC and anti-CCP negative (P<0.001. Anti-CCP positive versus anti-CCP negative RA patients, had increased AIP, TNFα and IL-6 (P<0.01, and lower levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c (P=0.02. The cIMT correlated with levels of anti-CCP (r=0.513, P=0.001, CRP (r=0.799, P<0.001, TNFα (r=0.642, P=0.001, and IL-6 (r=0.751, P<0.001. In multiple regression analysis, cIMT was associated with CRP (P<0.001 and anti-CCP levels (P=0.03. Conclusions. Levels of anti-CCP and CRP are associated with increased cIMT and cardiovascular risk supporting a clinical role of the measurement of cIMT in RA in predicting and preventing cardiovascular events.

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatic Diseases Our Research Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Research Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education Fund About Us Appointment Information Contact ...

  14. Moderation of the Relationship Between Reward Expectancy and Prediction Error-Related Ventral Striatal Reactivity by Anhedonia in Unmedicated Major Depressive Disorder: Findings From the EMBARC Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Tsafrir; Chase, Henry W.; Almeida, Jorge R.; Stiffler, Richelle; Zevallos, Carlos R.; Aslam, Haris A.; Deckersbach, Thilo; Weyandt, Sarah; Cooper, Crystal; Toups, Marisa; Carmody, Thomas; Kurian, Benji; Peltier, Scott; Adams, Phillip; McInnis, Melvin G.; Oquendo, Maria A.; McGrath, Patrick J.; Fava, Maurizio; Weissman, Myrna; Parsey, Ramin; Trivedi, Madhukar H.; Phillips, Mary L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Anhedonia, disrupted reward processing, is a core symptom of major depressive disorder. Recent findings demonstrate altered reward-related ventral striatal reactivity in depressed individuals, but the extent to which this is specific to anhedonia remains poorly understood. The authors examined the effect of anhedonia on reward expectancy (expected outcome value) and prediction error-(discrepancy between expected and actual outcome) related ventral striatal reactivity, as well as the relationship between these measures. Method A total of 148 unmedicated individuals with major depressive disorder and 31 healthy comparison individuals recruited for the multisite EMBARC (Establishing Moderators and Biosignatures of Antidepressant Response in Clinical Care) study underwent functional MRI during a well-validated reward task. Region of interest and whole-brain data were examined in the first- (N=78) and second- (N=70) recruited cohorts, as well as the total sample, of depressed individuals, and in healthy individuals. Results Healthy, but not depressed, individuals showed a significant inverse relationship between reward expectancy and prediction error-related right ventral striatal reactivity. Across all participants, and in depressed individuals only, greater anhedonia severity was associated with a reduced reward expectancy-prediction error inverse relationship, even after controlling for other symptoms. Conclusions The normal reward expectancy and prediction error-related ventral striatal reactivity inverse relationship concords with conditioning models, predicting a shift in ventral striatal responding from reward outcomes to reward cues. This study shows, for the first time, an absence of this relationship in two cohorts of unmedicated depressed individuals and a moderation of this relationship by anhedonia, suggesting reduced reward-contingency learning with greater anhedonia. These findings help elucidate neural mechanisms of anhedonia, as a step toward

  15. Moderation of the Relationship Between Reward Expectancy and Prediction Error-Related Ventral Striatal Reactivity by Anhedonia in Unmedicated Major Depressive Disorder: Findings From the EMBARC Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Tsafrir; Chase, Henry W; Almeida, Jorge R; Stiffler, Richelle; Zevallos, Carlos R; Aslam, Haris A; Deckersbach, Thilo; Weyandt, Sarah; Cooper, Crystal; Toups, Marisa; Carmody, Thomas; Kurian, Benji; Peltier, Scott; Adams, Phillip; McInnis, Melvin G; Oquendo, Maria A; McGrath, Patrick J; Fava, Maurizio; Weissman, Myrna; Parsey, Ramin; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Phillips, Mary L

    2015-09-01

    Anhedonia, disrupted reward processing, is a core symptom of major depressive disorder. Recent findings demonstrate altered reward-related ventral striatal reactivity in depressed individuals, but the extent to which this is specific to anhedonia remains poorly understood. The authors examined the effect of anhedonia on reward expectancy (expected outcome value) and prediction error- (discrepancy between expected and actual outcome) related ventral striatal reactivity, as well as the relationship between these measures. A total of 148 unmedicated individuals with major depressive disorder and 31 healthy comparison individuals recruited for the multisite EMBARC (Establishing Moderators and Biosignatures of Antidepressant Response in Clinical Care) study underwent functional MRI during a well-validated reward task. Region of interest and whole-brain data were examined in the first- (N=78) and second- (N=70) recruited cohorts, as well as the total sample, of depressed individuals, and in healthy individuals. Healthy, but not depressed, individuals showed a significant inverse relationship between reward expectancy and prediction error-related right ventral striatal reactivity. Across all participants, and in depressed individuals only, greater anhedonia severity was associated with a reduced reward expectancy-prediction error inverse relationship, even after controlling for other symptoms. The normal reward expectancy and prediction error-related ventral striatal reactivity inverse relationship concords with conditioning models, predicting a shift in ventral striatal responding from reward outcomes to reward cues. This study shows, for the first time, an absence of this relationship in two cohorts of unmedicated depressed individuals and a moderation of this relationship by anhedonia, suggesting reduced reward-contingency learning with greater anhedonia. These findings help elucidate neural mechanisms of anhedonia, as a step toward identifying potential biosignatures

  16. The dynamics of herpesvirus reactivations during and after severe drug eruptions: their relation to the clinical phenotype and therapeutic outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, T; Kano, Y; Mizukawa, Y; Shiohara, T

    2014-06-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome/drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DIHS/DRESS) and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS)/toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) represent contrasting poles of severe drug eruptions, and sequential reactivations of several herpesviruses have exclusively been demonstrated in the former. No previous studies, however, were extended beyond the acute stage. We sought to investigate whether herpesvirus reactivations could also be observed in SJS/TEN and beyond the acute stage of both diseases. Patients with SJS (n = 16), SJS/TEN overlap (n = 2), TEN (n = 10), and DIHS/DRESS (n = 34) were enrolled. We performed a retrospective analysis of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), and cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA loads sequentially determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction during a 2-year period after onset. Persistently increased EBV loads were detected in SJS during the acute stage and long after resolution, but not in others. In contrast, high HHV-6 loads were exclusively detected in DIHS/DRESS during the acute stage. The dynamics of herpesvirus reactivation varied in DIHS/DRESS according to the use of systemic corticosteroids: While EBV loads were higher in patients not receiving systemic corticosteroids, CMV and HHV-6 loads were higher in those receiving them. Distinct patterns of herpesvirus reactivation according to the pathological phenotype and to the use of systemic corticosteroids were observed during the acute stage and follow-up period, which may contribute, at least in part, to the difference in the clinical manifestations and long-term outcomes. Systemic corticosteroids during the acute stage may improve the outcomes in DIHS/DRESS. © 2014 The Authors. Allergy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Psoriasis and psoriasic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes Vera, Sandra Liliana; Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio; Restrepo Suarez, Jose Felix

    2003-01-01

    The psoriasis is an skin inflammatory disease characterized by chronic and recurrent red skin covered with silver scales. In their pathogenesis, immunogenetic and environmental factors are conjugated. Psoriatic arthritis. That is a seronegative arthropathy. In the greater part of cases follow to a chronic course of cutaneous psoriasis. In this paper, we analyzed the most frequent forms of presentation of cutaneous psoriasis and we revised the psoriatic arthropathy, with some indications about its treatment

  18. Tracheobronchomegaly and rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rua Marin, Catalina; Diaz Betancur, James Samir; Cardona, Alejandro; Ramirez Gomez, Luis Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Tracheobronchomegaly is a rare condition of unknown etiology that has been described in association with connective tissue diseases. We present a case of tracheomegaly in a patient with a long evolution rheumatoid arthritis. This is the second case reported in the medical literature until now. Association between these pathologies is uncertain and we can not establish a clear pathophysiological link due to the rarity of its occurrence and the late onset of symptoms

  19. The reactivity of natural organic matter to disinfection by-products formation and its relation to specific ultraviolet absorbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitis, M; Karanfil, T; Kilduff, J E; Wigton, A

    2001-01-01

    Five natural waters with a broad range of DOC concentrations were fractionated using various coal- and wood-based granular activated carbons (GAC) and alum coagulation. Adsorption and alum coagulation fractionated NOM solutions by preferentially removing components having high specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA). UV absorbing fractions of NOM were found to be the major contributors to DBP formation. SUVA appears to be an accurate predictor of reactivity with chlorine in terms of DBP yield; however, it was also found that low-SUVA components of NOM have higher bromine incorporation. SUVA has promise as a parameter for on-line monitoring and control of DBP formation in practical applications; however, the effects of bromide concentration may also need to be considered. Understanding how reactivity is correlated to SUVA may allow utilities to optimize the degree of treatment required to comply with DBP regulations. The reactive components that require removal, and the degree of treatment necessary to accomplish this removal, may be directly obtained from the relationship between SUVA removal and the degree of treatment (e.g., alum dose).

  20. Repeated administration of mazindol reduces spontaneous pain-related behaviors without modifying bone density and microarchitecture in a mouse model of complete Freund’s adjuvant-induced knee arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo-González, LE; Martínez-Martínez, A; Vargas-Muñoz, VM; Acosta-González, RI; Plancarte-Sánchez, R; Anaya-Reyes, M; Fernández del Valle-Laisequilla, C; Reyes-García, JG; Jiménez-Andrade, JM

    2017-01-01

    Background The role of dopaminergic system in the development of rheumatoid arthritis-related pain, a major symptom in this disease, has not been explored. Therefore, the anti-nociceptive effect of mazindol, a dopamine uptake inhibitor, was evaluated in a model of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritis. Furthermore, as studies have shown that the dopaminergic system regulates bone metabolism, the effect of mazindol on bone mass and microarchitecture was determined. Methods Adult ICR male mice received intra-articular injections of either CFA or saline into the right knee joint every week. Spontaneous pain-like behaviors (flinching and guarding) and locomotor activity were assessed at day 26 post-first CFA, following which, a single intraperitoneally (i.p.) administered dose of mazindol was given (1, 3 and 10 mg/kg). Then, the antinociceptive effect of a repeated administration of 3 mg/kg mazindol (daily, i.p.; day 15–day 26) was evaluated. Additionally, at day 26, the participation of D1-like, D2-like or opioid receptors in the antinociceptive effect of mazindol was evaluated. The effect of mazindol on bone density and microarchitecture was evaluated by micro-computed tomography. Results Acute administration of mazindol decreased the spontaneous pain-like behaviors in a dose-dependent manner without reducing the knee edema. However, mazindol at 10 mg/kg significantly increased the locomotor activity; therefore, 3 mg/kg mazindol was used for further studies. Repeated administration of 3 mg/kg mazindol significantly decreased the pain-like behaviors without modifying locomotor activity. The antinociceptive effect of mazindol was blocked by administration of a D2-like receptor antagonist (haloperidol), but not by administration of D1-like receptor antagonist (SCH 23390) or an opioid receptor antagonist (naloxone). Repeated administration of mazindol did not significantly modify the density and microarchitecture of periarticular bone of the arthritic

  1. Imaging of Posttraumatic Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Septic Arthritis, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, and Cancer Mimicking Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupasov, Andrey; Cain, Usa; Montoya, Simone; Blickman, Johan G

    2017-09-01

    This article focuses on the imaging of 5 discrete entities with a common end result of disability: posttraumatic arthritis, a common form of secondary osteoarthritis that results from a prior insult to the joint; avascular necrosis, a disease of impaired osseous blood flow, leading to cellular death and subsequent osseous collapse; septic arthritis, an infectious process leading to destructive changes within the joint; complex regional pain syndrome, a chronic limb-confined painful condition arising after injury; and cases of cancer mimicking arthritis, in which the initial findings seem to represent arthritis, despite a more insidious cause. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Radiographic abnormalities of the wrist in adult-onset still disease: Comparison with juvenile chronic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorkengren, A.G.; Pathria, M.N.; Terkeltaub, R.; Esdaile, J.; Weisman, M.; Sartoris, D.J.; Resnick, D.

    1987-01-01

    Pericapitate involvement of the wrist has been described as characteristic of adult-onset Still disease, a relatively rare disorder that is often diagnosed by exclusion after extensive and frequently invasive tests. To evaluate the diagnostic value of carpal radiography in cases of adult-onset Still disease, a retrospective blinded analysis of 48 patients, 16 each with adult-onset Still disease, juvenile chronic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis, was performed. Pericapitate articular alterations without radiocarpal involvement were found to be frequent in the setting of adult-onset Still disease but distinctly unusual among patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In juvenile chronic arthritis, severe pericapitate involvement was frequent, but generally occurred in conjunction with radiocarpal joint abnormalities

  3. Human MHC-II with Shared Epitope Motifs Are Optimal Epstein-Barr Virus Glycoprotein 42 Ligands—Relation to Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trier, Nicole; Izarzugaza, Jose; Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo; Houen, Gunnar

    2018-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic autoimmune disorder of unknown etiology, which is characterized by inflammation in the synovium and joint damage. Although the pathogenesis of RA remains to be determined, a combination of environmental (e.g., viral infections) and genetic factors influence disease onset. Especially genetic factors play a vital role in the onset of disease, as the heritability of RA is 50–60%, with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles accounting for at least 30% of the overall genetic risk. Some HLA-DR alleles encode a conserved sequence of amino acids, referred to as the shared epitope (SE) structure. By analyzing the structure of a HLA-DR molecule in complex with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), the SE motif is suggested to play a vital role in the interaction of MHC II with the viral glycoprotein (gp) 42, an essential entry factor for EBV. EBV has been repeatedly linked to RA by several lines of evidence and, based on several findings, we suggest that EBV is able to induce the onset of RA in predisposed SE-positive individuals, by promoting entry of B-cells through direct contact between SE and gp42 in the entry complex. PMID:29361739

  4. A survey of the images used on the Arthritis Research UK (ARUK) Osteomalacia Mind-Map in relation to cultural background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, David; Robinson, Sandra; Jagatsinh, Yogen; Adebajo, Ade; Helliwell, Philip; Rahman, Anisur

    2011-06-01

    To explore the appropriateness of the images in the Arthritis Research UK Mind-Map for Osteomalacia with people for whom it was intended (Bengali; Gujarati; Hindi; Punjabi and Urdu). Participants were identified in a convenient sample from contacts within their communities. They were asked to comment on the images for meaning, suitability and offence to people from their culture. A total of 56 people were surveyed. Appropriateness responses were either generic: Images of bone metabolism were confusing [31/56]; muscle weakness "looked like knee pain" [16/56]; a bending and cracking bone "looked like a dog's bone" [22/56] and that the bone pain man "looked like he had toothache" [21/56]; or culture-specific the depiction of food and the Burqa as below. Only 3 images caused any offence, phrased as "may offend someone". The Burqa was described as stereotyping. The images on the current Osteomalacia Mind-Map are largely appropriate and have little capacity to offend. Some may be improved upon in terms of conveying meaning. One set of images can suit all of the cultures. Images can cross cultural barriers. The revised Mind-Map should be more useful in conveying meaning to a wider selection of patients.

  5. Pentosidine in synovial fluid in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: relationship with disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J R; Takahashi, M; Suzuki, M; Kushida, K; Miyamoto, S; Inoue, T

    1998-12-01

    Pentosidine is an advanced glycation endproduct formed by glycosylation and oxidation. Our aim was to develop a means to measure pentosidine in synovial fluid (SF), and to compare its concentration in SF in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to investigate the relationship between its concentration in SF and the disease activity of RA. SF was collected from knee joints in 31 patients with RA and 40 with OA, who had hydrarthrosis. One patient with RA and 7 with OA who had the complication of diabetes mellitus or chronic renal failure made up the DM/CRF group, and the remaining patients made up the RA group (n = 30) and the OA group (n = 33). Pentosidine was measured by the direct HPLC method with column switching after hydrolysis of SF. Pentosidine was detected in all SF and was greater in RA (83.9 +/- 46.0 nmol/l, mean +/- SD) than in OA (40.1 +/- 19.6 nmol/l). Three DM/CRF patients undergoing hemodialysis had markedly high pentosidine levels (482.5 +/- 280.8 nmol/l). There was a significant correlation between pentosidine and C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and Lansbury Index (p Patients with RA were divided into high and low activity groups according to the CRP and Lansbury Index. Pentosidine was significantly higher in the high activity group (CRP > or = 2.0 mg/dl and Lansbury Index > or = 50%) than in the low activity group (CRP < 2.0 and/or Lansbury Index < 50) (100.9 +/- 42.8 vs 58.5 +/- 39.6 nmol/; p = 0.0013). Pentosidine in synovial fluid was higher in RA than in OA. Pentosidine levels in SF were related to the disease activity in RA.

  6. Validity and predictive ability of the juvenile arthritis disease activity score based on CRP versus ESR in a Nordic population-based setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordal, E B; Zak, M; Aalto, K

    2012-01-01

    To compare the juvenile arthritis disease activity score (JADAS) based on C reactive protein (CRP) (JADAS-CRP) with JADAS based on erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (JADAS-ESR) and to validate JADAS in a population-based setting.......To compare the juvenile arthritis disease activity score (JADAS) based on C reactive protein (CRP) (JADAS-CRP) with JADAS based on erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (JADAS-ESR) and to validate JADAS in a population-based setting....

  7. Serum levels of 14-3-3η protein supplement C-reactive protein and rheumatoid arthritis-associated antibodies to predict clinical and radiographic outcomes in a prospective cohort of patients with recent-onset inflammatory polyarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Nathalie; Marotta, Anthony; de Brum-Fernandes, Artur J; Liang, Patrick; Masetto, Ariel; Ménard, Henri A; Maksymowych, Walter P; Boire, Gilles

    2016-02-01

    Age, C-Reactive Protein (CRP) and autoantibodies (Abs) are associated with worse prognosis in patients with recent-onset inflammatory polyarthritis (EPA). Serum 14-3-3η protein is a joint-derived biomarker that up-regulates cytokines and enzymes that perpetuate local and systemic inflammation and may contribute to joint damage. Our objective was to evaluate, over a 5-year prospective period of observation, the additional prognostic potential of serum 14-3-3η protein in EPA patients. Clinical variables, serum and radiographs (scored according to the Sharp/van der Heijde (SvH) method) were collected serially. Relationships between serum 14-3-3η protein and other biomarkers were computed with Spearman correlations. Outcomes were Simple Disease Activity Index (SDAI) scores and joint damage progression: ΔSvH for SvH score and ΔErosion for its Erosive component. The additional predictive contribution of 14-3-3η was defined using generalized estimating equations (GEE) and generalized linear mixed models (GLMM). Among 331 patients, baseline 14-3-3η was ≥0.19 and ≥0.50 ng/ml in 153 (46.2 %) and 119 (36.0 %), respectively; CRP was >8.0 mg/L in 207 (62.5 %), and at least one Ab (Rheumatoid Factor, anti-CCP2 or anti-Sa/citrullinated vimentin) was positive in 170 (51.5 %). Elevated 14-3-3η levels moderately correlated with positive Abs, but not with elevated CRP. Baseline 14-3-3η ≥0.19 ng/ml was associated with more radiographic progression over 5 years. The optimal levels of baseline 14-3-3η to predict radiographic progression was defined by ROC curves at 0.50 ng/ml. Levels of 14-3-3η ≥0.50 ng/ml at baseline were associated with lower likelihoods of ever reaching SDAI remission (RR 0.79 (95 % CI 0.64-0.98), p = 0.03) and higher subsequent progression of Total and Erosion SvH scores. Elevated levels of 14-3-3η during follow-up also predicted higher subsequent progression, even in patients in SDAI remission. Decreases of 14-3-3η levels by at least 0

  8. Incidence and specificity of antibodies to types I, II, III, IV, and V collagen in rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases as measured by 125I-radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, J.M.; Huffstutter, E.H.; Townes, A.S.; Kang, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    Antibodies to human native and denatured types I, II, III, IV, and V collagens were measured using 125I-radioimmunoassay. Mean levels of binding by sera from 30 rheumatoid arthritis patients were significantly higher than those from 20 normal subjects against all of the collagens tested. The relative antibody concentration was higher in synovial fluid than in simultaneously obtained serum. Many patients with gout or various other rheumatic diseases also had detectable anticollagen antibodies. With a few notable exceptions, the majority of the reactivity detected in all patient groups was directed against covalent structural determinants present on all of the denatured collagens, suggesting a secondary reaction to tissue injury

  9. Effects by periodontitis on pristane-induced arthritis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Kaja; Lönnblom, Erik; Tour, Gregory; Kats, Anna; Mydel, Piotr; Georgsson, Pierre; Hultgren, Catharina; Kharlamova, Nastya; Norin, Ulrika; Jönsson, Jörgen; Lundmark, Anna; Hellvard, Annelie; Lundberg, Karin; Jansson, Leif; Holmdahl, Rikard; Yucel-Lindberg, Tülay

    2016-11-03

    An infection-immune association of periodontal disease with rheumatoid arthritis has been suggested. This study aimed to investigate the effect of pre-existing periodontitis on the development and the immune/inflammatory response of pristane-induced arthritis. We investigated the effect of periodontitis induced by ligature placement and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) infection, in combination with Fusobacterium nucleatum to promote its colonization, on the development of pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) in rats (Dark Agouti). Disease progression and severity of periodontitis and arthritis was monitored using clinical assessment, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT)/intraoral radiographs, antibody response, the inflammatory markers such as α-1-acid glycoprotein (α-1-AGP) and c-reactive protein (CRP) as well as cytokine multiplex profiling at different time intervals after induction. Experimentally induced periodontitis manifested clinically (P periodontitis-induction led to severe arthritis in all rats demonstrating that the severity of arthritis was not affected by the pre-existence of periodontitis. Endpoint analysis showed that 89% of the periodontitis-affected animals were positive for antibodies against arginine gingipain B and furthermore, the plasma antibody levels to a citrullinated P. gingivalis peptidylarginine deiminase (PPAD) peptide (denoted CPP3) were significantly (P periodontitis rats with PIA. Additionally, there was a trend towards increased pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels, and increased α-1-AGP levels in plasma from periodontitis-challenged PIA rats. Pre-existence of periodontitis induced antibodies against citrullinated peptide derived from PPAD in rats with PIA. However, there were no differences in the development or severity of PIA between periodontitis challenged and periodontitis free rats.

  10. The Role of Intracellular Organisms in the Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory arthritis is a condition which is characterised by recurrent episodes of joint pain and swelling. It encompasses a spectrum of disorders ranging from rheumatoid arthritis to ankylosing spondylitis. In these conditions, for reasons that are poorly understood, the immune system raises an inflammatory response within the joint space. In some cases, autoantigens have been identified (e.g., anticitrullinated peptides in rheumatoid arthritis, but the absence of these, in the seronegative arthritides, for example, raises question as to the underlying pathogenesis. Interest has, therefore, turned to host-pathogen interactions and whether aberrant immune responses to these could explain the development of arthritis. This has been most widely studied in reactive arthritis (ReA, where an infectious episode precedes the development of the joint symptoms. In this review, we present the evidence for the role of host-bacterial interactions in the pathogenesis of joint inflammation with particular emphasis on ReA. We discuss a range of possible mechanisms including molecular mimicry, persistent low grade infections, and abnormal host responses to common bacterial causes of reactive arthritis as well as discussing some of the clinical challenges that we face in making the diagnosis and in treatment of persistent symptoms.

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Patients from Johns Hopkins Stategies to Increase your Level of Physical Activity Role of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic Arthritis 101 2010 E.S.C.A.P.E. Study Patient Update Transitioning the JRA ...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatments are available, what is happening in the immune system and what other conditions are associated with RA. ... Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. Updated: ...

  13. Psoriatic arthritis as a mountain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Berthelot

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available There is no doubt that inflammatory arthritis/enthesitis and psoriasis coexist more frequently than would be expected by chance: for instance, in a study of 1285 patients with psoriasis seen in an hospital, 483 (38% were suffering from arthritis/ enthesitis, including 40 patients classified as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA (3%, 177 (14% as undifferentiated arthritis (UA, and 266 (21% as Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA (1. Although lower percentages have been noticed in the general population with psoriasis (6% of PsA in an extensive study of 1844 patients with psoriasis (2, they were superior to 5% (i.e. at least 5 times greater than the figures found for patients without psoriasis (3-7.

  14. Wnt/β-catenin Signaling in Osteoarthritis and in Other Forms of Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yachuan; Wang, Tingyu; Hamilton, John L; Chen, Di

    2017-09-01

    Arthritis defines a large group of diseases primarily affecting the joint. It is the leading cause of pain and disability in adults. Osteoarthritis (OA) affecting the knee or hip is the most common form among over 100 types of arthritis. Other types of arthritis include erosive hand OA, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) OA, facet joint OA, diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH), and spondyloarthritis (SpA). However, the specific molecular signals involved in the development and progression of OA and related forms of arthritis remain largely unknown. The canonical wingless/integrated (Wnt)/β-catenin signaling pathway could play a unique role in the pathogenesis of arthritis. In this review article, we will focus on the molecular mechanisms of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the pathogenesis of OA and other types of arthritis. Emerging evidence demonstrates that Wnts and Wnt-related molecules are involved in arthritis development and progression in human genetic studies and in vitro studies. Also, mouse models have been generated to determine the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the pathogenesis of arthritis. Wnt/β-catenin signaling represents a unique signaling pathway regulating arthritis development and progression, and the molecules in this particular pathway may serve as targets for the therapeutic intervention of arthritis. Mediators and downstream effectors of Wnt/β-catenin signaling are increased in OA as well other forms of arthritis, including DISH and SpA. Through extensive investigations, including pre-clinical studies in transgenic mice and translational and human studies, the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway has been proven to play roles in bone and joint pathology by directly affecting bone, cartilage, and synovial tissue; further, these pathologies can be reduced through targeting this pathway. Continued investigation into the distinct molecular signaling of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway will provide additional insights toward the therapeutic

  15. Clarifying relations between dispositional aggression and brain potential response: overlapping and distinct contributions of impulsivity and stress reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venables, Noah C; Patrick, Christopher J; Hall, Jason R; Bernat, Edward M

    2011-03-01

    Impulsive-aggressive individuals exhibit deficits in amplitude of the P3 brain potential response, however, it remains unclear how separable dispositional traits account for this association. The current study sought to clarify the basis of this association by examining contributions of trait impulsiveness and stress reactivity to the observed relationship between dispositional aggression and amplitude of the P3 brain potential response in a visual novelty-oddball procedure. A significant negative association was found between aggressiveness and amplitude of P3 response to both target and novel stimuli over frontal-central scalp sites. Impulsivity showed a parallel inverse relationship with P3 amplitude, attributable to its overlap with dispositional aggression. In contrast, stress reactivity did not exhibit a zero-order association with P3 amplitude, but modestly predicted P3 in a positive direction after accounting for its overlap with aggression. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for individual difference variables and brain processes underlying impulsive-aggressive behavior. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Reactive oxygen species modulator 1 (Romo1) as a novel diagnostic marker for lung cancer-related malignant effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hyeun; Park, Myung Jae; Choi, Sue In; Lee, Eun Joo; Lee, Sang Yeub; In, Kwang Ho

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species modulator 1 (Romo1) is a novel protein that plays an important role in intracellular reactive oxygen species generation. Recently, Romo1 has been suggested to have diagnostic and prognostic potential in lung cancer. However, there is no data on the diagnostic value of Romo1 level in malignant pleural effusion. We evaluated the clinical usefulness of Romo1 in pleural fluid for the diagnosis of malignant effusion in lung cancer patients. Pleural fluid Romo1 level was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and compared between lung cancer-associated malignant effusion (n = 53; 29 adenocarcinomas and 24 squamous cell carcinomas) and benign pleural effusions (n = 91; 31 tuberculous pleurisy, 30 parapneumonic effusion, and 30 transudate). The discriminative power of Romo1 for lung cancer-associated malignant effusion was determined using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis and compared with those of other tumor markers. Median Romo1 level in lung cancer-associated malignant effusion was 99.3 ng/mL, which was significantly higher than that in benign pleural effusions (P effusion from benign effusions was 67.0 ng/mL with a sensitivity of 73.8% and a specificity of 84.1%. The area under the curve was 0.837 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.750–0.886), which was significantly better than that of cytokeratin 19 fragments (P effusion. PMID:28121949

  17. Cardiovascular risk factors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in combination with hypertension depending on body weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sіrenko O.Yu.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to evaluate the frequency of cardiovascular risk factors and hypertension in patients with rheumatoid arthritis depending on body weight. The study involved 100 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and stably selected therapy for more than 6 months at the age from 45 to 65 years (mean age 53,19 ± 5,40 years. Traditional cardiovascular risk was assessed, taking into account risk factors by SCORE scale and amended for patients with RA. The levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein, serum creatinine, body mass index, body area index were determined. Arterial hypertension was diagnosed in 41 (41% patients with rheuma¬toid arthritis and was associated with traditional risk factors (age, obesity, rheumatoid factor, hyperuricemia and the duration of glucocorticoid therapy. Obesity and excess body mass occurred in the majority of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, herewith the highest level of inflammation indicators and risk of cardiovascular events was in overweight patients. Obesity was associated with duration of rheumatoid arthritis, the activity of the inflammatory process, the duration of glucocorticoids taking. It is found that the traditional SCORE scale does not fully reflect the risk of cardiovascular events in rheumatoid arthritis. Identification of hypertension and obesity increases the information content of the risk assessment of cardiovascular events in rheumatoid arthritis.

  18. [Analysis of clinical and imaging characteristics of infectious sacroiliac arthritis and review of literatures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Wang, Yanyan; Zhu, Jian; Jin, Jingyu; Zhao, Zheng; Zhang, Jianglin; Huang, Feng

    2015-05-01

    To study the clinical and imaging characteristics of patients with infectious sacroiliac arthritis. Twenty-one patients diagnosed with infectious sacroiliac arthritis were analyzed retrospectively between 2000 and 2014. The chief complaint was pain in hip and lumbosacral area. Their clinical features, laboratory tests and pathological examination results as well as CT/MRI/PET-CT images were evaluated. There were nine males and thirteen females eighteen (85.7%) patients had unilateral sacroiliac joint involvement. Among these patients, three were diagnosed with brucellosis sacroiliac arthritis (BSI), eight patients with tuberculosis sacroiliac arthritis (TSI), and ten patients with non-brucellosis and non-tuberculosis infectious sacroiliac arthritis (ISI). For those patients with non-brucellosis and non-tuberculosis infectious sacroiliac arthritis, white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were dramatically increased. Twelve patients were diagnosed pathologically including 6 ISI, 2 BSI and 4 TSI. Twelve patients and seventeen patients were scanned by CT and MRI respectively. Two patients undertook PET-CT examination. Antibiotic therapy showed significant therapeutic effects in all patients. Infectious sacroiliac arthritis patients with hip or lumbosacral pain as the chief complaint can be easily misdiagnosed as spondyloarthritis. Comprehensive analysis of clinical features, imaging and laboratory findings is essential for accurate diagnosis.

  19. Clinical and immunologic effects of fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in refractory rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trentham, D.E.; Belli, J.A.; Anderson, R.J.; Buckley, J.A.; Goetzl, E.J.; David, J.R.; Austen, K.F.

    1981-01-01

    Ten patients with refractory rheumatoid arthritis were given 3000 rad of fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in an uncontrolled therapeutic trial. Total lymphoid irradiation was associated with objective evidence of considerable clinical improvement in eight patients and with reduced blood lymphocyte counts in all 10. On completion of irradiation, there was an abrogation of lymphocyte reactivity in vitro in the patients with clinical responses, but abnormal antibody activities characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis and normal components of humoral immunity were not suppressed. Partial recrudescence of arthritis occurred shortly after a year after the completion of irradiation and was paralleled by a restitution of lymphocyte concentrations and responsiveness to mitogens to levels similar to those observed before irradiation. These data provide further evidence of T-cell involvement in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and demonstrate that total lymphoid irradiation can induce temporary relief, but they do not ascertain whether the natural history of this disease was altered

  20. Clinical and immunologic effects of fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in refractory rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trentham, D.E.; Belli, J.A.; Anderson, R.J.; Buckley, J.A.; Goetzl, E.J.; David, J.R.; Austen, K.F.

    1981-01-01

    Ten patients with refractory rheumatoid arthritis were given 3000 rad of fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in an uncontrolled therapeutic trial. Total lymphoid irradiation was associated with objective evidence of considerable clinical improvement in eight patients and with reduced blood lymphocyte counts in all 10. On completion of irradiation, there was an abrogation of lymphocyte reactivity in vitro in the patients with clinical responses, but abnormal antibody activities characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis and normal components of humoral immunity were not suppressed. Partial recrudescence of arthritis occurred shortly before a year after the completion of irradiation and was paralleled by a restitution of lymphocyte concentrations and responsiveness to mitogens to levels similar to those observed before irradiation. These data provide further evidence of T-cell involvement in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and demonstrate that total lymphoid irradiation can induce temporary relief, but they do not ascertain whether the natural history of this disease was altered

  1. Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory effects of steroids and arthritis-related biotherapies in an in vitro co-culture model with immune cells and synoviocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Noack

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: During rheumatoid arthritis (RA, steroids and biotherapies are used alone and combined. Efficacy has been established in clinical trials but their differential effects at the cellular level are less documented. The aim was to study these cellular effects using an in vitro model with synoviocytes interacting with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC to reproduce the interactions in the RA synovium.Methods: Activated-PBMC were co-cultured with RA synoviocytes during 48h. A dose-response of methylprednisolone (MP was tested and different biotherapies (Infliximab, Etanercept, Adalimumab, Tocilizumab, Abatacept and Rituximab were added alone or in combination with MP. Cytokine production (IL-17, IL-6, IL-1β, IFN-γ and IL-10 was measured by ELISA.Results: Addition of MP to co-cultures inhibited the production of all cytokines. The response to the biotherapies alone was treatment-dependent. IL-17 production was inhibited only by Tocilizumab (p=0.004 while IL-6 was decreased only by Infliximab (p≤0.002. IL-1β level was affected in all conditions (p≤0.03. IFN-γ production was mainly decreased by Infliximab (p=0.004, and IL-10 by Infliximab and Tocilizumab (p≤0.004. The combination MP and biotherapy did not induce an additional effect on pro-inflammatory cytokine inhibition. The combination MP and biotherapies induced a higher IL-10 secretion than MP alone, mainly with Rituximab.Conclusion: Steroids inhibited the secretion of all cytokines, and low doses were as potent. The anti-inflammatory effect of biotherapies was dependent on their mechanism of action. MP and biotherapy combination did not enhance the inhibitory effect on pro-inflammatory cytokines but could have a beneficial effect by increasing IL-10 production.

  2. Anti-Cyclic Citrullinated Peptide (Anti-CCP and Anti-Mutated Citrullinated Vimentin (Anti-MCV Relation with Extra-Articular Manifestations in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gonzalez-Lopez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the association between anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP and anti-mutated citrullinated vimentin antibodies (anti-MCV with the presence of extra-articular (ExRA manifestations in 225 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Ninety-five patients had ExRA and 130 had no ExRA. There was no association of anti-CCP and anti-MCV levels with the presence of ExRA as total group (P=0.40 and P=0.91, resp.. Making an analysis of individual manifestations, rheumatoid nodules were associated with positivity for rheumatoid factor (RF; (P=0.01, anti-CCP (P=0.048, and anti-MCV (P=0.02. Instead, RF, anti-CCP, or anti-MCV were not associated with SS, chronic anemia, or peripheral neuropathy. Levels of anti-CCP correlated with the score of the Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-Di (r=0.154, P=0.03, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR; (r=0.155, P=0.03, and RF (P=0.254, P<0.001, whereas anti-MCV titres only correlated with RF (r=0.169, P=0.02. On adjusted analysis, ExRA was associated with longer age (P=0.015, longer disease duration (P=0.007, higher DAS-28 score (P=0.002, and higher HAQ-DI score (P=0.007, but serum levels of anti-CCP and anti-MCV were not associated. These findings show the need to strengthen the evaluation of the pathogenic mechanisms implied in each specific ExRA manifestation.

  3. Switched Memory B Cells Are Increased in Oligoarticular and Polyarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Their Change Over Time Is Related to Response to Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, Emiliano; Aquilani, Angela; Cascioli, Simona; Moneta, Gian Marco; Caiello, Ivan; Farroni, Chiara; Giorda, Ezio; D'Oria, Valentina; Marafon, Denise Pires; Magni-Manzoni, Silvia; Carsetti, Rita; De Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2018-04-01

    To investigate whether abnormalities in B cell subsets in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) correlate with clinical features and response to treatment. A total of 109 patients diagnosed as having oligoarticular JIA or polyarticular JIA were enrolled in the study. B cell subsets in peripheral blood and synovial fluid were analyzed by flow cytometry. Switched memory B cells were significantly increased in patients compared to age-matched healthy controls (P < 0.0001). When patients were divided according to age at onset of JIA, in patients with early-onset disease (presenting before age 6 years) the expansion in switched memory B cells was more pronounced than that in patients with late-onset disease and persisted throughout the disease course. In longitudinal studies, during methotrexate (MTX) treatment, regardless of the presence or absence of active disease, the number of switched memory B cells increased significantly (median change from baseline 36% [interquartile range {IQR} 15, 66]). During treatment with MTX plus tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi), in patients maintaining disease remission, the increase in switched memory B cells was significantly lower than that in patients who experienced active disease (median change from baseline 4% [IQR -6, 32] versus 41% [IQR 11, 73]; P = 0.004). The yearly rate of increases in switched memory B cells was 1.5% in healthy controls, 1.2% in patients who maintained remission during treatment with MTX plus TNFi, 4.7% in patients who experienced active disease during treatment with MTX plus TNFi, and ~4% in patients treated with MTX alone. Switched memory B cells expand during the disease course at a faster rate in JIA patients than in healthy children. This increase is more evident in patients with early-onset JIA. TNFi treatment inhibits this increase in patients who achieve and maintain remission, but not in those with active disease. © 2018, American College of Rheumatology.

  4. Emotional Reactivity and Appraisal of Food in Relation to Eating Disorder Cognitions and Behaviours: Evidence to Support the Motivational Conflict Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, Sarah E; Hebert, Karen R; Benning, Stephen D

    2018-01-01

    Eating disorders are associated with both negative and positive emotional reactions towards food. Individual eating disorder symptoms may relate to distinct emotional responses to food, which could necessitate tailored treatments based on symptom presentation. We examined associations between eating disorder symptoms and psychophysiological responses to food versus neutral images in 87 college students [mean (SD) age = 19.70 (2.09); mean (SD) body mass index = 23.25(2.77)]. Reflexive and facial electromyography measures tapping negative emotional reactivity (startle blink reflex) and appraisal (corrugator muscle response) as well as positive emotional reactivity (postauricular reflex) and appraisal (zygomaticus muscle response) were collected. Eating disorder cognitions correlated with more corrugator activity to food versus neutral images, indicating negative appraisals of food. Binge eating was associated with increased postauricular reflex reactivity to food versus neutral images, suggesting enhanced appetitive motivation to food. The combination of cognitive eating disorder symptoms and binge eating may result in motivational conflict towards food. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  5. Bone pathology inpsoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Badokin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study different variants of osteolysis in pts with psoriatic arthritis (PA and to reveal their relationship with other clinico-radiological features of joint damage. Material and methods. 370 pts with definite PA having different variants of joint damage were included. Radiological examination of bones and joints (in some cases large picture frame was performed. Morphological evaluation of synovial biopsies was done in 34 pts with PA and 10 pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Results. Different types of osteolysis were revealed in 80 (21,6% pts. Osteolytic variant of joint damage was present in 29 pts. 33 pts had acral, 48 — intra-articular osteolysis and 16 - true bone atrophy. Frequency and intensity of bone resorption were associated with severity of PA. Acral osteolysis correlated with arthritis of distal interphalangeal joints and onychodystrophy. Intra-articular osteolysis was most often present in distal interphalangeal joints of hands and metacarpophalangeal joints (39,6% and 41,7% respectively. Characteristic feature of PA was combination of prominent resorption with formation of bone ankylosis and periosteal reaction. Ankylosis was present in 33,3% of pts with intra-articular osteolysis and in 60% of pts with combination of different osteolysis variants. Systemic reaction of microcirculation in synovial biopsies was most prominent in osteolytic variant: marked thickening of capillary and venule basal membrane with high level of acid phosphatase, increased capillary and precapillary blood flow with stasis features, vascular lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration, productive vasculitis with annular wall thickening, thrombovasculitis and villi deep layer sclerosis. Conclusion. Different variants of osteolysis show bone involvement in PA. Acral and intra- articular osteolysis association with bone ankylosis and periostitis proves their common pathogenetic entity.

  6. Collagen-Induced Arthritis: A model for Murine Autoimmune Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrosimone, K M; Jin, M; Poston, B; Liu, P

    2015-10-20

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a common autoimmune animal model used to study rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The development of CIA involves infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils into the joint, as well as T and B cell responses to type II collagen. In murine CIA, genetically susceptible mice (DBA/1J) are immunized with a type II bovine collagen emulsion in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), and receive a boost of type II bovine collagen in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) 21 days after the first injection. These mice typically develop disease 26 to 35 days after the initial injection. C57BL/6J mice are resistant to arthritis induced by type II bovine collagen, but can develop arthritis when immunized with type II chicken collagen in CFA, and receive a boost of type II chicken collagen in IFA 21 days after the first injection. The concentration of heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37RA (MT) in CFA also differs for each strain. DBA/1J mice develop arthritis with 1 mg/ml MT, while C57BL/6J mice require and 3-4 mg/ml MT in order to develop arthritis. CIA develops slowly in C57BL/6J mice and cases of arthritis are mild when compared to DBA/1J mice. This protocol describes immunization of DBA/1J mice with type II bovine collagen and the immunization of C57BL/6J mice with type II chicken collagen.

  7. Identification of laboratory markers of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis abstract objective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqi, N.; Ahmed, T.A.; Malik, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    To identify the laboratory markers of disease activity, by finding relationship of biochemical markers with clinical disease activity measurement in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Study Design: Cross sectional analytical study. Place and duration of study: Department of Immunology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Rawalpindi from January 2009 to January 2010 in collaboration with Fauji Foundation Hospital and Military Hospital Rawalpindi. Patients and Methods: One hundred patients diagnosed as having rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as per American college of Rheumatology (ACR) revised criteria 1987 and fulfilling the study's inclusion criteria were studied. These patients were assessed clinically according to Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI) and divided into three groups which were mild, moderate and severe based on disease activity. These three groups were then assessed for disease activity by Rheumatoid factor (RA factor), Anti Cyclic Citrullinated Peptide antibodies (anti CCP antibodies), Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) and C- Reactive Proteins (CRP). The association of these laboratory markers with three groups of disease activity was analyzed to detect most sensitive disease activity markers for RA. Results: All the assessed laboratory markers that are RA factor, anti CCP antibodies, ESR and CRP are directly related with RA disease activity and any of them can be used to assess disease activity in RA. However a combination of the tests, analyzed in this study markers maybe used for better prediction of disease activity Conclusion: The identification of the laboratory markers of disease activity may help physician to diagnose aggressive disease early and evaluate prognosis in RA patients. (author)

  8. Clinical course and outcome of early rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, I A; Katsimbri, P; Katsaraki, A; Temekonidis, T; Georgiadis, A; Drosos, A A

    2001-07-01

    We studied whether patients with seropositivity in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) comprise a different clinical group than those with seronegativity. Four hundred seventeen patients with early RA according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria (disease duration less than 1 year) were retrospectively studied by analysis of demographic, clinical, laboratory, radiological, and therapeutic disease characteristics from the time of diagnosis until the end of the study period (1981 1999) using a data base. There were 248 seropositive patients and 169 seronegative patients with RA. No statistically significant differences were seen between the two groups before commencement of the study period in relation to age of disease onset, male:female ratio, and disease duration. However, seropositive patients showed longer medical follow-up. In addition, at disease onset, seropositive RA patients presented more frequently with symmetrical polyarthritis and small joint involvement than seronegative patients. The seropositive group also had more tender and swollen joints, weaker grip strength, and higher erythrocyte sedimentation and C-reactive protein rates during the follow-up period. In contrast, the seronegative group had less severe radiological findings and greater functional ability at the end of the study. In Greek patients with early RA, rheumatoid factor seems to be a predictor of more severe disease activity.

  9. FRAS1-related extracellular matrix 3 (FREM3 single-nucleotide polymorphism effects on gene expression, amygdala reactivity and perceptual processing speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya eNikolova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The A allele of the Fras1-related extracellular matrix protein 3 (FREM3 rs7676614 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP was linked to major depressive disorder (MDD in an early genome-wide association study (GWAS, and to symptoms of psychomotor retardation in a follow-up investigation. In line with significant overlap between age- and depression-related molecular pathways, parallel work has shown that FREM3 expression in postmortem human brain decreases with age. Here we probe the effect of rs7676614 on amygdala reactivity and perceptual processing speed, both of which are altered in depression and aging. Amygdala reactivity was assessed using a face-matching BOLD fMRI paradigm in 365 Caucasian participants in the Duke Neurogenetics Study (192 women, mean age 19.7±1.2. Perceptual processing speed was indexed by reaction times in the same task and the Trails Making Test (TMT. The effect of rs7676614 on FREM3 mRNA brain expression levels was probed in a postmortem cohort of 169 Caucasian individuals (44 women, mean age 50.8±14.9. The A allele of rs7676614 was associated with blunted amygdala reactivity to faces, slower reaction times in the face-matching condition (p<0.04, as well as marginally slower performance on TMT Part B (p=0.056. In the postmortem cohort, the T allele of rs6537170 (proxy for the rs7676614 A allele, was associated with trend-level reductions in gene expression in Brodmann areas 11 and 47 (p=0.066, reminiscent of patterns characteristic of older age. The low-expressing allele of another FREM3 SNP (rs1391187 was similarly associated with reduced amygdala reactivity and slower TMT Part B speed, in addition to reduced BA47 activity and Extraversion (p<0.05. Together, these results suggest common genetic variation associated with reduced FREM3 expression may confer risk for a subtype of depression characterized by reduced reactivity to environmental stimuli and slower perceptual processing speed, possibly suggestive of

  10. Relations between tectonics and sedimentation along the Eastern Sardinian margin (Western Tyrrhenian Sea) : from rifting to reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaullier, Virginie; Chanier, Frank; Vendeville, Bruno; Lymer, Gaël; Maillard, Agnès; Thinon, Isabelle; Lofi, Johanna; Sage, Françoise; Giresse, Pierre; Bassetti, Maria-Angela

    2014-05-01

    The offshore-onshore project "METYSS-METYSAR" aims at better understand the Miocene-Pliocene relationships between crustal tectonics, salt tectonics, and sedimentation along the Eastern Sardinian margin, Western Tyrrhenian Sea. In this key-area, the Tyrrhenian back-arc basin underwent recent rifting (9-5 Ma), pro parte coeval with the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC, 5.96-5.33 Ma), sea-floor spreading starting during Pliocene times. Thereby, the Tyrrhenian basin and the Eastern Sardinian margin are excellent candidates for studying the mechanisms of extreme lithospheric stretching and thinning, the role of pre-existing structural fabric during and after rifting, and the reactivation of a passive margin and the associated deformation and sedimentation patterns during the MSC. We looked at the respective contributions of crustal and salt tectonics in quantifying vertical and horizontal movements, using especially the seismic markers of the MSC. Overall, we delineate the history of rifting and tectonic reactivation in the area. The distribution maps respectively of the Messinian Erosion Surface and of Messinian units (Upper Unit and Mobile Unit) show that a rifted basin already existed by Messinian time. This reveals a major pre-MSC rifting across the entire domain. Because salt tectonics can create fan-shaped geometries in sediments, syn-rift deposits have to be carefully re-examined in order to decipher the effects of crustal tectonics (rifting) and thin-skinned salt tectonics. Our data surprisingly show that there are no clues for Messinian syn-rift sediments along the East-Sardinia Basin and Cornaglia Terrace, hence no evidence for rifting after Late Tortonian times. Nevertheless, widespread deformation occurred during the Pliocene and can only be attributed to post-rift reactivation. This reactivation is characterized not only by normal faulting but also by contractional structures. Some Pliocene vertical movements caused localized gravity gliding of the mobile

  11. Comparative evaluation of levels of C-reactive protein and PMN in periodontitis patients related to cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, G; Nagaraj, M; Jayashree, A

    2013-05-01

    Numerous cross-sectional studies have suggested that chronic periodontitis is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. There is evidence that periodontitis and cardiovascular diseases are linked by inflammatory factors including C-reactive protein. The purpose of the study was to investigate the levels of CRP and PNM cells as a marker of inflammatory host response in the serum of chronic periodontitis patients and in patients with CVD. Study population included 75 patients; both male and female above 35 years were included for the study. The patients were divided into three groups of 25 each - Group I: Chronic periodontitis patients with CVD, Group II: Chronic periodontitis patients without CVD and Group III: Control subjects (without chronic periodontitis and CVD). Patients with chronic periodontitis had ≥8 teeth involved with probing depth (PD) ≥5 mm involved. The control group had PD ≤ 3 mm and no CVD. Venous blood was collected from the patients and C-reactive protein levels were analyzed by immunoturbidimetry. PMN was recorded by differential count method. On comparison, OHI-S Index, GI, mean PD, CRP and PMN values showed significant difference from Group I to III. CRP level was highly significant in Group I when compared with Group II and Group III. PMN level was highly significant in Group I when compared with Group III PMN level which was not significant. This study indicated that periodontitis may add the inflammation burden of the individual and may result in increased levels of CVD based on serum CRP levels. Thus, controlled prospective trials with large sample size should be carried out to know the true nature of the relationship if indeed one exists.

  12. JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I N Sartika

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA is the most common rheumatic condition in children. JRA is defined as persistent arthritis in 1 or more joints for at least 6 weeks, with the onset before age 16 years. The etiology of JRA is unknown. Antigen activated CD4+ T cell stimulate monocytes, macrophages, and synovial fibroblasts to produce the cytokines Interleukin-1 (IL-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-? and to secrete matrix metalloproteinases, which lead to chronic inflammation due to infiltration of inflammatory cell, angiogenesis, destruction of cartilage and bone with pannus formation. The 3 major subtypes of JRA are based on the symptoms at disease onset and are designated systemic onset, pauciarticular onset, and polyarticular onset. For all patients, the goals of therapy are to decrease chronic joint pain and suppress the inflammatory process. Poor prognostic have been observed in patients with polyarticular onset, rheumatoid factor, persistent morning stiffness, tenosynovitis, involvement of the small joints, rapid appearance of erosions, active late onset childhood, subcutaneous nodules, or antinuclear antibody.

  13. Pain and microcrystalline arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramonda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microcrystals are responsible for some of the most common and complex arthropathies which are often accompanied by intense, severe pain and inflammatory reactions. The main pathogens are crystals of monosodium urate (MSU, responsible for the gout, calcium pyrophosphate (CPP, which deposits also in various clinical forms of arthopathies, and basic calcium phosphate associated with osteoarthritis. In this context, the microcrystal arthritis is characterized by multiple, acute attacks followed by chronic pain, disability, impaired quality of life, and increased mortality. Given their chronic nature, they represent an ever more urgent public health problem. MSU and CPP crystals are also able to activate nociceptors. The pain in mycrocrystalline arthritis (MCA is an expression of the inflammatory process. In the course of these diseases there is an abundant release of inflammatory molecules, including prostaglandins 2 and kinins. Interleukin-1 represents the most important cytokine released during the crystal-induced inflammatory process. Therefore, clinically, pain is the most important component of MCA, which lead to functional impairment and disability in a large proportion of the population. It is fundamental to diagnose these diseases as early as possible, and to this aim, to identify appropriate and specific targets for a timely therapeutic intervention.

  14. Determination of the relative power density distribution in a heterogeneous reactor from the results of measurements of the reactivity effects and the neutron importance function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobrov, A. A.; Glushkov, E. S.; Zimin, A. A.; Kapitonova, A. V.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Nosov, V. I.; Petrushenko, R. P.; Smirnov, O. N.

    2012-01-01

    A method for experimental determination of the relative power density distribution in a heterogeneous reactor based on measurements of fuel reactivity effects and importance of neutrons from a californium source is proposed. The method was perfected on two critical assembly configurations at the NARCISS facility of the Kurchatov Institute, which simulated a small-size heterogeneous nuclear reactor. The neutron importance measurements were performed on subcritical and critical assemblies. It is shown that, along with traditionally used activation methods, the developed method can be applied to experimental studies of special features of the power density distribution in critical assemblies and reactors.

  15. Collagen-induced arthritis in nonhuman primates: multiple epitopes of type II collagen can induce autoimmune-mediated arthritis in outbred cynomolgus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimozuru, Y; Yamane, S; Fujimoto, K; Terao, K; Honjo, S; Nagai, Y; Sawitzke, A D; Terato, K

    1998-03-01

    To define which regions of the type II collagen (CII) molecule result in anticollagen antibody production and the subsequent development of autoantibodies in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) nonhuman primate model. Male and female cynomolgus monkeys (2-6 of each sex per group) were immunized with either chicken (Ch), human, or monkey (Mk) CII, or with cyanogen bromide (CB)-generated peptide fragments of ChCII emulsified in Freund's complete adjuvant. Monkeys were observed for the development of arthritis, and sera were collected and analyzed for anticollagen antibody specificity by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Overt arthritis developed in all groups of monkeys immunized with intact CII and with all major CB peptide fragments of ChCII except CB8. Onset and severity of arthritis correlated best with serum anti-MkCII antibody levels. The levels of IgG autoantibody to MkCII were a result of the cross-reactivity rate of anti-heterologous CII antibodies with MkCII, which was based on the genetic background of individual monkeys rather than on sex differences. CII from several species and disparate regions of the CII molecule were able to induce autoantibody-mediated arthritis in outbred cynomolgus monkeys. The strong anti-MkCII response suggests that epitope spreading or induction of broad-based CII cross-reactivity occurred in these animals. Autoantibody levels to MkCII were higher in CIA-susceptible monkeys than in resistant monkeys, despite comparable antibody levels in response to the various immunizations of CII. These results closely parallel the type of anticollagen responses found in sera from rheumatoid arthritis patients. Perhaps this can be accounted for by similar major histocompatibility complex heterogenicity associated with an outbred population, or maybe this is a primate-specific pattern of reactivity to CII.

  16. Effects of Biologic Agents in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Amyloidosis Treated with Hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kuroda, Takeshi; Tanabe, Naohito; Nozawa, Yukiko; Sato, Hiroe; Nakatsue, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Wada, Yoko; Saeki, Takako; Nakano, Masaaki; Narita, Ichiei

    2016-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to examine the safety and effects of therapy with biologics on the prognosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with reactive amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis on hemodialysis (HD). Methods Twenty-eight patients with an established diagnosis of reactive AA amyloidosis participated in the study. The survival was calculated from the date of HD initiation until the time of death, or up to end of June 2015 for the patients who were still alive. HD initiation was according ...

  17. Guidelines for the management of people with foot health problems related to rheumatoid arthritis: a survey of their use in podiatry practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Anita E; Graham, Andrea S; Davies, Samantha; Bowen, Catherine J

    2013-06-18

    In the last decade there has been a significant expansion in the body of knowledge on the effects of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on the foot and the management of these problems. Aligned with this has been the development of specialist clinical roles for podiatrists. However, despite being recommended by national guidelines, specialist podiatrists are scarce. In order to inform non-specialist podiatrists of the appropriate interventions for these foot problems, management guidelines have been developed and disseminated by a group of specialist podiatrists. The aim of this survey was to investigate the use of these guidelines in clinical practice. Following ethical approval an online questionnaire survey was carried out. The questions were formulated from a focus group and comprised fixed response and open response questions. The survey underwent cognitive testing with two podiatrists before being finalised. An inductive approach using thematic analysis was used with the qualitative data. 245 questionnaires were completed (128-non-specialist working in the private sector, 101 non-specialists working in the NHS and 16 specialist podiatrists). Overall, 97% of the non-specialists (n = 222) had not heard of the guidelines. The non-specialists identified other influences on their management of people with RA, such as their undergraduate training and professional body branch meetings. Three main themes emerged from the qualitative data: (i) the benefits of the foot health management guidelines, (ii) the barriers to the use of guidelines generally and (iii) the features of useable clinical guidelines. This study has revealed some crucial information about podiatrists' level of engagement with the foot health management guidelines and the use of guidelines in general. Specifically, the non-specialist podiatrists were less likely to use the foot health management guidelines than the specialist podiatrists. The positive aspects were that for the specialist practitioners

  18. Risks of malignancies related to tofacitinib and biological drugs in rheumatoid arthritis: Systematic review, meta-analysis, and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneiro, José Ramón; Souto, Alejandro; Gomez-Reino, Juan J

    2017-10-01

    To summarize and compare the risks of malignancies accompanying biologic DMARDs (b-DMARDs) and tofacitinib in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and long-term extension studies (LTEs). Articles in Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, and the Web of Science dated from 2000 to February 2015. Selection criteria were as follows: (1) focus on RCTs or LTEs in RA; (2) treatment with b-DMARDs or tofacitinib; (3) data on malignancies; and (4) a minimum follow-up of 12 weeks. Data included publication details, study design, risk of bias, number and types of malignancies, and patient characteristics and treatments. Of 113 articles and one updated report that were meta-analyzed, overall malignancies in RCTs showed odds ratio (95% confidence intervals) of 1.01 (0.72, 1.42) for all TNF antagonists, 1.12 (0.33, 3.81) for abatacept, 0.54 (0.20, 1.50) for rituximab, 0.70 (0.20, 2.41) for tocilizumab, and 2.39 (0.50, 11.5) for tofacitinib. Network meta-analysis of overall malignancies showed odds ratio (95% predictive intervals) of 1.68 (0.48-5.92) for infliximab, 0.79 (0.44-1.40) for etanercept, 0.93 (0.43-2.03) for adalimumab, 0.87 (0.28-2.75) for certolizumab, 0.87 (0.39-1.95) for golimumab, 1.04 (0.32-3.32) for abatacept, 0.58 (0.21-1.56) for rituximab, 0.60 (0.16-2.28) for tocilizumab, and 1.15 (0.24-5.47) for tofacitinib. Marginal numerical differences in the incidence rate of solid and hematological malignancies and non-melanoma skin cancers appeared in LTEs. In RCTs, treatment of RA with b-DMARDs or tofacitinib does not increase the risk for malignancies. Generalizability of the differences in the rate of specific malignancies encountered in LTEs requires continuous pharmacovigilance of real-world patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Radiological aspects of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schacherl, M.

    1985-01-01

    An introductory summary of the imaging-diagnosis will be given. The necessity of acquiring a catalogue of application to particular imaging methods is emphasized. Discussion of step by step diagnosis regarding rheumatologic questions is given on example of the hand. Technically insufficient radiographs and bad habits during diagnostic analysis are pointed out. Radiologic problems in differentiating arthritis/osteoarthrosis will be mentioned. The discussion of these points is followed by outlining the radiology of rheumatoid arthritis and the complexity of this disease. Introduction of a new stage classification. Finally twelve basic radiologic types of rheumatoid arthritis will be presented. (orig.) [de

  20. Effects of interpersonal violence-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on mother and child diurnal cortisol rhythm and cortisol reactivity to a laboratory stressor involving separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Maria I; Moser, Dominik A; Manini, Aurelia; Suardi, Francesca; Sancho-Rossignol, Ana; Torrisi, Raffaella; Rossier, Michel F; Ansermet, François; Dayer, Alexandre G; Rusconi-Serpa, Sandra; Schechter, Daniel S

    2017-04-01

    Women who have experienced interpersonal violence (IPV) are at a higher risk to develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), with dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and impaired social behavior. Previously, we had reported impaired maternal sensitivity and increased difficulty in identifying emotions (i.e. alexithymia) among IPV-PTSD mothers. One of the aims of the present study was to examine maternal IPV-PTSD salivary cortisol levels diurnally and reactive to their child's distress in relation to maternal alexithymia. Given that mother-child interaction during infancy and early childhood has important long-term consequences on the stress response system, toddlers' cortisol levels were assessed during the day and in response to a laboratory stressor. Mothers collected their own and their 12-48month-old toddlers' salivary samples at home three times: 30min after waking up, between 2-3pm and at bedtime. Moreover, mother-child dyads participated in a 120-min laboratory session, consisting of 3 phases: baseline, stress situation (involving mother-child separation and exposure to novelty) and a 60-min regulation phase. Compared to non-PTSD controls, IPV-PTSD mothers - but not their toddlers, had lower morning cortisol and higher bedtime cortisol levels. As expected, IPV-PTSD mothers and their children showed blunted cortisol reactivity to the laboratory stressor. Maternal cortisol levels were negatively correlated to difficulty in identifying emotions. Our data highlights PTSD-IPV-related alterations in the HPA system and its relevance to maternal behavior. Toddlers of IPV-PTSD mothers also showed an altered pattern of cortisol reactivity to stress that potentially may predispose them to later psychological disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Problems experienced by people with arthritis when using a computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Nancy A; Rogers, Joan C; Rubinstein, Elaine N; Allaire, Saralynn H; Wasko, Mary Chester

    2009-05-15

    To describe the prevalence of computer use problems experienced by a sample of people with arthritis, and to determine differences in the magnitude of these problems among people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA), and fibromyalgia (FM). Subjects were recruited from the Arthritis Network Disease Registry and asked to complete a survey, the Computer Problems Survey, which was developed for this study. Descriptive statistics were calculated for the total sample and the 3 diagnostic subgroups. Ordinal regressions were used to determine differences between the diagnostic subgroups with respect to each equipment item while controlling for confounding demographic variables. A total of 359 respondents completed a survey. Of the 315 respondents who reported using a computer, 84% reported a problem with computer use attributed to their underlying disorder, and approximately 77% reported some discomfort related to computer use. Equipment items most likely to account for problems and discomfort were the chair, keyboard, mouse, and monitor. Of the 3 subgroups, significantly more respondents with FM reported more severe discomfort, more problems, and greater limitations related to computer use than those with RA or OA for all 4 equipment items. Computer use is significantly affected by arthritis. This could limit the ability of a person with arthritis to participate in work and home activities. Further study is warranted to delineate disease-related limitations and develop interventions to reduce them.

  2. High levels of vitamin D in relation to reduced risk of schizophrenia with elevated C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dao-min; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Ai-guo; Chu, Zhao-xue; Wu, Qing; Li, Hui; Ge, Jin-fang; Dong, Yi; Zhu, Peng

    2015-08-30

    There is growing evidence on the novel role of vitamin D in reducing inflammation. This study aimed to examine the hypothesis that vitamin D is inversely associated with C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with schizophrenia, and high levels of vitamin D may be linked to reduced risk of schizophrenia with elevated CRP. Ninety-three patients with schizophrenia and 93 family-matched controls were recruited in this cross-sectional study. Plasma concentrations of CRP and 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] were measured using commercial kits. Information about demographic characteristics and clinic data were obtained by interviews or medical records. Mean levels of CRP and 25(OH)D were 43.3% higher and 26.7% lower for patients compared to controls, respectively. 25(OH)D were inversely associated with CRP in the patients, but not in the controls. The proportions of patients significantly increased with increasing quartiles of CRP, while significantly decreased with increasing quartiles of 25(OH)D. Among individuals with high CRP, participants with high 25(OH)D have significantly lower proportion (adjusted OR =0.217, 95% CI 0.063, 0.751) of schizophrenia compared to those with low 25(OH)D. The evidence suggested that high levels of vitamin D may be linked to reduced risk of schizophrenia with elevated CRP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Distinct contributions of reactive oxygen species in amygdala to bee venom-induced spontaneous pain-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yun-Fei; Neugebauer, Volker; Chen, Jun; Li, Zhen

    2016-04-21

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, play essential roles in physiological plasticity and are also involved in the pathogenesis of persistent pain. Roles of peripheral and spinal ROS in pain have been well established, but much less is known about ROS in the amygdala, a brain region that plays an important role in pain modulation. The present study explored the contribution of ROS in the amygdala to bee venom (BV)-induced pain behaviors. Our data show that the amygdala is activated following subcutaneous BV injection into the left hindpaw, which is reflected in the increased number of c-Fos positive cells in the central and basolateral amygdala nuclei in the right hemisphere. Stereotaxic administration of a ROS scavenger (tempol, 10mM), NADPH oxidase inhibitor (baicalein, 5mM) or lipoxygenase inhibitor (apocynin, 10mM) into the right amygdala attenuated the BV-induced spontaneous licking and lifting behaviors, but had no effect on BV-induced paw flinch reflexes. Our study provides further evidence for the involvement of the amygdala in nociceptive processing and pain behaviors, and that ROS in amygdala may be a potential target for treatment strategies to inhibit pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Asymptomatic atlantoaxial subluxation in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadali Nazarinia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study is conducted to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic cervical spine subluxation in rheumatoid arthritis patients by plain radiographs and its relation to demographic and clinical characteristics, disease activity measures and medications. 100 rheumatoid arthritis patients (18 male and 82 female were selected randomly, according to the American college of Rheumatology Criteria, who were under follow up in the rheumatology clinic. A complete history was taken, and physical examination has been done with focus on the cervical spine to determine their demographic data, disease duration, age of disease onset, drug history, swollen and tender joint counts, and ESR, Hb, CRP, RF levels. The disease activity of patients with rheumatoid arthritis was measured using the disease activity score 28. Radiographs of the cervical spine included lateral views taken in flexion, extension, neutral position of the neck and anterioposterior and odontoid projection view. Asymptomatic cervical spine subluxation was found in 17 of the 100 patients (17%. The prevalence of, anterior atlantoaxial subluxation, atlantoaxial impaction and subaxial subluxation was 10(10%, 5(5% and 6(6%, respectively. Posterior subluxation was not detected. The only characteristic that showed meaningful relationship with cervical spine subluxation was CRP (P=0.036. Our results showed that patients with RA, who have cervical spine subluxation cannot be distinguished on the basis of symptoms. Cervical spine involvement is common and may be asymptomatic, indicating routine cervical spine imaging is needed in patients with RA.

  5. The Association between Valuing Popularity and Relational Aggression: The Moderating Effects of Actual Popularity and Physiological Reactivity to Exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoulberg, Erin K.; Sijtsema, Jelle J.; Murray-Close, Dianna

    2011-01-01

    The association between having a reputation for valuing popularity and relational aggression was assessed in a sample of 126 female children and adolescents (mean age=12.43 years) at a 54-day residential summer camp for girls. Having a reputation for valuing popularity was positively related to relational aggression. This association was moderated…

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Osteoarthritis News Gout News Osteoporosis News Lupus News Fibromyalgia News Patient Corner Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Managing ... is made, what happens to your joints, what treatments are available, what is happening in the immune ...

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a Question Physician Corner Rheumatology Conference Rheumatology Rounds Case Rounds Radiology Rounds Pathophysiology of the Rheumatic Diseases Our Research Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Research Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education ...

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you learn more about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of RA is made, ... associated with RA. Learning more about your condition will allow you to take a more active role ...

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education Fund About Us Appointment Information Contact Us Our ... and what other conditions are associated with RA. Learning more about your condition will allow you to ...

  10. Rheumatoid arthritis and hand surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peretz, Anne Sofie Rosenborg; Madsen, Ole Rintek; Brogren, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis results in characteristic deformities of the hand. Medical treatment has undergone a remarkable development. However, not all patients achieve remission or tolerate the treatment. Patients who suffer from deformities and persistent synovitis may be candidates for hand surgery...

  11. Stay active and exercise - arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... around your spine and legs stronger. Ask your health care provider if you can use a stationary bike. Be aware that if you have arthritis of the hip or knee cap, biking can worsen your symptoms. If you are not ...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact Us Our Faculty Our Staff Rheumatology Specialty Centers You are here: Home / Patient Corner / Patient Webcasts / ... Ruffing has been a member of the Arthritis Center since 2000, currently serving as the Nurse Manager. ...

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education Fund About Us Appointment Information Contact Us Our Faculty Our Staff Rheumatology Specialty Centers You are here: Home / Patient ...

  14. Fetal Programming in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.D.O. de Steenwinkel (Florentien)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic, inflammatory, autoimmune disease mainly affecting synovial tissues, which can lead to severe morbidity and progressive joint destruction resulting in deformations and disability. Other important outcomes include

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take the place of any advice you ... Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  16. Distinguishing Pediatric Lyme Arthritis of the Hip from Transient Synovitis and Acute Bacterial Septic Arthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Aristides I; Anari, Jason B; Ramirez, Jose M; Sankar, Wudbhav N; Baldwin, Keith D

    2018-01-25

    Objective Lyme arthritis is an increasingly recognized clinical entity that often prompts orthopaedic evaluation in pediatric patients. While Lyme arthritis is most common in the knee, the clinical presentation of Lyme arthritis of the hip can be similar to both acute bacterial septic arthritis and transient synovitis. Accurately distinguishing these clinical entities is important since the definitive treatment of each is distinct. Because there is limited literature on monoarticular Lyme arthritis of the hip, the purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical and laboratory parameters associated with Lyme arthritis (LA) of the hip and compare them to septic arthritis (SA) and transient synovitis (TS).  Study design A systematic review of the literature was performed using the following search terms, including the variants and plural counterparts "hip" and "Lyme arthritis." A final database of individual patients was assembled from the published literature and direct author correspondence, when available. A previously published cohort of patients with hip transient synovitis or septic arthritis was used for comparative analysis. A comparative statistical analysis was performed to the assembled database to assess differences in laboratory and clinical variables between the three diagnoses.  Results Data on 88 patients diagnosed with Lyme arthritis of the hip was collected and consolidated from the 12 articles meeting inclusion criteria. The average age of patients presenting with Lyme arthritis was 7.5 years (± 3.5 years), the mean erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and the C-reactive protein (CRP) was 41 mm/hr and 3.9 mg/L, respectively. Peripheral white blood cell (WBC) count averaged 10.6 x 10 9 cells/L with the synovial WBC count averaging 55,888 cells/mm 3 . Compared to a previous cohort of patients with confirmed transient synovitis or septic arthritis, the 95% confidence interval for ESR was 21 - 33 mm

  17. Repeated administration of mazindol reduces spontaneous pain-related behaviors without modifying bone density and microarchitecture in a mouse model of complete Freund’s adjuvant-induced knee arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robledo-González LE

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available LE Robledo-González,1 A Martínez-Martínez,1 VM Vargas-Muñoz,1 RI Acosta-González,2 R Plancarte-Sánchez,3 M Anaya-Reyes,4 C Fernández del Valle-Laisequilla,5 JG Reyes-García,6 JM Jiménez-Andrade1 1Laboratorio de Farmacología, 2Departamento de Análisis Clínicos, Unidad Académica Multidisciplinaria Reynosa-Aztlán, UAT, Reynosa, Tamaulipas, Mexico; 3Departamento de Anestesiología, Terapia Intensiva y Clínica del Dolor, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, Mexico City, Mexico; 4Investigación Clínica y Farmacovigilancia, 5Investigación Clínica y Farmacovigilancia, Productos Medix, S.A. de C.V., Mexico City, Mexico; 6Sección de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigación, Escuela Superior de Medicina, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Mexico City, Mexico Background: The role of dopaminergic system in the development of rheumatoid arthritis-related pain, a major symptom in this disease, has not been explored. Therefore, the antinociceptive effect of mazindol, a dopamine uptake inhibitor, was evaluated in a model of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA-induced arthritis. Furthermore, as studies have shown that the dopaminergic system regulates bone metabolism, the effect of mazindol on bone mass and microarchitecture was determined.Methods: Adult ICR male mice received intra-articular injections of either CFA or saline into the right knee joint every week. Spontaneous pain-like behaviors (flinching and guarding and locomotor activity were assessed at day 26 post-first CFA, following which, a single intraperitoneally (i.p. administered dose of mazindol was given (1, 3 and 10 mg/kg. Then, the antinociceptive effect of a repeated administration of 3 mg/kg mazindol (daily, i.p.; day 15–day 26 was evaluated. Additionally, at day 26, the participation of D1-like, D2-like or opioid receptors in the antinociceptive effect of mazindol was evaluated. The effect of mazindol on bone density and microarchitecture was evaluated by micro

  18. Oxidative Stress Markers and C-Reactive Protein Are Related to Severity of Heart Failure in Patients with Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celina Wojciechowska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of study was to determine relationships between functional capacity (NYHA class, left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF, hemodynamic parameters, and biomarkers of redox state and inflammation in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. Methods. DCM patients (n=109, aged 45.97±10.82 years, NYHA class IIV, and LVEF 2.94±7.1% were studied. Controls comprised age-matched healthy volunteers (n=28. Echocardiography and right heart catheterization were performed. Serum activities of superoxide dismutase isoenzymes (MnSOD and CuZnSOD, concentrations of uric acid (UA, malondialdehyde (MDA, and C-reactive protein (hs-CRP were measured. Results. MnSOD, UA, hs-CRP, and MDA were significantly higher in DCM patients compared to controls. Except MDA concentration, above parameters were higher in patients in III-IV NYHA class or with lower LVEF. hsCRP correlated with of MnSOD (P<0.05 and CuZnSOD activity (P<0.01. Both isoenzymes positively correlated with mPAP and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (MnSOD, resp., P<0.01 and P<0.05 and CuZnSOD P<0.05; P<0.05. UA positively correlated with MnSOD (P<0.05, mPAP (P<0.05, and PVRI (P<0.05. The negative correlation between LVEF and UA (P<0.01 was detected. Conclusion. There are relationships among the severity of symptoms of heart failure, echocardiographic hemodynamic parameters, oxidative stress, and inflammatory activation. Increased MnSOD activity indicates the mitochondrial source of ROS in patients with advanced heart failure.

  19. Arthritis in America PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-03-07

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the March 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Many adults in the United States have arthritis. Learn how to reduce the pain of arthritis, as well as manage the condition.  Created: 3/7/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 3/7/2017.

  20. Citrullinated Chemokines in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    inflammation, thick- ness of the synovial lining layer, and vascularity (16). These observations support the hypothesis that citrulli- nated chemokines may...Gerszten RE, Garcia-Zepeda EA, Lim YC, Yoshida M, Ding HA, Gimbrone MA, et al. MCP-1 and IL-8 trigger firm adhesion of monocytes to vascular endothelium...arthritis: regulation of its production in synovial cells by interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor. Arthritis Rheum 1993;36:762–71. 35. Hatano Y

  1. Education for arthritis patients: a community pharmacy based pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkova, Valentina B

    2009-04-01

    There are different kinds of arthritis, widely spread among the population, that make them a clinical problem with social, psychological and economic burden. Different education programs have been developed in order to improve patients' disease management, medication compliance and from there patients' quality of life. To develop and implement a community pharmacy-based educational program for patients with arthritis. Improvements in pain, medication compliance, decrease in general practitioner's visits and hospitalizations are expected. Prospective, randomized, controlled trial. The sample consisted of 43 individuals, with different stages of arthritis (aged 15 - 71), attending pharmacies - intervention group; and 43 individuals - control group. A 4-month education was conducted on the following topics: what causes arthritis and what are the factors that can intensify it; pain management and physical activities; self-management and prevention; pharmacotherapy and possible adverse drug reactions. Patient's health-related quality of life was assessed in the beginning and at the end of the survey. PARAMETERS ASSESSED DURING THE FOUR STAGES OF THE PROGRAM WERE: frequency of severe pain, frequency of general practitioner's visits, frequency of urgent medical aid calls, compliance with therapy, satisfaction with pharmacy services. Improvement in patients' health-related quality of life was observed and also: decrease in the severity of patients' pain, decrease in the physician's visits, and increase in satisfaction overall care. Positive results from the educational approach in pharmacy conditions were demonstrated. These consequences have a potential to increase arthritis patient's quality of life.

  2. Physiotherapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented. PMID:15266230

  3. Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Chang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been implicated as one of the most important extrinsic risk factors for its development and severity. Recent developments have shed light on the pathophysiology of RA in smokers, including oxidative stress, inflammation, autoantibody formation and epigenetic changes. The association of smoking and the development of RA have been demonstrated through epidemiologic studies, as well as through in vivo and animal models of RA. With increased use of biological agents in addition to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs, there has been interest in how smoking affects drug response in RA treatment. Recent evidence suggests the response and drug survival in people treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF therapy is poorer in heavy smokers, and possible immunological mechanisms for this effect are presented in the current paper.

  4. Sacroiliac joint involvement in classical or definite rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, A. de; Graudal, H.

    1980-01-01

    In 188 patients with rheumatoid arthritis 564 radiologic examinations of the sacroiliac joints were performed. Severe blurring of the joint space or ankylosis were uncommon. The involvement was related to an age > 40 years at the onset, high values of the ESR and involvement of most joint groups in the limbs and cervical spine. Sex, presence or high titres of the rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibodies were unrelated to lesions of the sacroiliac joints. A relation to the severity of rheumatoid arthritis rather than to the immunologic condition is suggested. (Auth.)

  5. [Management of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiehn, C; Krüger, K

    2016-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is the most common inflammatory rheumatic disease. Due to the destruction of joints in the course of the disease it leads to significant morbidity in affected patients. The quality of life and even life expectancy can be severely impaired. Early diagnosis and early initiation of treatment is a decisive step towards a more benign course of the disease. New classification criteria have been published in order to help in early diagnosis. Methods of imaging, such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging help in the detection of synovitis, which is the major pathomorphological manifestation of arthritis and should be identified without any doubt. Treatment follows the rule of treat to target with the aim of achieving remission or if this is not realistic, at least the lowest possible level of disease activity. The first and perhaps most important step in therapy is the initiation of methotrexate or if contraindications are present, another disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) as soon as the diagnosis is made. Initial addition of glucocorticoids is recommended, which should be reduced in dose and terminated as soon as possible. Furthermore, either the combination of different DMARDs or the start of biologic DMARDs, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) inhibitors or second generation biologic DMARDs is possible as a treatment option. The treatment follows the rule of shared decision-making and is the standard to treat comorbidities, the use an interdisciplinary approach and to treat functional deficits by rehabilitation measures, such as physiotherapy.

  6. The association between valuing popularity and relational aggression : The moderating effects of actual popularity and physiological reactivity to exclusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shoulberg, Erin K.; Sijtsema, Jelle J.; Murray-Close, Dianna

    The association between having a reputation for valuing popularity and relational aggression was assessed in a sample of 126 female children and adolescents (mean age = 12.43 years) at a 54-day residential summer camp for girls. Having a reputation for valuing popularity was positively related to

  7. Evidence for submarine landslides and continental slope erosion related to fault reactivation during the last glaciation offshore eastern Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Ange, F.; Campbell, C.; MacKillop, K.; Mosher, D. C.; Piper, D. J.; Roger, J.

    2012-12-01

    Many studies have proposed that reactivation of dormant faults during deglaciation is a source of neotectonic activity in glaciated regions, but few have demonstrated the relationship to submarine landslides. In this study, seabed morphology and shallow geology of the outer continental margin adjacent to the Charlie Gibbs Fracture Zone off Newfoundland, Canada was investigated for evidence of this relationship. The glacial history and morphology of the margin suggest that the entire continental shelf in the area, coincident with major continental crustal lineaments, was ice-covered during the Last glacial cycle, and transverse troughs delineate the paleo-icestream drainage patterns. A recent investigation of Notre Dame Trough revealed the existence of large sediment failures on the shelf. The current study investigates complex seafloor erosion and widespread mass transport deposition (MTD) on the continental slope seaward of Notre Dame Trough, using recently-acquired high resolution seismic reflection data and piston cores. The new data reveal that a trough mouth fan (TMF) is present on the slope seaward of Notre Dame Trough. The Notre Dame TMF is characterized by a succession of stacked debris flows, but does not show a lobate shape in plan view like other classic TMFs. Instead, the Notre Dame TMF has abruptly-truncated margins suggesting post-depositional failure and erosion of the fan deposits. Seismic reflection data show that the locations of the failures along the TMF margin are coincident with a set of shallow faults; however the current dataset does not image the deeper portion of the faults. On the upper slope immediately south of the TMF, a narrow and deeply incised canyon is located along-trend with the Notre Dame Trough. The location of this canyon appears to be controlled by a fault. Downslope from this canyon, along the southern margin of the TMF, a 25 km wide, flat-floored, U-shaped valley was eroded into a succession of stacked MTD-filled channels

  8. Early Subchondral Bone Loss at Arthritis Onset Predicted Late Arthritis Severity in a Rat Arthritis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courbon, Guillaume; Cleret, Damien; Linossier, Marie-Thérèse; Vico, Laurence; Marotte, Hubert

    2017-06-01

    Synovitis is usually observed before loss of articular function in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition to the synovium and according to the "Inside-Outside" theory, bone compartment is also involved in RA pathogenesis. Then, we investigated time dependent articular bone loss and prediction of early bone loss to late arthritis severity on the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model. Lewis female rats were longitudinally monitored from arthritis induction (day 0), with early (day 10) and late (day 17) steps. Trabecular and cortical microarchitecture parameters of four ankle bones were assessed by microcomputed tomography. Gene expression was determined at sacrifice. Arthritis occurred at day 10 in AIA rats. At this time, bone erosions were detected on four ankle bones, with cortical porosity increase (+67%) and trabecular alterations including bone volume fraction (BV/TV: -13%), and trabecular thickness decrease. Navicular bone assessment was the most reproducible and sensitive. Furthermore, strong correlations were observed between bone alterations at day 10 and arthritis severity or bone loss at day 17, including predictability of day 10 BV/TV to day 17 articular index (R 2  = 0.76). Finally, gene expression at day 17 confirmed massive osteoclast activation and interestingly provided insights on strong activation of bone formation inhibitor markers at the joint level. In rat AIA, bone loss was already observed at synovitis onset and was predicted late arthritis severity. Our results reinforced the key role of subchondral bone in arthritis pathogenesis, in favour to the "Inside-Outside" theory. Mechanisms of bone loss in rat AIA involved resorption activation and formation inhibition changes. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1318-1325, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Treatment and Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Treatment and Causes Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents How Is Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated? Doctors have many ways to treat this ...

  10. Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIH Research Matters January 13, 2014 Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery An international research team identified 42 new ... Edition Distracted Driving Raises Crash Risk Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery Oxytocin Affects Facial Recognition Connect with Us ...

  11. IJMBR ARTHRITIS edited 4.3.1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJP

    2015-10-28

    Oct 28, 2015 ... Findings: Septic arthritis in the index patient developed insidiously and was diagnosed after ... mellitus, malignancy, and rheumatoid arthritis. Others include ... intravenous drug use, anemia, hemodialysis and the extremes of ...

  12. Collagen-induced arthritis in C57BL/6 mice is associated with a robust and sustained T-cell response to type II collagen

    OpenAIRE

    Inglis, Julia J; Criado, Gabriel; Medghalchi, Mino; Andrews, Melanie; Sandison, Ann; Feldmann, Marc; Williams, Richard O

    2007-01-01

    Many genetically modified mouse strains are now available on a C57BL/6 (H-2b) background, a strain that is relatively resistant to collagen-induced arthritis. To facilitate the molecular understanding of autoimmune arthritis, we characterised the induction of arthritis in C57BL/6 mice and then validated the disease as a relevant pre-clinical model for rheumatoid arthritis. C57BL/6 mice were immunised with type II collagen using different protocols, and arthritis incidence, severity, and respo...

  13. Use and perceived relevance of health-related Internet sites and online contact with peers among young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pelt, P.A.; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Kruize, A.A.; Huisman, J.; Dolhain, R.J.E.M.; Wulffraat, N.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of use and relevance of health-related Internet (HRI) sites and online peer support groups and their association with demographic, disease-related and psychosocial variables in young people with JIA. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, 176 young people (10-27

  14. Case report patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Váňová, Tereza

    2012-01-01

    Title of bachelors thesis: Case report patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis Summary: The work is focused on diseases rheumatoid arthritis and its physiotherapy care. It consists of two parts. Part of the general anatomy of the joint contains a general, deals with the disease rheumatoid arthritis, its diagnosis, treatment and comprehensive rehabilitation treatment. Part has its own special case report physiotherapy sessions on this topic. Key words: rheumatoid arthritis, comprehensive ...

  15. Predictive Factors for Differentiating Between Septic Arthritis and Lyme Disease of the Knee in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Keith D; Brusalis, Christopher M; Nduaguba, Afamefuna M; Sankar, Wudbhav N

    2016-05-04

    Differentiating between septic arthritis and Lyme disease of the knee in endemic areas can be challenging and has major implications for patient management. The purpose of this study was to identify a prediction rule to differentiate septic arthritis from Lyme disease in children presenting with knee pain and effusion. We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients younger than 18 years of age with knee effusions who underwent arthrocentesis at our institution from 2005 to 2013. Patients with either septic arthritis (positive joint fluid culture or synovial white blood-cell count of >60,000 white blood cells/mm(3) with negative Lyme titer) or Lyme disease (positive Lyme immunoglobulin G on Western blot analysis) were included. To avoid misclassification bias, undiagnosed knee effusions and joints with both a positive culture and positive Lyme titers were excluded. Historical, clinical, and laboratory data were compared between groups to identify variables for comparison. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent predictive variables. One hundred and eighty-nine patients were studied: 23 with culture-positive septic arthritis, 26 with culture-negative septic arthritis, and 140 with Lyme disease. Multivariate binary logistic regression identified pain with short arc motion, history of fever reported by the patient or a family member, C-reactive protein of >4 mg/L, and age younger than 2 years as independent predictive factors for septic arthritis. A simpler model was developed that showed that the risk of septic arthritis with none of these factors was 2%, with 1 of these factors was 18%, with 2 of these factors was 45%, with 3 of these factors was 84%, or with all 4 of these factors was 100%. Although septic arthritis of the knee and Lyme monoarthritis share common features that can make them difficult to distinguish clinically, the presence of pain with short arc motion, C-reactive protein of >4.0 mg/L, patient-reported history of

  16. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in inflammatory arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Eshed, Iris; Althoff, Christian E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) is a relatively new technique that can enable assessment of the overall inflammatory status of people with arthritis, but standards for image acquisition, definitions of key pathologies, and a quantification system are required. Our aim...... was to perform a systematic literature review (SLR) and to develop consensus definitions of key pathologies, anatomical locations for assessment, a set of MRI sequences and imaging planes for the different body regions, and a preliminary scoring system for WB-MRI in inflammatory arthritis. Methods: An SLR...

  17. Illness perceptions and psychological distress associated with physical health-related quality of life in primary Sjögren's syndrome compared to systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsis, Konstantinos; Voulgari, Paraskevi V; Tsifetaki, Niki; Drosos, Alexandros A; Carvalho, André F; Hyphantis, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Notwithstanding that psychological distress and illness perceptions are important in determining outcomes in rheumatic diseases, few studies investigated these variables in primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). We aimed to compare illness perceptions and psychological distress in patients with pSS, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to test whether their associations with health-related quality of life (HRQoL) are similar in these groups of patients. In 57 patients with pSS, 75 with SLE and 199 with RA, we administered the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), the Symptom Check-List and the Brief-Illness Perception Questionnaire to assess psychological variables and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument, Short-Form to assess HRQoL. Hierarchical regression models determined the associations of psychological variables with HRQoL after adjusting for demographic variables and clinical parameters. The prevalence of clinically significant depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 ≥ 10) was 24.6 % in pSS, 29.3 % in SLE and 25.1 % in RA. Patients with pSS showed little understanding of their disease (comprehensibility) and attributed more symptoms to their illness (identity) compared with the other groups of patients. Illness perceptions and depressive symptoms were independently associated with physical HRQoL in a similar pattern in all three groups. In pSS, however, the patients' worries about the consequences of their illness was a stronger correlate of physical HRQoL than pain. These findings indicate that psychological factors are important correlates of HRQoL in these disease groups and encourage the design of psycho-educational therapies targeting disease-related cognitions in pSS in an attempt to improve patient's physical HRQoL.

  18. Exercise therapy in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takken, T.; van Brussel, M.; Engelbert, R. H. H.; van der Net, J.; Kuis, W.; Helders, P. J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Exercise therapy is considered an important component of the treatment of arthritis. The efficacy of exercise therapy has been reviewed in adults with rheumatoid arthritis but not in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). To assess the effects of exercise therapy on functional ability,

  19. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for human...

  20. Collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bevaart, Lisette; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J.; Tak, Paul P.

    2010-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice is an animal model for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and can be induced in DBA/1 and C57BL/6 mice using different protocols. The CIA model can be used to unravel mechanisms involved in the development of arthritis and is frequently used to study the effect of new

  1. Aggressive Periodontitis and Chronic Arthritis: Blood Mononuclear Cell Gene Expression and Plasma Protein Levels of Cytokines and Cytokine Inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Korsbæk Connor; Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    -inflammatory cytokines and cytokine receptors in patients with periodontitis and patients with arthritis representing two examples of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as periodontitis and arthritis. To identify possible disease-specific characteristics of subjects with periodontitis relative to subjects with chronic......TNF-RI plasma levels in patients with LAgP and RA. CONCLUSIONS: The study demonstrated only a few changes in the PBMC expression of various cytokine and cytokine inhibitor genes in aggressive periodontitis and chronic arthritis compared to controls. There were a few similarities among disease groups...... inflammation in general, patients with arthritis (juvenile idiopathic arthritis [JIA] and rheumatoid arthritis [RA]) were included. METHODS: The study population consisted of white adults periodontitis (LAgP; n = 18), generalized aggressive periodontitis...

  2. Late onset rheumatoid arthritis an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexhepi, Sylejman; Rexhepi, Mjellma; Sahatçiu-Meka, Vjollca; Rexhepi, Blerta; Bahtiri, Elton; Mahmutaj, Vigan

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may have an onset at older age. The onset of the disease at the age of 60 and over is called late-onset rheumatoid arthritis (LORA). The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical, laboratory, radiological, and treatment characteristics of patients with LORA compared to those with early-onset RA (EaORA), provided that all the patients had an approximately equal duration of the disease. This is an observational single-center study, which involved 120 patients with an established diagnosis of RA, of which 60 patients had LORA, and 60 patients EaORA. The disease activity, measured by the Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28-ESR), was significantly higher in the LORA group compared to the EaORA group (p0.05), while the number of patients positive for anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) was signifi cantly greater in the EaORA group (p<0.05). The values of C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were significantly higher in the LORA than in the EaORA group. Hemoglobin levels were lower in the LORA group (11.96±1.64 g/dL) than in the EaORA group (12.18±1.56 g/dL). The most used disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) were methotrexate and sulfasalazine, while biological drugs were not used. In conclusion, based on the results of our study, LORA has some features that distinguish it from EaORA, such as higher disease activity, more frequent involvement of large joints, and more pronounced structural damage. This should be taken in account in clinical practice, especially regarding treatment choices.

  3. Psoriatic arthritis: imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lubrano

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Imaging techniques to assess psoriatic arthritis (PsA include radiography, ultrasonography (US, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, computed tomography (CT and bone scintigraphy. The radiographic hallmark of PsA is the combination of destructive changes (joint erosions, tuft resorption, osteolysis with bone proliferation (including periarticular and shaft periostitis, ankylosis, spur formation and non-marginal syndesmophytes. US has an increasing important role in the evaluation of PsA. In fact, power Doppler US is useful mainly for its ability to assess musculoskeletal (joints, tendons, entheses and cutaneous (skin and nails involvement, to monitor efficacy of therapy and to guide steroid injections at the level of inflamed joints, tendon sheaths and entheses. MRI allows direct visualization of inflammation in peripheral and axial joints, and peripheral and axial entheses, and has dramatically improved the possibilities for early diagnosis and objective monitoring of the disease process in PsA. MRI has allowed explaining the relationships among enthesitis, synovitis and osteitis in PsA, supporting a SpA pattern of inflammation where enthesitis is the primary target of inflammation. CT has little role in assessment of peripheral joints, but it may be useful in assessing elements of spine disease. CT accuracy is similar to MRI in assessment of erosions in sacroiliac joint involvement, but CT is not as effective in detecting synovial inflammation. Bone scintigraphy lacks specificity and is now supplanted with US and MRI techniques.

  4. Prostaglandins and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Fattahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, autoimmune, and complex inflammatory disease leading to bone and cartilage destruction, whose cause remains obscure. Accumulation of genetic susceptibility, environmental factors, and dysregulated immune responses are necessary for mounting this self-reacting disease. Inflamed joints are infiltrated by a heterogeneous population of cellular and soluble mediators of the immune system, such as T cells, B cells, macrophages, cytokines, and prostaglandins (PGs. Prostaglandins are lipid inflammatory mediators derived from the arachidonic acid by multienzymatic reactions. They both sustain homeostatic mechanisms and mediate pathogenic processes, including the inflammatory reaction. They play both beneficial and harmful roles during inflammation, according to their site of action and the etiology of the inflammatory response. With respect to the role of PGs in inflammation, they can be effective mediators in the pathophysiology of RA. Thus the use of agonists or antagonists of PG receptors may be considered as a new therapeutic protocol in RA. In this paper, we try to elucidate the role of PGs in the immunopathology of RA.

  5. Leishmaniasis in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cutolo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis represents a complex of diseases with an important clinical and epidemiological diversity. Visceral leishmaniasis is of higher priority than cutaneous leishmaniasis as it is a fatal disease in the absence of treatment. The clinical spectrum of leishmaniasis and control of the infection are influenced by the parasite-host relationship. The role of cellular immune responses of the Th1 type in the protection against disease in experimental and human leishmaniasis is well established. TNF-α has been implicated in cytokine-induced macrophage activation and tissue granuloma formation, two activities linked to control of intracellular visceral infection caused by Leishmania donovani. Anti- tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α strategies have had a marked and substantial impact in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, however the clinical use of TNF-α antagonists has been accompanied by increased reporting of infections. Here we report the first case of visceral leishmaniasis in a patient treated for a long period of time with human anti TNF-α monoclonal antibody, adalimumab. Due to the low incidence rate of Mediterranean visceral leishmaniasis, a systematic screening for leishmaniasis in all patients treated with biologics may be not recommended. However, for those patients living at high risk of leishmaniasis exposure, a periodical serological monitoring should be performed during therapy with anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies.

  6. The Relations of Temperament Reactivity and Effortful Control to Children’s Adjustment Problems in China and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qing; Lengua, Liliana J.; Wang, Yun

    2014-01-01

    The relations of parents’ and teachers’ reports of temperament anger-irritability, positive emotionality, and effortful control (attention focusing and inhibitory control) to children’s externalizing and internalizing problems were examined in Chinese (N = 382) and U.S. (N = 322) samples of school-age children. Results suggested that in both cultures, low effortful control and high anger–irritability were associated with high externalizing problems, although the relations were stronger in the Chinese sample than in the U.S. sample. Low positive emotionality was associated with high internalizing problems in both cultures. However, high positive emotionality was associated with noncomorbid externalizing problems (teachers’ reports) in the Chinese sample but not in the U.S. sample. These findings suggest that there are considerable cross-cultural similarities in the temperament-adjustment associations, although some cross-cultural differences might exist. Implications of the findings for the detection and intervention of adjustment problems in Chinese children are discussed. PMID:19413428

  7. Collagen-Induced Arthritis: A model for Murine Autoimmune Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Pietrosimone, K. M.; Jin, M.; Poston, B.; Liu, P.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a common autoimmune animal model used to study rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The development of CIA involves infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils into the joint, as well as T and B cell responses to type II collagen. In murine CIA, genetically susceptible mice (DBA/1J) are immunized with a type II bovine collagen emulsion in complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA), and receive a boost of type II bovine collagen in incomplete Freund’s adjuvant (IFA) 21 days aft...

  8. The relation between bystanders' behavioral reactivity to distress and later helping behavior during a violent conflict in virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortensius, Ruud; Neyret, Solène; Slater, Mel; de Gelder, Beatrice

    2018-01-01

    The occurrence of helping behavior is thought to be automatically triggered by reflexive reactions and promoted by intuitive decisions. Here, we studied whether reflexive reactions to an emergency situation are associated with later helping behavior in a different situation, a violent conflict. First, 29 male supporters of F.C. Barcelona performed a cued-reaction time task with a low and high cognitive load manipulation, to tap into reflexive and reflective processes respectively, during the observation of an emergency. Next, participants entered a bar in Virtual Reality and had a conversation with a virtual fellow supporter. During this conversation, a virtual Real Madrid supporter entered and started an aggressive argument with the fellow supporter that escalated into a physical fight. Verbal and physical interventions of the participant served as measures of helping behavior. Results showed that faster responses to an emergency situation during low, but not during high cognitive load, were associated with more interventions during the violent conflict. However, a tendency to describe the decision to act during the violent conflict as intuitive and reflex-like was related to more interventions. Further analyses revealed that a disposition to experience sympathy, other-oriented feelings during distressful situations, was related to self-reported intuitive decision-making, a reduced distance to the perpetrator, and higher in the intervening participants. Taken together, these results shed new light on helping behavior and are consistent with the notion of a motivational system in which the act of helping is dependent on a complex interplay between intuitive, reflexive and deliberate, reflective processes.

  9. The relation between bystanders’ behavioral reactivity to distress and later helping behavior during a violent conflict in virtual reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyret, Solène; Slater, Mel; de Gelder, Beatrice

    2018-01-01

    The occurrence of helping behavior is thought to be automatically triggered by reflexive reactions and promoted by intuitive decisions. Here, we studied whether reflexive reactions to an emergency situation are associated with later helping behavior in a different situation, a violent conflict. First, 29 male supporters of F.C. Barcelona performed a cued-reaction time task with a low and high cognitive load manipulation, to tap into reflexive and reflective processes respectively, during the observation of an emergency. Next, participants entered a bar in Virtual Reality and had a conversation with a virtual fellow supporter. During this conversation, a virtual Real Madrid supporter entered and started an aggressive argument with the fellow supporter that escalated into a physical fight. Verbal and physical interventions of the participant served as measures of helping behavior. Results showed that faster responses to an emergency situation during low, but not during high cognitive load, were associated with more interventions during the violent conflict. However, a tendency to describe the decision to act during the violent conflict as intuitive and reflex-like was related to more interventions. Further analyses revealed that a disposition to experience sympathy, other-oriented feelings during distressful situations, was related to self-reported intuitive decision-making, a reduced distance to the perpetrator, and higher in the intervening participants. Taken together, these results shed new light on helping behavior and are consistent with the notion of a motivational system in which the act of helping is dependent on a complex interplay between intuitive, reflexive and deliberate, reflective processes. PMID:29672638

  10. Towards adoptive cellular therapy of chronic autoimmune arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flierman, Roelof

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a relatively common disease that is characterized by chronic inflammation of joints. The research as described in this thesis focused on the question of whether adoptive cellular therapy is effective in a mouse model of RA. The most generally known type of adoptive

  11. Bacillus coagulans: a viable adjunct therapy for relieving symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis according to a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, David R; Eichas, Katy; Holmes, Judith

    2010-01-12

    Lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB) probiotics demonstrate immunomodulating and anti-inflammatory effects and the ability to lessen the symptoms of arthritis in both animals and humans. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-design, clinical pilot trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of the LAB probiotic preparation, Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086, on symptoms and measures of functional capacity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in combination with pharmacological anti-arthritic medications. Forty-five adult men and women with symptoms of RA were randomly assigned to receive Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 or placebo once a day in a double-blind fashion for 60 days in addition to their standard anti-arthritic medications. Arthritis activity was evaluated by clinical examination, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI), and laboratory tests for erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Subjects who received Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 experienced borderline statistically significant improvement in the Patient Pain Assessment score (P = .052) and statistically significant improvement in Pain Scale (P = .046) vs placebo. Compared with placebo, Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 treatment resulted in greater improvement in patient global assessment and self-assessed disability; reduction in CRP; as well as the ability to walk 2 miles, reach, and participate in daily activities. There were no treatment-related adverse events reported throughout this study. Results of this pilot study suggest that adjunctive treatment with Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 LAB probiotic appeared to be a safe and effective for patients suffering from RA. Because of the low study population size, larger trials are needed to verify these results. ACTRN12609000435280.

  12. Bacillus coagulans: a viable adjunct therapy for relieving symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis according to a randomized, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eichas Katy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB probiotics demonstrate immunomodulating and anti-inflammatory effects and the ability to lessen the symptoms of arthritis in both animals and humans. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-design, clinical pilot trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of the LAB probiotic preparation, Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086, on symptoms and measures of functional capacity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA in combination with pharmacological anti-arthritic medications. Methods Forty-five adult men and women with symptoms of RA were randomly assigned to receive Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 or placebo once a day in a double-blind fashion for 60 days in addition to their standard anti-arthritic medications. Arthritis activity was evaluated by clinical examination, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR criteria, the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI, and laboratory tests for erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR and C-reactive protein (CRP. Results Subjects who received Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 experienced borderline statistically significant improvement in the Patient Pain Assessment score (P = .052 and statistically significant improvement in Pain Scale (P = .046 vs placebo. Compared with placebo, Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 treatment resulted in greater improvement in patient global assessment and self-assessed disability; reduction in CRP; as well as the ability to walk 2 miles, reach, and participate in daily activities. There were no treatment-related adverse events reported throughout this study. Conclusions Results of this pilot study suggest that adjunctive treatment with Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 LAB probiotic appeared to be a safe and effective for patients suffering from RA. Because of the low study population size, larger trials are needed to verify these results. Trial registration ACTRN12609000435280

  13. Bacillus coagulans: a viable adjunct therapy for relieving symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis according to a randomized, controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB) probiotics demonstrate immunomodulating and anti-inflammatory effects and the ability to lessen the symptoms of arthritis in both animals and humans. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-design, clinical pilot trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of the LAB probiotic preparation, Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086, on symptoms and measures of functional capacity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in combination with pharmacological anti-arthritic medications. Methods Forty-five adult men and women with symptoms of RA were randomly assigned to receive Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 or placebo once a day in a double-blind fashion for 60 days in addition to their standard anti-arthritic medications. Arthritis activity was evaluated by clinical examination, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI), and laboratory tests for erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Results Subjects who received Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 experienced borderline statistically significant improvement in the Patient Pain Assessment score (P = .052) and statistically significant improvement in Pain Scale (P = .046) vs placebo. Compared with placebo, Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 treatment resulted in greater improvement in patient global assessment and self-assessed disability; reduction in CRP; as well as the ability to walk 2 miles, reach, and participate in daily activities. There were no treatment-related adverse events reported throughout this study. Conclusions Results of this pilot study suggest that adjunctive treatment with Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 LAB probiotic appeared to be a safe and effective for patients suffering from RA. Because of the low study population size, larger trials are needed to verify these results. Trial registration ACTRN12609000435280 PMID:20067641

  14. Characterizing the potential for fault reactivation related to CO2 injection through subsurface structural mapping and stress field analysis, Wellington Field, Sumner County, KS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, D.; Bidgoli, T.; Taylor, M. H.

    2015-12-01

    South-central Kansas has experienced an unprecedented increase in seismic activity since 2013. The spatial and temporal relationship of the seismicity with brine disposal operations has renewed interest in the role of fluids in fault reactivation. This study focuses on determining the suitability of CO2 injection into a Cambro-Ordovician reservoir for long-term storage and a Mississippian reservoir for enhanced oil recovery in Wellington Field, Sumner County, Kansas. Our approach for determining the potential for induced seismicity has been to (1) map subsurface faults and estimate in-situ stresses, (2) perform slip and dilation tendency analysis to identify optimally-oriented faults relative to the estimated stress field, and (3) monitor surface deformation through cGPS data and InSAR imaging. Through the use of 3D seismic reflection data, 60 near vertical, NNE-striking faults have been identified. The faults range in length from 140-410 m and have vertical separations of 3-32m. A number of faults appear to be restricted to shallow intervals, while others clearly cut the top basement reflector. Drilling-induced tensile fractures (N=78) identified from image logs and inversion of earthquake focal mechanism solutions (N=54) are consistent with the maximum horizontal stress (SHmax) oriented ~E-W. Both strike-slip and normal-slip fault plane solutions for earthquakes near the study area suggest that SHmax and Sv may be similar in magnitude. Estimates of stress magnitudes using step rate tests (Shmin = 2666 psi), density logs (Sv = 5308 psi), and calculations from wells with drilling induced tensile fractures (SHmax = 4547-6655 psi) are determined at the gauge depth of 4869ft. Preliminary slip and dilation tendency analysis indicates that faults striking 0°-20° are stable, whereas faults striking 26°-44° may have a moderate risk for reactivation with increasing pore-fluid pressure.

  15. C-reactive protein as an available biomarker determining mental component of health-related quality of life among individuals with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabour, Hadis; Latifi, Sahar; Soltani, Zahra; Shakeri, Hania; Norouzi Javidan, Abbas; Ghodsi, Seyed-Mohammad; Hadian, Mohammad Reza; Emami Razavi, Seyed-Hassan

    2017-05-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) has been shown to correlate with health-related quality of life (HRQL) in some chronic medical conditions. However, these associations have not yet described in spinal cord injury (SCI). In this study, we tried to identify biomarkers associated with HRQL in SCI. Cross-sectional. Tertiary rehabilitation center. Referred patients to Brain and Spinal Cord Injury Research Center between November 2010 and April 2013. Blood samples were taken to measure circulatory CRP, leptin, adiponectin, ferritin, parathyroid hormone, calcitonin, thyroid hormones, fasting plasma glucose and lipid profile. All the analyses were performed with adjustment for injury-related confounders (level of injury, injury completeness and time since injury) and demographic characteristics. HRQL was measured with Short Form health survey (SF-36). The initial inverse association between CRP and total score of SF-36 (P: 0.006, r = -0.28) was lost after adjustment for confounders. However, the negative correlation between CRP and Mental Component Summary (MCS) remained significant (P: 0.0005, r = -0.38). Leptin level was inversely correlated with Physical Component Summary (PCS) (P: 0.02, r = -0.30). Although CRP and leptin levels were not related with total scores of SF-36 questionnaire, CRP can be more useful in determining mental component of HRQL whereas leptin can be a determinant of physical component. The combined consideration of these two biomarkers may help to predict HRQL in individuals with SCI.

  16. Functional impact of treatment with ranibizumab under a reactive strategy in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Pinazo, R; Dolz-Marco, R; Andreu-Fenoll, M; Farrés, J; Monclús, L

    2017-03-01

    To analyse the functional recovery using a pro re nata (PRN) dosing strategy with intravitreal injections of ranibizumab for patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). An observational, retrospective, single-centre study, was conducted on patients with neovascular AMD managed with a PRN strategy with ranibizumab, and were followed-up for a minimum of 18 months. Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected from medical records. The percentage of visual acuity (VA) recovered after losing 5 or more letters was calculated taking into account the previous visit, as well as considering the best VA recorded prior to the retreament. The analysis included 128 patients. The mean (SD) follow-up period was 18.9 (2.3) months. The mean (SD) elapsed days between onset of symptoms and diagnosis, and between prescription and administration of treatment was 50.2 (57.4) and 10.9 (16.0), respectively. Only 108 patients were prescribed ranibizumab after losing 5 or more letters of VA. The mean (SD) VA recovery compared to the previous VA was 70.3% (114.4). On the other hand, the mean (SD) VA recovery when considering the best VA registered before the retreatment was 43.5% (112.9), with 59.4% of re-treatments having a VA recovery below 75%, and with 11.7% not presenting any VA recovery. A PRN dosing strategy with intravitreal ranibizumab for neovascular AMD may not be efficient in preserving and/or recovering VA in the long-term, due to a cumulative irreversible VA loss. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Kidney involvement in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lazzarini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA is a widespread disease and its renal involvement, relatively common, is clinically significant because worsens course and mortality of the primary disease. There is still no agreement on the prevalence of renal disorders in RA: data analysis originates from different sources, as death certificates, autopsies, clinical and laboratory findings and kidney biopsies, each with its limitations. Histoimmunological studies on bioptical specimens of patients with RA and kidney damage, led to clarify prevalent pathologies. In order of frequency: glomerulonephritis and amyloidosis (60-65% and 20-30% respectively, followed by acute or chronic interstitial nephritis. Kidney injury during RA includes secondary renal amyloidosis, nephrotoxic effects of antirheumatic drugs and nephropathies as extra-articular manifestations (rheumatoid nephropathy. Amyloidosis affects survival, increases morbidity and is the main cause of end stage renal disease in patients with RA and nephropathy. Strong association between RA activity and amyloidosis needs the use of immunosuppressive and combined therapies, to prevent this complication and reduce risk of dialysis. Long-lasting and combined RA pharmacotherapy involves various renal side effects. In this review we describe NSAIDs and DMARDs (Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs nephrotoxicity, particularly by gold compounds, D-penicillamine, cyclosporine A and methotrexate. Rare cases of IgA glomerulonephritis during immunomodulating therapy with leflunomide and TNF blocking receptor (etanercept are reported; real clinical significance of this drug-related nephropathy will be established by development of RA treatment. In RA nephropathies, mesangial glomerulonephritis is the most frequent histological lesion (35-60 % out of biopsies from patients with urinary abnormalities and/or kidney impairment, followed by minimal change glomerulopathy (3-14% and p-ANCA positive necrotizing crescentic

  18. SECONDARY OSTEOARTHRITIS IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Starodubtseva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the problems of comorbidities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Two or more RA-related conditions were diagnosed according to the results of the QUEST-RA program implemented in 34 countries. Osteoarthritis along with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and osteoporosis was detected among the most commonly diseases. Owing to expanded diagnostic capabilities, the recognition and treatment of the comorbidities have recently received much attention, as embodied in the draft Association of Rheumatologists of Russia Guidelines for RA management (2014; Part 1. The concept and major characteristics of secondary osteoarthritis in RA are analyzed. It is precisely the inflammatory process and underlying disease-related risk factors, including treatment, that have impact on the development of secondary osteoarthritis and patients’ quality of life as a whole. All this allows an inference about the mechanisms closely intertwined with the underlying disease for the development of secondary osteoarthritis, which initiates cartilage damage and further remodeling. Primary and secondary osteoarthritis was comparatively analyzed. Particular emphasis is placed on current cartilage biomarkers, their diagnostic value and role in monitoring the efficiency of treatment in clinical trials. The paper provides a comparative analysis of detectable serum and urine biomarkers according to the results of the complex analysis made by the National Institutes of Health. Particular attention is given to cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP. Foreign authors’ investigations suggest that there is a relationship between serum COMP levels and disease severity and joint X-ray changes. There is evidence for the efficacy of hyaluronic acid used in the treatment of secondary osteoarthritis in patients with RA. 

  19. Dietetic recommendations in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Rosa Alhambra-Expósito

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic autoimmune disease that has a significant effect on patients’ physical, emotional, and social functioning. For decades, patients have used different diets to try to improve the symptoms of RA. The possible benefits of dietary therapy for rheumatoid arthritis are reviewed in this article. Nutritional objectives for RA, are to halt the loss of bone mass, promote healing of bone fractures and improving bone-associated inflammatory disorders and joints. In general, diets low in saturated fat, rich in polyunsaturated fats: omega 3 and omega 6, rich in complex carbohydrates and fiber are recommended.

  20. Identifying flares in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bykerk, Vivian P; Bingham, Clifton O; Choy, Ernest H

    2016-01-01

    to flare, with escalation planned in 61%. CONCLUSIONS: Flares are common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and are often preceded by treatment reductions. Patient/MD/DAS agreement of flare status is highest in patients worsening from R/LDA. OMERACT RA flare questions can discriminate between patients with...... Set. METHODS: Candidate flare questions and legacy measures were administered at consecutive visits to Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort (CATCH) patients between November 2011 and November 2014. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) core set indicators were recorded. Concordance to identify flares...