WorldWideScience

Sample records for related molecular mechanism

  1. Chemo-mechanical coupling in molecular motors interpreted through the uncertainty relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jomova, Klaudia, E-mail: kjomova@ukf.sk [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Constantine The Philosopher University, SK-949 74 Nitra (Slovakia); Zelenicky, L' ubomir [Department of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Constantine The Philosopher University, SK-949 74 Nitra (Slovakia); Morris, Harry [School of Pharmacy and Chemistry, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 3AF (United Kingdom); Mazur, Milan [Institute of Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics, Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology, Slovak Technical University, SK-812 37 Bratislava (Slovakia); Valko, Marian, E-mail: marian.valko@stuba.sk [Institute of Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics, Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology, Slovak Technical University, SK-812 37 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2010-06-16

    Graphical abstract: A new, unique representation of biophysical uncertainty relations have been formulated by combining both the quantum mechanical and of statistical mechanics uncertainty relations into a single entity. The biophysical uncertainty relations are especially suitable for the estimation of chemo-mechanical coupling between chemical and physical variables in molecular motors. This statement is supported by examples on myosin motors under conditions of low load and sub-piconewton force fluctuations of actomyosin interacting, in vitro, with a single actin filament. We have approached the description of chemo-mechanical coupling only in terms of macroscopic quantities which are regarded as stochastic variables. - Abstract: A new, unique representation of biophysical uncertainty relations have been formulated by combining both the quantum mechanical and of statistical mechanics uncertainty relations into a single entity. The biophysical uncertainty relations are especially suitable for the estimation of chemo-mechanical coupling between chemical and physical variables in molecular motors. This statement is supported by examples on myosin motors under conditions of low load and sub-piconewton force fluctuations of actomyosin interacting, in vitro, with a single actin filament. We have approached the description of chemo-mechanical coupling only in terms of macroscopic quantities which are regarded as stochastic variables.

  2. Polyphenol Stilbenes: Molecular Mechanisms of Defence against Oxidative Stress and Aging-Related Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Reinisalo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have highlighted the key roles of oxidative stress and inflammation in aging-related diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, age-related macular degeneration (AMD, and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. In aging cells, the natural antioxidant capacity decreases and the overall efficiency of reparative systems against cell damage becomes impaired. There is convincing data that stilbene compounds, a diverse group of natural defence phenolics, abundant in grapes, berries, and conifer bark waste, may confer a protective effect against aging-related diseases. This review highlights recent data helping to clarify the molecular mechanisms involved in the stilbene-mediated protection against oxidative stress. The impact of stilbenes on the nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf2 mediated cellular defence against oxidative stress as well as the potential roles of SQSTM1/p62 protein in Nrf2/Keap1 signaling and autophagy will be summarized. The therapeutic potential of stilbene compounds against the most common aging-related diseases is discussed.

  3. Polyphenol Stilbenes: Molecular Mechanisms of Defence against Oxidative Stress and Aging-Related Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinisalo, Mika; Kårlund, Anna; Koskela, Ali; Kaarniranta, Kai; Karjalainen, Reijo O

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have highlighted the key roles of oxidative stress and inflammation in aging-related diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and Alzheimer's disease (AD). In aging cells, the natural antioxidant capacity decreases and the overall efficiency of reparative systems against cell damage becomes impaired. There is convincing data that stilbene compounds, a diverse group of natural defence phenolics, abundant in grapes, berries, and conifer bark waste, may confer a protective effect against aging-related diseases. This review highlights recent data helping to clarify the molecular mechanisms involved in the stilbene-mediated protection against oxidative stress. The impact of stilbenes on the nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) mediated cellular defence against oxidative stress as well as the potential roles of SQSTM1/p62 protein in Nrf2/Keap1 signaling and autophagy will be summarized. The therapeutic potential of stilbene compounds against the most common aging-related diseases is discussed.

  4. Molecular inflammation as an underlying mechanism of the aging process and age-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, H Y; Lee, E K; Choi, Y J; Kim, J M; Kim, D H; Zou, Y; Kim, C H; Lee, J; Kim, H S; Kim, N D; Jung, J H; Yu, B P

    2011-07-01

    Aging is a biological process characterized by time-dependent functional declines that are influenced by changes in redox status and by oxidative stress-induced inflammatory reactions. An organism's pro-inflammatory status may underlie the aging process and age-related diseases. In this review, we explore the molecular basis of low-grade, unresolved, subclinical inflammation as a major risk factor for exacerbating the aging process and age-related diseases. We focus on the redox-sensitive transcription factors, NF-κB and FOXO, which play essential roles in the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators and anti-oxidant enzymes, respectively. Major players in molecular inflammation are discussed with respect to the age-related up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules, cyclo-oxygenase-2, lipoxygenase, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. The molecular inflammation hypothesis proposed by our laboratory is briefly described to give further molecular insights into the intricate interplay among redox balance, pro-inflammatory gene activation, and chronic age-related inflammatory diseases. The final section discusses calorie restriction as an aging-retarding intervention that also exhibits extraordinarily effective anti-inflammatory activity by modulating GSH redox, NF-κB, SIRT1, PPARs, and FOXOs.

  5. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Sperm-Oocyte Interactions Opinions Relative to in Vitro Fertilization (IVF

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    George Anifandis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the biggest prerequisites for pregnancy is the fertilization step, where a human haploid spermatozoon interacts and penetrates one haploid oocyte in order to produce the diploid zygote. Although fertilization is defined by the presence of two pronuclei and the extraction of the second polar body the process itself requires preparation of both gametes for fertilization to take place at a specific time. These preparations include a number of consecutive biochemical and molecular events with the help of specific molecules and with the consequential interaction between the two gametes. These events take place at three different levels and in a precise order, where the moving spermatozoon penetrates (a the outer vestments of the oocyte, known as the cumulus cell layer; (b the zona pellucida (ZP; where exocytosis of the acrosome contents take place and (c direct interaction of the spermatozoon with the plasma membrane of the oocyte, which involves a firm adhesion of the head of the spermatozoon with the oocyte plasma membrane that culminates with the fusion of both sperm and oocyte membranes (Part I. After the above interactions, a cascade of molecular signal transductions is initiated which results in oocyte activation. Soon after the entry of the first spermatozoon into the oocyte and oocyte activation, the oocyte’s coat (the ZP and the oocyte’s plasma membrane seem to change quickly in order to initiate a fast block to a second spermatozoon (Part II. Sometimes, two spermatozoa fuse with one oocyte, an incidence of 1%–2%, resulting in polyploid fetuses that account for up to 10%–20% of spontaneously aborted human conceptuses. The present review aims to focus on the first part of the human sperm and oocyte interactions, emphasizing the latest molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling this process.

  6. [Molecular mechanisms of macroevolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhodeev, O N

    2005-01-01

    The present paper is devoted to the evolutionary role of genetic modules shuffing. The mechanisms capable to produce new molecular functions and significant complications of ontogenesis are reviewed. Two-step model of macroevolution is proposed. This model comprises: (1) Arising of a new combination of genetic modules. This step does not result in formation of a new taxon but makes necessary ground for that process. (2) Precise structure completing of the new combination of modules and corresponding genome optimization by use of various mechanisms including point mutations. This step concerns many genes and finally leads to formation of a new taxon. It is shown that arising of new combinations of genetic modules might work out as molecular basis for progressive evolution, while alternative structural completing of the same combination might result in adaptive radiation.

  7. ROS, Cell Senescence, and Novel Molecular Mechanisms in Aging and Age-Related Diseases

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    Pierpaola Davalli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aging process worsens the human body functions at multiple levels, thus causing its gradual decrease to resist stress, damage, and disease. Besides changes in gene expression and metabolic control, the aging rate has been associated with the production of high levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS and/or Reactive Nitrosative Species (RNS. Specific increases of ROS level have been demonstrated as potentially critical for induction and maintenance of cell senescence process. Causal connection between ROS, aging, age-related pathologies, and cell senescence is studied intensely. Senescent cells have been proposed as a target for interventions to delay the aging and its related diseases or to improve the diseases treatment. Therapeutic interventions towards senescent cells might allow restoring the health and curing the diseases that share basal processes, rather than curing each disease in separate and symptomatic way. Here, we review observations on ROS ability of inducing cell senescence through novel mechanisms that underpin aging processes. Particular emphasis is addressed to the novel mechanisms of ROS involvement in epigenetic regulation of cell senescence and aging, with the aim to individuate specific pathways, which might promote healthy lifespan and improve aging.

  8. ROS, Cell Senescence, and Novel Molecular Mechanisms in Aging and Age-Related Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davalli, Pierpaola; Mitic, Tijana; Caporali, Andrea; Lauriola, Angela; D'Arca, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The aging process worsens the human body functions at multiple levels, thus causing its gradual decrease to resist stress, damage, and disease. Besides changes in gene expression and metabolic control, the aging rate has been associated with the production of high levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and/or Reactive Nitrosative Species (RNS). Specific increases of ROS level have been demonstrated as potentially critical for induction and maintenance of cell senescence process. Causal connection between ROS, aging, age-related pathologies, and cell senescence is studied intensely. Senescent cells have been proposed as a target for interventions to delay the aging and its related diseases or to improve the diseases treatment. Therapeutic interventions towards senescent cells might allow restoring the health and curing the diseases that share basal processes, rather than curing each disease in separate and symptomatic way. Here, we review observations on ROS ability of inducing cell senescence through novel mechanisms that underpin aging processes. Particular emphasis is addressed to the novel mechanisms of ROS involvement in epigenetic regulation of cell senescence and aging, with the aim to individuate specific pathways, which might promote healthy lifespan and improve aging.

  9. Molecular mechanisms in gliomagenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulleman, Esther; Helin, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    , in order to design novel therapies and treatments for GBM, research has recently intensified to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to GBM formation. Modeling of astrocytomas by genetic manipulation of mice suggests that deregulation of the pathways that control gliogenesis during normal...... brain development, such as the differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) into astrocytes, might contribute to GBM formation. These pathways include growth factor-induced signal transduction routes and processes that control cell cycle progression, such as the p16-CDK4-RB and the ARF-MDM2-p53 pathways...

  10. Molecular mechanics application in inorganic Chemistry

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    Coelho Lilian Weitzel

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is a review about basic principles of the molecular mechanics that is the most important tool used in molecular modeling area, and their applications to the calculation of the relative stability and chemical reactivity of organometalic and coordination compounds. We show how molecular mechanics can be successfully applied to a wide variety of inorganic systems.

  11. Molecular mechanisms of photosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenship, R.E.

    2001-12-15

    Photosynthesis is a biological process that is as complex as it is fundamental. It is a field that spans time scales from the cosmic to the femtosecond, and bridges disciplines from biochemistry to geology. In the last ten years major advances in the field and improved research techniques have further deepened the understanding of the process of photosynthesis. Molecular Mechanisms of Photosynthesis stands as an ideal introduction to this subject. The author, a leading authority in photosynthesis research, offers a modern approach to photosynthesis in this accessible and well-illustrated text. The book provides a concise overview of the basic principles of energy storage and the history of the field, then progresses into more advanced topics such as electron transfer pathways, kinetics, genetic manipulations, and evolution. Throughout, the author includes an interdisciplinary emphasis that makes this book appealing across fields. authorship: leading authority in photosynthesis and the President of the International Society of Photosynthesis Research. First authoritative text to enter the market in 10 years. Stresses an interdisciplinary approach, which appeals to all science students. Emphasizes the recent advances in molecular structures and mechanisms. Only text to contain comprehensive coverage of both bacterial and plant photosynthesis. Includes the latest insights and research on structural information, improved spectroscopic techniques as well as advances in biochemical and genetic methods. Presents the most extensive treatment of the Origin and evolution of photosynthesis. Comprehensive appendix, which includes a detailed introduction to the physical basis of photosynthesis, including thermodynamics, kinetics and spectroscopy. (author)

  12. Understanding molecular structure from molecular mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allinger, Norman L

    2011-04-01

    Molecular mechanics gives us a well known model of molecular structure. It is less widely recognized that valence bond theory gives us structures which offer a direct interpretation of molecular mechanics formulations and parameters. The electronic effects well-known in physical organic chemistry can be directly interpreted in terms of valence bond structures, and hence quantitatively calculated and understood. The basic theory is outlined in this paper, and examples of the effects, and their interpretation in illustrative examples is presented.

  13. The effect of fasting on the important molecular mechanisms related to cancer treatment

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    Vahideh Keyvani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Fasting does have remarkable benefits in the treatment of cancer and another diseases such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and a multitude of other chronic diseases. It has been determined that fasting could play an important role during cancer treatment and progression via the regulation of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 as well as other growth factors. Also, it has been shown that fasting would enhance the chemotherapy effect in cancer patients, selectively protects normal cells and organisms from chemotherapy toxicity, while simultaneously sensitizing tumors. In this article, we discuss the benefits of fasting in the treatment of cancer through several different molecular pathways.

  14. Molecular mechanisms in cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadson, Keith; Hauck, Ludger; Billia, Filio

    2017-07-01

    Cardiomyopathies represent a heterogeneous group of diseases that negatively affect heart function. Primary cardiomyopathies specifically target the myocardium, and may arise from genetic [hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D), mitochondrial cardiomyopathy] or genetic and acquired [dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM)] etiology. Modern genomics has identified mutations that are common in these populations, while in vitro and in vivo experimentation with these mutations have provided invaluable insight into the molecular mechanisms native to these diseases. For example, increased myosin heavy chain (MHC) binding and ATP utilization lead to the hypercontractile sarcomere in HCM, while abnormal protein-protein interaction and impaired Ca2+ flux underlie the relaxed sarcomere of DCM. Furthermore, expanded access to genetic testing has facilitated identification of potential risk factors that appear through inheritance and manifest sometimes only in the advanced stages of the disease. In this review, we discuss the genetic and molecular abnormalities unique to and shared between these primary cardiomyopathies and discuss some of the important advances made using more traditional basic science experimentation. © 2017 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  15. Molecular mechanisms underlying the potential antiobesity-related diseases effect of cocoa polyphenols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, F.; Ismail, A.; Kersten, A.H.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and related metabolic diseases (e.g., type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and hypertension) are the most prevailing nutrition-related issues in the world. An emerging feature of obesity is their relationship with chronic inflammation that begins in white adipose tissue and eventually

  16. Medication-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw: New Insights into Molecular Mechanisms and Cellular Therapeutic Approaches

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lombard, Thomas; Neirinckx, Virginie; Rogister, Bernard; Gilon, Yves; Wislet, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    ... of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) [1], given the increasing number of osteonecrosis of the jaw cases reported in patients treated with bisphosphonates (BPs). However, since this c...

  17. Polyphenol Stilbenes: Molecular Mechanisms of Defence against Oxidative Stress and Aging-Related Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Reinisalo, Mika; K?rlund, Anna; Koskela, Ali; Kaarniranta, Kai; Karjalainen, Reijo O.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have highlighted the key roles of oxidative stress and inflammation in aging-related diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In aging cells, the natural antioxidant capacity decreases and the overall efficiency of reparative systems against cell damage becomes impaired. There is convincing data that stilbene compounds, a diverse group of natural defence phenolics, abundant in grapes, berries, and conifer...

  18. (In)activity-related neuroplasticity in brainstem control of sympathetic outflow: unraveling underlying molecular, cellular, and anatomical mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischel, Nicholas A.; Subramanian, Madhan; Dombrowski, Maryetta D.; Llewellyn-Smith, Ida J.

    2015-01-01

    More people die as a result of physical inactivity than any other preventable risk factor including smoking, high cholesterol, and obesity. Cardiovascular disease, the number one cause of death in the United States, tops the list of inactivity-related diseases. Nevertheless, the vast majority of Americans continue to make lifestyle choices that are creating a rapidly growing burden of epidemic size and impact on the United States healthcare system. It is imperative that we improve our understanding of the mechanisms by which physical inactivity increases the incidence of cardiovascular disease and how exercise can prevent or rescue the inactivity phenotype. The current review summarizes research on changes in the brain that contribute to inactivity-related cardiovascular disease. Specifically, we focus on changes in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), a critical brain region for basal and reflex control of sympathetic activity. The RVLM is implicated in elevated sympathetic outflow associated with several cardiovascular diseases including hypertension and heart failure. We hypothesize that changes in the RVLM contribute to chronic cardiovascular disease related to physical inactivity. Data obtained from our translational rodent models of chronic, voluntary exercise and inactivity suggest that functional, anatomical, and molecular neuroplasticity enhances glutamatergic neurotransmission in the RVLM of sedentary animals. Collectively, the evidence presented here suggests that changes in the RVLM resulting from sedentary conditions are deleterious and contribute to cardiovascular diseases that have an increased prevalence in sedentary individuals. The mechanisms by which these changes occur over time and their impact are important areas for future study. PMID:25957223

  19. Molecular mechanisms of photosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youvan, D.C.; Marrs, B.L.

    1987-06-01

    Knowledge of the molecular interactions, structure and genetic basis of the photosynthetic reaction center makes it possible to ask more detailed questions about its function. Spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography and molecular genetics combine to give a detailed picture of events in photosynthesis and shown how particular molecules contribute to the process. The molecular biology of the photosynthesis center of Rhodopseudomonas is investigated.

  20. Molecular mechanisms of cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weber, Georg F

    2007-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Section I. General Mechanisms of Transformation 1. Theories of Carcinogenesis...

  1. Anticancer molecular mechanisms of resveratrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Maria Varoni

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is a pleiotropic phytochemical belonging to the stilbene family. Despite it is only significantly present in grape products, a huge amount of preclinical studies investigated its anticancer properties in a plethora of cellular and animal models. Molecular mechanisms of resveratrol involved signaling pathways related to: extracellular growth factors and receptor tyrosine kinases; formation of multiprotein complexes and cell metabolism; cell proliferation and genome instability; cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase signaling (cytokine, integrin and developmental pathways; signal transduction by the transforming growth factor-β super-family; apoptosis and inflammation; immune-surveillance and hormone signaling. Resveratrol also showed a promising role to counteract multi-drug resistance: in adjuvant therapy, associated with 5-fluoruracyl and cisplatin, resveratrol had additive and/or synergistic effects increasing the chemosensitization of cancer cells. Resveratrol, by acting on diverse mechanisms simultaneously, has been emphasized as a promising, multi-target, anticancer agent, relevant in both cancer prevention and treatment.

  2. Distinct molecular features facilitating ice-binding mechanisms in hyperactive antifreeze proteins closely related to an Antarctic sea ice bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rachana; Chakraborti, Pratim; Bhowmick, Rupa; Mukhopadhyay, Subhasish

    2015-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins or ice-binding proteins (IBPs) facilitate the survival of certain cellular organisms in freezing environment by inhibiting the growth of ice crystals in solution. Present study identifies orthologs of the IBP of Colwellia sp. SLW05, which were obtained from a wide range of taxa. Phylogenetic analysis on the basis of conserved regions (predicted as the 'ice-binding domain' [IBD]) present in all the orthologs, separates the bacterial and archaeal orthologs from that of the eukaryotes'. Correspondence analysis pointed out that the bacterial and archaeal IBDs have relatively higher average hydrophobicity than the eukaryotic members. IBDs belonging to bacterial as well as archaeal AFPs contain comparatively more strands, and therefore are revealed to be under higher evolutionary selection pressure. Molecular docking studies prove that the ice crystals form more stable complex with the bacterial as well as archaeal proteins than the eukaryotic orthologs. Analysis of the docked structures have traced out the ice-binding sites (IBSs) in all the orthologs which continue to facilitate ice-binding activity even after getting mutated with respect to the well-studied IBSs of Typhula ishikariensis and notably, all these mutations performing ice-binding using 'anchored clathrate mechanism' have been found to prefer polar and hydrophilic amino acids. Horizontal gene transfer studies point toward a strong selection pressure favoring independent evolution of the IBPs in some polar organisms including prokaryotes as well as eukaryotes because these proteins facilitate the polar organisms to acclimatize to the adversities in their niche, thus safeguarding their existence.

  3. Molecular Mechanisms of Preeclampsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hod, Tammy; Cerdeira, Ana Sofia; Karumanchi, S. Ananth

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific disease characterized by new onset hypertension and proteinuria after 20 wk of gestation. It is a leading cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Exciting discoveries in the last decade have contributed to a better understanding of the molecular basis of this disease. Epidemiological, experimental, and therapeutic studies from several laboratories have provided compelling evidence that an antiangiogenic state owing to alterations in circulating angiogenic factors leads to preeclampsia. In this review, we highlight the role of key circulating antiangiogenic factors as pathogenic biomarkers and in the development of novel therapies for preeclampsia. PMID:26292986

  4. Molecular Mechanisms of Anthracycline Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beretta, Giovanni Luca; Zunino, Franco

    On the basis of evidence that anthracyclines are DNA intercalating agents and DNA is the primary target, a large number of analogs and related intercalators have been developed. However, doxorubicin and closely related anthracyclines still remain among the most effective antitumor agents. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to explain their efficacy. They include inhibition of DNA-dependent functions, free radical formation, and membrane interactions. The primary mechanism of action is now ascribed to drug interference with the function of DNA topoisomerase II. The stabilization of the topoisomerase-mediated cleavable complex results in a specific type of DNA damage (i.e., double-strand protein-associated DNA breaks). The drug-stabilized cleavable complex is a potentially reversible molecular event and its persistence, as a consequence of strong DNA binding, may be recognized as an apoptotic stimulus. Indirect evidence supports the notion that the bioreductive processes of the quinone moiety generating the semiquinone radical with concomitant production of reactive oxygen species may contribute to the drug effects. The cellular defense mechanisms and response to genotoxic/cytotoxic stress appear to be critical determinants of the tumor sensitivity to anthracyclines.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of Parturition

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    F. Ferré

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The initial signal for triggering human parturition might be fetal but of trophoblastic origin. Concomitantly, this placental signal would have as its target not only the uterus but also the fetus by activating its hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis. The latter would represent a second fetal signal which, at the fetomaternal interface, would amplify and define in time the mechanisms responsible for the onset of labor, implying changes in the myometrial and cervical extracellular matrix associated with the accession of the contractile phenotype for myometrial cells. At each phase of these processes in the utero-feto-placental system, the nature of these signals remains to be identified. Is there a single substance, or rather, and more likely, a combination of several?

  6. Molecular mechanisms of rosacea pathogenesis

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    Davydova A.M.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents possible molecular mechanisms for rosacea pathogenesis from current domestic and foreign clinical observations and laboratory research: regulation and expression defects of antimicrobial peptides, vascular endothelial growth factor, the effect of serine proteases, oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species and ferritin on the occurrence and course of rosacea. New developments in molecular biology and genetics are advanced for researching the interaction of multiple factors involved in rosacea pathogenesis, as well as providing the bases for potentially new therapies.

  7. Molecular pathogenesis and mechanisms of thyroid cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Mingzhao

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a common endocrine malignancy. There has been exciting progress in understanding its molecular pathogenesis in recent years, as best exemplified by the elucidation of the fundamental role of several major signalling pathways and related molecular derangements. Central to these mechanisms are the genetic and epigenetic alterations in these pathways, such as mutation, gene copy-number gain and aberrant gene methylation. Many of these molecular alterations represent novel diagnostic and prognostic molecular markers and therapeutic targets for thyroid cancer, which provide unprecedented opportunities for further research and clinical development of novel treatment strategies for this cancer. PMID:23429735

  8. Molecular Mechanism of Heterogeneous Catalysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 6. Molecular Mechanism of Heterogeneous Catalysis - The 2007 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. R S Swathi K L Sebastian. General Article Volume 13 Issue 6 June 2008 pp 548-560 ...

  9. STATINS AND MYOPATHY: MOLECULAR MECHANISMS

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    O. M. Drapkina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The safety of statin therapy is considered. In particular the reasons of a complication such as myopathy are discussed in detail. The molecular mechanisms of statin myopathy , as well as its risk factors are presented. The role of coenzyme Q10 in the myopathy development and coenzyme Q10 application for the prevention of this complication are considered. 

  10. STATINS AND MYOPATHY: MOLECULAR MECHANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Drapkina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The safety of statin therapy is considered. In particular the reasons of a complication such as myopathy are discussed in detail. The molecular mechanisms of statin myopathy , as well as its risk factors are presented. The role of coenzyme Q10 in the myopathy development and coenzyme Q10 application for the prevention of this complication are considered. 

  11. Sampling Molecular Conformers in Solution with Quantum Mechanical Accuracy at a Nearly Molecular-Mechanics Cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Marta; Micciarelli, Marco; Laio, Alessandro; Baroni, Stefano

    2016-09-13

    We introduce a method to evaluate the relative populations of different conformers of molecular species in solution, aiming at quantum mechanical accuracy, while keeping the computational cost at a nearly molecular-mechanics level. This goal is achieved by combining long classical molecular-dynamics simulations to sample the free-energy landscape of the system, advanced clustering techniques to identify the most relevant conformers, and thermodynamic perturbation theory to correct the resulting populations, using quantum-mechanical energies from density functional theory. A quantitative criterion for assessing the accuracy thus achieved is proposed. The resulting methodology is demonstrated in the specific case of cyanin (cyanidin-3-glucoside) in water solution.

  12. TRIENNIAL GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT SYMPOSIUM: Molecular mechanisms related to bovine intramuscular fat deposition in the longissimus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baik, M; Kang, H J; Park, S J; Na, S W; Piao, M; Kim, S Y; Fassah, D M; Moon, Y S

    2017-05-01

    The intramuscular fat (IMF) content of the LM, also known as marbling, is particularly important in determining the price of beef in Korea, Japan, and the United States. Deposition of IMF is influenced by both genetic (e.g., breed, gender, and genotype) and nongenetic factors (e.g., castration, nutrition, stressors, animal weight, and age). Castration of bulls markedly increases deposition of IMF, resulting in improved beef quality. Here, we present a comparative gene expression approach between bulls and steers. Transcriptomic and proteomic studies have demonstrated that the combined effects of increases in lipogenesis, fatty acid uptake, and fatty acid esterification and decreased lipolysis are associated with increased IMF deposition in the LM. Several peripheral tissues (LM, adipose tissues, and the liver) are involved in lipid metabolism. Therefore, understanding the significance of the tissue network in lipid metabolism is important. Here, we demonstrate that lipid metabolism in LM tissues is crucial for IMF deposition, whereas lipid metabolism in the liver plays only a minor role. Metabolism of body fat and IMF deposition in bovine species has similarities with these processes in metabolic diseases, such as obesity in humans and rodents. Extensive studies on metabolic diseases using epigenome modification (DNA methylation, histone modification, and microRNA), microbial metagenomics, and metabolomics have been performed in humans and rodents, and new findings have been reported using these technologies. The importance of applying "omics" fields (epigenomics, metagenomics, and metabolomics) to the study of IMF deposition in cattle is described. New information on the molecular mechanisms of IMF deposition may be used to design nutritional or genetic methods to manipulate IMF deposition and to modify fatty acid composition in beef cattle. Applying nutrigenomics could maximize the expression of genetic potential of economically important traits (e.g., marbling

  13. Molecular mechanisms underlying bacterial persisters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maisonneuve, Etienne; Gerdes, Kenn

    2014-01-01

    All bacteria form persisters, cells that are multidrug tolerant and therefore able to survive antibiotic treatment. Due to the low frequencies of persisters in growing bacterial cultures and the complex underlying molecular mechanisms, the phenomenon has been challenging to study. However, recent...... technological advances in microfluidics and reporter genes have improved this scenario. Here, we summarize recent progress in the field, revealing the ubiquitous bacterial stress alarmone ppGpp as an emerging central regulator of multidrug tolerance and persistence, both in stochastically and environmentally...... induced persistence. In several different organisms, toxin-antitoxin modules function as effectors of ppGpp-induced persistence....

  14. Molecular Mechanism of Somite Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulfidan Coskun

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available From third week of gestation, notochord and the neural folds begin to gather at the center of the embryo to form the paraxial mesoderm. Paraxial mesoderm separates into blocks of cells called somitomers at the lateral sides of the neural tube of the head region. At the beginning of the third week somitomeres take ring shapes and form blocks of somites from occipital region to caudal region. Although somites are transient structures, they are extremely important in organizing the segmental pattern of vertebrate embryos. Somites give rise to the cells that form the vertebrae and ribs, the dermis of the dorsal skin, the skeletal muscles of the back, and the skeletal muscles of the body wall and limbs. Somitogenesis are formed by a genetic mechanism that is regulated by cyclical expression of genes in the Notch, Wnt and fibroblast growth factor signaling pathways. The prevailing model of the mechanism governing somitogenesis is the “clock and wave front”. Somitogenesis has components of periodicity, separation, epithelialization and axial specification. According to this model, the clock causes cells to undergo repeated oscillations, with a particular phase of each oscillation defining the competency of cells in the presomitic mesoderm to form a somite. Any disruption in this mechanism can be cause of severe segmentation defects of the vertebrae and congenital anomalies. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms underlying the somitogenesis which is an important part of morphogenesis. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 362-376

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Cardiovascular Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The average lifespan of humans is increasing, and with it the percentage of people entering the 65 and older age group is growing rapidly and will continue to do so in the next 20 years. Within this age group, cardiovascular disease will remain the leading cause of death, and the cost associated with treatment will continue to increase. Aging is an inevitable part of life and unfortunately poses the largest risk factor for cardiovascular disease. CONTENT: We provide an overview of some of the molecular mechanisms involved in regulating lifespan and health, including mitochondria, telomeres, stem cells, sirtuins, Adenosine Monophosphate-activated Protein Kinase, Mammalian Target of Rapamycin and Insulin-like Growth Factor 1. We also provide future perspectives of lifespan and health, which are intimately linked fields. SUMMARY: Aging remains the biggest non-modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The biological, structural and mechanical changes in senescent cardiovascular system are thought to contribute in increasing incidence of cardiovascular disease in aging. Understanding the mechanisms contributing to such changes is therefore crucial for both prevention and development of treatment for cardiovascular diseases. KEYWORDS: cardiovascular aging, mitochondria, telomeres, sirtuin, stem cells.

  16. Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Thilo Martin

    Cautious optimism has arisen over recent decades with respect to the long struggle against bacteria, viruses, and parasites. This has been offset, however, by a fatal complacency stemming from previous successes such as the development of antimicrobial drugs, the eradication of smallpox, and global immunization programs. Infectious diseases nevertheless remain the world's leading cause of death, killing at least 17 million persons annually [61]. Diarrheal diseases caused by Vibrio cholerae or Shigella dysenteriae kill about 3 million persons every year, most of them young children: Another 4 million die of tuberculosis or tetanus. Outbreaks of diphtheria in Eastern Europe threatens the population with a disease that had previously seemed to be overcome. Efforts to control infectious diseases more comprehensively are undermined not only by socioeconomic conditions but also by the nature of the pathogenic organisms itself; some isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterobacter have become so resistant to drugs by horizontal gene transfer that they are almost untreatable. In addition, the mechanism of genetic variability helps pathogens to evade the human immune system, thus compromising the development of powerful vaccines. Therefore detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of microbial pathogenicity is absolutely necessary to develop new strategies against infectious diseases and thus to lower their impact on human health and social development.

  17. Research advances in molecular mechanism of mother-to-child transmission of HCV and related risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAO Luhua

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is a global health problem and people are generally susceptible to HCV. Main routes of transmission include blood transmission, sexual transmission, and mother-to-child transmission. Anti-HCV screening of blood products has substantially reduced the blood transmission of HCV. Remarkable breakthrough has been made in the treatment of hepatitis C with direct-acting antiviral agents and the trend of HCV transmission has been significantly curbed. Since HCV infection is occult, hepatitis C vaccine has not been successfully developed, and there lack effective blocking measures for mother-to-child transmission, which will become one of the major route of HCV transmission. Reducing the rate of mother-to-child transmission of HCV is very important in preventing neonatal HCV infection and reducing the incidence rate of HCV infection. In recent years, many researchers have concentrated on the detailed mechanisms and risk factors of mother-to-child transmission of HCV and made great achievements; however, there are still controversies over some issues. This article reviews the research advances in the specific mechanisms of mother-to-child transmission of HCV in China and other countries.

  18. MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF FEAR LEARNING AND MEMORY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Joshua P.; Cain, Christopher K.; Ostroff, Linnaea E.; LeDoux, Joseph E.

    2011-01-01

    Pavlovian fear conditioning is a useful behavioral paradigm for exploring the molecular mechanisms of learning and memory because a well-defined response to a specific environmental stimulus is produced through associative learning processes. Synaptic plasticity in the lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA) underlies this form of associative learning. Here we summarize the molecular mechanisms that contribute to this synaptic plasticity in the context of auditory fear conditioning, the form of fear conditioning best understood at the molecular level. We discuss the neurotransmitter systems and signaling cascades that contribute to three phases of auditory fear conditioning: acquisition, consolidation, and reconsolidation. These studies suggest that multiple intracellular signaling pathways, including those triggered by activation of Hebbian processes and neuromodulatory receptors, interact to produce neural plasticity in the LA and behavioral fear conditioning. Together, this research illustrates the power of fear conditioning as a model system for characterizing the mechanisms of learning and memory in mammals, and potentially for understanding fear related disorders, such as PTSD and phobias. PMID:22036561

  19. Exploration of the inhibiting effect of Notch-1 blocker on tumor growth in osteosarcoma mouse models as well as related molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhou

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the inhibiting effect of Notch-1 blocker on tumor growth in osteosarcoma mouse models as well as related molecular mechanisms. Methods: SCID mice were selected as experimental subjects, and osteosarcoma mouse models were built through subcutaneous injection of osteosarcoma cells and divided into GSI group and PBS group who received GSI and PBS intervention respectively. 0 d, 5 d, 10 d, 15 d and 20 d after intervention, tumor tissue volume was detected; 20 d after intervention, the contents of pro-apoptosis, proproliferation and invasion-related molecules in tumor tissue were detected. Results: On the 0 d of intervention, tumor volume of GSI group was not significantly different from that of PBS group; 5 d, 10 d, 15 d and 20 d after intervention, tumor volume of GSI group was significantly lower than that of PBS group; 20 d after intervention, the contents of pro-proliferation molecules AEG-1, Orai1, STIM1, PAK5, RIPK4 and β-catenin as well as invasion-promoting molecules Gab2, DLK1, Scr and B7-H3 in tumor tissue of GSI group were significantly lower than those of PBS group, and the contents of pro-apoptosis molecules RanBP9, PD-1, PDL1 and PD-L2 as well as invasion-inhibiting molecules TIMP1 and TIMP2 were significantly higher than those of PBS group. Conclusion: Notch-1 blocker can inhibit tumor growth in osteosarcoma mouse models, and the molecular mechanisms involved in the process include reducing the generation of pro-proliferation molecules and invasion-promoting molecules and increasing the generation of pro-apoptosis and invasion-inhibiting molecules.

  20. Molecular Mechanisms of Appetite Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hee Yu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of obesity has been rapidly increasing worldwide over the last several decades and has become a major health problem in developed countries. The brain, especially the hypothalamus, plays a key role in the control of food intake by sensing metabolic signals from peripheral organs and modulating feeding behaviors. To accomplish these important roles, the hypothalamus communicates with other brain areas such as the brainstem and reward-related limbic pathways. The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin and pancreatic β-cell-derived insulin inform adiposity to the hypothalamus. Gut hormones such as cholecystokinin, peptide YY, pancreatic polypeptide, glucagon-like peptide 1, and oxyntomodulin transfer satiety signals to the brain and ghrelin relays hunger signals. The endocannabinoid system and nutrients are also involved in the physiological regulation of food intake. In this article, we briefly review physiological mechanisms of appetite regulation.

  1. Molecular Mechanics of Tip-Link Cadherins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotomayor, Marcos; Weihofen, Wilhelm A.; Gaudet, Rachelle; Corey, David P.

    2011-11-01

    The hair-cell tip link, a fine filament directly conveying force to mechanosensitive transduction channels, is likely composed of two proteins, protocadherin-15 and cadherin-23, whose mutation causes deafness. However, their complete molecular structure, elasticity, and deafness-related structural defects remain largely unknown. We present crystal structures of extracellular (EC) tip-link cadherin repeats involved in hereditary deafness and tip link formation. In addition, we show that the deafness mutation D101G, in the linker region between the repeats EC1 and EC2 of cadherin-23, causes a slight bend between repeats and decreases Ca2+ affinity. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that tip-link cadherin repeats are stiff and that either removing Ca2+ or mutating Ca2+-binding residues reduces rigidity and unfolding strength. The structures and simulations also suggest mechanisms underlying inherited deafness and how cadherin-23 may bind with protocadherin-15 to form the tip link.

  2. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of AKI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Anupam; Dong, Zheng; Harris, Raymond; Murray, Patrick; Parikh, Samir M; Rosner, Mitchell H; Kellum, John A; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we review the current evidence for the cellular and molecular mechanisms of AKI, focusing on epithelial cell pathobiology and related cell-cell interactions, using ischemic AKI as a model. Highlighted are the clinical relevance of cellular and molecular targets that have been investigated in experimental models of ischemic AKI and how such models might be improved to optimize translation into successful clinical trials. In particular, development of more context-specific animal models with greater relevance to human AKI is urgently needed. Comorbidities that could alter patient susceptibility to AKI, such as underlying diabetes, aging, obesity, cancer, and CKD, should also be considered in developing these models. Finally, harmonization between academia and industry for more clinically relevant preclinical testing of potential therapeutic targets and better translational clinical trial design is also needed to achieve the goal of developing effective interventions for AKI. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  3. Analytical mechanics for relativity and quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Johns, Oliver Davis

    2011-01-01

    Analytical Mechanics for Relativity and Quantum Mechanics is an innovative and mathematically sound treatment of the foundations of analytical mechanics and the relation of classical mechanics to relativity and quantum theory. It is intended for use at the introductory graduate level. A distinguishing feature of the book is its integration of special relativity into teaching of classical mechanics. After a thorough review of the traditional theory, Part II of the book introduces extended Lagrangian and Hamiltonian methods that treat time as a transformable coordinate rather than the fixed parameter of Newtonian physics. Advanced topics such as covariant Langrangians and Hamiltonians, canonical transformations, and Hamilton-Jacobi methods are simplified by the use of this extended theory. And the definition of canonical transformation no longer excludes the Lorenz transformation of special relativity. This is also a book for those who study analytical mechanics to prepare for a critical exploration of quantum...

  4. Molecular Mechanism for Genetic Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobell, Henry M.

    1972-01-01

    Symmetry considerations of proteinnucleic acid interaction suggest the existence of an alternate branched configuration for DNA induced by binding specific structural proteins to symmetrically arranged polynucleotide base sequences. The concept that such sequences exist at the ends of genes or operons leads to a molecular model for genetic recombination in eukaryotic cells. PMID:4115953

  5. Molecular mechanisms of NCAM function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinsby, Anders M; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2004-01-01

    receptor that responds to both homophilic and heterophilic cues, as well as a mediator of cell-cell adhesion. This review describes NCAM function at the molecular level. We discuss recent models for extracellular ligand-interactions of NCAM, and the intracellular signaling cascade that follows to define...

  6. Polarization effects in molecular mechanical force fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak, Piotr; Dupradeau, François-Yves; Duan, Yong; Wang, Junmei

    2014-01-01

    The focus here is on incorporating electronic polarization into classical molecular mechanical force fields used for macromolecular simulations. First, we briefly examine currently used molecular mechanical force fields and the current status of intermolecular forces as viewed by quantum mechanical approaches. Next, we demonstrate how some components of quantum mechanical energy are effectively incorporated into classical molecular mechanical force fields. Finally, we assess the modeling methods of one such energy component—polarization energy—and present an overview of polarizable force fields and their current applications. Incorporating polarization effects into current force fields paves the way to developing potentially more accurate, though more complex, parameterizations that can be used for more realistic molecular simulations. PMID:21828594

  7. Polarization effects in molecular mechanical force fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cieplak, Piotr [Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92120 (United States); Dupradeau, Francois-Yves [UMR CNRS 6219-Faculte de Pharmacie, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 1 rue des Louvels, F-80037 Amiens (France); Duan, Yong [Genome Center and Department of Applied Science, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Wang Junmei, E-mail: pcieplak@burnham.or [Department of Pharmacology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 6001 Forest Park Boulevard, ND9.136, Dallas, TX 75390-9050 (United States)

    2009-08-19

    The focus here is on incorporating electronic polarization into classical molecular mechanical force fields used for macromolecular simulations. First, we briefly examine currently used molecular mechanical force fields and the current status of intermolecular forces as viewed by quantum mechanical approaches. Next, we demonstrate how some components of quantum mechanical energy are effectively incorporated into classical molecular mechanical force fields. Finally, we assess the modeling methods of one such energy component-polarization energy-and present an overview of polarizable force fields and their current applications. Incorporating polarization effects into current force fields paves the way to developing potentially more accurate, though more complex, parameterizations that can be used for more realistic molecular simulations. (topical review)

  8. Molecular mechanism of insulin resistance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Free fatty acids are known to play a key role in promoting loss of insulin sensitivity, thereby causing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. However, the underlying mechanism involved is still unclear. In searching for the cause of the mechanism, it has been found that palmitate inhibits insulin receptor (IR) gene expression, ...

  9. Molecular deformation mechanisms in polyethylene

    CERN Document Server

    Coutry, S

    2001-01-01

    adjacent labelled stems is significantly larger when the DPE guest is a copolymer molecule. Our comparative studies on various types of polyethylene lead to the conclusion that their deformation behaviour under drawing has the same basis, with additional effects imputed to the presence of tie-molecules and branches. Three major points were identified in this thesis. The changes produced by drawing imply (1) the crystallisation of some of the amorphous polymer and the subsequent orientation of the newly formed crystals, (2) the re-orientation of the crystalline ribbons and (3) the beginning of crystallite break-up. However, additional effects were observed for the high molecular weight linear sample and the copolymer sample and were attributed, respectively, to the presence of tie-molecules and of branches. It was concluded that both the tie-molecules and the branches are restricting the molecular movement during deformation, and that the branches may be acting as 'anchors'. This work is concerned with details...

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Prostate Cancer Progression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holt, Shawn

    2003-01-01

    In studies to define the mechanisms involved in the progression of immortal, non-tumorigenic prostate cells to a tumorigenic state, we have found that molecular chaperones are elevated along with telomerase activity...

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of Prostate Cancer Progression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holt, Shawn

    2004-01-01

    In studios to define the mechanisms involved in the progression of immortal non tumorigenic prostate cells to a tumorigenic state, we have found that molecular chaperones are elevated along with telomerase activity...

  12. Molecular mechanism of Endosulfan action in mammals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Endosulfan is a broad-spectrum organochlorine pesticide, speculated to be detrimental to human health in areas ofactive exposure. However, the molecular insights to its mechanism of action remain poorly understood. In two recentstudies, our group investigated the physiological and molecular aspects of endosulfan ...

  13. Molecular mechanisms of oxygen activation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hayaishi, Osamu

    1974-01-01

    ... OF THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE REPRODUCED OR TRANSMITTED IN ANY FORM OR BY ANY MEANS, ELECTRONIC OR MECHANICAL, INCLUDING PHOTOCOPY, RECORDING, OR ANY INFORMATION STORAGE AND RETRIEVAL SYSTEM, WITHOUT PERMISSION IN WRITING FROM THE PUBLISHER. ACADEMIC PRESS, INC. I l l Fifth Avenue, New York, New York 10003 United Kingdom ACADEMIC Edition PRESS, publis...

  14. Molecular mechanics of tropocollagen-hydroxyapatite biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Devendra Kumar

    Hard biomaterials such as bone, dentin, and nacre show remarkable mechanical performance and serve as inspiration for development of next generation of composite materials with high strength and toughness. Such materials have primarily an organic phase (e.g. tropocollagen (TC) or chitin) and a mineral phase (e.g. hydroxyapatite (HAP) or aragonite) arranged in a staggered arrangement at nanoscopic length scales. Interfacial interactions between the organic phases and the mineral phases and structural effects arising due to the staggered and hierarchical arrangements are identified to be the two most important determinants for high mechanical performance of such biomaterials. Effects of these determinants in such biomaterials are further intertwined with factors such as loading configuration, chemical environment, mineral crystal shape, and residue sequences in polymer chains. Atomistic modeling is a desired approach to investigate such sub nanoscale issues as experimental techniques for investigations at such small scale are still in nascent stage. For this purpose, explicit three dimensional (3D) molecular dynamics (MD) and ab initio MD simulations of quasi-static mechanical deformations of idealized Tropocollagen-Hydroxyapatite (TC-HAP) biomaterials with distinct interfacial arrangements and different loading configurations are performed. Focus is on developing insights into the molecular level mechanics of TC-HAP biomaterials at fundamental lengthscale with emphasis on interface phenomenon. Idealized TC-HAP atomistic models are analyzed for their mechanical strength and fracture failure behavior from the viewpoint of interfacial interactions between TC and HAP and associated molecular mechanisms. In particular, study focuses on developing an understanding of factors such as role of interfacial structural arrangement, hierarchical structure design, influence of water, effect of changes in HAP crystal shape, and mutations in TC molecule on the mechanical strength

  15. Fast method for quantum mechanical molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklasson, Anders M. N.; Cawkwell, Marc J.

    2012-11-01

    As the processing power available for scientific computing grows, first-principles Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations are becoming increasingly popular for the study of a wide range of problems in materials science, chemistry, and biology. Nevertheless, the computational cost of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics still remains prohibitively large for many potential applications. Here we show how to avoid a major computational bottleneck: the self-consistent-field optimization prior to force calculations. The optimization-free quantum mechanical molecular dynamics method gives trajectories that are almost indistinguishable from an “exact” microcanonical Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulation even when low-prefactor linear scaling sparse matrix algebra is used. Our findings show that the computational gap between classical and quantum mechanical molecular dynamics simulations can be significantly reduced.

  16. Molecular mechanisms and therapeutic interventions in sarcopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Sup Park

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia is the degenerative loss of muscle mass and function with aging. Recently sarcopenia was recognized as a clinical disease by the International Classification of Disease, 10th revision, Clinical Modification. An imbalance between protein synthesis and degradation causes a gradual loss of muscle mass, resulting in a decline of muscle function as a progress of sarcopenia. Many mechanisms involved in the onset of sarcopenia include age-related factors as well as activity-, disease-, and nutrition-related factors. The stage of sarcopenia reflecting the severity of conditions assists clinical management of sarcopenia. It is important that systemic descriptions of the disease conditions include age, sex, and other environmental risk factors as well as levels of physical function. To develop a new therapeutic intervention needed is the detailed understanding of molecular and cellular mechanisms by which apoptosis, autophagy, atrophy, and hypertrophy occur in the muscle stem cells, myotubes, and/or neuromuscular junction. The new strategy to managing sarcopenia will be signal-modulating small molecules, natural compounds, repurposing of old drugs, and muscle-specific microRNAs.

  17. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Trepo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocarcinogenesis is a complex process that remains still partly understood. That might be explained by the multiplicity of etiologic factors, the genetic/epigenetic heterogeneity of tumors bulks and the ignorance of the liver cell types that give rise to tumorigenic cells that have stem cell-like properties. The DNA stress induced by hepatocyte turnover, inflammation and maybe early oncogenic pathway activation and sometimes viral factors, leads to DNA damage response which activates the key tumor suppressive checkpoints p53/p21Cip1 and p16INK4a/pRb responsible of cell cycle arrest and cellular senescence as reflected by the cirrhosis stage. Still obscure mechanisms, but maybe involving the Wnt signaling and Twist proteins, would allow pre-senescent hepatocytes to bypass senescence, acquire immortality by telomerase reactivation and get the last genetic/epigenetic hits necessary for cancerous transformation. Among some of the oncogenic pathways that might play key driving roles in hepatocarcinogenesis, c-myc and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling seem of particular interest. Finally, antiproliferative and apoptosis deficiencies involving TGF-β, Akt/PTEN, IGF2 pathways for instance are prerequisite for cancerous transformation. Of evidence, not only the transformed liver cell per se but the facilitating microenvironment is of fundamental importance for tumor bulk growth and metastasis.

  18. Cancer chemoprevention – selected molecular mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Walczak

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of diet on cancer formation and prevention of carcinogenesis has attracted considerable attention for years and is the subject of several studies. Some components of the daily diet, such as resveratrol, curcumin, genistein, gingerol, can significantly reduce the risk of cancer or affect the rate of tumor progression. Cancer chemoprevention assumes the use of natural or synthetic biologically active substances in order to prevent, inhibit or reverse the progression of cancer. There are many biologically active compounds in several natural products, i.e. garlic, ginger, soy, curcuma, tomatoes, cruciferous plants or green tea. Their chemopreventive activity is based on the inhibition of processes underlying carcinogenesis (inflammation, transformation and proliferation, but also affects the final phase of carcinogenesis - angiogenesis and metastasis. Despite the relatively low toxicity of chemopreventive agents, their molecular targets often coincide with the objectives of the currently used cancer therapies. The widespread use of chemopreventive agents may contribute to reduction of the rate of cancer incidence, and increase the effectiveness of conventional cancer therapies. In the present study, selected molecular mechanisms of the chemopreventive activity have been discussed, especially their involvement in the regulation of signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, metastasis and angiogenesis. The role of chemopreventive agents in the inflammatory process, the metabolism of xenobiotics and multidrug resistance has been also characterized.

  19. Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Modeling of Drug Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lonsdale, Richard; Fort, Rachel M; Rydberg, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    )-mexiletine in CYP1A2 with hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods, providing a more detailed and realistic model. Multiple reaction barriers have been calculated at the QM(B3LYP-D)/MM(CHARMM27) level for the direct N-oxidation and H-abstraction/rebound mechanisms. Our calculated barriers......The mechanism of cytochrome P450(CYP)-catalyzed hydroxylation of primary amines is currently unclear and is relevant to drug metabolism; previous small model calculations have suggested two possible mechanisms: direct N-oxidation and H-abstraction/rebound. We have modeled the N-hydroxylation of (R...... indicate that the direct N-oxidation mechanism is preferred and proceeds via the doublet spin state of Compound I. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the presence of an ordered water molecule in the active site assists in the binding of mexiletine in the active site...

  20. Molecular mechanisms of DNA photodamage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starrs, S.M

    2000-05-01

    Photodamage in DNA, caused by ultraviolet (UV) light, can occur by direct excitation of the nucleobases or indirectly via the action of photosensitisers. Such, DNA photodamage can be potentially mutagenic or lethal. Among the methods available for detecting UV-induced DNA damage, gel sequencing protocols, utilising synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides as targets for UV radiation, allow photolesions to be mapped at nucleotide resolution. This approach has been applied to investigate both DNA damage mechanisms. Following a general overview of DNA photoreactivity, and a description of the main experimental procedures, Chapter 3 identifies the origin of an anomalous mobility shift observed in purine chemical sequence ladders that can confuse the interpretation of DNA cleavage results; measures to abolish this shift are also described. Chapters 4 and 5 examine the alkali-labile DNA damage photosensitised by representative nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and the fluoroquinolone antibiotics. Suprofen was the most photoactive NSAID studied, producing different patterns of guanine-specific damage in single-stranded and duplex DNA. Uniform modification of guanine bases, typifying attack by singlet oxygen, was observed in single-stranded oligodeoxyribonucleotides. In duplex molecules, modification was limited to the 5'-G of GG doublets, which is indicative of an electron transfer. The effect of quenchers and photoproduct analysis substantiated these findings. The quinolone, nalidixic acid, behaves similarly. The random base cleavage photosensitised by the fluoroquinolones, has been attributed to free radicals produced during their photodecomposition. Chapter 6 addresses the photoreactivity of purines within unusual DNA structures formed by the repeat sequences (GGA){sub n} and (GA){sub n}, and a minihairpin. There was no definitive evidence for enhanced purine reactivity caused by direct excitation. Finally, Chapter 7 investigates the mutagenic potential of a

  1. The molecular mechanism of cholestatic pruritus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Elferink, Ronald P. J.; Kremer, Andreas E.; Martens, Job J. W. W.; Beuers, Ulrich H.

    2011-01-01

    Pruritus is a frequent symptom in patients with cholestatic liver diseases. Pruritus can be excruciating and, in rare cases, become a primary indication for liver transplantation. The molecular mechanism of itch signal transduction is largely unclear. It was our hypothesis that compounds which

  2. Molecular mechanisms of drug-induced thrombocytopenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgess, J K

    A wide range of drugs can induce thrombocytopenia. Molecular mechanisms for the formation of specific epitopes for all the drug-dependent antibodies appear to be very similar. A restricted set of glycoproteins on the platelet surface interacts with the drugs to form neoepitopes, to which the

  3. [Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and molecular mechanisms of jaundice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirsa, M; Sticová, E

    2013-07-01

    The introductory summarises the classical path of heme degradation and classification of jaundice. Subsequently, a description of neonatal types of jaundice is given, known as Crigler Najjar, Gilberts, DubinJohnson and Rotor syndromes, emphasising the explanation of the molecular mechanisms of these metabolic disorders. Special attention is given to a recently discovered molecular mechanism of the Rotor syndrome. The mechanism is based on the inability of the liver to retrospectively uptake the conjugated bilirubin fraction primarily excreted into the blood, not bile. A reduced ability of the liver to uptake the conjugated bilirubin contributes to the development of hyperbilirubinemia in common disorders of the liver and bile ducts and to the toxicity of xenobiotics and drugs using transport proteins for conjugated bilirubin.

  4. [Molecular mechanism and genetic basis of geoherbs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lu-Qi; Guo, Lan-Ping; Hu, Juan; Shao, Ai-Juan

    2008-10-01

    As products of interaction of time and space, geoherbs, which are essential parts of Chinese Materia Medica, were characterized in different morphology, unique habitat, continuous and changeable sites. The main fields in molecular mechanism of geoherbs focus on: biodiversity and molecular identification, genetic different and evolutionary genetics, geo-variation and environmental adaptation, germplasm and aimed genus choosing, expression and control of functional gene, gene transfer and bio-safety evaluation. The main tasks are to discover the genetic variation at molecular level, ascertain the molecular characteristics of geoherbs and the effect of environment on gene expression of geoherbs, confirm the genetic factors attribute to the forming of geoherbs, and find out the genetic basis of geoherbs at individual level and population level, respectively. This paper pointed out that the essential of geoherbs is continuers quantities variation at population level, geoherb's populations are different in gene frequency with the others'; geohersm are quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlled by multi - gene or combination with multiple-gene and major gene at individual level. It is very important to pay more attention to the scale effect of geoherbs, refer the theories and methods of quantities genetic, and concern more about the interaction of environment and gene in geoherbs' molecular mechanism research.

  5. Molecular mechanisms of taste transduction in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimaru, Yoshiro

    2009-01-01

    Among the five senses, taste and olfaction play crucial roles in the detection of chemical substances in the environment and are referred to as chemical senses. In the past decade, much progress has been made in studies on molecular mechanisms of the gustatory system by methods such as those based on molecular and cellular biology, genetics, and bioinformatics. This review covers recent studies on taste receptors, intracellular signaling transduction in taste receptor cells, and taste coding at the periphery in vertebrates from fish to mammals.

  6. Aton, Relativity, and Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    2006-03-01

    In the mechanics of the Aton, we have shown that the Davisson-Germer experiments and other crystal based experiments can be modeled without recourse to particle-wave notions. We have also shown that the energy levels of the hydrogen atom and the helium atom can be calculated accurately with Atonic Mechanics, subject to the limits of three-body effects in the latter atom. Using the Aton concept, we now provide a way to unify Einstein's Relativity with what we commonly refer to as quantum mechanics. We note that entanglement is an intrinsic part of the mechanics of the Aton.

  7. Molecular mechanism for the umami taste synergism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Klebansky, Boris; Fine, Richard M.; Xu, Hong; Pronin, Alexey; Liu, Haitian; Tachdjian, Catherine; Li, Xiaodong

    2008-01-01

    Umami is one of the 5 basic taste qualities. The umami taste of L-glutamate can be drastically enhanced by 5′ ribonucleotides and the synergy is a hallmark of this taste quality. The umami taste receptor is a heteromeric complex of 2 class C G-protein-coupled receptors, T1R1 and T1R3. Here we elucidate the molecular mechanism of the synergy using chimeric T1R receptors, site-directed mutagenesis, and molecular modeling. We propose a cooperative ligand-binding model involving the Venus flytrap domain of T1R1, where L-glutamate binds close to the hinge region, and 5′ ribonucleotides bind to an adjacent site close to the opening of the flytrap to further stabilize the closed conformation. This unique mechanism may apply to other class C G-protein-coupled receptors. PMID:19104071

  8. Molecular mechanisms of hepatic injury and repair

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, Neil C

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis I examined molecular mechanisms involved in acute and chronic liver injury, and also studied basic pathways mediating tumour promotion. Acute hepatic failure secondary to paracetamol poisoning is associated with high mortality. C-jun (NH2) terminal kinase (JNK) is a member of the mitogen activated protein kinase family and is a key intracellular signaling molecule involved in the control of cell fate. Paracetamol induced hepatic JNK activation in both human and m...

  9. [Recent advances in molecular mechanisms of supernumerary tooth formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Li-hong; Wang, Xu

    2013-08-18

    Despite advances in the knowledge of tooth morphogenesis and differentiation, little is relatively known about the aetiology and molecular mechanisms underlying supernumerary tooth formation. Mice, which are commonly used for studying tooth development, only exhibit one dentition. However, a number of mouse models are now starting to provide some insight into the mechanisms that control overall tooth number within the dentition. This review describes recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of supernumerary tooth formation. Indeed, many of the molecular signaling pathways known to be involved in normal development of the tooth germ can also give rise to supernumerary teeth if inappropriately regulated. These include components of the Hedgehog, FGF, Wnt and BMP families, which may potentially play a role in human supernumerary tooth formation.

  10. Fernblock (Polypodium leucotomos Extract: Molecular Mechanisms and Pleiotropic Effects in Light-Related Skin Conditions, Photoaging and Skin Cancers, a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepcion Parrado

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Healthier life styles include increased outdoors time practicing sports and walking. This means increased exposure to the sun, leading to higher risk of sunburn, photoaging and skin cancer. In addition to topical barrier products, oral supplementations of various botanicals endowed with antioxidant activity are emerging as novel method of photoprotection. Polypodium leucotomos extract (PL, commercial name Fernblock®, IFC Group, Spain is a powerful antioxidant due to its high content of phenolic compounds. PL is administered orally, with proven safety, and it can also be used topically. Its mechanisms include inhibition of the generation and release of reactive oxygen species (ROS by ultraviolet (UV light. It also prevents UV- and ROS-induced DNA damage with inhibition of AP1 and NF-κB and protection of natural antioxidant enzyme systems. At the cellular level, PL decreases cellular apoptosis and necrosis mediated UV and inhibits abnormal extracellular matrix remodeling. PL reduces inflammation, prevents immunosuppression, activates tumor suppressor p53 and inhibits UV-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 enzyme expression. In agreement with increased p53 activity, PL decreased UV radiation-induced cell proliferation. PL also prevents common deletions mitochondrial DNA damage induced by UVA, and MMP-1 expression induced Visible Light and Infrared Radiation. These cellular and molecular effects are reflected in inhibitions of carcinogenesis and photoaging.

  11. Upregulation of interleukin-1β/transforming growth factor-β1 and hypoxia relate to molecular mechanisms underlying immobilization-induced muscle contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Yuichiro; Sakamoto, Junya; Nakano, Jiro; Kataoka, Hideki; Sasabe, Ryo; Goto, Kyo; Tanaka, Miho; Origuchi, Tomoki; Yoshimura, Toshiro; Okita, Minoru

    2015-09-01

    In this study we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying muscle contracture in rats. The rats were divided into immobilization and control groups, and soleus muscles of the right and left sides were selected for analyses. The levels of CD11b and α-SMA protein, IL-1β, and TGF-β1 mRNA, and type I and III collagen protein and mRNA were significantly greater in the immobilization group than in the control group at all time-points. HIF-1α mRNA levels were significantly higher in the immobilization group at 4 weeks. Moreover, HIF-1α, α-SMA, and type I collagen levels were significantly higher at 4 weeks than at 1 and 2 weeks in the immobilization group. In the early stages of immobilization, upregulation of IL-1β/TGF-β1 via macrophages may promote fibroblast differentiation that could affect muscle contracture. The soleus muscle became hypoxic in the later stages of immobilization, suggesting that hypoxia influences the progression of muscle contracture. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of Renal Ischemic Conditioning Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kierulf-Lassen, Casper; Nieuwenhuijs-Moeke, Gertrude J; Krogstrup, Nicoline V

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury is the leading cause of acute kidney injury in a variety of clinical settings such as renal transplantation and hypovolemic and/or septic shock. Strategies to reduce ischemia-reperfusion injury are obviously clinically relevant. Ischemic conditioning is an inherent part...... of the renal defense mechanism against ischemia and can be triggered by short periods of intermittent ischemia and reperfusion. Understanding the signaling transduction pathways of renal ischemic conditioning can promote further clinical translation and pharmacological advancements in this era. This review...... summarizes research on the molecular mechanisms underlying both local and remote ischemic pre-, per- and postconditioning of the kidney. The different types of conditioning strategies in the kidney recruit similar powerful pro-survival mechanisms. Likewise, renal ischemic conditioning mobilizes many...

  13. Molecular Mechanisms in Exercise-Induced Cardioprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Golbidi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical inactivity is increasingly recognized as modifiable behavioral risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. A partial list of proposed mechanisms for exercise-induced cardioprotection include induction of heat shock proteins, increase in cardiac antioxidant capacity, expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress proteins, anatomical and physiological changes in the coronary arteries, changes in nitric oxide production, adaptational changes in cardiac mitochondria, increased autophagy, and improved function of sarcolemmal and/or mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channels. It is currently unclear which of these protective mechanisms are essential for exercise-induced cardioprotection. However, most investigations focus on sarcolemmal KATP channels, NO production, and mitochondrial changes although it is very likely that other mechanisms may also exist. This paper discusses current information about these aforementioned topics and does not consider potentially important adaptations within blood or the autonomic nervous system. A better understanding of the molecular basis of exercise-induced cardioprotection will help to develop better therapeutic strategies.

  14. Molecular mechanisms for protein-encoded inheritance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiltzius, Jed J.W.; Landau, Meytal; Nelson, Rebecca; Sawaya, Michael R.; Apostol, Marcin I.; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Soriaga, Angela B.; Cascio, Duilio; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Eisenberg, David; (Cornell); (HHMI)

    2009-12-01

    In prion inheritance and transmission, strains are phenotypic variants encoded by protein 'conformations'. However, it is unclear how a protein conformation can be stable enough to endure transmission between cells or organisms. Here we describe new polymorphic crystal structures of segments of prion and other amyloid proteins, which offer two structural mechanisms for the encoding of prion strains. In packing polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by alternative packing arrangements (polymorphs) of {beta}-sheets formed by the same segment of a protein; in segmental polymorphism, prion strains are encoded by distinct {beta}-sheets built from different segments of a protein. Both forms of polymorphism can produce enduring conformations capable of encoding strains. These molecular mechanisms for transfer of protein-encoded information into prion strains share features with the familiar mechanism for transfer of nucleic acid-encoded information into microbial strains, including sequence specificity and recognition by noncovalent bonds.

  15. Biological Applications of Hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyoung Kang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since in most cases biological macromolecular systems including solvent water molecules are remarkably large, the computational costs of performing ab initio calculations for the entire structures are prohibitive. Accordingly, QM calculations that are jointed with MM calculations are crucial to evaluate the long-range electrostatic interactions, which significantly affect the electronic structures of biological macromolecules. A UNIX-shell-based interface program connecting the quantum mechanics (QMs and molecular mechanics (MMs calculation engines, GAMESS and AMBER, was developed in our lab. The system was applied to a metalloenzyme, azurin, and PU.1-DNA complex; thereby, the significance of the environmental effects on the electronic structures of the site of interest was elucidated. Subsequently, hybrid QM/MM molecular dynamics (MD simulation using the calculation system was employed for investigation of mechanisms of hydrolysis (editing reaction in leucyl-tRNA synthetase complexed with the misaminoacylated tRNALeu, and a novel mechanism of the enzymatic reaction was revealed. Thus, our interface program can play a critical role as a powerful tool for state-of-the-art sophisticated hybrid ab initio QM/MM MD simulations of large systems, such as biological macromolecules.

  16. Molecular mechanisms of robustness in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempe, Janne; Lachowiec, Jennifer; Sullivan, Alessandra M; Queitsch, Christine

    2013-02-01

    Robustness, the ability of organisms to buffer phenotypes against perturbations, has drawn renewed interest among developmental biologists and geneticists. A growing body of research supports an important role of robustness in the genotype to phenotype translation, with far-reaching implications for evolutionary processes and disease susceptibility. Similar to animals and fungi, plant robustness is a function of genetic network architecture. Most perturbations are buffered; however, perturbation of network hubs destabilizes many traits. Here, we review recent advances in identifying molecular robustness mechanisms in plants that have been enabled by a combination of classical genetics and population genetics with genome-scale data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Simulation with quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbault, Florent; Maurel, François

    2015-10-01

    Biological macromolecules, such as proteins or nucleic acids, are (still) molecules and thus they follow the same chemical rules that any simple molecule follows, even if their size generally renders accurate studies unhelpful. However, in the context of drug discovery, a detailed analysis of ligand association is required for understanding or predicting their interactions and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) computations are relevant tools to help elucidate this process. In this review, the authors explore the use of QM/MM for drug discovery. After a brief description of the molecular mechanics (MM) technique, the authors describe the subtractive and additive techniques for QM/MM computations. The authors then present several application cases in topics involved in drug discovery. QM/MM have been widely employed during the last decades to study chemical processes such as enzyme-inhibitor interactions. However, despite the enthusiasm around this area, plain MM simulations may be more meaningful than QM/MM. To obtain reliable results, the authors suggest fixing several keystone parameters according to the underlying chemistry of each studied system.

  18. Multiscale Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Simulations with Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lin; Wu, Jingheng; Yang, Weitao

    2016-10-11

    Molecular dynamics simulation with multiscale quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods is a very powerful tool for understanding the mechanism of chemical and biological processes in solution or enzymes. However, its computational cost can be too high for many biochemical systems because of the large number of ab initio QM calculations. Semiempirical QM/MM simulations have much higher efficiency. Its accuracy can be improved with a correction to reach the ab initio QM/MM level. The computational cost on the ab initio calculation for the correction determines the efficiency. In this paper we developed a neural network method for QM/MM calculation as an extension of the neural-network representation reported by Behler and Parrinello. With this approach, the potential energy of any configuration along the reaction path for a given QM/MM system can be predicted at the ab initio QM/MM level based on the semiempirical QM/MM simulations. We further applied this method to three reactions in water to calculate the free energy changes. The free-energy profile obtained from the semiempirical QM/MM simulation is corrected to the ab initio QM/MM level with the potential energies predicted with the constructed neural network. The results are in excellent accordance with the reference data that are obtained from the ab initio QM/MM molecular dynamics simulation or corrected with direct ab initio QM/MM potential energies. Compared with the correction using direct ab initio QM/MM potential energies, our method shows a speed-up of 1 or 2 orders of magnitude. It demonstrates that the neural network method combined with the semiempirical QM/MM calculation can be an efficient and reliable strategy for chemical reaction simulations.

  19. Molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Labeur

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the most recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR. Most effects of glucocorticoids are mediated by the intracellular GR which is present in almost every tissue and controls transcriptional activation via direct and indirect mechanisms. Nevertheless the glucocorticoid responses are tissue -and gene- specific. GR associates selectively with corticosteroid ligands produced in the adrenal gland in response to changes of humoral homeostasis. Ligand interaction with GR promotes either GR binding to genomic glucocorticoid response elements, in turn modulating gene transcription, or interaction of GR monomers with other transcription factors activated by other signalling pathways leading to transrepression. The GR regulates a broad spectrum of physiological functions, including cell differentiation, metabolism and inflammatory responses. Thus, disruption or dysregulation of GR function will result in severe impairments in the maintenance of homeostasis and the control of adaptation to stress.

  20. Molecular Mechanisms of Cardioprotective Actions of Tanshinones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyou-Ju Jin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tanshinones are lipophilic compounds derived from Salvia miltiorrhiza (Danshen that has been widely used to treat coronary heart diseases in China. The cardioprotective actions of tanshinones have been extensively studied in various models of myocardial infarction, cardiac ischemia reperfusion injury, cardiac hypertrophy, atherosclerosis, hypoxia, and cardiomyopathy. This review outlines the recent development in understanding the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved in the cardioprotective actions of tanshinones, in particular on mitochondrial apoptosis, calcium, nitric oxide, ROS, TNF-α, PKC, PI3K/Akt, IKK/NF-κB, and TGF-β1/Smad mechanisms, which highlights the potential of these compounds as therapeutic agents for treating cardiovascular diseases.

  1. [Programmed necrosis and necroptosis - molecular mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giżycka, Agata; Chorostowska-Wynimko, Joanna

    2015-12-16

    Programmed necrosis has been proven vital for organism development and homeostasis maintenance. Its regulatory effects on functional activity of the immune system, as well as on pathways regulating the death mechanisms in cells with diminished apoptotic activity, including malignant cells, have been confirmed. There is also increasing evidence indicating necrosis involvement in many human pathologies. Contrary to previous beliefs, necrosis is not only a passive, pathological, gene-independent process. However, the current knowledge regarding molecular regulation of programmed necrosis is scarce. In part this is due to the multiplicity and complexity of signaling pathways involved in programmed necrosis, as well as the absence of specific cellular markers identifying this process, but also the ambiguous and imprecise international terminology. This review presents the current state of the art on molecular mechanisms of programmed necrosis. In particular, its specific and frequent form, necroptosis, is discussed. The role of RIP1 and RIP3 kinases in this process is presented, as well as the diverse pathways induced by ligation of tumor necrosis factor α, to its receptor, TNFR1, i.e. cell survival, apoptosis or necroptosis.

  2. Molecular inhibitory mechanism of tricin on tyrosinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yan; Li, Lin; Hu, Song-Qing

    2013-04-01

    Tricin was evaluated as a type of tyrosinase inhibitor with good efficacy compared to arbutin. Tricin functioned as a non-competitive inhibitor of tyrosinase, with an equilibrium constant of 2.30 mmol/L. The molecular mechanisms underlying the inhibition of tyrosinase by tricin were investigated by means of circular dichroism spectra, fluorescence quenching and molecular docking. These assays demonstrated that the interactions between tricin and tyrosinase did not change the secondary structure. The interaction of tricin with residues in the hydrophobic pocket of tyrosinase was revealed by fluorescence quenching; the complex was stabilized by hydrophobic associations and hydrogen bonding (with residues Asn80 and Arg267). Docking results implied that the possible inhibitory mechanisms may be attributed to the stereospecific blockade effects of tricin on substrates or products and flexible conformation alterations in the tyrosinase active center caused by weak interactions between tyrosinase and tricin. The application of this type of flavonoid as a tyrosinase inhibitor will lead to significant advances in the field of depigmentation.

  3. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of reprogramming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Marie N. [Gene Expression Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla 92037, CA (United States); University Hospital of Würzburg, Department of Pediatrics, 2 Josef-Schneiderstrasse, 97080 Würzburg (Germany); Sancho-Martinez, Ignacio [Gene Expression Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla 92037, CA (United States); Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, King' s College London, 28th Floor, Tower Wing, Guy' s Hospital, Great Maze Pond, London (United Kingdom); Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos, E-mail: belmonte@salk.edu [Gene Expression Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla 92037, CA (United States)

    2016-05-06

    Despite the profound and rapid advancements in reprogramming technologies since the generation of the first induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in 2006[1], the molecular basics of the process and its implications are still not fully understood. Recent work has suggested that a subset of TFs, so called “Pioneer TFs”, play an important role during the stochastic phase of iPSC reprogramming [2–6]. Pioneer TFs activities differ from conventional transcription factors in their mechanism of action. They bind directly to condensed chromatin and elicit a series of chromatin remodeling events that lead to opening of the chromatin. Chromatin decondensation by pioneer factors progressively occurs during cell division and in turn exposes specific gene promoters in the DNA to which TFs can now directly bind to promoters that are readily accessible[2, 6]. Here, we will summarize recent advancements on our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying reprogramming to iPSC as well as the implications that pioneer Transcription Factor activities might play during different lineage conversion processes. - Highlights: • Pioneer transcription factor activity underlies the initial steps of iPSC generation. • Reprogramming can occur by cis- and/or trans- reprogramming events. • Cis-reprogramming implies remodeling of the chromatin for enabling TF accessibility. • Trans-reprogramming encompasses direct binding of Tfs to their target gene promoters.

  4. Molecular mechanism of ER stress-induced gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Wang, Yarui; Li, Xiaofeng; Chen, Zhaolin; Li, Xiaohui; Wang, Huan; Ni, Mingming; Li, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily, whose members are capable of inducing apoptosis and inflammation. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) plays a key role in immune surveillance in macrophages. TRAIL mRNA and protein expression have previously been detected in macrophages; however, whether ERS has any effects on TRAIL expression in macrophages has not yet been determined. Here, we demonstrate that thapsigargin (TG) and tunicamycin (TM), two ERS inducers activated macrophages were able to increase TRAIL mRNA and protein expression in RAW264.7 macrophages, the culture supernatant of THP-1 cells, and mouse peritoneal macrophages, indicating that ERS as a potent inducer of TRAIL transcription and expression in macrophages. This effect was blocked by the specific JNK inhibitor SP600125 and transcription factor AP-1 inhibitor SR 1130. Interestingly, at the molecular level, regulation of TRAIL expression by ERS was accompanied by a significant decrease in cytokine signaling suppressor 3 (SOCS3). SOCS3 siRNA clearly increased the expression of TRAIL mRNA and protein under ERS by activating the AP-1 components phosphorylated c-Jun and phosphorylated c-Fos in RAW264.7 cells. In contrast, over-expression of SOCS3 reversed ERS-induced TRAIL expression. These findings provide in vitro evidence that SOCS3 plays a critical negative role in the regulation of ERS-induced TRAIL expression via the Jun N-terminal kinase/AP-1 signaling pathway in macrophages. © 2015 FEBS.

  5. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics dual Hamiltonian free energy perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyak, Iakov; Benighaus, Tobias; Boulanger, Eliot; Thiel, Walter

    2013-08-14

    The dual Hamiltonian free energy perturbation (DH-FEP) method is designed for accurate and efficient evaluation of the free energy profile of chemical reactions in quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations. In contrast to existing QM/MM FEP variants, the QM region is not kept frozen during sampling, but all degrees of freedom except for the reaction coordinate are sampled. In the DH-FEP scheme, the sampling is done by semiempirical QM/MM molecular dynamics (MD), while the perturbation energy differences are evaluated from high-level QM/MM single-point calculations at regular intervals, skipping a pre-defined number of MD sampling steps. After validating our method using an analytic model potential with an exactly known solution, we report a QM/MM DH-FEP study of the enzymatic reaction catalyzed by chorismate mutase. We suggest guidelines for QM/MM DH-FEP calculations and default values for the required computational parameters. In the case of chorismate mutase, we apply the DH-FEP approach in combination with a single one-dimensional reaction coordinate and with a two-dimensional collective coordinate (two individual distances), with superior results for the latter choice.

  6. Screened Electrostatic Interactions in Molecular Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Truhlar, Donald G

    2014-10-14

    In a typical application of molecular mechanics (MM), the electrostatic interactions are calculated from parametrized partial atomic charges treated as point charges interacting by radial Coulomb potentials. This does not usually yield accurate electrostatic interactions at van der Waals distances, but this is compensated by additional parametrized terms, for example Lennard-Jones potentials. In the present work, we present a scheme involving radial screened Coulomb potentials that reproduces the accurate electrostatics much more accurately. The screening accounts for charge penetration of one subsystem's charge cloud into that of another subsystem, and it is incorporated into the interaction potential in a way similar to what we proposed in a previous article (J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2010, 6, 3330) for combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations, but the screening parameters are reoptimized for MM. The optimization is carried out with electrostatic-potential-fitted partial atomic charges, but the optimized parameters should be useful with any realistic charge model. In the model we employ, the charge density of an atom is approximated as the sum of a point charge representing the nucleus and inner electrons and a smeared charge representing the outermost electrons; in particular, for all atoms except hydrogens, the smeared charge represents the two outermost electrons in the present model. We find that the charge penetration effect can cause very significant deviations from the popular point-charge model, and by comparison to electrostatic interactions calculated by symmetry-adapted perturbation theory, we find that the present results are considerably more accurate than point-charge electrostatic interactions. The mean unsigned error in electrostatics for a large and diverse data set (192 interaction energies) decreases from 9.2 to 3.3 kcal/mol, and the error in the electrostatics for 10 water dimers decreases from 1.7 to 0.5 kcal

  7. The epidemiology of supernumerary teeth and the associated molecular mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xi; Yu, Fang; Liu, Junjun; Cai, Wenping; Zhao, Yumei; Zhao, Shouliang; Liu, Shangfeng

    2017-07-03

    Supernumerary teeth are common clinical dental anomalies. Although various studies have provided abundant information regarding genes and signaling pathways involved in tooth morphogenesis, which include Wnt, FGF, BMP, and Shh, the molecular mechanism of tooth formation, especially for supernumerary teeth, is still unclear. In the population, some cases of supernumerary teeth are sporadic, while others are syndrome-related with familial hereditary. The prompt and accurate diagnosis of syndrome related supernumerary teeth is quite important for some distinctive disorders. Mice are the most commonly used model system for investigating supernumerary teeth. The upregulation of Wnt and Shh signaling in the dental epithelium results in the formation of multiple supernumerary teeth in mice. Understanding the molecular mechanism of supernumerary teeth is also a component of understanding tooth formation in general and provides clinical guidance for early diagnosis and treatment in the future.

  8. Dissociation mechanisms of photoexcited molecular ions

    CERN Document Server

    Inglis, L C

    2003-01-01

    Photoionisation of gas phase molecules, in the energy range 8 - 40 eV, and the subsequent dissociation mechanisms have been investigated using threshold photoelectron spectroscopy and ion time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The excitation source used was monochromatic radiation, delivered by station 3.2 at the Daresbury Laboratory Synchrotron Radiation Source. These two techniques have also been combined in threshold photoelectron-photoion coincidence experiments, in order to record coincidence time-of-flight mass spectra and thereby determine breakdown curves. Such curves display the ion fragmentation as a function of internal energy. In addition, computer modelling techniques have been employed to gain some understanding of the unimolecular dissociations of energy selected molecular ions by establishing theoretical breakdown graphs, appearance energies, fragmentation pathways and dissociation rates. Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations have been carried out, generating ionisation and appearance energies, ...

  9. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of heterotopic ossification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Diana M; Ramirez, Melissa R; Reginato, Anthony M; Medici, Damian

    2014-10-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a debilitating condition in which cartilage and bone forms in soft tissues such as muscle, tendon, and ligament causing immobility. This process is induced by inflammation associated with traumatic injury. In an extremely rare genetic disorder called fibrodysplasia ossificans progessiva (FOP), a combination of inflammation associated with minor soft tissue injuries and a hereditary genetic mutation causes massive HO that progressively worsens throughout the patients' lifetime leading to the formation of an ectopic skeleton. An activating mutation in the BMP type I receptor ALK2 has been shown to contribute to the heterotopic lesions in FOP patients, yet recent studies have shown that other events are required to stimulate HO including activation of sensory neurons, mast cell degranulation, lymphocyte infiltration, skeletal myocyte cell death, and endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EndMT). In this review, we discuss the recent evidence and mechanistic data that describe the cellular and molecular mechanisms that give rise to heterotopic bone.

  10. The molecular mechanisms of obesity paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonopoulos, Alexios S; Tousoulis, Dimitris

    2017-07-01

    Clinical observations suggest a complex relationship between human obesity and cardiovascular disease. Whilst abdominal (visceral) adiposity leads to deleterious metabolic disturbances, subcutaneous fat accumulation has a benign effect on cardiometabolic risk. Notably, an accumulating body of evidence paradoxically links increased body mass index with a better prognosis in patients with established cardiovascular disease, a finding that has been termed the 'obesity paradox'. Whilst this is now acknowledged to be an epidemiological finding, a metabolically healthy obese group associated with low cardiovascular risk has also been identified. The current concept of adipose tissue (AT) biology suggests that AT expansion is feasible without accompanying adipocyte dysfunction. A metabolically healthy obese phenotype can be promoted by exercise, but is also linked with intrinsic AT molecular characteristics such as efficient fat storage and lipid droplet formation, high adipogenesis capacity, low extracellular matrix fibrosis, angiogenesis potential, adipocyte browning and low macrophages infiltration/activation. Such features are associated with a secretomic profile of human AT which is protective for the cardiovascular system. In the present review, we summarize the existing knowledge on the molecular mechanisms underlying the 'obesity paradox' and whether fatness can be healthy too. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Exact and Optimal Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiming; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2014-09-09

    Motivated by recent work in density matrix embedding theory, we define exact link orbitals that capture all quantum mechanical (QM) effects across arbitrary quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) boundaries. Exact link orbitals are rigorously defined from the full QM solution, and their number is equal to the number of orbitals in the primary QM region. Truncating the exact set yields a smaller set of link orbitals optimal with respect to reproducing the primary region density matrix. We use the optimal link orbitals to obtain insight into the limits of QM/MM boundary treatments. We further analyze the popular general hybrid orbital (GHO) QM/MM boundary across a test suite of molecules. We find that GHOs are often good proxies for the most important optimal link orbital, although there is little detailed correlation between the detailed GHO composition and optimal link orbital valence weights. The optimal theory shows that anions and cations cannot be described by a single link orbital. However, expanding to include the second most important optimal link orbital in the boundary recovers an accurate description. The second optimal link orbital takes the chemically intuitive form of a donor or acceptor orbital for charge redistribution, suggesting that optimal link orbitals can be used as interpretative tools for electron transfer. We further find that two optimal link orbitals are also sufficient for boundaries that cut across double bonds. Finally, we suggest how to construct "approximately" optimal link orbitals for practical QM/MM calculations.

  12. Molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Bojórquez, Lucia Nikolaia; Dehesa, Alejandro Zentella; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2004-01-01

    Pathogenesis of the development of sepsis is highly complex and has been the object of study for many years. The inflammatory phenomena underlying septic shock are described in this review, as well as the enzymes and genes involved in the cellular activation that precedes this condition. The most important molecular aspects are discussed, ranging from the cytokines involved and their respective transduction pathways to the cellular mechanisms related to accelerated catabolism and multi-organic failure.

  13. Molecular mechanisms of synaptic remodeling in alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyzar, Evan J; Pandey, Subhash C

    2015-08-05

    Alcohol use and alcohol addiction represent dysfunctional brain circuits resulting from neuroadaptive changes during protracted alcohol exposure and its withdrawal. Alcohol exerts a potent effect on synaptic plasticity and dendritic spine formation in specific brain regions, providing a neuroanatomical substrate for the pathophysiology of alcoholism. Epigenetics has recently emerged as a critical regulator of gene expression and synaptic plasticity-related events in the brain. Alcohol exposure and withdrawal induce changes in crucial epigenetic processes in the emotional brain circuitry (amygdala) that may be relevant to the negative affective state defined as the "dark side" of addiction. Here, we review the literature concerning synaptic plasticity and epigenetics, with a particular focus on molecular events related to dendritic remodeling during alcohol abuse and alcoholism. Targeting epigenetic processes that modulate synaptic plasticity may yield novel treatments for alcoholism. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. Multiresolution molecular mechanics: Implementation and efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biyikli, Emre; To, Albert C., E-mail: albertto@pitt.edu

    2017-01-01

    Atomistic/continuum coupling methods combine accurate atomistic methods and efficient continuum methods to simulate the behavior of highly ordered crystalline systems. Coupled methods utilize the advantages of both approaches to simulate systems at a lower computational cost, while retaining the accuracy associated with atomistic methods. Many concurrent atomistic/continuum coupling methods have been proposed in the past; however, their true computational efficiency has not been demonstrated. The present work presents an efficient implementation of a concurrent coupling method called the Multiresolution Molecular Mechanics (MMM) for serial, parallel, and adaptive analysis. First, we present the features of the software implemented along with the associated technologies. The scalability of the software implementation is demonstrated, and the competing effects of multiscale modeling and parallelization are discussed. Then, the algorithms contributing to the efficiency of the software are presented. These include algorithms for eliminating latent ghost atoms from calculations and measurement-based dynamic balancing of parallel workload. The efficiency improvements made by these algorithms are demonstrated by benchmark tests. The efficiency of the software is found to be on par with LAMMPS, a state-of-the-art Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation code, when performing full atomistic simulations. Speed-up of the MMM method is shown to be directly proportional to the reduction of the number of the atoms visited in force computation. Finally, an adaptive MMM analysis on a nanoindentation problem, containing over a million atoms, is performed, yielding an improvement of 6.3–8.5 times in efficiency, over the full atomistic MD method. For the first time, the efficiency of a concurrent atomistic/continuum coupling method is comprehensively investigated and demonstrated.

  15. Mechanistic insights into Mg2+-independent prenylation by CloQ from classical molecular mechanics and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayse, Craig A; Merz, Kenneth M

    2014-08-05

    Understanding the mechanism of prenyltransferases is important to the design of engineered proteins capable of synthesizing derivatives of naturally occurring therapeutic agents. CloQ is a Mg(2+)-independent aromatic prenyltransferase (APTase) that transfers a dimethylallyl group to 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate in the biosynthetic pathway for clorobiocin. APTases consist of a common ABBA fold that defines a β-barrel containing the reaction cavity. Positively charged basic residues line the inside of the β-barrel of CloQ to activate the pyrophosphate leaving group to replace the function of the Mg(2+) cofactor in other APTases. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of CloQ, its E281G and F68S mutants, and the related NovQ were used to explore the binding of the 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate (4HPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate substrates in the reactive cavity and the role of various conserved residues. Hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics potential of mean force (PMF) calculations show that the effect of the replacement of the Mg(2+) cofactor with basic residues yields a similar activation barrier for prenylation to Mg(2+)-dependent APTases like NphB. The topology of the binding pocket for 4HPP is important for selective prenylation at the ortho position of the ring. Methylation at this position alters the conformation of the substrate for O-prenylation at the phenol group. Further, a two-dimensional PMF scan shows that a "reverse" prenylation product may be a possible target for protein engineering.

  16. Decomposition of Amino Diazeniumdiolates (NONOates): Molecular Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaikh, Nizamuddin; Valiev, Marat; Lymar, Sergei V.

    2014-08-23

    Although diazeniumdiolates (X[N(O)NO]-) are extensively used in biochemical, physiological, and pharmacological studies due to their ability to slowly release NO and/or its congeneric nitroxyl, the mechanisms of these processes remain obscure. In this work, we used a combination of spectroscopic, kinetic, and computational techniques to arrive at a qualitatively consistent molecular mechanism for decomposition of amino diazeniumdiolates (amino NONOates: R2N[N(O)NO]-, where R = -N(C2H5)2 (1), -N(C3H4NH2)2 (2), or -N(C2H4NH2)2 (3)). Decomposition of these NONOates is triggered by protonation of their [NN(O)NO]- group with apparent pKa and decomposition rate constants of 4.6 and 1 s-1 for 1-H, 3.5 and 83 x 10-3 s-1 for 2-H, and 3.8 and 3.3 x 10-3 s-1 for 3-H. Although protonation occurs mainly on the O atoms of the functional group, only the minor R2N(H)N(O)NO tautomer (population ~0.01%, for 1) undergoes the N-N heterolytic bond cleavage (k ~102 s-1 for 1) leading to amine and NO. Decompositions of protonated amino NONOates are strongly temperature-dependent; activation enthalpies are 20.4 and 19.4 kcal/mol for 1 and 2, respectively, which includes contributions from both the tautomerization and bond cleavage. The bond cleavage rates exhibit exceptional sensitivity to the nature of R substituents which strongly modulate activation entropy. At pH < 2, decompositions of all these NONOates are subject to additional acid catalysis that occurs through di-protonation of the [NN(O)NO]- group.

  17. Xenon preconditioning: molecular mechanisms and biological effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wenwu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Xenon is one of noble gases and has been recognized as an anesthetic for more than 50 years. Xenon possesses many of the characteristics of an ideal anesthetic, but it is not widely applied in clinical practice mainly because of its high cost. In recent years, numerous studies have demonstrated that xenon as an anesthetic can exert neuroprotective and cardioprotective effects in different models. Moreover, xenon has been applied in the preconditioning, and the neuroprotective and cardioprotective effects of xenon preconditioning have been investigated in a lot of studies in which some mechanisms related to these protections are proposed. In this review, we summarized these mechanisms and the biological effects of xenon preconditioning.

  18. Molecular mechanism of alcoholic fatty liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasineni, Karuna; Casey, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    Ethanol abuse and chronic ethanol consumption remains a major public health problem and is responsible for a high rate of morbidity. Alcohol-induced fatty liver generally begins as hepatic steatosis, and if the cause persists, this invariably progresses to steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. The original biochemical explanation for an alcoholic fatty liver centered on the ability of ethanol metabolism to shift the redox state of the liver and inhibit fatty acid oxidation. Subsequent studies found repression of fatty acid oxidation and that the induction of lipogenesis can occur in alcoholic conditions. Ethanol activates sterol regulatory element binding protein 1, inducing a battery of lipogenic enzymes. These effects may be due in part to inhibition of AMP-dependent protein kinase, reduction in plasma adiponectin or increased levels of TNF-α the liver. They in turn activate lipogenic pathways and inhibit fatty acid oxidation. Besides the fatty acid synthesis and oxidation, ethanol also alters lipid droplet (LD, the storage form of triglycerides, TG) metabolism in hepatocytes and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) secretion from liver. Because steatosis is now regarded as a significant risk factor for advanced liver pathology, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms in its etiology provides new therapeutic targets to reverse the alcoholic fatty liver. PMID:22701235

  19. Molecular mechanism of fertilization in the pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Junya; Kashiwazaki, Naomi

    2012-10-01

    At fertilization, the sperm triggers resumption from the arrest, extrusion of the second polar body and pronuclear formation, the events of which are collectively acknowledged as 'oocyte activation'. In all species up to date, oocyte activation requires a fertilization-associated increase in the intracellular concentration of calcium. Especially in mammals, the signal of intracellular calcium rise at fertilization consists of periodical rises, which are also referred to as calcium oscillations. Our recent results suggest that these calcium oscillations have an important role in not only oocyte activation but also development of mammals. Pigs are animals of great agricultural value and ones in which assisted reproductive techniques, including somatic cell nuclear transfer, to produce gene-modified pigs. Although reconstructed embryos require artificial activation stimuli which mimic fertilization-associated increase of intracellular calcium in the oocytes, it has been known that the developmental ability of the oocytes after artificial activation is low and the regimen seems to be required for improvement. Recently we focused on two molecules, phospholipase C zeta and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor which have important roles in regulation of calcium oscillations during fertilization in mammals, including pigs. In this review, we will discuss the present status and future perspective of molecular mechanisms during fertilization in pigs. © 2012 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  20. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of intestinal fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speca, Silvia; Giusti, Ilaria; Rieder, Florian; Latella, Giovanni

    2012-07-28

    Fibrosis is a chronic and progressive process characterized by an excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) leading to stiffening and/or scarring of the involved tissue. Intestinal fibrosis may develop in several different enteropathies, including inflammatory bowel disease. It develops through complex cell, extracellular matrix, cytokine and growth factor interactions. Distinct cell types are involved in intestinal fibrosis, such as resident mesenchymal cells (fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and smooth muscle cells) but also ECM-producing cells derived from epithelial and endothelial cells (through a process termed epithelial- and endothelial-mesenchymal transition), stellate cells, pericytes, local or bone marrow-derived stem cells. The most important soluble factors that regulate the activation of these cells include cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, components of the renin-angiotensin system, angiogenic factors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, mammalian target of rapamycin, and products of oxidative stress. It soon becomes clear that although inflammation is responsible for triggering the onset of the fibrotic process, it only plays a minor role in the progression of this condition, as fibrosis may advance in a self-perpetuating fashion. Definition of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in intestinal fibrosis may provide the key to developing new therapeutic approaches.

  1. Internal force corrections with machine learning for quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingheng; Shen, Lin; Yang, Weitao

    2017-10-28

    Ab initio quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulation is a useful tool to calculate thermodynamic properties such as potential of mean force for chemical reactions but intensely time consuming. In this paper, we developed a new method using the internal force correction for low-level semiempirical QM/MM molecular dynamics samplings with a predefined reaction coordinate. As a correction term, the internal force was predicted with a machine learning scheme, which provides a sophisticated force field, and added to the atomic forces on the reaction coordinate related atoms at each integration step. We applied this method to two reactions in aqueous solution and reproduced potentials of mean force at the ab initio QM/MM level. The saving in computational cost is about 2 orders of magnitude. The present work reveals great potentials for machine learning in QM/MM simulations to study complex chemical processes.

  2. Internal force corrections with machine learning for quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingheng; Shen, Lin; Yang, Weitao

    2017-10-01

    Ab initio quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulation is a useful tool to calculate thermodynamic properties such as potential of mean force for chemical reactions but intensely time consuming. In this paper, we developed a new method using the internal force correction for low-level semiempirical QM/MM molecular dynamics samplings with a predefined reaction coordinate. As a correction term, the internal force was predicted with a machine learning scheme, which provides a sophisticated force field, and added to the atomic forces on the reaction coordinate related atoms at each integration step. We applied this method to two reactions in aqueous solution and reproduced potentials of mean force at the ab initio QM/MM level. The saving in computational cost is about 2 orders of magnitude. The present work reveals great potentials for machine learning in QM/MM simulations to study complex chemical processes.

  3. Catalytic mechanism of RNA backbone cleavage by ribonuclease H from quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosta, Edina; Nowotny, Marcin; Yang, Wei; Hummer, Gerhard

    2011-06-15

    We use quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations to study the cleavage of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) backbone catalyzed by ribonuclease H. This protein is a prototypical member of a large family of enzymes that use two-metal catalysis to process nucleic acids. By combining Hamiltonian replica exchange with a finite-temperature string method, we calculate the free energy surface underlying the RNA-cleavage reaction and characterize its mechanism. We find that the reaction proceeds in two steps. In a first step, catalyzed primarily by magnesium ion A and its ligands, a water molecule attacks the scissile phosphate. Consistent with thiol-substitution experiments, a water proton is transferred to the downstream phosphate group. The transient phosphorane formed as a result of this nucleophilic attack decays by breaking the bond between the phosphate and the ribose oxygen. In the resulting intermediate, the dissociated but unprotonated leaving group forms an alkoxide coordinated to magnesium ion B. In a second step, the reaction is completed by protonation of the leaving group, with a neutral Asp132 as a likely proton donor. The overall reaction barrier of ∼15 kcal mol(-1), encountered in the first step, together with the cost of protonating Asp132, is consistent with the slow measured rate of ∼1-100/min. The two-step mechanism is also consistent with the bell-shaped pH dependence of the reaction rate. The nonmonotonic relative motion of the magnesium ions along the reaction pathway agrees with X-ray crystal structures. Proton-transfer reactions and changes in the metal ion coordination emerge as central factors in the RNA-cleavage reaction. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  4. Physiology and molecular mechanism of glucocorticoid action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Nagalski

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous glucocorticoids (GCs are secreted into the systemic circulation from the adrenal cortex. This release is under the control of the circadian clock and can be enhanced at any time in response to a stressor. The levels of circulating GC are regulated systemically by the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and locally by access to target cells and pre-receptor metabolism by 11β-hydroxysteroids dehydrogenase enzymes. GCs mediate their genomic action by binding to two different ligand-inducible transcription factors: high-affinity mineralocorticoid receptor (MR and 10-fold lower affinity glucocorticoid receptors (GRs. Responses to GCs vary among individuals, cells, and tissues. The diversity and specificity in the steroid hormone’s response in the cell is controlled at different levels, including receptor translocation, interaction with specific transcription factors and coregulators, and the regulation of receptor protein levels by microRNA. Moreover, multiple GR isoforms are generated from one single GR gene by alternative splicing and alternative translation initiation. These isoforms all have unique tissue distribution patterns and transcriptional regulatory profiles. Furthermore, each is subjected to various post-translational modifications that affect receptor function. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms of GC action is further complicated by the realization that GCs can induce rapid, non-genomic effects within the cytoplasm. A tight regulation of GC secretion and their cell-specific activity is essential for proper organism function. This is particularly seen under conditions of GC deficiency or excess, as in Addison’s disease and Cushing’s syndrome, respectively.

  5. [Multiple sclerosis: molecular and cellular mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boĭko, A N; Favorova, O O

    1995-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic central nervous system disease of considerable medical and social impact. It is characterized by destruction of the myelin, the axon proteolipid sheath, or demyelination. While the etiology of MS remains unknown, one of the most well-grounded theories of its pathogenesis postulates that immunomediated inflammatory processes play the main role in myelin damage. The leading role in the autoimmune disturbance development belongs to T-cell system, however, B-cells also participate in the pathological process. Both genetical predisposition and environmental influence are involved in MS development. Correlations were found between MS and numerous environmental factors, including ecology and different infectious agents. However, no single environmental factor and no single infection was confirmed to be the primary cause of MS. The predisposition to MS seems to depend on several genes. Alleles and haplotypes of HLA genes which are the main human immune-response genes are undoubtedly associated with MS. Serological methods have shown weak association of MS with A3 and B7 loci of HLA class I. Stronger association was found for HLA class II haplotype specified to DR2(DR15), DQ6(DQ1) in serology typing nomenclature or DRB1*1501, DQA1*0102, DQB1*0602 in sequence-based genotyping terminology. Besides, MS was found to be associated with alleles of genes of T-cell receptors, cytokines, myelin components and some others, although these results are sometimes contradictory. The analysis of genetical predisposition factors and of possible mechanisms of their involvement in demyelination process on molecular and cellular levels should enlighten the MS pathogenesis and provide new ways of medical treatment and prevention of MS.

  6. Silica Synthesis by Sponges: Unanticipated Molecular Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, D. E.; Weaver, J. C.

    2001-12-01

    substitutions of specific amino acid sidechains, in conjunction with computer-assisted molecular modeling and biomimetic synthesis, allowed us to probe the determinants of catalytic activity and confirm the identification of the amino acid sidechains required for hydrolysis of the silicon alkoxides. If, as suggested by the data of others, silicic acid is conjugated with organic moieties after its transport into the cell, the catalytic mechanism described here may be important in biosilicification by sponges. As is often the case, we have been better able to answer mechanistic questions about "how" silica can be formed biologically, than "why" the diversity of structures is elaborated. Studies of spicule formation during cellular regeneration in Tethya aurantia reveal that synthesis of the larger silica needles (megascleres) and smaller starburst-shaped microscleres may be independently regulated, presumably at the genetic level. The spatial segregation of these morphologically-distinct spicule types within the sponge further suggests an adaptive significance of the different skeletal elements.

  7. Molecular definitions of autophagy and related processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Baehrecke, Eric H.; Ballabio, Andrea; Boya, Patricia; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Cecconi, Francesco; Choi, Augustine MK; Chu, Charleen T.; Codogno, Patrice; Colombo, Maria Isabel; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Debnath, Jayanta; Deretic, Vojo; Dikic, Ivan; Eskelinen, Eeva-Liisa; Fimia, Gian Maria; Fulda, Simone; Gewirtz, David A.; Green, Douglas R.; Hansen, Malene; Harper, J. Wade; Jäättelä, Marja; Johansen, Terje; Juhasz, Gabor; Kimmelman, Alec C.; Kraft, Claudine; Ktistakis, Nicholas T.; Kumar, Sharad; Levine, Beth; Lopez-Otin, Carlos; Madeo, Frank; Martens, Sascha; Martinez, Jennifer; Melendez, Alicia; Mizushima, Noboru; Münz, Christian; Murphy, Leon O.; Penninger, Josef Martin; Piacentini, Mauro; Reggiori, Fulvio; Rubinsztein, David C.; Ryan, Kevin M.; Santambrogio, Laura; Scorrano, Luca; Simon, Anna Katharina; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Simonsen, Anne; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Tooze, Sharon A; Yoshimori, Tamotsu; Yuan, Junying; Yue, Zhenyu; Zhong, Qing; Kroemer, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the molecular machinery that underlies autophagic responses has been characterized with ever increasing precision in multiple model organisms. Moreover, it has become clear that autophagy and autophagy-related processes have profound implications for human pathophysiology.

  8. Cellular and molecular mechanisms coordinating pancreas development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastidas-Ponce, Aimée; Scheibner, Katharina; Lickert, Heiko; Bakhti, Mostafa

    2017-08-15

    The pancreas is an endoderm-derived glandular organ that participates in the regulation of systemic glucose metabolism and food digestion through the function of its endocrine and exocrine compartments, respectively. While intensive research has explored the signaling pathways and transcriptional programs that govern pancreas development, much remains to be discovered regarding the cellular processes that orchestrate pancreas morphogenesis. Here, we discuss the developmental mechanisms and principles that are known to underlie pancreas development, from induction and lineage formation to morphogenesis and organogenesis. Elucidating such principles will help to identify novel candidate disease genes and unravel the pathogenesis of pancreas-related diseases, such as diabetes, pancreatitis and cancer. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. HBV DNA Integration: Molecular Mechanisms and Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Thomas; Budzinska, Magdalena A; Shackel, Nicholas A; Urban, Stephan

    2017-04-10

    Chronic infection with the Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) is a major cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality. One peculiar observation in cells infected with HBV (or with closely‑related animal hepadnaviruses) is the presence of viral DNA integration in the host cell genome, despite this form being a replicative dead-end for the virus. The frequent finding of somatic integration of viral DNA suggests an evolutionary benefit for the virus; however, the mechanism of integration, its functions, and the clinical implications remain unknown. Here we review the current body of knowledge of HBV DNA integration, with particular focus on the molecular mechanisms and its clinical implications (including the possible consequences of replication-independent antigen expression and its possible role in hepatocellular carcinoma). HBV DNA integration is likely to influence HBV replication, persistence, and pathogenesis, and so deserves greater attention in future studies.

  10. HBV DNA Integration: Molecular Mechanisms and Clinical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Thomas; Budzinska, Magdalena A.; Shackel, Nicholas A.; Urban, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Chronic infection with the Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) is a major cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality. One peculiar observation in cells infected with HBV (or with closely‑related animal hepadnaviruses) is the presence of viral DNA integration in the host cell genome, despite this form being a replicative dead-end for the virus. The frequent finding of somatic integration of viral DNA suggests an evolutionary benefit for the virus; however, the mechanism of integration, its functions, and the clinical implications remain unknown. Here we review the current body of knowledge of HBV DNA integration, with particular focus on the molecular mechanisms and its clinical implications (including the possible consequences of replication-independent antigen expression and its possible role in hepatocellular carcinoma). HBV DNA integration is likely to influence HBV replication, persistence, and pathogenesis, and so deserves greater attention in future studies. PMID:28394272

  11. Metabolic alterations and molecular mechanism in silkworm larvae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Metabolic alterations and molecular mechanism in silkworm larvae during viral infection: A review. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... of sericulture largely and greatly depends on the metabolic modulations and molecular mechanism of silkworm, besides its genetic composition and immunological resistance. One of the ...

  12. Protein kinase C substrate phosphorylation in relation to neural growth and synaptic plasticity: a common molecular mechanism underlying multiple neural functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    In these studies, we addressed the issues of: (1) whether neural protein kinase C (PKC) substrates might be altered in phosphorylation following induction of long-term potentiation (LTP); (2) whether PKC substrate phosphorylation might be specifically related to a model of neural plasticity other than LTP; and (3) whether the PKC substrates implicated in adult synaptic plasticity might be present in axonal growth cones given reports that high concentrations of PKC are found in these structures. Using quantitative analysis of multiple two-dimensional gels, we found that the two major substrates of exogenous purified PKC in adult hippocampal homogenate are both directly correlated to persistence of LTP. In rhesus monkey cerebral cortex, the proteins corresponding to protein F1 and 80k displayed topographical gradients in /sup 32/P-incorporation along the occipitotemporal visual processing pathway. The phosphorylation of both proteins was 11- and 14-fold higher, respectively, in temporal regions of this pathway implicated in the storage of visual representations, than in occipital regions, which do not appear to directly participate in visual memory functions.

  13. Deciphering Molecular Mechanism Underlying Hypolipidemic Activity of Echinocystic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Han

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous study showed that a triterpene mixture, consisting of echinocystic acid (EA and oleanolic acid (OA at a ratio of 4 : 1, dose-dependently ameliorated the hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis in rabbits fed with high fat/high cholesterol diets. This study was aimed at exploring the mechanisms underlying antihyperlipidemic effect of EA. Molecular docking simulation of EA was performed using Molegro Virtual Docker (version: 4.3.0 to investigate the potential targets related to lipid metabolism. Based on the molecular docking information, isotope labeling method or spectrophotometry was applied to examine the effect of EA on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT, and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT in rat liver microsomes. Our results revealed a strong affinity of EA towards ACAT and DGAT in molecular docking analysis, while low binding affinity existed between EA and HMG-CoA reductase as well as between EA and cholesteryl ester transfer protein. Consistent with the results of molecular docking, in vitro enzyme activity assays showed that EA inhibited ACAT and DGAT, with IC50 values of 103 and 139 μM, respectively, and exhibited no significant effect on HMG-CoA reductase activity. The present findings suggest that EA may exert hypolipidemic effect by inhibiting the activity of ACAT and DGAT.

  14. Quantum mechanics of molecular rate processes

    CERN Document Server

    Levine, Raphael D

    1999-01-01

    This survey of applications of the theory of collisions and rate processes to molecular problems explores collisions of molecules with internal structure, generalized Ehrenfest theorem, theory of reactive collisions, and role of symmetry. It also reviews partitioning technique, equivalent potentials and quasibound states, theory of direct reactions, more. 1969 edition.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Survival Strategies in Extreme Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Migliardo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, one of the major challenges in biophysics is to disclose the molecular mechanisms underlying biological processes. In such a frame, the understanding of the survival strategies in extreme conditions received a lot of attention both from the scientific and applicative points of view. Since nature provides precious suggestions to be applied for improving the quality of life, extremophiles are considered as useful model-systems. The main goal of this review is to present an overview of some systems, with a particular emphasis on trehalose playing a key role in several extremophile organisms. The attention is focused on the relation among the structural and dynamic properties of biomolecules and bioprotective mechanisms, as investigated by complementary spectroscopic techniques at low- and high-temperature values.

  16. Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Study of the Sialyltransferase Reaction Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Yojiro; Kanematsu, Yusuke; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2016-10-11

    The sialyltransferase is an enzyme that transfers the sialic acid moiety from cytidine 5'-monophospho-N-acetyl-neuraminic acid (CMP-NeuAc) to the terminal position of glycans. To elucidate the catalytic mechanism of sialyltransferase, we explored the potential energy surface along the sialic acid transfer reaction coordinates by the hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics method on the basis of the crystal structure of sialyltransferase CstII. Our calculation demonstrated that CstII employed an S N 1-like reaction mechanism via the formation of a short-lived oxocarbenium ion intermediate. The computational barrier height was 19.5 kcal/mol, which reasonably corresponded with the experimental reaction rate. We also found that two tyrosine residues (Tyr156 and Tyr162) played a vital role in stabilizing the intermediate and the transition states by quantum mechanical interaction with CMP.

  17. DNA oxidation as a potential molecular mechanism mediating drug-induced birth defects: phenytoin and structurally related teratogens initiate the formation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in vitro and in vivo in murine maternal hepatic and embryonic tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L; Wells, P G

    1995-11-01

    M), reflected their murine teratogenic potency. Given the relatively low activities of cytochromes P450, compared to PHS and LPOs, in human and rodent embryonic tissues, these data support the potential teratological importance of peroxidase-catalysed bioactivation of xenobiotics with structural similarities to phenytoin. These studies provide the first evidence that peroxidase-catalysed embryonic DNA oxidation may constitute a critical molecular mechanism mediating the teratogenicity of phenytoin and related drugs and environmental chemicals, and suggest the potential teratological importance of additional embryonic processes, such as DNA repair and tumor suppressor genes, as determinants of susceptibility.

  18. The molecular mechanisms of offspring effects from obese pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dowling, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of obesity, increased weight gain and the popularity of high-fat \\/ high-sugar diets are seriously impacting upon the global population. Billions of individuals are affected, and although diet and lifestyle are of paramount importance to the development of adult obesity, compelling evidence is emerging which suggests that maternal obesity and related disorders may be passed on to the next generation by non-genetic means. The processes acting within the uteri of obese mothers may permanently predispose offspring to a diverse plethora of diseases ranging from obesity and diabetes to psychiatric disorders. This review aims to summarise some of the molecular mechanisms and active processes currently known about maternal obesity and its effect on foetal and neonatal physiology and metabolism. Complex and multifactorial networks of molecules are intertwined and culminate in a pathologically synergistic manner to cause disruption and disorganisation of foetal physiology. This altered phenotype may potentiate the cycle of intergenerational transmission of obesity and related disorders.

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Quantum Mechanics / Molecular Mechanics and Adaptive Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lin; Yang, Weitao

    2018-02-13

    Direct molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with ab initio quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) methods is very powerful for studying the mechanism of chemical reactions in complex environment but very time consuming. The computational cost on QM/MM calculations during MD simulations can be reduced significantly using semiempirical QM/MM methods with lower accuracy. To achieve higher accuracy at the ab initio QM/MM level, a correction on the existing semiempirical QM/MM model is an attractive way. Recently, we reported a neural network (NN) method as QM/MM-NN to predict the potential energy difference between semiempirical and ab initio QM/MM approaches. The high-level results can be obtained using neural network based on semiempirical QM/MM MD simulations, but the lack of direct MD samplings at the ab initio QM/MM level is still a deficiency that limits the applications of QM/MM-NN. In the present paper, we developed a dynamic scheme of QM/MM-NN for direct MD simulations on the NN-predicted potential energy surface to approximate ab initio QM/MM MD. Since some configurations excluded from the database for NN training were encountered during simulations, which may cause some difficulties on MD samplings, an adaptive procedure inspired by the selection scheme reported by Behler was employed with some adaptions to update NN and carry out MD iteratively. We further applied the adaptive QM/MM-NN MD method to the free energy calculation and transition path optimization on chemical reactions in water. The results at the ab initio QM/MM level can be well reproduced using this method after 2-4 iteration cycles. The saving in computational cost is about 2 orders of magnitude. It demonstrates that the QM/MM-NN with direct MD simulations has great potentials not only for the calculation of thermodynamic properties but also for the characterization of reaction dynamics, which provides a useful tool to study chemical or biochemical systems in solution or enzymes.

  20. Quantum Mechanical Studies of Molecular Hyperpolarizabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-30

    the molecular orbitals, leads to the coupled perturbed Hartree-Fock ( CPHF ) method.14 3 The U1 f X)(J; 2)l X(1; 2)d, 2 , (8) results of CPHF and CHF...thef fnrte-tid lent CPHF . ’ 16 At least in the static case these method. terms should not be considered as cnrrelation corrections. These terms arise...these formulas is obtain- tions, subject to the field-dependent orbitals. ed by excluding all even or odd terms in Eq. (1) by ( CPHF is the static

  1. Symposium on molecular and cellular mechanisms of mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    These proceedings contain abstracts only of the 21 papers presented at the Sympsoium. The papers dealt with molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis and cellular responses to chemical and physical mutagenic agents. (ERB)

  2. Molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones resistance in Mycoplasma hominis clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Dong-Ya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones resistance in Mycoplasma hominis (MH clinical strains isolated from urogenital specimens. 15 MH clinical isolates with different phenotypes of resistance to fluoroquinolones antibiotics were screened for mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs of DNA gyrase (gyrA and gyrB and topoisomerase IV (parC and parE in comparison with the reference strain PG21, which is susceptible to fluoroquinolones antibiotics. 15 MH isolates with three kinds of quinolone resistance phenotypes were obtained. Thirteen out of these quinolone-resistant isolates were found to carry nucleotide substitutions in either gyrA or parC. There were no alterations in gyrB and no mutations were found in the isolates with a phenotype of resistance to Ofloxacin (OFX, intermediate resistant to Levofloxacin (LVX and Sparfloxacin (SFX, and those susceptible to all three tested antibiotics. The molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical isolates of MH was reported in this study. The single amino acid mutation in ParC of MH may relate to the resistance to OFX and LVX and the high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones for MH is likely associated with mutations in both DNA gyrase and the ParC subunit of topoisomerase IV.

  3. Sarcoidosis extent relates to molecular variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monast, C S; Li, K; Judson, M A; Baughman, R P; Wadman, E; Watt, R; Silkoff, P E; Barnathan, E S; Brodmerkel, C

    2017-06-01

    The molecular basis of sarcoidosis phenotype heterogeneity and its relationship to effective treatment of sarcoidosis have not been elucidated. Peripheral samples from sarcoidosis subjects who participated in a Phase II study of golimumab [anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α] and ustekinumab [anti-interleukin (IL)-12p40] were used to measure the whole blood transcriptome and levels of serum proteins. Differential gene and protein expression analyses were used to explore the molecular differences between sarcoidosis phenotypes as defined by extent of organ involvement. The same data were also used in conjunction with an enrichment algorithm to identify gene expression changes associated with treatment with study drugs compared to placebo. Our analyses revealed marked heterogeneity among the three sarcoidosis phenotypes included in the study cohort, including striking differences in enrichment of the interferon pathway. Conversely, enrichments of multiple pathways, including T cell receptor signalling, were similar among phenotypes. We also identify differences between treatment with golimumab and ustekinumab that may explain the differences in trends for clinical efficacy observed in the trial. We find that molecular heterogeneity is associated with sarcoidosis in a manner that may be related to the extent of organ involvement. These findings may help to explain the difficulty in identifying clinically efficacious sarcoidosis treatments and suggest hypotheses for improved therapeutic strategies. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  4. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic lung disease characterized by excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) and remodeling of the lung architecture. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is considered the most common and severe form of the disease, with a median survival of approximately three years and no proven effective therapy. Despite the fact that effective treatments are absent and the precise mechanisms that drive fibrosis in most patients remain incompletely understood, an extensive body of scientific literature regarding pulmonary fibrosis has accumulated over the past 35 years. In this review, we discuss three broad areas which have been explored that may be responsible for the combination of altered lung fibroblasts, loss of alveolar epithelial cells, and excessive accumulation of ECM: inflammation and immune mechanisms, oxidative stress and oxidative signaling, and procoagulant mechanisms. We discuss each of these processes separately to facilitate clarity, but certainly significant interplay will occur amongst these pathways in patients with this disease. PMID:22824096

  5. Mechanical Properties of Nanostructured Materials Determined Through Molecular Modeling Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    The potential for gains in material properties over conventional materials has motivated an effort to develop novel nanostructured materials for aerospace applications. These novel materials typically consist of a polymer matrix reinforced with particles on the nanometer length scale. In this study, molecular modeling is used to construct fully atomistic models of a carbon nanotube embedded in an epoxy polymer matrix. Functionalization of the nanotube which consists of the introduction of direct chemical bonding between the polymer matrix and the nanotube, hence providing a load transfer mechanism, is systematically varied. The relative effectiveness of functionalization in a nanostructured material may depend on a variety of factors related to the details of the chemical bonding and the polymer structure at the nanotube-polymer interface. The objective of this modeling is to determine what influence the details of functionalization of the carbon nanotube with the polymer matrix has on the resulting mechanical properties. By considering a range of degree of functionalization, the structure-property relationships of these materials is examined and mechanical properties of these models are calculated using standard techniques.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of von Willebrand Factor mechanoregulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakobi, A.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311489621

    2012-01-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) multimers mediate primary adhesion and aggregation of platelets. The potency to recruit platelets critically depends on the size of VWF multimers, which is regulated by a feedback mechanism involving shear-induced unfolding of the A2 domain in VWF and cleavage by the

  7. Mechanism of Molecular Exchange in Copolymer Micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Hyung; Lodge, Timothy; Bates, Frank

    2010-03-01

    Compared to thermodynamic structure, much less has been known about the kinetics of block copolymer micelles which should underlay the attainment of thermodynamic equilibrium. In this presentation, molecular exchange between spherical micelles formed by isotopically labeled diblock copolymers was investigated using time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering. Two pairs of structurally matched poly(styrene-b-ethylene-alt-propylene) (PS-PEP) were synthesized and dispersed in isotopic mixture of squalane, highly selective to PEP block. Each pair includes polymers with fully deuterated (dPS-PEP) and a normal (hPS-PEP) PS blocks. Temperature dependence of the micelle exchange rate R(t) is consistent with melt dynamics for the core polymer. Furthermore, R(t) is significantly sensitive to the core block length N due to the thermodynamic penalty associated with ejecting a core block into the solvent. This hypersensitivity, combined with modest polydispersity in N, leads to an approximately logarithmic decay in R(t).

  8. Molecular mechanisms in plant abiotic stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poltronieri Palmiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Improved crop varieties are needed to sustain the food supply, to fight climate changes, water scarcity, temperature increase and a high variability of rainfalls. Variability of drought and increase in soil salinity have negative effects on plant growth and abiotic stresses seriously threaten sustainable agricultural production. To overcome the influence of abiotic stresses, new tolerant plant varieties and breeding techniques using assisted selection are sought. A deep understanding of the mechanisms that respond to stress and sustain stress resistance is required. Here is presented an overview of several mechanisms that interact in the stress response. Localised synthesis of plant hormones, second messengers and local effectors of abiotic stress response and survival, the signaling pathways regulated by plant hormones are today better understood. Metabolic networks in drought stress responses, long distance signaling, cross-talk between plant organs finalised to tissue-specific expression of abiotic stress relieving genes have been at the centre of most recent studies.

  9. Molecular mechanisms regulating NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Eun-Kyeong; Kim, Jin Kyung; Shin, Dong-Min; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are multi-protein signaling complexes that trigger the activation of inflammatory caspases and the maturation of interleukin-1β. Among various inflammasome complexes, the NLRP3 inflammasome is best characterized and has been linked with various human autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Thus, the NLRP3 inflammasome may be a promising target for anti-inflammatory therapies. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the mechanisms by which the NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in the cytosol. We also describe the binding partners of NLRP3 inflammasome complexes activating or inhibiting the inflammasome assembly. Our knowledge of the mechanisms regulating NLRP3 inflammasome signaling and how these influence inflammatory responses offers further insight into potential therapeutic strategies to treat inflammatory diseases associated with dysregulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:26549800

  10. Biological and molecular mechanisms of sulfur mustard analogue-induced toxicity in JB6 and HaCaT cells: possible role of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated/ataxia telangiectasia-Rad3-related cell cycle checkpoint pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari-Singh, Neera; Gu, Mallikarjuna; Agarwal, Chapla; White, Carl W; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2010-06-21

    Effective medical treatment and preventive measures for chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (HD)-caused incapacitating skin toxicity are lacking, because of limited knowledge of its mechanism of action. The proliferating basal epidermal cells are primary major sites of attack during HD-caused skin injury. Therefore, employing mouse JB6 and human HaCaT epidermal cells, here, we investigated the molecular mechanism of HD analogue 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES)-induced skin cytotoxicity. As compared to the control, up to 1 mM CEES treatment of these cells for 2, 4, and 24 h caused dose-dependent decreases in cell viability and proliferation as measured by DNA synthesis, together with S and G2-M phase arrest in cell cycle progression. Mechanistic studies showed phosphorylation of DNA damage sensors and checkpoint kinases, ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) at ser1981 and ataxia telangiectasia-Rad3-related (ATR) at ser428 within 30 min of CEES exposure, and modulation of S and G2-M phase-associated cell cycle regulatory proteins, which are downstream targets of ATM and ATR kinases. Hoechst-propidium iodide staining demonstrated that CEES-induced cell death was both necrotic and apoptotic in nature, and the latter was induced at 4 and 24 h of CEES treatment in HaCaT and JB6 cells, respectively. An increase in caspase-3 activity and both caspase-3 and poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) cleavage coinciding with CEES-caused apoptosis in both cell lines suggested the involvement of the caspase pathway. Together, our findings suggest a DNA-damaging effect of CEES that activates ATM/ATR cell cycle checkpoint signaling as well as caspase-PARP pathways, leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis/necrosis in both JB6 and HaCaT cells. The identified molecular targets, quantitative biomarkers, and epidermal cell models in this study have the potential and usefulness in rapid development of effective prophylactic and therapeutic interventions against HD-induced skin toxicity.

  11. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of muscle atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bonaldo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is a plastic organ that is maintained by multiple pathways regulating cell and protein turnover. During muscle atrophy, proteolytic systems are activated, and contractile proteins and organelles are removed, resulting in the shrinkage of muscle fibers. Excessive loss of muscle mass is associated with poor prognosis in several diseases, including myopathies and muscular dystrophies, as well as in systemic disorders such as cancer, diabetes, sepsis and heart failure. Muscle loss also occurs during aging. In this paper, we review the key mechanisms that regulate the turnover of contractile proteins and organelles in muscle tissue, and discuss how impairments in these mechanisms can contribute to muscle atrophy. We also discuss how protein synthesis and degradation are coordinately regulated by signaling pathways that are influenced by mechanical stress, physical activity, and the availability of nutrients and growth factors. Understanding how these pathways regulate muscle mass will provide new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of muscle atrophy in metabolic and neuromuscular diseases.

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of Circadian Regulation During Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, Susana; Boyle, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Disruption of the regular environmental circadian cues in addition to stringent and demanding operational schedules are two main factors that undoubtedly impact sleep patterns and vigilant performance in the astronaut crews during spaceflight. Most research is focused on the behavioral aspects of the risk of circadian desynchronization, characterized by fatigue and health and performance decrement. A common countermeasure for circadian re-entrainment utilizes blue-green light to entrain the circadian clock and mitigate this risk. However, an effective countermeasure targeting the photoreceptor system requires that the basic circadian molecular machinery remains intact during spaceflight. The molecular clock consists of sets of proteins that perform different functions within the clock machinery: circadian oscillators (genes whose expression levels cycle during the day, keep the pass of cellular time and regulate downstream effector genes), the effector or output genes (those which impact the physiology of the tissue or organism), and the input genes (responsible for sensing the environmental cues that allow circadian entrainment). The main environmental cue is light. As opposed to the known photoreceptors (rods and cones), the non-visual light stimulus is received by a subset of the population of retinal ganglion cells called intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC) that express melanopsin (opsin 4 -Opn4-) as the photoreceptor. We hypothesize that spaceflight may affect ipRGC and melanopsin expression, which may be a contributing cause of circadian disruption during spaceflight. To answer this question, eyes from albino Balb/cJ mice aboard STS-133 were collected for histological analysis and gene expression profiling of the retina at 1 and 7 days after landing. Both vivarium and AEM (animal enclosure module) mice were used as ground controls. Opn4 expression was analyzed by real time RT/qPCR and retinal sections were stained for Opn4

  13. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Palate Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C; Lan, Y; Jiang, R

    2017-10-01

    Development of the mammalian secondary palate involves highly dynamic morphogenetic processes, including outgrowth of palatal shelves from the oral side of the embryonic maxillary prominences, elevation of the initially vertically oriented palatal shelves to the horizontal position above the embryonic tongue, and subsequently adhesion and fusion of the paired palatal shelves at the midline to separate the oral cavity from the nasal cavity. Perturbation of any of these processes could cause cleft palate, a common birth defect that significantly affects patients' quality of life even after surgical treatment. In addition to identifying a large number of genes required for palate development, recent studies have begun to unravel the extensive cross-regulation of multiple signaling pathways, including Sonic hedgehog, bone morphogenetic protein, fibroblast growth factor, transforming growth factor β, and Wnt signaling, and multiple transcription factors during palatal shelf growth and patterning. Multiple studies also provide new insights into the gene regulatory networks and/or dynamic cellular processes underlying palatal shelf elevation, adhesion, and fusion. Here we summarize major recent advances and integrate the genes and molecular pathways with the cellular and morphogenetic processes of palatal shelf growth, patterning, elevation, adhesion, and fusion.

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of Opioid Receptor-Dependent Signaling and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hasani, Ream; Bruchas, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Opioid receptors have been targeted for the treatment of pain and related disorders for thousands of years, and remain the most widely used analgesics in the clinic. Mu (μ), kappa (κ), and delta (δ) opioid receptors represent the originally classified receptor subtypes, with opioid receptor like-1 (ORL1) being the least characterized. All four receptors are G-protein coupled, and activate inhibitory G-proteins. These receptors form homo- and hetereodimeric complexes, signal to kinase cascades, and scaffold a variety of proteins. In this review, we discuss classical mechanisms and developments in understanding opioid tolerance, opioid receptor signaling, and highlight advances in opioid molecular pharmacology, behavioral pharmacology, and human genetics. We put into context how opioid receptor signaling leads to the modulation of behavior with the potential for therapeutic intervention. Finally, we conclude that there is a continued need for more translational work on opioid receptors in vivo. PMID:22020140

  15. Conserved Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Homeostasis of the Golgi Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathal Wilson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Golgi complex performs a central function in the secretory pathway in the sorting and sequential processing of a large number of proteins destined for other endomembrane organelles, the plasma membrane, or secretion from the cell, in addition to lipid metabolism and signaling. The Golgi apparatus can be regarded as a self-organizing system that maintains a relatively stable morphofunctional organization in the face of an enormous flux of lipids and proteins. A large number of the molecular players that operate in these processes have been identified, their functions and interactions defined, but there is still debate about many aspects that regulate protein trafficking and, in particular, the maintenance of these highly dynamic structures and processes. Here, we consider how an evolutionarily conserved underlying mechanism based on retrograde trafficking that uses lipids, COPI, SNAREs, and tethers could maintain such a homeodynamic system.

  16. Relativity of representations in quantum mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    de la Torre, A C

    2001-01-01

    Only the position representation is used in introductory quantum mechanics and the momentum representation is not usually presented until advanced undergraduate courses. To emphasize the relativity of the representations of the abstract formulation of quantum mechanics, two examples of representations related to the operators aX+(1-a)P and (XP+PX)/2 are presented.

  17. Molecular Mechanisms of Circadian Regulation During Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, S. B.; Boyle, R.

    2012-01-01

    The physiology of both vertebrates and invertebrates follows internal rhythms coordinated in phase with the 24-hour daily light cycle. This circadian clock is governed by a central pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the brain. However, peripheral circadian clocks or oscillators have been identified in most tissues. How the central and peripheral oscillators are synchronized is still being elucidated. Light is the main environmental cue that entrains the circadian clock. Under the absence of a light stimulus, the clock continues its oscillation in a free-running condition. In general, three functional compartments of the circadian clock are defined. The vertebrate retina contains endogenous clocks that control many aspects of retinal physiology, including retinal sensitivity to light, neurohormone synthesis (melatonin and dopamine), rod disk shedding, signalling pathways and gene expression. Neurons with putative local circadian rhythm generation are found among all the major neuron populations in the mammalian retina. In the mouse, clock genes and function are more localized to the inner retinal and ganglion cell layers. The photoreceptor, however, secrete melatonin which may still serve a an important circadian signal. The reception and transmission of the non-visual photic stimulus resides in a small subpopulation (1-3%) or retinal ganglion cells (RGC) that express the pigment melanopsin (Opn4) and are called intrisically photoreceptive RGC (ipRGC). Melanopsin peak absorption is at 420 nm and all the axons of the ipRGC reach the SCN. A common countermeasure for circadian re-entrainment utilizes blue-green light to entrain the circadian clock and mitigate the risk of fatigue and health and performance decrement due to circadian rhythm disruption. However, an effective countermeasure targeting the photoreceptor system requires that the basic circadian molecular machinery remains intact during spaceflight. We hypothesize that spaceflight may affect ip

  18. Transcriptome analyses reveal molecular mechanism underlying tapping panel dryness of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis)

    OpenAIRE

    Dejun Li; Xuncheng Wang; Zhi Deng; Hui Liu; Hong Yang; Guangming He

    2016-01-01

    Tapping panel dryness (TPD) is a serious threat to natural rubber yields from rubber trees, but the molecular mechanisms underlying TPD remain poorly understood. To identify TPD-related genes and reveal these molecular mechanisms, we sequenced and compared the transcriptomes of bark between healthy and TPD trees. In total, 57,760 assembled genes were obtained and analyzed in details. In contrast to healthy rubber trees, 5652 and 2485 genes were up- or downregulated, respectively, in TPD trees...

  19. Mechanical properties of borophene films: a reactive molecular dynamics investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quy Le, Minh; Mortazavi, Bohayra; Rabczuk, Timon

    2016-11-01

    The most recent experimental advances could provide ways for the fabrication of several atomic thick and planar forms of boron atoms. For the first time, we explore the mechanical properties of five types of boron films with various vacancy ratios ranging from 0.1-0.15, using molecular dynamics simulations with ReaxFF force field. It is found that the Young’s modulus and tensile strength decrease with increasing the temperature. We found that boron sheets exhibit an anisotropic mechanical response due to the different arrangement of atoms along the armchair and zigzag directions. At room temperature, 2D Young’s modulus and fracture stress of these five sheets appear in the range 63-136 N m-1 and 12-19 N m-1, respectively. In addition, the strains at tensile strength are in the ranges of 9%-14%, 11%-19%, and 10%-16% at 1, 300, and 600 K, respectively. This investigation not only reveals the remarkable stiffness of 2D boron, but establishes relations between the mechanical properties of the boron sheets to the loading direction, temperature and atomic structures.

  20. Anemia: Progress in molecular mechanisms and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Vijay G.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Here we review recent insights into how red blood cells (RBCs) are produced, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying various forms of anemia, and novel therapies derived from these findings. It is likely that these new insights, mainly arising from basic scientific studies, will contribute immensely to understanding frequently debilitating forms of anemia and the ability to treat affected patients. Major worldwide diseases that may stand to benefit from the new advances include the hemoglobinopathies (β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease), rare genetic disorders of red blood cell production, and anemias associated with chronic kidney disease, inflammation, and cancer. Promising new treatment approaches include drugs that target recently defined pathways in red blood cell production, iron metabolism, and fetal globin gene expression, as well as gene therapies using improved viral vectors and newly developed genome editing technologies. PMID:25742458

  1. Anemia: progress in molecular mechanisms and therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Vijay G; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2015-03-01

    Anemia is a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Here we review recent insights into how red blood cells (RBCs) are produced, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying various forms of anemia, and novel therapies derived from these findings. It is likely that these new insights, mainly arising from basic scientific studies, will contribute immensely to both the understanding of frequently debilitating forms of anemia and the ability to treat affected patients. Major worldwide diseases that are likely to benefit from new advances include the hemoglobinopathies (β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease); rare genetic disorders of RBC production; and anemias associated with chronic kidney disease, inflammation, and cancer. Promising new approaches to treatment include drugs that target recently defined pathways in RBC production, iron metabolism, and fetal globin-family gene expression, as well as gene therapies that use improved viral vectors and newly developed genome editing technologies.

  2. Neurotrophin Propeptides: Biological Functions and Molecular Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafieva, Lola M; Gasanov, Eugene V

    2016-01-01

    Neurotrophins constitute a family of growth factors that play a key role in the regulation of the development and function of the central and peripheral nervous systems. A common feature of all the neurotrophins is their synthesis in cells as long precursors (pre-pro-neurotrophins) that contain an N-terminal signal peptide, a following propeptide and the mature neurotrophin. Although the signal peptide functions have been well studied, the role of neurotrophin propeptides is not so clear. Here, we briefly summarize the biochemistry of neurotrophin propeptides, including their role as folding-assistants for the mature factor and their role in processing and in secretion of neurotrophins. In the main part of the review we summarize our current state of knowledge of the biological activity of neurotrophin propeptides, their possible mechanisms of action, and their potential influence on the activity of the mature neurotrophins.

  3. Flavonoids health benefits and their molecular mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Z-P; Peng, Z-Y; Peng, M-J; Yan, W-B; Ouyang, Y-Z; Zhu, H-L

    2011-02-01

    Flavonoids are a group of polyphenolic compounds, diverse in chemical structure and characteristics, found ubiquitously in plants. Until now, more than 9000 different flavonoid compounds were described in plants, where they play important biological roles by affecting several developmental processes. There has been increasing interest in the research of flavonoids from dietary sources, due to growing evidence of the versatile health benefits of flavonoids including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiproliferative and anticancer activity, freeradical scavenging capacity, antihypertensive effects, coronary heart disease prevention and anti-human immunodeficiency virus functions. This paper reviews the current advances in flavonoids in food with emphasis on mechanism aspects on the basis of the published literature, which may provide some guidance for researchers in further investigations and for industries in developing practical health agents.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of memory in imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonia, Revaz O; McCabe, Brian J

    2015-03-01

    Converging evidence implicates the intermediate and medial mesopallium (IMM) of the domestic chick forebrain in memory for a visual imprinting stimulus. During and after imprinting training, neuronal responsiveness in the IMM to the familiar stimulus exhibits a distinct temporal profile, suggesting several memory phases. We discuss the temporal progression of learning-related biochemical changes in the IMM, relative to the start of this electrophysiological profile. c-fos gene expression increases <15 min after training onset, followed by a learning-related increase in Fos expression, in neurons immunopositive for GABA, taurine and parvalbumin (not calbindin). Approximately simultaneously or shortly after, there are increases in phosphorylation level of glutamate (AMPA) receptor subunits and in releasable neurotransmitter pools of GABA and taurine. Later, the mean area of spine synapse post-synaptic densities, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor number and phosphorylation level of further synaptic proteins are elevated. After ∼ 15 h, learning-related changes in amounts of several synaptic proteins are observed. The results indicate progression from transient/labile to trophic synaptic modification, culminating in stable recognition memory. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. MOLECULAR TARGETS AND MECHANISMS FOR ETHANOL ACTION IN GLYCINE RECEPTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Daya I.; Trudell, James R.; Crawford, Daniel K.; Alkana, Ronald L.; Davies, Daryl L.

    2010-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) are recognized as the primary mediators of neuronal inhibition in the spinal cord, brain stem and higher brain regions known to be sensitive to ethanol. Building evidence supports the notion that ethanol acting on GlyRs causes at least a subset of its behavioral effects and may be involved in modulating ethanol intake. For over two decades, GlyRs have been studied at the molecular level as targets for ethanol action. Despite the advances in understanding the effects of ethanol in vivo and in vitro, the precise molecular sites and mechanisms of action for ethanol in ligand-gated ion channels in general, and in GlyRs specifically, are just now starting to become understood. The present review focuses on advances in our knowledge produced by using molecular biology, pressure antagonism, electrophysiology and molecular modeling strategies over the last two decades to probe, identify and model the initial molecular sites and mechanisms of ethanol action in GlyRs. The molecular targets on the GlyR are covered on a global perspective, which includes the intracellular, transmembrane and extracellular domains. The latter has received increasing attention in recent years. Recent molecular models of the sites of ethanol action in GlyRs and their implications to our understanding of possible mechanism of ethanol action and novel targets for drug development in GlyRs are discussed. PMID:20399807

  6. Molecular Mechanism of Apoptosis and Necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulfidan Coskun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Organismal homeostasis depends on an intricate balance between cell death and renewal. Apoptosis is a process of programmed cell death that plays a critical role in some normal and pathologic conditions beginning from embryologic development and ends at death. Apoptosis is initiated by morphological changes at the cell membrane, surface organels and nucleus. Apoptosis starts with death signals coming from outside or inside of the cell and continue to activate the mechanisms of apoptosis via cell death receptor or mitochondrial pathways. During apoptosis a group proteases are activated which cause DNA fragmentation, cytoplasmic shrinkage and membrane blebbing. Apoptotic cells divide into apoptotic bodies and then these apoptotic bodies are removed from tissue by phagocytes and adjacent cells In contrast to the “programmed” nature of apoptosis, necrotic cell death has always been believed to be a random, uncontrolled process that leads to death of the cell. Also necrosis, which is an other type of cell death, came to be used to describe pathologic cell death which cause inflamation. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2011; 20(3.000: 145-158

  7. Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Mercury Transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    smith, jeremy

    2014-04-15

    Mercury (Hg) is a major global pollutant arising from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Defining the factors that determine the relative affinities of different ligands for the mercuric ion, Hg2+, is critical to understanding its speciation, transformation, and bioaccumulation in the environment. Here, we used quantum chemistry to dissect the relative binding free energies for a series of inorganic anion complexes of Hg2+. The results show that, whereas in the gas phase the binding affinity of two identical anionic ligands (forming HgL2) increases with ligand (L–) hardness, in contrast, in the aqueous phase the affinity increases with ligand softness. This switch in affinity upon hydration is shown to result mostly from interactions with only a small number (e.g. one or two) of water molecules. The results yield a clear, robust periodic trend within the chalcogenide and halide groups and are in agreement with the well-known experimentally observed preference of Hg2+ for soft ligands. By comparing the Hg2+ binding of one with two anions, the gas phase preferences are found to arise from the enhancement of reactivity of the cationic complex (HgL+) with the hardness of L–. The approach establishes a theoretical basis for understanding Hg speciation in the biosphere.

  8. Molecular mechanisms of dominant expression in porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badminton, M N; Elder, G H

    2005-01-01

    Partial deficiency of enzymes in the haem synthetic pathway gives rise to a group of seven inherited metabolic disorders, the porphyrias. Each deficiency is associated with a characteristic increase in haem precursors that correlates with the symptoms associated with individual porphyrias and allows accurate diagnosis. Two types of clinical presentation occur separately or in combination; acute life-threatening neurovisceral attacks and/or cutaneous symptoms. Five of the porphyrias are low-penetrance autosomal dominant conditions in which clinical expression results from additional factors that act by increasing demand for haem or by causing an additional decrease in enzyme activity or by a combination of these effects. These include both genetic and environmental factors. In familial porphyria cutanea tarda (PCTF), environmental factors that include alcohol, exogenous oestrogens and hepatotropic viruses result in inhibition of hepatic enzyme activity via a mechanism that involves excess iron accumulation. In erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP), co-inheritance of a functional polymorphism in trans to a null ferrochelatase allele accounts for most clinically overt cases. In the autosomal dominant acute hepatic porphyrias (acute intermittent porphyria, variegate porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria), acute neurovisceral attacks occur in a minority of those who inherit one of these disorders. Although various exogenous (e.g. drugs, alcohol) and endogenous factors (e.g. hormones) have been identified as provoking acute attacks, these do not provide a full explanation for the low penetrance of these disorders. It seems probable that genetic background influences susceptibility to acute attacks, but the genes that are involved have not yet been identified.

  9. Reaction Mechanism of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Glutamine Synthetase Using Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Cátia; Ramos, Maria J; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino

    2016-06-27

    This paper is devoted to the understanding of the reaction mechanism of mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine synthetase (mtGS) with atomic detail, using computational quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods at the ONIOM M06-D3/6-311++G(2d,2p):ff99SB//B3LYP/6-31G(d):ff99SB level of theory. The complete reaction undergoes a three-step mechanism: the spontaneous transfer of phosphate from ATP to glutamate upon ammonium binding (ammonium quickly loses a proton to Asp54), the attack of ammonia on phosphorylated glutamate (yielding protonated glutamine), and the deprotonation of glutamine by the leaving phosphate. This exothermic reaction has an activation free energy of 21.5 kcal mol(-1) , which is consistent with that described for Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase (15-17 kcal mol(-1) ). The participating active site residues have been identified and their role and energy contributions clarified. This study provides an insightful atomic description of the biosynthetic reaction that takes place in this enzyme, opening doors for more accurate studies for developing new anti-tuberculosis therapies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Mini-review: Molecular mechanisms of antifouling compounds

    KAUST Repository

    Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2013-04-01

    Various antifouling (AF) coatings have been developed to protect submerged surfaces by deterring the settlement of the colonizing stages of fouling organisms. A review of the literature shows that effective AF compounds with specific targets are ones often considered non-toxic. Such compounds act variously on ion channels, quorum sensing systems, neurotransmitters, production/release of adhesive, and specific enzymes that regulate energy production or primary metabolism. In contrast, AF compounds with general targets may or may not act through toxic mechanisms. These compounds affect a variety of biological activities including algal photosynthesis, energy production, stress responses, genotoxic damage, immunosuppressed protein expression, oxidation, neurotransmission, surface chemistry, the formation of biofilms, and adhesive production/release. Among all the targets, adhesive production/release is the most common, possibly due to a more extensive research effort in this area. Overall, the specific molecular targets and the molecular mechanisms of most AF compounds have not been identified. Thus, the information available is insufficient to draw firm conclusions about the types of molecular targets to be used as sensitive biomarkers for future design and screening of compounds with AF potential. In this review, the relevant advantages and disadvantages of the molecular tools available for studying the molecular targets of AF compounds are highlighted briefly and the molecular mechanisms of the AF compounds, which are largely a source of speculation in the literature, are discussed. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  11. Molecular Theory of the Living Cell Concepts, Molecular Mechanisms, and Biomedical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Sungchul

    2012-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive molecular theory of the living cell based on over thirty concepts, principles and laws imported from thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, chemical kinetics, informatics, computer science, linguistics, semiotics, and philosophy. The author formulates physically, chemically and enzymologically realistic molecular mechanisms to account for the basic living processes such as ligand-receptor interactions, protein folding, single-molecule enzymic catalysis, force-generating mechanisms in molecular motors, signal transduction, regulation of the genome-wide RNA metabolism, morphogenesis, the micro-macro coupling in coordination dynamics, the origin of life, and the mechanisms of biological evolution itself. Possible solutions to basic and practical problems facing contemporary biology and biomedical sciences have been suggested, including pharmacotheragnostics and personalized medicine.

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Mercury Transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, Anne O. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Microbiology; Smith, Jeremy C. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology

    2016-04-25

    Hg is of special interest to DOE due to past intensive use in manufacture of nuclear weapons at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Because of its facile oxidation/reduction [Hg(II)/Hg(0)] chemistry, ability to bond to carbon [as in highly toxic methylmercury: MeHg(I)] and its unique physical properties [e.g., volatility of Hg(0)], Hg has a complex environmental cycle involving soils, sediments, waterways and the atmosphere and including biotic and abiotic chemical and physical transport and transformations. Understanding such processes well enough to design stewardship plans that minimize negative impacts in diverse ecological settings requires rich knowledge of the contributing abiotic and biotic processes. Prokaryotes are major players in the global Hg cycle. Facultative and anaerobic bacteria can form MeHg(I) with consequent intoxication of wildlife and humans. Sustainable stewardship of Hg-contaminated sites requires eliminating not only MeHg(I) but also the Hg(II) substrate for methylation. Fortunately, a variety of mercury resistant (HgR) aerobic and facultative bacteria and archaea can do both things. Prokaryotes harboring narrow or broad Hg resistance (mer) loci detoxify Hg(II) or RHg(I), respectively, to relatively inert, less toxic, volatile Hg(0). HgR microbes are enriched in highly contaminated sites and extensive field data show they depress levels of MeHg >500-fold in such zones. So, enhancing the natural capacity of indigenous HgR microbes to remove Hg(II) and RHg(I) from soils, sediments and waterways is a logical component of a comprehensive plan for clean up and stewardship of contaminated sites.

  13. Cisplatin in cancer therapy: molecular mechanisms of action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasari, Shaloam; Tchounwou, Paul Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin, cisplatinum, or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II), is a well-known chemotherapeutic drug. It has been used for treatment of numerous human cancers including bladder, head and neck, lung, ovarian, and testicular cancers. It is effective against various types of cancers, including carcinomas, germ cell tumors, lymphomas, and sarcomas. Its mode of action has been linked to its ability to crosslink with the purine bases on the DNA; interfering with DNA repair mechanisms, causing DNA damage, and subsequently inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. However, because of drug resistance and numerous undesirable side effects such as severe kidney problems, allergic reactions, decrease immunity to infections, gastrointestinal disorders, hemorrhage, and hearing loss especially in younger patients, other platinum-containing anti-cancer drugs such as carboplatin, oxaliplatin and others, have also been used. Furthermore, combination therapies of cisplatin with other drugs have been highly considered to overcome drug-resistance and reduce toxicity. This comprehensive review highlights the physicochemical properties of cisplatin and related platinum-based drugs, and discusses its uses (either alone or in combination with other drugs) for the treatment of various human cancers. A special attention is given to its molecular mechanisms of action, and its undesirable side effects. PMID:25058905

  14. Special Relativity, Causality and Quantum Mechanics-2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 9. Special Relativity, Causality and Quantum Mechanics - 2. Guruprasad Kar Samir Kunkri Sujit K Choudhary. General Article Volume 11 Issue 9 September 2006 pp 43-54 ...

  15. Risk sharing relations and enforcement mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barr, A.; Dekker, M.; Fafchamps, M.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate whether the set of available enforcement mechanisms affects the formation of risk sharing relations by applying dyadic regression analysis to data from a specifically designed behavioural experiment, two surveys and a genealogical mapping exercise. During the experiment participants

  16. Prediction of mechanical properties for hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets using molecular mechanics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsuki, Toshiaki; Natsuki, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Mechanical behaviors of nanomaterials are not easy to be evaluated in the laboratory because of their extremely small size and difficulty controlling. Thus, a suitable model for the estimation of the mechanical properties for nanomaterials becomes very important. In this study, the elastic properties of boron nitride (BN) nanosheets, including the elastic modulus, the shear modulus, and the Poisson's ratio, are predicted using a molecular mechanics model. The molecular mechanics force filed is established to directly incorporate the Morse potential function into the constitutive model of nanostructures. According to the molecular mechanics model, the chirality effect of hexagonal BN nanosheets on the elastic modulus is investigated through a closed-form solution. The simulated result shows that BN nanosheets exhibit an isotropic elastic property. The present analysis yields a set of very simple formulas and is able to be served as a good approximation on the mechanical properties for the BN nanosheets.

  17. Prediction of mechanical properties for hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets using molecular mechanics model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natsuki, Toshiaki [Shinshu University, Faculty of Textile Science and Technology, Ueda (Japan); Shinshu University, Institute of Carbon Science and Technology, Nagano (Japan); Natsuki, Jun [Shinshu University, Institute of Carbon Science and Technology, Nagano (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Mechanical behaviors of nanomaterials are not easy to be evaluated in the laboratory because of their extremely small size and difficulty controlling. Thus, a suitable model for the estimation of the mechanical properties for nanomaterials becomes very important. In this study, the elastic properties of boron nitride (BN) nanosheets, including the elastic modulus, the shear modulus, and the Poisson's ratio, are predicted using a molecular mechanics model. The molecular mechanics force filed is established to directly incorporate the Morse potential function into the constitutive model of nanostructures. According to the molecular mechanics model, the chirality effect of hexagonal BN nanosheets on the elastic modulus is investigated through a closed-form solution. The simulated result shows that BN nanosheets exhibit an isotropic elastic property. The present analysis yields a set of very simple formulas and is able to be served as a good approximation on the mechanical properties for the BN nanosheets. (orig.)

  18. Nuclear Magnetic Shielding Constants from Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Calculations Using Polarizable Embedding: Role of the Embedding Potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinmann, Casper; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Kongsted, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    shielding constants of both acrolein and acetone solvated in water are based on a number of snapshots extracted from classical molecular dynamics simulations. We focus on the carbonyl chromophore in both molecules, which shows large solvation effects, and we study the convergence of shielding constants......We present NMR shielding constants obtained through quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) embedding calculations. Contrary to previous reports, we show that a relatively small QM region is sufficient, provided that a high-quality embedding potential is used. The calculated averaged NMR...

  19. Antigenic variation: Molecular and genetic mechanisms of relapsing disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruse, J.M.; Lewis, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. They are: Contemporary Concepts of Antigenic Variation; Antigenic Variation in the Influenza Viruses; Mechanisms of Escape of Visna Lentiviruses from Immunological Control; A Review of Antigenic Variation by the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus; Biologic and Molecular Variations in AIDS Retrovirus Isolates; Rabies Virus Infection: Genetic Mutations and the Impact on Viral Pathogenicity and Immunity; Immunobiology of Relapsing Fever; Antigenic Variation in African Trypanosomes; Antigenic Variation and Antigenic Diversity in Malaria; and Mechanisms of Immune Evasion in Schistosomiasis.

  20. Applications of molecular quantum mechanics to problems in chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, H.F. III

    1983-03-01

    The past decade has witnessed remarkable progress in the development of rigorous quantum mechanical methods for the study of molecular electronic structure. Key developments include the emergence of large scale configuration interaction methods (including more than one million variational parameters) and of analytic first and second energy derivative techniques. These advances have greatly increased the scope of current applications of quantun mechanics to chemistry. Present and anticipated future developments with respect to the fields of physical, organic, and inorganic chemistry are surveyed.

  1. Combination of metformin with chemotherapeutic drugs via different molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Mei; Darko, Kwame Oteng; Tao, Ting; Huang, Yanjun; Su, Qiongli; He, Caimei; Yin, Tao; Liu, Zhaoqian; Yang, Xiaoping

    2017-03-01

    Metformin, a widely prescribed drug for treating type II diabetes, is one of the most extensively recognized metabolic modulators which has shown an important anti-cancer property. However, fairly amount of clinical trials on its single administration have not demonstrated a convincing efficiency yet. Thus, recent studies tend to combine metformin with clinical commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs to decrease their toxicity and attenuate their tumor resistance. These strategies have displayed promising clinical benefits. Interestingly, metformin experiences a diversity of molecular mechanisms when it combines different chemotherapeutic drugs. For example, AMPK/mTOR signaling pathway activation plays a major role when it combines with hormone modulating drugs. In contrast, suppression of HIF-1, p-gp and MRP1 protein expression is its main mechanism when metformin combines with anti-metabolites. Furthermore, when combining of metformin with antibiotics, inhibition of oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling pathway becomes a novel pharmaceutical mechanism for its cardio-protective effect. Induction of apoptotic mitochondria and nucleus could be the major player for the synergistic effect of its combination with cisplatin. In contrast, down-regulation of lipoprotein or cholesterol synthesis might be the undefined molecular base when metformin combines with taxane. Thus, deep exploration of molecular mechanisms of metformin with these different drugs is critical to understand its synergistic effect and help for personalized administration. In this mini-review, detailed molecular mechanisms of these combinations are discussed and summarized. This work will promote better understanding of molecular mechanisms of metformin and provide precise targets to identify specific patient groups to achieve satisfactory treatment efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Molecular Mechanisms of Offspring Effects from Obese Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Dowling

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of obesity, increased weight gain and the popularity of high-fat / high-sugar diets are seriously impacting upon the global population. Billions of individuals are affected, and although diet and lifestyle are of paramount importance to the development of adult obesity, compelling evidence is emerging which suggests that maternal obesity and related disorders may be passed on to the next generation by non-genetic means. The processes acting within the uteri of obese mothers may permanently predispose offspring to a diverse plethora of diseases ranging from obesity and diabetes to psychiatric disorders. This review aims to summarise some of the molecular mechanisms and active processes currently known about maternal obesity and its effect on foetal and neonatal physiology and metabolism. Complex and multifactorial networks of molecules are intertwined and culminate in a pathologically synergistic manner to cause disruption and disorganisation of foetal physiology. This altered phenotype may potentiate the cycle of intergenerational transmission of obesity and related disorders.

  3. Possible molecular mechanisms linking air pollution and asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Susanna; Tenconi, Rossana; Lelii, Mara; Preti, Valentina; Nazzari, Erica; Consolo, Silvia; Patria, Maria Francesca

    2014-03-01

    Air pollution has many effects on the health of both adults and children, but children's vulnerability is unique. The aim of this review is to discuss the possible molecular mechanisms linking air pollution and asthma in children, also taking into account their genetic and epigenetic characteristics. Air pollutants appear able to induce airway inflammation and increase asthma morbidity in children. A better definition of mechanisms related to pollution-induced airway inflammation in asthmatic children is needed in order to find new clinical and therapeutic strategies for preventing the exacerbation of asthma. Moreover, reducing pollution-induced oxidative stress and consequent lung injury could decrease children's susceptibility to air pollution. This would be extremely useful not only for the asthmatic children who seem to have a genetic susceptibility to oxidative stress, but also for the healthy population. In addition, epigenetics seems to have a role in the lung damage induced by air pollution. Finally, a number of epidemiological studies have demonstrated that exposure to common air pollutants plays a role in the susceptibility to, and severity of respiratory infections. Air pollution has many negative effects on pediatric health and it is recognised as a serious health hazard. There seems to be an association of air pollution with an increased risk of asthma exacerbations and acute respiratory infections. However, further studies are needed in order to clarify the specific mechanism of action of different air pollutants, identify genetic polymorphisms that modify airway responses to pollution, and investigate the effectiveness of new preventive and/or therapeutic approaches for subjects with low antioxidant enzyme levels. Moreover, as that epigenetic changes are inheritable during cell division and may be transmitted to subsequent generations, it is very important to clarify the role of epigenetics in the relationship between air pollution and lung disease

  4. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of aldosterone producing adenoma development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheerazed eBoulkroun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary aldosteronism (PA is the most common form of secondary hypertension with an estimated prevalence of ~10% in referred patients. PA occurs as a result of a dysregulation of the normal mechanisms controlling adrenal aldosterone production. It is characterized by hypertension with low plasma renin and elevated aldosterone and often associated with hypokalemia. The two major causes of PA are unilateral aldosterone producing adenoma (APA and bilateral adrenal hyperplasia, accounting together for ~95% of cases. In addition to the well-characterized effect of excess mineralocorticoids on blood pressure, high levels of aldosterone also have cardiovascular, renal and metabolic consequences. Hence, long-term consequences of PA include increased risk of coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, heart failure and atrial fibrillation. Despite recent progress in the management of patients with PA, critical issues related to diagnosis, subtype differentiation and treatment of non-surgically correctable forms still persist. A better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of the disease should lead to the identification of more reliable diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for a more sensitive and specific screening and new therapeutic options. In this review we will summarize our current knowledge on the molecular and cellular mechanisms of APA development. On one hand, we will discuss how various animal models have improved our understanding of the pathophysiology of excess aldosterone production. On the other hand, we will summarize the major advances made during the last few years in the genetics of APA due to transcriptomic studies and whole exome sequencing. The identification of recurrent and somatic mutations in genes coding for ion channels (KCNJ5 and CACNA1D and ATPases (ATP1A1 and ATP2B3 allowed highlighting the central role of calcium signaling in autonomous aldosterone production by the adrenal.

  5. Resveratrol and Calcium Signaling: Molecular Mechanisms and Clinical Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey E. McCalley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is a naturally occurring compound contributing to cellular defense mechanisms in plants. Its use as a nutritional component and/or supplement in a number of diseases, disorders, and syndromes such as chronic diseases of the central nervous system, cancer, inflammatory diseases, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases has prompted great interest in the underlying molecular mechanisms of action. The present review focuses on resveratrol, specifically its isomer trans-resveratrol, and its effects on intracellular calcium signaling mechanisms. As resveratrol’s mechanisms of action are likely pleiotropic, its effects and interactions with key signaling proteins controlling cellular calcium homeostasis are reviewed and discussed. The clinical relevance of resveratrol’s actions on excitable cells, transformed or cancer cells, immune cells and retinal pigment epithelial cells are contrasted with a review of the molecular mechanisms affecting calcium signaling proteins on the plasma membrane, cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria. The present review emphasizes the correlation between molecular mechanisms of action that have recently been identified for resveratrol and their clinical implications.

  6. Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Simulations Identify the Ring-Opening Mechanism of Creatininase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitonnom, Jitrayut; Mujika, Jon I; van der Kamp, Marc W; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2017-12-05

    Creatininase catalyzes the conversion of creatinine (a biosensor for kidney function) to creatine via a two-step mechanism: water addition followed by ring opening. Water addition is common to other known cyclic amidohydrolases, but the precise mechanism for ring opening is still under debate. The proton donor in this step is either His178 or a water molecule bound to one of the metal ions, and the roles of His178 and Glu122 are unclear. Here, the two possible reaction pathways have been fully examined by means of combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations at the SCC-DFTB/CHARMM22 level of theory. The results indicate that His178 is the main catalytic residue for the whole reaction and explain its role as proton shuttle during the ring-opening step. In the first step, His178 provides electrostatic stabilization to the gem-diolate tetrahedral intermediate. In the second step, His178 abstracts the hydroxyl proton of the intermediate and delivers it to the cyclic amide nitrogen, leading to ring opening. The latter is the rate-limiting step with a free energy barrier of 18.5 kcal/mol, in agreement with the experiment. We find that Glu122 must be protonated during the enzyme reaction, so that it can form a stable hydrogen bond with its neighboring water molecule. Simulations of the E122Q mutant showed that this replacement disrupts the H-bond network formed by three conserved residues (Glu34, Ser78, and Glu122) and water, increasing the energy barrier. Our computational studies provide a comprehensive explanation for previous structural and kinetic observations, including why the H178A mutation causes a complete loss of activity but the E122Q mutation does not.

  7. Survival under stress: molecular mechanisms of metabolic rate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies in my laboratory are analysing the molecular mechanisms and regulatory events that underlie transitions to and from hypometabolic states In systems including ... Our newest research targets two areas: the role of protein kinases in regulating metabolic adjustments and the role of stress-induced gene expression in ...

  8. Molecular pathogenetic mechanisms of nephrotic edema: progress in understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camici, Marcello

    2005-06-01

    Molecular and pathogenetic mechanisms in sodium retention and water reabsorption of nephrotic edema are discussed. Are reported and analyzed molecular mechanisms about sodium retention in collecting duct cells regarding activation and surface expression of epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) and sodium-potassium-ATPase (Na,K-ATPase) by aldosterone, vasopressin, natriuretic peptide system (underfill theory): is necessary a better understanding about the dysregulation of ENaC and Na,K-ATPase surface expression and the resistance to natriuretic peptide system. Are also reported and analyzed molecular mechanisms of sodium retention in proximal tubule cells regarding intrinsic albumin toxicity upon type 3 sodium-hydrogen exchanger ionic pump and the activity of sodium-hydrogen exchanger regulatory factor protein (overfill theory): a better knowledge about the link between albumin, sodium-hydrogen exchanger type 3 (NHE3) ionic pump, sodium-hydrogen exchanger regulatory factor protein is necessary. Then molecular mechanisms of vasopressin free water retention through acquaporin water channels in collecting duct cells are discussed: further studies are necessary to understand vasopressin release pathway (osmotic/nonosmotic) and V2 receptor activation with cell surface expression of renal acquaporins water channel.

  9. molecular mechanisms of metabolic rate depression in animals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    55-4. Survival under stress: molecular mechanisms of metabolic rate depression in animals. Kenneth B. Storey. Institute of Biochemistry, Departments of Biology and Chemistry, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1S 5B6. E-mail: kbstorey@ccs.earleton.ea. Received 1 September 1997; accepted 4 March J 998.

  10. Molecular mechanisms of epithelial host defense in the airways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Joost Bastiaan

    2007-01-01

    Airway epithelial cells are indispensable for the host defense system in the lungs. Various strategies by which epithelial cells protect the lungs against inhaled pathogens have been described. In spite of that, the molecular mechanisms by which epithelial cells initiate and control the host defense

  11. Advance of Mechanically Controllable Break Junction for Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Lei; Xiang, Dong

    2017-06-01

    Molecular electronics stands for the ultimate size of functional elements, keeping up with an unstoppable trend over the past few decades. As a vital component of molecular electronics, single molecular junctions have attracted significant attention from research groups all over the world. Due to its pronounced superiority, the mechanically controllable break junctions (MCBJ) technique has been widely applied to characterize the dynamic performance of single molecular junctions. This review presents a system analysis for single-molecule junctions and offers an overview of four test-beds for single-molecule junctions, thus offering more insight into the mechanisms of electron transport. We mainly focus on the development of state-of-the-art mechanically controlled break junctions. The three-terminal gated MCBJ approaches are introduced to manipulate the electron transport of molecules, and MCBJs are combined with characterization techniques. Additionally, applications of MCBJs and remarkable properties of single molecules are addressed. Finally, the challenges and perspective for the mechanically controllable break junctions technique are provided.

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of Bone 18F-NaF Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Czernin, Johannes; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Schiepers, Christiaan

    2010-01-01

    There is renewed interest in 18F-NaF bone imaging with PET or PET/CT. The current brief discussion focuses on the molecular mechanisms of 18F-NaF deposition in bone and presents model-based approaches to quantifying bone perfusion and metabolism in the context of preclinical and clinical applications of bone imaging with PET.

  13. Molecular mechanisms of disease in hereditary red blood cell enzymopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, Henricus Anthonius van

    2004-01-01

    Metabolically defective red blood cells are old before their time, and suffer from metabolic progeria. The focus of this thesis was to identify the molecular mechanisms by which inherited enzymopathies of the red blood cell lead to impaired enzyme function and, consequently, shorten red blood cell

  14. Prediction of Sliding Friction Coefficient Based on a Novel Hybrid Molecular-Mechanical Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaogang; Zhang, Yali; Wang, Jianmei; Sheng, Chenxing; Li, Zhixiong

    2018-08-01

    Sliding friction is a complex phenomenon which arises from the mechanical and molecular interactions of asperities when examined in a microscale. To reveal and further understand the effects of micro scaled mechanical and molecular components of friction coefficient on overall frictional behavior, a hybrid molecular-mechanical model is developed to investigate the effects of main factors, including different loads and surface roughness values, on the sliding friction coefficient in a boundary lubrication condition. Numerical modelling was conducted using a deterministic contact model and based on the molecular-mechanical theory of friction. In the contact model, with given external loads and surface topographies, the pressure distribution, real contact area, and elastic/plastic deformation of each single asperity contact were calculated. Then asperity friction coefficient was predicted by the sum of mechanical and molecular components of friction coefficient. The mechanical component was mainly determined by the contact width and elastic/plastic deformation, and the molecular component was estimated as a function of the contact area and interfacial shear stress. Numerical results were compared with experimental results and a good agreement was obtained. The model was then used to predict friction coefficients in different operating and surface conditions. Numerical results explain why applied load has a minimum effect on the friction coefficients. They also provide insight into the effect of surface roughness on the mechanical and molecular components of friction coefficients. It is revealed that the mechanical component dominates the friction coefficient when the surface roughness is large (Rq > 0.2 μm), while the friction coefficient is mainly determined by the molecular component when the surface is relatively smooth (Rq < 0.2 μm). Furthermore, optimal roughness values for minimizing the friction coefficient are recommended.

  15. Hardening Mechanisms of Silicon Nanospheres: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    grants NSF_CMMI 0800896 and CMMI -1000415. Additional support was obtained by the Air Force through an AOARD-08-4131 program dedicated to...directly compare these types of simulations to the experimental results. The focus of this thesis is the molecular dynamics simulations related to the...response of real material response. 1.2 Experimental Background Because the molecular dynamics simulations that comprise this thesis are

  16. Substrate binding and catalytic mechanism in phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus. a molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Graça Thrige, D; Buur, J R; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    1997-01-01

    For the first time a consistent catalytic mechanism of phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus is reported based on molecular mechanics calculations. We have identified the position of the nucleophilic water molecule, which is directly involved in the hydrolysis of the natural substrate phosphatidyl......For the first time a consistent catalytic mechanism of phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus is reported based on molecular mechanics calculations. We have identified the position of the nucleophilic water molecule, which is directly involved in the hydrolysis of the natural substrate...... phosphatidylcholine, in phospholipase C. This catalytically essential water molecule, after being activated by an acidic residue (Asp55), performs the nucleophilic attack on the phosphorus atom in the substrate, leading to a trigonal bipyramidal pentacoordinated intermediate (and structurally similar transition state......). The subsequent collapse of the intermediate, regeneration of the enzyme, and release of the products has to involve a not yet identified second water molecule. The catalytic mechanism reported here is based on a series of molecular mechanics calculations. First, the x-ray structure of phospholipase C from B...

  17. Molecular mechanisms of morning onset of myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maemura, K; Layne, M D; Watanabe, M; Perrell, M A; Nagai, R; Lee, M E

    2001-12-01

    We recently isolated a novel bHLH/PAS protein, CLIF (cycle like factor), by yeast two-hybrid screening of human umbilical endothelial cell cDNA library. CLIF is preferentially expressed in endothelial and neuronal cells. Because CLIF is expressed in vascular endothelial cells and forms a heterodimer with CLOCK, the key transcription factor controlling the circadian rhythm, we hypothesized that CLIF regulates the circadian oscillation of PAI-1 gene expression in endothelial cells. Northern blot analysis of mouse organs showed circadian oscillations of PAI-I mRNA levels. In addition, the clock-related genes also showed circadian oscillation in peripheral tissues. In endothelial cells, the heterodimer of CLIF and CLOCK upregulated the PAI-1 gene expression through E-box sites. Furthermore, Period and Cryptochrome, which are negative regulators in the feedback loop of the biological clock, inhibited PAI-1 promoter activation by the CLOCK:CLIF heterodimer. These results suggest that the peripheral tissues have their own biological clock and CLIF regulates the circadian oscillation of PAI-1 gene expression in endothelial cells. This study suggests a novel molecular mechanism of the morning onset of myocardial infarction. Here we review our recent work and literature.

  18. Insights on Molecular Mechanisms of Chondrocytes Death in Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Charlier

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a joint pathology characterized by progressive cartilage degradation. Medical care is mainly based on alleviating pain symptoms. Compelling studies report the presence of empty lacunae and hypocellularity in cartilage with aging and OA progression, suggesting that chondrocyte cell death occurs and participates to OA development. However, the relative contribution of apoptosis per se in OA pathogenesis appears complex to evaluate. Indeed, depending on technical approaches, OA stages, cartilage layers, animal models, as well as in vivo or in vitro experiments, the percentage of apoptosis and cell death types can vary. Apoptosis, chondroptosis, necrosis, and autophagic cell death are described in this review. The question of cell death causality in OA progression is also addressed, as well as the molecular pathways leading to cell death in response to the following inducers: Fas, Interleukin-1β (IL-1β, Tumor Necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, leptin, nitric oxide (NO donors, and mechanical stresses. Furthermore, the protective role of autophagy in chondrocytes is highlighted, as well as its decline during OA progression, enhancing chondrocyte cell death; the transition being mainly controlled by HIF-1α/HIF-2α imbalance. Finally, we have considered whether interfering in chondrocyte apoptosis or promoting autophagy could constitute therapeutic strategies to impede OA progression.

  19. Insights on Molecular Mechanisms of Chondrocytes Death in Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, Edith; Relic, Biserka; Deroyer, Céline; Malaise, Olivier; Neuville, Sophie; Collée, Julie; Malaise, Michel G; De Seny, Dominique

    2016-12-20

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint pathology characterized by progressive cartilage degradation. Medical care is mainly based on alleviating pain symptoms. Compelling studies report the presence of empty lacunae and hypocellularity in cartilage with aging and OA progression, suggesting that chondrocyte cell death occurs and participates to OA development. However, the relative contribution of apoptosis per se in OA pathogenesis appears complex to evaluate. Indeed, depending on technical approaches, OA stages, cartilage layers, animal models, as well as in vivo or in vitro experiments, the percentage of apoptosis and cell death types can vary. Apoptosis, chondroptosis, necrosis, and autophagic cell death are described in this review. The question of cell death causality in OA progression is also addressed, as well as the molecular pathways leading to cell death in response to the following inducers: Fas, Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), Tumor Necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), leptin, nitric oxide (NO) donors, and mechanical stresses. Furthermore, the protective role of autophagy in chondrocytes is highlighted, as well as its decline during OA progression, enhancing chondrocyte cell death; the transition being mainly controlled by HIF-1α/HIF-2α imbalance. Finally, we have considered whether interfering in chondrocyte apoptosis or promoting autophagy could constitute therapeutic strategies to impede OA progression.

  20. Final Report - Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Mercury Transformation - UCSF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Susan M. [UCSF

    2014-04-24

    The bacterial mercury resistance (mer) operon functions in Hg biogeochemistry and bioremediation by converting reactive inorganic Hg(II) and organic [RHg(II)]1+ mercurials to relatively inert monoatomic mercury vapor, Hg(0). Its genes regulate operon expression (MerR, MerD, MerOP), import Hg(II) (MerT, MerP, and MerC), and demethylate (MerB) and reduce (MerA) mercurials. We focus on how these components interact with each other and with the host cell to allow cells to survive and detoxify Hg compounds. Understanding how this ubiquitous detoxification system fits into the biology and ecology of its bacterial host is essential to guide interventions that support and enhance Hg remediation. In the current overall project we focused on two aspects of this system: (1) investigations of the energetics of Hg(II)-ligand binding interactions, and (2) both experimental and computational approaches to investigating the molecular mechanisms of Hg(II) acquisition by MerA and intramolecular transfer of Hg(II) prior to reduction within the MerA enzyme active site. Computational work was led by Prof. Jeremy Smith and took place at the University of Tennessee, while experimental work on MerA was led by Prof. Susan Miller and took place at the University of California San Francisco.

  1. Multiple molecular mechanisms cause reproductive isolation between three yeast species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Yu Chou

    Full Text Available Nuclear-mitochondrial conflict (cytonuclear incompatibility is a specific form of Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibility previously shown to cause reproductive isolation in two yeast species. Here, we identified two new incompatible genes, MRS1 and AIM22, through a systematic study of F2 hybrid sterility caused by cytonuclear incompatibility in three closely related Saccharomyces species (S. cerevisiae, S. paradoxus, and S. bayanus. Mrs1 is a nuclear gene product required for splicing specific introns in the mitochondrial COX1, and Aim22 is a ligase encoded in the nucleus that is required for mitochondrial protein lipoylation. By comparing different species, our result suggests that the functional changes in MRS1 are a result of coevolution with changes in the COX1 introns. Further molecular analyses demonstrate that three nonsynonymous mutations are responsible for the functional differences of Mrs1 between these species. Functional complementation assays to determine when these incompatible genes altered their functions show a strong correlation between the sequence-based phylogeny and the evolution of cytonuclear incompatibility. Our results suggest that nuclear-mitochondrial incompatibility may represent a general mechanism of reproductive isolation during yeast evolution.

  2. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study of oxygen binding in hemocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Toru; Thiel, Walter

    2014-05-15

    We report a combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) study on the mechanism of reversible dioxygen binding in the active site of hemocyanin (Hc). The QM region is treated by broken-symmetry density functional theory (DFT) with spin projection corrections. The X-ray structures of deoxygenated (deoxyHc) and oxygenated (oxyHc) hemocyanin are well reproduced by QM/MM geometry optimizations. The computed relative energies strongly depend on the chosen density functional. They are consistent with the available thermodynamic data for oxygen binding in hemocyanin and in synthetic model complexes when the BH&HLYP hybrid functional with 50% Hartree-Fock exchange is used. According to the QM(BH&HLYP)/MM results, the reaction proceeds stepwise with two sequential electron transfer (ET) processes in the triplet state followed by an intersystem crossing to the singlet product. The first ET step leads to a nonbridged superoxo CuB(II)-O2(•-) intermediate via a low-barrier transition state. The second ET step is even more facile and yields a side-on oxyHc complex with the characteristic Cu2O2 butterfly core, accompanied by triplet-singlet intersystem crossing. The computed barriers are very small so that the two ET processes are expected to very rapid and nearly simultaneous.

  3. A quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study on the hydrolysis mechanism of New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kongkai; Lu, Junyan; Liang, Zhongjie; Kong, Xiangqian; Ye, Fei; Jin, Lu; Geng, Heji; Chen, Yong; Zheng, Mingyue; Jiang, Hualiang; Li, Jun-Qian; Luo, Cheng

    2013-03-01

    New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1 (NDM-1) has emerged as a major global threat to human health for its rapid rate of dissemination and ability to make pathogenic microbes resistant to almost all known β-lactam antibiotics. In addition, effective NDM-1 inhibitors have not been identified to date. In spite of the plethora of structural and kinetic data available, the accurate molecular characteristics of and details on the enzymatic reaction of NDM-1 hydrolyzing β-lactam antibiotics remain incompletely understood. In this study, a combined computational approach including molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations was performed to characterize the catalytic mechanism of meropenem catalyzed by NDM-1. The quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics results indicate that the ionized D124 is beneficial to the cleavage of the C-N bond within the β-lactam ring. Meanwhile, it is energetically favorable to form an intermediate if no water molecule coordinates to Zn2. Moreover, according to the molecular dynamics results, the conserved residue K211 plays a pivotal role in substrate binding and catalysis, which is quite consistent with previous mutagenesis data. Our study provides detailed insights into the catalytic mechanism of NDM-1 hydrolyzing meropenem β-lactam antibiotics and offers clues for the discovery of new antibiotics against NDM-1 positive strains in clinical studies.

  4. Mechanisms of two-color laser-induced field-free molecular orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanner, Michael; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Frumker, Eugene; Corkum, Paul

    2012-09-14

    Two mechanisms of two-color (ω+2ω) laser-induced field-free molecular orientation, based on the hyperpolarizability and ionization depletion, are explored and compared. The CO molecule is used as a computational example. While the hyperpolarizability mechanism generates small amounts of orientation at intensities below the ionization threshold, ionization depletion quickly becomes the dominant mechanism as soon as ionizing intensities are reached. Only the ionization mechanism leads to substantial orientation (e.g., on the order of ≳0.1). For intensities typical of laser-induced molecular alignment and orientation experiments, the two mechanisms lead to robust, characteristic timings of the field-free orientation wave-packet revivals relative to the alignment revivals and the revival time. The revival timings can be used to detect the active orientation mechanism experimentally.

  5. Asbestos-related diseases in automobile mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameille, Jacques; Rosenberg, Nicole; Matrat, Mireille; Descatha, Alexis; Mompoint, Dominique; Hamzi, Lounis; Atassi, Catherine; Vasile, Manuela; Garnier, Robert; Pairon, Jean-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Automobile mechanics have been exposed to asbestos in the past, mainly due to the presence of chrysotile asbestos in brakes and clutches. Despite the large number of automobile mechanics, little is known about the non-malignant respiratory diseases observed in this population. The aim of this retrospective multicenter study was to analyse the frequency of pleural and parenchymal abnormalities on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in a population of automobile mechanics. The study population consisted of 103 automobile mechanics with no other source of occupational exposure to asbestos, referred to three occupational health departments in the Paris area for systematic screening of asbestos-related diseases. All subjects were examined by HRCT and all images were reviewed separately by two independent readers; who in the case of disagreement discussed until they reached agreement. Multiple logistic regression models were constructed to investigate factors associated with pleural plaques. Pleural plaques were observed in five cases (4.9%) and interstitial abnormalities consistent with asbestosis were observed in one case. After adjustment for age, smoking status, and a history of non-asbestos-related respiratory diseases, multiple logistic regression models showed a significant association between the duration of exposure to asbestos and pleural plaques. The asbestos exposure experienced by automobile mechanics may lead to pleural plaques. The low prevalence of non-malignant asbestos-related diseases, using a very sensitive diagnostic tool, is in favor of a low cumulative exposure to asbestos in this population of workers.

  6. Atomistic insight into the catalytic mechanism of glycosyltransferases by combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvaroška, Igor

    2015-02-11

    Glycosyltransferases catalyze the formation of glycosidic bonds by assisting the transfer of a sugar residue from donors to specific acceptor molecules. Although structural and kinetic data have provided insight into mechanistic strategies employed by these enzymes, molecular modeling studies are essential for the understanding of glycosyltransferase catalyzed reactions at the atomistic level. For such modeling, combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods have emerged as crucial. These methods allow the modeling of enzymatic reactions by using quantum mechanical methods for the calculation of the electronic structure of the active site models and treating the remaining enzyme environment by faster molecular mechanics methods. Herein, the application of QM/MM methods to glycosyltransferase catalyzed reactions is reviewed, and the insight from modeling of glycosyl transfer into the mechanisms and transition states structures of both inverting and retaining glycosyltransferases are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular Mechanisms Behind the Chemopreventive Effects of Anthocyanidins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Xing Hou

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanins are polyphenolic ring-based flavonoids, and are widespread in fruits and vegetables of red-blue color. Epidemiological investigations and animal experiments have indicated that anthocyanins may contribute to cancer chemoprevention. The studies on the mechanism have been done recently at molecular level. This review summarizes current molecular bases for anthocyanidins on several key steps involved in cancer chemoprevention: (i inhibition of anthocyanidins in cell transformation through targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway and activator protein 1 (AP-1 factor; (ii suppression of anthocyanidins in inflammation and carcinogenesis through targeting nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB pathway and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2 gene; (iii apoptotic induction of cancer cells by anthocyanidins through reactive oxygen species (ROS / c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK-mediated caspase activation. These data provide a first molecular view of anthocyanidins contributing to cancer chemoprevention.

  8. Mesoporous titanium phosphates and related molecular sieves ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    in the chemical and petrochemical industries. Phosphate-based molecular sieves 4–6 ... industry because of their interesting 2D and 3D framework topologies. On the other hand, commercial anion ... mesoporous aluminophosphate derived from polyoxometalate clusters 8,9 are the only examples of such a class of material.

  9. Special Relativity, Causality and Quantum Mechanics - 1

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The problem arose when it was shown that Maxwell's equations change their form when written in other iner- tial frames following the Galilean transformations which keep the laws of mechanics invariant in all inertial frames. So the principle of relativity seemed to be at stake with the entry of the electromagnetic theory in ...

  10. Molecular and regulatory mechanisms controlling floral organ development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Darragh; Graciet, Emmanuelle; Wellmer, Frank

    2016-05-01

    The genetic and molecular mechanisms that underlie the formation of angiosperm flowers have been studied extensively for nearly three decades. This work has led to detailed insights into the gene regulatory networks that control this vital developmental process in plants. Here, we review some of the key findings in the field of flower development and discuss open questions that must be addressed in order to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of flower formation. In particular, we focus on the specification of the different types of floral organs and on how the morphogenesis of these organs is controlled to give rise to mature flowers. Central to this process are the floral organ identity genes, which encode members of the family of MADS-domain transcription factors. We summarize what is currently known about the functions of these master regulators and discuss a working model for the molecular mechanism that may underlie their activities. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. Molecular Mechanisms and Function Prediction of Long Noncoding RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handong Ma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The central dogma of gene expression considers RNA as the carrier of genetic information from DNA to protein. However, it has become more and more clear that RNA plays more important roles than simply being the information carrier. Recently, whole genome transcriptomic analyses have identified large numbers of dynamically expressed long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs, many of which are involved in a variety of biological functions. Even so, the functions and molecular mechanisms of most lncRNAs still remain elusive. Therefore, it is necessary to develop computational methods to predict the function of lncRNAs in order to accelerate the study of lncRNAs. Here, we review the recent progress in the identification of lncRNAs, the molecular functions and mechanisms of lncRNAs, and the computational methods for predicting the function of lncRNAs.

  12. Cellular and molecular mechanisms in the pathophysiology of systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua-Huy, T; Dinh-Xuan, A T

    2015-04-01

    Fibrosis is characterized by disproportionate accumulation of collagens and other extracellular matrix substances, resulting in organ dysfunction and failure. In systemic sclerosis, cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of fibrosis are highly complex and yet barely understood. Anatomopathological findings showed the coexistence of patchy inflammatory cell infiltration, microvascular injuries, and fibrotic foci. One of the most commonly accepted hypotheses considers endothelial activation as the triggering phenomenon inducing inflammatory and autoimmunity activation. The resulting cytokines and autoantibodies production accelerates the proliferating rate of normal fibroblasts and their transformation into myofibroblasts, leading to diffuse fibrosis. This review aims to focus on cellular and molecular mechanisms implicated in the fibrogenesis of systemic sclerosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular Mechanisms of Chromium in Alleviating Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Yinan; Clark, Suzanne; Ren, Jun; Sreejayan, Nair

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity, dyslipidemia, and cardiovascular anomalies and is a major health problem approaching global epidemic proportions. Insulin resistance, a prediabetic condition, precedes the onset of frank type 2 diabetes and offers potential avenues for early intervention to treat the disease. Although lifestyle modifications and exercise can reduce the incidence of diabetes, compliance has proved to be difficult, warranting pharmacological interventions. However, most of the currently available drugs that improve insulin sensitivity have adverse effects. Therefore, attractive strategies to alleviate insulin resistance include dietary supplements. One such supplement is chromium, which has been shown reduce insulin resistance in some, but not all, studies. Furthermore, the molecular mechanisms of chromium in alleviating insulin resistance remain elusive. This review examines emerging reports on the effect of chromium, as well as molecular and cellular mechanisms by which chromium may provide beneficial effects in alleviating insulin resistance. PMID:22423897

  14. Molecular interaction mechanisms in reverse micellar extraction of microbial transglutaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tingting; Lin, Mingxiang; Wan, Junfen; Cao, Xuejun

    2017-08-18

    Reverse micellar extraction is an efficient and economical alternative for protein purification. In this study, microbial transglutaminase (MTGase) from crude materials was purified using reverse micellar extraction, and the molecular interaction mechanism in reverse micellar extraction of MTGase was explored. By using a molecular simulation study, the interaction mechanism of forward extraction was investigated. The molecular simulation results reveal the interaction of MTGase-water-surfactant is the major driving force for the forward extraction. Further, the effect of ionic strength on molecular interactions in backward extraction was investigated using 1H low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectra. In backward extraction, the interactions between water and the other two molecules (MTGase and surfactant molecules) are enhanced while the interactions between target molecules (MTGase) and the other two molecules (water and surfactant molecules) are weakened as the ionic strength increases. Moreover, the effect of size exclusion on backward extraction was also investigated. The results demonstrate size exclusion has limit effect at high ionic strength, and the weakened interaction of MTGase-water-surfactant is the main reason causing the release of the target molecules in backward extraction. This work might provide valuable reference to the MTGase purification and downstream processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Bioinformatics analysis on molecular mechanism of rheum officinale in treatment of jaundice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Si; Tu, Jun; Nie, Peng; Yan, Xiaojun

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To study the molecular mechanism of Rheum officinale in the treatment of Jaundice by building molecular networks and comparing canonical pathways. Methods: Target proteins of Rheum officinale and related genes of Jaundice were searched from Pubchem and Gene databases online respectively. Molecular networks and canonical pathways comparison analyses were performed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Results: The molecular networks of Rheum officinale and Jaundice were complex and multifunctional. The 40 target proteins of Rheum officinale and 33 Homo sapiens genes of Jaundice were found in databases. There were 19 common pathways both related networks. Rheum officinale could regulate endothelial differentiation, Interleukin-1B (IL-1B) and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) in these pathways. Conclusions: Rheum officinale treat Jaundice by regulating many effective nodes of Apoptotic pathway and cellular immunity related pathways.

  16. Molecular mechanism of interaction between norfloxacin and trypsin studied by molecular spectroscopy and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Wang, Gongke; Lu, Xiumin; Lv, Juan; Xu, Meihua; Zhang, Weiwei

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of the binding of norfloxacin (NRF) to trypsin was investigated by fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence and UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy and molecular modeling at physiological conditions. The quenching mechanism and the binding mode were investigated in terms of the association constants and basic thermodynamic parameters. The results of spectroscopic measurements suggested that NRF have a strong ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of trypsin through static quenching procedure. Moreover, fluorescence experiments were also performed at different values of pH to elucidate the effect of pH on the binding. The NRF-trypsin complex was stabilized by hydrophobic forces and hydrogen bonding, via tryptophan residue as indicated from the thermodynamic parameters, which was consistent with the results of molecular docking and accessible surface area calculations.

  17. Molecular Mechanism of hTERT Function in Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-20

    Molecular mechanism of hTERT function in mitochondria (x) Material has been given an OPSEC review and it has been determined to be non sensitive and...transcriptase (hTERT) is localized to mitochondria , as well as the nucleus, but details about its biology and function in the organelle remain largely...demonstrate the canonical nuclear RNA [human telomerase RNA (hTR)] is not present in human mitochondria and not required for the mitochondrial

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of nanocrystalline nickel: structure and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swygenhoven, H. van [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Caro, A. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche

    1997-09-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations of low temperature elastic and plastic deformation of Ni nanophase samples (3-7 nm) are performed. The samples are polycrystals nucleated from different seeds, with random locations and orientations. Bulk and Young`s modulus, onset of plastic deformation and mechanism responsible for the plastic behaviour are studied and compared with the behaviour of coarse grained samples. (author) 1 fig., 3 refs.

  19. Mechanical Models of Fault-Related Folding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A. M.

    2003-01-09

    The subject of the proposed research is fault-related folding and ground deformation. The results are relevant to oil-producing structures throughout the world, to understanding of damage that has been observed along and near earthquake ruptures, and to earthquake-producing structures in California and other tectonically-active areas. The objectives of the proposed research were to provide both a unified, mechanical infrastructure for studies of fault-related foldings and to present the results in computer programs that have graphical users interfaces (GUIs) so that structural geologists and geophysicists can model a wide variety of fault-related folds (FaRFs).

  20. Molecular Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is an autosomal recessive motor neuron disease with a high incidence and is the most common genetic cause of infant mortality. SMA is primarily characterized by degeneration of the spinal motor neurons that leads to skeletal muscle atrophy followed by symmetric limb paralysis, respiratory failure, and death. In humans, mutation of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1 gene shifts the load of expression of SMN protein to the SMN2 gene that produces low levels of full-length SMN protein because of alternative splicing, which are sufficient for embryonic development and survival but result in SMA. The molecular mechanisms of the (a regulation of SMN gene expression and (b degeneration of motor neurons caused by low levels of SMN are unclear. However, some progress has been made in recent years that have provided new insights into understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of SMA pathogenesis. In this review, we have briefly summarized recent advances toward understanding of the molecular mechanisms of regulation of SMN levels and signaling mechanisms that mediate neurodegeneration in SMA.

  1. Quantum mechanics/coarse-grained molecular mechanics (QM/CG-MM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinitskiy, Anton V; Voth, Gregory A

    2018-01-07

    Numerous molecular systems, including solutions, proteins, and composite materials, can be modeled using mixed-resolution representations, of which the quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach has become the most widely used. However, the QM/MM approach often faces a number of challenges, including the high cost of repetitive QM computations, the slow sampling even for the MM part in those cases where a system under investigation has a complex dynamics, and a difficulty in providing a simple, qualitative interpretation of numerical results in terms of the influence of the molecular environment upon the active QM region. In this paper, we address these issues by combining QM/MM modeling with the methodology of "bottom-up" coarse-graining (CG) to provide the theoretical basis for a systematic quantum-mechanical/coarse-grained molecular mechanics (QM/CG-MM) mixed resolution approach. A derivation of the method is presented based on a combination of statistical mechanics and quantum mechanics, leading to an equation for the effective Hamiltonian of the QM part, a central concept in the QM/CG-MM theory. A detailed analysis of different contributions to the effective Hamiltonian from electrostatic, induction, dispersion, and exchange interactions between the QM part and the surroundings is provided, serving as a foundation for a potential hierarchy of QM/CG-MM methods varying in their accuracy and computational cost. A relationship of the QM/CG-MM methodology to other mixed resolution approaches is also discussed.

  2. Quantum mechanics/coarse-grained molecular mechanics (QM/CG-MM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinitskiy, Anton V.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2018-01-01

    Numerous molecular systems, including solutions, proteins, and composite materials, can be modeled using mixed-resolution representations, of which the quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach has become the most widely used. However, the QM/MM approach often faces a number of challenges, including the high cost of repetitive QM computations, the slow sampling even for the MM part in those cases where a system under investigation has a complex dynamics, and a difficulty in providing a simple, qualitative interpretation of numerical results in terms of the influence of the molecular environment upon the active QM region. In this paper, we address these issues by combining QM/MM modeling with the methodology of "bottom-up" coarse-graining (CG) to provide the theoretical basis for a systematic quantum-mechanical/coarse-grained molecular mechanics (QM/CG-MM) mixed resolution approach. A derivation of the method is presented based on a combination of statistical mechanics and quantum mechanics, leading to an equation for the effective Hamiltonian of the QM part, a central concept in the QM/CG-MM theory. A detailed analysis of different contributions to the effective Hamiltonian from electrostatic, induction, dispersion, and exchange interactions between the QM part and the surroundings is provided, serving as a foundation for a potential hierarchy of QM/CG-MM methods varying in their accuracy and computational cost. A relationship of the QM/CG-MM methodology to other mixed resolution approaches is also discussed.

  3. [Abiotrophia related endocarditis: contribution of molecular biology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutoille, D; Reynaud, A E; Leautez, S; Ponge, T; Raffi, F

    1999-12-11

    Former nutritionally-deficient (variant) streptococci were recently separated from other streptococci viridans to constitute a new Abiotrophia genus, subdivided into two species, Abiotrophia defectiva (ex-Streptococcus defectivus) and Abiotrophia adjacens (ex-Streptococcus adjacens). A woman was admitted to the hospital because of purpura and fever. Vegetations were shown by trans-esophageal echocardiography. Although blood samples were positive within 24 hours, accurate identification of the morphologically and biochemically streptococcus-like bacteria that had grown remained impossible. Molecular biology technicals permitted to identify Abiotrophia defectiva, ex-Streptococcus defectivus. This new genus is important to be identified in clinical practice, because of the increased virulence of these bacteria, when compared with Streptococci viridans. They are also frequently penicillin-resistant. Molecular biology technicals allow precocious diagnosis, and make possible the improvement of the prognosis.

  4. [Cell-molecular mechanisms of nitrogen dioxide-induced damaging effect on bronchial epithelium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titova, O N; Lebedeva, E S; Kuzubova, N A; Preobrazhenskaia, T N

    2014-08-01

    Nitrogen dioxide and reactive nitrogen species play a key role in the development environment related diseases by initiation of cell death and damage of bronchoalveolar epithelium. This review examines the possible cell-molecular mechanisms of nitrogen dioxide-induced damaging effect on bronchial epithelium.

  5. Signs and Related Mechanisms of Ethanol Hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Mãgalhaes, Teresa; Queirós, Odília; Proença, Jorge Brandão; Moreira, Roxana; de Lourdes Bastos, Maria; Carvalho, Félix

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol is the most abused psychoactive substance. Accordingly to World Health Organization ethanol ranks among the top five risk factors for disease, disability and death (3.3 million/year) throughout the world. This manuscript highlights and critically analyses clinical and forensic signs related to hepatoxicity of ethanol that may lead to suspected of abuse. Namely, steatosis, jaundice, cirrhosis, hemorrhoids, esophageal varices caput medusae, ascites, petechiae, ecchymoses, splenomegaly, hemochromatosis, xanthelasma, nutritional deficiency, testicular atrophy, gynecomastia and dilated congestive cardiomyopathy are discussed and related to the toxic mechanism of ethanol.

  6. [Molecular mechanisms of TRP channels in mechano-sensory transduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wen-juan; Huang, Gui-fang; Kang, Li-jun

    2012-03-01

    Channels from the TRP superfamily have essential roles in a wide variety of sensory transductions, especially in mechano-sensation, such as hearing, touch and mechanical pain. TRP channels are also implicated in major channelopathies, including deafness, chronic pain, autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and ventricular hypertrophy. As the leading candidates for mechano-sensitive channels, some TRP channels appear to be mechano-receptor, which can be activated by mechanical forces directly, such as C. elegans TRPN homolog TRP-4; whereas others may act as signal modulators, receiving and amplifying signals indirectly. This review is to introduce the function of TRPs in mechano-sensory transduction and to discuss the underlying molecular mechanisms.

  7. Molecular mechanisms of coronavirus RNA capping and methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Guo, Deyin

    2016-02-01

    The 5'-cap structures of eukaryotic mRNAs are important for RNA stability, pre-mRNA splicing, mRNA export, and protein translation. Many viruses have evolved mechanisms for generating their own cap structures with methylation at the N7 position of the capped guanine and the ribose 2'-Oposition of the first nucleotide, which help viral RNAs escape recognition by the host innate immune system. The RNA genomes of coronavirus were identified to have 5'-caps in the early 1980s. However, for decades the RNA capping mechanisms of coronaviruses remained unknown. Since 2003, the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus has drawn increased attention and stimulated numerous studies on the molecular virology of coronaviruses. Here, we review the current understanding of the mechanisms adopted by coronaviruses to produce the 5'-cap structure and methylation modification of viral genomic RNAs.

  8. Physiological, Molecular and Genetic Mechanisms of Long-Term Habituation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calin-Jageman, Robert J

    2009-09-12

    Work funded on this grant has explored the mechanisms of long-term habituation, a ubiquitous form of learning that plays a key role in basic cognitive functioning. Specifically, behavioral, physiological, and molecular mechanisms of habituation have been explored using a simple model system, the tail-elicited siphon-withdrawal reflex (T-SWR) in the marine mollusk Aplysia californica. Substantial progress has been made on the first and third aims, providing some fundamental insights into the mechanisms by which memories are stored. We have characterized the physiological correlates of short- and long-term habituation. We found that short-term habituation is accompanied by a robust sensory adaptation, whereas long-term habituation is accompanied by alterations in sensory and interneuron synaptic efficacy. Thus, our data indicates memories can be shifted between different sites in a neural network as they are consolidated from short to long term. At the molecular level, we have accomplished microarray analysis comparing gene expression in both habituated and control ganglia. We have identified a network of putatively regulated transcripts that seems particularly targeted towards synaptic changes (e.g. SNAP25, calmodulin) . We are now beginning additional work to confirm regulation of these transcripts and build a more detailed understanding of the cascade of molecular events leading to the permanent storage of long-term memories. On the third aim, we have fostered a nascent neuroscience program via a variety of successful initiatives. We have funded over 11 undergraduate neuroscience scholars, several of whom have been recognized at national and regional levels for their research. We have also conducted a pioneering summer research program for community college students which is helping enhance access of underrepresented groups to life science careers. Despite minimal progress on the second aim, this project has provided a) novel insight into the network mechanisms by

  9. Epidemiological bases and molecular mechanisms linking obesity, diabetes, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Salmerón, María; Chocarro-Calvo, Ana; García-Martínez, José Manuel; de la Vieja, Antonio; García-Jiménez, Custodia

    2017-02-01

    The association between diabetes and cancer was hypothesized almost one century ago. Today, a vast number of epidemiological studies support that obese and diabetic populations are more likely to experience tissue-specific cancers, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Obesity, diabetes, and cancer share many hormonal, immune, and metabolic changes that may account for the relationship between diabetes and cancer. In addition, antidiabetic treatments may have an impact on the occurrence and course of some cancers. Moreover, some anticancer treatments may induce diabetes. These observations aroused a great controversy because of the ethical implications and the associated commercial interests. We report an epidemiological update from a mechanistic perspective that suggests the existence of many common and differential individual mechanisms linking obesity and type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus to certain cancers. The challenge today is to identify the molecular links responsible for this association. Classification of cancers by their molecular signatures may facilitate future mechanistic and epidemiological studies. Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Statistical-mechanical theory of ultrasonic absorption in molecular liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobryn, Alexander E.; Hirata, Fumio

    2007-01-01

    We present results of the theoretical description of ultrasonic phenomena in molecular liquids. In particular, we are interested in the development of a microscopical, i.e., statistical-mechanical, framework capable of explaining the long living puzzle of excess ultrasonic absorption in liquids. Typically, an ultrasonic wave in a liquid can be generated by applying a periodically alternating external pressure with an angular frequency that corresponds to the ultrasound. If the perturbation introduced by such a process is weak, its statistical-mechanical treatment can be done with the use of a linear response theory. We treat the liquid as a system of interacting sites, so that all the response/aftereffect functions as well as the energy dissipation and generalized (wave-vector and frequency-dependent) ultrasonic absorption coefficient are obtained in terms of familiar site-site static and time correlation functions such as static structure factors or intermediate scattering functions. To express the site-site intermediate scattering functions, we refer to the site-site memory equations in the mode-coupling approximation for first-order memory kernels, while equilibrium properties such as site-site static structure factors, and direct and total correlation functions are deduced from the integral equation theory of molecular liquids known as RISM, or one of its generalizations. All of the formalism is phrased in a general manner, hence the results obtained are expected to work for arbitrary types of molecular liquids including simple, ionic, polar, and nonpolar liquids.

  11. Molecular mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kendall R; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in significant disability due to cognitive deficits particularly in attention, learning and memory, and higher-order executive functions. The role of TBI in chronic neurodegeneration and the development of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and most recently chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is of particular importance. However, despite significant effort very few therapeutic options exist to prevent or reverse cognitive impairment following TBI. In this review, we present experimental evidence of the known secondary injury mechanisms which contribute to neuronal cell loss, axonal injury, and synaptic dysfunction and hence cognitive impairment both acutely and chronically following TBI. In particular we focus on the mechanisms linking TBI to the development of two forms of dementia: AD and CTE. We provide evidence of potential molecular mechanisms involved in modulating Aβ and Tau following TBI and provide evidence of the role of these mechanisms in AD pathology. Additionally we propose a mechanism by which Aβ generated as a direct result of TBI is capable of exacerbating secondary injury mechanisms thereby establishing a neurotoxic cascade that leads to chronic neurodegeneration.

  12. Molecular mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction following traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kendall R.; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in significant disability due to cognitive deficits particularly in attention, learning and memory, and higher-order executive functions. The role of TBI in chronic neurodegeneration and the development of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and most recently chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is of particular importance. However, despite significant effort very few therapeutic options exist to prevent or reverse cognitive impairment following TBI. In this review, we present experimental evidence of the known secondary injury mechanisms which contribute to neuronal cell loss, axonal injury, and synaptic dysfunction and hence cognitive impairment both acutely and chronically following TBI. In particular we focus on the mechanisms linking TBI to the development of two forms of dementia: AD and CTE. We provide evidence of potential molecular mechanisms involved in modulating Aβ and Tau following TBI and provide evidence of the role of these mechanisms in AD pathology. Additionally we propose a mechanism by which Aβ generated as a direct result of TBI is capable of exacerbating secondary injury mechanisms thereby establishing a neurotoxic cascade that leads to chronic neurodegeneration. PMID:23847533

  13. Molecular Mechanisms of Cognitive Dysfunction following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendall Rae Walker

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI results in significant disability due to cognitive deficits particularly in attention, learning and memory and higher-order executive functions. The role of TBI in chronic neurodegeneration and the development of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS and most recently chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is of particular importance. However, despite significant effort very few therapeutic options exist to prevent or reverse cognitive impairment following TBI. In this review we present experimental evidence of the known secondary injury mechanisms which contribute to neuronal cell loss, axonal injury and synaptic dysfunction and hence cognitive impairment both acutely and chronically following TBI. In particular we focus on the mechanisms linking TBI to the development of two forms of dementia: AD and CTE. We provide evidence of potential molecular mechanisms involved in modulating Aβ and Tau following TBI and provide evidence of the role of these mechanisms in AD pathology. Additionally we propose a mechanism by which Aβ generated as a direct result of TBI is capable of exacerbating secondary injury mechanisms thereby establishing a neurotoxic cascade that leads to chronic neurodegeneration.

  14. Combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods in computational enzymology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kamp, Marc W; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2013-04-23

    Computational enzymology is a rapidly maturing field that is increasingly integral to understanding mechanisms of enzyme-catalyzed reactions and their practical applications. Combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods are important in this field. By treating the reacting species with a quantum mechanical method (i.e., a method that calculates the electronic structure of the active site) and including the enzyme environment with simpler molecular mechanical methods, enzyme reactions can be modeled. Here, we review QM/MM methods and their application to enzyme-catalyzed reactions to investigate fundamental and practical problems in enzymology. A range of QM/MM methods is available, from cheaper and more approximate methods, which can be used for molecular dynamics simulations, to highly accurate electronic structure methods. We discuss how modeling of reactions using such methods can provide detailed insight into enzyme mechanisms and illustrate this by reviewing some recent applications. We outline some practical considerations for such simulations. Further, we highlight applications that show how QM/MM methods can contribute to the practical development and application of enzymology, e.g., in the interpretation and prediction of the effects of mutagenesis and in drug and catalyst design.

  15. Neural tube closure: cellular, molecular and biomechanical mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulou, Evanthia; Galea, Gabriel L; Rolo, Ana; Greene, Nicholas D E; Copp, Andrew J

    2017-02-15

    Neural tube closure has been studied for many decades, across a range of vertebrates, as a paradigm of embryonic morphogenesis. Neurulation is of particular interest in view of the severe congenital malformations - 'neural tube defects' - that result when closure fails. The process of neural tube closure is complex and involves cellular events such as convergent extension, apical constriction and interkinetic nuclear migration, as well as precise molecular control via the non-canonical Wnt/planar cell polarity pathway, Shh/BMP signalling, and the transcription factors Grhl2/3, Pax3, Cdx2 and Zic2. More recently, biomechanical inputs into neural tube morphogenesis have also been identified. Here, we review these cellular, molecular and biomechanical mechanisms involved in neural tube closure, based on studies of various vertebrate species, focusing on the most recent advances in the field. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Quantum Interactomics and Cancer Molecular Mechanisms: I. Report Outline

    CERN Document Server

    Baianu, I C

    2004-01-01

    Single cell interactomics in simpler organisms, as well as somatic cell interactomics in multicellular organisms, involve biomolecular interactions in complex signalling pathways that were recently represented in modular terms by quantum automata with ‘reversible behavior’ representing normal cell cycling and division. Other implications of such quantum automata, modular modeling of signaling pathways and cell differentiation during development are in the fields of neural plasticity and brain development leading to quantum-weave dynamic patterns and specific molecular processes underlying extensive memory, learning, anticipation mechanisms and the emergence of human consciousness during the early brain development in children. Cell interactomics is here represented for the first time as a mixture of ‘classical’ states that determine molecular dynamics subject to Boltzmann statistics and ‘steady-state’, metabolic (multi-stable) manifolds, together with ‘configuration’ spaces of metastable quant...

  17. The molecular mechanism and physiological role of cytoplasmic streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Motoki; Ito, Kohji

    2015-10-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming occurs widely in plants ranging from algae to angiosperms. However, the molecular mechanism and physiological role of cytoplasmic streaming have long remained unelucidated. Recent molecular genetic approaches have identified specific myosin members (XI-2 and XI-K as major and XI-1, XI-B, and XI-I as minor motive forces) for the generation of cytoplasmic streaming among 13 myosin XIs in Arabidopsis thaliana. Simultaneous knockout of these myosin XI members led to a reduced velocity of cytoplasmic streaming and marked defects of plant development. Furthermore, the artificial modifications of myosin XI-2 velocity changed plant and cell sizes along with the velocity of cytoplasmic streaming. Therefore, we assume that cytoplasmic streaming is one of the key regulators in determining plant size. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Cocoa phytochemicals: recent advances in molecular mechanisms on health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Jaekyoon; Shim, Jaesung; Lee, Chang Yong; Lee, Ki Won; Lee, Hyong Joo

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports on cocoa are appealing in that a food commonly consumed for pure pleasure might also bring tangible benefits for human health. Cocoa consumption is correlated with reduced health risks of cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and cancer, and the health-promoting effects of cocoa are mediated by cocoa-driven phytochemicals. Cocoa is rich in procyanidins, theobromine, (-)-epicatechin, catechins, and caffeine. Among the phytochemicals present in consumed cocoa, theobromine is most available in human plasma, followed by caffeine, (-)-epicatechin, catechin, and procyanidins. It has been reported that cocoa phytochemicals specifically modulate or interact with specific molecular targets linked to the pathogenesis of chronic human diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, obesity, diabetes, and skin aging. This review summarizes comprehensive recent findings on the beneficial actions of cocoa-driven phytochemicals in molecular mechanisms of human health.

  19. The molecular mechanism for nuclear transport and its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun Hak; Han, Myoung-Eun; Oh, Sae-Ock

    2017-06-01

    Transportation between the cytoplasm and the nucleoplasm is critical for many physiological and pathophysiological processes including gene expression, signal transduction, and oncogenesis. So, the molecular mechanism for the transportation needs to be studied not only to understand cell physiological processes but also to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Recent progress in the research of the nuclear transportation (import and export) via nuclear pore complex and four important factors affecting nuclear transport (nucleoporins, Ran, karyopherins, and nuclear localization signals/nuclear export signals) will be discussed. Moreover, the clinical significance of nuclear transport and its application will be reviewed. This review will provide some critical insight for the molecular design of therapeutics which need to be targeted inside the nucleus.

  20. An efficient method for the calculation of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics free energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Christopher J; Manby, Frederick R; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2008-01-07

    The combination of quantum mechanics (QM) with molecular mechanics (MM) offers a route to improved accuracy in the study of biological systems, and there is now significant research effort being spent to develop QM/MM methods that can be applied to the calculation of relative free energies. Currently, the computational expense of the QM part of the calculation means that there is no single method that achieves both efficiency and rigor; either the QM/MM free energy method is rigorous and computationally expensive, or the method introduces efficiency-led assumptions that can lead to errors in the result, or a lack of generality of application. In this paper we demonstrate a combined approach to form a single, efficient, and, in principle, exact QM/MM free energy method. We demonstrate the application of this method by using it to explore the difference in hydration of water and methane. We demonstrate that it is possible to calculate highly converged QM/MM relative free energies at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ/OPLS level within just two days of computation, using commodity processors, and show how the method allows consistent, high-quality sampling of complex solvent configurational change, both when perturbing hydrophilic water into hydrophobic methane, and also when moving from a MM Hamiltonian to a QM/MM Hamiltonian. The results demonstrate the validity and power of this methodology, and raise important questions regarding the compatibility of MM and QM/MM forcefields, and offer a potential route to improved compatibility.

  1. Sexual polyploidization in plants--cytological mechanisms and molecular regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Storme, Nico; Geelen, Danny

    2013-05-01

    In the plant kingdom, events of whole genome duplication or polyploidization are generally believed to occur via alterations of the sexual reproduction process. Thereby, diploid pollen and eggs are formed that contain the somatic number of chromosomes rather than the gametophytic number. By participating in fertilization, these so-called 2n gametes generate polyploid offspring and therefore constitute the basis for the establishment of polyploidy in plants. In addition, diplogamete formation, through meiotic restitution, is an essential component of apomixis and also serves as an important mechanism for the restoration of F1 hybrid fertility. Characterization of the cytological mechanisms and molecular factors underlying 2n gamete formation is therefore not only relevant for basic plant biology and evolution, but may also provide valuable cues for agricultural and biotechnological applications (e.g. reverse breeding, clonal seeds). Recent data have provided novel insights into the process of 2n pollen and egg formation and have revealed multiple means to the same end. Here, we summarize the cytological mechanisms and molecular regulatory networks underlying 2n gamete formation, and outline important mitotic and meiotic processes involved in the ectopic induction of sexual polyploidization. © 2013 Ghent University. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. United polarizable multipole water model for molecular mechanics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Rui; Wang, Lee-Ping; Wang, Qiantao; Pande, Vijay S.; Ren, Pengyu

    2015-07-01

    We report the development of a united AMOEBA (uAMOEBA) polarizable water model, which is computationally 3-5 times more efficient than the three-site AMOEBA03 model in molecular dynamics simulations while providing comparable accuracy for gas-phase and liquid properties. In this coarse-grained polarizable water model, both electrostatic (permanent and induced) and van der Waals representations have been reduced to a single site located at the oxygen atom. The permanent charge distribution is described via the molecular dipole and quadrupole moments and the many-body polarization via an isotropic molecular polarizability, all located at the oxygen center. Similarly, a single van der Waals interaction site is used for each water molecule. Hydrogen atoms are retained only for the purpose of defining local frames for the molecular multipole moments and intramolecular vibrational modes. The parameters have been derived based on a combination of ab initio quantum mechanical and experimental data set containing gas-phase cluster structures and energies, and liquid thermodynamic properties. For validation, additional properties including dimer interaction energy, liquid structures, self-diffusion coefficient, and shear viscosity have been evaluated. The results demonstrate good transferability from the gas to the liquid phase over a wide range of temperatures, and from nonpolar to polar environments, due to the presence of molecular polarizability. The water coordination, hydrogen-bonding structure, and dynamic properties given by uAMOEBA are similar to those derived from the all-atom AMOEBA03 model and experiments. Thus, the current model is an accurate and efficient alternative for modeling water.

  3. Molecular mechanisms of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, M A; Liñares, J; Martín, R

    1997-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains are among the most common nosocomial pathogens. The most significant mechanism of resistance to methicillin in this-species is the acquisition of a genetic determinant (mecA gene). However, resistance seems to have a more complex molecular basis, since additional chromosomal material is involved in such resistance. Besides, overproduction of penicillinase and/or alterations in the PBPs can contribute to the formation of resistance phenotypes. Genetic and environmental factors leading to MRSA are reviewed.

  4. Molecular mechanisms for synchronous, asynchronous, and spontaneous neurotransmitter release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Pascal S; Regehr, Wade G

    2014-01-01

    Most neuronal communication relies upon the synchronous release of neurotransmitters, which occurs through synaptic vesicle exocytosis triggered by action potential invasion of a presynaptic bouton. However, neurotransmitters are also released asynchronously with a longer, variable delay following an action potential or spontaneously in the absence of action potentials. A compelling body of research has identified roles and mechanisms for synchronous release, but asynchronous release and spontaneous release are less well understood. In this review, we analyze how the mechanisms of the three release modes overlap and what molecular pathways underlie asynchronous and spontaneous release. We conclude that the modes of release have key fusion processes in common but may differ in the source of and necessity for Ca(2+) to trigger release and in the identity of the Ca(2+) sensor for release.

  5. Advances in molecular mechanism of cardioprotection induced by helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi-ping; Zhang, Ju-yi; Feng, Dong-xia; Kong, Yan; Xu, Zhuan; Chen, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Helium has been classified as a kind of inert gas that is not effortless to spark chemical reactions with other substances in the past decades. Nevertheless, the cognition of scientists has gradually changed accompanied with a variety of studies revealing the potential molecular mechanism underlying organ-protection induced by helium. Especially, as a non-anesthetic gas which is deficient of relevant cardiopulmonary side effects, helium conditioning is recognized as an emerging and promising approach to exert favorable effects by mimicking the cardioprotection of anesthetic gases or xenon. In this review we will summarize advances in the underlying biological mechanisms and clinical applicability with regards to the cardioprotective effects of helium. PMID:28744366

  6. Molecular Mechanism Underlying Lymphatic Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwen Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As the most challenging human malignancies, pancreatic cancer is characterized by its insidious symptoms, low rate of surgical resection, high risk of local invasion, metastasis and recurrence, and overall dismal prognosis. Lymphatic metastasis, above all, is recognized as an early adverse event in progression of pancreatic cancer and has been described to be an independent poor prognostic factor. It should be noted that the occurrence of lymphatic metastasis is not a casual or stochastic but an ineluctable and designed event. Increasing evidences suggest that metastasis-initiating cells (MICs and the microenvironments may act as a double-reed style in this crime. However, the exact mechanisms on how they function synergistically for this dismal clinical course remain largely elusive. Therefore, a better understanding of its molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in pancreatic lymphatic metastasis is urgently required. In this review, we will summarize the latest advances on lymphatic metastasis in pancreatic cancer.

  7. Molecular mechanism of action of metformin: old or new insights?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rena, Graham; Pearson, Ewan R; Sakamoto, Kei

    2013-09-01

    Metformin is the first-line drug treatment for type 2 diabetes. Globally, over 100 million patients are prescribed this drug annually. Metformin was discovered before the era of target-based drug discovery and its molecular mechanism of action remains an area of vigorous diabetes research. An improvement in our understanding of metformin's molecular targets is likely to enable target-based identification of second-generation drugs with similar properties, a development that has been impossible up to now. The notion that 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) mediates the anti-hyperglycaemic action of metformin has recently been challenged by genetic loss-of-function studies, thrusting the AMPK-independent effects of the drug into the spotlight for the first time in more than a decade. Key AMPK-independent effects of the drug include the mitochondrial actions that have been known for many years and which are still thought to be the primary site of action of metformin. Coupled with recent evidence of AMPK-independent effects on the counter-regulatory hormone glucagon, new paradigms of AMPK-independent drug action are beginning to take shape. In this review we summarise the recent research developments on the molecular action of metformin.

  8. Dissecting the Molecular Mechanisms of Neurodegenerative Diseases through Network Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A. Santiago

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are rarely caused by a mutation in a single gene but rather influenced by a combination of genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. Emerging high-throughput technologies such as RNA sequencing have been instrumental in deciphering the molecular landscape of neurodegenerative diseases, however, the interpretation of such large amounts of data remains a challenge. Network biology has become a powerful platform to integrate multiple omics data to comprehensively explore the molecular networks in the context of health and disease. In this review article, we highlight recent advances in network biology approaches with an emphasis in brain-networks that have provided insights into the molecular mechanisms leading to the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s (AD, Parkinson’s (PD and Huntington’s diseases (HD. We discuss how integrative approaches using multi-omics data from different tissues have been valuable for identifying biomarkers and therapeutic targets. In addition, we discuss the challenges the field of network medicine faces toward the translation of network-based findings into clinically actionable tools for personalized medicine applications.

  9. Dissecting the Molecular Mechanisms of Neurodegenerative Diseases through Network Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Jose A; Bottero, Virginie; Potashkin, Judith A

    2017-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are rarely caused by a mutation in a single gene but rather influenced by a combination of genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. Emerging high-throughput technologies such as RNA sequencing have been instrumental in deciphering the molecular landscape of neurodegenerative diseases, however, the interpretation of such large amounts of data remains a challenge. Network biology has become a powerful platform to integrate multiple omics data to comprehensively explore the molecular networks in the context of health and disease. In this review article, we highlight recent advances in network biology approaches with an emphasis in brain-networks that have provided insights into the molecular mechanisms leading to the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's (AD), Parkinson's (PD) and Huntington's diseases (HD). We discuss how integrative approaches using multi-omics data from different tissues have been valuable for identifying biomarkers and therapeutic targets. In addition, we discuss the challenges the field of network medicine faces toward the translation of network-based findings into clinically actionable tools for personalized medicine applications.

  10. Ion pair structures in aqueous KSCN solution: Classical and quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical molecular dynamic simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Manik Kumer; Choi, Cheol Ho [Dept. of Chemistry and Green-Nano Materials Research Center, College of Natural Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jun Ho; Cho, Min Haeng [Dept. of Chemistry, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Ion pair formation and dissociation are fundamental processes in electrolyte solutions so that understanding thermodynamic stabilities and dynamic aspects of ion pairs is of great importance. The structures of various ion pair states are here studied by carrying out classical and quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of aqueous KSCN solutions. A few different solvent potential models are considered and the resulting ion pair structures are directly compared. In particular, when KSCN is treated quantum mechanically and effective fragment potential (EFP) model for water is used, we found two stable forms of ion pairs that can be considered as contact ion pair (CIP) and solvent separated ion pair (SSIP), where the interionic distances between K{sup +} and SCN {sup −} are found to be 4.0 and 5.5 Å, respectively. QM/EFP-MD further indicates that the nitrogen side of SCN {sup −} is preferentially interacting with K{sup +} in CIP. However, the corresponding CIP appears at 3.0 Å interionic distance in fully classical MD simulation at a higher KSCN concentration. Nonetheless, both QM/EFP and classical MD simulation results show that the CIP state appears to be more stable than SSIP. From the site-site radial distribution functions (RDF) calculated from the QM/MM and classical MD trajectories, detailed ion pair structures and surrounding solvent configurations are further elucidated.

  11. Mechanical tuning of molecular machines for nucleotide recognition at the air-water interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinoda Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Molecular machines embedded in a Langmuir monolayer at the air-water interface can be operated by application of lateral pressure. As part of the challenge associated with versatile sensing of biologically important substances, we here demonstrate discrimination of nucleotides by applying a cholesterol-armed-triazacyclononane host molecule. This molecular machine can discriminate ribonucleotides based on a twofold to tenfold difference in binding constants under optimized conditions including accompanying ions in the subphase and lateral surface pressures of its Langmuir monolayer. The concept of mechanical tuning of the host structure for optimization of molecular recognition should become a novel methodology in bio-related nanotechnology as an alternative to traditional strategies based on increasingly complex and inconvenient molecular design strategies.

  12. Obstructive renal injury: from fluid mechanics to molecular cell biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro C Ucero

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Alvaro C Ucero1,*, Sara Gonçalves2,*, Alberto Benito-Martin1, Beatriz Santamaría1, Adrian M Ramos1, Sergio Berzal1, Marta Ruiz-Ortega1, Jesus Egido1, Alberto Ortiz11Fundación Jiménez Díaz, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Fundación Renal Iñigo Alvarez de Toledo, Madrid, Spain; 2Nefrologia e Transplantação Renal, Hospital de Santa Maria EPE, Lisbon, Portugal *Both authors contributed equally to the manuscriptAbstract: Urinary tract obstruction is a frequent cause of renal impairment. The physiopathology of obstructive nephropathy has long been viewed as a mere mechanical problem. However, recent advances in cell and systems biology have disclosed a complex physiopathology involving a high number of molecular mediators of injury that lead to cellular processes of apoptotic cell death, cell injury leading to inflammation and resultant fibrosis. Functional studies in animal models of ureteral obstruction using a variety of techniques that include genetically modified animals have disclosed an important role for the renin-angiotensin system, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 and other mediators of inflammation in this process. In addition, high throughput techniques such as proteomics and transcriptomics have identified potential biomarkers that may guide clinical decision-making.Keywords: urinary tract obstruction, renal injury, fluid mechanics, molecular cell biology

  13. Obesity-related hypertension: possible pathophysiological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaněčková, Ivana; Maletínská, Lenka; Behuliak, Michal; Nagelová, Veronika; Zicha, Josef; Kuneš, Jaroslav

    2014-12-01

    Hypertension is one of the major risk factors of cardiovascular diseases, but despite a century of clinical and basic research, the discrete etiology of this disease is still not fully understood. The same is true for obesity, which is recognized as a major global epidemic health problem nowadays. Obesity is associated with an increasing prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors including hypertension, abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia. Epidemiological studies have shown that excess weight gain predicts future development of hypertension, and the relationship between BMI and blood pressure (BP) appears to be almost linear in different populations. There is no doubt that obesity-related hypertension is a multifactorial and polygenic trait, and multiple potential pathogenetic mechanisms probably contribute to the development of higher BP in obese humans. These include hyperinsulinemia, activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, sympathetic nervous system stimulation, abnormal levels of certain adipokines such as leptin, or cytokines acting at the vascular endothelial level. Moreover, some genetic and epigenetic mechanisms are also in play. Although the full manifestation of both hypertension and obesity occurs predominantly in adulthood, their roots can be traced back to early ontogeny. The detailed knowledge of alterations occurring in the organism of experimental animals during particular critical periods (developmental windows) could help to solve this phenomenon in humans and might facilitate the age-specific prevention of human obesity-related hypertension. In addition, better understanding of particular pathophysiological mechanisms might be useful in so-called personalized medicine. © 2014 Society for Endocrinology.

  14. MATCH: An Atom- Typing Toolset for Molecular Mechanics Force Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesselman, Joseph D.; Price, Daniel J.; Knight, Jennifer L.; Brooks, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a toolset of program libraries collectively titled MATCH (Multipurpose Atom-Typer for CHARMM) for the automated assignment of atom types and force field parameters for molecular mechanics simulation of organic molecules. The toolset includes utilities for the conversion from multiple chemical structure file formats into a molecular graph. A general chemical pattern-matching engine using this graph has been implemented whereby assignment of molecular mechanics atom types, charges and force field parameters is achieved by comparison against a customizable list of chemical fragments. While initially designed to complement the CHARMM simulation package and force fields by generating the necessary input topology and atom-type data files, MATCH can be expanded to any force field and program, and has core functionality that makes it extendable to other applications such as fragment-based property prediction. In the present work, we demonstrate the accurate construction of atomic parameters of molecules within each force field included in CHARMM36 through exhaustive cross validation studies illustrating that bond increment rules derived from one force field can be transferred to another. In addition, using leave-one-out substitution it is shown that it is also possible to substitute missing intra and intermolecular parameters with ones included in a force field to complete the parameterization of novel molecules. Finally, to demonstrate the robustness of MATCH and the coverage of chemical space offered by the recent CHARMM CGENFF force field (Vanommeslaeghe, et al., JCC., 2010, 31, 671–690), one million molecules from the PubChem database of small molecules are typed, parameterized and minimized. PMID:22042689

  15. A Practical Quantum Mechanics Molecular Mechanics Method for the Dynamical Study of Reactions in Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendieta-Moreno, Jesús I; Marcos-Alcalde, Iñigo; Trabada, Daniel G; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Ortega, José; Mendieta, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods are excellent tools for the modeling of biomolecular reactions. Recently, we have implemented a new QM/MM method (Fireball/Amber), which combines an efficient density functional theory method (Fireball) and a well-recognized molecular dynamics package (Amber), offering an excellent balance between accuracy and sampling capabilities. Here, we present a detailed explanation of the Fireball method and Fireball/Amber implementation. We also discuss how this tool can be used to analyze reactions in biomolecules using steered molecular dynamics simulations. The potential of this approach is shown by the analysis of a reaction catalyzed by the enzyme triose-phosphate isomerase (TIM). The conformational space and energetic landscape for this reaction are analyzed without a priori assumptions about the protonation states of the different residues during the reaction. The results offer a detailed description of the reaction and reveal some new features of the catalytic mechanism. In particular, we find a new reaction mechanism that is characterized by the intramolecular proton transfer from O1 to O2 and the simultaneous proton transfer from Glu 165 to C2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular Mechanisms of Cutaneous Inflammatory Disorder: Atopic Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Eun; Kim, Jong Sic; Cho, Dae Ho; Park, Hyun Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease resulting from interactions between genetic susceptibility and environmental factors. The pathogenesis of AD is poorly understood, and the treatment of recalcitrant AD is still challenging. There is accumulating evidence for new gene polymorphisms related to the epidermal barrier function and innate and adaptive immunity in patients with AD. Newly-found T cells and dendritic cell subsets, cytokines, chemokines and signaling pathways have extended our understanding of the molecular pathomechanism underlying AD. Genetic changes caused by environmental factors have been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of AD. We herein present a review of the genetics, epigenetics, barrier dysfunction and immunological abnormalities in AD with a focus on updated molecular biology. PMID:27483258

  17. MOLECULAR MECHANISM OF MICROBIAL TECHNETIUM REDUCTION FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiChristina, Thomas J. [Georgia Tech

    2013-04-30

    Microbial Tc(VII) reduction is an attractive alternative strategy for bioremediation of technetium-contaminated subsurface environments. Traditional ex situ remediation processes (e.g., adsorption or ion exchange) are often limited by poor extraction efficiency, inhibition by competing ions and production of large volumes of produced waste. Microbial Tc(VII) reduction provides an attractive alternative in situ remediation strategy since the reduced end-product Tc(IV) precipitates as TcO2, a highly insoluble hydrous oxide. Despite its potential benefits, the molecular mechanism of microbial Tc(VII) reduction remains poorly understood. The main goal of the proposed DOENABIR research project is to determine the molecular mechanism of microbial Tc(VII) reduction. Random mutagenesis studies in our lab have resulted in generation of a set of six Tc(VII) reduction-deficient mutants of Shewanella oneidensis. The anaerobic respiratory deficiencies of each Tc(VII) reduction-deficient mutant was determined by anaerobic growth on various combinations of three electron donors and 14 terminal electron acceptors. Results indicated that the electron transport pathways to Tc(VII), NO3 -, Mn(III) and U(VI) share common structural or regulatory components. In addition, we have recently found that wild-type Shewanella are also able to reduce Tc(IV) as electron acceptor, producing Tc(III) as an end-product. The recent genome sequencing of a variety of technetium-reducing bacteria and the anticipated release of several additional genome sequences in the coming year, provides us with an unprecedented opportunity to determine the mechanism of microbial technetium reduction across species and genus lines.

  18. Molecular and Epigenetic Mechanisms of MLL in Human Leukemogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballabio, Erica; Milne, Thomas A., E-mail: thomas.milne@imm.ox.ac.uk [MRC Molecular Haematology Unit, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital Headington, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-10

    Epigenetics is often defined as the study of heritable changes in gene expression or chromosome stability that don’t alter the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic changes are established through multiple mechanisms that include DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs and the covalent modification of specific residues on histone proteins. It is becoming clear not only that aberrant epigenetic changes are common in many human diseases such as leukemia, but that these changes by their very nature are malleable, and thus are amenable to treatment. Epigenetic based therapies have so far focused on the use of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, which tend to have more general and widespread effects on gene regulation in the cell. However, if a unique molecular pathway can be identified, diseases caused by epigenetic mechanisms are excellent candidates for the development of more targeted therapies that focus on specific gene targets, individual binding domains, or specific enzymatic activities. Designing effective targeted therapies depends on a clear understanding of the role of epigenetic mutations during disease progression. The Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) protein is an example of a developmentally important protein that controls the epigenetic activation of gene targets in part by methylating histone 3 on lysine 4. MLL is required for normal development, but is also mutated in a subset of aggressive human leukemias and thus provides a useful model for studying the link between epigenetic cell memory and human disease. The most common MLL mutations are chromosome translocations that fuse the MLL gene in frame with partner genes creating novel fusion proteins. In this review, we summarize recent work that argues MLL fusion proteins could function through a single molecular pathway, but we also highlight important data that suggests instead that multiple independent mechanisms underlie MLL mediated leukemogenesis.

  19. Molecular and Epigenetic Mechanisms of MLL in Human Leukemogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A. Milne

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetics is often defined as the study of heritable changes in gene expression or chromosome stability that don’t alter the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic changes are established through multiple mechanisms that include DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs and the covalent modification of specific residues on histone proteins. It is becoming clear not only that aberrant epigenetic changes are common in many human diseases such as leukemia, but that these changes by their very nature are malleable, and thus are amenable to treatment. Epigenetic based therapies have so far focused on the use of histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, which tend to have more general and widespread effects on gene regulation in the cell. However, if a unique molecular pathway can be identified, diseases caused by epigenetic mechanisms are excellent candidates for the development of more targeted therapies that focus on specific gene targets, individual binding domains, or specific enzymatic activities. Designing effective targeted therapies depends on a clear understanding of the role of epigenetic mutations during disease progression. The Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL protein is an example of a developmentally important protein that controls the epigenetic activation of gene targets in part by methylating histone 3 on lysine 4. MLL is required for normal development, but is also mutated in a subset of aggressive human leukemias and thus provides a useful model for studying the link between epigenetic cell memory and human disease. The most common MLL mutations are chromosome translocations that fuse the MLL gene in frame with partner genes creating novel fusion proteins. In this review, we summarize recent work that argues MLL fusion proteins could function through a single molecular pathway, but we also highlight important data that suggests instead that multiple independent mechanisms underlie MLL mediated leukemogenesis.

  20. Molecular medicine of fragile X syndrome: based on known molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shi-Yu; Wu, Ling-Qian; Duan, Ran-Hui

    2016-02-01

    Extensive research on fragile X mental retardation gene knockout mice and mutant Drosophila models has largely expanded our knowledge on mechanism-based treatment of fragile X syndrome (FXS). In light of these findings, several clinical trials are now underway for therapeutic translation to humans. Electronic literature searches were conducted using the PubMed database and ClinicalTrials.gov. The search terms included "fragile X syndrome", "FXS and medication", "FXS and therapeutics" and "FXS and treatment". Based on the publications identified in this search, we reviewed the neuroanatomical abnormalities in FXS patients and the potential pathogenic mechanisms to monitor the progress of FXS research, from basic studies to clinical trials. The pathological mechanisms of FXS were categorized on the basis of neuroanatomy, synaptic structure, synaptic transmission and fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) loss of function. The neuroanatomical abnormalities in FXS were described to motivate extensive research into the region-specific pathologies in the brain responsible for FXS behavioural manifestations. Mechanism-directed molecular medicines were classified according to their target pathological mechanisms, and the most recent progress in clinical trials was discussed. Current mechanism-based studies and clinical trials have greatly contributed to the development of FXS pharmacological therapeutics. Research examining the extent to which these treatments provided a rescue effect or FMRP compensation for the developmental impairments in FXS patients may help to improve the efficacy of treatments.

  1. Optimization and benchmarking of a perturbative Metropolis Monte Carlo quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldt, Jonas; Miranda, Sebastião; Pratas, Frederico; Roma, Nuno; Tomás, Pedro; Mata, Ricardo A

    2017-12-28

    In this work, we present an optimized perturbative quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method for use in Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations. The model adopted is particularly tailored for the simulation of molecular systems in solution but can be readily extended to other applications, such as catalysis in enzymatic environments. The electrostatic coupling between the QM and MM systems is simplified by applying perturbation theory to estimate the energy changes caused by a movement in the MM system. This approximation, together with the effective use of GPU acceleration, leads to a negligible added computational cost for the sampling of the environment. Benchmark calculations are carried out to evaluate the impact of the approximations applied and the overall computational performance.

  2. Mechanisms underlying methamphetamine-related dental disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clague, Jason; Belin, Thomas R; Shetty, Vivek

    2017-06-01

    The authors clarified the causal mechanisms underlying the high prevalence of dental disease encountered in people who habitually use methamphetamine (meth). Using a stratified sampling approach, the authors conducted comprehensive oral examinations and psychosocial assessments for 571 study participants who used meth. Three calibrated dentists, who used National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) protocols, characterized the study participants' dental disease. The authors also collected data related to study participants' history of meth use and other attributes linked to dental disease. Study participants who used meth manifested higher rates of xerostomia and caries experience compared with NHANES control participants. Participants who used meth had a higher level of daily consumption of sugary beverages compared with NHANES control participants. Smoking meth did not increase caries experience over other modes of intake. Dental hygiene was a significant determinant of dental health outcomes. Mode of intake and frequency of meth use have a minimal impact on dental health outcomes. Behaviors, such as sugary beverage consumption and poor oral hygiene, better explain dental health outcomes. Having a better understanding of the causal mechanisms of "meth mouth" sets the stage for clinicians to provide more personalized interventions and management of dental disease in people who use meth. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cellular and molecular mechanisms for the bone response to mechanical loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, S. A.

    2001-01-01

    To define the cellular and molecular mechanisms for the osteogenic response of bone to increased loading, several key steps must be defined: sensing of the mechanical signal by cells in bone, transduction of the mechanical signal to a biochemical one, and transmission of that biochemical signal to effector cells. Osteocytes are likely to serve as sensors of loading, probably via interstitial fluid flow produced during loading. Evidence is presented for the role of integrins, the cell's actin cytoskeleton, G proteins, and various intracellular signaling pathways in transducing that mechanical signal to a biochemical one. Nitric oxide, prostaglandins, and insulin-like growth factors all play important roles in these pathways. There is growing evidence for modulation of these mechanotransduction steps by endocrine factors, particularly parathyroid hormone and estrogen. The efficiency of this process is also impaired in the aged animal, yet what remains undefined is at what step mechanotransduction is affected.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of toxicity of important food-borne phytotoxins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Martena, M.J.; Boersma, M.G.; Spiegelenberg, W.; Alink, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    At present, there is an increasing interest for plant ingredients and their use in drugs, for teas, or in food supplements. The present review describes the nature and mechanism of action of the phytochemicals presently receiving increased attention in the field of food toxicology. This relates to

  5. [Molecular mechanism of action of tetanus toxin and botulinum neurotoxins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulain, B

    1994-02-01

    Tetanus toxin and botulinum neurotoxins are di-chain proteins of 150 kD molecular weight. They are produced by bacteria of the Clostridium genus. These toxins act on the nervous system by inhibiting neurotransmitter release (glycine and GABA in the case of tetanus toxin; acetylcholine in the case of botulinum neurotoxins) thus inducing the spastic or flaccid paralysis that characterizes tetanus and botulism, respectively. Their cellular mechanism of action involves three main steps, namely binding to the neurone membrane, internalization and intracellular blockade of the release mechanism for neurotransmitters. Membrane acceptors for these toxins are not yet fully identified; they would consist of membrane gangliosides and proteins. The internalization step would be achieved by endocytosis. Recent findings show that both binding and internalization are mediated only by the heavy chain of the toxins whereas the intracellular blockade of neurotransmitter release involves their light chain alone. The light chain has been identified as a zinc metalloprotease and its substrates would be proteins involved in the neurotransmitter release mechanism. The target of tetanus toxin and of botulinum neurotoxin type B is VAMP/synaptobrevin, a membrane protein of the synaptic vesicles of nerve cell terminals.

  6. Ethanol-Induced Cerebellar Ataxia: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, M Saeed

    2015-08-01

    The cerebellum is an important target of ethanol toxicity given that cerebellar ataxia is the most consistent physical manifestation of acute ethanol consumption. Despite the significance of the cerebellum in ethanol-induced cerebellar ataxia (EICA), the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying EICA are incompletely understood. However, two important findings have shed greater light on this phenomenon. First, ethanol-induced blockade of cerebellar adenosine uptake in rodent models points to a role for adenosinergic A1 modulation of EICA. Second, the consistent observation that intracerebellar administration of nicotine in mice leads to antagonism of EICA provides evidence for a critical role of cerebellar nitric oxide (NO) in EICA reversal. Based on these two important findings, this review discusses the potential molecular events at two key synaptic sites (mossy fiber-granule cell-Golgi cell (MGG synaptic site) and granule cell parallel fiber-Purkinje cell (GPP synaptic site) that lead to EICA. Specifically, ethanol-induced neuronal NOS inhibition at the MGG synaptic site acts as a critical trigger for Golgi cell activation which leads to granule cell deafferentation. Concurrently, ethanol-induced inhibition of adenosine uptake at the GPP synaptic site produces adenosine accumulation which decreases glutamate release and leads to the profound activation of Purkinje cells (PCs). These molecular events at the MGG and GPP synaptic sites are mutually reinforcing and lead to cerebellar dysfunction, decreased excitatory output of deep cerebellar nuclei, and EICA. The critical importance of PCs as the sole output of the cerebellar cortex suggests normalization of PC function could have important therapeutic implications.

  7. Scientometrics of drug discovery efforts: pain-related molecular targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissin, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to make a scientometric assessment of drug discovery efforts centered on pain-related molecular targets. The following scientometric indices were used: the popularity index, representing the share of articles (or patents) on a specific topic among all articles (or patents) on pain over the same 5-year period; the index of change, representing the change in the number of articles (or patents) on a topic from one 5-year period to the next; the index of expectations, representing the ratio of the number of all types of articles on a topic in the top 20 journals relative to the number of articles in all (>5,000) biomedical journals covered by PubMed over a 5-year period; the total number of articles representing Phase I-III trials of investigational drugs over a 5-year period; and the trial balance index, a ratio of Phase I-II publications to Phase III publications. Articles (PubMed database) and patents (US Patent and Trademark Office database) on 17 topics related to pain mechanisms were assessed during six 5-year periods from 1984 to 2013. During the most recent 5-year period (2009-2013), seven of 17 topics have demonstrated high research activity (purinergic receptors, serotonin, transient receptor potential channels, cytokines, gamma aminobutyric acid, glutamate, and protein kinases). However, even with these seven topics, the index of expectations decreased or did not change compared with the 2004-2008 period. In addition, publications representing Phase I-III trials of investigational drugs (2009-2013) did not indicate great enthusiasm on the part of the pharmaceutical industry regarding drugs specifically designed for treatment of pain. A promising development related to the new tool of molecular targeting, ie, monoclonal antibodies, for pain treatment has not yet resulted in real success. This approach has not yet demonstrated clinical effectiveness (at least with nerve growth factor) much beyond conventional analgesics, when its

  8. Generic Transport Mechanisms for Molecular Traffic in Cellular Protrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Isabella R.; Frey, Erwin

    2017-03-01

    Transport of molecular motors along protein filaments in a half-closed geometry is a common feature of biologically relevant processes in cellular protrusions. Using a lattice-gas model we study how the interplay between active and diffusive transport and mass conservation leads to localized domain walls and tip localization of the motors. We identify a mechanism for task sharing between the active motors (maintaining a gradient) and the diffusive motion (transport to the tip), which ensures that energy consumption is low and motor exchange mostly happens at the tip. These features are attributed to strong nearest-neighbor correlations that lead to a strong reduction of active currents, which we calculate analytically using an exact moment identity, and might prove useful for the understanding of correlations and active transport also in more elaborate systems.

  9. Molecular targets and mechanisms of bioactive peptides against metabolic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shanshan; Liu, Ling; He, Guoqing; Wu, Jianping

    2017-11-30

    Bioactive peptides are present in all living organisms and have critical roles ranging from protection against infection as the key element of innate immunity, regulating blood pressure and glucose levels, to reducing signs of ageing by killing senescent cells. Bioactive peptides are also encrypted within food protein sequences that can be released during proteolysis or food processing. These specific food protein fragments are reported to have potential for improving human health and preventing metabolic diseases through their impact on inflammation, blood pressure, obesity, and type-2 diabetes. This review mainly focuses on the molecular targets and the underlying mechanisms of bioactive peptides against various metabolic syndromes including inflammation, high blood pressure, obesity, and type-2 diabetes, to provide new insights and perspectives on the potential of bioactive peptides for management of metabolic syndromes.

  10. Recent Advances in Methamphetamine Neurotoxicity Mechanisms and Its Molecular Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaobin Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (METH is a sympathomimetic amine that belongs to phenethylamine and amphetamine class of psychoactive drugs, which are widely abused for their stimulant, euphoric, empathogenic, and hallucinogenic properties. Many of these effects result from acute increases in dopamine and serotonin neurotransmission. Subsequent to these acute effects, METH produces persistent damage to dopamine and serotonin release in nerve terminals, gliosis, and apoptosis. This review summarized the numerous interdependent mechanisms including excessive dopamine, ubiquitin-proteasome system dysfunction, protein nitration, endoplasmic reticulum stress, p53 expression, inflammatory molecular, D3 receptor, microtubule deacetylation, and HIV-1 Tat protein that have been demonstrated to contribute to this damage. In addition, the feasible therapeutic strategies according to recent studies were also summarized ranging from drug and protein to gene level.

  11. Recent Advances in Molecular Mechanisms of Taste Signaling and Modifying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemura, Noriatsu; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2016-01-01

    The sense of taste conveys crucial information about the quality and nutritional value of foods before it is ingested. Taste signaling begins with taste cells via taste receptors in oral cavity. Activation of these receptors drives the transduction systems in taste receptor cells. Then particular transmitters are released from the taste cells and activate corresponding afferent gustatory nerve fibers. Recent studies have revealed that taste sensitivities are defined by distinct taste receptors and modulated by endogenous humoral factors in a specific group of taste cells. Such peripheral taste generations and modifications would directly influence intake of nutritive substances. This review will highlight current understanding of molecular mechanisms for taste reception, signal transduction in taste bud cells, transmission between taste cells and nerves, regeneration from taste stem cells, and modification by humoral factors at peripheral taste organs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Complement involvement in periodontitis: molecular mechanisms and rational therapeutic approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajishengallis, George; Maekawa, Tomoki; Abe, Toshiharu; Hajishengallis, Evlambia; Lambris, John D.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is a network of interacting fluid-phase and cell surface-associated molecules that trigger, amplify, and regulate immune and inflammatory signaling pathways. Dysregulation of this finely balanced network can destabilize host-microbe homeostasis and cause inflammatory tissue damage. Evidence from clinical and animal model-based studies suggests that complement is implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontitis, a polymicrobial community-induced chronic inflammatory disease that destroys the tooth-supporting tissues. This review discusses molecular mechanisms of complement involvement in the dysbiotic transformation of the periodontal microbiome and the resulting destructive inflammation, culminating in loss of periodontal bone support. These mechanistic studies have additionally identified potential therapeutic targets. In this regard, interventional studies in preclinical models have provided proof-of-concept for using complement inhibitors for the treatment of human periodontitis. PMID:26306443

  13. A Hybrid Imperative and Functional Molecular Mechanics Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Deboni

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular mechanics applications model the interactions among large ensembles of discrete particles. They are used where probabilistic methods are inadequate, such as drug chemistry. This methodology is difficult to parallelize with good performance, due to its poor locality, uneven partitions, and dynamic behavior. Imperative programs have been written that attempt this on shared and distributed memory machines. Given such a program, the computational kernel can be rewritten in Sisal, a functional programming language, and integrated with the rest of the imperative program under the Sisal Foreign Language Interface. This allows minimal effort and maximal return from parallelization work, and leaves the work appropriate to imperative implementation in its original form. We describe such an effort, focusing on the parts of the application that are appropriate for Sisal implementation, the specifics of mixed-language programming, and the complex performance behavior of the resulting hybrid code.

  14. DNA replication stress: from molecular mechanisms to human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Sergio; Méndez, Juan

    2017-02-01

    The genome of proliferating cells must be precisely duplicated in each cell division cycle. Chromosomal replication entails risks such as the possibility of introducing breaks and/or mutations in the genome. Hence, DNA replication requires the coordinated action of multiple proteins and regulatory factors, whose deregulation causes severe developmental diseases and predisposes to cancer. In recent years, the concept of "replicative stress" (RS) has attracted much attention as it impinges directly on genomic stability and offers a promising new avenue to design anticancer therapies. In this review, we summarize recent progress in three areas: (1) endogenous and exogenous factors that contribute to RS, (2) molecular mechanisms that mediate the cellular responses to RS, and (3) the large list of diseases that are directly or indirectly linked to RS.

  15. Quantum-Mechanical Calculations on Molecular Substructures Involved in Nanosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Szefler

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this review article, four ideas are discussed: (a aromaticity of fullerenes patched with flowers of 6-and 8-membered rings, optimized at the HF and DFT levels of theory, in terms of HOMA and NICS criteria; (b polybenzene networks, from construction to energetic and vibrational spectra computations; (c quantum-mechanical calculations on the repeat units of various P-type crystal networks and (d construction and stability evaluation, at DFTB level of theory, of some exotic allotropes of diamond D5, involved in hyper-graphenes. The overall conclusion was that several of the yet hypothetical molecular nanostructures herein described are serious candidates to the status of real molecules.

  16. Obstructive renal injury: from fluid mechanics to molecular cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucero, Alvaro C; Gonçalves, Sara; Benito-Martin, Alberto; Santamaría, Beatriz; Ramos, Adrian M; Berzal, Sergio; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesus; Ortiz, Alberto

    2010-04-22

    Urinary tract obstruction is a frequent cause of renal impairment. The physiopathology of obstructive nephropathy has long been viewed as a mere mechanical problem. However, recent advances in cell and systems biology have disclosed a complex physiopathology involving a high number of molecular mediators of injury that lead to cellular processes of apoptotic cell death, cell injury leading to inflammation and resultant fibrosis. Functional studies in animal models of ureteral obstruction using a variety of techniques that include genetically modified animals have disclosed an important role for the renin-angiotensin system, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and other mediators of inflammation in this process. In addition, high throughput techniques such as proteomics and transcriptomics have identified potential biomarkers that may guide clinical decision-making.

  17. Molecular Mechanisms of Crude Oil Developmental Toxicity in Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incardona, John P

    2017-07-01

    With major oil spills in Korea, the United States, and China in the past decade, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of studies characterizing the developmental toxicity of crude oil and its associated polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs). The use of model fish species with associated tools for genetic manipulation, combined with high throughput genomics techniques in nonmodel fish species, has led to significant advances in understanding the cellular and molecular bases of functional and morphological defects arising from embryonic exposure to crude oil. Following from the identification of the developing heart as the primary target of crude oil developmental toxicity, studies on individual PACs have revealed a diversity of cardiotoxic mechanisms. For some PACs that are strong agonists of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), defects in heart development arise in an AHR-dependent manner, which has been shown for potent organochlorine agonists, such as dioxins. However, crude oil contains a much larger fraction of compounds that have been found to interfere directly with cardiomyocyte physiology in an AHR-independent manner. By comparing the cellular and molecular responses to AHR-independent and AHR-dependent toxicity, this review focuses on new insights into heart-specific pathways underlying both acute and secondary adverse outcomes to crude oil exposure during fish development.

  18. Neuroprotection and its molecular mechanism following spinal cord injury☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nai-Kui; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Acute spinal cord injury initiates a complex cascade of molecular events termed ‘secondary injury’, which leads to progressive degeneration ranging from early neuronal apoptosis at the lesion site to delayed degeneration of intact white matter tracts, and, ultimately, expansion of the initial injury. These secondary injury processes include, but are not limited to, inflammation, free radical-induced cell death, glutamate excitotoxicity, phospholipase A2 activation, and induction of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways, which are important targets in developing neuroprotective strategies for treatment of spinal cord injury. Recently, a number of studies have shown promising results on neuroprotection and recovery of function in rodent models of spinal cord injury using treatments that target secondary injury processes including inflammation, phospholipase A2 activation, and manipulation of the PTEN-Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. The present review outlines our ongoing research on the molecular mechanisms of neuroprotection in experimental spinal cord injury and briefly summarizes our earlier findings on the therapeutic potential of pharmacological treatments in spinal cord injury. PMID:25624837

  19. Quantum mechanical force fields for condensed phase molecular simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, Timothy J.; York, Darrin M.

    2017-09-01

    Molecular simulations are powerful tools for providing atomic-level details into complex chemical and physical processes that occur in the condensed phase. For strongly interacting systems where quantum many-body effects are known to play an important role, density-functional methods are often used to provide the model with the potential energy used to drive dynamics. These methods, however, suffer from two major drawbacks. First, they are often too computationally intensive to practically apply to large systems over long time scales, limiting their scope of application. Second, there remain challenges for these models to obtain the necessary level of accuracy for weak non-bonded interactions to obtain quantitative accuracy for a wide range of condensed phase properties. Quantum mechanical force fields (QMFFs) provide a potential solution to both of these limitations. In this review, we address recent advances in the development of QMFFs for condensed phase simulations. In particular, we examine the development of QMFF models using both approximate and ab initio density-functional models, the treatment of short-ranged non-bonded and long-ranged electrostatic interactions, and stability issues in molecular dynamics calculations. Example calculations are provided for crystalline systems, liquid water, and ionic liquids. We conclude with a perspective for emerging challenges and future research directions.

  20. Molecular mechanisms underlying phosphate sensing, signaling, and adaptation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoliang; Liao, Hong; Lucas, William J

    2014-03-01

    As an essential plant macronutrient, the low availability of phosphorus (P) in most soils imposes serious limitation on crop production. Plants have evolved complex responsive and adaptive mechanisms for acquisition, remobilization and recycling of phosphate (Pi) to maintain P homeostasis. Spatio-temporal molecular, physiological, and biochemical Pi deficiency responses developed by plants are the consequence of local and systemic sensing and signaling pathways. Pi deficiency is sensed locally by the root system where hormones serve as important signaling components in terms of developmental reprogramming, leading to changes in root system architecture. Root-to-shoot and shoot-to-root signals, delivered through the xylem and phloem, respectively, involving Pi itself, hormones, miRNAs, mRNAs, and sucrose, serve to coordinate Pi deficiency responses at the whole-plant level. A combination of chromatin remodeling, transcriptional and posttranslational events contribute to globally regulating a wide range of Pi deficiency responses. In this review, recent advances are evaluated in terms of progress toward developing a comprehensive understanding of the molecular events underlying control over P homeostasis. Application of this knowledge, in terms of developing crop plants having enhanced attributes for P use efficiency, is discussed from the perspective of agricultural sustainability in the face of diminishing global P supplies. © 2014 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  1. Molecular mechanisms of ROS production and oxidative stress in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsholme, Philip; Cruzat, Vinicius Fernandes; Keane, Kevin Noel; Carlessi, Rodrigo; de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo Homem

    2016-12-15

    Oxidative stress and chronic inflammation are known to be associated with the development of metabolic diseases, including diabetes. Oxidative stress, an imbalance between oxidative and antioxidative systems of cells and tissues, is a result of over production of oxidative-free radicals and associated reactive oxygen species (ROS). One outcome of excessive levels of ROS is the modification of the structure and function of cellular proteins and lipids, leading to cellular dysfunction including impaired energy metabolism, altered cell signalling and cell cycle control, impaired cell transport mechanisms and overall dysfunctional biological activity, immune activation and inflammation. Nutritional stress, such as that caused by excess high-fat and/or carbohydrate diets, promotes oxidative stress as evident by increased lipid peroxidation products, protein carbonylation and decreased antioxidant status. In obesity, chronic oxidative stress and associated inflammation are the underlying factors that lead to the development of pathologies such as insulin resistance, dysregulated pathways of metabolism, diabetes and cardiovascular disease through impaired signalling and metabolism resulting in dysfunction to insulin secretion, insulin action and immune responses. However, exercise may counter excessive levels of oxidative stress and thus improve metabolic and inflammatory outcomes. In the present article, we review the cellular and molecular origins and significance of ROS production, the molecular targets and responses describing how oxidative stress affects cell function including mechanisms of insulin secretion and action, from the point of view of possible application of novel diabetic therapies based on redox regulation. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  2. Theoretical Characterization of the Spectral Density of the Water-Soluble Chlorophyll-Binding Protein from Combined Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosnik, Andreana M; Curutchet, Carles

    2015-12-08

    Over the past decade, both experimentalists and theorists have worked to develop methods to describe pigment-protein coupling in photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes in order to understand the molecular basis of quantum coherence effects observed in photosynthesis. Here we present an improved strategy based on the combination of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and excited-state calculations to predict the spectral density of electronic-vibrational coupling. We study the water-soluble chlorophyll-binding protein (WSCP) reconstituted with Chl a or Chl b pigments as the system of interest and compare our work with data obtained by Pieper and co-workers from differential fluorescence line-narrowing spectra (Pieper et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2011, 115 (14), 4042-4052). Our results demonstrate that the use of QM/MM MD simulations where the nuclear positions are still propagated at the classical level leads to a striking improvement of the predicted spectral densities in the middle- and high-frequency regions, where they nearly reach quantitative accuracy. This demonstrates that the so-called "geometry mismatch" problem related to the use of low-quality structures in QM calculations, not the quantum features of pigments high-frequency motions, causes the failure of previous studies relying on similar protocols. Thus, this work paves the way toward quantitative predictions of pigment-protein coupling and the comprehension of quantum coherence effects in photosynthesis.

  3. Molecular Mechanism for LAMP1 Recognition by Lassa Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Dvashi, Hadas; Cohen, Nadav; Israeli, Hadar; Diskin, Ron

    2015-08-01

    Lassa virus is a notorious human pathogen that infects many thousands of people each year in West Africa, causing severe viral hemorrhagic fevers and significant mortality. The surface glycoprotein of Lassa virus mediates receptor recognition through its GP1 subunit. Here we report the crystal structure of GP1 from Lassa virus, which is the first representative GP1 structure for Old World arenaviruses. We identify a unique triad of histidines that forms a binding site for LAMP1, a known lysosomal protein recently discovered to be a critical receptor for internalized Lassa virus at acidic pH. We demonstrate that mutation of this histidine triad, which is highly conserved among Old World arenaviruses, impairs LAMP1 recognition. Our biochemical and structural data further suggest that GP1 from Lassa virus may undergo irreversible conformational changes that could serve as an immunological decoy mechanism. Together with a variable region that we identify on the surface of GP1, those could be two distinct mechanisms that Lassa virus utilizes to avoid antibody-based immune response. Structural data at atomic resolution for viral proteins is key for understanding their function at the molecular level and can facilitate novel avenues for combating viral infections. Here we used X-ray protein crystallography to decipher the crystal structure of the receptor-binding domain (GP1) from Lassa virus. This is a pathogenic virus that causes significant illness and mortality in West Africa. This structure reveals the overall architecture of GP1 domains from the group of viruses known as the Old World arenaviruses. Using this structural information, we elucidated the mechanisms for pH switch and binding of Lassa virus to LAMP1, a recently identified host receptor that is critical for successful infection. Lastly, our structural analysis suggests two novel immune evasion mechanisms that Lassa virus may utilize to escape antibody-based immune response. Copyright © 2015, American

  4. Molecular Mechanisms Linking Exercise to Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Gehl, Julie; Christensen, Jesper F.

    2018-01-01

    The benefits of exercise training for cancer patients are becoming increasingly evident. Physical exercise has been shown to reduce cancer incidence and inhibit tumor growth. Here we provide the status of the current molecular understanding of the effect of exercise on cancer. We propose...... that exercise has a role in controlling cancer progression through a direct effect on tumor-intrinsic factors, interplay with whole-body exercise effects, alleviation of cancer-related adverse events, and improvement of anti-cancer treatment efficacy. These findings have wide-ranging societal implications......, as this understanding may lead to changes in cancer treatment strategies. Hojman et al. discuss the role of exercise in controlling cancer progression through direct effects on tumor-intrinsic factors, interplay with whole-body exercise effects, alleviation of cancer-related adverse events, and improvement of cancer...

  5. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of metformin: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viollet, Benoit; Guigas, Bruno; Sanz Garcia, Nieves; Leclerc, Jocelyne; Foretz, Marc; Andreelli, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Considerable efforts have been made since the 1950s to better understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of action of metformin, a potent antihyperglycemic agent now recommended as the first line oral therapy for type 2 diabetes (T2D). The main effect of this drug from the biguanide family is to acutely decrease hepatic glucose production, mostly through a mild and transient inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory-chain complex 1. In addition, the resulting decrease in hepatic energy status activates the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a cellular metabolic sensor, providing a generally accepted mechanism for metformin action on hepatic gluconeogenic program. The demonstration that the respiratory-chain complex 1, but not AMPK, is the primary target of metformin was recently strengthened by showing that the metabolic effect of the drug is preserved in liver-specific AMPK-deficient mice. Beyond its effect on glucose metabolism, metformin was reported to restore ovarian function in polycystic ovary syndrome, reduce fatty liver and to lower microvascular and macrovascular complications associated with T2D. Its use was also recently suggested as an adjuvant treatment for cancer or gestational diabetes, and for the prevention in pre-diabetic populations. These emerging new therapeutic areas for metformin will be reviewed together with recent data from pharmacogenetic studies linking genetic variations to drug response, a promising new step towards personalized medicine in the treatment of T2D. PMID:22117616

  6. Molecular mechanics parameters for the FapydG DNA lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kun; Hornak, Viktor; de los Santos, Carlos; Grollman, Arthur P; Simmerling, Carlos

    2008-01-15

    FapydG is a common oxidative DNA lesion involving opening of the imidazole ring. It shares the same precursor as 8-oxodG and can be excised by the same enzymes as 8-oxodG. However, the loss of the aromatic imidazole in FapydG results in a reduction of the double bond character between C5 and N7, with an accompanying increase in conformational flexibility. Experimental characterization of FapydG is hampered by high reactivity, and thus it is desirable to investigate structural details through computer simulation. We show that the existing Amber force field parameters for FapydG do not reproduce X-ray structural data. We employed quantum mechanics energy profile calculations to derive new molecular mechanics parameters for the rotation of the dihedral angles in the eximidazole moiety. Using these parameters, all-atom simulations in explicit water reproduce the nonplanar conformation of cFapydG in the crystal structure of the complex with L. lactis glycosylase Fpg. We note that the nonplanar structure is stabilized by an acidic residue that is not present in most Fpg sequences. Simulations of the E-->S mutant, as present in E. coli, resulted in a more planar conformation, suggesting that the highly nonplanar form observed in the crystal structure may not have direct biological relevance for FapydG.

  7. Molecular mechanisms of Tetranychus urticae chemical adaptation in hop fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piraneo, Tara G; Bull, Jon; Morales, Mariany A; Lavine, Laura C; Walsh, Douglas B; Zhu, Fang

    2015-12-01

    The two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch is a major pest that feeds on >1,100 plant species. Many perennial crops including hop (Humulus lupulus) are routinely plagued by T. urticae infestations. Hop is a specialty crop in Pacific Northwest states, where 99% of all U.S. hops are produced. To suppress T. urticae, growers often apply various acaricides. Unfortunately T. urticae has been documented to quickly develop resistance to these acaricides which directly cause control failures. Here, we investigated resistance ratios and distribution of multiple resistance-associated mutations in field collected T. urticae samples compared with a susceptible population. Our research revealed that a mutation in the cytochrome b gene (G126S) in 35% tested T. urticae populations and a mutation in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene (F1538I) in 66.7% populations may contribute resistance to bifenazate and bifenthrin, respectively. No mutations were detected in Glutamate-gated chloride channel subunits tested, suggesting target site insensitivity may not be important in our hop T. urticae resistance to abamectin. However, P450-mediated detoxification was observed and is a putative mechanism for abamectin resistance. Molecular mechanisms of T. urticae chemical adaptation in hopyards is imperative new information that will help growers develop effective and sustainable management strategies.

  8. Molecular Mechanisms of Particle Ration Induced Apoptosis in Lymphocyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yufang

    Space radiation, composed of high-energy charged nuclei (HZE particles) and protons, has been previously shown to severely impact immune homeostasis in mice. To determine the molecular mechanisms that mediate acute lymphocyte depletion following exposure to HZE particle radiation mice were exposed to particle radiation beams at Brookhaven National Laboratory. We found that mice given whole body 5 6Fe particle irradiation (1GeV /n) had dose-dependent losses in total lymphocyte numbers in the spleen and thymus (using 200, 100 and 50 cGy), with thymocytes being more sensitive than splenocytes. All phenotypic subsets were reduced in number. In general, T cells and B cells were equally sensitive, while CD8+ T cells were more senstive than CD4+ T cells. In the thymus, immature CD4+CD8+ double-positive thymocytes were exquisitely sensitive to radiation-induced losses, single-positive CD4 or CD8 cells were less sensitive, and the least mature double negative cells were resistant. Irradiation of mice deficient in genes encoding essential apoptosis-inducing proteins revealed that the mechanism of lymphocyte depletion is independent of Fas ligand and TRAIL (TNF-ralated apoptosis-inducing ligand), in contrast to γ-radiation-induced lymphocyte losses which require the Fas-FasL pathway. Using inhibitors in vitro, lymphocyte apoptosis induced by HZE particle radiation was found to be caspase dependent, and not involve nitric oxide or oxygen free radicals.

  9. Emerging anticancer potentials of goniothalamin and its molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyed, Mohamed Ali; Jantan, Ibrahim; Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of most cancers is still inadequate, despite tremendous steady progress in drug discovery and effective prevention. Nature is an attractive source of new therapeutics. Several medicinal plants and their biomarkers have been widely used for the treatment of cancer with less known scientific basis of their functioning. Although a wide array of plant derived active metabolites play a role in the prevention and treatment of cancer, more extensive scientific evaluation of their mechanisms is still required. Styryl-lactones are a group of secondary metabolites ubiquitous in the genus Goniothalamus that have demonstrated to possess antiproliferative activity against cancer cells. A large body of evidence suggests that this activity is associated with the induction of apoptosis in target cells. In an effort to promote further research on the genus Goniothalamus, this review offers a broad analysis of the current knowledge on Goniothalamin (GTN) or 5, 6, dihydro-6-styryl-2-pyronone (C13H12O2), a natural occurring styryl-lactone. Therefore, it includes (i) the source of GTN and other metabolites; (ii) isolation, purification, and (iii) the molecular mechanisms of actions of GTN, especially the anticancer properties, and summarizes the role of GTN which is crucial for drug design, development, and application in future for well-being of humans.

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Liver Fibrosis in HIV/HCV Coinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio M. Mastroianni

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in people coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Several studies have shown that HIV infection promotes accelerated HCV hepatic fibrosis progression, even with HIV replication under full antiretroviral control. The pathogenesis of accelerated hepatic fibrosis among HIV/HCV coinfected individuals is complex and multifactorial. The most relevant mechanisms involved include direct viral effects, immune/cytokine dysregulation, altered levels of matrix metalloproteinases and fibrosis biomarkers, increased oxidative stress and hepatocyte apoptosis, HIV-associated gut depletion of CD4 cells, and microbial translocation. In addition, metabolic alterations, heavy alcohol use, as well drug use, may have a potential role in liver disease progression. Understanding the pathophysiology and regulation of liver fibrosis in HIV/HCV co-infection may lead to the development of therapeutic strategies for the management of all patients with ongoing liver disease. In this review, we therefore discuss the evidence and potential molecular mechanisms involved in the accelerated liver fibrosis seen in patients coinfected with HIV and HCV.

  11. Multiresolution molecular mechanics: Surface effects in nanoscale materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Qingcheng, E-mail: qiy9@pitt.edu; To, Albert C., E-mail: albertto@pitt.edu

    2017-05-01

    Surface effects have been observed to contribute significantly to the mechanical response of nanoscale structures. The newly proposed energy-based coarse-grained atomistic method Multiresolution Molecular Mechanics (MMM) (Yang, To (2015), ) is applied to capture surface effect for nanosized structures by designing a surface summation rule SR{sup S} within the framework of MMM. Combined with previously proposed bulk summation rule SR{sup B}, the MMM summation rule SR{sup MMM} is completed. SR{sup S} and SR{sup B} are consistently formed within SR{sup MMM} for general finite element shape functions. Analogous to quadrature rules in finite element method (FEM), the key idea to the good performance of SR{sup MMM} lies in that the order or distribution of energy for coarse-grained atomistic model is mathematically derived such that the number, position and weight of quadrature-type (sampling) atoms can be determined. Mathematically, the derived energy distribution of surface area is different from that of bulk region. Physically, the difference is due to the fact that surface atoms lack neighboring bonding. As such, SR{sup S} and SR{sup B} are employed for surface and bulk domains, respectively. Two- and three-dimensional numerical examples using the respective 4-node bilinear quadrilateral, 8-node quadratic quadrilateral and 8-node hexahedral meshes are employed to verify and validate the proposed approach. It is shown that MMM with SR{sup MMM} accurately captures corner, edge and surface effects with less 0.3% degrees of freedom of the original atomistic system, compared against full atomistic simulation. The effectiveness of SR{sup MMM} with respect to high order element is also demonstrated by employing the 8-node quadratic quadrilateral to solve a beam bending problem considering surface effect. In addition, the introduced sampling error with SR{sup MMM} that is analogous to numerical integration error with quadrature rule in FEM is very small. - Highlights:

  12. Extending quantum mechanics entails extending special relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravinda, S.; Srikanth, R.

    2016-05-01

    The complementarity between signaling and randomness in any communicated resource that can simulate singlet statistics is generalized by relaxing the assumption of free will in the choice of measurement settings. We show how to construct an ontological extension for quantum mechanics (QMs) through the oblivious embedding of a sound simulation protocol in a Newtonian spacetime. Minkowski or other intermediate spacetimes are ruled out as the locus of the embedding by virtue of hidden influence inequalities. The complementarity transferred from a simulation to the extension unifies a number of results about quantum non-locality, and implies that special relativity has a different significance for the ontological model and for the operational theory it reproduces. Only the latter, being experimentally accessible, is required to be Lorentz covariant. There may be certain Lorentz non-covariant elements at the ontological level, but they will be inaccessible at the operational level in a valid extension. Certain arguments against the extendability of QM, due to Conway and Kochen (2009) and Colbeck and Renner (2012), are attributed to their assumption that the spacetime at the ontological level has Minkowski causal structure.

  13. Molecular mechanisms controlling proton pumping by bacteriorhodopsin. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouch, Rosalie K.; Ebrey, Thomas G.

    2000-02-10

    Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is the simplest biological system for the transduction of light energy. Light energy is directly converted to transmembrane proton gradient by a single, small membrane protein. The extraordinary stability of bR makes it an outstanding subject for bioenergetic studies. This project has focused on the role of interactions between key residues of the pigment involved in light-induced proton transfer. Methods to estimate the strength of these interactions and their correlation with the rate and efficiency of proton transfer have been developed. The concept of the coupling of the protonation states of key groups has been applied to individual steps of the proton transfer with the ultimate goal of understanding on the molecular level the driving forces for proton transport and the pathway of the transported proton in bT. The mechanism of light-induced proton release, uptake and the mechanism of recovery of initial state of bT has been examined. The experiments were performed with genetically engineered, site-specific mutants of bR. This has enabled us to characterize the role of individual amino acid residues in bR. Time resolved and low temperature absorption spectroscopy and light-induced photocurrent measurements were used in order to study the photochemical cycle and proton transfer in mutant pigments. Chemical modification and crosslinking of both the specific amino acids to the chromophore or to other amino acids were used to elucidate the role of light-induced conformational changes in the photocycle and the structure of the protein in the ground state. The results of this project provided new knowledge on the architecture of the proton transfer pathways inside the protein, on the mechanism of proton release in bR, and on the role of specific amino acid residues in the structure and function of bR.

  14. [Molecular Mechanisms of Circadian Rhythm and Sleep Homeostasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kon, Kazuhiro; Ode, Koji L; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2017-03-01

    Sleep-wake cycle is controlled by the interplay between circadian rhythm and sleep homeostasis. Genetic studies, through the discovery of mutants with altered sleep-wake behaviors, have explored the molecular components that regulate our daily rhythms. In mammalian circadian clocks, negative-feedback loops composed of a set of transcription activators and inhibitors generate a cell-autonomous oscillation of transcriptional activity. Recent studies further discovered that such transcriptional feedback is controlled through post-translational modifications for the fine-tuning of the oscillation period. Compared to circadian clocks, the canonical molecular model for sleep homeostasis is not established yet. However, recent advances in mammalian forward and reverse genetic studies discovered several genes that regulate sleep duration. Interestingly, these genes include ion channels and kinases, which potentially modify these channels. A part of sleep-related ion channels is involved in Ca2+-dependent hyperpolarization of the neuronal membrane potential. Computational models suggest that the hyperpolarization pathway underlies the firing patterns observed in the cortical pyramidal neurons during sleep. Thus, ion channels controlling the membrane potential of the cortical neurons may be involved in sleep homeostasis.

  15. Molecular Mechanism: ERK Signaling, Drug Addiction, and Behavioral Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei-Lun; Quizon, Pamela M; Zhu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Addiction to psychostimulants has been considered as a chronic psychiatric disorder characterized by craving and compulsive drug seeking and use. Over the past two decades, accumulating evidence has demonstrated that repeated drug exposure causes long-lasting neurochemical and cellular changes that result in enduring neuroadaptation in brain circuitry and underlie compulsive drug consumption and relapse. Through intercellular signaling cascades, drugs of abuse induce remodeling in the rewarding circuitry that contributes to the neuroplasticity of learning and memory associated with addiction. Here, we review the role of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase, and its related intracellular signaling pathways in drug-induced neuroadaptive changes that are associated with drug-mediated psychomotor activity, rewarding properties and relapse of drug seeking behaviors. We also discuss the neurobiological and behavioral effects of pharmacological and genetic interferences with ERK-associated molecular cascades in response to abused substances. Understanding the dynamic modulation of ERK signaling in response to drugs may provide novel molecular targets for therapeutic strategies to drug addiction. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Survivin-T34A: molecular mechanism and therapeutic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan R Aspe

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan R Aspe, Nathan R WallCenter for Health Disparities Research and Molecular Medicine, Division of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Department of Basic Sciences, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA, USAAbstract: The inhibitor of apoptosis protein survivin's threonine 34 to alanine (T34A mutation abolishes a phosphorylation site for p34(cdc2–cyclin B1, resulting in initiation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in cancer cells; however, it has little known direct effects on normal cells. The possibility that targeting survivin in this way may provide a novel approach for selective cancer gene therapy has yet to be fully evaluated. Although a flurry of work was undertaken in the late 1990s and early 2000s, only minor advances on this mutant have recently taken place. We recently described that cells generated to express a stable form of the mutant protein released this survivin-T34A to the conditioned medium. When this conditioned medium was collected and deposited on naive tumor cells, conditioned medium T34A was as effective as some chemotherapeutics in the induction of tumor cell apoptosis, and when combined with other forms of genotoxic stressors potentiated their killing effects. We hope with this review to revitalize the T34A field, as there is still much that needs to be investigated. In addition to determining the therapeutic dose and the duration of drug therapy required at the disease site, a better understanding of other key factors is also important. These include knowledge of target cell populations, cell-surface receptors, changes that occur in the target tissue at the molecular and cellular level with progression of the disease, and the mechanism and site of therapeutic action.Keywords: survivin, T34A, apoptosis, proliferation, therapy

  17. Molecular modifiers reveal a mechanism of pathological crystal growth inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jihae; Granja, Ignacio; Taylor, Michael G.; Mpourmpakis, Giannis; Asplin, John R.; Rimer, Jeffrey D.

    2016-08-01

    Crystalline materials are crucial to the function of living organisms, in the shells of molluscs, the matrix of bone, the teeth of sea urchins, and the exoskeletons of coccoliths. However, pathological biomineralization can be an undesirable crystallization process associated with human diseases. The crystal growth of biogenic, natural and synthetic materials may be regulated by the action of modifiers, most commonly inhibitors, which range from small ions and molecules to large macromolecules. Inhibitors adsorb on crystal surfaces and impede the addition of solute, thereby reducing the rate of growth. Complex inhibitor-crystal interactions in biomineralization are often not well elucidated. Here we show that two molecular inhibitors of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization—citrate and hydroxycitrate—exhibit a mechanism that differs from classical theory in that inhibitor adsorption on crystal surfaces induces dissolution of the crystal under specific conditions rather than a reduced rate of crystal growth. This phenomenon occurs even in supersaturated solutions where inhibitor concentration is three orders of magnitude less than that of the solute. The results of bulk crystallization, in situ atomic force microscopy, and density functional theory studies are qualitatively consistent with a hypothesis that inhibitor-crystal interactions impart localized strain to the crystal lattice and that oxalate and calcium ions are released into solution to alleviate this strain. Calcium oxalate monohydrate is the principal component of human kidney stones and citrate is an often-used therapy, but hydroxycitrate is not. For hydroxycitrate to function as a kidney stone treatment, it must be excreted in urine. We report that hydroxycitrate ingested by non-stone-forming humans at an often-recommended dose leads to substantial urinary excretion. In vitro assays using human urine reveal that the molecular modifier hydroxycitrate is as effective an inhibitor of nucleation

  18. Phosphorus physiological ecology and molecular mechanisms in marine phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Senjie; Litaker, Richard Wayne; Sunda, William G

    2016-02-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for marine phytoplankton and indeed all life forms. Current data show that P availability is growth-limiting in certain marine systems and can impact algal species composition. Available P occurs in marine waters as dissolved inorganic phosphate (primarily orthophosphate [Pi]) or as a myriad of dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) compounds. Despite numerous studies on P physiology and ecology and increasing research on genomics in marine phytoplankton, there have been few attempts to synthesize information from these different disciplines. This paper is aimed to integrate the physiological and molecular information on the acquisition, utilization, and storage of P in marine phytoplankton and the strategies used by these organisms to acclimate and adapt to variations in P availability. Where applicable, we attempt to identify gaps in our current knowledge that warrant further research and examine possible metabolic pathways that might occur in phytoplankton from well-studied bacterial models. Physical and chemical limitations governing cellular P uptake are explored along with physiological and molecular mechanisms to adapt and acclimate to temporally and spatially varying P nutrient regimes. Topics covered include cellular Pi uptake and feedback regulation of uptake systems, enzymatic utilization of DOP, P acquisition by phagotrophy, P-limitation of phytoplankton growth in oceanic and coastal waters, and the role of P-limitation in regulating cell size and toxin levels in phytoplankton. Finally, we examine the role of P and other nutrients in the transition of phytoplankton communities from early succession species (diatoms) to late succession ones (e.g., dinoflagellates and haptophytes). © 2015 Phycological Society of America.

  19. Molecular mechanisms for sweet-suppressing effect of gymnemic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanematsu, Keisuke; Kusakabe, Yuko; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Nakamura, Seiji; Imoto, Toshiaki; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2014-09-12

    Gymnemic acids are triterpene glycosides that selectively suppress taste responses to various sweet substances in humans but not in mice. This sweet-suppressing effect of gymnemic acids is diminished by rinsing the tongue with γ-cyclodextrin (γ-CD). However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the sweet-suppressing effect of gymnemic acids and the interaction between gymnemic acids versus sweet taste receptor and/or γ-CD. To investigate whether gymnemic acids directly interact with human (h) sweet receptor hT1R2 + hT1R3, we used the sweet receptor T1R2 + T1R3 assay in transiently transfected HEK293 cells. Similar to previous studies in humans and mice, gymnemic acids (100 μg/ml) inhibited the [Ca(2+)]i responses to sweet compounds in HEK293 cells heterologously expressing hT1R2 + hT1R3 but not in those expressing the mouse (m) sweet receptor mT1R2 + mT1R3. The effect of gymnemic acids rapidly disappeared after rinsing the HEK293 cells with γ-CD. Using mixed species pairings of human and mouse sweet receptor subunits and chimeras, we determined that the transmembrane domain of hT1R3 was mainly required for the sweet-suppressing effect of gymnemic acids. Directed mutagenesis in the transmembrane domain of hT1R3 revealed that the interaction site for gymnemic acids shared the amino acid residues that determined the sensitivity to another sweet antagonist, lactisole. Glucuronic acid, which is the common structure of gymnemic acids, also reduced sensitivity to sweet compounds. In our models, gymnemic acids were predicted to dock to a binding pocket within the transmembrane domain of hT1R3. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Predicting mechanical properties of polyvinylidene fluoride/carbon nanotube composites by molecular simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui-Lung; Su, Chia-Hao; Ju, Shin-Pon; Chen, Hsing-Yin; Lin, Jenn-Sen; Hsieh, Jin-Yuan; Yang, Po-Yu; Lin, Chen-Yun

    2017-11-01

    Pristine polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and its CNT composites (PVDF/CNT) at three CNT weight fractions, 8 wt%, 16 wt% and 24 wt%, were used to investigate the influence of CNT fraction on the mechanical properties of PVDF. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was utilized to predict the mechanical properties of PVDF/CNT composites. The tensile stress–strain profiles indicate that the Young’s modulus and tensile strength of pristine PVDF can be significantly improved by the embedded CNTs. However, these CNTs induce stress concentration within the composites, resulting in increased brittleness and a fracture at lower strains. By taking advantage of this molecular simulation procedure, fast comparable predictive properties of PVDF/CNT composites could be performed, with the simulation results providing atomistic-level insights into this new pathway to reduce the cost and research time in related experiments.

  1. Molecular mechanisms of traumatic brain injury in children. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Pavan; Jagannathan, Jay

    2008-10-01

    Despite advances in molecular biology and genetics, the precise pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children is unknown. In this paper the authors review what is currently known about intra- and extracellular responses to pediatric TBI and relate these factors to future investigations. Although hyperemia and vascular congestion have long been thought to be the hallmarks of pediatric TBI, on a cellular level, calcium influx as well as modulation of local neurotransmitters appears to play a major role in its onset. Recent genetic and proteomic research has identified specific neurotrophic factors as well as apoptotic and antiapoptotic genes that appear to control the progression of inflammation and neuronal damage. The search for a therapeutic target will ultimately require a thorough understanding of these factors and their interplay on a proteomic, genomic, and neuromic level.

  2. Instant Update: Considering the Molecular Mechanisms of Mutation & Natural Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubler, Tina; Adams, Patti; Scammell, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The molecular basis of evolution is an important concept to understand but one that students and teachers often find challenging. This article provides training and guidance for teachers on how to present molecular evolution concepts so that students will associate molecular changes with the evolution of form and function in organisms. Included…

  3. Molecular Mechanisms of Microcystin Toxicity in Animal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Campos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcystins (MC are potent hepatotoxins produced by the cyanobacteria of the genera Planktothrix, Microcystis, Aphanizomenon, Nostoc and Anabaena. These cyclic heptapeptides have strong affinity to serine/threonine protein phosphatases (PPs thereby acting as an inhibitor of this group of enzymes. Through this interaction a cascade of events responsible for the MC cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in animal cells may take place. Moreover MC induces oxidative stress in animal cells and together with the inhibition of PPs, this pathway is considered to be one of the main mechanisms of MC toxicity. In recent years new insights on the key enzymes involved in the signal-transduction and toxicity have been reported demonstrating the complexity of the interaction of these toxins with animal cells. Key proteins involved in MC up-take, biotransformation and excretion have been identified, demonstrating the ability of aquatic animals to metabolize and excrete the toxin. MC have shown to interact with the mitochondria. The consequences are the dysfunction of the organelle, induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS and cell apoptosis. MC activity leads to the differential expression/activity of transcriptional factors and protein kinases involved in the pathways of cellular differentiation, proliferation and tumor promotion activity. This activity may result from the direct inhibition of the protein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A. This review aims to summarize the increasing data regarding the molecular mechanisms of MC toxicity in animal systems, reporting for direct MC interacting proteins and key enzymes in the process of toxicity biotransformation/excretion of these cyclic peptides.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of microcystin toxicity in animal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Alexandre; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2010-01-21

    Microcystins (MC) are potent hepatotoxins produced by the cyanobacteria of the genera Planktothrix, Microcystis, Aphanizomenon, Nostoc and Anabaena. These cyclic heptapeptides have strong affinity to serine/threonine protein phosphatases (PPs) thereby acting as an inhibitor of this group of enzymes. Through this interaction a cascade of events responsible for the MC cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in animal cells may take place. Moreover MC induces oxidative stress in animal cells and together with the inhibition of PPs, this pathway is considered to be one of the main mechanisms of MC toxicity. In recent years new insights on the key enzymes involved in the signal-transduction and toxicity have been reported demonstrating the complexity of the interaction of these toxins with animal cells. Key proteins involved in MC up-take, biotransformation and excretion have been identified, demonstrating the ability of aquatic animals to metabolize and excrete the toxin. MC have shown to interact with the mitochondria. The consequences are the dysfunction of the organelle, induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell apoptosis. MC activity leads to the differential expression/activity of transcriptional factors and protein kinases involved in the pathways of cellular differentiation, proliferation and tumor promotion activity. This activity may result from the direct inhibition of the protein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A. This review aims to summarize the increasing data regarding the molecular mechanisms of MC toxicity in animal systems, reporting for direct MC interacting proteins and key enzymes in the process of toxicity biotransformation/excretion of these cyclic peptides.

  5. Multiresolution molecular mechanics: Surface effects in nanoscale materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qingcheng; To, Albert C.

    2017-05-01

    Surface effects have been observed to contribute significantly to the mechanical response of nanoscale structures. The newly proposed energy-based coarse-grained atomistic method Multiresolution Molecular Mechanics (MMM) (Yang, To (2015), [57]) is applied to capture surface effect for nanosized structures by designing a surface summation rule SRS within the framework of MMM. Combined with previously proposed bulk summation rule SRB, the MMM summation rule SRMMM is completed. SRS and SRB are consistently formed within SRMMM for general finite element shape functions. Analogous to quadrature rules in finite element method (FEM), the key idea to the good performance of SRMMM lies in that the order or distribution of energy for coarse-grained atomistic model is mathematically derived such that the number, position and weight of quadrature-type (sampling) atoms can be determined. Mathematically, the derived energy distribution of surface area is different from that of bulk region. Physically, the difference is due to the fact that surface atoms lack neighboring bonding. As such, SRS and SRB are employed for surface and bulk domains, respectively. Two- and three-dimensional numerical examples using the respective 4-node bilinear quadrilateral, 8-node quadratic quadrilateral and 8-node hexahedral meshes are employed to verify and validate the proposed approach. It is shown that MMM with SRMMM accurately captures corner, edge and surface effects with less 0.3% degrees of freedom of the original atomistic system, compared against full atomistic simulation. The effectiveness of SRMMM with respect to high order element is also demonstrated by employing the 8-node quadratic quadrilateral to solve a beam bending problem considering surface effect. In addition, the introduced sampling error with SRMMM that is analogous to numerical integration error with quadrature rule in FEM is very small.

  6. Molecular Mechanisms of Curcumin Renoprotection in Experimental Acute Renal Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youling Fan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available As a highly perfused organ, the kidney is especially sensitive to ischemia and reperfusion. Ischemia-reperfusion (IR-induced acute kidney injury (AKI has a high incidence during the perioperative period in the clinic and is an important link in ischemic acute renal failure (IARF. Therefore, IR-induced AKI has important clinical significance and it is necessary to explore to develop drugs to prevent and alleviate IR-induced AKI. Curcumin [diferuloylmethane, 1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxiphenyl-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione] is a polyphenol compound derived from Curcuma longa (turmeric and was shown to have a renoprotective effect on ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI in a previous study. However, the specific mechanisms underlying the protective role of curcumin in IR-induced AKI are not completely understood. APPL1 is a protein coding gene that has been shown to be involved in the crosstalk between the adiponectin-signaling and insulin-signaling pathways. In the study, to investigate the molecular mechanisms of curcumin effects in kidney ischemia/reperfusion model, we observed the effect of curcumin in experimental models of IR-induced AKI and we found that curcumin treatment significantly increased the expression of APPL1 and inhibited the activation of Akt after IR treatment in the kidney. Our in vitro results showed that apoptosis of renal tubular epithelial cells was exacerbated with hypoxia-reoxygenation (HR treatment compared to sham control cells. Curcumin significantly decreased the rate of apoptosis in renal tubular epithelial cells with HR treatment. Moreover, knockdown of APPL1 activated Akt and subsequently aggravated apoptosis in HR-treated renal tubular epithelial cells. Conversely, inhibition of Akt directly reversed the effects of APPL1 knockdown. In summary, our study demonstrated that curcumin mediated upregulation of APPL1 protects against ischemia reperfusion induced AKI by inhibiting Akt phosphorylation.

  7. Trends in nanoscale mechanics mechanics of carbon nanotubes, graphene, nanocomposites and molecular dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book contains a collection of the state-of-the-art reviews written by the leading researchers in the areas of nanoscale mechanics, molecular dynamics, nanoscale modeling of nanocomposites and mechanics of carbon nanotubes. No other book has reviews of the recent discoveries such as a nanoscale analog of the Pauli’s principle, i.e., effect of the spatial exclusion of electrons or the SEE effect, a new Registry Matrix Analysis for the nanoscale interfacial sliding and new data on the effective viscosity of interfacial electrons in nanoscale stiction at the interfaces. This volume is also an exceptional resource on the well tested nanoscale modeling of carbon nanotubes and nanocomposites, new nanoscale effects, unique evaluations of the effective thickness of carbon nanotubes under different loads, new data on which size of carbon nanotubes is safer and many other topics. Extensive bibliography concerning all these topics is included along with the lucid short reviews. Numerous illustrations are provided...

  8. Evaluation of carbohydrate molecular mechanical force fields by quantum mechanical calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Lars Bo Stegeager; Madsen, D.E.; Esbensen, A.L.

    2004-01-01

    of the (gg, gt and tg) rotamers of methyl alpha-D-glucopyranoside and methyl alpha-D-galactopyranoside are (0.13, 0.00, 0.15) and (0.64, 0.00, 0.77) kcal/mol. respectively. The results of the quantum mechanical calculations are compared with the results of calculations using the 20 second...... for monosaccharide carbohydrate benchmark systems. Selected results are: (i) The interaction energy of the alpha-D-alucopyranose-H2O heterodimer is estimated to be 4.9 kcal/mol, using a composite method including terms at highly correlated (CCSD(T)) level. Most molecular mechanics force fields are in error...

  9. First quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics studies of the inhibition mechanism of cruzain by peptidyl halomethyl ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafet, Kemel; Ferrer, Silvia; Moliner, Vicent

    2015-06-02

    Cruzain is a primary cysteine protease expressed by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi during Chagas disease infection, and thus, the development of inhibitors of this protein is a promising target for designing an effective therapy against the disease. In this paper, the mechanism of inhibition of cruzain by two different irreversible peptidyl halomethyl ketones (PHK) inhibitors has been studied by means of hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics-molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to obtain a complete representation of the possible free energy reaction paths. These have been traced on free energy surfaces in terms of the potential of mean force computed at AM1d/MM and DFT/MM levels of theory. An analysis of the possible reaction mechanisms of the inhibition process has been performed showing that the nucleophilic attack of an active site cysteine, Cys25, on a carbon atom of the inhibitor and the cleavage of the halogen-carbon bond take place in a single step. PClK appears to be much more favorable than PFK from a kinetic point of view. This result would be in agreement with experimental studies in other papain-like enzymes. A deeper analysis of the results suggests that the origin of the differences between PClK and PFK can be the different stabilizing interactions established between the inhibitors and the residues of the active site of the protein. Any attempt to explore the viability of the inhibition process through a stepwise mechanism involving the formation of a thiohemiketal intermediate and a three-membered sulfonium intermediate has been unsuccessful. Nevertheless, a mechanism through a protonated thiohemiketal, with participation of His159 as a proton donor, appears to be feasible despite showing higher free energy barriers. Our results suggest that PClK can be used as a starting point to develop a proper inhibitor of cruzain.

  10. Molecular mechanism for cavitation in water under tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzl, Georg; Gonzalez, Miguel A.; Geiger, Philipp; Caupin, Frédéric; Abascal, José L. F.; Dellago, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Despite its relevance in biology and engineering, the molecular mechanism driving cavitation in water remains unknown. Using computer simulations, we investigate the structure and dynamics of vapor bubbles emerging from metastable water at negative pressures. We find that in the early stages of cavitation, bubbles are irregularly shaped and become more spherical as they grow. Nevertheless, the free energy of bubble formation can be perfectly reproduced in the framework of classical nucleation theory (CNT) if the curvature dependence of the surface tension is taken into account. Comparison of the observed bubble dynamics to the predictions of the macroscopic Rayleigh–Plesset (RP) equation, augmented with thermal fluctuations, demonstrates that the growth of nanoscale bubbles is governed by viscous forces. Combining the dynamical prefactor determined from the RP equation with CNT based on the Kramers formalism yields an analytical expression for the cavitation rate that reproduces the simulation results very well over a wide range of pressures. Furthermore, our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with cavitation rates obtained from inclusion experiments. This suggests that homogeneous nucleation is observed in inclusions, whereas only heterogeneous nucleation on impurities or defects occurs in other experiments. PMID:27803329

  11. Mechanical properties of irradiated nanowires – A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, Emilio [Grupo de NanoMateriales, Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla, 653 Santiago (Chile); Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Matemática y del Medio Ambiente, Universidad Tecnológica Metropolitana, Santiago 7800002 (Chile); Tramontina, Diego [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, 5500 Mendoza (Argentina); Instituto de Bioingeniería, Universidad de Mendoza, 5500 Mendoza (Argentina); Gutiérrez, Gonzalo, E-mail: gonzalo@fisica.ciencias.uchile.cl [Grupo de NanoMateriales, Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla, 653 Santiago (Chile); Bringa, Eduardo [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, 5500 Mendoza (Argentina)

    2015-12-15

    In this work we study, by means of molecular dynamics simulation, the change in the mechanical properties of a gold nanowire with pre-existing radiation damage. The gold nanowire is used as a simple model for a nanofoam, made of connected nanowires. Radiation damage by keV ions leads to the formation of a stacking fault tetrahedron (SFT), and this defect leads to a reduced plastic threshold, as expected, when the nanowire is subjected to tension. We quantify dislocation and twin density during the deformation, and find that the early activation of the SFT as a dislocation source leads to reduced dislocation densities compared to the case without radiation damage. In addition, we observed a total destruction of the SFT, as opposed to a recent simulation study where it was postulated that SFTs might act as self-generating dislocation sources. The flow stress at large deformation is also found to be slightly larger for the irradiated case, in agreement with recent experiments. - Highlights: • Stacking Fault Tetrahedra (SFT) formation proceeds by cascades, containing typically a vacancy cluster and interstitials. • Applied tension leads to the destruction of the SFT, in contrast to a recently reported case of a SFT which soften the NW. • After the initial dislocation activity, strength is controlled by a few surviving dislocations.

  12. Unraveling the cellular and molecular mechanisms of repetitive magnetic stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian eMüller-Dahlhaus

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite numerous clinical studies, which have investigated the therapeutic potential of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS in various brain diseases, our knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying rTMS-based therapies remains limited. Thus, a deeper understanding of rTMS-induced neural plasticity is required to optimize current treatment protocols. Studies in small animals or appropriate in vitro preparations (including models of brain diseases provide highly useful experimental approaches in this context. State-of-the-art electrophysiological and live-cell imaging techniques that are well established in basic neuroscience can help answering some of the major questions in the field, such as (i which neural structures are activated during TMS, (ii how does rTMS induce Hebbian plasticity, and (iii are other forms of plasticity (e.g., metaplasticity, structural plasticity induced by rTMS? We argue that data gained from these studies will support the development of more effective and specific applications of rTMS in clinical practice.

  13. Molecular mechanism of obesity-induced "metabolic" tissue remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Miyako; Itoh, Michiko; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Suganami, Takayoshi

    2017-10-31

    Chronic inflammation is a common molecular basis underlying a variety of chronic diseases. Accumulating evidence has also suggested that chronic inflammation contributes to the pathogenesis of obesity and diabetes, which have been considered as a metabolic disease. For the last several decades, there was a dramatic progress in the underlying mechanism of adipose tissue dysfunction induced by obesity. Tissue remodeling is one of the histological features of chronic inflammation, in which stromal cells dramatically change in number and cell type. Indeed, adipose tissue remodeling is induced by various stromal cells and results in the impairment of adipose tissue function such as adipocytokine production and lipid storage, which leads to systemic metabolic disorder. In addition to adipose tissue, liver is another example of obesity-induced tissue remodeling. In this review, we will discuss how obesity induces interstitial fibrosis in adipose tissue and liver, particularly focusing on the role of macrophages. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanical Response Study of Collagen by means of Molecular Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    in't Veld, Pieter J.

    2005-03-01

    We developed a coarse-grained model to study mechanical behavior of collagen fibrils as a function of their degree of cross-linking. A collagen molecule is represented by Lennard-Jones beads, which intra-molecularly are connected through harmonic springs on both bond length and angle. In this model each bead represents a helical turn in a collagen molecule. Triple-helical collagen molecules, which are 300 nm long, are packed within fibrils in a staggered fashion with an axial spacing of 67 nm in the absence of a load on the tendon. We treat the outer layer or shell different from the core by assuming the shell has the maximum amount of available cross-links. The core has a variable amount of cross-links by allowing cross-link formation and breakage depending on a reaction-type criterion. We study the stress-strain behavior of a single fibril through tensile deformation along the principal axis and a three-point bend perpendicular to the principal axis.

  15. Molecular spectroscopic study for suggested mechanism of chrome tanned leather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashy, Elshahat H A; Osman, Osama; Mahmoud, Abdel Aziz; Ibrahim, Medhat

    2012-03-01

    Collagen represents the structural protein of the extracellular matrix, which gives strength of hides and/or skin under tanning process. Chrome tan is the most important tanning agent all over the world. The methods for production of leather evolved over several centuries as art and engineering with little understanding of the underlying science. The present work is devoted to suggest the most probable mechanistic action of chrome tan on hide proteins. First the affect of Cr upon hide protein is indicated by the studied mechanical properties. Then the spectroscopic characterization of the hide protein as well as chrome tanned leather was carried out with Horizontal Attenuated Total Reflection (HATR) FT-IR. The obtained results indicate how the chromium can attached with the active sites of collagen. Molecular modeling confirms that chromium can react with amino as well as carboxylate groups. Four schemes were obtained to describe the possible interactions of chrome tan with hide proteins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Understanding the mechanisms of amorphous creep through molecular simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Penghui; Short, Michael P; Yip, Sidney

    2017-12-26

    Molecular processes of creep in metallic glass thin films are simulated at experimental timescales using a metadynamics-based atomistic method. Space-time evolutions of the atomic strains and nonaffine atom displacements are analyzed to reveal details of the atomic-level deformation and flow processes of amorphous creep in response to stress and thermal activations. From the simulation results, resolved spatially on the nanoscale and temporally over time increments of fractions of a second, we derive a mechanistic explanation of the well-known variation of creep rate with stress. We also construct a deformation map delineating the predominant regimes of diffusional creep at low stress and high temperature and deformational creep at high stress. Our findings validate the relevance of two original models of the mechanisms of amorphous plasticity: one focusing on atomic diffusion via free volume and the other focusing on stress-induced shear deformation. These processes are found to be nonlinearly coupled through dynamically heterogeneous fluctuations that characterize the slow dynamics of systems out of equilibrium.

  17. Molecular mechanisms that distinguish TFIID housekeeping from regulatable SAGA promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Wim J; O'Duibhir, Eoghan; Lijnzaad, Philip; van Leenen, Dik; Groot Koerkamp, Marian Ja; Kemmeren, Patrick; Holstege, Frank Cp

    2017-02-01

    An important distinction is frequently made between constitutively expressed housekeeping genes versus regulated genes. Although generally characterized by different DNA elements, chromatin architecture and cofactors, it is not known to what degree promoter classes strictly follow regulatability rules and which molecular mechanisms dictate such differences. We show that SAGA-dominated/TATA-box promoters are more responsive to changes in the amount of activator, even compared to TFIID/TATA-like promoters that depend on the same activator Hsf1. Regulatability is therefore an inherent property of promoter class. Further analyses show that SAGA/TATA-box promoters are more dynamic because TATA-binding protein recruitment through SAGA is susceptible to removal by Mot1. In addition, the nucleosome configuration upon activator depletion shifts on SAGA/TATA-box promoters and seems less amenable to preinitiation complex formation. The results explain the fundamental difference between housekeeping and regulatable genes, revealing an additional facet of combinatorial control: an activator can elicit a different response dependent on core promoter class. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  18. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of alcohol-induced osteopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhenhua; Liu, Yao; Liu, Yitong; Chen, Hui; Shi, Songtao; Liu, Yi

    2017-12-01

    Alcoholic beverages are widely consumed, resulting in a staggering economic cost in different social and cultural settings. Types of alcohol consumption vary from light occasional to heavy, binge drinking, and chronic alcohol abuse at all ages. In general, heavy alcohol consumption is widely recognized as a major epidemiological risk factor for chronic diseases and is detrimental to many organs and tissues, including bones. Indeed, recent findings demonstrate that alcohol has a dose-dependent toxic effect in promoting imbalanced bone remodeling. This imbalance eventually results in osteopenia, an established risk factor for osteoporosis. Decreased bone mass and strength are major hallmarks of osteopenia, which is predominantly attributed not only to inhibition of bone synthesis but also to increased bone resorption through direct and indirect pathways. In this review, we present knowledge to elucidate the epidemiology, potential pathogenesis, and major molecular mechanisms and cellular effects that underlie alcoholism-induced bone loss in osteopenia. Novel therapeutic targets for correcting alcohol-induced osteopenia are also reviewed, such as modulation of proinflammatory cytokines and Wnt and mTOR signaling and the application of new drugs.

  19. Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection: Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Viral Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleiss, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is responsible for approximately 40,000 congenital infections in the United States each year. Congenital CMV disease frequently produces serious neurodevelopmental disability, as well as vision impairment and sensorineural hearing loss. Development of a CMV vaccine is therefore considered to be a major public health priority. The mechanisms by which CMV injures the fetus are complex and likely include a combination of direct fetal injury induced by pathologic virally-encoded gene products, an inability of the maternal immune response to control infection, and the direct impact of infection on placental function. CMV encodes gene products that function, both at the RNA and the protein level, to interfere with many cellular processes. These include gene products that modify the cell cycle; interfere with apoptosis; induce an inflammatory response; mediate vascular injury; induce site-specific breakage of chromosomes; promote oncogenesis; dysregulate cellular proliferation; and facilitate evasion of host immune responses. This minireview summarizes current concepts regarding these aspects of the molecular virology of CMV and the potential pathogenic impact of viral gene expression on the developing fetus. Areas for potential development of novel therapeutic intervention are suggested for improving the outcome of this disabling congenital infection. PMID:21827434

  20. The molecular mechanisms, diagnosis and management of congenital hyperinsulinism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil Senniappan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI is the result of unregulated insulin secretion from the pancreatic β-cells leading to severe hypoglycaemia. In these patients it is important to make an accurate diagnosis and initiate the appropriate management so as to avoid hypoglycemic episodes and prevent the potentially associated complications like epilepsy, neurological impairment and cerebral palsy. At a genetic level abnormalities in eight different genes (ABCC8, KCNJ11, GLUD1, GCK, HADH, SLC16A1, HNF4A and UCP2 have been reported with CHI. Loss of function mutations in ABCC8/KCNJ11 lead to the most severe forms of CHI which are usually medically unresponsive. At a histological level there are two major subgroups, diffuse and focal, each with a different genetic etiology. The focal form is sporadic in inheritance and is localized to a small region of the pancreas whereas the diffuse form is inherited in an autosomal recessive (or dominant manner. Imaging using a specialized positron emission tomography scan with the isotope fluroine-18 L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenyalanine (18F-DOPA-PET-CT is used to accurately locate the focal lesion pre-operatively and if removed can cure the patient from hypoglycemia. Understanding the molecular mechanisms, the histological basis, improvements in imaging modalities and surgical techniques have all improved the management of patients with CHI.

  1. Molecular signaling mechanisms behind polyphenol-induced bone anabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    For millennia, in the different cultures all over the world, plants have been extensively used as a source of therapeutic agents with wide-ranging medicinal applications, thus becoming part of a rational clinical and pharmacological investigation over the years. As bioactive molecules, plant-derived polyphenols have been demonstrated to exert many effects on human health by acting on different biological systems, thus their therapeutic potential would represent a novel approach on which natural product-based drug discovery and development could be based in the future. Many reports have provided evidence for the benefits derived from the dietary supplementation of polyphenols in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Polyphenols are able to protect the bone, thanks to their antioxidant properties, as well as their anti-inflammatory actions by involving diverse signaling pathways, thus leading to bone anabolic effects and decreased bone resorption. This review is meant to summarize the research works performed so far, by elucidating the molecular mechanisms of action of polyphenols in a bone regeneration context, aiming at a better understanding of a possible application in the development of medical devices for bone tissue regeneration.

  2. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of tooth root development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingyuan; Parada, Carolina; Chai, Yang

    2017-02-01

    The tooth root is an integral, functionally important part of our dentition. The formation of a functional root depends on epithelial-mesenchymal interactions and integration of the root with the jaw bone, blood supply and nerve innervations. The root development process therefore offers an attractive model for investigating organogenesis. Understanding how roots develop and how they can be bioengineered is also of great interest in the field of regenerative medicine. Here, we discuss recent advances in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying tooth root formation. We review the function of cellular structure and components such as Hertwig's epithelial root sheath, cranial neural crest cells and stem cells residing in developing and adult teeth. We also highlight how complex signaling networks together with multiple transcription factors mediate tissue-tissue interactions that guide root development. Finally, we discuss the possible role of stem cells in establishing the crown-to-root transition, and provide an overview of root malformations and diseases in humans. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Shaping mitotic chromosomes: From classical concepts to molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kschonsak, Marc; Haering, Christian H

    2015-07-01

    How eukaryotic genomes are packaged into compact cylindrical chromosomes in preparation for cell divisions has remained one of the major unsolved questions of cell biology. Novel approaches to study the topology of DNA helices inside the nuclei of intact cells, paired with computational modeling and precise biomechanical measurements of isolated chromosomes, have advanced our understanding of mitotic chromosome architecture. In this Review Essay, we discuss - in light of these recent insights - the role of chromatin architecture and the functions and possible mechanisms of SMC protein complexes and other molecular machines in the formation of mitotic chromosomes. Based on the information available, we propose a stepwise model of mitotic chromosome condensation that envisions the sequential generation of intra-chromosomal linkages by condensin complexes in the context of cohesin-mediated inter-chromosomal linkages, assisted by topoisomerase II. The described scenario results in rod-shaped metaphase chromosomes ready for their segregation to the cell poles. © 2015 The Authors. Bioessays published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study of the catalytic cycle of water splitting in photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproviero, Eduardo M; Gascón, José A; McEvoy, James P; Brudvig, Gary W; Batista, Victor S

    2008-03-19

    This paper investigates the mechanism of water splitting in photosystem II (PSII) as described by chemically sensible models of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in the S0-S4 states. The reaction is the paradigm for engineering direct solar fuel production systems since it is driven by solar light and the catalyst involves inexpensive and abundant metals (calcium and manganese). Molecular models of the OEC Mn3CaO4Mn catalytic cluster are constructed by explicitly considering the perturbational influence of the surrounding protein environment according to state-of-the-art quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) hybrid methods, in conjunction with the X-ray diffraction (XRD) structure of PSII from the cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus. The resulting models are validated through direct comparisons with high-resolution extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic data. Structures of the S3, S4, and S0 states include an additional mu-oxo bridge between Mn(3) and Mn(4), not present in XRD structures, found to be essential for the deprotonation of substrate water molecules. The structures of reaction intermediates suggest a detailed mechanism of dioxygen evolution based on changes in oxidization and protonation states and structural rearrangements of the oxomanganese cluster and surrounding water molecules. The catalytic reaction is consistent with substrate water molecules coordinated as terminal ligands to Mn(4) and calcium and requires the formation of an oxyl radical by deprotonation of the substrate water molecule ligated to Mn(4) and the accumulation of four oxidizing equivalents. The oxyl radical is susceptible to nucleophilic attack by a substrate water molecule initially coordinated to calcium and activated by two basic species, including CP43-R357 and the mu-oxo bridge between Mn(3) and Mn(4). The reaction is concerted with water ligand exchange, swapping the activated water by a water molecule in the second coordination shell of

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of pathogenesis-related ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We described the cloning and characterization of pathogenesis-related protein 5 gene in maize, named ZmPR5 (GenBank Accession Number: HM230665). Molecular and bioinformatic analyses of ZmPR5 revealed an open reading frame (ORF) of 525 bp, encoding a protein of 175 amino acids (aa) and a deduced ...

  6. Molecular cloning and characterization of pathogenesis-related ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-21

    Dec 21, 2011 ... We described the cloning and characterization of pathogenesis-related protein 5 gene in maize, named. ZmPR5 (GenBank Accession Number: HM230665). Molecular and .... experiment were sheath from both the resistant and susceptible inbred lines. Actin (GenBank Accession number: 99030435) was.

  7. A cascade of recently discovered molecular mechanisms involved in abiotic stress tolerance of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Muhammad; Dahab, Abdel hafiz Adam; Wangzhen, Guo; Tianzhen, Zhang

    2012-04-01

    Today, agriculture is facing a tremendous threat from the climate change menace. As human survival is dependent on a constant supply of food from plants as the primary producers, we must aware of the underlying molecular mechanisms that plants have acquired as a result of molecular evolution to cope this rapidly changing environment. This understanding will help us in designing programs aimed at developing crop plant cultivars best suited to our needs of a sustainable agriculture. The field of systems biology is rapidly progressing, and new insight is coming out about the molecular mechanisms involved in abiotic stress tolerance. There is a cascade of changes in transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome of plants during these stress responses. We have tried to cover most pronounced recent developments in the field of "omics" related to abiotic stress tolerance of plants. These changes are very coordinated, and often there is crosstalk between different components of stress tolerance. The functions of various molecular entities are becoming more clear and being associated with more precise biological phenomenon.

  8. Ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulation of electron transfer process: fractional electron approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiancheng; Hu, Hao; Hu, Xiangqian; Cohen, Aron J; Yang, Weitao

    2008-03-28

    Electron transfer (ET) reactions are one of the most important processes in chemistry and biology. Because of the quantum nature of the processes and the complicated roles of the solvent, theoretical study of ET processes is challenging. To simulate ET processes at the electronic level, we have developed an efficient density functional theory (DFT) quantum mechanical (QM)/molecular mechanical (MM) approach that uses the fractional number of electrons as the order parameter to calculate the redox free energy of ET reactions in solution. We applied this method to study the ET reactions of the aqueous metal complexes Fe(H(2)O)(6)(2+/3+) and Ru(H(2)O)(6)(2+/3+). The calculated oxidation potentials, 5.82 eV for Fe(II/III) and 5.14 eV for Ru(II/III), agree well with the experimental data, 5.50 and 4.96 eV, for iron and ruthenium, respectively. Furthermore, we have constructed the diabatic free energy surfaces from histogram analysis based on the molecular dynamics trajectories. The resulting reorganization energy and the diabatic activation energy also show good agreement with experimental data. Our calculations show that using the fractional number of electrons (FNE) as the order parameter in the thermodynamic integration process leads to efficient sampling and validate the ab initio QM/MM approach in the calculation of redox free energies.

  9. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Muscle Fiber Composition Under Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Nadia A.

    1999-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying the selective and debilitating atrophy of specific skeletal muscle fiber types that accompanies sustained conditions of microgravity. Since little is currently known about the regulation of fiber-specific gene expression programs in mammalian muscle, elucidation of the basic mechanisms of fiber diversification is a necessary prerequisite to the generation of therapeutic strategies for attenuation of muscle atrophy on earth or in space. Vertebrate skeletal muscle development involves the fusion of undifferentiated mononucleated myoblasts to form multinucleated myofibers, with a concomitant activation of muscle-specific genes encoding proteins that form the force-generating contractile apparatus. The regulatory circuitry controlling skeletal muscle gene expression has been well studied in a number of vertebrate animal systems. The goal of this project has been to achieve a similar level of understanding of the mechanisms underlying the further specification of muscles into different fiber types, and the role played by innervation and physical activity in the maintenance and adaptation of different fiber phenotypes into adulthood. Our recent research on the genetic basis of fiber specificity has focused on the emergence of mature fiber types and have implicated a group of transcriptional regulatory proteins, known as E proteins, in the control of fiber specificity. The restriction of E proteins to selected muscle fiber types is an attractive hypothetical mechanism for the generation of muscle fiber-specific patterns of gene expression. To date our results support a model wherein different E proteins are selectively expressed in muscle cells to determine fiber-restricted gene expression. These studies are a first step to define the molecular mechanisms responsible for the shifts in fiber type under conditions of microgravity, and to determine the potential importance of E proteins as

  10. Ab Initio Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Studies of Histone Modifying Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingkai

    Histone proteins that form the nucleosome core are subject to a variety of post-translational transformations. These histone modifications make up the histone code which extends the information in the genetic code and is emerging as an essential mechanism to regulate gene expression. In spite of a current flurry of significant advances in experimental studies, there has been little theoretical understanding regarding how enzymes generate or remove these modifications. Very recently, we have made excellent progresses in investigating two such important histone-modifying enzyme families: zinc-dependent histone deacetylases (HDACs) and histone lysine methyltransferases (HKMTs). Our studies on a histonedeacetylase- like protein HDLP suggested a novel catalytic mechanism. The simulations on HKMT SET7/9 have characterized the histone lysine methylation reaction and elucidated the origin of enzyme catalysis. Our computational approaches centered on the pseudobond ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) method, which allows for accurate modeling of the chemistry at the reaction active site while properly including the effects of the protein environment

  11. Carboplatin: molecular mechanisms of action associated with chemoresistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziele Fonseca de Sousa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Carboplatin is a derivative of cisplatin; it has a similar mechanism of action, but differs in terms of structure and toxicity. It was approved by the FDA in the 1980s and since then it has been widely used in the treatment of several tumor types. This agent is characterized by its ability to generate lesions in DNA through the formation of adducts with platinum, thereby inhibiting replication and transcription and leading to cell death. However, its use can lead to serious inconvenience arising from the development of resistance that some patients acquire during treatment, limiting the scope of its full potential. Currently, the biochemical mechanisms related to resistance are not precisely known. Therefore, knowledge of pathways associated with resistance caused by carboplatin exposure may provide valuable clues for more efficient rational drug design in platinum-based therapy and the development of new therapeutic strategies. In this narrative review, we discuss some of the known mechanisms of resistance to platinum-based drugs, especially carboplatin.

  12. Molecular mechanism of crystallization impacting calcium phosphate cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giocondi, J L; El-Dasher, B S; Nancollas, G H; Orme, C A

    2009-05-31

    In summary, SPM data has shown that (1) Mg inhibits growth on all steps but relatively high Mg/Ca ratios are needed. Extracting the mechanism of interaction requires more modeling of the kinetic data, but step morphology is consistent with incorporation. (2) Citrate has several effects depending on the citrate/Ca ratio. At the lowest concentrations, citrate increases the step free energy without altering the step kinetics; at higher concentrations, the polar step is slowed. (3) Oxalate also slows the polar step but additionally stabilizes a new facet, with a [100]{sub Cc} step. (4) Etidronate has the greatest kinetic impact of the molecules studied. At 7{micro}M concentrations, the polar step slows by 60% and a new polar step appears. However, at the same time the [10-1]{sub Cc} increases by 67%. It should be noted that all of these molecules complex calcium and can effect kinetics by altering the solution supersaturation or the Ca to HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ratio. For the SPM data shown, this effect was corrected for to distinguish the effect of the molecule at the crystal surface from the effect of the molecule on the solution speciation. The goal of this paper is to draw connections between fundamental studies of atomic step motion and potential strategies for materials processing. It is not our intent to promote the utility of SPM for investigating processes in cement dynamics. The conditions are spectacularly different in many ways. The data shown in this paper are fairly close to equilibrium (S=1.6) whereas the nucleation of cements is initiated at supersaturation ratios in the thousands to millions. Of course, after the initial nucleation phase, the growth will occur at more modest supersaturations and as the cement evolves towards equilibrium certainly some of the growth will occur in regimes such as shown here. In addition to the difference in supersaturation, cements tend to have lower additive to calcium ratios. As an example, the additive to Ca ratio is

  13. Features of Knowledge Building in Biology: Understanding Undergraduate Students’ Ideas about Molecular Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southard, Katelyn; Wince, Tyler; Meddleton, Shanice; Bolger, Molly S.

    2016-01-01

    Research has suggested that teaching and learning in molecular and cellular biology (MCB) is difficult. We used a new lens to understand undergraduate reasoning about molecular mechanisms: the knowledge-integration approach to conceptual change. Knowledge integration is the dynamic process by which learners acquire new ideas, develop connections between ideas, and reorganize and restructure prior knowledge. Semistructured, clinical think-aloud interviews were conducted with introductory and upper-division MCB students. Interviews included a written conceptual assessment, a concept-mapping activity, and an opportunity to explain the biomechanisms of DNA replication, transcription, and translation. Student reasoning patterns were explored through mixed-method analyses. Results suggested that students must sort mechanistic entities into appropriate mental categories that reflect the nature of MCB mechanisms and that conflation between these categories is common. We also showed how connections between molecular mechanisms and their biological roles are part of building an integrated knowledge network as students develop expertise. We observed differences in the nature of connections between ideas related to different forms of reasoning. Finally, we provide a tentative model for MCB knowledge integration and suggest its implications for undergraduate learning. PMID:26931398

  14. Lung cancer-associated brain metastasis: Molecular mechanisms and therapeutic options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Meysam; Bahrami, Tayyeb; Salmaninejad, Arash; Nosrati, Rahim; Ghaffari, Parisa; Ghaffari, Seyed H

    2017-10-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related mortality in humans. There are several reasons for this high rate of mortality, including metastasis to several organs, especially the brain. In fact, lung cancer is responsible for approximately 50% of all brain metastases, which are very difficult to manage. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying lung cancer-associated brain metastasis brings up novel therapeutic promises with the hope to ameliorate the severity of the disease. Here, we provide an overview of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of lung cancer dissemination and metastasis to the brain, as well as promising horizons for impeding lung cancer brain metastasis, including the role of cancer stem cells, the blood-brain barrier, interactions of lung cancer cells with the brain microenvironment and lung cancer-driven systemic processes, as well as the role of growth factor/receptor tyrosine kinases, cell adhesion molecules and non-coding RNAs. In addition, we provide an overview of current and novel therapeutic approaches, including radiotherapy, surgery and stereotactic radiosurgery, chemotherapy, as also targeted cancer stem cell and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-based therapies, micro-RNA-based therapies and other small molecule or antibody-based therapies. We will also discuss the daunting potential of some combined therapies. The identification of molecular mechanisms underlying lung cancer metastasis has opened up new avenues towards their eradication and provides interesting opportunities for future research aimed at the development of novel targeted therapies.

  15. Transcriptome analyses reveal molecular mechanism underlying tapping panel dryness of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dejun; Wang, Xuncheng; Deng, Zhi; Liu, Hui; Yang, Hong; He, Guangming

    2016-03-23

    Tapping panel dryness (TPD) is a serious threat to natural rubber yields from rubber trees, but the molecular mechanisms underlying TPD remain poorly understood. To identify TPD-related genes and reveal these molecular mechanisms, we sequenced and compared the transcriptomes of bark between healthy and TPD trees. In total, 57,760 assembled genes were obtained and analyzed in details. In contrast to healthy rubber trees, 5652 and 2485 genes were up- or downregulated, respectively, in TPD trees. The TPD-related genes were significantly enriched in eight GO terms and five KEGG pathways and were closely associated with ROS metabolism, programmed cell death and rubber biosynthesis. Our results suggest that rubber tree TPD is a complex process involving many genes. The observed lower rubber yield from TPD trees might result from lower isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) available for rubber biosynthesis and from downregulation of the genes in post-IPP steps of rubber biosynthesis pathway. Our results not only extend our understanding of the complex molecular events involved in TPD but also will be useful for developing effective measures to control TPD of rubber trees.

  16. Neuroactive steroids: molecular mechanisms of action and implications for neuropsychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupprecht, R; di Michele, F; Hermann, B; Ströhle, A; Lancel, M; Romeo, E; Holsboer, F

    2001-11-01

    Besides their binding to cognate intracellular receptors gonadal steroids may also act as functional antagonists at the 5-HT3 receptor. A structure-activity relationship for the actions of a variety of steroids at the 5-HT3 receptor was elaborated that differed considerably from that known for GABA(A) receptors. Steroids appear to interact allosterically with ligand-gated ion channels at the receptor membrane interface. The functional antagonism of gonadal steroids at the 5-HT3 receptor may play a role for the development and course of nausea during pregnancy and of psychiatric disorders. Moreover, we could demonstrate that 3alpha-reduced neuroactive steroids concurrently modulate the GABA(A) receptor and regulate gene expression via the progesterone receptor after intracellular oxidation. Animal studies showed that progesterone is converted rapidly into GABAergic neuroactive steroids in vivo. Progesterone reduces locomotor activity in a dose dependent fashion in male Wister rats. Moreover, progesterone and 3alpha,5alpha-tetrahydroprogesterone produce a benzodiazepine-like sleep EEG profile in rats and humans. In addition, there is a dysequilibrium of such 3alpha-reduced neuroactive steroids during major depression which is corrected by successful treatment with antidepressants. Neuroactive steroids may further be involved in the treatment of depression and anxiety with antidepressants in patients during ethanol withdrawal. First studies in patients with panic disorder suggest that neuroactive steroids may also play a pivotal role in human anxiety. The genomic and non-genomic effects of steroids in the brain contribute to the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders and the mechanisms of action of antidepressants. Neuroactive steroids affect a broad spectrum of behavioral functions through their unique molecular properties and may constitute a yet unexploited class of drugs.

  17. Stability mechanisms of a thermophilic laccase probed by molecular dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels J Christensen

    Full Text Available Laccases are highly stable, industrially important enzymes capable of oxidizing a large range of substrates. Causes for their stability are, as for other proteins, poorly understood. In this work, multiple-seed molecular dynamics (MD was applied to a Trametes versicolor laccase in response to variable ionic strengths, temperatures, and glycosylation status. Near-physiological conditions provided excellent agreement with the crystal structure (average RMSD ∼0.92 Å and residual agreement with experimental B-factors. The persistence of backbone hydrogen bonds was identified as a key descriptor of structural response to environment, whereas solvent-accessibility, radius of gyration, and fluctuations were only locally relevant. Backbone hydrogen bonds decreased systematically with temperature in all simulations (∼9 per 50 K, probing structural changes associated with enthalpy-entropy compensation. Approaching T opt (∼350 K from 300 K, this change correlated with a beginning "unzipping" of critical β-sheets. 0 M ionic strength triggered partial denucleation of the C-terminal (known experimentally to be sensitive at 400 K, suggesting a general salt stabilization effect. In contrast, F(- (but not Cl(- specifically impaired secondary structure by formation of strong hydrogen bonds with backbone NH, providing a mechanism for experimentally observed small anion destabilization, potentially remedied by site-directed mutagenesis at critical intrusion sites. N-glycosylation was found to support structural integrity by increasing persistent backbone hydrogen bonds by ∼4 across simulations, mainly via prevention of F(- intrusion. Hydrogen-bond loss in distinct loop regions and ends of critical β-sheets suggest potential strategies for laboratory optimization of these industrially important enzymes.

  18. Unraveling the Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Nasopharyngeal Bacterial Community Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter A. A. de Steenhuijsen Piters

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The upper respiratory tract is colonized by a diverse array of commensal bacteria that harbor potential pathogens, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. As long as the local microbial ecosystem—also called “microbiome”—is in balance, these potentially pathogenic bacterial residents cause no harm to the host. However, similar to macrobiological ecosystems, when the bacterial community structure gets perturbed, potential pathogens can overtake the niche and cause mild to severe infections. Recent studies using next-generation sequencing show that S. pneumoniae, as well as other potential pathogens, might be kept at bay by certain commensal bacteria, including Corynebacterium and Dolosigranulum spp. Bomar and colleagues are the first to explore a specific biological mechanism contributing to the antagonistic interaction between Corynebacterium accolens and S. pneumoniae in vitro [L. Bomar, S. D. Brugger, B. H. Yost, S. S. Davies, K. P. Lemon, mBio 7(1:e01725-15, 2016, doi:10.1128/mBio.01725-15]. The authors comprehensively show that C. accolens is capable of hydrolyzing host triacylglycerols into free fatty acids, which display antipneumococcal properties, suggesting that these bacteria might contribute to the containment of pneumococcus. This work exemplifies how molecular epidemiological findings can lay the foundation for mechanistic studies to elucidate the host-microbe and microbial interspecies interactions underlying the bacterial community structure. Next, translation of these results to an in vivo setting seems necessary to unveil the magnitude and importance of the observed effect in its natural, polymicrobial setting.

  19. Molecular mechanisms of extensive mitochondrial gene rearrangementin plethodontid salamanders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Rachel Lockridge; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-06-01

    Extensive gene rearrangement is reported in the mitochondrial genomes of lungless salamanders (Plethodontidae). In each genome with a novel gene order, there is evidence that the rearrangement was mediated by duplication of part of the mitochondrial genome, including the presence of both pseudogenes and additional, presumably functional, copies of duplicated genes. All rearrangement-mediating duplications include either the origin of light strand replication and the nearby tRNA genes or the regions flanking the origin of heavy strand replication. The latter regions comprise nad6, trnE, cob, trnT, an intergenic spacer between trnT and trnP and, in some genomes, trnP, the control region, trnF, rrnS, trnV, rrnL, trnL1, and nad1. In some cases, two copies of duplicated genes, presumptive regulatory regions, and/or sequences with no assignable function have been retained in the genome following the initial duplication; in other genomes, only one of the duplicated copies has been retained. Both tandem and non-tandem duplications are present in these genomes, suggesting different duplication mechanisms. In some of these mtDNAs, up to 25 percent of the total length is composed of tandem duplications of non-coding sequence that includes putative regulatory regions and/or pseudogenes of tRNAs and protein-coding genes along with otherwise unassignable sequences. These data indicate that imprecise initiation and termination of replication, slipped-strand mispairing, and intra-molecular recombination may all have played a role in generating repeats during the evolutionary history of plethodontid mitochondrial genomes.

  20. Neurobiological mechanisms of treatment resistant depression: Functional, structural and molecular imaging studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kwaasteniet, B.P.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis investigated the neurobiological mechanisms of TRD using functional, structural and molecular imaging studies. First the neurobiological mechanisms of MDD were investigated and revealed decreased functional connectivity between the ventral and dorsal network. Thereafter, structural

  1. Molecular architecture and mechanism of the anaphase-promoting complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; McLaughlin, Stephen H.; Barford, David

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitination of cell cycle regulatory proteins by the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) controls sister chromatid segregation, cytokinesis and the establishment of G1. The APC/C is an unusually large multimeric cullin-RING ligase. Its activity is strictly dependent on regulatory coactivator subunits that promote APC/C – substrate interactions and stimulate its catalytic reaction. Because the structures of many APC/C subunits and their organization within the assembly are unknown, the molecular basis for these processes is poorly understood. Here, from a cryo-EM reconstruction of a human APC/C-coactivator-substrate complex at 7.4 Å resolution, we have determined the complete secondary structural architecture of the complex. With this information we identified protein folds for structurally uncharacterized subunits, and the definitive location of all 20 APC/C subunits within the 1.2 MDa assembly. Comparison with apo APC/C shows that coactivator promotes a profound allosteric transition involving displacement of the cullin-RING catalytic subunits relative to the degron recognition module of coactivator and Apc10. This transition is accompanied by increased flexibility of the cullin-RING subunits and enhanced affinity for UbcH10~ubiquitin, changes which may contribute to coactivator-mediated stimulation of APC/C E3 ligase activity. PMID:25043029

  2. Metabolic actions of FGF21: molecular mechanisms and therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Ge

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 is an atypical member of the FGF family that functions as an endocrine factor. In obese animals, elevation of plasma FGF21 levels by either pharmacological or genetic approaches reduces body weight, decreases hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, alleviates fatty liver and increases insulin sensitivity. FGF21 exerts its pleiotropic metabolic effects through its actions on multiple targets, including adipose tissue, liver, brain and pancreas. The expression of FGF21 is under the control of both peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα. A growing body of evidence suggests that the metabolic benefits of these two nuclear receptors are mediated in part by induction of FGF21. In humans, plasma levels of FGF21 are elevated in obese subjects and patients with type 2 diabetes, but are reduced in patients with autoimmune diabetes. This review summarizes recent advances in understanding the physiological roles of FGF21 and the molecular pathways underlying its actions, and also discusses the future prospective of developing FGF21 or its agonists as therapeutic agents for obesity-related medical complications.

  3. Computing pKa Values with a Mixing Hamiltonian Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Fan, Xiaoli; Jin, Yingdi; Hu, Xiangqian; Hu, Hao

    2013-09-10

    Accurate computation of the pKa value of a compound in solution is important but challenging. Here, a new mixing quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) Hamiltonian method is developed to simulate the free-energy change associated with the protonation/deprotonation processes in solution. The mixing Hamiltonian method is designed for efficient quantum mechanical free-energy simulations by alchemically varying the nuclear potential, i.e., the nuclear charge of the transforming nucleus. In pKa calculation, the charge on the proton is varied in fraction between 0 and 1, corresponding to the fully deprotonated and protonated states, respectively. Inspired by the mixing potential QM/MM free energy simulation method developed previously [H. Hu and W. T. Yang, J. Chem. Phys. 2005, 123, 041102], this method succeeds many advantages of a large class of λ-coupled free-energy simulation methods and the linear combination of atomic potential approach. Theory and technique details of this method, along with the calculation results of the pKa of methanol and methanethiol molecules in aqueous solution, are reported. The results show satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

  4. Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Modeling of Enzymatic Processes: Caveats and Breakthroughs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesne, Matthew G; Borowski, Tomasz; de Visser, Sam P

    2016-02-18

    Nature has developed large groups of enzymatic catalysts with the aim to transfer substrates into useful products, which enables biosystems to perform all their natural functions. As such, all biochemical processes in our body (we drink, we eat, we breath, we sleep, etc.) are governed by enzymes. One of the problems associated with research on biocatalysts is that they react so fast that details of their reaction mechanisms cannot be obtained with experimental work. In recent years, major advances in computational hardware and software have been made and now large (bio)chemical systems can be studied using accurate computational techniques. One such technique is the quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) technique, which has gained major momentum in recent years. Unfortunately, it is not a black-box method that is easily applied, but requires careful set-up procedures. In this work we give an overview on the technical difficulties and caveats of QM/MM and discuss work-protocols developed in our groups for running successful QM/MM calculations. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of Cannabis Signaling in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronan, Patrick J; Wongngamnit, Narin; Beresford, Thomas P

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis has been cultivated and used by humans for thousands of years. Research for decades was focused on understanding the mechanisms of an illegal/addictive drug. This led to the discovery of the vast endocannabinoid system. Research has now shifted to understanding fundamental biological questions related to one of the most widespread signaling systems in both the brain and the body. Our understanding of cannabinoid signaling has advanced significantly in the last two decades. In this review, we discuss the state of knowledge on mechanisms of Cannabis signaling in the brain and the modulation of key brain neurotransmitter systems involved in both brain reward/addiction and psychiatric disorders. It is highly probable that various cannabinoids will be found to be efficacious in the treatment of a number of psychiatric disorders. However, while there is clearly much potential, marijuana has not been properly vetted by the medical-scientific evaluation process and there are clearly a range of potentially adverse side-effects-including addiction. We are at crossroads for research on endocannabinoid function and therapeutics (including the use of exogenous treatments such as Cannabis). With over 100 cannabinoid constituents, the majority of which have not been studied, there is much Cannabis research yet to be done. With more states legalizing both the medicinal and recreational use of marijuana the rigorous scientific investigation into cannabinoid signaling is imperative. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Molecular panel for detection of sepsis-related microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Leslie Ecker; Dalposso, Karilene; Hackbarth, Bruna Barbosa; Gonçalves, Anderson R; Westphal, Glauco Adrieno; França, Paulo Henrique Condeixa de; Pinho, Mauro de Souza Leite

    2011-03-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response related to high mortality rates in the hospital environment. Delayed etiological diagnosis and inadequate antimicrobial therapy are associated with treatment failures. Molecular tests based on polymerase chain reaction are regarded as faster and more accurate procedures than culture techniques for microbial identification, providing a higher rate of therapeutic success. To develop a panel of primers for DNA fragments of sepsis-related microorganisms. Primers for amplification of Enterobacter spp., Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida spp. were designed and tested for sensitivity and specificity on the basis of their respective standard strains. The intended specificity was obtained for P. aeruginosa, S. aureus and Candida spp primers. Sensitivity tests showed a threshold for detection from 5 ng to 500 fg in blood samples contaminated with microbial DNA. The molecular panel presented offers the advantage of a flexible 'open' system when compared to other multiplex detection methods.

  7. Determinants of reactivity and selectivity in soluble epoxide hydrolase from quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdale, Richard; Hoyle, Simon; Grey, Daniel T; Ridder, Lars; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2012-02-28

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is an enzyme involved in drug metabolism that catalyzes the hydrolysis of epoxides to form their corresponding diols. sEH has a broad substrate range and shows high regio- and enantioselectivity for nucleophilic ring opening by Asp333. Epoxide hydrolases therefore have potential synthetic applications. We have used combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) umbrella sampling molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (at the AM1/CHARMM22 level) and high-level ab initio (SCS-MP2) QM/MM calculations to analyze the reactions, and determinants of selectivity, for two substrates: trans-stilbene oxide (t-SO) and trans-diphenylpropene oxide (t-DPPO). The calculated free energy barriers from the QM/MM (AM1/CHARMM22) umbrella sampling MD simulations show a lower barrier for phenyl attack in t-DPPO, compared with that for benzylic attack, in agreement with experiment. Activation barriers in agreement with experimental rate constants are obtained only with the highest level of QM theory (SCS-MP2) used. Our results show that the selectivity of the ring-opening reaction is influenced by several factors, including proximity to the nucleophile, electronic stabilization of the transition state, and hydrogen bonding to two active site tyrosine residues. The protonation state of His523 during nucleophilic attack has also been investigated, and our results show that the protonated form is most consistent with experimental findings. The work presented here illustrates how determinants of selectivity can be identified from QM/MM simulations. These insights may also provide useful information for the design of novel catalysts for use in the synthesis of enantiopure compounds.

  8. A quantum-mechanics molecular-mechanics scheme for extended systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Diego; Sanchez, Veronica M; Scherlis, Damián A

    2016-08-24

    We introduce and discuss a hybrid quantum-mechanics molecular-mechanics (QM-MM) approach for Car-Parrinello DFT simulations with pseudopotentials and planewaves basis, designed for the treatment of periodic systems. In this implementation the MM atoms are considered as additional QM ions having fractional charges of either sign, which provides conceptual and computational simplicity by exploiting the machinery already existing in planewave codes to deal with electrostatics in periodic boundary conditions. With this strategy, both the QM and MM regions are contained in the same supercell, which determines the periodicity for the whole system. Thus, while this method is not meant to compete with non-periodic QM-MM schemes able to handle extremely large but finite MM regions, it is shown that for periodic systems of a few hundred atoms, our approach provides substantial savings in computational times by treating classically a fraction of the particles. The performance and accuracy of the method is assessed through the study of energetic, structural, and dynamical aspects of the water dimer and of the aqueous bulk phase. Finally, the QM-MM scheme is applied to the computation of the vibrational spectra of water layers adsorbed at the TiO2 anatase (1 0 1) solid-liquid interface. This investigation suggests that the inclusion of a second monolayer of H2O molecules is sufficient to induce on the first adsorbed layer, a vibrational dynamics similar to that taking place in the presence of an aqueous environment. The present QM-MM scheme appears as a very interesting tool to efficiently perform molecular dynamics simulations of complex condensed matter systems, from solutions to nanoconfined fluids to different kind of interfaces.

  9. Integrated network analysis reveals potentially novel molecular mechanisms and therapeutic targets of refractory epilepsies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Chu

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a complex neurological disorder and a significant health problem. The pathogenesis of epilepsy remains obscure in a significant number of patients and the current treatment options are not adequate in about a third of individuals which were known as refractory epilepsies (RE. Network medicine provides an effective approach for studying the molecular mechanisms underlying complex diseases. Here we integrated 1876 disease-gene associations of RE and located those genes to human protein-protein interaction (PPI network to obtain 42 significant RE-associated disease modules. The functional analysis of these disease modules showed novel molecular pathological mechanisms of RE, such as the novel enriched pathways (e.g., "presynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors", "signaling by insulin receptor". Further analysis on the relationships between current drug targets and the RE-related disease genes showed the rational mechanisms of most antiepileptic drugs. In addition, we detected ten potential novel drug targets (e.g., KCNA1, KCNA4-6, KCNC3, KCND2, KCNMA1, CAMK2G, CACNB4 and GRM1 located in three RE related disease modules, which might provide novel insights into the new drug discovery for RE therapy.

  10. Integrated network analysis reveals potentially novel molecular mechanisms and therapeutic targets of refractory epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hongwei; Sun, Pin; Yin, Jiahui; Liu, Guangming; Wang, Yiwei; Zhao, Pengyao; Zhu, Yizhun; Yang, Xiaohan; Zheng, Tiezheng; Zhou, Xuezhong; Jin, Weilin; Sun, Changkai

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is a complex neurological disorder and a significant health problem. The pathogenesis of epilepsy remains obscure in a significant number of patients and the current treatment options are not adequate in about a third of individuals which were known as refractory epilepsies (RE). Network medicine provides an effective approach for studying the molecular mechanisms underlying complex diseases. Here we integrated 1876 disease-gene associations of RE and located those genes to human protein-protein interaction (PPI) network to obtain 42 significant RE-associated disease modules. The functional analysis of these disease modules showed novel molecular pathological mechanisms of RE, such as the novel enriched pathways (e.g., "presynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors", "signaling by insulin receptor"). Further analysis on the relationships between current drug targets and the RE-related disease genes showed the rational mechanisms of most antiepileptic drugs. In addition, we detected ten potential novel drug targets (e.g., KCNA1, KCNA4-6, KCNC3, KCND2, KCNMA1, CAMK2G, CACNB4 and GRM1) located in three RE related disease modules, which might provide novel insights into the new drug discovery for RE therapy.

  11. Epigenetics: Behavioral Influences on Gene Function, Part II--Molecular Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogren, Marilee P.; Lombroso, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    A study presented on the effect of parenting on stress response and other behaviors show that animals exposed to a high degree of nurturing show a blunted response to stress. Molecular mechanisms responsible for these differences in the adult offspring as well as the molecular mechanisms by which epigenetic effects are propagated from one…

  12. Study of the Molecular Mechanism of Anti-inflammatory Activity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Bee venom (BV) is traditionally used in many inflammatory chronic conditions but its mechanism of action at molecular level is not fully understood. This study was undertaken to elucidate the mechanism of action of bee venom at the molecular level Methods: We used lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation in Raw ...

  13. A Model of How Different Biology Experts Explain Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Caleb M.; Anderson, Trevor R.; Pelaez, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    Constructing explanations is an essential skill for all science learners. The goal of this project was to model the key components of expert explanation of molecular and cellular mechanisms. As such, we asked: What is an appropriate model of the components of explanation used by biology experts to explain molecular and cellular mechanisms? Do…

  14. RELATIONAL MECHANISMS IN INNOVATION CO-CREATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodica Boier

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, producers and customers establish relationships to mutually undertake the development of an innovative product. Consequently, it will be always of interest for an innovative company to know the degree to which different related suppliers are willing to form partnerships by participating in its new product development process. Several managerial implications flow from the link between relationship marketing and innovation processes, ranging from tactical product-related decisions to strategic competitor-related decisions, usually made in a relatively short period of time. Dedicated customer relationship systems track the interactions with customers and improve the flow of ideas for new products. When trying to develop long-term customer relationships, the ability to provide superior value to stakeholders is a must. Through carefully conducted relationships, customers are linked with the innovation company during the entire innovation process, and create a space for mutual understanding, learning and value co-creation. In order to co-create business value through online, also combined with offline innovation-related activities, customer orientation should be implemented throughout the organization – its culture, their systems, including the whole range of interactions.

  15. Molecular mechanisms of continuous light inhibition of Atlantic salmon parr-smolt transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffansson, Sigurd O.E.; Nielsen, Tom O.; Ebbesson, Lars O.E.

    2007-01-01

    . The present study addresses the endocrine and molecular mechanisms controlling the development of hypo-osmoregulatory ability and how artificial photoperiod can disrupt these changes. Juvenile Atlantic salmon reared under constant light (LL) from first feeding, were separated into two groups, and exposed...... that continuous light prevents the completion of parr-smolt transformation at a very basic level, disrupting the natural up-regulation of key elements of the endocrine system involved in the regulation of the parr-smolt transformation, and consequently inhibiting the smoltification-related increase in expression...

  16. Learning and Memory, Part II: Molecular Mechanisms of Synaptic Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombroso, Paul; Ogren, Marilee

    2009-01-01

    The molecular events that are responsible for strengthening synaptic connections and how these are linked to memory and learning are discussed. The laboratory preparations that allow the investigation of these events are also described.

  17. Cancer Chemoprevention and Piperine: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafiq A. Rather

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a genetic disease characterized by unregulated growth and dissemination of malignantly transformed neoplastic cells. The process of cancer development goes through several stages of biochemical and genetic alterations in a target cell. Several dietary alkaloids have been found to inhibit the molecular events and signaling pathways associated with various stages of cancer development and therefore are useful in cancer chemoprevention. Cancer chemoprevention has long been recognized as an important prophylactic strategy to reduce the burden of cancer on health care system. Cancer chemoprevention assumes the use of one or more pharmacologically active agents to block, suppress, prevent, or reverse the development of invasive cancer. Piperine is an active alkaloid with an excellent spectrum of therapeutic activities such as anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, anti-asthmatic, anti-convulsant, anti-mutagenic, antimycobacterial, anti-amoebic, and anti-cancer activities. In this article, we made an attempt to sum up the current knowledge on piperine that supports the chemopreventive potential of this dietary phytochemical. Many mechanisms have been purported to understand the chemopreventive action of piperine. Piperine has been reported to inhibit the proliferation and survival of many types of cancer cells through its influence on activation of apoptotic signaling and inhibition of cell cycle progression. Piperine is known to affect cancer cells in variety of other ways such as influencing the redox homeostasis, inhibiting cancer stem cell (CSC self-renewal and modulation of ER stress and autophagy. Piperine can modify activity of many enzymes and transcription factors to inhibit invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Piperine is a potent inhibitor of p-glycoprotein (P-gp and has a significant effect on the drug metabolizing enzyme (DME system. Because of its inhibitory influence on P-gp activity, piperine can reverse

  18. AMMOS: Automated Molecular Mechanics Optimization tool for in silico Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pencheva, Tania; Lagorce, David; Pajeva, Ilza; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Miteva, Maria A

    2008-01-01

    Background Virtual or in silico ligand screening combined with other computational methods is one of the most promising methods to search for new lead compounds, thereby greatly assisting the drug discovery process. Despite considerable progresses made in virtual screening methodologies, available computer programs do not easily address problems such as: structural optimization of compounds in a screening library, receptor flexibility/induced-fit, and accurate prediction of protein-ligand interactions. It has been shown that structural optimization of chemical compounds and that post-docking optimization in multi-step structure-based virtual screening approaches help to further improve the overall efficiency of the methods. To address some of these points, we developed the program AMMOS for refining both, the 3D structures of the small molecules present in chemical libraries and the predicted receptor-ligand complexes through allowing partial to full atom flexibility through molecular mechanics optimization. Results The program AMMOS carries out an automatic procedure that allows for the structural refinement of compound collections and energy minimization of protein-ligand complexes using the open source program AMMP. The performance of our package was evaluated by comparing the structures of small chemical entities minimized by AMMOS with those minimized with the Tripos and MMFF94s force fields. Next, AMMOS was used for full flexible minimization of protein-ligands complexes obtained from a mutli-step virtual screening. Enrichment studies of the selected pre-docked complexes containing 60% of the initially added inhibitors were carried out with or without final AMMOS minimization on two protein targets having different binding pocket properties. AMMOS was able to improve the enrichment after the pre-docking stage with 40 to 60% of the initially added active compounds found in the top 3% to 5% of the entire compound collection. Conclusion The open source AMMOS

  19. Tannins, Peptic Ulcers and Related Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, Neyres Zinia Taveira; de Souza Falcão, Heloina; Gomes, Isis Fernandes; de Almeida Leite, Thiago Jose; de Morais Lima, Gedson Rodrigues; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria; Tavares, Josean Fechine; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral; de Athayde-Filho, Petrônio Filgueiras; Batista, Leonia Maria

    2012-01-01

    This review of the current literature aims to study correlations between the chemical structure and gastric anti-ulcer activity of tannins. Tannins are used in medicine primarily because of their astringent properties. These properties are due to the fact that tannins react with the tissue proteins with which they come into contact. In gastric ulcers, this tannin-protein complex layer protects the stomach by promoting greater resistance to chemical and mechanical injury or irritation. Moreover, in several experimental models of gastric ulcer, tannins have been shown to present antioxidant activity, promote tissue repair, exhibit anti Helicobacter pylori effects, and they are involved in gastrointestinal tract anti-inflammatory processes. The presence of tannins explains the anti-ulcer effects of many natural products. PMID:22489149

  20. Tannins, Peptic Ulcers and Related Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonia Maria Batista

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This review of the current literature aims to study correlations between the chemical structure and gastric anti-ulcer activity of tannins. Tannins are used in medicine primarily because of their astringent properties. These properties are due to the fact that tannins react with the tissue proteins with which they come into contact. In gastric ulcers, this tannin-protein complex layer protects the stomach by promoting greater resistance to chemical and mechanical injury or irritation. Moreover, in several experimental models of gastric ulcer, tannins have been shown to present antioxidant activity, promote tissue repair, exhibit anti Helicobacter pylori effects, and they are involved in gastrointestinal tract anti-inflammatory processes. The presence of tannins explains the anti-ulcer effects of many natural products.

  1. Tannins, peptic ulcers and related mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, Neyres Zinia Taveira; de Souza Falcão, Heloina; Gomes, Isis Fernandes; de Almeida Leite, Thiago Jose; de Morais Lima, Gedson Rodrigues; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria; Tavares, Josean Fechine; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral; de Athayde-Filho, Petrônio Filgueiras; Batista, Leonia Maria

    2012-01-01

    This review of the current literature aims to study correlations between the chemical structure and gastric anti-ulcer activity of tannins. Tannins are used in medicine primarily because of their astringent properties. These properties are due to the fact that tannins react with the tissue proteins with which they come into contact. In gastric ulcers, this tannin-protein complex layer protects the stomach by promoting greater resistance to chemical and mechanical injury or irritation. Moreover, in several experimental models of gastric ulcer, tannins have been shown to present antioxidant activity, promote tissue repair, exhibit anti Helicobacter pylori effects, and they are involved in gastrointestinal tract anti-inflammatory processes. The presence of tannins explains the anti-ulcer effects of many natural products.

  2. Molecular mechanisms and treatment strategies for Dupuytren?s disease

    OpenAIRE

    O'Gorman, David B.; Vi, Linda; Gan,Bing Siang

    2010-01-01

    Dupuytren?s disease (DD) is a common disease of the hand and is characterized by thickening of the palmar fascia and formation of tight collagenous disease cords. At present, the disease is incurable and the molecular pathophysiology of DD is unknown. Surgery remains the most commonly used treatment for DD, but this requires extensive postoperative therapy and is associated with high rates of recurrence. Over the past decades, more indepth exploration of the molecular basis of DD has raised t...

  3. A Proteomics View of the Molecular Mechanisms and Biomarkers of Glaucomatous Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezel, Gülgün

    2013-01-01

    Despite improving understanding of glaucoma, key molecular players of neurodegeneration that can be targeted for treatment of glaucoma, or molecular biomarkers that can be useful for clinical testing, remain unclear. Proteomics technology offers a powerful toolbox to accomplish these important goals of the glaucoma research and is increasingly being applied to identify molecular mechanisms and biomarkers of glaucoma. Recent studies of glaucoma using proteomics analysis techniques have resulted in the lists of differentially expressed proteins in human glaucoma and animal models. The global analysis of protein expression in glaucoma has been followed by cell-specific proteome analysis of retinal ganglion cells and astrocytes. The proteomics data have also guided targeted studies to identify post-translational modifications and protein-protein interactions during glaucomatous neurodegeneration. In addition, recent applications of proteomics have provided a number of potential biomarker candidates. Proteomics technology holds great promise to move glaucoma research forward toward new treatment strategies and biomarker discovery. By reviewing the major proteomics approaches and their applications in the field of glaucoma, this article highlights the power of proteomics in translational and clinical research related to glaucoma and also provides a framework for future research to functionally test the importance of specific molecular pathways and validate candidate biomarkers. PMID:23396249

  4. Variational calculation of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical free energy with electronic polarization of solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Takeshi

    2012-04-07

    Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) free energy calculation presents a significant challenge due to an excessive number of QM calculations. A useful approach for reducing the computational cost is that based on the mean field approximation to the QM subsystem. Here, we describe such a mean-field QM/MM theory for electronically polarizable systems by starting from the Hartree product ansatz for the total system and invoking a variational principle of free energy. The MM part is then recast to a classical polarizable model by introducing the charge response kernel. Numerical test shows that the potential of mean force (PMF) thus obtained agrees quantitatively with that obtained from a direct QM/MM calculation, indicating the utility of self-consistent mean-field approximation. Next, we apply the obtained method to prototypical reactions in several qualitatively different solvents and make a systematic comparison of polarization effects. The results show that in aqueous solution the PMF does not depend very much on the water models employed, while in nonaqueous solutions the PMF is significantly affected by explicit polarization. For example, the free energy barrier for a phosphoryl dissociation reaction in acetone and cyclohexane is found to increase by more than 10 kcal/mol when switching the solvent model from an empirical to explicitly polarizable one. The reason for this is discussed based on the parametrization of empirical nonpolarizable models.

  5. The mechanics-modulated tunneling spectrum and low-pass effect of viscoelastic molecular monolayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun; Zhang, Xiaoyue; Shao, Jian; Yu, Jing; Wang, Biao; Zheng, Yue

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the force-induced conductance fluctuation in molecules is essential for building molecular devices with high stability. While stiffness of molecule is usually considered to be desirable for stable conductance, we demonstrate mechanical dragging in viscoelastic molecules integrates both noise resistance and mechanical controllability to molecular conductance. Via conductive atomic force microscope measurement and theoretical modeling, it's found that viscoelastic Azurin monolayer has spectrum-like pattern of conductance corresponding to the duration and strength of applied mechanical pulse under low-frequency excitation. Conductance fluctuation is prevented under high-frequency excitation by dragging dissipation, which qualifies molecular junction with electric robustness against mechanical noise.

  6. Mechanical and molecular studies of biocomposites filled with oil palm empty fruit bunches microfibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikmatin, S.; Saepulloh, D. R.; Irmansyah; Syafiuddin, A.

    2017-05-01

    The present work aims to investigate mechanical and molecular characteristics of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) composites filled with oil palm empty fruit bunches (OPEFB) microfibers. OPEFB microfibers were produced using mechanical milling. Composite granules were fabricated using single screw extruder. These composites were then used for fabricating helmet according to the Indonesian National Standard (SNI). Mechanical testing confirms that the helmet produced using this biocomposites are suitable to the SNI. Molecular interaction between matrix with OPEFB can be described using orbital hybridization theory. In general, this study has successfully investigated mechanical and molecular properties of the biocomposites.

  7. Radiation toxins: molecular mechanisms of action and radiomimetic properties .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Vecheslav

    Introduction: Acute Radiation Disease (ARD) or Acute Radiation Syndromes (ARS) were defined as a toxic poisonous with development of the acute pathological processes in irradi-ated animals: systemic inflammatory response syndrome(SIRS), toxic multiple organ injury (TMOI), toxic multiple organ dysfunction syndromes (TMOD), toxic multiple organ failure (TMOF). However, the nature of radiation toxins, their mechanisms of formation, molecular structure, and mechanism of actions remain uncertain. Moderate and high doses of radiation induce apoptotic necrosis of radiosensitive cells with formation of Radiation Toxins and in-flammation development. Mild doses of radiation induce apoptosis or controlled programmed death of radiosensitive cells without Radiation Toxins formation and development of inflam-mation processes. Only radiation induced apoptotic necrosis initiates formation of Radiation Toxins(RT). Radiation Toxins are playing an important role as the trigger mechanisms for in-flammation development and cell lysis. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome after radiation involves an influence of various endogenous agents and mediators of inflammation such as bradykinin, histamine, serotonin and phospholipases activation, prostaglandins biosyn-thesis. Although, formation of non-specific toxins such as Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) is an important pathological process at mild or high doses of radiation. Reactive Oxygen Species play an important role in molecules damage and development of peroxidation of lipids and pro-teins which are the structural parts of cell and mitochondrial membranes. ROS and bio-radicals induce damage of DNA and RNA and peroxidation of their molecules. But high doses of radia-tion, severe and extremely severe physiological stress, result in cells death by apoptotic necrosis and could be defined as the neuroimmune acute disease. Excitotoxicity is an important patho-logical mechanism which damages the central nervous system. We postulate that

  8. Viewing Molecular and Interface Interactions of Curcumin Amorphous Solid Dispersions for Comprehending Dissolution Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Wang, Xin; Li, Chang; Fan, Na; Wang, Jian; He, Zhonggui; Sun, Jin

    2017-08-07

    Tautomeric curcumin amorphous solid dispersions (Cur ASDs) formulated with various typical polymers (polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG), polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 (PVP), Eudragit EPO (EuD), EuD/hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose E50 (HPMC), and PVP/EuD) were probed using in situ Raman imaging plus spectroscopy and molecular modeling techniques, and dissolution mechanism of Cur ASDs were revealed mainly through molecular and interfacial interactions formed between Cur and polymer. The results demonstrated that Cur of keto form existed in Cur-PEG, Cur of enol form was shown in Cur-PVP, while Cur-EuD or Cur ASDs formulated with EuD as component had Cur of keto form and enol form. Hydrogen bond interactions were formed between OH group (PEG, HPMC) with C═O (Cur), and C═O (PVP or EuD) with the OH group (Cur). For Cur ASDs formulated with single polymer, the existed form of Cur was possibly related with the molecular interactions formed between drug and polymer. The wetting effect of excipient and Cur ASDs as well as their fitting equations of contact angle profiles should be seriously considered when analyzing the dissolution mechanism of Cur ASDs. Furthermore, dissolution of Cur-EuD with erosion dissolution pattern was higher than Cur-PVP with diffusion mechanism, and their crystallization pathway can ascribe to solution pathway and solid matrix pathway, respectively. Last but not least, turbidimetry method was effective in determining which excipient was superior and evaluating the function of polymers, including their abilities to improve amorphous Cur loading, drug dissolution, and supersaturation levels. Therefore, both the probing of tautomeric Cur in ASDs at intermolecular level and elucidation of its dissolution mechanism has tremendous value.

  9. The first hyperpolarizability of p-nitroaniline in 1,4-dioxane : A quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, L; van Duijnen, PT

    2005-01-01

    In this work we have investigated the first hyperpolarizability of pNA in 1,4-dioxane solution using a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) model. The particular model adopted is the recently developed discrete solvent reaction field (DRF) model. The DRF model is a polarizable QM/MM model

  10. Molecular mechanisms of citrus flavanones on hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, Rodrigo Polimeni; Constantin, Renato Polimeni; Bracht, Adelar; Yamamoto, Nair Seiko; Ishii-Iwamoto, Emy Luiza; Constantin, Jorgete

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that hyperglycaemia is the initiating cause of tissue damage associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus and that enhanced hepatic gluconeogenesis may account for the increase in blood glucose levels. The purpose of this work was to investigate the possible actions and mechanisms of three related citrus flavanones, namely hesperidin, hesperetin and naringenin, on hepatic gluconeogenesis and related parameters using isolated perfused rat liver. Hesperetin and naringenin (but not hesperidin) inhibited gluconeogenesis from lactate plus pyruvate, alanine and dihydroxyacetone. The inhibitory effects of these flavanones on gluconeogenesis from lactate and pyruvate (hesperetin IC50 75.6 μM; naringenin IC50 85.5 μM) as well as from alanine were considerably more pronounced than those from dihydroxyacetone. The main cause of gluconeogenesis inhibition is the reduction of pyruvate carboxylation by hesperetin (IC50 134.2 μM) and naringenin (IC50 143.5 μM) via inhibition of pyruvate transport into the mitochondria. Secondary causes are likely inhibition of energy metabolism, diversion of glucose 6-phosphate for glucuronidation reactions and oxidation of NADH by flavanone phenoxyl radicals. The influence of the structural differences between hesperetin and naringenin on their metabolic effects was negligible. Analytical evidence indicated that the presence of a rutinoside moiety in hesperidin noticeably decreases its metabolic effects, confirming that hesperetin and naringenin interact with intracellular enzymes and mitochondrial or cellular membranes better than hesperidin. Thus, the inhibition of the gluconeogenic pathway by citrus flavanones, which was similar to that of the drug metformin, may represent an attractive novel treatment strategy for type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Estrogen receptor alpha: molecular mechanisms and emerging insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candelaria, Nicholes R; Liu, Ka; Lin, Chin-Yo

    2013-10-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is a cellular receptor for the female sex hormone estrogen and other natural and synthetic ligands and play critical roles in normal development and physiology and in the etiology and treatment of endocrine-related diseases. ERα is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of transcription factors and regulates target gene expression in a ligand-dependent manner. It has also been shown to interact with G-protein coupled receptors and associated signaling molecules in the cytoplasm. Transcriptionally, ERα either binds DNA directly through conserved estrogen response element sequence motifs or indirectly by tethering to other interacting transcription factors and nucleate transcriptional regulatory complexes which include an array of co-regulator proteins. Genome-scale studies of ERα transcriptional activity and localization have revealed mechanistic complexity and insights including novel interactions with several transcription factors, including FOXA1, AP-2g, GATA3, and RUNX1, which function as pioneering, collaborative, or tethering factors. The major challenge and exciting prospect moving forward is the comprehensive definition and integration of ERα complexes and mechanisms and their tissue-specific roles in normal physiology and in human diseases. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. [Effects and molecular mechanism of nicotine on odontoblasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-An; Wen, Ling-Ying; Yang, Fu-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2008-04-01

    To observe the effects of nicotine on the proliferation of odontoblasts and explore the possible mechanism. Odontoblasts MDPC-23 were cultured, inoculated and divided into two groups randomly. With no stimuli added for the control group, the experimental group was stimulated by 100 microg/mL nicotine. After 8 hours, 10 micromol/L BrdU was added to label cells at S stage in cell cycle. 24 hours later, odontoblasts were fixed and immunofluorescence staining was performed with specific mouse BrdU antibody. After counterstaining with propidium iodide, BrdU positive cells were arbitrarily scored microscopically by an independent estimation conducted three times, and the corresponding total cell number in the same vision were counted in both groups. BrdU positive cell rates were calculated and compared statistically. At the same time, odontoblasts MDPC-23 were cultured and stimulated by 100 microg/mL nicotine, the dynamic Ca2+ concentration inside the cytoplasm were detected immediately by a confocal laser scanning microscope. The ratio of S stage cells in the experimental group was 36.3% significantly lower than that (48.2%) in the control group. After the addition of 100 microg/mL nicotine, the Ca2+ concentration inside the cytoplasm rose rapidly, sustained at a high level for a short time and then relapsed gradually. Nicotine had inhibitory effects on the proliferation of odontoblasts MDPC-23, which might be related to the increased Ca2+ concentration in the cytoplasm.

  13. Mechanical-Kinetic Modeling of a Molecular Walker from a Modular Design Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ruizheng; Loh, Iong Ying; Li, Hongrong; Wang, Zhisong

    2017-02-01

    Artificial molecular walkers beyond burnt-bridge designs are complex nanomachines that potentially replicate biological walkers in mechanisms and functionalities. Improving the man-made walkers up to performance for widespread applications remains difficult, largely because their biomimetic design principles involve entangled kinetic and mechanical effects to complicate the link between a walker's construction and ultimate performance. Here, a synergic mechanical-kinetic model is developed for a recently reported DNA bipedal walker, which is based on a modular design principle, potentially enabling many directional walkers driven by a length-switching engine. The model reproduces the experimental data of the walker, and identifies its performance-limiting factors. The model also captures features common to the underlying design principle, including counterintuitive performance-construction relations that are explained by detailed balance, entropy production, and bias cancellation. While indicating a low directional fidelity for the present walker, the model suggests the possibility of improving the fidelity above 90% by a more powerful engine, which may be an improved version of the present engine or an entirely new engine motif, thanks to the flexible design principle. The model is readily adaptable to aid these experimental developments towards high-performance molecular walkers.

  14. An overview of potential molecular mechanisms involved in VSMC phenotypic modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-Jie; Zhou, Yi; Chen, Lei; Wang, Yan-Qin; Wang, Xu; Pi, Yan; Gao, Chang-Yue; Li, Jing-Cheng; Zhang, Li-Li

    2016-02-01

    The fully differentiated medial vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of mature vessels keep quiescent and contractile. However, VSMC can exhibit the plasticity in phenotype switching from a differentiated and contractile phenotype to a dedifferentiated state in response to alterations in local environmental cues, which is called phenotypic modulation or switching. Distinguishing from its differentiated state expressing more smooth muscle (SM)-specific/selective proteins, the phenotypic modulation in VSMC is characterized by an increased rate of proliferation, migration, synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins and decreased expression of SM contractile proteins. Although it has been well demonstrated that phenotypic modulation of VSMC contributes to the occurrence and progression of many proliferative vascular diseases, little is known about the details of the molecular mechanisms of VSMC phenotypic modulation. Growing evidence suggests that variety of molecules including microRNAs, cytokines and biochemical factors, membrane receptors, ion channels, cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix play important roles in controlling VSMC phenotype. The focus of the present review is to provide an overview of potential molecular mechanisms involved in VSMC phenotypic modulation in recent years. To clarify VSMC differentiation and phenotypic modulation mechanisms will contribute to producing cell-based therapeutic interventions for aberrant VSMC differentiation-related diseases.

  15. Treating electrostatics with Wolf summation in combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda-May, Pedro; Pu, Jingzhi

    2015-11-07

    The Wolf summation approach [D. Wolf et al., J. Chem. Phys. 110, 8254 (1999)], in the damped shifted force (DSF) formalism [C. J. Fennell and J. D. Gezelter, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 234104 (2006)], is extended for treating electrostatics in combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulations. In this development, we split the QM/MM electrostatic potential energy function into the conventional Coulomb r(-1) term and a term that contains the DSF contribution. The former is handled by the standard machinery of cutoff-based QM/MM simulations whereas the latter is incorporated into the QM/MM interaction Hamiltonian as a Fock matrix correction. We tested the resulting QM/MM-DSF method for two solution-phase reactions, i.e., the association of ammonium and chloride ions and a symmetric SN2 reaction in which a methyl group is exchanged between two chloride ions. The performance of the QM/MM-DSF method was assessed by comparing the potential of mean force (PMF) profiles with those from the QM/MM-Ewald and QM/MM-isotropic periodic sum (IPS) methods, both of which include long-range electrostatics explicitly. For ion association, the QM/MM-DSF method successfully eliminates the artificial free energy drift observed in the QM/MM-Cutoff simulations, in a remarkable agreement with the two long-range-containing methods. For the SN2 reaction, the free energy of activation obtained by the QM/MM-DSF method agrees well with both the QM/MM-Ewald and QM/MM-IPS results. The latter, however, requires a greater cutoff distance than QM/MM-DSF for a proper convergence of the PMF. Avoiding time-consuming lattice summation, the QM/MM-DSF method yields a 55% reduction in computational cost compared with the QM/MM-Ewald method. These results suggest that, in addition to QM/MM-IPS, the QM/MM-DSF method may serve as another efficient and accurate alternative to QM/MM-Ewald for treating electrostatics in condensed-phase simulations of chemical reactions.

  16. Molecular mechanisms underlying thermal adaptation of xeric animals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-03-15

    Mar 15, 2007 ... Author Affiliations. M B Evgen'Ev1 2 D G Garbuz1 V Y Shilova1 O G Zatsepina1. Engelhardt Institute of Molecular Biology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilov Street 32, Moscow 199991, Russia; Institute of Cell Biophysics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino, Moscow Region, 142292, Russia ...

  17. Molecular mechanisms and treatment strategies for Dupuytren’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B O’Gorman

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available David B O’Gorman1,2,3,4, Linda Vi1,2,5, Bing Siang Gan1,2,3,5,61Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory, 2The Hand and Upper Limb Centre, St. Joseph’s Health Care London, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, 3Departments of Surgery, 4Biochemistry, 5Physiology and Pharmacology, 6Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, OT, CanadaAbstract: Dupuytren’s disease (DD is a common disease of the hand and is characterized by thickening of the palmar fascia and formation of tight collagenous disease cords. At present, the disease is incurable and the molecular pathophysiology of DD is unknown. Surgery remains the most commonly used treatment for DD, but this requires extensive postoperative therapy and is associated with high rates of recurrence. Over the past decades, more indepth exploration of the molecular basis of DD has raised the hopes of developing new treatment modalities. This paper reviews the clinical presentation and molecular pathophysiology of this disease, as well as current and emerging treatment. It also explores the implications of new findings in the laboratory for future treatment.Keywords: Dupuytren’s contracture, Dupuytren’s disease, fibrosis

  18. Molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance | Pillay | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improved understanding of the molecular basis of insulin resistance could ultimately lead to a better understanding of the causation of these conditions and the ... Here, particular attention is devoted to the initial events that follow the binding of insulin to its receptor, including changes in insulin receptor phosphorylation.

  19. Plant interactions with microbes and insects: from molecular mechanisms to ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieterse, Corné M J; Dicke, Marcel

    2007-12-01

    Plants are members of complex communities and interact both with antagonists and beneficial organisms. An important question in plant defense-signaling research is how plants integrate signals induced by pathogens, beneficial microbes and insects into the most appropriate adaptive response. Molecular and genomic tools are now being used to uncover the complexity of the induced defense signaling networks that have evolved during the arms races between plants and their attackers. Molecular biologists and ecologists are joining forces to place molecular mechanisms of plant defense into an ecological perspective. Here, we review our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of induced plant defense and their potential ecological relevance in nature.

  20. [Molecular Biology on the Mechanisms of Autism Spectrum Disorder for Clinical Psychiatrists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinodan, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    While, in general, a certain number of clinical psychiatrists might not be familiar with molecular biology, the mechanisms of mental illnesses have been uncovered by molecular biology for decades. Among mental illnesses, even biological psychiatrists and neuroscientists have paid less attention to the biological treatment of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) than Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia since ASD has been regarded as a developmental disorder that was seemingly untreatable. However, multifaceted methods of molecular biology have revealed the mechanisms that would lead to the medication of ASD. In this article, how molecular biology dissects the pathobiology of ASD is described in order to announce the possibilities of biological treatment for clinical psychiatrists.

  1. Molecular Aspects of H. pylori-Related MALT Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott R. Owens

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori-related extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue is a paradigm for malignancy arising in an inflammatory background. While the diagnosis of H. pylori gastritis is often straightforward, distinction between severe gastritis and early lymphoma can be difficult and requires careful assessment of clinical findings in addition to histological features and immunohistochemical results. A number of cytogenetic abnormalities have been discovered in H. pylori-related lymphomas and several have clinical importance, related to the responsiveness of lymphoma to H. pylori eradication therapy, but routine molecular studies are not widely utilized. While molecular methods may be used in equivocal cases, a trial of conservative therapy is warranted given the propensity for these lymphomas to regress with eradication of the organism. Once therapy is initiated, care must be taken to avoid a premature assignment of disease refractoriness because complete response can take several months to more than a year. Cases truly refractory to H. pylori eradication therapy may be treated with adjuvant chemoradiation with a high response rate.

  2. Molecular mechanisms of amitraz mammalian toxicity: a comprehensive review of existing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Pino, Javier; Moyano-Cires, Paula Viviana; Anadon, Maria Jose; Díaz, María Jesús; Lobo, Margarita; Capo, Miguel Andrés; Frejo, María Teresa

    2015-06-15

    Amitraz is a formamidine pesticide widely used as an insecticide and acaricide. Amitraz poisoning cases in humans and animals are still being described to date, which is a cause of concern for health authorities. Amitraz was reported not to pose unreasonable risks or adverse effects to humans or the environment unlike the other commercialized member of the formamidine family, chlordimeform, which was removed from the market because of carcinogenic effects in animal studies. Amitraz was classified as a nonquantifiable "Suggestive Evidence of Carcinogenicity" and not genotoxic, but recently, it has been reported that it could induce genotoxic effects. Moreover, ever since the previously published evaluations made by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Joint Meeting of Pesticide Residues (JMPR) there have been new reported data on amitraz toxicity related to genotoxicity, oxidative stress, cell death, immunotoxicty, endocrine disruption, and developmental toxicity which indicate that the risk of this compound could be underestimated. Furthermore, there is missing information about the dose-response relationship for some mechanisms and toxic effects described for amitraz and its metabolites, the mechanism of action by which several toxic effects are produced, and amitraz pharmacokinetics on different species. According to this, the new information reported should be taken into account, and more studies should be performed to fill in the gaps of missing information for a complete hazard identification and therefore an exhaustive risk assessment of amitraz. This review is aimed at updating the current knowledge on molecular mechanisms of amitraz mammalian toxicity, pointing out the missing information, providing some possible explanation of the mechanism by which some toxic effects observed are produced, and suggesting future direction of its research. To our knowledge, this is the first review on the molecular mechanisms of amitraz toxicity.

  3. Molecular Age-Related Changes in the Anterior Segment of the Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Hernandez-Zimbron

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To examine the current knowledge about the age-related processes in the anterior segment of the eye at a biological, clinical, and molecular level. Methods. We reviewed the available published literature that addresses the aging process of the anterior segment of the eye and its associated molecular and physiological events. We performed a search on PubMed, CINAHL, and Embase using the MeSH terms “eye,” “anterior segment,” and “age.” We generated searches to account for synonyms of these keywords and MESH headings as follows: (1 “Eye” AND “ageing process” OR “anterior segment ageing” and (2 “Anterior segment” AND “ageing process” OR “anterior segment” AND “molecular changes” AND “age.” Results. Among the principal causes of age-dependent alterations in the anterior segment of the eye, we found the mutation of the TGF-β gene and loss of autophagy in addition to oxidative stress, which contributes to the pathogenesis of degenerative diseases. Conclusions. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding some of the molecular mechanisms related to aging in the anterior segment of the eye. We also introduce and propose potential roles of autophagy, an important mechanism responsible for maintaining homeostasis and proteostasis under stress conditions in the anterior segment during aging.

  4. Features of Knowledge Building in Biology: Understanding Undergraduate Students' Ideas about Molecular Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southard, Katelyn; Wince, Tyler; Meddleton, Shanice; Bolger, Molly S

    2016-01-01

    Research has suggested that teaching and learning in molecular and cellular biology (MCB) is difficult. We used a new lens to understand undergraduate reasoning about molecular mechanisms: the knowledge-integration approach to conceptual change. Knowledge integration is the dynamic process by which learners acquire new ideas, develop connections between ideas, and reorganize and restructure prior knowledge. Semistructured, clinical think-aloud interviews were conducted with introductory and upper-division MCB students. Interviews included a written conceptual assessment, a concept-mapping activity, and an opportunity to explain the biomechanisms of DNA replication, transcription, and translation. Student reasoning patterns were explored through mixed-method analyses. Results suggested that students must sort mechanistic entities into appropriate mental categories that reflect the nature of MCB mechanisms and that conflation between these categories is common. We also showed how connections between molecular mechanisms and their biological roles are part of building an integrated knowledge network as students develop expertise. We observed differences in the nature of connections between ideas related to different forms of reasoning. Finally, we provide a tentative model for MCB knowledge integration and suggest its implications for undergraduate learning. © 2016 K. Southard et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  5. The Frame of Fixed Stars in Relational Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Relational mechanics is a gauge theory of classical mechanics whose laws do not govern the motion of individual particles but the evolution of the distances between particles. Its formulation gives a satisfactory answer to Leibniz's and Mach's criticisms of Newton's mechanics: relational mechanics does not rely on the idea of an absolute space. When describing the behavior of small subsystems with respect to the so called "fixed stars", relational mechanics basically agrees with Newtonian mechanics. However, those subsystems having huge angular momentum will deviate from the Newtonian behavior if they are described in the frame of fixed stars. Such subsystems naturally belong to the field of astronomy; they can be used to test the relational theory.

  6. Quantum Mechanics and Molecular Mechanics Study of the Catalytic Mechanism of Human AMSH-LP Domain Deubiquitinating Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenyou; Liu, Yongjun; Ling, Baoping

    2015-08-25

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) catalyze the cleavage of the isopeptide bond in polyubiquitin chains to control and regulate the deubiquitination process in all known eukaryotic cells. The human AMSH-LP DUB domain specifically cleaves the isopeptide bonds in the Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains. In this article, the catalytic mechanism of AMSH-LP has been studied using a combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics method. Two possible hydrolysis processes (Path 1 and Path 2) have been considered. Our calculation results reveal that the activation of Zn(2+)-coordinated water molecule is the essential step for the hydrolysis of isopeptide bond. In Path 1, the generated hydroxyl first attacks the carbonyl group of Gly76, and then the amino group of Lys63 is protonated, which is calculated to be the rate limiting step with an energy barrier of 13.1 kcal/mol. The energy barrier of the rate limiting step and the structures of intermediate and product are in agreement with the experimental results. In Path 2, the protonation of amino group of Lys63 is prior to the nucleophilic attack of activated hydroxyl. The two proton transfer processes in Path 2 correspond to comparable overall barriers (33.4 and 36.1 kcal/mol), which are very high for an enzymatic reaction. Thus, Path 2 can be ruled out. During the reaction, Glu292 acts as a proton transfer mediator, and Ser357 mainly plays a role in stabilizing the negative charge of Gly76. Besides acting as a Lewis acid, Zn(2+) also influences the reaction by coordinating to the reaction substrates (W1 and Gly76).

  7. The molecular mechanisms of zinc neurotoxicity and the pathogenesis of vascular type senile dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Dai; Kawahara, Masahiro

    2013-11-07

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential trace element that is abundantly present in the brain. Despite its importance in normal brain functions, excess Zn is neurotoxic and causes neurodegeneration following transient global ischemia and plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of vascular-type dementia (VD). We have investigated the molecular mechanisms of Zn-induced neurotoxicity using immortalized hypothalamic neurons (GT1-7 cells) and found that carnosine (β-alanyl histidine) and histidine (His) inhibited Zn2+-induced neuronal death. A DNA microarray analysis revealed that the expression of several genes, including metal-related genes (metallothionein and Zn transporter 1), endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress related genes (GADD34, GADD45, and p8), and the calcium (Ca)-related gene Arc (activity-related cytoskeleton protein), were affected after Zn exposure. The co-existence of carnosine or His inhibited the expression of GADD34, p8, and Arc, although they did not influence the expression of the metal-related genes. Therefore, ER-stress and the disruption of Ca homeostasis may underlie the mechanisms of Zn-induced neurotoxicity, and carnosine might be a possible drug candidate for the treatment of VD.

  8. The Molecular Mechanisms of Zinc Neurotoxicity and the Pathogenesis of Vascular Type Senile Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kawahara

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Zinc (Zn is an essential trace element that is abundantly present in the brain. Despite its importance in normal brain functions, excess Zn is neurotoxic and causes neurodegeneration following transient global ischemia and plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of vascular-type dementia (VD. We have investigated the molecular mechanisms of Zn-induced neurotoxicity using immortalized hypothalamic neurons (GT1-7 cells and found that carnosine (β-alanyl histidine and histidine (His inhibited Zn2+-induced neuronal death. A DNA microarray analysis revealed that the expression of several genes, including metal-related genes (metallothionein and Zn transporter 1, endoplasmic reticulum (ER-stress related genes (GADD34, GADD45, and p8, and the calcium (Ca-related gene Arc (activity-related cytoskeleton protein, were affected after Zn exposure. The co-existence of carnosine or His inhibited the expression of GADD34, p8, and Arc, although they did not influence the expression of the metal-related genes. Therefore, ER-stress and the disruption of Ca homeostasis may underlie the mechanisms of Zn-induced neurotoxicity, and carnosine might be a possible drug candidate for the treatment of VD.

  9. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Genomic Instability in Brca-Deficient Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark 6Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Immune Disease Institute and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Children’s...Blegdamsvej 3b, 2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark 2Laboratory of Genome Integrity, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA...14, 1293–1301 (1994). 46. Wang, H. et al. Biochemical evidence for Ku-independent backup pathways of NHEJ. Nucleic Acids Res. 31, 5377–5388 (2003

  10. A mechanical actuator driven electrochemically by artificial molecular muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juluri, Bala Krishna; Kumar, Ajeet S; Liu, Yi; Ye, Tao; Yang, Ying-Wei; Flood, Amar H; Fang, Lei; Stoddart, J Fraser; Weiss, Paul S; Huang, Tony Jun

    2009-02-24

    A microcantilever, coated with a monolayer of redox-controllable, bistable [3]rotaxane molecules (artificial molecular muscles), undergoes reversible deflections when subjected to alternating oxidizing and reducing electrochemical potentials. The microcantilever devices were prepared by precoating one surface with a gold film and allowing the palindromic [3]rotaxane molecules to adsorb selectively onto one side of the microcantilevers, utilizing thiol-gold chemistry. An electrochemical cell was employed in the experiments, and deflections were monitored both as a function of (i) the scan rate (+0.4 V) and reducing (cycles. The microcantilevers deflect in one direction following oxidation and in the opposite direction upon reduction. The approximately 550 nm deflections were calculated to be commensurate with forces per molecule of approximately 650 pN. The thermal relaxation that characterizes the device's deflection is consistent with the double bistability associated with the palindromic [3]rotaxane and reflects a metastable contracted state. The use of the cooperative forces generated by these self-assembled, nanometer-scale artificial molecular muscles that are electrically wired to an external power supply constitutes a seminal step toward molecular-machine-based nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS).

  11. Molecular mechanisms of axon guidance in the developing corticospinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canty, A J; Murphy, M

    2008-06-01

    The great repertoire of movements in higher order mammals comes courtesy of the corticospinal tract (CST) which is able to initiate precise movement of the entire musculature of the axial and limb muscle groups. It forms the longest axonal trajectory in the mammalian central nervous system and its axons must navigate the entire length of the central nervous system--from its origins in the deeper layers of the cerebral cortex down through the cerebral peduncles and brainstem and along the entire length of the spinal cord. This period of navigation is incredibly complex, and relies upon the coordinated regulation of a collection of molecular guidance cues - coming from all of the known major families of guidance cues - the ephrins, slits, Netrins and Semaphorins - that work together to steer the growing axonal tips through the brain and spinal cord. As such a long tract, the CST forms an excellent experimental model to investigate the nature of molecular cues that sequentially guide axons through the central nervous system. Using the rodent as a model system, this review discusses each step of axonal guidance through the major brain regions--starting from the decision to grow ventrally out of the cortical plate to the eventual activity-dependent refinement of circuitry in the spinal grey matter. In recent years, the identification of these guidance cues and their proposed mode of action is beginning to give us a picture at a molecular level of how the CST is guided so accurately over such a long distance.

  12. Molecular and Neuronal Plasticity Mechanisms in the Amygdala-Prefrontal Cortical Circuit: Implications for Opiate Addiction Memory Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura G Rosen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The persistence of associative memories linked to the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse is a core underlying feature of the addiction process. Opiate class drugs in particular, possess potent euphorigenic effects which, when linked to environmental cues, can produce drug-related ‘trigger’ memories that may persist for lengthy periods of time, even during abstinence, in both humans and other animals. Furthermore, the transitional switch from the drug-naïve, non-dependent state to states of dependence and withdrawal, represents a critical boundary between distinct neuronal and molecular substrates associated with opiate-reward memory formation. Identifying the functional molecular and neuronal mechanisms related to the acquisition, consolidation, recall and extinction phases of opiate-related reward memories is critical for understanding, and potentially reversing, addiction-related memory plasticity characteristic of compulsive drug-seeking behaviors. The mammalian prefrontal cortex (PFC and basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA share important functional and anatomical connections that are involved importantly in the processing of associative memories linked to drug reward. In addition, both regions share interconnections with the mesolimbic pathway’s ventral tegmental area (VTA and nucleus accumbens (NAc and can modulate dopamine (DA transmission and neuronal activity associated with drug-related DAergic signaling dynamics. In this review, we will summarize research from both human and animal modelling studies highlighting the importance of neuronal and molecular plasticity mechanisms within this circuitry during critical phases of opiate addiction-related learning and memory processing. Specifically, we will focus on two molecular signaling pathways known to be involved in both drug-related neuroadaptations and in memory-related plasticity mechanisms; the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase system (ERK and the Ca2+/calmodulin

  13. On the Vibration of Single-Walled Carbon Nanocones: Molecular Mechanics Approach versus Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ansari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The vibrational behavior of single-walled carbon nanocones is studied using molecular structural method and molecular dynamics simulations. In molecular structural approach, point mass and beam elements are employed to model the carbon atoms and the connecting covalent bonds, respectively. Single-walled carbon nanocones with different apex angles are considered. Besides, the vibrational behavior of nanocones under various types of boundary conditions is studied. Predicted natural frequencies are compared with the existing results in the literature and also with the ones obtained by molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that decreasing apex angle and the length of carbon nanocone results in an increase in the natural frequency. Comparing the vibrational behavior of single-walled carbon nanocones under different boundary conditions shows that the effect of end condition on the natural frequency is more prominent for nanocones with smaller apex angles.

  14. BOOK REVIEW: Advanced Mechanics and General Relativity Advanced Mechanics and General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louko, Jorma

    2011-04-01

    Joel Franklin's textbook `Advanced Mechanics and General Relativity' comprises two partially overlapping, partially complementary introductory paths into general relativity at advanced undergraduate level. Path I starts with the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of Newtonian point particle motion, emphasising the action principle and the connection between symmetries and conservation laws. The concepts are then adapted to point particle motion in Minkowski space, introducing Lorentz transformations as symmetries of the action. There follows a focused development of tensor calculus, parallel transport and curvature, using examples from Newtonian mechanics and special relativity, culminating in the field equations of general relativity. The Schwarzschild solution is analysed, including a detailed discussion of the tidal forces on a radially infalling observer. Basics of gravitational radiation are examined, highlighting the similarities to and differences from electromagnetic radiation. The final topics in Path I are equatorial geodesics in Kerr and the motion of a relativistic string in Minkowski space. Path II starts by introducing scalar field theory on Minkowski space as a limit of point masses connected by springs, emphasising the action principle, conservation laws and the energy-momentum tensor. The action principle for electromagnetism is introduced, and the coupling of electromagnetism to a complex scalar field is developed in a detailed and pedagogical fashion. A free symmetric second-rank tensor field on Minkowski space is introduced, and the action principle of general relativity is recovered from coupling the second-rank tensor to its own energy-momentum tensor. Path II then merges with Path I and, supplanted with judicious early selections from Path I, can proceed to the Schwarzschild solution. The choice of material in each path is logical and focused. A notable example in Path I is that Lorentz transformations in Minkowki space are introduced

  15. Examining the Mechanical Equilibrium of Microscopic Stresses in Molecular Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Sánchez, Alejandro; Vanegas, Juan M.; Arroyo, Marino

    2015-06-01

    The microscopic stress field provides a unique connection between atomistic simulations and mechanics at the nanoscale. However, its definition remains ambiguous. Rather than a mere theoretical preoccupation, we show that this fact acutely manifests itself in local stress calculations of defective graphene, lipid bilayers, and fibrous proteins. We find that popular definitions of the microscopic stress violate the continuum statements of mechanical equilibrium, and we propose an unambiguous and physically sound definition.

  16. Neuroinflammation and ALS: Transcriptomic Insights into Molecular Disease Mechanisms and Therapeutic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Morello

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a neurodegenerative disease affecting the motor nervous system. Despite the mechanism underlying motor neuron death is not yet clarified, multiple pathogenic processes have been proposed to account for ALS. Among these, inflammatory/immune responses have recently gained particular interest, although there are conflicting reports on the role of these processes in ALS pathogenesis and treatment. This apparent discrepancy may be due to the absence of an effective stratification of ALS patients into subgroups with markedly different clinical, biological, and molecular features. Our research group recently described genome-wide characterization of motor cortex samples from sporadic ALS (SALS patients, revealing the existence of molecular and functional heterogeneity in SALS. Here, we reexamine data coming from our previous work, focusing on transcriptomic changes of inflammatory-related genes, in order to investigate their potential contribution in ALS. A total of 1573 inflammatory genes were identified as differentially expressed between SALS patients and controls, characterizing distinct topological pathways and networks, suggestive of specific inflammatory molecular signatures for different patient subgroups. Besides providing promising insights into the intricate relationship between inflammation and ALS, this paper represents a starting point for the rationale design and development of novel and more effective diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  17. Molecular mechanisms in the selective basal activation of pyrabactin receptor 1: Comparative analysis of mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmyla Dorosh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrabactin receptors (PYR play a central role in abscisic acid (ABA signal transduction; they are ABA receptors that inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2C. Molecular aspects contributing to increased basal activity of PYR against PP2C are studied by molecular dynamics (MD simulations. An extensive series of MD simulations of the apo-form of mutagenized PYR1 as a homodimer and in complex with homology to ABA-insensitive 1 (HAB1 phosphatase are reported. In order to investigate the detailed molecular mechanisms mediating PYR1 activity, the MD data was analyzed by essential collective dynamics (ECD, a novel approach that allows the identification, with atomic resolution, of persistent dynamic correlations based on relatively short MD trajectories. Employing the ECD method, the effects of select mutations on the structure and dynamics of the PYR1 complexes were investigated and considered in the context of experimentally determined constitutive activities against HAB1. Approaches to rationally design constitutively active PYR1 constructs to increase PP2C inhibition are discussed.

  18. The Progress of Mitophagy and Related Pathogenic Mechanisms of the Neurodegenerative Diseases and Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrion, an organelle with two layers of membrane, is extremely vital to eukaryotic cell. Its major functions are energy center and apoptosis censor inside cell. The intactness of mitochondrial membrane is important to maintain its structure and function. Mitophagy is one kind of autophagy. In recent years, studies of mitochondria have shown that mitophagy is regulated by various factors and is an important regulation mechanism for organisms to maintain their normal state. In addition, abnormal mitophagy is closely related to several neurodegenerative diseases and tumor. However, the related signal pathway and its regulation mechanism still remain unclear. As a result, summarizing the progress of mitophagy and its related pathogenic mechanism not only helps to reveal the complicated molecular mechanism, but also helps to find a new target to treat the related diseases.

  19. DMPD: Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: roles of the receptor complex. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14609719 Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide...ivation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: roles of the receptor complex. Pub...medID 14609719 Title Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: ro

  20. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies of Trypanosoma cruzi triosephosphate isomerase inhibitors. Insights into the inhibition mechanism and selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minini, Lucía; Álvarez, Guzmán; González, Mercedes; Cerecetto, Hugo; Merlino, Alicia

    2015-05-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) triosephosphate isomerase (TcTIM) is a glycolytic enzyme essential for parasite survival and has been considered an interesting target for the development of new antichagasic compounds. The homodimeric enzyme is catalytically active only as a dimer. Interestingly, significant differences exist between the human and parasite TIMs interfaces with a sequence identity of 52%. Therefore, compounds able to specifically disrupt TcTIM but not Homo sapiens TIM (hTIM) dimer interface could become selective antichagasic drugs. In the present work, the binding modes of 1,2,4-thiadiazol, phenazine and 1,2,6-thiadiazine derivatives to TcTIM were investigated using molecular docking combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results show that phenazine and 1,2,6-thiadiazine derivatives, 2 and 3, act as dimer-disrupting inhibitors of TcTIM having also allosteric effects in the conformation of the active site. On the other hand, the 1,2,4-thiadiazol derivative 1 binds into the active site causing a significant decrease in enzyme mobility in both monomers. The loss of conformational flexibility upon compound 1 binding suggests that this inhibitor could be preventing essential motions of the enzyme required for optimal activity. The lack of inhibitory activity of 1 against hTIM was also investigated and seems to be related with the high mobility of hTIM which would hinder the formation of a stable ligand-enzyme complex. This work has contributed to understand the mechanism of action of this kind of inhibitors and could result of great help for future rational novel drug design. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Probing the molecular mechanism behind the cognitive impairment induced by THC

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Botta, J.; Cordomi, A.; Bondar, Alexey; Lazar, Josef; Pardo, L.; McCormick, P. J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 121, 2 (SI) (2017), s. 11-2 ISSN 1742-7835 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : THC * molecular mechanism * cognitive impairment Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 3.176, year: 2016

  2. Features of Knowledge Building in Biology: Understanding Undergraduate Students' Ideas about Molecular Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southard, Katelyn; Wince, Tyler; Meddleton, Shanice; Bolger, Molly S.

    2016-01-01

    Research has suggested that teaching and learning in molecular and cellular biology (MCB) is difficult. We used a new lens to understand undergraduate reasoning about molecular mechanisms: the knowledge-integration approach to conceptual change. Knowledge integration is the dynamic process by which learners acquire new ideas, develop connections…

  3. [Interactions of DNA bases with individual water molecules. Molecular mechanics and quantum mechanics computation results vs. experimental data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, E; Lino, J; Deriabina, A; Herrera, J N F; Poltev, V I

    2013-01-01

    To elucidate details of the DNA-water interactions we performed the calculations and systemaitic search for minima of interaction energy of the systems consisting of one of DNA bases and one or two water molecules. The results of calculations using two force fields of molecular mechanics (MM) and correlated ab initio method MP2/6-31G(d, p) of quantum mechanics (QM) have been compared with one another and with experimental data. The calculations demonstrated a qualitative agreement between geometry characteristics of the most of local energy minima obtained via different methods. The deepest minima revealed by MM and QM methods correspond to water molecule position between two neighbor hydrophilic centers of the base and to the formation by water molecule of hydrogen bonds with them. Nevertheless, the relative depth of some minima and peculiarities of mutual water-base positions in' these minima depend on the method used. The analysis revealed insignificance of some differences in the results of calculations performed via different methods and the importance of other ones for the description of DNA hydration. The calculations via MM methods enable us to reproduce quantitatively all the experimental data on the enthalpies of complex formation of single water molecule with the set of mono-, di-, and trimethylated bases, as well as on water molecule locations near base hydrophilic atoms in the crystals of DNA duplex fragments, while some of these data cannot be rationalized by QM calculations.

  4. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of human microtia via a pig model of HOXA1 syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruimin Qiao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Microtia is a congenital malformation of the outer ears. Although both genetic and environmental components have been implicated in microtia, the genetic causes of this innate disorder are poorly understood. Pigs have naturally occurring diseases comparable to those in humans, providing exceptional opportunity to dissect the molecular mechanism of human inherited diseases. Here we first demonstrated that a truncating mutation in HOXA1 causes a monogenic disorder of microtia in pigs. We further performed RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq analysis on affected and healthy pig embryos (day 14.25. We identified a list of 337 differentially expressed genes (DEGs between the normal and mutant samples, shedding light on the transcriptional network involving HOXA1. The DEGs are enriched in biological processes related to cardiovascular system and embryonic development, and neurological, renal and urological diseases. Aberrant expressions of many DEGs have been implicated in human innate deformities corresponding to microtia-associated syndromes. After applying three prioritizing algorithms, we highlighted appealing candidate genes for human microtia from the 337 DEGs. We searched for coding variants of functional significance within six candidate genes in 147 microtia-affected individuals. Of note, we identified one EVC2 non-synonymous mutation (p.Asp1174Asn as a potential disease-implicating variant for a human microtia-associated syndrome. The findings advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying human microtia, and provide an interesting example of the characterization of human disease-predisposing variants using pig models.

  5. Human tumor-associated viruses and new insights into the molecular mechanisms of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D; Gutkind, J S

    2008-12-01

    The study of acute-transforming retroviruses and their oncogenes and of the multiple mechanisms deployed by DNA viruses to circumvent the growth-suppressive and proapoptotic function of tumor suppressor genes has provided the foundation of our current understanding of cancer biology. Unlike acute-transforming animal viruses, however, human tumor-associated viruses lead to malignancies with a prolonged latency and in conjunction with other environmental and host-related cooperating events. The relevance of viral infection to human cancer development has often been debated. We now know that at least six human viruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), human papilloma virus (HPV), human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV-1) and Kaposi's associated sarcoma virus (KSHV) contribute to 10-15% of the cancers worldwide. Hence, the opportunity exists to fight cancer at the global scale by preventing the spread of these viruses, by the development and distribution of effective and safe antiviral vaccines, and by identifying their oncogenic mechanism. Here, we discuss the molecular events underlying the neoplastic potential of the human tumor-associated viruses, with emphasis on the enigmatic KSHV and its numerous virally hijacked proangiogenic, immune-evasive and tumor-promoting genes. The emerging information may facilitate the development of new molecular-targeted approaches to prevent and treat virally associated human malignancies.

  6. Characterization of the molecular mechanism of the bone-anabolic activity of carfilzomib in multiple myeloma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Hu

    Full Text Available Carfilzomib, the next generation of proteasome inhibitor, may increase osteoblast-related markers in patients with multiple myeloma, but the molecular mechanism of its effect on mesenchymal stem cell differentiation to osteoblasts remains unknown. Herein, we demonstrated that carfilzomib significantly promoted mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into osteoblasts. In osteoprogenitor cells and primary mesenchymal stem cells from patients with myeloma, carfilzomib induced increases in alkaline phosphatase activity, matrix mineralization, and calcium deposition via Wnt-independent activation of β-catenin/TCF signaling. Using affinity pull-down assays with immunoblotting analysis and immunofluorescence, we found that carfilzomib induced stabilization of both free and active forms of β-catenin in a time- and dose-dependent manner that was not associated with β-catenin transcriptional regulation. Nuclear translocation of β-catenin protein was associated with TCF transcriptional activity that was independent of the effects of GSK3β-activation and of signaling induced by 19 Wnt ligands, 10 Frizzled receptors, and LRP5/6 co-receptors. Blocking activation of β-catenin/TCF signaling by dominant negative TCF1 or TCF4 attenuated carfilzomib-induced matrix mineralization. Thus, carfilzomib induced osteoblast differentiation via Wnt-independent activation of the β-catenin/TCF pathway. These results provide a novel molecular mechanism critical to understanding the anabolic role of carfilzomib on myeloma-induced bone disease.

  7. Molecular Mechanisms Modulating the Phenotype of Macrophages and Microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie A. Amici

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages and microglia play crucial roles during central nervous system development, homeostasis and acute events such as infection or injury. The diverse functions of tissue macrophages and microglia are mirrored by equally diverse phenotypes. A model of inflammatory/M1 versus a resolution phase/M2 macrophages has been widely used. However, the complexity of macrophage function can only be achieved by the existence of varied, plastic and tridimensional macrophage phenotypes. Understanding how tissue macrophages integrate environmental signals via molecular programs to define pathogen/injury inflammatory responses provides an opportunity to better understand the multilayered nature of macrophages, as well as target and modulate cellular programs to control excessive inflammation. This is particularly important in MS and other neuroinflammatory diseases, where chronic inflammatory macrophage and microglial responses may contribute to pathology. Here, we perform a comprehensive review of our current understanding of how molecular pathways modulate tissue macrophage phenotype, covering both classic pathways and the emerging role of microRNAs, receptor-tyrosine kinases and metabolism in macrophage phenotype. In addition, we discuss pathway parallels in microglia, novel markers helpful in the identification of peripheral macrophages versus microglia and markers linked to their phenotype.

  8. Molecular mechanisms involved in Bacillus subtilis biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielich-Süss, Benjamin; Lopez, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary Biofilms are the predominant lifestyle of bacteria in natural environments, and they severely impact our societies in many different fashions. Therefore, biofilm formation is a topic of growing interest in microbiology, and different bacterial models are currently studied to better understand the molecular strategies that bacteria undergo to build biofilms. Among those, biofilms of the soil-dwelling bacterium Bacillus subtilis are commonly used for this purpose. Bacillus subtilis biofilms show remarkable architectural features that are a consequence of sophisticated programs of cellular specialization and cell-cell communication within the community. Many laboratories are trying to unravel the biological role of the morphological features of biofilms, as well as exploring the molecular basis underlying cellular differentiation. In this review, we present a general perspective of the current state of knowledge of biofilm formation in B. subtilis. In particular, a special emphasis is placed on summarizing the most recent discoveries in the field and integrating them into the general view of these truly sophisticated microbial communities. PMID:24909922

  9. Molecular mechanisms involved in the cardiovascular and neuroprotective effects of anthocyanins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pascual-Teresa, Sonia

    2014-10-01

    Anthocyanins are the main group of natural hydrosoluble pigments in plants. They introduce colouring to foods, with colours ranging from blue to red and orange. Nowadays, their importance for the Food and Pharmaceutical industries is mainly based in the existing scientific work evidencing their beneficial effects on the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and neurological conditions. Different mechanisms have been shown to be involved in those effects. The most consistent ones are related to their antihypertensive and endothelium protective activities, antiatherogenic activity and their interaction with the estrogenic receptor. In some of the existing work, studies on structure-activity relationship have been done, showing that modifications on the structure of anthocyanins, besides having an effect on their colours, have a clear incidence on their interaction with different steps in the principal pathways related to these diseases. Therefore, different colours might show different molecular mechanisms. However, in a normal diet most of these compounds are present simultaneously and, thus; they can act by different mechanisms but can rise to a common final action. Design of new food product or food supplements should take these potential synergies into consideration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Carcinogenic metal compounds: recent insight into molecular and cellular mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyersmann, Detmar [University of Bremen (Germany). Biochemistry, Department of Biology and Chemistry; Hartwig, Andrea [Technical University of Berlin (Germany). Institute of Food Technology and Food Chemistry

    2008-08-15

    Mechanisms of carcinogenicity are discussed for metals and their compounds, classified as carcinogenic to humans or considered to be carcinogenic to humans: arsenic, antimony, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, nickel and vanadium. Physicochemical properties govern uptake, intracellular distribution and binding of metal compounds. Interactions with proteins (e.g., with zinc finger structures) appear to be more relevant for metal carcinogenicity than binding to DNA. In general, metal genotoxicity is caused by indirect mechanisms. In spite of diverse physicochemical properties of metal compounds, three predominant mechanisms emerge: (1) interference with cellular redox regulation and induction of oxidative stress, which may cause oxidative DNA damage or trigger signaling cascades leading to stimulation of cell growth; (2) inhibition of major DNA repair systems resulting in genomic instability and accumulation of critical mutations; (3) deregulation of cell proliferation by induction of signaling pathways or inactivation of growth controls such as tumor suppressor genes. In addition, specific metal compounds exhibit unique mechanisms such as interruption of cell-cell adhesion by cadmium, direct DNA binding of trivalent chromium, and interaction of vanadate with phosphate binding sites of protein phosphatases. (orig.)

  11. Carcinogenic metal compounds: recent insight into molecular and cellular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyersmann, Detmar; Hartwig, Andrea

    2008-08-01

    Mechanisms of carcinogenicity are discussed for metals and their compounds, classified as carcinogenic to humans or considered to be carcinogenic to humans: arsenic, antimony, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, nickel and vanadium. Physicochemical properties govern uptake, intracellular distribution and binding of metal compounds. Interactions with proteins (e.g., with zinc finger structures) appear to be more relevant for metal carcinogenicity than binding to DNA. In general, metal genotoxicity is caused by indirect mechanisms. In spite of diverse physicochemical properties of metal compounds, three predominant mechanisms emerge: (1) interference with cellular redox regulation and induction of oxidative stress, which may cause oxidative DNA damage or trigger signaling cascades leading to stimulation of cell growth; (2) inhibition of major DNA repair systems resulting in genomic instability and accumulation of critical mutations; (3) deregulation of cell proliferation by induction of signaling pathways or inactivation of growth controls such as tumor suppressor genes. In addition, specific metal compounds exhibit unique mechanisms such as interruption of cell-cell adhesion by cadmium, direct DNA binding of trivalent chromium, and interaction of vanadate with phosphate binding sites of protein phosphatases.

  12. QSPR models based on molecular mechanics and quantum chemical calculations. 1. Construction of Boltzmann averaged descriptors for alkanes, alcohols, diols, ethers and cyclic compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyekjær, Jane Dannow; Rasmussen, Kjeld; Jonsdottir, Svava Osk

    2002-01-01

    -averaged by selection of the most relevant conformers out of a set of possible molecular conformers generated by a systematic scheme presented in this paper. Six of these descriptors are calculated with molecular mechanics and three with quantum chemical methods. Especially interesting descriptors are the relative van...

  13. Cyclobutane Thymine Photodimerization Mechanism Revealed by Nonadiabatic Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauer, Clemens; Nogueira, Juan J; Marquetand, Philipp; González, Leticia

    2016-12-14

    The formation of cyclobutane thymine dimers is one of the most important DNA carcinogenic photolesions induced by ultraviolet irradiation. The long debated question whether thymine dimerization after direct light excitation involves singlet or triplet states is investigated here for the first time using nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the precursor of this [2 + 2] cycloaddition reaction is the singlet doubly π(2)π*(2) excited state, which is spectroscopically rather dark. Excitation to the bright (1)ππ* or dark (1)nπ* excited states does not lead to thymine dimer formation. In all cases, intersystem crossing to the triplet states is not observed during the simulated time, indicating that ultrafast dimerization occurs in the singlet manifold. The dynamics simulations also show that dimerization takes place only when conformational control happens in the doubly excited state.

  14. Molecular mechanisms of liver injury: apoptosis or necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kewei

    2014-10-01

    Hepatic apoptosis is thought of as a prevalent mechanism in most forms of liver injury. However, the role of hepatic apoptosis is often intermixed with the cellular necrosis. It remains unknown how apoptosis is relevant to the progression of the liver injury. This review summarizes the characteristics of both hepatic apoptosis and necrosis in pathogenesis of liver diseases. Apoptosis and necrosis represent alternative outcomes of different etiology during liver injury. Apoptosis is a main mode of cell death in chronic viral hepatitis, but is intermingled with necrosis in cholestatic livers. Necrosis is the principal type of liver cell killing in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. Anti-apoptosis as a strategy is beneficial to liver repair response. Therapeutic options of liver disease depend on the understanding toward pathogenic mechanisms of different etiology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Temperature Compensation of the Circadian Clock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Virshup

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available An approximately 24-h biological timekeeping mechanism called the circadian clock is present in virtually all light-sensitive organisms from cyanobacteria to humans. The clock system regulates our sleep–wake cycle, feeding–fasting, hormonal secretion, body temperature, and many other physiological functions. Signals from the master circadian oscillator entrain peripheral clocks using a variety of neural and hormonal signals. Even centrally controlled internal temperature fluctuations can entrain the peripheral circadian clocks. But, unlike other chemical reactions, the output of the clock system remains nearly constant with fluctuations in ambient temperature, a phenomenon known as temperature compensation. In this brief review, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of the posttranslational modifications, especially a phosphoswitch mechanism controlling the stability of PER2 and its implications for the regulation of temperature compensation.

  16. [Melatonin as a molecular marker of age-related pathologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuev, V A; Trifonov, N I; Linkova, N S; Kvetnaia, T V

    2017-01-01

    The review has described melatonin as a prognostic marker of invasive and non-invasive diagnostic of organism aging time and age-related pathology. Decreasing of melatonin level in buccal cells has correlated with patient age. Melatonin level in patients with Alzheimer disease has decreased. Melatonin level in blood plasma has correlated with severity of menopausal syndrome. Melatonin secretion in enterocytes increased during gastric ulcer. In oncology patients was described changes of 6-COMT - metabolite of melatonin in urine in dependent of histology type and stage of disease. Thus, melatonin is the molecular marker, which characterized integral processes in neuro-immuno-endocrine system and can be verified by non-invasive methods in peripheral tissues and biological fluids of organism.

  17. Molecular Mechanisms of Antipsychotic Drug-Induced Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiezhong Chen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Antipsychotic drugs (APDs are widely prescribed to control various mental disorders. As mental disorders are chronic diseases, these drugs are often used over a life-time. However, APDs can cause serious glucometabolic side-effects including type 2 diabetes and hyperglycaemic emergency, leading to medication non-compliance. At present, there is no effective approach to overcome these side-effects. Understanding the mechanisms for APD-induced diabetes should be helpful in prevention and treatment of these side-effects of APDs and thus improve the clinical outcomes of APDs. In this review, the potential mechanisms for APD-induced diabetes are summarized so that novel approaches can be considered to relieve APD-induced diabetes. APD-induced diabetes could be mediated by multiple mechanisms: (1 APDs can inhibit the insulin signaling pathway in the target cells such as muscle cells, hepatocytes and adipocytes to cause insulin resistance; (2 APD-induced obesity can result in high levels of free fatty acids (FFA and inflammation, which can also cause insulin resistance. (3 APDs can cause direct damage to β-cells, leading to dysfunction and apoptosis of β-cells. A recent theory considers that both β-cell damage and insulin resistance are necessary factors for the development of diabetes. In high-fat diet-induced diabetes, the compensatory ability of β-cells is gradually damaged, while APDs cause direct β-cell damage, accounting for the severe form of APD-induced diabetes. Based on these mechanisms, effective prevention of APD-induced diabetes may need an integrated approach to combat various effects of APDs on multiple pathways.

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of Metastasis Suppression in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Church of Harrisburg 1999 Development Team - Finance, Church Plant - Harrisburg Area Evangelical Free Church 1997 Environmental Health Advisory...Washington, DC 1988 Screening Systems for Anti-invasive and Anti-metastatic Drugs. Bioassay -directed Discovery of Anti-tumor and Anti-viral Agents...the cell lines did not maintain transgene expression levels following in vivo growth. The mechanism of action of Kail is not completely understood

  19. Effect of cyclic strain on the mechanical behavior of virgin ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanzini, A

    2011-10-01

    Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a polymeric material employed in critical biomedical applications. Knowledge of its mechanical behavior is essential in order to obtain accurate prediction of stresses and deformations in real components, in particular when cyclic loading is considered. In the present research the effects of alternating and pulsating cyclic strain on the mechanical response of UHMWPE were studied by means of an experimental procedure based on tests carried out in strain control at different mean cyclic strain levels. During the tests the temperature increase due to hysteretic heating was controlled by means of a compressed air cooling apparatus specifically devised. By taking advantage of the possibility to control and stabilize temperature, cyclic steady-state mechanical response was investigated at room temperature and at 37 and 50 °C, comparing the effects of alternating and pulsating loading cycles. A transient thermal analysis using the finite element method (FEM) was also carried out to analyze temperature distribution within the specimen. UHMWPE exhibited cyclic softening as a result of a thermal contribution due to temperature increase and of a mechanical contribution related to the effects of applied load on the microstructure. The material exhibited different peak stress percent reductions for pulsating and alternating loading and during tensile and compressive loading phases. For pulsating tests significant cyclic mean stress relaxation was also observed. Based on the experimental procedure described the cyclic curve was determined as a function of temperature and fitted with a Ramberg-Osgood type constitutive equation, in which material parameters are temperature dependent. In this way the combined effects of temperature rises, such as those that might occur in biological environments or due to frictional heating, and mechanical loads could effectively be taken into account for constitutive modeling purposes of

  20. From molecular signatures to predictive biomarkers: Modeling disease pathophysiology and drug mechanism of action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eHeinzel

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Omics profiling significantly expanded the molecular landscape describing clinical phenotypes. Association analysis resulted in first diagnostic and prognostic biomarker signatures entering clinical utility. However, utilizing Omics for deepening our understanding of disease pathophysiology, and further including specific interference with drug mechanism of action on a molecular process level still sees limited added value in the clinical setting.We exemplify a computational workflow for expanding from statistics-based association analysis towards deriving molecular pathway and process models for characterizing phenotypes and drug mechanism of action. Interference analysis on the molecular model level allows identification of predictive biomarker candidates for testing drug response. We discuss this strategy on diabetic nephropathy, a complex clinical phenotype triggered by diabetes and presenting with renal as well as cardiovascular endpoints. A molecular pathway map indicates involvement of multiple molecular mechanisms, and selected biomarker candidates reported as associated with disease progression are identified for specific molecular processes. Selective interference of drug mechanism of action and disease-associated processes is identified for drug classes in clinical use, in turn providing precision medicine hypotheses utilizing predictive biomarkers.

  1. Report of National Cancer Institute symposium: comparison of mechanisms of carcinogenesis by radiation and chemical agents. I. Common molecular mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    Some aspects of molecular mechanisms common to radiation and chemical carcinogenesis are discussed, particularly the DNA damage done by these agents. Emphasis is placed on epidemiological considerations and on dose-response models used in risk assessment to extrapolate from experimental data obtained at high doses to the effects from long-term, low-level exposures. 3 references, 6 figures. (ACR)

  2. Insights of asphaltene aggregation mechanism from molecular dynamics simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer De León

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió el proceso de agregación de asfaltenos utilizando té cnicas de dinámica molecular. Se utilizaron cuatro estructuras diferentes. Las primeras tres moléculas tienen una estructura continental, con núcleos aromáticos condensador, mientras que la cuarta pose e una estructura tipo archipiélago, con pequeños grupos de anillos ar omáticos conectados con cadenas saturadas. Las moléculas fueron construidas de manera atomística, en la cual cada átomo se desc ribe individualmente. Se calcula ron las fuerzas de interacción a 300 K y 200 atm; las fuerzas de Van der W aals y las interacciones elect rostáticas fueron evaluadas separadamente. Se calculó el paráme tro de solubilidad para las cuatro molécu las. Se encontró que las inte racciones de Van der Waals asoc iadas a los anillos aromáticos y las fuerzas electrostáticas ocasionadas princ ipalmente por la presencia de heteroátomos como oxígeno, azufr e y nitrógeno, son igualmente r elevantes en la agregación de moléculas de asfalteno. Para todas las molé culas se encontró que los sistemas de asfaltenos tienen menor e nergía en estado de agregación que en estado monomérico. Para las estruct uras continentales, la presencia de largas cadenas obstruye el proceso de formación de agregados. Para las estructuras tipo archipiélago, la flexibilidad de las moléculas facilita la agregación con ot ras estructuras. La presencia de heteroátomos ocasiona una fuerza repulsiva que dificulta la agregación. El volumen molecular y la energía de c ohesión también son sensibles a la confi guración geométrica y la compos ición de las especies, lo cual afecta el parámetro de solubilidad.

  3. Exploring the molecular mechanism of acute heat stress exposure in broiler chickens using gene expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Q B; Song, X Y; Ji, C L; Zhang, X Q; Zhang, D X

    2014-08-10

    The process of heat regulation is complex and its exact molecular mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, to investigate the global gene regulation response to acute heat exposure, gene microarrays were exploited to analyze the effects of heat stress on three tissues (brain, liver, leg muscle) of the yellow broiler chicken (Gallus gallus). We detected 166 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the brain, 219 in the leg muscle and 317 in the liver. Six of these genes were differentially expressed in all three tissues and were validated by qRT-PCR, and included heat shock protein genes (HSPH1, HSP25), apoptosis-related genes (RB1CC1, BAG3), a cell proliferation and differentiation-related gene (ID1) and the hunger and energy metabolism related gene (PDK). All these genes might be important factors in chickens suffering from heat stress. We constructed gene co-expression networks using the DEGs of the brain, leg muscle and liver and two, four and two gene co-expression modules were identified in these tissues, respectively. Functional enrichment of these gene modules revealed that various functional clusters were related to the effects of heat stress, including those for cytoskeleton, extracellular space, ion binding and energy metabolism. We concluded that these genes and functional clusters might be important factors in chickens under acute heat stress. Further in-depth research on the newly discovered heat-related genes and functional clusters is required to fully understand their molecular functions in thermoregulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Unraveling the mechanism of a reversible photoactivated molecular proton crane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Loop, Tibert H; Ruesink, Freek; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Sanders, Hans J; Buma, Wybren J; Woutersen, S

    2014-11-13

    We study the structural dynamics of the photoactivated molecular proton crane 7-hydroxy-8-(morpholinomethyl)quinoline using femtosecond UV-pump IR-probe spectroscopy. Upon electronic excitation, a proton is transferred from the hydroxy to the amine group located on the rotatable morpholino side group. This morpholino group subsequently delivers the proton to the aromatic quinoline nitrogen by rotation around the C-C bond. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy allows us to study this process in unprecedented detail. We find that the transport of the proton involves multiple time scales. Upon photoexcitation, the OH proton is transferred within <300 fs to the morpholino side group. After this, the intramolecular hydrogen bond that locks the crane arm breaks with a time constant of 36 ± 1 ps. Subsequently, the protonated crane arm rotates with a time constant of 334 ± 12 ps to deliver the proton at the quinoline moiety. After the proton crane has returned to its electronic ground state with a time constant 700 ± 22 ps, the proton is transferred back from the quinoline nitrogen to the negatively charged O atom. The time constant of the back rotation is 39.8 ± 0.2 ns, about 200 times slower than the forward proton transfer.

  5. A molecular mechanism for eflornithine resistance in African trypanosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel M Vincent

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Human African trypanosomiasis, endemic to sub-Saharan Africa, is invariably fatal if untreated. Its causative agent is the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Eflornithine is used as a first line treatment for human African trypanosomiasis, but there is a risk that resistance could thwart its use, even when used in combination therapy with nifurtimox. Eflornithine resistant trypanosomes were selected in vitro and subjected to biochemical and genetic analysis. The resistance phenotype was verified in vivo. Here we report the molecular basis of resistance. While the drug's target, ornithine decarboxylase, was unaltered in resistant cells and changes to levels of metabolites in the targeted polyamine pathway were not apparent, the accumulation of eflornithine was shown to be diminished in resistant lines. An amino acid transporter gene, TbAAT6 (Tb927.8.5450, was found to be deleted in two lines independently selected for resistance. Ablating expression of this gene in wildtype cells using RNA interference led to acquisition of resistance while expression of an ectopic copy of the gene introduced into the resistant deletion lines restored sensitivity, confirming the role of TbAAT6 in eflornithine action. Eflornithine resistance is easy to select through loss of a putative amino acid transporter, TbAAT6. The loss of this transporter will be easily identified in the field using a simple PCR test, enabling more appropriate chemotherapy to be administered.

  6. [Molecular mechanisms of genetic damages of the myocardium in cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasanov, A G; Bershova, T V; Basargina, E N; Bakanov, M I

    2010-01-01

    The review highlighted problems of reorganization of myocardical contractile and cytoskeletal proteins in cardiomyopathy (CM). The role of the genetic factors coding contractile proteins, proteins of thin and thick filaments, and also extracellular matrix proteins in processes of formation and development of hypertrophic (HCM) and dilated (DCM) cardiomyopathy are analyzed. The mechanisms responsible for the changes in cardiac proteins on regulation involved into force generation, its transfer, recycling ATP, impairments in transmembranal signals, that finally lead to cardiac cell dysfunction determining various manifestations of CM are considered.

  7. [Advanced findings on the molecular mechanisms for behavioral sensitization to psychostimulants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujike, H

    2001-01-01

    Repeated administration of psychostimulants like methamphetamine and cocaine induce behavioral sensitization, which is recognized as an animal model for dependence and psychoses. Many previous studies have proved two major cascades play a crucial roles for molecular mechanisms underling sensitization. The first one is activation of D1 dopamine receptors by robust increase of dopamine release, followed by activation of adenylyl cyclase, increase of cyclic AMP, activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and phosphorylation of proteins by PKA. The second one is activation of NMDA receptor by enhanced release of glutamine, followed by increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration, formation of Ca2+/calmodulin complex, and phosphorylation of several proteins such as calcineurin, CaM-K II and nitric oxide synthase. Recent advanced findings on sensitization mechanisms were reviewed from three different aspects: 1) Studies using knockout mice offered quite amazing findings that D1DA-receptor-lacking mice or dopamine-transporter-lacking mice can develop sensitization and dependence, which were not consistent with the previously established hypotheses based on behavioral pharmacology. In addition, those data showed the important roles of vesicular monoamine transporter 2, 5HT1B receptors and delta FosB. 2) Research on neural-plasticity-related sensitization revealed the involvement of several molecules such as tissue plasminogen activator, arc (activity-regulated, cytoskeleton-associated), synaptophysin and stathmin. Increased expression of these genes may participate in the rearrangement of neural networks with synaptogenesis and expansion of dendrites 3) Trials to discover novel-genes-involved sensitization phenomenon using differential display or subtraction cloning found some candidate genes, mrt-1, NAC-1 and CART. Although in these areas are still in progress, accumulating findings will elucidate the details of the molecular mechanism of behavioral sensitization and dependence.

  8. Signature gene expression reveals novel clues to the molecular mechanisms of dimorphic transition in Penicillium marneffei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ence Yang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Systemic dimorphic fungi cause more than one million new infections each year, ranking them among the significant public health challenges currently encountered. Penicillium marneffei is a systemic dimorphic fungus endemic to Southeast Asia. The temperature-dependent dimorphic phase transition between mycelium and yeast is considered crucial for the pathogenicity and transmission of P. marneffei, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we re-sequenced P. marneffei strain PM1 using multiple sequencing platforms and assembled the genome using hybrid genome assembly. We determined gene expression levels using RNA sequencing at the mycelial and yeast phases of P. marneffei, as well as during phase transition. We classified 2,718 genes with variable expression across conditions into 14 distinct groups, each marked by a signature expression pattern implicated at a certain stage in the dimorphic life cycle. Genes with the same expression patterns tend to be clustered together on the genome, suggesting orchestrated regulations of the transcriptional activities of neighboring genes. Using qRT-PCR, we validated expression levels of all genes in one of clusters highly expressed during the yeast-to-mycelium transition. These included madsA, a gene encoding MADS-box transcription factor whose gene family is exclusively expanded in P. marneffei. Over-expression of madsA drove P. marneffei to undergo mycelial growth at 37°C, a condition that restricts the wild-type in the yeast phase. Furthermore, analyses of signature expression patterns suggested diverse roles of secreted proteins at different developmental stages and the potential importance of non-coding RNAs in mycelium-to-yeast transition. We also showed that RNA structural transition in response to temperature changes may be related to the control of thermal dimorphism. Together, our findings have revealed multiple molecular mechanisms that may underlie the dimorphic transition

  9. Molecular mechanisms of the genetic risk factors in pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanatsu, Kunihiko; Tomita, Taisuke

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the extensive deposition of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Until recently, only the APOE gene had been known as a genetic risk factor for late-onset AD (LOAD), which accounts for more than 95% of all AD cases. However, in addition to this well-established genetic risk factor, genome-wide association studies have identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms as genetic risk factors of LOAD, such as PICALM and BIN1 . In addition, whole genome sequencing and exome sequencing have identified rare variants associated with LOAD, including TREM2 . We review the recent findings related to the molecular mechanisms by which these genetic risk factors contribute to AD, and our perspectives regarding the etiology of AD for the development of therapeutic agents.

  10. PIDOTIMOD, a new immunostimulating dipeptide, studied by molecular mechanics, normal mode analysis and dynamics calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Vincenzo; Pucciariello, Rachele; Crimella, Tiziano; Stradi, Riccardo

    1993-10-01

    A theoretical study of PIDOTIMOD, a new immunostimulating dipeptide, using a combination of molecular mechanics, normal mode analysis and dynamics methods, has been carried out. The results have been compared with the experimental ones obtained using NMR spectroscopy. Conformational calculations and NMR spectra identify two classes of conformers, trans and cis, around the peptide bond between the rings, with relative conformational populations of 0.55 and 0.45, respectively. The best agreement is obtained using a dielectric constant ɛ = 7 in the calculations. The conformational features show that the path connecting the trans and the cis forms may involve the rotation of the bridged peptide bond alone. From a dynamic point of view the conformers appear rather rigid, and only the oxo-prolyl ring and the carboxyl group show significant rigid body-like motions. Interesting correlations occur in the fluctuations of the torsion angles.

  11. Physiological and molecular mechanisms associated with cross tolerance between hypoxia and low temperature in Thaumatotibia leucotreta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boardman, Leigh; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Terblanche, John S

    2015-01-01

    hardening and cross tolerance responses. Given that combined exposure to hypoxia and low temperature is used to sterilize commodities in post-harvest pest management programs, researchers can now exploit these mechanisms involved in cross tolerance to develop more targeted control methods....... identified to date. Using larvae of false codling moth Thaumatotibia leucotreta, a pest of southern Africa, we investigated the physiological and molecular responses to hypoxia or temperature stress pre-treatments, followed by a standard low temperature exposure. Survival rates were significantly influenced...... by pretreatment conditions, although T. leucotreta shows relatively high basal resistance to various stressors (4% variation in larval survival across all pre-treatments). Results showed that mild pre-treatments with chilling and hypoxia increased resistance to low temperatures and that these responses were...

  12. An Overview of Carcinogenic Heavy Metal: Molecular Toxicity Mechanism and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Yeo Jin; Seo, Young Rok

    2015-12-01

    Almost all heavy metals are serious toxicants as carcinogens. However, due to their chemical and physiological properties, heavy metals are useful in industrial areas including alloy, smelting and production of commercial products. Such applications increase the opportunity for heavy metal exposure. Waste from industrial processes is also a major source of environmental contamination and accumulation in the human body. Arsenic, cadmium, chromium, and nickel are classified as group 1 carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, and are utilized commercially. In this review, we used molecular pathway analysis to understand the toxicity and carcinogenic mechanisms of these metals. Our analyzed data showed that above-mentioned metallic substances induce oxidative stress, DNA damage, and cell death processes, resulting in increase the risk of cancer and cancer-related diseases. Thus, we might think phytochelatin molecules and antioxidative phytochemical substances are helpful for prevention of heavy metal-induced cancer.

  13. Molecular mechanisms for chemoprevention of colorectal cancer by natural dietary compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Min-Hsiung; Lai, Ching-Shu; Wu, Jia-Ching; Ho, Chi-Tang

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the major causes of cancer-related mortality in both men and women worldwide. This review focuses on preventing the initiation and promotion of neoplastic growth in colorectal cancer, particularly with natural dietary compounds. Chemoprevention is defined as the use of natural dietary compounds and/or synthetic substances that can delay, prevent, or even reverse the development of adenomas, as well as the progression from adenoma to carcinoma. The molecular mechanisms of their chemopreventive action are associated with the modulation of signaling cascades, gene expressions involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis and the suppression of chronic inflammation, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Here, we summarize the currently known targets and signaling pathways whereby natural dietary compounds interfere with the development of colorectal cancer, and thus providing evidence for these substances in colonic cancer chemopreventive action. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Cardiac Molecular-Acclimation Mechanisms in Response to Swimming-Induced Exercise in Atlantic Salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Vicente; Grisdale-Helland, Barbara; Helland, Ståle J.; Torgersen, Jacob; Kristensen, Torstein; Claireaux, Guy; Farrell, Anthony P.; Takle, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac muscle is a principal target organ for exercise-induced acclimation mechanisms in fish and mammals, given that sustained aerobic exercise training improves cardiac output. Yet, the molecular mechanisms underlying such cardiac acclimation have been scarcely investigated in teleosts. Consequently, we studied mechanisms related to cardiac growth, contractility, vascularization, energy metabolism and myokine production in Atlantic salmon pre-smolts resulting from 10 weeks exercise-training at three different swimming intensities: 0.32 (control), 0.65 (medium intensity) and 1.31 (high intensity) body lengths s−1. Cardiac responses were characterized using growth, immunofluorescence and qPCR analysis of a large number of target genes encoding proteins with significant and well-characterized function. The overall stimulatory effect of exercise on cardiac muscle was dependent on training intensity, with changes elicited by high intensity training being of greater magnitude than either medium intensity or control. Higher protein levels of PCNA were indicative of cardiac growth being driven by cardiomyocyte hyperplasia, while elevated cardiac mRNA levels of MEF2C, GATA4 and ACTA1 suggested cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. In addition, up-regulation of EC coupling-related genes suggested that exercised hearts may have improved contractile function, while higher mRNA levels of EPO and VEGF were suggestive of a more efficient oxygen supply network. Furthermore, higher mRNA levels of PPARα, PGC1α and CPT1 all suggested a higher capacity for lipid oxidation, which along with a significant enlargement of mitochondrial size in cardiac myocytes of the compact layer of fish exercised at high intensity, suggested an enhanced energetic support system. Training also elevated transcription of a set of myokines and other gene products related to the inflammatory process, such as TNFα, NFκB, COX2, IL1RA and TNF decoy receptor. This study provides the first characterization of the

  15. Cardiac molecular-acclimation mechanisms in response to swimming-induced exercise in Atlantic salmon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Castro

    Full Text Available Cardiac muscle is a principal target organ for exercise-induced acclimation mechanisms in fish and mammals, given that sustained aerobic exercise training improves cardiac output. Yet, the molecular mechanisms underlying such cardiac acclimation have been scarcely investigated in teleosts. Consequently, we studied mechanisms related to cardiac growth, contractility, vascularization, energy metabolism and myokine production in Atlantic salmon pre-smolts resulting from 10 weeks exercise-training at three different swimming intensities: 0.32 (control, 0.65 (medium intensity and 1.31 (high intensity body lengths s(-1. Cardiac responses were characterized using growth, immunofluorescence and qPCR analysis of a large number of target genes encoding proteins with significant and well-characterized function. The overall stimulatory effect of exercise on cardiac muscle was dependent on training intensity, with changes elicited by high intensity training being of greater magnitude than either medium intensity or control. Higher protein levels of PCNA were indicative of cardiac growth being driven by cardiomyocyte hyperplasia, while elevated cardiac mRNA levels of MEF2C, GATA4 and ACTA1 suggested cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. In addition, up-regulation of EC coupling-related genes suggested that exercised hearts may have improved contractile function, while higher mRNA levels of EPO and VEGF were suggestive of a more efficient oxygen supply network. Furthermore, higher mRNA levels of PPARα, PGC1α and CPT1 all suggested a higher capacity for lipid oxidation, which along with a significant enlargement of mitochondrial size in cardiac myocytes of the compact layer of fish exercised at high intensity, suggested an enhanced energetic support system. Training also elevated transcription of a set of myokines and other gene products related to the inflammatory process, such as TNFα, NFκB, COX2, IL1RA and TNF decoy receptor. This study provides the first

  16. Molecular Mechanisms That Contribute to Bone Marrow Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason J. Ivanusic

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pain associated a bony pathology puts a significant burden on individuals, society, and the health-care systems worldwide. Pathology that involves the bone marrow activates sensory nerve terminal endings of peripheral bone marrow nociceptors, and is the likely trigger for pain. This review presents our current understanding of how bone marrow nociceptors are influenced by noxious stimuli presented in pathology associated with bone marrow. A number of ion channels and receptors are emerging as important modulators of the activity of peripheral bone marrow nociceptors. Nerve growth factor (NGF sequestration has been trialed for the management of inflammatory bone pain (osteoarthritis, and there is significant evidence for interaction of NGF with bone marrow nociceptors. Activation of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 sensitizes bone marrow nociceptors and could contribute to increased sensitivity of patients to noxious stimuli in various bony pathologies. Acid-sensing ion channels sense changes to tissue pH in the bone marrow microenvironment and could be targeted to treat pathology that involves acidosis of the bone marrow. Piezo2 is a mechanically gated ion channel that has recently been reported to be expressed by most myelinated bone marrow nociceptors and might be a target for treatments directed against mechanically induced bone pain. These ion channels and receptors could be useful targets for the development of peripherally acting drugs to treat pain of bony origin.

  17. A current review of molecular mechanisms regarding osteoarthritis and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andrew S; Ellman, Michael B; Yan, Dongyao; Kroin, Jeffrey S; Cole, Brian J; van Wijnen, Andre J; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2013-09-25

    Osteoarthritis afflicts millions of individuals across the world resulting in impaired quality of life and increased health costs. To understand this disease, physicians have been studying risk factors, such as genetic predisposition, aging, obesity, and joint malalignment; however have been unable to conclusively determine the direct etiology. Current treatment options are short-term or ineffective and fail to address pathophysiological and biochemical mechanisms involved with cartilage degeneration and the induction of pain in arthritic joints. OA pain involves a complex integration of sensory, affective, and cognitive processes that integrate a variety of abnormal cellular mechanisms at both peripheral and central (spinal and supraspinal) levels of the nervous system Through studies examined by investigators, the role of growth factors and cytokines has increasingly become more relevant in examining their effects on articular cartilage homeostasis and the development of osteoarthritis and osteoarthritis-associated pain. Catabolic factors involved in both cartilage degradation in vitro and nociceptive stimulation include IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α, PGE2, FGF-2 and PKCδ, and pharmacologic inhibitors to these mediators, as well as compounds such as RSV and LfcinB, may potentially be used as biological treatments in the future. This review explores several biochemical mediators involved in OA and pain, and provides a framework for the understanding of potential biologic therapies in the treatment of degenerative joint disease in the future. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular mechanisms of Chlamydia trachomatis resistance to antimicrobial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestrovic, Tomislav; Ljubin-Sternak, Suncanica

    2018-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis (C. trachomatis) is a leading cause of bacterial sexually transmitted infections in developed and undeveloped countries, and therefore a global public health issue. In an era of increasing bacterial resistance to antibiotics, resistance has been an exceedingly rare phenomenon in C. trachomatis; however, clinical treatment failures attributed to multidrug-resistant C. trachomatis strains have been described on several occasions. Cell culture systems using McCoy cells and subsequent immunofluorescent staining are still the most common methodology used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, but the presence of resistance markers should be appraised by further genetic analysis. Azithromycin resistance of C. trachomatis is often a result of the mutations in the peptidyl transferase region of 23S rRNA genes, tetracycline resistance is usually linked to the presence of foreign genomic islands integrated in chlamydial chromosome, whereas a predominant mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance is a point mutation in the gyrA quinolone-resistance-determining region. A nucleotide substitution in rpoB gene is responsible for rifampin resistance, and different mechanisms have been involved in the development of resistance to aminoglycosides, lincomycin and sulphonamide/trimethoprim combinations.

  19. Genetic and Molecular Mechanisms of Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Maize Inflorescence Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Manfei; Zhong, Wanshun; Yang, Fang; Zhang, Zuxin

    2018-02-06

    The establishment of inflorescence architecture is critical for the reproduction of flowering plant species. The maize plant generates two types of inflorescences, the tassel and the ear, and their architectures have a large effect on grain yield and yield-related traits that are genetically controlled by quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Since ear and tassel architecture are deeply affected by the activity of inflorescence meristems, key QTLs and genes regulating meristematic activity have important impacts on inflorescence development and show great potential for optimizing grain yield. Isolation of yield trait-related QTLs is challenging but these QTLs have direct application in maize breeding. Additionally, characterization and functional dissection of QTLs can provide genetic and molecular knowledge of quantitative variation in inflorescence architecture. In this review, we summarize currently identified QTLs responsible for the establishment of ear and tassel architecture and discuss the potential genetic control of four ear-related and four tassel-related traits. In recent years, several inflorescence architecture-related QTLs have been characterized at the gene level. We review the mechanisms of these characterized QTLs. © The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Exploiting large-pore metal-organic frameworks for separations through entropic molecular mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres-Knoop, A.; Dubbeldam, D.

    2015-01-01

    We review the molecular mechanisms behind adsorption and the separations of mixtures in metal-organic frameworks and zeolites. Separation mechanisms can be based on differences in the affinity of the adsorbate with the framework and on entropic effects. To develop next-generation adsorbents, the

  1. Molecular mechanism of 7TM receptor activation--a global toggle switch model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, Thue W; Frimurer, Thomas M; Holst, Birgitte

    2006-01-01

    The multitude of chemically highly different agonists for 7TM receptors apparently do not share a common binding mode or active site but nevertheless act through induction of a common molecular activation mechanism. A global toggle switch model is proposed for this activation mechanism to reconcile...

  2. Radiative and mechanical feedback into the molecular gas of NGC 253

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenberg, M. J. F.; Kazandjian, M. V.; van der Werf, P. P.; Israel, F. P.; Meijerink, R.; Weiß, A.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Güsten, R.

    Starburst galaxies are galaxies or regions of galaxies undergoing intense periods of star formation. Understanding the heating and cooling mechanisms in these galaxies can give us insight to the driving mechanisms that fuel the starburst. Molecular emission lines play a crucial role in the cooling

  3. Molecular mechanisms of thyroid tumorigenesis; Molekulare Mechanismen der Schilddruesentumorgenese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, K.; Fuehrer, D. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig (Germany). Abt. fuer Endokrinolgoie, Diabetologie und Nephrologie

    2008-09-15

    Thyroid nodules are the most frequent endocrine disorder and occur in approximately 30% of the German population. Thyroid nodular disease constitutes a very heterogeneous entity. A striking diversity of possible functional and morphological features of a thyroid tumour derived from the same thyroid ancestor cell, is a hallmark of thyroid tumorigenesis and is due to specific genetic alterations. Defects in known candidate genes can be found in up to 70% of differentiated thyroid carcinomas and determine the respective cancer phenotype. Papillary thyroid cancers (PTC) harbour BRAF (or much less frequently RAS) mutations in sporadically occurring tumours, while radiation-induced PTC display chromosomal rearrangements such as RET, TRK, APR9 / BRAF. These genetic events results in constitutive MAPKinase activation. Follicular thyroid cancers (FTC) harbour RAS mutations or PAX8/ PPAR{gamma} rearrangements, both of which, however have also been identified in follicular adenoma. In addition, recent studies show, that activation of PI3K/AKT signalling occurs with high frequency in follicular thyroid tumours. Undifferentiated (anaplastic) thyroid cancers (ATC) display genetic features of FTC or PTC, in addition to aberant activation of multiple tyrosinkinase pathways (overexpression or mutations in PI3K and MAPK pathways). This underscores the concept of a sequential evolution of ATC from differentiated thyroid cancer, a process widely conceived to be triggered by p53 inactivation. In contrast, the molecular pathogenesis of benign thyroid tumours, in particular cold thyroid nodules is less known, except for toxic thyroid nodules, which arise from constitutive activation of cAMP signalling, predominantly through TSHR mutations. (orig.)

  4. A theoretical study of the molecular mechanism of the GAPDH Trypanosoma cruzi enzyme involving iodoacetate inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Agnaldo Silva; Lameira, Jerônimo; Alves, Cláudio Nahum

    2011-10-01

    The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme (GAPDH) is an important biological target for the development of new chemotherapeutic agents against Chagas disease. In this Letter, the inhibition mechanism of GAPDH involving iodoacetate (IAA) inhibitor was studied using the hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approach and molecular dynamic simulations. Analysis of the potential energy surface and potential of mean force show that the covalent attachment of IAA inhibitor to the active site of the enzyme occurs as a concerted process. In addition, the energy terms decomposition shows that NAD+ plays an important role in stabilization of the reagents and transition state.

  5. A β-Mannanase with a Lysozyme-like Fold and a Novel Molecular Catalytic Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yi; Petricevic, Marija; John, Alan; Raich, Lluís; Jenkins, Huw; Portela De Souza, Leticia; Cuskin, Fiona; Gilbert, Harry J; Rovira, Carme; Goddard-Borger, Ethan D; Williams, Spencer J; Davies, Gideon J

    2016-12-28

    The enzymatic cleavage of β-1,4-mannans is achieved by endo-β-1,4-mannanases, enzymes involved in germination of seeds and microbial hemicellulose degradation, and which have increasing industrial and consumer product applications. β-Mannanases occur in a range of families of the CAZy sequence-based glycoside hydrolase (GH) classification scheme including families 5, 26, and 113. In this work we reveal that β-mannanases of the newly described GH family 134 differ from other mannanase families in both their mechanism and tertiary structure. A representative GH family 134 endo-β-1,4-mannanase from a Streptomyces sp. displays a fold closely related to that of hen egg white lysozyme but acts with inversion of stereochemistry. A Michaelis complex with mannopentaose, and a product complex with mannotriose, reveal ligands with pyranose rings distorted in an unusual inverted chair conformation. Ab initio quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics metadynamics quantified the energetically accessible ring conformations and provided evidence in support of a 1C4 → 3H4‡ → 3S1 conformational itinerary along the reaction coordinate. This work, in concert with that on GH family 124 cellulases, reveals how the lysozyme fold can be co-opted to catalyze the hydrolysis of different polysaccharides in a mechanistically distinct manner.

  6. Luteolin: A Flavonoid that Has Multiple Cardio-Protective Effects and Its Molecular Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuanyuan; Shang, Pingping; Li, Dongye

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) has become the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. A well-monitored diet with a sufficient intake of fruits and vegetables has been confirmed as a primary prevention of CVD. Plant constituents such as flavonoids have been shown to confer healthy benefits. Luteolin (Lut), a kind of flavonoid, possesses anti-oxidative, anti-tumor, and anti-inflammatory properties. Recent scientific literature has reported the cardiac protective effects of Lut in vitro and in vivo . Therefore, the aim of this review is to provide an update and detailed overview with cardio-protective molecular mechanisms of Lut with a focus on multiple intrinsic and extrinsic effectors. We further explore how these mechanisms participate in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, heart failure (HF) and atherosclerosis (AS). A proper understanding of the cardiovascular protective effects and the relative mechanisms of Lut may provide the possibility of new drug design and development for CVD. With the previous studies mainly focused on basic research, we need to advance the prospects of its further clinical utilization against CVD, large prospective clinical trials of Lut are needed to observe its therapeutic effects on patients with I/R injury, HF and AS, especially on the effective therapeutic dosage, and safety of long-term administration.

  7. Molecular analysis of an oyster-related norovirus outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenonen, Nancy P; Hannoun, Charles; Olsson, Margareta B; Bergström, Tomas

    2009-06-01

    Contaminated raw oysters were implicated in a severe outbreak of norovirus (NoV) gastroenteritis affecting 30 restaurant guests. To define the outbreak source by using molecular methods to characterize NoV strains detected in patient and oyster samples. Molecular epidemiological studies based on nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of patient and oyster NoV strains, and comparison to background dataset. NoV genotype (G) I.1 was detected in the one patient stool analyzed by in-house TaqMan real time RT-PCR and classical nested RT-PCR targeting NoV RNA-dependent polymerase (RdRp, 285 nt), and by nested RT-PCR targeting RdRp-capsid-poly(A)-3' (3085 nt). Patient strain showed >or=99% similarity (285 nt) with three NoV strains detected in two of five oysters examined by classical nested RT-PCR (RdRp). A third oyster tested positive for NoV GII.3. Phylogenetic analysis showed clustering of patient and oyster strains related to this outbreak with GI.1 strains from previous local outbreaks, and mussel studies. Sequence data revealed >or=99% similarity (285 nt) between NoV GI.1 strains detected in patient stool and suspect oysters, linking the contaminated oysters to the outbreak. Identification of human NoV GI and GII strains in oysters indicated contamination of human fecal origin, presumably from inappropriate storage in the harbor. Comparative long-fragment analysis of the patient strain revealed 99% similarity (3085 nt) with NoV GI.1 strains detected in previous outbreaks and environmental mussel studies from West Sweden, 87% with M87661 (Norwalk68) and 96% with L23828 (SRSV-KY-89/89/J). These results indicated considerable genomic stability of NoV GI.1 strains over time.

  8. Mammalian life histories: their evolution and molecular-genetic mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacher, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    Survival curves for various species of mammals are discussed and a table is presented to show recorded maximum life spans of about 30 species of mammals. The range of longevities is from one year for shrews and moles up to more than 80 years for the fin whale. The constitutional correlates of longevity are discussed with regard to body size, brain weight,metabolic rates, and body temperature. It is concluded that longevity evolved as a positive trait, associated with the evolution of large body size and brain size. Life table data for man, the thorough-bred horse, beagle dogs, and the laboratory rodents, Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus are discussed. The data show a pattern of exponential increase of death rate with age. A laboratory model using Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus for the study of the longevity-assurance mechanisms is described. (HLW)

  9. Molecular mechanism of energy conservation in polysulfide respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jormakka, Mika; Yokoyama, Ken; Yano, Takahiro; Tamakoshi, Masatada; Akimoto, Satoru; Shimamura, Tatsuro; Curmi, Paul; Iwata, So

    2008-07-01

    Bacterial polysulfide reductase (PsrABC) is an integral membrane protein complex responsible for quinone-coupled reduction of polysulfide, a process important in extreme environments such as deep-sea vents and hot springs. We determined the structure of polysulfide reductase from Thermus thermophilus at 2.4-A resolution, revealing how the PsrA subunit recognizes and reduces its unique polyanionic substrate. The integral membrane subunit PsrC was characterized using the natural substrate menaquinone-7 and inhibitors, providing a comprehensive representation of a quinone binding site and revealing the presence of a water-filled cavity connecting the quinone binding site on the periplasmic side to the cytoplasm. These results suggest that polysulfide reductase could be a key energy-conserving enzyme of the T. thermophilus respiratory chain, using polysulfide as the terminal electron acceptor and pumping protons across the membrane via a previously unknown mechanism.

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Disease Pathogenesis Differ in Krabbe Disease Variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spratley, Samantha J; Hill, Chris H; Viuff, Agnete H

    2016-01-01

    Krabbe disease is a severe, fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by defects in the lysosomal enzyme galactocerebrosidase (GALC). The correct targeting of GALC to the lysosome is essential for the degradation of glycosphingolipids including the primary lipid component of myelin. Over 100...... different mutations have been identified in GALC that cause Krabbe disease but the mechanisms by which they cause disease remain unclear. We have generated monoclonal antibodies against full-length human GALC and used these to monitor the trafficking and processing of GALC variants in cell-based assays...... to cause disease due to protein misfolding and should be targeted for pharmacological chaperone therapies. Other GALC variants can be correctly secreted by cells and cause disease due to catalytic defects in the enzyme active site, inappropriate post-translational modification or a potential inability...

  11. Angiogenesis in Dermatology - Insights of Molecular Mechanisms and Latest Developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richarz, N A; Boada, A; Carrascosa, J M

    Angiogenesis is the growth of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels. It is a biological process essential in physiological wound healing or pathological inflammation and tumor growth, which underlies a complex interplay of stimulating and inhibiting signals. Extracellular matrix, cells of innate and adaptive immunity and endothelial cells itself are a major source of angiogenic factors that activate or inhibit specific receptors and consequently influence intracellular signaling pathways. Most inflammatory and neoplastic diseases in dermatology are characterized by excessive angiogenesis, such as psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, as well as melanoma, non-melanoma skin cancer, but also benign vascular neoplasia. In this article we describe current knowledge of angiogenesis and its most relevant mechanisms in different dermatological disorders with particular emphasis on the angiogenic factors (vascular endothelial growth factor) and angiopoietins as a target of current and future directions of anti-angiogenic therapy. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Analyzing the molecular mechanism of lipoprotein localization in Brucella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goolab, Shivani; Roth, Robyn L.; van Heerden, Henriette; Crampton, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins possess diverse structure and functionality, ranging from bacterial physiology to pathogenic processes. As such many lipoproteins, originating from Brucella are exploited as potential vaccines to countermeasure brucellosis infection in the host. These membrane proteins are translocated from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane where they are anchored peripherally by a multifaceted targeting mechanism. Although much research has focused on the identification and classification of Brucella lipoproteins and their potential use as vaccine candidates for the treatment of Brucellosis, the underlying route for the translocation of these lipoproteins to the outer surface of the Brucella (and other pathogens) outer membrane (OM) remains mostly unknown. This is partly due to the complexity of the organism and evasive tactics used to escape the host immune system, the variation in biological structure and activity of lipoproteins, combined with the complex nature of the translocation machinery. The biosynthetic pathway of Brucella lipoproteins involves a distinct secretion system aiding translocation from the cytoplasm, where they are modified by lipidation, sorted by the lipoprotein localization machinery pathway and thereafter equipped for export to the OM. Surface localized lipoproteins in Brucella may employ a lipoprotein flippase or the β-barrel assembly complex for translocation. This review provides an overview of the characterized Brucella OM proteins that form part of the OM, including a handful of other characterized bacterial lipoproteins and their mechanisms of translocation. Lipoprotein localization pathways in gram negative bacteria will be used as a model to identify gaps in Brucella lipoprotein localization and infer a potential pathway. Of particular interest are the dual topology lipoproteins identified in Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenza. The localization and topology of these lipoproteins from other gram negative bacteria

  13. Cellular, molecular, and epigenetic mechanisms in non-associative conditioning: implications for pain and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahn, Elizabeth J; Guzman-Karlsson, Mikael C; David Sweatt, J

    2013-10-01

    Sensitization is a form of non-associative conditioning in which amplification of behavioral responses can occur following presentation of an aversive or noxious stimulus. Understanding the cellular and molecular underpinnings of sensitization has been an overarching theme spanning the field of learning and memory as well as that of pain research. In this review we examine how sensitization, both in the context of learning as well as pain processing, shares evolutionarily conserved behavioral, cellular/synaptic, and epigenetic mechanisms across phyla. First, we characterize the behavioral phenomenon of sensitization both in invertebrates and vertebrates. Particular emphasis is placed on long-term sensitization (LTS) of withdrawal reflexes in Aplysia following aversive stimulation or injury, although additional invertebrate models are also covered. In the context of vertebrates, sensitization of mammalian hyperarousal in a model of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), as well as mammalian models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain is characterized. Second, we investigate the cellular and synaptic mechanisms underlying these behaviors. We focus our discussion on serotonin-mediated long-term facilitation (LTF) and axotomy-mediated long-term hyperexcitability (LTH) in reduced Aplysia systems, as well as mammalian spinal plasticity mechanisms of central sensitization. Third, we explore recent evidence implicating epigenetic mechanisms in learning- and pain-related sensitization. This review illustrates the fundamental and functional overlay of the learning and memory field with the pain field which argues for homologous persistent plasticity mechanisms in response to sensitizing stimuli or injury across phyla. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Modeling of Drug Metabolism: Mexiletine N-Hydroxylation by Cytochrome P450 1A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdale, Richard; Fort, Rachel M; Rydberg, Patrik; Harvey, Jeremy N; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2016-06-20

    The mechanism of cytochrome P450(CYP)-catalyzed hydroxylation of primary amines is currently unclear and is relevant to drug metabolism; previous small model calculations have suggested two possible mechanisms: direct N-oxidation and H-abstraction/rebound. We have modeled the N-hydroxylation of (R)-mexiletine in CYP1A2 with hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods, providing a more detailed and realistic model. Multiple reaction barriers have been calculated at the QM(B3LYP-D)/MM(CHARMM27) level for the direct N-oxidation and H-abstraction/rebound mechanisms. Our calculated barriers indicate that the direct N-oxidation mechanism is preferred and proceeds via the doublet spin state of Compound I. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the presence of an ordered water molecule in the active site assists in the binding of mexiletine in the active site, but this is not a prerequisite for reaction via either mechanism. Several active site residues play a role in the binding of mexiletine in the active site, including Thr124 and Phe226. This work reveals key details of the N-hydroxylation of mexiletine and further demonstrates that mechanistic studies using QM/MM methods are useful for understanding drug metabolism.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Malignant Transformation by Low Dose Cadmium in Normal Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cartularo

    Full Text Available Cadmium is a carcinogenic metal, the mechanisms of which are not fully understood. In this study, human bronchial epithelial cells were transformed with sub-toxic doses of cadmium (0.01, 0.05, and 0.1 μM and transformed clones were characterized for gene expression changes using RNA-seq, as well as other molecular measurements. 440 genes were upregulated and 47 genes were downregulated in cadmium clones relative to control clones over 1.25-fold. Upregulated genes were associated mostly with gene ontology terms related to embryonic development, immune response, and cell movement, while downregulated genes were associated with RNA metabolism and regulation of transcription. Several embryonic genes were upregulated, including the transcription regulator SATB2. SATB2 is critical for normal skeletal development and has roles in gene expression regulation and chromatin remodeling. Small hairpin RNA knockdown of SATB2 significantly inhibited growth in soft agar, indicating its potential as a driver of metal-induced carcinogenesis. An increase in oxidative stress and autophagy was observed in cadmium clones. In addition, the DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase was depleted by transformation with cadmium. MGMT loss caused significant decrease in cell viability after treatment with the alkylating agent temozolomide, demonstrating diminished capacity to repair such damage. Results reveal various mechanisms of cadmium-induced malignant transformation in BEAS-2B cells including upregulation of SATB2, downregulation of MGMT, and increased oxidative stress.

  16. Molecular mechanisms and theranostic potential of miRNAs in drug resistance of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wanli; Ma, Jiaojiao; Zhou, Wei; Cao, Bo; Zhou, Xin; Yang, Zhiping; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhao, Qingchuan; Fan, Daiming; Hong, Liu

    2017-11-01

    Systemic chemotherapy is a curative approach to inhibit gastric cancer cells proliferation. Despite the great progress in anti-cancer treatment achieved during the last decades, drug resistance and treatment refractoriness still extensively persists. Recently, accumulating studies have highlighted the role of miRNAs in drug resistance of gastric cancers by modulating some drug resistance-related proteins and genes expression. Pre-clinical reports indicate that miRNAs might serve as ideal biomarkers and potential targets, thus holding great promise for developing targeted therapy and personalized treatment for the patients with gastric cancer. Areas covered: This review provide a comprehensive overview of the current advances of miRNAs and molecular mechanisms underlying miRNA-mediated drug resistance in gastric cancer. We particularly focus on the potential values of drug resistance-related miRNAs as biomarkers and novel targets in gastric cancer therapy and envisage the future research developments of these miRNAs and challenges in translating the new findings into clinical applications. Expert opinion: Although the concrete mechanisms of miRNAs in drug resistance of gastric cancer have not been fully clarified, miRNA may be a promising theranostic approach. Further studies are still needed to facilitate the clinical applications of miRNAs in drug resistant gastric cancer.

  17. Molecular Mechanisms and Metabolomics of Natural Polyphenols Interfering with Breast Cancer Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ci, Yingqian; Qiao, Jinping; Han, Mei

    2016-12-17

    Metastatic cancers are the main cause of cancer-related death. In breast primary cancer, the five-year survival rate is close to 100%; however, for metastatic breast cancer, that rate drops to a mere 25%, due in part to the paucity of effective therapeutic options for treating metastases. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have indicated that consumption of natural polyphenols significantly reduces the risk of cancer metastasis. Therefore, this review summarizes the research findings involving the molecular mechanisms and metabolomics of natural polyphenols and how they may be blocking breast cancer metastasis. Most natural polyphenols are thought to impair breast cancer metastasis through downregulation of MMPs expression, interference with the VEGF signaling pathway, modulation of EMT regulator, inhibition of NF-κB and mTOR expression, and other related mechanisms. Intake of natural polyphenols has been shown to impact endogenous metabolites and complex biological metabolic pathways in vivo. Breast cancer metastasis is a complicated process in which each step is modulated by a complex network of signaling pathways. We hope that by detailing the reported interactions between breast cancer metastasis and natural polyphenols, more attention will be directed to these promising candidates as effective adjunct therapies against metastatic breast cancer in the clinic.

  18. A novel mechanism for red emission carbon dots: hydrogen bond dominated molecular states emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianxiang; Zhu, Jinyang; Zhai, Yue; Wang, He; Bai, Xue; Dong, Biao; Wang, Haiyu; Song, Hongwei

    2017-09-14

    Carbon dots (CDs) have emerged as novel fluorescent probes due to their remarkable optical properties; however, red emission is still rare, has a relatively low efficiency, and its mechanism remains ambiguous. Herein, relatively efficient red-emission CDs based on p-phenylenediamine were prepared through various solvothermal means, where the highest quantum yield approached 41.1% in n-amyl alcohol, which was the most efficient quantum yield reported to date. Various structural characterizations were performed and confirmed that the red emission originated from the molecular states consisting of a nitrogen-containing organic fluorophore. The CDs were dispersed in different organic solvents and showed tunable emission, evolving from green to orange-red in aprotic solvents and a red emission in protic solvents. Further solvent correlation studies indicated that the hydrogen bond effect between the CDs and solvents was the main mechanism leading to the spectral shift. Accordingly, solid-state luminescent CDs-polymers were fabricated, which also demonstrated continuously tunable emission properties. This work opens a new window for recognizing the generation of tunable and red-emission CDs.

  19. Perfect/complete scattering experiments probing quantum mechanics on atomic and molecular collisions and coincidences

    CERN Document Server

    Kleinpoppen, Hans; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this book is to elucidate what kind of experiment must be performed in order to determine the full set of independent parameters which can be extracted and calculated from theory, where electrons, photons, atoms, ions, molecules, or molecular ions may serve as the interacting constituents of matter.  The feasibility of such perfect' and-or `complete' experiments, providing the complete quantum mechanical knowledge of the process, is associated with the enormous potential of modern research techniques, both, in experiment and theory.  It is even difficult to overestimate the role of theory in setting of the complete experiment, starting with the fact that an experiment can be complete only within a certain theoretical framework, and ending with the direct prescription of what, and in what conditions should be measured to make the experiment `complete'.  The language of the related theory is the language of quantum mechanical amplitudes and their relative phases.  This book captures the spi...

  20. DHEA and frontal fibrosing alopecia: molecular and physiopathological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Neide Kalil

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGFβ1) promotes fibrosis, differentiating epithelial cells and quiescent fibroblasts into myofibroblasts and increasing expression of extracellular matrix. Recent investigations have shown that PPAR (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor*) is a negative regulator of fibrotic events induced by TGFβ1. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is an immunomodulatory hormone essential for PPAR functions, and is reduced in some processes characterized by fibrosis. Although scarring alopecia characteristically develops in the female biological period in which occurs decreased production of DHEA, there are no data in the literature relating its reduction to fibrogenic process of this condition. This article aims to review the fibrogenic activity of TGFβ1, its control by PPAR and its relation with DHEA in the frontal fibrosing alopecia.

  1. Molecular Recognition of Azelaic Acid and Related Molecules with DNA Polymerase I Investigated by Molecular Modeling Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawon, Jakaria; Khan, Akib Mahmud; Rahman, Adhip; Hoque, Mohammad Mazharol; Khan, Mohammad Abdul Kader; Sarwar, Mohammed G; Halim, Mohammad A

    2016-10-01

    Molecular recognition has central role on the development of rational drug design. Binding affinity and interactions are two key components which aid to understand the molecular recognition in drug-receptor complex and crucial for structure-based drug design in medicinal chemistry. Herein, we report the binding affinity and the nonbonding interactions of azelaic acid and related compounds with the receptor DNA polymerase I (2KFN). Quantum mechanical calculation was employed to optimize the modified drugs using B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. Charge distribution, dipole moment and thermodynamic properties such as electronic energy, enthalpy and free energy of these optimized drugs are also explored to evaluate how modifications impact the drug properties. Molecular docking calculation was performed to evaluate the binding affinity and nonbonding interactions between designed molecules and the receptor protein. We notice that all modified drugs are thermodynamically more stable and some of them are more chemically reactive than the unmodified drug. Promise in enhancing hydrogen bonds is found in case of fluorine-directed modifications as well as in the addition of trifluoroacetyl group. Fluorine participates in forming fluorine bonds and also stimulates alkyl, pi-alkyl interactions in some drugs. Designed drugs revealed increased binding affinity toward 2KFN. A1, A2 and A3 showed binding affinities of -8.7, -8.6 and -7.9 kcal/mol, respectively against 2KFN compared to the binding affinity -6.7 kcal/mol of the parent drug. Significant interactions observed between the drugs and Thr358 and Asp355 residues of 2KFN. Moreover, designed drugs demonstrated improved pharmacokinetic properties. This study disclosed that 9-octadecenoic acid and drugs containing trifluoroacetyl and trifluoromethyl groups are the best 2KFN inhibitors. Overall, these results can be useful for the design of new potential candidates against DNA polymerase I.

  2. Review Article A Novel Regulatory Mechanism of Apoptosis by Calreticulin, a Molecular Chaperone in the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    OpenAIRE

    Ihara, Yoshito

    2003-01-01

    Calreticulin (CRT) is a Ca"--binding lectin-like molecular chaperone of the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. Recently, CRT has been revealed to be a multi-functional molecule related with glycoprotein maturation and chaperone function, Ca" homeostasis, cell adhesion, cell signaling, transcriptional regulation, and nuclear transporting mechanisms. CRT is also essential for cardiac and neural development in mice, suggesting an importance in the regulation of cell survival and death during de...

  3. Recent advances toward a molecular mechanism of efflux pump inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Opperman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Multi-drug resistance (MDR in Gram-negative pathogens, such as the Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, poses a significant threat to our ability to effectively treat infections caused by these organisms. A major component in the development of the MDR phenotype in Gram-negative bacteria is overexpression of RND-type efflux pumps, which actively pump antibacterial agents and biocides from the periplasm to the outside of the cell. Consequently, bacterial efflux pumps are an important target for developing novel antibacterial treatments. Potent efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs could be used as adjuvant therapies that would increase the potency of existing antibiotics and decrease the emergence of MDR bacteria. Several potent inhibitors of RND type efflux pump have been reported in the literature, and at least three of these EPI series were optimized in a pre-clinical development program. However, none of these compounds have been tested in the clinic. One of the major hurdles to the development of EPIs has been the lack of biochemical, computational, and structural methods that could be used to guide rational drug design. Here we review recent reports that have advanced our understanding of the mechanism of action of several potent EPIs against RND-type pumps.

  4. The molecular mechanism and regulatory pathways of cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant cancer is among the top of the life-threatening conditions, challenging humanity for a long time. Traditional methods of cancer therapy include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, which aim to remove/destroy cancer cells. Although theoretically very promising, none of these methods can effectively eradicate cancer, the reason for which can be attributed to our incomplete understanding of the mechanism of cancer metastasis and recurrence. In recent years, researchers have proposed the theory of cancer stem cell (CSC. CSC is a small population of tumor cells that have unlimited self-renewal ability, exhibit a strong resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and have been proved to be the core reason of cancer metastasis and recurrence. CSC theory provides a deep insight into malignant tumorigenesis that brings new hope for tumor therapy. In this paper, we intend to discuss the development of CSC theory and summarize the regulatory pathways involved in CSC origin and self-renewal, which might be of assistance in the future development of malignant cancer therapy.

  5. Multidrug-Resistant Candida: Epidemiology, Molecular Mechanisms, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Patterson, Thomas F

    2017-08-15

    Invasive Candida infections remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality, especially in hospitalized and immunocompromised or critically ill patients. A limited number of antifungal agents from only a few drug classes are available to treat patients with these serious infections. Resistance can be either intrinsic or acquired. Resistance mechanisms are not exchanged between Candida; thus, acquired resistance either emerges in response to an antifungal selection pressure in the individual patient or, more rarely, occur due to horizontal transmission of resistant strains between patients. Although multidrug resistance is uncommon, increasing reports of multidrug resistance to the azoles, echinocandins, and polyenes have occurred in several Candida species, most notably Candida glabrata and more recently Candida auris. Drivers are overall antifungal use, subtherapeutic drug levels at sites of infection/colonization, drug sequestration in the biofilm matrix, and, in the setting of outbreaks, suboptimal infection control. Moreover, recent research suggests that DNA mismatch repair gene mutations may facilitate acquisition of resistance mutations in C. glabrata specifically. Diagnosis of antifungal-resistant Candida infections is critical to the successful management of patients with these infections. Reduction of unnecessary use of antifungals via antifungal stewardship is critical to limit multidrug resistance emergence. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Anticancer effects and molecular mechanisms of epigallocatechin-3-gallate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-jin Min

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG is a type of catechin found in green tea. EGCG exhibits a variety of activities, including anti-inflammatory, antidiabetes, antiobesity, and antitumor. In this review, we focus on the antitumor effects of EGCG. EGCG inhibits carcinogen activity, tumorigenesis, proliferation, and angiogenesis, and induces cell death. These effects are associated with modulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS production. Although EGCG has a dual function of antioxidant and pro-oxidant potential, EGCG-mediated modulation of ROS production is reported to be responsible for its anticancer effects. The EGCG-mediated inhibition of nuclear factor-κB signaling is also associated with inhibition of migration, angiogenesis, and cell viability. Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases activity upregulates the anticancer effect of EGCG on migration, invasion, and apoptosis. In addition, EGCG could also induce epigenetic modification by inhibition of DNA methyltransferase activity and regulation of acetylation on histone, leading to an upregulation of apoptosis. Although EGCG promotes strong anticancer effects by multiple mechanisms, further studies are needed to define the use of EGCG in clinical treatment.

  7. Nutritional Systems Biology Modeling: From Molecular Mechanisms to Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Albert A.; Freidig, Andreas P.; De Roos, Baukje; Jamshidi, Neema; Heinemann, Matthias; Rullmann, Johan A.C.; Hall, Kevin D.; Adiels, Martin; van Ommen, Ben

    2009-01-01

    The use of computational modeling and simulation has increased in many biological fields, but despite their potential these techniques are only marginally applied in nutritional sciences. Nevertheless, recent applications of modeling have been instrumental in answering important nutritional questions from the cellular up to the physiological levels. Capturing the complexity of today's important nutritional research questions poses a challenge for modeling to become truly integrative in the consideration and interpretation of experimental data at widely differing scales of space and time. In this review, we discuss a selection of available modeling approaches and applications relevant for nutrition. We then put these models into perspective by categorizing them according to their space and time domain. Through this categorization process, we identified a dearth of models that consider processes occurring between the microscopic and macroscopic scale. We propose a “middle-out” strategy to develop the required full-scale, multilevel computational models. Exhaustive and accurate phenotyping, the use of the virtual patient concept, and the development of biomarkers from “-omics” signatures are identified as key elements of a successful systems biology modeling approach in nutrition research—one that integrates physiological mechanisms and data at multiple space and time scales. PMID:19956660

  8. The Molecular Mechanisms of Vitamin A Deficiency in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza Dorosty-Motlagh, Ahmad; Mohammadzadeh Honarvar, Niyaz; Sedighiyan, Mohsen; Abdolahi, Mina

    2016-09-01

    Vitamin A, considered to be an essential nutrient, has important actions in immunological responses and the central nervous system (CNS). Neuroimmunological functions of vitamin A are mediated through its active metabolite, retinoic acid (RA). In the CNS, RA contributes to regeneration and plasticity, while also playing a key role in enhancing tolerance and reducing inflammatory responses by regulating T cell, B cell and dendritic cell populations. However, evidence has indicated lower plasma levels of vitamin A in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Vitamin A deficiency leads to dysregulation of immune tolerance and pathogenic immune cell production in this disease. Vitamin A may ameliorate MS pathogenesis through numerous mechanisms including a reduction in inflammatory processes by re-establishing the balance between pathogenic (Th1, Th17, Th9) and immunoprotective cells (Th2, Tregs), modulating B cell and dendritic cell function as well as increasing tolerance of autoimmunity and regeneration in the CNS. Thus, the results from the current review suggest that vitamin A can be considered as a potential treatment in MS disease management.

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Insulin Resistance in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sandhya S.; Zhang, Liping; Mitch, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance refers to reduced sensitivity of organs to insulin-initiated biologic processes that result in metabolic defects. Insulin resistance is common in patients with end-stage renal disease but also occurs in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), even when the serum creatinine is minimally increased. Following insulin binding to its receptor, auto-phosphorylation of the insulin receptor is followed by kinase reactions that phosphorylate insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt. In fact, low levels of Akt phosphorylation (p-Akt) identifies the presence of the insulin resistance that leads to metabolic defects in insulin-initiated metabolism of glucose, lipids and muscle proteins. Besides CKD, other complex conditions (e.g., inflammation, oxidative stress, metabolic acidosis, aging and excess angiotensin II) reduce p-Akt resulting in insulin resistance. Insulin resistance in each of these conditions is due to activation of different, E3 ubiquitin ligases which specifically conjugate ubiquitin to IRS-1 marking it for degradation in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Consequently, IRS-1 degradation suppresses insulin-induced intracellular signaling, causing insulin resistance. Understanding mechanisms of insulin resistance could lead to therapeutic strategies that improve the metabolism of patients with CKD. PMID:26444029

  10. Molecular mechanisms of mTOR regulation by stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberle, Alexander Martin; Prentzell, Mirja Tamara; van Eunen, Karen; Bakker, Barbara Marleen; Grellscheid, Sushma Nagaraja; Thedieck, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Tumors are prime examples of cell growth in unfavorable environments that elicit cellular stress. The high metabolic demand and insufficient vascularization of tumors cause a deficiency of oxygen and nutrients. Oncogenic mutations map to signaling events via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), metabolic pathways, and mitochondrial function. These alterations have been linked with cellular stresses, in particular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, hypoxia, and oxidative stress. Yet tumors survive these challenges and acquire highly energy-demanding traits, such as overgrowth and invasiveness. In this review we focus on stresses that occur in cancer cells and discuss them in the context of mTOR signaling. Of note, many tumor traits require mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) activity, but mTORC1 hyperactivation eventually sensitizes cells to apoptosis. Thus, mTORC1 activity needs to be balanced in cancer cells. We provide an overview of the mechanisms contributing to mTOR regulation by stress and suggest a model wherein stress granules function as guardians of mTORC1 signaling, allowing cancer cells to escape stress-induced cell death.

  11. Basic principles and molecular mechanisms of olfactory axon pathfinding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Y; Mori, K

    1997-11-01

    The present review describes several lines of recent evidence providing new insights into the basic principles and mechanisms of axon projection from the olfactory epithelium to the olfactory bulb. Olfactory sensory neurons are classified into approximately 1000 subtypes according to the expression of specific odorant receptors. Olfactory sensory neurons expressing a given odorant receptor are distributed within one zone out of the four circumscribed zones of the olfactory epithelium and send their axons to the corresponding zone of the olfactory bulb: the principle of zone-to-zone projection. We discuss possible functions of a novel cell adhesion molecule, viz., OCAM, in the formation and maintenance of zone-to-zone projection of both olfactory and vomeronasal axons. Furthermore, olfactory sensory neurons expressing a given odorant receptor converge their axons onto only two topographically fixed glomeruli among the 1500-3000 glomeruli in the olfactory bulb: the principle of glomerular convergence. These axonal connection patterns give rise to the response specificity of the second-order neurons, viz., the mitral/tufted cells, to a particular range of odor molecules. In the process of glomerular convergence, combinatorial functions of axon-associated cell adhesion molecules and odorant receptor proteins may be required for the establishment of the precise targeting of olfactory axons to the appropriate glomeruli.

  12. An Updated Review of the Molecular Mechanisms in Drug Hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Bing Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug hypersensitivity may manifest ranging from milder skin reactions (e.g., maculopapular exanthema and urticaria to severe systemic reactions, such as anaphylaxis, drug reactions with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS/drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS, or Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS/toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN. Current pharmacogenomic studies have made important strides in the prevention of some drug hypersensitivity through the identification of relevant genetic variants, particularly for genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and human leukocyte antigens (HLAs. The associations identified by these studies are usually drug, phenotype, and ethnic specific. The drug presentation models that explain how small drug antigens might interact with HLA and T cell receptor (TCR molecules in drug hypersensitivity include the hapten theory, the p-i concept, the altered peptide repertoire model, and the altered TCR repertoire model. The broad spectrum of clinical manifestations of drug hypersensitivity involving different drugs, as well as the various pathomechanisms involved, makes the diagnosis and management of it more challenging. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the predisposing factors, immune mechanisms, pathogenesis, diagnostic tools, and therapeutic approaches for drug hypersensitivity.

  13. The Britannica Guide to Relativity and Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Gregersen, Erik

    2010-01-01

    The oft-referenced "E = mc2" may perhaps be one of the world's most famous equations, but it actually represents only one aspect of the complex branch of physics known as relativity. Together, relativity and quantum mechanics explain both the most cosmic and most elementary relationships and processes of the universe. The profound place that relativity and quantum mechanics occupy in subverting longstanding notions about space, time, matter, and more and the brilliant individuals who advanced study in these fields are the subjects of this volume.

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of Innate Immune Inhibition by Non-Segmented Negative-Sense RNA Viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Srirupa; Basler, Christopher F.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.; Leung, Daisy W.

    2016-08-01

    The host innate immune system serves as the first line of defense against viral infections. Germline-encoded pattern recognition receptors detect molecular patterns associated with pathogens and activate innate immune responses. Of particular relevance to viral infections are those pattern recognition receptors that activate type I interferon responses, which establish an antiviral state. The order Mononegavirales is composed of viruses that possess single-stranded, non-segmented negative-sense (NNS) RNA genomes and are important human pathogens that consistently antagonize signaling related to type I interferon responses. NNS viruses have limited encoding capacity compared to many DNA viruses, and as a likely consequence, most open reading frames encode multifunctional viral proteins that interact with host factors in order to evade host cell defenses while promoting viral replication. In this review, we will discuss the molecular mechanisms of innate immune evasion by select NNS viruses. A greater understanding of these interactions will be critical in facilitating the development of effective therapeutics and viral countermeasures.

  15. Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine-Mediated Anemia: Regarding Molecular Mechanisms of Erythropoiesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Morceau

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemia of cancer and chronic inflammatory diseases is a frequent complication affecting quality of life. For cancer patients it represents a particularly bad prognostic. Low level of erythropoietin is considered as one of the causes of anemia in these pathologies. The deficiency in erythropoietin production results from pro-inflammatory cytokines effect. However, few data is available concerning molecular mechanisms involved in cytokine-mediated anemia. Some recent publications have demonstrated the direct effect of pro-inflammatory cytokines on cell differentiation towards erythroid pathway, without erythropoietin defect. This suggested that pro-inflammatory cytokine-mediated signaling pathways affect erythropoietin activity. They could interfere with erythropoietin-mediated signaling pathways, inducing early apoptosis and perturbing the expression and regulation of specific transcription factors involved in the control of erythroid differentiation. In this review we summarize the effect of tumor necrosis factor (TNFα, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL, and interferon (IFN-γ on erythropoiesis with a particular interest for molecular feature.

  16. Structure-function relations in physiology education: Where's the mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Matthew E; Gardner, Stephanie M

    2017-06-01

    Physiology demands systems thinking: reasoning within and between levels of biological organization and across different organ systems. Many physiological mechanisms explain how structures and their properties interact at one level of organization to produce emergent functions at a higher level of organization. Current physiology principles, such as structure-function relations, selectively neglect mechanisms by not mentioning this term explicitly. We explored how students characterized mechanisms and functions to shed light on how students make sense of these terms. Students characterized mechanisms as 1 ) processes that occur at levels of organization lower than that of functions; and 2 ) as detailed events with many steps involved. We also found that students produced more variability in how they characterized functions compared with mechanisms: students characterized functions in relation to multiple levels of organization and multiple definitions. We interpret these results as evidence that students see mechanisms as holding a more narrow definition than used in the biological sciences, and that students struggle to coordinate and distinguish mechanisms from functions due to cognitive processes germane to learning in many domains. We offer the instructional suggestion that we scaffold student learning by affording students opportunities to relate and also distinguish between these terms so central to understanding physiology. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. A Molecular Dynamics (MD and Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM Study on Ornithine Cyclodeaminase (OCD: A Tale of Two Iminiums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W. Gauld

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Ornithine cyclodeaminase (OCD is an NAD+-dependent deaminase that is found in bacterial species such as Pseudomonas putida. Importantly, it catalyzes the direct conversion of the amino acid L-ornithine to L-proline. Using molecular dynamics (MD and a hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM method in the ONIOM formalism, the catalytic mechanism of OCD has been examined. The rate limiting step is calculated to be the initial step in the overall mechanism: hydride transfer from the L-ornithine’s Cα–H group to the NAD+ cofactor with concomitant formation of a Cα=NH2+ Schiff base with a barrier of 90.6 kJ mol−1. Importantly, no water is observed within the active site during the MD simulations suitably positioned to hydrolyze the Cα=NH2+ intermediate to form the corresponding carbonyl. Instead, the reaction proceeds via a non-hydrolytic mechanism involving direct nucleophilic attack of the δ-amine at the Cα-position. This is then followed by cleavage and loss of the α-NH2 group to give the Δ1-pyrroline-2-carboxylate that is subsequently reduced to L-proline.

  18. Insight into the Mechanism of Hydrolysis of Meropenem by OXA-23 Serine-β-lactamase Gained by Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgrignani, Jacopo; Grazioso, Giovanni; De Amici, Marco

    2016-09-13

    The fast and constant development of drug resistant bacteria represents a serious medical emergency. To overcome this problem, the development of drugs with new structures and modes of action is urgently needed. In this work, we investigated, at the atomistic level, the mechanisms of hydrolysis of Meropenem by OXA-23, a class D β-lactamase, combining unbiased classical molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling simulations with classical force field-based and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics potentials. Our calculations provide a detailed structural and dynamic picture of the molecular steps leading to the formation of the Meropenem-OXA-23 covalent adduct, the subsequent hydrolysis, and the final release of the inactive antibiotic. In this mechanistic framework, the predicted activation energy is in good agreement with experimental kinetic measurements, validating the expected reaction path.

  19. Distinct cellular and molecular environments support aging-related DNA methylation changes in the substantia nigra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasolino, Maria; Liu, Shuo; Wang, Yinsheng; Zhou, Zhaolan

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to couple brain region-specific changes in global DNA methylation over aging to underlying cellular and molecular environments. We measured two major forms of DNA methylation and analyzed Dnmt, Tet and metabolite levels in the striatum and substantia nigra (SN) over aging in healthy male mice. The ratio of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine to 5-methylcytosine increases over aging in the SN, and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine increases preferentially in dopaminergic neurons. Additionally, this age-dependent alteration in methylation correlates with a reduction in the ratio of α-ketoglutarate to succinate in the SN. Distinct cellular and molecular environments correlate with aging-associated methylation changes in the SN, implicating this epigenetic mechanism in the susceptibility of this brain region to age-related cell loss.

  20. Insights into the Lactonase Mechanism of Serum Paraoxonase 1 (PON1): Experimental and Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Quang Anh Tuan; Kim, Seonghoon; Chang, Rakwoo; Kim, Yong Hwan

    2015-07-30

    Serum paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a versatile enzyme for the hydrolysis of various substrates (e.g., lactones, phosphotriesters) and for the formation of a promising chemical platform γ-valerolactone. Elucidation of the PON1-catalyzed lactonase reaction mechanism is very important for understanding the enzyme function and for engineering this enzyme for specific applications. Kinetic study and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method were used to investigate the PON1-catalyzed lactonase reaction of γ-butyrolactone (GBL) and (R)-γ-valerolactone (GVL). The activation energies obtained from the QM/MM calculations were in good agreement with the experiments. Interestingly, the QM/MM energy barriers at MP2/3-21G(d,p) level for the lactonase of GVL and GBL were respectively 14.3-16.2 and 11.5-13.1 kcal/mol, consistent with the experimental values (15.57 and 14.73 kcal/mol derived from respective kcat values of 36.62 and 147.21 s(-1)). The QM/MM energy barriers at MP2/6-31G(d) and MP2/6-31G(d,p) levels were also in relatively good agreements with the experiments. Importantly, the difference in the QM/MM energy barriers at MP2 level with all investigated basis sets for the lactonase of GVL and GBL were in excellent agreement with the experiments (0.9-3.1 and 0.8 kcal/mol, respectively). A detailed mechanism for the PON1-catalyzed lactonase reaction was also proposed in this study.

  1. Hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics/Coarse Grained Modeling: A Triple-Resolution Approach for Biomolecular Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokkar, Pandian; Boulanger, Eliot; Thiel, Walter; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa

    2015-04-14

    We present a hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics/coarse-grained (QM/MM/CG) multiresolution approach for solvated biomolecular systems. The chemically important active-site region is treated at the QM level. The biomolecular environment is described by an atomistic MM force field, and the solvent is modeled with the CG Martini force field using standard or polarizable (pol-CG) water. Interactions within the QM, MM, and CG regions, and between the QM and MM regions, are treated in the usual manner, whereas the CG-MM and CG-QM interactions are evaluated using the virtual sites approach. The accuracy and efficiency of our implementation is tested for two enzymes, chorismate mutase (CM) and p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (PHBH). In CM, the QM/MM/CG potential energy scans along the reaction coordinate yield reaction energies that are too large, both for the standard and polarizable Martini CG water models, which can be attributed to adverse effects of using large CG water beads. The inclusion of an atomistic MM water layer (10 Å for uncharged CG water and 5 Å for polarizable CG water) around the QM region improves the energy profiles compared to the reference QM/MM calculations. In analogous QM/MM/CG calculations on PHBH, the use of the pol-CG description for the outer water does not affect the stabilization of the highly charged FADHOOH-pOHB transition state compared to the fully atomistic QM/MM calculations. Detailed performance analysis in a glycine-water model system indicates that computation times for QM energy and gradient evaluations at the density functional level are typically reduced by 40-70% for QM/MM/CG relative to fully atomistic QM/MM calculations.

  2. Cellular and molecular mechanisms in environmental and occupational inhalation toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechelmann, Herbert

    2004-01-01

    The central issue of this review are inflammatory changes that take place in the mucous membranes of the respiratory tract as a result of inhaled pollutants. Of particular relevance are dusts, SO2, ozone, aldehydes und volatile organic compounds. Bioorganic pollutants, especially fragments of bacteria and fungi, occur predominantly in indoor dusts. They activate the toll-like/IL-1 receptor and lead to the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB for the release of numerous proinflammatory cytokines. Metals are predominant in ambient air dust particles. They induce the release of reactive oxygen species that cause damage to lipids, proteins and the DNA of the cell. As well as NF-κB, transcription factors that foster proliferation are activated via stress activated protein kinases. Organic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitroso-compounds of incomplete combustion processes activate additional via the cytosolic arylhydrocarbon receptor for detoxification enzymes. Sulphur dioxide leads to acid stress, and ozone to oxidative stress of the cell. This is accompanied by the release of proinflammatory cytokines via stress activated protein kinases. Aldehydes and volatile organic compounds activate the vanilloid receptor of trigeminal nerve fibres and induce a hyperreactivity of the mucous membrane via the release of nerve growth factors. The mechanisms described work synergistically and lead to a chronic inflammatory reaction of the mucous membranes of the upper respiratory tract that is regularly demonstrable in inhabitants of western industrial nations. It is unclear whether we are dealing here with a physiological inflammation or with an at least partially avoidable result of chronic pollutant exposure. PMID:22073044

  3. Molecular Mechanisms behind Free Radical Scavengers Function against Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadinejad, Fereshteh; Geir Møller, Simon; Hashemzadeh-Chaleshtori, Morteza; Bidkhori, Gholamreza; Jami, Mohammad-Saeid

    2017-07-10

    Accumulating evidence shows that oxidative stress is involved in a wide variety of human diseases: rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, cancers, etc. Here, we discuss the significance of oxidative conditions in different disease, with the focus on neurodegenerative disease including Parkinson's disease, which is mainly caused by oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively), collectively known as RONS, are produced by cellular enzymes such as myeloperoxidase, NADPH-oxidase (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Natural antioxidant systems are categorized into enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant groups. The former includes a number of enzymes such as catalase and glutathione peroxidase, while the latter contains a number of antioxidants acquired from dietary sources including vitamin C, carotenoids, flavonoids and polyphenols. There are also scavengers used for therapeutic purposes, such as 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) used routinely in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (not as a free radical scavenger), and 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one (Edaravone) that acts as a free radical detoxifier frequently used in acute ischemic stroke. The cell surviving properties of L-DOPA and Edaravone against oxidative stress conditions rely on the alteration of a number of stress proteins such as Annexin A1, Peroxiredoxin-6 and PARK7/DJ-1 (Parkinson disease protein 7, also known as Protein deglycase DJ-1). Although they share the targets in reversing the cytotoxic effects of H₂O₂, they seem to have distinct mechanism of function. Exposure to L-DOPA may result in hypoxia condition and further induction of ORP150 (150-kDa oxygen-regulated protein) with its concomitant cytoprotective effects but Edaravone seems to protect cells via direct induction of Peroxiredoxin-2 and inhibition of apoptosis.

  4. Molecular Mechanisms behind Free Radical Scavengers Function against Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Ahmadinejad

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence shows that oxidative stress is involved in a wide variety of human diseases: rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, cancers, etc. Here, we discuss the significance of oxidative conditions in different disease, with the focus on neurodegenerative disease including Parkinson’s disease, which is mainly caused by oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively, collectively known as RONS, are produced by cellular enzymes such as myeloperoxidase, NADPH-oxidase (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase and nitric oxide synthase (NOS. Natural antioxidant systems are categorized into enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant groups. The former includes a number of enzymes such as catalase and glutathione peroxidase, while the latter contains a number of antioxidants acquired from dietary sources including vitamin C, carotenoids, flavonoids and polyphenols. There are also scavengers used for therapeutic purposes, such as 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA used routinely in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (not as a free radical scavenger, and 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one (Edaravone that acts as a free radical detoxifier frequently used in acute ischemic stroke. The cell surviving properties of L-DOPA and Edaravone against oxidative stress conditions rely on the alteration of a number of stress proteins such as Annexin A1, Peroxiredoxin-6 and PARK7/DJ-1 (Parkinson disease protein 7, also known as Protein deglycase DJ-1. Although they share the targets in reversing the cytotoxic effects of H2O2, they seem to have distinct mechanism of function. Exposure to L-DOPA may result in hypoxia condition and further induction of ORP150 (150-kDa oxygen-regulated protein with its concomitant cytoprotective effects but Edaravone seems to protect cells via direct induction of Peroxiredoxin-2 and inhibition of apoptosis.

  5. Inactivation of TEM-1 by avibactam (NXL-104): insights from quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics metadynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgrignani, Jacopo; Grazioso, Giovanni; De Amici, Marco; Colombo, Giorgio

    2014-08-12

    The fast and constant development of drug-resistant bacteria represents a serious medical emergence. To overcome this problem, the development of drugs with new structures and modes of action is urgently needed. In this context, avibactam represents a promising, innovative inhibitor of beta-lactamases with a novel molecular structure compared to previously developed inhibitors, showing a promising inhibitory activity toward a significant number of beta-lactamase enzymes. In this work, we studied, at the atomistic level, the mechanisms of formation of the covalent complex between avibactam and TEM-1, an experimentally well-characterized class A beta-lactamase, using classical and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations combined with metadynamics. Our simulations provide a detailed structural and energetic picture of the molecular steps leading to the formation of the avibactam/TEM-1 covalent adduct. In particular, they support a mechanism in which the rate-determining step is the water-assisted Glu166 deprotonation by Ser70. In this mechanistic framework, the predicted activation energy is in good agreement with experimental kinetic measurements. Additionally, our simulations highlight the important role of Lys73 in assisting the Ser70 and Ser130 deprotonations. While based on the specific case of the avibactam/TEM-1, the simple protocol we present here can be immediately extended and applied to the study of covalent complex formation in different enzyme-inhibitor pairs.

  6. [Modified Mechanism of Cell Walls from Chinese Fir Treated with Low-Molecular-Weight Phenol Formaldehyde Resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan-hui; Fei, Ben-hua; Zhao, Rong-jun

    2015-12-01

    Study on the modified mechanism of wood cell walls, it is very important for improving treatment reagents, optimizing treatment technology, and enhancing wood density, mechanical properties, dimensional stability, and so on. Samples of plantation Chinese fir were treated gradually with synthesized water-soluble low-molecular-weight phenol formaldehyde (PF) resins under vacuum and pressure. The correlated physical and chemical properties of the treated and untreated reference samples were determined by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer(NMR) (Using method of Cross Polarization/Magic Angle Spinning for continuous testing) with high precision and resolution. The results showed that, after treated with water-soluble low-molecular-weight PF resin, the average values of crystallinity from the treated samples were decreased obviously, and the average reduction rate was 12.67%, 11.91% and 6.26%, respectively. Comparing water-soluble, low-molecular-weight PF resin modified Chinese fir with untreated reference samples, no new chemical shifts and characteristic peaks of functional groups from esters, ethers, etc. were present by using FTIR and ¹³C NMR spectrum. It was considered that there was no distinct chemical reaction between the water-soluble low-molecular-weight PF resin and Chinese Fir cell walls. But water-soluble low-molecular-weight PF resin could enter into the structure relatively loose, large size spaces, relatively area large amorphous regions in cell walls of Chinese fir tracheids, and form physical filling, which resulting in the decreasing of relative crystallinity. This study has important reference value for the development of new wood modification reagents and the optimization of wood modification process. The findings also provide important theoretical foundation for further proving the modification mechanisms of wood cell walls and enriching the modified theories of

  7. Mechanism of Salinity Tolerance in Plants: Physiological, Biochemical, and Molecular Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bingru

    2014-01-01

    Salinity is a major abiotic stress limiting growth and productivity of plants in many areas of the world due to increasing use of poor quality of water for irrigation and soil salinization. Plant adaptation or tolerance to salinity stress involves complex physiological traits, metabolic pathways, and molecular or gene networks. A comprehensive understanding on how plants respond to salinity stress at different levels and an integrated approach of combining molecular tools with physiological and biochemical techniques are imperative for the development of salt-tolerant varieties of plants in salt-affected areas. Recent research has identified various adaptive responses to salinity stress at molecular, cellular, metabolic, and physiological levels, although mechanisms underlying salinity tolerance are far from being completely understood. This paper provides a comprehensive review of major research advances on biochemical, physiological, and molecular mechanisms regulating plant adaptation and tolerance to salinity stress. PMID:24804192

  8. Molecular diversity among seven Solanum (eggplant and relatives ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seven Solanum species (eggplants) were investigated for molecular diversity. Besides its widespread cultivation, nutritional and economic importance, its genome has not been extensively researched. 39 Solanum accessions, a landrace and tomato variety (LBR 48) were molecularly analyzed by simple sequence repeat ...

  9. Mechanism and Dynamics of Molecular Exchange at the Silica/Binary Solvent Mixtures Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Karnes, JJ; Benjamin, I

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of acetonitrile/methanol mixtures in contact with a hydroxylated silica surface are used to elucidate the mechanism of molecular exchange at a hydrophilic liquid/solid interface. The different hydrogen-bonding ability of the two solvents provides a driving force for the adsorption/desorption process, which is followed by examining several structural and energetic properties of the system. Two different reaction co...

  10. Molecular mechanism regulating 24-hour rhythm of dopamine D3 receptor expression in mouse ventral striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Eriko; Matsunaga, Naoya; Kakimoto, Keisuke; Hamamura, Kengo; Hayashi, Akane; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2013-05-01

    The dopamine D3 receptor (DRD3) in the ventral striatum is thought to influence motivation and motor functions. Although the expression of DRD3 in the ventral striatum has been shown to exhibit 24-hour variations, the mechanisms underlying the variation remain obscure. Here, we demonstrated that molecular components of the circadian clock act as regulators that control the 24-hour variation in the expression of DRD3. The transcription of DRD3 was enhanced by the retinoic acid-related orphan receptor α (RORα), and its activation was inhibited by the orphan receptor REV-ERBα, an endogenous antagonist of RORα. The serum or dexamethasone-induced oscillation in the expression of DRD3 in cells was abrogated by the downregulation or overexpression of REV-ERBα, suggesting that REV-ERBα functions as a regulator of DRD3 oscillations in the cellular autonomous clock. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays of the DRD3 promoter indicated that the binding of the REV-ERBα protein to the DRD3 promoter increased in the early dark phase. DRD3 protein expression varied with higher levels during the dark phase. Moreover, the effects of the DRD3 agonist 7-hydroxy-N,N-dipropyl-2-aminotetralin (7-OH-DPAT)-induced locomotor hypoactivity were significantly increased when DRD3 proteins were abundant. These results suggest that RORα and REV-ERBα consist of a reciprocating mechanism wherein RORα upregulates the expression of DRD3, whereas REV-ERBα periodically suppresses the expression at the time of day when REV-ERBα is abundant. Our present findings revealed that a molecular link between the circadian clock and the function of DRD3 in the ventral striatum acts as a modulator of the pharmacological actions of DRD3 agonists/antagonists.

  11. Cold Denaturation Unveiled: Molecular Mechanism of the Asymmetric Unfolding of Yeast Frataxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfelice, Domenico; Morandi, Edoardo; Pastore, Annalisa; Niccolai, Neri; Temussi, Piero Andrea

    2015-12-01

    What is the mechanism that determines the denaturation of proteins at low temperatures, which is, by now, recognized as a fundamental property of all proteins? We present experimental evidence that clarifies the role of specific interactions that favor the entrance of water into the hydrophobic core, a mechanism originally proposed by Privalov but never proved experimentally. By using a combination of molecular dynamics simulation, molecular biology, and biophysics, we identified a cluster of negatively charged residues that represents a preferential gate for the entrance of water molecules into the core. Even single-residue mutations in this cluster, from acidic to neutral residues, affect cold denaturation much more than heat denaturation, suppressing cold denaturation at temperatures above zero degrees. The molecular mechanism of the cold denaturation of yeast frataxin is intrinsically different from that of heat denaturation. ©2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  12. Catecholamines in stress: molecular mechanisms of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabban, Esther L

    2007-06-01

    The catecholamines play key roles in orchestrating the response to stress. While this is crucial to handle emergency situations, stress becomes maladaptive when prolonged or repeated, increasing allosteric load and susceptibility to a wide range of serious diseases. The time frame of the regulation of gene expression, especially as it relates to catecholamine (CA) biosynthetic enzymes are compared in three crucial catecholaminergic locations, the adrenal medulla, sympathetic ganglia and locus coeruleus in male animals. The adrenal medulla displays very rapid response to stress and gene profiling reveals a wide repertoire of target genes, many of them activated by single and not by repeated stress. In contrast to the adrenal medulla, the sympathetic ganglia are especially responsive to activation of the HPA axis, and ACTH may have a direct effect. The locus coeruleus, origin of most of the noradrenergic neurons innervating much of the brain, displays activation of additional signalling pathways and transcription factor with repeated compared to single exposure to stress. Most of the studies have been performed in males. However, there is considerable evidence that females respond differently to stress. Estradiol can regulate TH, DBH and GTPCH gene expression, as well as to modulate its response to other second messenger such as cAMP. Prior treatment with estradiol was found to alter the response of CA biosynthetic enzymes to stress. This emphasizes the tissue and sex specific features of the mechanistic underpinning of the adaptation or maladaptation of the catecholaminergic systems to stress and provides the basis for specific interventions. Key words: Adrenal medulla - Catecholamine biosynthesis - Estrogen - Sympathetic ganglia - Locus coeruleus - Stress - Transcription factors.

  13. Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Free Energy Maps and Nonadiabatic Simulations for a Photochemical Reaction in DNA: Cyclobutane Thymine Dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendieta-Moreno, Jesús I; Trabada, Daniel G; Mendieta, Jesús; Lewis, James P; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Ortega, José

    2016-11-03

    The absorption of ultraviolet radiation by DNA may result in harmful genetic lesions that affect DNA replication and transcription, ultimately causing mutations, cancer, and/or cell death. We analyze the most abundant photochemical reaction in DNA, the cyclobutane thymine dimer, using hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) techniques and QM/MM nonadiabatic molecular dynamics. We find that, due to its double helix structure, DNA presents a free energy barrier between nonreactive and reactive conformations leading to the photolesion. Moreover, our nonadiabatic simulations show that most of the photoexcited reactive conformations return to standard B-DNA conformations after an ultrafast nonradiative decay to the ground state. This work highlights the importance of dynamical effects (free energy, excited-state dynamics) for the study of photochemical reactions in biological systems.

  14. Insights into the phosphatase and the synthase activities of human bisphosphoglycerate mutase: a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wen-Ting; Zheng, Qing-Chuan; Zhang, Hong-Xing

    2014-03-07

    Bisphosphoglycerate mutase (BPGM) is a multi-activity enzyme. Its main function is to synthesize the 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate, the allosteric effector of hemoglobin. This enzyme can also catalyze the 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate to the 3-phosphoglycerate. In this study, the reaction mechanisms of both the phosphatase and the synthase activities of human bisphosphoglycerate mutase were theoretically calculated by using the quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics method based on the metadynamics and umbrella sampling simulations. The simulation results not only show the free energy curve of the phosphatase and the synthase reactions, but also reveal the important role of some residues in the active site. Additionally, the energy barriers of the two reactions indicate that the activity of the synthase in human bisphosphoglycerate mutase is much higher than that of the phosphatase. The estimated reaction barriers are consistent with the experimental data. Therefore, our work can give important information to understand the catalytic mechanism of the bisphosphoglycerate mutase family.

  15. Multilevel Quantum Mechanics Theories and Molecular Mechanics Calculations of the Cl-+ CH3I Reaction in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Li, Chen; Wang, Dunyou

    2017-10-19

    The Cl - + CH 3 I → CH 3 Cl + I - reaction in water was studied using combined multilevel quantum mechanism theories and molecular mechanics with an explicit water solvent model. The study shows a significant influence of aqueous solution on the structures of the stationary points along the reaction pathway. A detailed, atomic-level evolution of the reaction mechanism shows a concerted one-bond-broken and one-bond-formed mechanism, as well as a synchronized charge-transfer process. The potentials of mean force calculated with the CCSD(T) and DFT treatments of the solute produce a free activation barrier at 24.5 and 19.0 kcal/mol, respectively, which agrees with the experimental one at 22.0 kcal/mol. The solvent effects have also been quantitatively analyzed: in total, the solvent effects raise the activation energy by 20.2 kcal/mol, which shows a significant impact on this reaction in water.

  16. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of muscle aging and sarcopenia and effects of electrical stimulation in seniors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Barberi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The prolongation of skeletal muscle strength in aging and neuromuscular disease has been the objective of numerous studies employing a variety of approaches. It is generally accepted that cumulative failure to repair damage related to an overall decrease in anabolic processes is a primary cause of functional impairment in muscle. The functional performance of skeletal muscle tissues declines during post- natal life and it is compromised in different diseases, due to an alteration in muscle fiber composition and an overall decrease in muscle integrity as fibrotic invasions replace functional contractile tissue. Characteristics of skeletal muscle aging and diseases include a conspicuous reduction in myofiber plasticity (due to the progressive loss of muscle mass and in particular of the most powerful fast fibers, alteration in muscle-specific transcriptional mechanisms, and muscle atrophy. An early decrease in protein synthetic rates is followed by a later increase in protein degradation, to affect biochemical, physiological, and morphological parameters of muscle fibers during the aging process. Alterations in regenerative pathways also compromise the functionality of muscle tissues. In this review we will give an overview of the work on molecular and cellular mechanisms of aging and sarcopenia and the effects of electrical stimulation in seniors.

  17. Molecular mechanisms of felodipine suppressing atherosclerosis in high-cholesterol-diet apolipoprotein E-knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Rui; Cheng, Xiang; Liao, Yu-Hua; Chen, Yong; Xie, Jiang-Jiao; Yu, Xian; Ding, Ying-Jun; Tang, Ting-Ting

    2008-02-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation processes are key components of atherosclerosis, from fatty streak formation to plaque rupture and thrombosis. Evidence has revealed that calcium-channel blockers (CCB) could retard atherogenesis, but the exact mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. The present study was undertaken to investigate the potential effects and molecular mechanisms of the CCB felodipine on the process of atherosclerosis in high-cholesterol-diet (HCD) apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE KO) mice. Adult male ApoE KO mice were given a normal diet (ND) or HCD and were randomized to no treatment or felodipine (5 mg / kg per day for 12 weeks). The ApoE KO mice with HCD were associated with a marked increase in plasma lipid levels, atherosclerotic lesion area, and the expressions of NADPH oxidase subunits (p47 and Rac-1), nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) in nucleus, phosphor-inhibitors of kappaB (p-IkappaB), tumor necrosis-alpha (TNF-alpha), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and vascular cell-adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). These changes were suppressed in mice that were treated with felodipine (5 mg/kg per day for 12 weeks) concomitant with HCD administration, with no significant change in systolic blood pressure and plasma lipid levels. The results suggest that felodipine can attenuate atherosclerosis, and this effect is partly related to inhibition of oxidative stress and inflammatory signal-transduction pathways, which lead to decreases in the expression of inflammatory cytokines.

  18. Biotechnological Wood Modification with Selective White-Rot Fungi and Its Molecular Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Gradinger

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial mechanisms of lignin degradation may be utilised for solid-state fermentations other than biopulping, during which the selective conversion of lignin is required. The current paper reviews current work into selective lignin conversion, with emphasis on the contributions made by our research group, which consists of researchers from five different laboratories. Three of them cooperate within Wood K plus. The recent research of this group has focussed on fermentations utilising the unique metabolism of selective white-rot fungi to modify wood surfaces during relatively short fermentation times of less than one week and on research into the molecular mechanisms causing these modifications. Lignin degradation by selective fungi (e.g. Ceriporiopsis subvermispora and species of the genus Phlebia on the wood surfaces was significant after three days. After seven days the overall lignin content of spruce wood shavings was reduced by more than 3.5 %. Lignin loss was accompanied by an increase of extractable substances. To evaluate small changes and to trace the fungal modification processes, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR techniques and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy were applied and adapted. The spectra recorded in the near infrared region (FT-NIR turned out to be very useful for kinetic studies of the biopulping/biomodification processes and a good method to evaluate the capabilities of fungi to modify wood surfaces within this short period.

  19. Molecular mechanism of manipulating seed coat coloration in oilseed Brassica species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Cheng-Yu

    2013-05-01

    Yellow seed is a desirable characteristic for the breeding of oilseed Brassica crops, but the manifestation of seed coat color is very intricate due to the involvement of various pigments, the main components of which are flavonols, proanthocyanidin (condensed tannin), and maybe some other phenolic relatives, like lignin and melanin. The focus of this review is to examine the genetics mechanism regarding the biosynthesis and regulation of these pigments in the seed coat of oilseed Brassica. This knowledge came largely from recent researches on the molecular mechanism of TRANSPARENT TESTA (tt) and similar mutations in the ancestry model plant of Brassica, Arabidopsis. Some key enzymes in the flavonoid (flavonols and proanthocyanidin) biosynthetic pathway have been characterized in tt mutants. Some orthologs to these TRANSPARENT TESTA genes have also been cloned in Brassica species. However, it is suggested that some alterative metabolism pathways, including lignin and melanin, might also be involved in seed color manifestation. Polyphenol oxidases, such as laccase, tyrosinase, or even peroxidase, participate in the oxidation step in proanthocyanidin, lignin, and melanin biosynthesis. Moreover, some researches also suggested that melanic pigment in black-seeded Brassica was several fold higher than in yellow-seeded Brassica. Although more experiments are required to evaluate the importance of lignin and melanin in seed coat browning, the current results suggest that the flavonols and proanthocyanidin are not the only roles affecting seed color.

  20. The Anti-Cancer Effect of Polyphenols against Breast Cancer and Cancer Stem Cells: Molecular Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdal Dayem

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The high incidence of breast cancer in developed and developing countries, and its correlation to cancer-related deaths, has prompted concerned scientists to discover novel alternatives to deal with this challenge. In this review, we will provide a brief overview of polyphenol structures and classifications, as well as on the carcinogenic process. The biology of breast cancer cells will also be discussed. The molecular mechanisms involved in the anti-cancer activities of numerous polyphenols, against a wide range of breast cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo, will be explained in detail. The interplay between autophagy and apoptosis in the anti-cancer activity of polyphenols will also be highlighted. In addition, the potential of polyphenols to target cancer stem cells (CSCs via various mechanisms will be explained. Recently, the use of natural products as chemotherapeutics and chemopreventive drugs to overcome the side effects and resistance that arise from using chemical-based agents has garnered the attention of the scientific community. Polyphenol research is considered a promising field in the treatment and prevention of breast cancer.

  1. Adsorption Behavior and Mechanism of SCA-1 on a Calcite Surface: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhengyang; Shen, Qiying; Liang, Lijun; Shen, Jia-Wei; Wang, Qi

    2017-10-24

    The crystallization mechanism for natural mineral, especially the role of biological molecules in biomineralization, is still under debate. Protein adsorption on material surfaces plays a key role in biomineralization. In this article, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to systematically investigate the adsorption behavior of struthio camelus eggshell protein struthiocalcin-1 (SCA-1) on the calcite (104) surface with several different starting orientations in an explicit water environment. For each binding configuration, detailed adsorption behaviors and a mechanism were presented with the analysis of interaction energy, binding residues, hydrogen bonding, and structures (such as DSSP, dipole moment, and the electrostatic potential calculation). The results indicate that the positively charged and polar residues are the dominant residues for protein adsorption on the calcite (104) surface, and the strong electrostatic interaction drives the binding of model protein to the surface. The hydrogen bond bridge was found to play an important role in surface interactions as well. These results also demonstrate that SCA-1 is relatively rigid in spite of strong adsorption with few structural changes in α-helix and β-sheet contents. The results of the orientation calculation suggest that the dipole moment of the protein tends to remain parallel to calcite in most stable cases, which was confirmed by electrostatic potential isosurfaces analysis.

  2. Exploring the inter-molecular interactions in amyloid-β protofibril with molecular dynamics simulations and molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area free energy calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fu-Feng; Liu, Zhen; Bai, Shu; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2012-04-01

    Aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides correlates with the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. However, the inter-molecular interactions between Aβ protofibril remain elusive. Herein, molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area analysis based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations was performed to study the inter-molecular interactions in Aβ17-42 protofibril. It is found that the nonpolar interactions are the important forces to stabilize the Aβ17-42 protofibril, while electrostatic interactions play a minor role. Through free energy decomposition, 18 residues of the Aβ17-42 are identified to provide interaction energy lower than -2.5 kcal/mol. The nonpolar interactions are mainly provided by the main chain of the peptide and the side chains of nine hydrophobic residues (Leu17, Phe19, Phe20, Leu32, Leu34, Met35, Val36, Val40, and Ile41). However, the electrostatic interactions are mainly supplied by the main chains of six hydrophobic residues (Phe19, Phe20, Val24, Met35, Val36, and Val40) and the side chains of the charged residues (Glu22, Asp23, and Lys28). In the electrostatic interactions, the overwhelming majority of hydrogen bonds involve the main chains of Aβ as well as the guanidinium group of the charged side chain of Lys28. The work has thus elucidated the molecular mechanism of the inter-molecular interactions between Aβ monomers in Aβ17-42 protofibril, and the findings are considered critical for exploring effective agents for the inhibition of Aβ aggregation.

  3. A density functional theory study on the molecular mechanism of the cycloaddition between (E)-methyl cinnamate and cyclopentadiene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, C.N. [Departamento de Quimica, Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Naturais Universidade Federal do Para, CP 11101, 66075-110, Belem, Para (Brazil)]. E-mail: nahum@ufpa.br; Camilo, F.F. [Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, CP 26077, 05513-970 Sao Paulo SP (Brazil); Gruber, J. [Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, CP 26077, 05513-970 Sao Paulo SP (Brazil); Silva, A.B.F. da [Departamento de Quimica e Fisica Molecular, Instituto de Quimica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, CP 780, 13560-970 Sao Carlos SP (Brazil)

    2004-11-15

    The molecular mechanism of the Diels-Alder reaction between (E)-methyl cinnamate and cyclopentadiene has been characterized by means of density functional theory method at the B3LYP/6-31G* theory level. Stationary points for two reactive channels, endo-cis and exo-cis, on potential energy surfaces, have been characterized. Three Lewis acids, boron trifluoride (BF{sub 3}), aluminum trichloride (AlCl{sub 3}) and catechol boron bromide (CBB), have been used as catalysts taking into account the formation of a complex between the boron or aluminum atom and the carbonyl oxygen of (E)-methyl cinnamate. The molecular mechanism of the uncatalyzed reaction corresponds to a concerted process. In the presence of BF{sub 3} and AlCl{sub 3}, enhancement of both the asynchronicity and charge transfer between diene and the dienophile, with small decreased energy barriers, were obtained. With CBB, the molecular mechanism changes and the reaction takes place along a stepwise mechanism. The inclusion of the CBB catalyst drastically decreases the energy barrier associated with the carbon-carbon bond formation of the first step relative to the concerted process. The results obtained in this work are compared with experimental data and AM1 semiempirical calculation.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of increased cerebral vulnerability after repeated mild blast-induced traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Kamnaksh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The consequences of a mild traumatic brain injury can be especially severe if it is repeated within the period of increased cerebral vulnerability (ICV that follows the initial insult. To better understand the molecular mechanisms that contribute to ICV, we exposed rats to different levels of mild blast overpressure (5 exposures; total pressure range: 15.54–19.41 psi or 107.14–133.83 kPa at a rate of 1 per 30 min, monitored select physiological parameters, and assessed behavior. Two days post-injury or sham, we determined changes in protein biomarkers related to various pathologies in behaviorally relevant brain regions and in plasma. We found that oxygen saturation and heart rate were transiently depressed following mild blast exposure and that injured rats exhibited significantly increased anxiety- and depression-related behaviors. Proteomic analyses of the selected brain regions showed evidence of substantial oxidative stress and vascular changes, altered cell adhesion, and inflammation predominantly in the prefrontal cortex. Importantly, these pathological changes as well as indications of neuronal and glial cell loss/damage were also detected in the plasma of injured rats. Our findings illustrate some of the complex molecular changes that contribute to the period of ICV in repeated mild blast-induced traumatic brain injury. Further studies are needed to determine the functional and temporal relationship between the various pathomechanisms. The validation of these and other markers can help to diagnose individuals with ICV using a minimally invasive procedure and to develop evidence-based treatments for chronic neuropsychiatric conditions.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of How Mercury Inhibits Water Permeation through Aquaporin-1: Understanding by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Yoshinori; Okimoto, Noriaki; Kadohira, Ikuko; Suematsu, Makoto; Yasuoka, Kenji; Yasui, Masato

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Aquaporin (AQP) functions as a water-conducting pore. Mercury inhibits the water permeation through AQP. Although site-directed mutagenesis has shown that mercury binds to Cys189 during the inhibition process, it is not fully understood how this inhibits the water permeation through AQP1. We carried out 40 ns molecular dynamics simulations of bovine AQP1 tetramer with mercury (Hg-AQP1) or without mercury (Free AQP1). In Hg-AQP1, Cys191 (Cys189 in human AQP1) is converted to Cys-SHg+ in each monomer. During each last 10 ns, we observed water permeation events occurred 23 times in Free AQP1 and never in Hg-AQP1. Mercury binding did not influence the whole structure, but did induce a collapse in the orientation of several residues at the ar/R region. In Free AQP1, backbone oxygen atoms of Gly190, Cys191, and Gly192 lined, and were oriented to, the surface of the water pore channel. In Hg-AQP1, however, the SHg+ of Cys191-SHg+ was oriented toward the outside of the water pore. As a result, the backbone oxygen atoms of Gly190, Cys191, and Gly192 became disorganized and the ar/R region collapsed, thereby obstructing the permeation of water. We suggest that mercury disrupts the water pore of AQP1 through local conformational changes in the ar/R region. PMID:20409470

  6. Molecular basis and mechanisms of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: classical and new drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida Da Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida; Palomino, Juan Carlos

    2011-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the leading public health problems worldwide. Declared as a global emergency in 1993 by the WHO, its control is hampered by the emergence of multidrug resistance (MDR), defined as resistance to at least rifampicin and isoniazid, two key drugs in the treatment of the disease. More recently, severe forms of drug resistance such as extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB have been described. After the discovery of several drugs with anti-TB activity, multidrug therapy became fundamental for control of the disease. Major advances in molecular biology and the availability of new information generated after sequencing the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis increased our knowledge of the mechanisms of resistance to the main anti-TB drugs. Better knowledge of the mechanisms of drug resistance in TB and the molecular mechanisms involved will help us to improve current techniques for rapid detection and will also stimulate the exploration of new targets for drug activity and drug development. This article presents an updated review of the mechanisms and molecular basis of drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. It also comments on the several gaps in our current knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance to the main classical and new anti-TB drugs and briefly discusses some implications of the development of drug resistance and fitness, transmission and pathogenicity of M. tuberculosis.

  7. Crosstalk between Apoptosis and Autophagy: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Strategies in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelouahid El-Khattouti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Both apoptosis and autophagy are highly conserved processes that besides their role in the maintenance of the organismal and cellular homeostasis serve as a main target of tumor therapeutics. Although their important roles in the modulation of tumor therapeutic strategies have been widely reported, the molecular actions of both apoptosis and autophagy are counteracted by cancer protective mechanisms. While apoptosis is a tightly regulated process that is implicated in the removal of damaged or unwanted cells, autophagy is a cellular catabolic pathway that is involved in lysosomal degradation and recycling of proteins and organelles, and thereby is considered an important survival/protective mechanism for cancer cells in response to metabolic stress or chemotherapy. Although the relationship between autophagy and cell death is very complicated and has not been characterized in detail, the molecular mechanisms that control this relationship are considered to be a relevant target for the development of a therapeutic strategy for tumor treatment. In this review, we focus on the molecular mechanisms of apoptosis, autophagy, and those of the crosstalk between apoptosis and autophagy in order to provide insight into the molecular mechanisms that may be essential for the balance between cell survival and death as well as their role as targets for the development of novel therapeutic approaches.

  8. Arithmetic for the unification of quantum mechanics and general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korotkikh, Victor, E-mail: v.korotkikh@cqu.edu.a [School of Computing Sciences, Faculty of Business and Informatics, Central Queensland University, Mackay, Queensland, 4740 (Australia)

    2009-06-01

    In the paper we bring attention to description of complex systems in terms of self-organization processes of prime integer relations. Revealed through the unity of two equivalent forms, arithmetical and geometrical, the description may have the potential for the unification of quantum mechanics and general relativity. Remarkably, based on integers and controlled by arithmetic only such processes can define nonlocal correlations between parts of a complex system and the geometry of their spacetimes.

  9. Multi-level Quantum Mechanics and Molecular Mechanics Study of Ring Opening Process of Guanine Damage by Hydroxyl Radical in Aqueous Solution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peng Liu; Qiong Wang; Meixing Niu; Dunyou Wang

    2017-01-01

    Combining multi-level quantum mechanics theories and molecular mechanics with an explicit water model, we investigated the ring opening process of guanine damage by hydroxyl radical in aqueous solution...

  10. Ventilator-related causes of lung injury: the mechanical power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattinoni, L; Tonetti, T; Cressoni, M; Cadringher, P; Herrmann, P; Moerer, O; Protti, A; Gotti, M; Chiurazzi, C; Carlesso, E; Chiumello, D; Quintel, M

    2016-10-01

    We hypothesized that the ventilator-related causes of lung injury may be unified in a single variable: the mechanical power. We assessed whether the mechanical power measured by the pressure-volume loops can be computed from its components: tidal volume (TV)/driving pressure (∆P aw), flow, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), and respiratory rate (RR). If so, the relative contributions of each variable to the mechanical power can be estimated. We computed the mechanical power by multiplying each component of the equation of motion by the variation of volume and RR: [Formula: see text]where ∆V is the tidal volume, ELrs is the elastance of the respiratory system, I:E is the inspiratory-to-expiratory time ratio, and R aw is the airway resistance. In 30 patients with normal lungs and in 50 ARDS patients, mechanical power was computed via the power equation and measured from the dynamic pressure-volume curve at 5 and 15 cmH2O PEEP and 6, 8, 10, and 12 ml/kg TV. We then computed the effects of the individual component variables on the mechanical power. Computed and measured mechanical powers were similar at 5 and 15 cmH2O PEEP both in normal subjects and in ARDS patients (slopes = 0.96, 1.06, 1.01, 1.12 respectively, R (2) > 0.96 and p ventilator-related causes of lung injury and of their variations. The equation can be easily implemented in every ventilator's software.

  11. Nonlinear Hamiltonian mechanics applied to molecular dynamics theory and computational methods for understanding molecular spectroscopy and chemical reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Farantos, Stavros C

    2014-01-01

    This brief presents numerical methods for describing and calculating invariant phase space structures, as well as solving the classical and quantum equations of motion for polyatomic molecules. Examples covered include simple model systems to realistic cases of molecules spectroscopically studied. Vibrationally excited and reacting molecules are nonlinear dynamical systems, and thus, nonlinear mechanics is the proper theory to elucidate molecular dynamics by investigating invariant structures in phase space. Intramolecular energy transfer, and the breaking and forming of a chemical bond have now found a rigorous explanation by studying phase space structures.

  12. Theoretical modeling of large molecular systems. Advances in the local self consistent field method for mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monari, Antonio; Rivail, Jean-Louis; Assfeld, Xavier

    2013-02-19

    Molecular mechanics methods can efficiently compute the macroscopic properties of a large molecular system but cannot represent the electronic changes that occur during a chemical reaction or an electronic transition. Quantum mechanical methods can accurately simulate these processes, but they require considerably greater computational resources. Because electronic changes typically occur in a limited part of the system, such as the solute in a molecular solution or the substrate within the active site of enzymatic reactions, researchers can limit the quantum computation to this part of the system. Researchers take into account the influence of the surroundings by embedding this quantum computation into a calculation of the whole system described at the molecular mechanical level, a strategy known as the mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach. The accuracy of this embedding varies according to the types of interactions included, whether they are purely mechanical or classically electrostatic. This embedding can also introduce the induced polarization of the surroundings. The difficulty in QM/MM calculations comes from the splitting of the system into two parts, which requires severing the chemical bonds that link the quantum mechanical subsystem to the classical subsystem. Typically, researchers replace the quantoclassical atoms, those at the boundary between the subsystems, with a monovalent link atom. For example, researchers might add a hydrogen atom when a C-C bond is cut. This Account describes another approach, the Local Self Consistent Field (LSCF), which was developed in our laboratory. LSCF links the quantum mechanical portion of the molecule to the classical portion using a strictly localized bond orbital extracted from a small model molecule for each bond. In this scenario, the quantoclassical atom has an apparent nuclear charge of +1. To achieve correct bond lengths and force constants, we must take into account the inner shell of

  13. NOX signaling in molecular cardiovascular mechanisms involved in the blood pressure homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Mariarosaria eSantillo; Antonio eColantuoni; Paolo eMondola; Bruna eGuida; Simona eDamiano

    2015-01-01

    Blood pressure homeostasis is maintained by several mechanisms regulating cardiac output, vascular resistances and blood volume. At cellular levels, reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling is involved in multiple molecular mechanisms controlling blood pressure. Among ROS producing systems, NADPH oxidases (NOXs), expressed in different cells of the cardiovascular system, are the most important enzymes clearly linked to the development of hypertension. NOXs exert a central role in cardiac me...

  14. Direct quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations of two-dimensional vibrational responses: N-methylacetamide in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Jonggu; Cho, Minhaeng, E-mail: mcho@korea.ac.k [Department of Chemistry, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Multidimensional infrared (IR) spectroscopy has emerged as a viable tool to study molecular structure and dynamics in condensed phases, and the third-order vibrational response function is the central quantity underlying various nonlinear IR spectroscopic techniques, such as pump-probe, photon echo and two-dimensional (2D) IR spectroscopy. In this paper, a new computational method is presented that calculates this nonlinear response function in the classical limit from a series of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, employing a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) force field. The method relies on the stability matrix formalism where the dipole-dipole quantum mechanical commutators appearing in the exact quantum response function are replaced by the corresponding Poisson brackets. We present the formulation and computational algorithm of the method for both the classical and the QM/MM force fields and apply it to the 2D IR spectroscopy of carbon monoxide (CO) and N-methylacetamide (NMA), each solvated in a water cluster. The conventional classical force field with harmonic bond potentials is shown to be incapable of producing a reliable 2D IR signal because intramolecular vibrational anharmonicity, essential to the production of the nonlinear signal, is absent in such a model. The QM/MM force field, on the other hand, produces distinct 2D spectra for the NMA and CO systems with clear vertical splitting and cross peaks, reflecting the vibrational anharmonicities and the vibrational couplings between the underlying vibrational modes, respectively. In the NMA spectrum, the coupling between the amide I and II modes is also well reproduced. While attaining the converged spectrum is found to be challenging with this method, with an adequate amount of computing it can be straightforwardly applied to new systems containing multiple chromophores with little modeling effort, and therefore it would be useful in understanding the multimode 2D IR spectrum

  15. Development of enhanced radioprotectors - Biochemical and molecular genetical approaches on the radioprotective mechanism of natural products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Hee; Lee, Eun Ju; Hong, Jung A [Kyunghee University, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    To identify radio-protective agent candidate among medicinal plants and to elucidate the mechanism of action of the candidate material by using modern biochemical and molecular biological methods, we screened radio-protective activity among 48 medicinal plants. Seven samples showed above 20% protective activities against oxidative cell damage: Euryale ferox, Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Salvia miltiorrhiza, Eucomia ulmoides, Paeonia suffruticosa, Spirodela polyrrhiza, and Nelumbo nucifera. We also screened for oxidative stress sensitizing activity among other 51 medicinal plants. Among those samples, 11 samples showed good sensitizing effect; Melia azedarach, Agastache rugosa, Catalpa ovata, Prunus persica, Sinomenium acutum, Pulsatilla koreana, Oldenlandia diffusa, Anthriscus sylvestris, Schizandra chinensis, Gleditsia sinensis, and Cridium officinale. We also reported the radio-protective effect of DTT. The treatment of DTT increased cell survival after gamma-irradiation, decreased in the frequencies of micronucleus, and reduction in DNA fragmentation and apoptotic cells. Induction of apoptosis after UV-C irradiation was revealed by the changes in the relative cell death, increase in the relative amount of apoptotic cells, and the induction of DNA fragmentation. 165 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  16. Systematic analysis of molecular mechanisms for HCC metastasis via text mining approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Cheng; Zhu, Caizhong; Chen, Haoyang; Xiong, Yiru; Tan, Junyuan; Chen, Dong; Li, Jin

    2017-02-21

    To systematically explore the molecular mechanism for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastasis and identify regulatory genes with text mining methods. Genes with highest frequencies and significant pathways related to HCC metastasis were listed. A handful of proteins such as EGFR, MDM2, TP53 and APP, were identified as hub nodes in PPI (protein-protein interaction) network. Compared with unique genes for HBV-HCCs, genes particular to HCV-HCCs were less, but may participate in more extensive signaling processes. VEGFA, PI3KCA, MAPK1, MMP9 and other genes may play important roles in multiple phenotypes of metastasis. Genes in abstracts of HCC-metastasis literatures were identified. Word frequency analysis, KEGG pathway and PPI network analysis were performed. Then co-occurrence analysis between genes and metastasis-related phenotypes were carried out. Text mining is effective for revealing potential regulators or pathways, but the purpose of it should be specific, and the combination of various methods will be more useful.

  17. Complex molecular mechanisms underlying seedling salt tolerance in rice revealed by comparative transcriptome and metabolomic profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Sheng; Zhao, Xiu-Qin; Li, Min; Huang, Li-Yu; Xu, Jian-Long; Zhang, Fan; Cui, Yan-Ru; Fu, Bin-Ying; Li, Zhi-Kang

    2016-01-01

    To understand the physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying seedling salt tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa L.), the phenotypic, metabolic, and transcriptome responses of two related rice genotypes, IR64 and PL177, with contrasting salt tolerance were characterized under salt stress and salt+abscisic acid (ABA) conditions. PL177 showed significantly less salt damage, lower Na+/K+ ratios in shoots, and Na+ translocation from roots to shoots, attributed largely to better salt exclusion from its roots and salt compartmentation of its shoots. Exogenous ABA was able to enhance the salt tolerance of IR64 by selectively decreasing accumulation of Na+ in its roots and increasing K+ in its shoots. Salt stress induced general and organ-specific increases of many primary metabolites in both rice genotypes, with strong accumulation of several sugars plus proline in shoots and allantoin in roots. This was due primarily to ABA-mediated repression of genes for degradation of these metabolites under salt. In PL177, salt specifically up-regulated genes involved in several pathways underlying salt tolerance, including ABA-mediated cellular lipid and fatty acid metabolic processes and cytoplasmic transport, sequestration by vacuoles, detoxification and cell-wall remodeling in shoots, and oxidation–reduction reactions in roots. Combined genetic and transcriptomic evidence shortlisted relatively few candidate genes for improved salt tolerance in PL177. PMID:26512058

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of Taste Recognition: Considerations about the Role of Saliva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Károly Fábián

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The gustatory system plays a critical role in determining food preferences and food intake, in addition to nutritive, energy and electrolyte balance. Fine tuning of the gustatory system is also crucial in this respect. The exact mechanisms that fine tune taste sensitivity are as of yet poorly defined, but it is clear that various effects of saliva on taste recognition are also involved. Specifically those metabolic polypeptides present in the saliva that were classically considered to be gut and appetite hormones (i.e., leptin, ghrelin, insulin, neuropeptide Y, peptide YY were considered to play a pivotal role. Besides these, data clearly indicate the major role of several other salivary proteins, such as salivary carbonic anhydrase (gustin, proline-rich proteins, cystatins, alpha-amylases, histatins, salivary albumin and mucins. Other proteins like glucagon-like peptide-1, salivary immunoglobulin-A, zinc-α-2-glycoprotein, salivary lactoperoxidase, salivary prolactin-inducible protein and salivary molecular chaperone HSP70/HSPAs were also expected to play an important role. Furthermore, factors including salivary flow rate, buffer capacity and ionic composition of saliva should also be considered. In this paper, the current state of research related to the above and the overall emerging field of taste-related salivary research alongside basic principles of taste perception is reviewed.

  19. GOLD CLUSTER LABELS AND RELATED TECHNOLOGIES IN MOLECULAR MORPHOLOGY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HAINFELD,J.F.; POWELL,R.D.

    2004-02-04

    Although intensely colored, even the largest colloidal gold particles are not, on their own, sufficiently colored for routine use as a light microscopy stain: only with very abundant antigens or with specialized illumination methods can bound gold be seen. Colloidal gold probes were developed primarily as markers for electron microscopy, for which their very high electron density and selectivity for narrow size distributions when prepared in different ways rendered them highly suited. The widespread use of gold labeling for light microscopy was made possible by the introduction of autometallographic enhancement methods. In these processes, the bound gold particles are exposed to a solution containing metal ions and a reducing agent; they catalyze the reduction of the ions, resulting in the deposition of additional metal selectively onto the particles. On the molecular level, the gold particles are enlarged up to 30-100 nm in diameter; on the macroscale level, this results in the formation of a dark stain in regions containing bound gold particles, greatly increasing visibility and contrast. The applications of colloidal gold have been described elsewhere in this chapter, we will focus on the use of covalently linked cluster complexes of gold and other metals. A gold cluster complex is a discrete molecular coordination compound comprising a central core, or ''cluster'' of electron-dense metal atoms, ligated by a shell of small organic molecules (ligands), which are linked to the metal atoms on the surface of the core. This structure gives clusters several important advantages as labels. The capping of the metal surface by ligands prevents non-specific binding to cell and tissue components, which can occur with colloidal gold. Cluster compounds are more stable and may be used under a wider range of conditions. Unlike colloidal gold, clusters do not require additional macromolecules such as bovine serum albumin or polyethylene glycol for

  20. Molecular mechanisms of pulmonary response progression in crystalline silica exposed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellamuthu, Rajendran; Umbright, Christina; Roberts, Jenny R; Young, Shih-Houng; Richardson, Diana; McKinney, Walter; Chen, Bean T; Li, Shengqiao; Kashon, Michael; Joseph, Pius

    2017-02-01

    An understanding of the mechanisms underlying diseases is critical for their prevention. Excessive exposure to crystalline silica is a risk factor for silicosis, a potentially fatal pulmonary disease. Male Fischer 344 rats were exposed by inhalation to crystalline silica (15 mg/m3, six hours/day, five days) and pulmonary response was determined at 44 weeks following termination of silica exposure. Additionally, global gene expression profiling in lungs and BAL cells and bioinformatic analysis of the gene expression data were done to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the progression of pulmonary response to silica. A significant increase in lactate dehydrogenase activity and albumin content in BAL fluid (BALF) suggested silica-induced pulmonary toxicity in the rats. A significant increase in the number of alveolar macrophages and infiltrating neutrophils in the lungs and elevation in monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in BALF suggested the induction of pulmonary inflammation in the silica exposed rats. Histological changes in the lungs included granuloma formation, type II pneumocyte hyperplasia, thickening of alveolar septa and positive response to Masson's trichrome stain. Microarray analysis of global gene expression detected 94 and 225 significantly differentially expressed genes in the lungs and BAL cells, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis of the gene expression data identified significant enrichment of several disease and biological function categories and canonical pathways related to pulmonary toxicity, especially inflammation. Taken together, these data suggested the involvement of chronic inflammation as a mechanism underlying the progression of pulmonary response to exposure of rats to crystalline silica at 44 weeks following termination of exposure.